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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

SamplingSoil  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as absorbents.

2

Flux Measurement with Conditional Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is proposed to measure scalar fluxes using conditional sampling. Only the mean concentrations of updraft and downdraft samples, the standard deviation of the vertical velocity, and a coefficient of proportionality, b, need to be known. ...

Joost A. Businger; Steven P. Oncley

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

heat flux heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dT/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the heat is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments

4

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture flux moisture flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture flux A quantity measured according to the formula B = {lambda}(dq/dz), where {lambda} is the conductivity of the soil that the moisture is moving through. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts

5

Definition: Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares...

6

Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling Gas Flux Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Flux Sampling Details Activities (26) Areas (20) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Dictionary.png Gas Flux Sampling: Gas flux sampling measures the flow of volatile gas emissions from a specific location and compares it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can be an indication of hydrothermal activity.

7

Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homeowners should submit this form with their soil samples when requesting a soil test from the Texas A&M Soil Testing Laboratory.

Provin, Tony

2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

8

SamplingSoil - Energy Innovation Portal  

INL has developed a method for sampling soil to determine the presence of extremely fine particles such as asbestos.

9

Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling Soil Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Sampling Details Activities (10) Areas (9) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Can reveal relatively high permeability zones Hydrological: Thermal: Used to locate active hydrothermal systems Dictionary.png Soil Sampling: Soil sampling is a method that can be used for exploration of geothermal resources that lack obvious surface manifestations. Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of

10

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) Exploration Activity Details...

11

Deriving the Surface Soil Heat Flux from Observed Soil Temperature and Soil Heat Flux Profiles Using a Variational Data Assimilation Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel approach to infer surface soil heat fluxes from measured profiles of soil temperature, soil heat flux, and observations of the vegetation canopy temperature and the incoming shortwave radiation is evaluated for the Cabauw measurement ...

R. J. Ronda; F. C. Bosveld

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Haleakala Volcano Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The field survey program on the northwest rift zone consisted of soil mercury and radon emanometry surveys, groundwater temperature and chemistry studies, Schlumberger resistivity soundings and self-potential profiles. Geophysical and geochemical surveys along this rift (southwest) were limited by difficult field conditions and access limitations. The geophysical program consisted of one Schlumberger sounding, one

13

Flux Sampling Errors for Aircraft and Towers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various errors and influences leading to differences between tower- and aircraft-measured fluxes are surveyed. This survey is motivated by reports in the literature that aircraft fluxes are sometimes smaller than tower-measured fluxes. Both tower ...

L. Mahrt

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location...

15

Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Gas Sampling Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Soil Gas Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Identify concealed faults that act as conduits for hydrothermal fluids. Hydrological: Identify hydrothermal gases of magmatic origin. Thermal: Differentiate between amagmatic or magmatic sources heat. Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling: Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases

16

Diurnal Covariation in Soil Heat Flux and Net Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diurnal variation in soil heat flux is a key constraint on the amount of energy available for sensible and latent heating of the lower troposphere. Many studies have demonstrated that soil heat flux G is strongly correlated with net radiation Rn. ...

Joseph A. Santanello Jr.; Mark A. Friedl

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References Jennifer L. Lewicki, Curtis M. Oldenburg (Unknown) Near-Surface Co2 Monitoring And Analysis To Detect Hidden Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_(Lewicki_%26_Oldenburg)&oldid=508144" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded Activities What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

18

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanometry sampling conducted in the Keaau prospect were similarly unable to define any anomalies that could reasonably be interpreted to be due to subsurface thermal effects. References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In Hawaii Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Mauna_Loa_Northeast_Rift_Area_(Thomas,_1986)&oldid=389039"

19

Soil samples at the APS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

harmful pests or diseases. Examples of soil are: topsoil, forest litter, wood or plant compost, humus, and earthworm castings." 3. What is not soil? Materials free of organic...

20

Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Mokapu Penninsula Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The high degree of cultural activity (e.g. residential areas, streets, jet runways, etc.) on Mokapu both limited the extent of the soil geochemical surveys performed and rendered their interpretation much more difficult. Soil mercury concentrations and radon emanometry data on the peninsula showed a few localized high values (Figs 13, 14), but no consistent correlation between the anomalous zones and geologic features could be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lualualei Valley Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury and radon emanation surveys were performed over much of the accessible surface of Lualualei Valley (Cox and Thomas, 1979). The results of these surveys (Figs 7 and 8) delineated several areas in which soil mercury concentrations or radon emanation rates were substantially above normal background values. Some of these areas were apparently coincident with the mapped fracture systems associated with the caldera boundaries.

22

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Laboratory experiments aimed at evaluating gas flux sampling methods The value of using the noble gas suite in transport studies is made obvious by the eight-fold enrichment in 4Her132Xe observed in the 80% CO sample (Table 2 1), relative to abundancies in air. Our results at least show that gas samples collected by either sudden pre-evacuated container or gradual gas pump. Removal of tens of cm3 of gas through an access pipe appear to reflect steady-state values. On-site measurements other than CO2 flux could

23

Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL...

24

Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

25

Samples of Soil from Arco, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Samples from a single drilling made at Arco, Idaho were submitted to determine the adsorptive capacity of soil at Arco, Idaho for radioactive elements.

Stewart, G. D.

1949-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

26

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Lahaina-Kaanapali Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry patterns observed for the Lahaina prospect were similar to those found in Olowalu. Several localized zones of high mercury concentration or enhanced radon emanation were observed, but showed little relationship to each other or to the recognized geologic structure in the area. The data were interpreted to suggest that there might be a small thermal anomaly to the northeast of the

27

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Soil mercury concentration and radon emanometry surveys were conducted along the stream beds in both Olowalu and Ukumehame Canyons and on the coastal alluvial fans (Cox and Cuff, 1981a). The results of these surveys indicated that a few minor -nomalies might be present. However, the extreme topographic relief in the area did not permit sufficient coverage of the

28

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

Dahlgran, J.R.

1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

29

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

Dahlgran, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation are described using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

Dahlgran, James R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Bivariate Conditional Sampling of Moisture Flux over a Tropical Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New applications of conditional sampling using the bivariate joint frequency distribution (JFD) and conditional mean distribution (CMD) are introduced to analyze time series of water vapor flux obtained from aircraft gust-probe vertical velocity ...

Robert L. Grossman

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Sampling Errors in Flux Measurements of Slowly Depositing Pollutants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling errors in vertical flux measurements obtained by eddy correlation methods are investigated by specifying a jointly normal–lognormal density distribution for the vertical velocity and scalar concentration. The probability density function ...

Edward E. O'Brien

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Definition: Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Soil Gas Sampling Soil gas sampling is sometimes used in exploration for blind geothermal resources to detect anomalously high concentrations of hydrothermal gases in the near-surface environment. Identification of high concentrations of hydrothermal gas species may indicates the presence of enhanced permeability (faults) and high temperature hydrothermal activity at depth. Soil gas data may also be used to study other important aspects of the geothermal system, such as distinguishing between magmatic and amagmatic sources of heat. The technique may also be used for ongoing monitoring of the geothermal system during resource development and production.

34

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Unspecified Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Design of Sampling Strategies to Detect CO2 Emissions From Hidden Geothermal Systems, Lewicki, Oldenburg and Kennedy. The objective of this project is to investigate geothermal CO2 monitoring in the near surface as a tool to discover hidden geothermal reservoirs. A primary goal of this project is to develop an approach that places emphasis on cost and time-efficient near-surface exploration methods and yields results to guide and focus more cost-intensive geophysical measurements, installation of deep wells, and geochemical analyses of deep fluids. To this end, we present (1) the physical properties of CO2 key to its transport in the

35

Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kawaihae Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes The soil geochemistry yielded quite complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radonemanation rates within the survey area (Cox and Cuff, 1981c). Mercury concentrations (Fig. 38) showed a general minimum along the Kawaihae-Waimea roads and a broad trend of increasing mercury

36

Turbulent Flux Transfer over Bare-Soil Surfaces: Characteristics and Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parameterization of turbulent flux from bare-soil and undercanopy surfaces is imperative for modeling land–atmosphere interactions in arid and semiarid regions, where flux from the ground is dominant or comparable to canopy-sourced flux. This ...

Kun Yang; Toshio Koike; Hirohiko Ishikawa; Joon Kim; Xin Li; Huizhi Liu; Shaomin Liu; Yaoming Ma; Jieming Wang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Hualalai Northwest Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Hualalai lower northwest rift and southern flank were sampled for soil mercury concentration and radon emanation rates (Cox and Cuff, 1981d). The data generated by these surveys yielded complex patterns of mercury concentrations and radon emanation rates that generally did not show coincident anomalies (Figs 42, 43). References Donald M. Thomas (1 January 1986) Geothermal Resources Assessment In

38

Spatial Variability of Net Radiation and Soil Heat Flux Density on Two Logged Sites at Montmorency, Quebec  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Net radiation data from 32 sample points and soil heat flux density values from six sample points on two logged sites at Montmorency in 1979 are presented. The two sites were of different ages; one had been clearcut in 1975 and the other in 1978. ...

J. H. McCaughey

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Sonochemical Digestion of Soil and Sediment Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work was performed as part of a broader effort to automate analytical methods for determination of plutonium and other radioisotopes in environmental samples. The work described here represented a screening study to determine the potential for applying ultrasonic irradiation to sample digestion. Two standard reference materials (SRMs) were used in this study: Columbia River Sediment and Rocky Flats Soil. The key experiments performed are listed below along with a summary of the results. The action of nitric acid, regardless of its concentration and liquid-to-solid ratio, did not achieve dissolution efficiency better that 20%. The major fraction of natural organic matter (NOM) remained undissolved by this treatment. Sonication did not result in improved dissolution for the SRMs tested. The action of hydrofluoric acid at concentrations of 8 M and higher achieved much more pronounced dissolution (up to 97% dissolved for the Rocky Flats soil sample and up to 78% dissolved for the Columbia River Sediment sample). Dissolution efficiency remains constant for solid-to-liquid ratios of up to 0.05 to 1 and decreases for the higher loadings of the solid phase. Sonication produced no measurable effect in improving the dissolution of the samples compared with the control digestion experiments. Combined treatment of the SRM by mixtures of HNO3 and HF showed inferior performance compared with the HF alone. An adverse effect of sonication was found for the Rocky Flats soil material, which became more noticeable at higher HF concentrations. Sonication of the Columbia River sediment samples had no positive effect in the mixed acid treatment. The results indicate that applying ultrasound in an isolated cup horn configuration does not offer any advantage over conventional ''heat and mix'' treatment for dissolution of the soil and sediment based on the SRM examined here. This conclusion, however, is based on an approach that uses gravimetric analysis to determine gross dissolution efficiency. This approach does not allow any conclusion regarding the possible advantage of sonication in selective dissolution of plutonium traces incorporated into an inorganic or organic fraction of the samples.

Sinkov, Sergei I.; Lumetta, Gregg J.

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

40

forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Fort Collins, CO 80523-1490 January 2004 #12;#12;1 Guide to Sampling Soil Compaction Using Hand-Held Soil Penetrometers1 Prepared by Dave Jones and Matt Kunze Center for Environmental Management

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gaseous geochemical signatures vary from system to system and utilization of a multi-gas analytical approach to exploration or characterization should enhance the survey's clarity. This paper describes differences in the gaseous geochemical signatures between the Steamboat Springs and Brady's Hot Springs geothermal systems and illustrates the usefulness of Hg vapor in soils at Desert Peak for mapping the trends of concealed geologic

42

Specification for soil multisensor and soil sampling cone penetrometer probes  

SciTech Connect

Specification requirements for engineering, fabrication, and performance of cone penetrometer (CP) soil multisensor and sampling probes (CP-probes) which are required to support contract procurement for services are presented. The specification provides a documented technical basis of quality assurance that is required to use the probes in an operating Hanford tank farm. The documentation cited in this specification will be incorporated into an operational fielding plan that will address all activities associated with the use of the CP-probes. The probes discussed in this specification support the Hanford Tanks Initiative AX-104 Tank Plume Characterization Sub-task. The probes will be used to interrogate soils and vadose zone surrounding tank AX-104.

Iwatate, D.F.

1997-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

43

The Effect of Soil Thermal Conductivity Parameterization on Surface Energy Fluxes and Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The sensitivity of sensible and latent heat fluxes and surface temperatures to the parameterization of the soil thermal conductivity is demonstrated using a soil vegetation atmosphere transfer scheme (SVATS) applied to intensive field campaigns (...

C. D. Peters-Lidard; E. Blackburn; X. Liang; E. F. Wood

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Exploratory research and development project for soil sampling probe investigation  

SciTech Connect

The report investigates a number of design concepts for a soil sampling probe. The design concepts are shown as a series of figures drawn to scale. The probe would be attached to the lower end of a 2-inch diameter drill casing that is inserted into the ground with a steady downward force. It is intended to be used at soil depths of 0-50 feet. Small soil samples will be gathered through the use of a pneumatic jet or a remotely operated mechanical finger. The soil sample will then be transported pneumatically from the tip of the probe to the surface via a sample line in the center of the drill casing. This is achieved by entraining the soil samples in a stream of clean dry nitrogen. At the surface, the soil sample will be filtered from the carrier gas. The report also considers designs that use a carrier capsule. The soil would be remotely placed in a transport capsule at the tip of the probe and pneumatic pressure would be used to force the capsule up the sample line to the surface for retrieval. The soil sampling is to be done without removing the drill casing or using any of the typical coring tools. The sampling system is specifically aimed at soil that may be contaminated with radioactive or toxic materials. The system is suitable for remote operation with a minimum impact and generation of waste. The concepts may also be useful for remote sampling for other applications. 8 figs.

Thurston, G.C.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Soil Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National Park Using Aster And Aviris Remote Sensing Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSoilSamplingAtYel...

46

Soil Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Mccoy Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding...

47

Definition: Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soils that are above or adjacent to a "hidden" hydrothermal system will have a unique chemistry that can be indicative of a hydrothermal system at depth and a zone of relatively...

48

An Air–Soil Layer Coupled Scheme for Computing Surface Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An air–soil layer coupled scheme is developed to compute surface fluxes of sensible heat and latent heat from data collected at the Oklahoma Atmospheric Radiation Measurement–Cloud and Radiation Testbed (ARM–CART) stations. This new scheme ...

Qin Xu; Binbin Zhou; Stephen D. Burk; Edward H. Barker

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

50

Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location...

51

Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) Exploration...

52

Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation,...

53

Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details...

54

The Sensitivity of Surface Fluxes to Soil Water Content in Three Land Surface Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaporative fraction (EF; the ratio of latent heat flux to the sum of the latent plus sensible heat fluxes) can be measured in the field to an accuracy of about 10%. In this modeling study, the authors try to determine to what accuracy soil ...

Paul A. Dirmeyer; Fanrong J. Zeng; Agnès Ducharne; Jean C. Morrill; Randal D. Koster

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Molokai Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Due to the very small potential market on the island of Molokai for geothermal energy, only a limited effort was made to confirm a resource in the identified PGRA. An attempt was made to locate the (now abandoned) water well that was reported to have encountered warm saline fluids. The well was located but had caved in above the water table and thus no water sampling was possible. Temperature measurements in the open portion of the well were performed, but no temperatures significantly above ambient were

56

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Bergfeld, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Deborah Bergfeld, William C. Evans, James F. Howle, Christopher D. Farrar (2006) Carbon Dioxide Emissions From Vegetation-Kill Zones Around The Resurgent Dome Of Long Valley Caldera, Eastern California, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Bergfeld,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=386973

57

Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Lightning Dock Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Based on all of the data, McLin concluded that there was little to no correlation between values for CO2 flux and known or postulated faults, and between the CO2 flux and the shallow thermal anomaly. Instead, the flux values appeared to depict a completely random pattern throughout the study area. Notably, absolute values for CO2 flux were elevated throughout the surveyed areas (McLin, 2004). A possible explanation not considered by

58

Pesticide transfer dynamics and fluxes in the stream of a small vineyard watershed -Assessing the effect of sampling strategy on fluxes estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strategy, Pesticides fluxes, Surface water, Vineyard Introduction The intensive use of pesticides for crop on the mobilisation of pesticides and total fluxes in surface water. Moreover, the effect of the sampling strategy ranged from 1.0 to 60 g. Effect of sampling strategy on the estimation of pesticides fluxes in the river

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

59

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Akutan Fumaroles Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Arsenic (As), mercury (Hg), and carbon dioxide (CO2) all appear in anomalously high concentrations near the hot springs and at the junction of the Fumarole Valley and the HSBV. This indicates either that Hg is being lost from a reservoir due to boiling and steam loss, probably northwest of the junction, or erosion has carried these elements in sediment from the higher elevation manifestations. The presence of such volatiles in

60

Quality Control and Flux Sampling Problems for Tower and Aircraft Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of automated tests is developed for tower and aircraft time series to identify instrumentation problems, flux sampling problems, and physically plausible but unusual situations. The automated procedures serve as a safety net for quality ...

Dean Vickers; L. Mahrt

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

GICHD mine dog testing project : soil sample results #5.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fifth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in June 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3  

SciTech Connect

A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Improved cryogenic coring device for sampling wetland soils  

SciTech Connect

This paper is the third in a series on the design and construction (Knaus 1986) and improvements (Knaus and Cahoon 1990) of a cryogenic soil-coring device (cryocorer). Freezing wetland soils in place during sampling eliminates compaction, dewatering, and loss of flocculent material at the water-sediment interface. The cryocorer is suitable for sampling soils of emergent marsh and mangrove forests as well as shallow water bottoms, although it has been used primarily for the former. A small-diameter frozen soil core minimizes disruption of the surface, can be evaluated immediately for overall quality, and can be used to measure soil profiles and subsample for further analysis. The cryocorer continues to be used in studies of wetland accretion and soil bulk density throughout the US. Concomitant with the increased use of the device, improvements in cryocorer design and application have occurred. Reported here are improvements in design that have been made since 1992 with references to wetland research in which the cryocorer has been used extensively.

Cahoon, D.R.; Lynch, J.C. [National Biological Service, Lafayette, LA (United States); Knaus, R.M. [Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

RAPID DETERMINATION OF RADIOSTRONTIUM IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

Maxwell, S.

2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

67

Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References J. L. Lewicki, M. L. Fischer, G. E. Hilley (2008) Six-Week Time Series Of Eddy Covariance Co2 Flux At Mammoth Mountain, California- Performance Evaluation And Role Of Meteorological Forcing Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Gas_Flux_Sampling_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Lewicki,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=508150" Categories: Exploration Activities DOE Funded

68

DUS II SOIL GAS SAMPLING AND AIR INJECTION TEST RESULTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air injection well testing was performed at the Dynamic Underground Stripping (DUS) site located near the M-Area Settling Basin (referred to as DUS II in this report). The objective of this testing was to determine the effectiveness of continued operation of these systems. Steam injection ended on September 19, 2009 and since this time the extraction operations have utilized residual heat that is present in the subsurface. The well testing campaign began on June 5, 2012 and was completed on June 25, 2012. Thirty-two (32) SVE wells were purged for 24 hours or longer using the active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) system at the DUS II site. During each test five or more soil gas samples were collected from each well and analyzed for target volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The DUS II site is divided into four parcels (see Figure 1) and soil gas sample results show the majority of residual VOC contamination remains in Parcel 1 with lesser amounts in the other three parcels. Several VOCs, including tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and trichloroethylene (TCE), were detected. PCE was the major VOC with lesser amounts of TCE. Most soil gas concentrations of PCE ranged from 0 to 60 ppmv with one well (VEW-22A) as high as 200 ppmv. Air sparging (AS) generally involves the injection of air into the aquifer through either vertical or horizontal wells. AS is coupled with SVE systems when contaminant recovery is necessary. While traditional air sparging (AS) is not a primary component of the DUS process, following the cessation of steam injection, eight (8) of the sixty-three (63) steam injection wells were used to inject air. These wells were previously used for hydrous pyrolysis oxidation (HPO) as part of the DUS process. Air sparging is different from the HPO operations in that the air was injected at a higher rate (20 to 50 scfm) versus HPO (1 to 2 scfm). . At the DUS II site the air injection wells were tested to determine if air sparging affected VOC soil gas concentrations during ASVE. Five (5) SVE wells that were located closest to the air injection wells were used as monitoring points during the air sparging tests. The air sparging tests lasted 48 hours. Soil gas sample results indicate that sparging did not affect VOC concentrations in four of the five sparging wells, while results from one test did show an increase in soil gas concentrations.

Noonkester, J.; Jackson, D.; Jones, W.; Hyde, W.; Kohn, J.; Walker, R.

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

69

Final Report for DOE grant no. DE-FG02-04ER63883: Can soil genomics predict the impact of precipitation on nitrous oxide flux from soil  

SciTech Connect

Nitrous oxide is a potent greenhouse gas that is released by microorganisms in soil. However, the production of nitrous oxide in soil is highly variable and difficult to predict. Future climate change may have large impacts on nitrous oxide release through alteration of precipitation patterns. We analyzed DNA extracted from soil in order to uncover relationships between microbial processes, abundance of particular DNA sequences and net nitrous oxide fluxes from soil. Denitrification, a microbial process in which nitrate is used as an electron acceptor, correlated with nitrous oxide flux from soil. The abundance of ammonia oxidizing archaea correlated positively, but weakly, with nitrous oxide production in soil. The abundance of bacterial genes in soil was negatively correlated with gross nitrogen mineralization rates and nitrous oxide release from soil. We suggest that the most important control over nitrous oxide production in soil is the growth and death of microorganisms. When organisms are growing nitrogen is incorporated into their biomass and nitrous oxide flux is low. In contrast, when microorganisms die, due to predation or infection by viruses, inorganic nitrogen is released into the soil resulting in nitrous oxide release. Higher rates of precipitation increase access to microorganisms by predators or viruses through filling large soil pores with water and therefore can lead to large releases of nitrous oxide from soil. We developed a new technique, stable isotope probing with 18O-water, to study growth and mortality of microorganisms in soil.

Egbert Schwartz

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea East Rift Area Exploration Technique Gas Flux Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Radon emanometry data for the same locality (Fig. 61) (Cox, 1980) similarly presented a complicated pattern of radon outgassing along the lower rift zone. Even though complexities are present within the rift zone, there

71

Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantify above- and below-ground CH{sub 4} fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} loading from the waste body. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH{sub 4}). However, much of the CH{sub 4} produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH{sub 4} fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH{sub 4} into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH{sub 4} concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH{sub 4} fluxes and CH{sub 4} loading were estimated from soil-gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH{sub 4} oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH{sub 4} emissions from the test section (daily mean up to {approx}91,500 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH{sub 4} concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH{sub 4} (uptake up to -380 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH{sub 4} loading over short distances in the cover soil, while potential methanotrophic activity derived from GPPTs was high (v{sub max} {approx} 13 mmol L{sup -1}(soil air) h{sup -1}) at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. Our results provide a basis to assess spatial and temporal variability of CH{sub 4} dynamics in the complex terrain of a landfill-cover soil.

Schroth, M.H., E-mail: martin.schroth@env.ethz.ch [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Eugster, W. [Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 2, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gomez, K.E. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gonzalez-Gil, G. [Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology, EPF Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Niklaus, P.A. [Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 2, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Oester, P. [Oester Messtechnik, Bahnhofstrasse 3, 3600 Thun (Switzerland)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Bayesian hierarchical models for soil CO{sub 2} flux and leak detection at geologic sequestration sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper characterizations of background soil CO{sub 2} respiration rates are critical for interpreting CO{sub 2} leakage monitoring results at geologic sequestration sites. In this paper, a method is developed for determining temperature-dependent critical values of soil CO{sub 2} flux for preliminary leak detection inference. The method is illustrated using surface CO{sub 2} flux measurements obtained from the AmeriFlux network fit with alternative models for the soil CO{sub 2} flux versus soil temperature relationship. The models are fit first to determine pooled parameter estimates across the sites, then using a Bayesian hierarchical method to obtain both global and site-specific parameter estimates. Model comparisons are made using the deviance information criterion (DIC), which considers both goodness of fit and model complexity. The hierarchical models consistently outperform the corresponding pooled models, demonstrating the need for site-specific data and estimates when determining relationships for background soil respiration. A hierarchical model that relates the square root of the CO{sub 2} flux to a quadratic function of soil temperature is found to provide the best fit for the AmeriFlux sites among the models tested. This model also yields effective prediction intervals, consistent with the upper envelope of the flux data across the modeled sites and temperature ranges. Calculation of upper prediction intervals using the proposed method can provide a basis for setting critical values in CO{sub 2} leak detection monitoring at sequestration sites.

Yang, Ya-Mei; Small, Mitchell J.; Junker, Brian; Bromhal, Grant S.; Strazisar, Brian; Wells, Arthur

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Error Analysis and Sampling Strategy Design for Using Fixed or Mobile Platforms to Estimate Ocean Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For estimating lateral flux in the ocean using fixed or mobile platforms, the authors present a method of analyzing the estimation error and designing the sampling strategy. When an array of moorings is used, spatial aliasing leads to an error in ...

Yanwu Zhang; James G. Bellingham; Yi Chao

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

DNDC: A process-based model of greenhouse gas fluxes from agricultural soils Donna L. Giltrap a,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DNDC: A process-based model of greenhouse gas fluxes from agricultural soils Donna L. Giltrap a complex feedbacks and interactions. Understanding the impacts of human activities on greenhouse gas to feed the Earth's increasing population. As greenhouse gas emissions from soils are the result

75

Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Area (Klusman & Landress, 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes This study involved the field collection and laboratory analysis of Al-horizon soil samples in the vicinity of a known geothermal source at Long Valley, California. The samples were analyzed for several constituents known to have influence on Hg retention by soils, including pH, hydrous Fe and Mn, and organic carbon, as well as Hg. The data compiled for these secondary parameters and the field-determined parameters of geology, soil

76

Radionuclide Activities in Contaminated Soils: Effects of Sampling Bias on Remediation of Coarse-Grained Soils in Hanford Formation  

SciTech Connect

Only a limited set of particle size-contaminant concentration data is available for soils from the Hanford Site. These data are based on bench-scale tests on single soil samples from one waste site each in operable units 100-BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-FR-1, and three samples from the North Pond 300-FF-1 operable unit. The objective of this study was to 1) examine available particle size-contaminant of concern activity and concentration data for 100 and 300 Area soils, 2) assess the effects of sampling bias, 3) suggest sampling protocols, and 4) formulate a method to determine the contaminant of concern activities and concentrations of the whole soil based on the measurements conducted on a finer size fraction of the whole soil.

Mattigod, Shas V.; Martin, Wayne J.

2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

77

Radionuclide Activities in Contaminated Soils: Effects of Sampling Bias on Remediation of Coarse-Grained Soils in Hanford Formation  

SciTech Connect

Only a limited set of particle size-contaminant concentration data is available for soils from the Hanford Site. These data are based on bench-scale tests on single soil samples from one waste site each in operable units 100-BC-1, 100-DR-1, and 100-FR-1, and three samples from the North Pond 300-FF-1 operable unit. The objective of this study was to (1) examine available particle size-contaminant of concern activity and concentration data for 100 and 300 Area soils, (2) assess the effects of sampling bias, (3) suggest sampling protocols, and (4) formulate a method to determine the contaminant of concern activities and concentrations of the whole soil based on the measurements conducted on a finer size fraction of the whole soil.

Mattigod, Shas V; Martin, Wayne J

2001-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

78

Flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5000 5000 6000 7000 8000 Wavelength (Angstroms) Flux (in arbitrary units) SN 1990N SN 1989B SN 1993O SN 1981B SN 1994D SN 1997ap Iron Peak Blends Ca II Si II & Co II Fe II & III Day -7 Day -5 Day -4 Day -2 ± 2 Day 0 Day +2 * -50 0 50 100 150 Observed days from peak Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 Observed R magnitude 27 26 25 24 Observed I magnitude 27 26 25 24 23 R band Ground-based I band HST I band (b) (c) (a) Pre-SN observation 3.5 4.0 4.5 5.0 5.5 log(cz) 14 16 18 20 22 24 26 effective m B 0.02 0.05 0.1 0.2 0.5 1.0 redshift z Hamuy et al (A.J. 1996) Supernova Cosmology Project 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H = 50 km s -1 Mpc -1 ) No Big Bang 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 -3 -2 -1 0 1 2 3 ! " z ~ 0 . 4 z = 0 . 8 3 6 8 % 9 0 % 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 ! M Age < 9.6 Gyr (H=50 km/s/Mpc)

79

An Investigation of the Conditional Sampling Method Used to Estimate Fluxes of Active, Reactive, and Passive Scalars  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditional sampling flux measurement technique was evaluated for four scalars (temperature, water vapor, ozone, and carbon dioxide) by comparison with direct eddy correlation measurements at two sites. The empirical constant ? relating the ...

Gabriel G. Katul; Peter L. Finkelstein; John F. Clarke; Thomas G. Ellestad

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Measurements of Plutonium and Americium in Soil Samples from Project 57 using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the preliminary site characterization conducted for Project 57, soils samples were collected for separation into several size-fractions using the Suspended Soil Particle Sizing System (SSPSS). Soil samples were collected specifically for separation by the SSPSS at three general locations in the deposited Project 57 plume, the projected radioactivity of which ranged from 100 to 600 pCi/g. The primary purpose in focusing on samples with this level of activity is that it would represent anticipated residual soil contamination levels at the site after corrective actions are completed. Consequently, the results of the SSPSS analysis can contribute to dose calculation and corrective action-level determinations for future land-use scenarios at the site.

John L. Bowen; Rowena Gonzalez; David S. Shafer

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Flux of carbon from 14C-enriched leaf litter throughout a forest soil mesocosm  

SciTech Connect

The role of DOC for the build-up of soil organic carbon pools is still not well known, but it is thought to play a role in the transport of carbon to a greater depth where it becomes more stable. The aim of this study was to elucidate within-year dynamics of carbon transport from litter to the O (Oe and Oa) and A horizons. Mesocosms with constructed soil profiles were used to study dynamics of C transport from 14C-enriched (about 1000 ) leaf litter to the Oe/Oa and A horizons as well as the mineralization of leaf litter. The mesocosms were placed in the field for 17 months during which time fluxes and 14C content of DOC and CO2 were measured. Changes in 14C in leaf litter and bulk soil C pools were also recorded. Significant simultaneous release and immobilization of DOC occurring in both the O and A horizons was hypothesized. Contrary to our hypothesis, DOC released from the labeled Oi horizon was not retained within the Oe/Oa layer. DOC originating in the unlabeled Oe/Oa layer was also released for transport. Extensive retention of DOC occurred in the A horizon. DOC leaching from A horizon consisted of a mix of DOC from different sources, with a main fraction originating in the A horizon and a smaller fraction leached from the overlaying horizons. The C and 14C budget for the litter layer also indicated a surprisingly large amount of carbon with ambient ?14C-signature to be respired from this layer. Data for this site also suggested significant contributions from throughfall to dissolved organic carbon (DOC) transport into and respiration from the litter layer. The results from this study showed that DOC retentionwas low in the O horizon and therefore not important for the O horizon carbon budget. In the A horizon DOC retention was extensive, but annual DOC input was small compared to C stocks and therefore not important for changes in soil C on an annual timescale.

Froberg, Mats J. [Sveriges Lantbruksuniversitet; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Trumbore, Susan E. [University of California, Irvine; Swanston, Christopher W. [USFS; Todd Jr, Donald E [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils (Phase II) Field Sampling Plan  

SciTech Connect

This Field Sampling Plan describes the Operable Unit 3-13, Group 3, Other Surface Soils, Phase II remediation field sampling activities to be performed at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center located within the Idaho National Laboratory Site. Sampling activities described in this plan support characterization sampling of new sites, real-time soil spectroscopy during excavation, and confirmation sampling that verifies that the remedial action objectives and remediation goals presented in the Final Record of Decision for Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center, Operable Unit 3-13 have been met.

G. L. Schwendiman

2006-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The purpose of this paper is to examine whether statistical analysis of encrustation chemistries, when supplemented with petrologic data, can identify the individual processes that generate and degrade fumarolic encrustations. Knowledge of these specific processes broadens the applications of fumarolic alteration studies. Geochemical data for a

84

EG & G Mount Plant, December 1990 and January 1991, D & D soil box sampling  

SciTech Connect

Six hundred eighty-two (682) containers of soil were generated at Mound Plant between April 1 and October 31, 1990 as a result of the excavation of soils containing plutonium-238 at two ongoing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program sites; these areas are known as Area 14, the waste transfer system (WTS) hillside, and Area 17, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building Area. The soils from these areas are part of the Mound Plant waste stream number AMDM-000000010, Contaminated Soil, and are proposed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. These containers of soil are currently in storage at Mound Plant. The purpose of this sampling and analysis was to demonstrate that the D&D soils comply with the waste acceptance requirements of the NTS, as presented In Nevada Test Site Defense Waste Acceptance Criteria, Certification, and Transfer Requirements (DOE 1988). The sealed waste packages, constructed of wood or metal, are currently being stored In Building 31 and at other locations throughout the Mound Plant. For additional historical information concerning the D&D soils, Including waste stream evaluations and past sampling data see the Sampling and Analysis Plan for Mound Plant D&D Soils Packages (EG&G 1991).

NONE

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Sampling and analysis plan for Mount Plant D & D soils packages, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

There are currently 682 containers of soils in storage at Mound Plant, generated between April 1 and October 31, 1990 as a result of excavation of soils containing plutonium-238 at two ongoing Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program sites. These areas are known as Area 14, the waste transfer system (WTS) hillside, and Area 17, the Special Metallurgical (SM) Building area. The soils from these areas are part of Mound Plant waste stream number AMDM-000000010, Contaminated Soil, and are proposed for shipment to the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for disposal as low-level radioactive waste. The sealed waste packages, constructed of either wood or metal, are currently being stored in Building 31 and at other locations throughout the Mound facility. At a meeting in Las Vegas, Nevada on October, 26, 1990, DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE-NV) and NTS representatives requested that the Mound Plant D&D soils proposed for shipment to NTS be sampled for Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) constituents. On December 14, 1990, DOE-NV also requested that additional analyses be performed on the soils from one of the soils boxes for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), particle size distribution, and free liquids. The purpose of this plan is to document the proposed sampling and analyses of the packages of D&D soils produced prior to October 31, 1990. In order to provide a thorough description of the soils excavated from the WTS and SM areas, sections 1.1 and 1.2 provide historical Information concerning the D&D soils, including waste stream evaluations and past sampling data.

NONE

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

Farhadi, Leila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Soil Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Salt Wells Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Adsorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and radiometric geophysical surveys were carried out in conjunction with geologic mapping to test the application of these ground-based techniques to geothermal exploration at three prospects in Nevada by Henkle Jr. et al. in 2005. Mercury soil vapor surveys were not widely used in geothermal exploration in the western US at the time, although the association of mercury vapors with geothermal

89

Situ soil sampling probe system with heated transfer line  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed both to an improved in situ penetrometer probe and to a heated, flexible transfer line. The line and probe may be implemented together in a penetrometer system in which the transfer line is used to connect the probe to a collector/analyzer at the surface. The probe comprises a heater that controls a temperature of a geologic medium surrounding the probe. At least one carrier gas port and vapor collection port are located on an external side wall of the probe. The carrier gas port provides a carrier gas into the geologic medium, and the collection port captures vapors from the geologic medium for analysis. In the transfer line, a flexible collection line that conveys a collected fluid, i.e., vapor, sample to a collector/analyzer. A flexible carrier gas line conveys a carrier gas to facilitate the collection of the sample. A system heating the collection line is also provided. Preferably the collection line is electrically conductive so that an electrical power source can generate a current through it so that the internal resistance generates heat.

Robbat, Jr., Albert (Andover, MA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky, 1989) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Soil Sampling Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes One-hundred twelve samples were collected from relatively unaltered air-fall ejecta along two Novarupta Basin traverse lines (Fig. 5). One hundred eighty-two samples were taken from active/fossil fumaroles in Novarupta Basin (22 sites, Fig. 5), fossil fumaroles (41 sites) and air-fall tephra (2 sites) within and immediately adjacent to the remainder of the VTTS (Fig. 6). In total, 294 samples were collected from 127 sites

91

Guidance for characterizing explosives contaminated soils: Sampling and selecting on-site analytical methods  

SciTech Connect

A large number of defense-related sites are contaminated with elevated levels of secondary explosives. Levels of contamination range from barely detectable to levels above 10% that need special handling due to the detonation potential. Characterization of explosives-contaminated sites is particularly difficult due to the very heterogeneous distribution of contamination in the environment and within samples. To improve site characterization, several options exist including collecting more samples, providing on-site analytical data to help direct the investigation, compositing samples, improving homogenization of samples, and extracting larger samples. On-site analytical methods are essential to more economical and improved characterization. On-site methods might suffer in terms of precision and accuracy, but this is more than offset by the increased number of samples that can be run. While verification using a standard analytical procedure should be part of any quality assurance program, reducing the number of samples analyzed by the more expensive methods can result in significantly reduced costs. Often 70 to 90% of the soil samples analyzed during an explosives site investigation do not contain detectable levels of contamination. Two basic types of on-site analytical methods are in wide use for explosives in soil, calorimetric and immunoassay. Calorimetric methods generally detect broad classes of compounds such as nitroaromatics or nitramines, while immunoassay methods are more compound specific. Since TNT or RDX is usually present in explosive-contaminated soils, the use of procedures designed to detect only these or similar compounds can be very effective.

Crockett, A.B. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Craig, H.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Portland, OR (United States). Oregon Operations Office; Jenkins, T.F. [Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab., Hanover, NH (United States); Sisk, W.E. [Army Environmental Center, Aberdeen Proving Grounds, MD (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Determination of Natural Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Swipe Samples Utilizing Yttrium/Beryllium Ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1. Objective: A method to determine whether beryllium (Be) components in surface swipe samples are from a natural source is needed. 2. Methods: Soil samples and surface swipes from area facilities were analyzed for marker elements to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be). To be useful, the natural marker element must be present at reasonably consistent levels across the site, must correlate with the Be concentration, and not have the potential to be present from non-natural sources. 3. Results: The research on marker elements used to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be) concentrations demonstrates a clear correlation between Be and yttrium (Y) in natural soils on the Nevada National Security Site. The Y/Be ratio is proposed as a method to characterize the source of Be in soil and surface swipe samples and to aid in recommendations for follow up actions. Swipe samples are analyzed using an ICP/MS method and compared with results from soil samples. Natural soil constituent levels and the Y/Be Ratio range is determined for the occupied and historical facilities and surrounding areas. Y/Be ratios within the statistical range established indicate the Be is from a natural source. Y/Be ratios lower than this range indicate the presence of another Be source, and may then be correlated to alloy, ceramic, or other operational sources by the ratios of copper, nickel, cobalt, uranium, and/or niobium. Example case studies of evaluations of buildings with historical operational beryllium usage, current ongoing technical processes, and heavy equipment used in large building demolitions are included demonstrating the value of the ratio approach. 4. Conclusions: This differentiation is valuable as there is no known correlation between natural beryllium in soil and beryllium disease.

None

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

93

Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus. 8 figs.

Rossabi, J.; May, C.P.; Pemberton, B.E.; Shinn, J.; Sprague, K.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

94

EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.  

SciTech Connect

The workshop's main objectives are (1) to present the emerging modalities for analyzing carbon in soil, (2) to assess their error propagation, (3) to recommend new protocols and sampling strategies for the new instrumentation, and, (4) to compare the costs of the new methods with traditional chemical ones.

WIELOPOLSKI, L.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.  

SciTech Connect

The workshop's main objectives are (1) to present the emerging modalities for analyzing carbon in soil, (2) to assess their error propagation, (3) to recommend new protocols and sampling strategies for the new instrumentation, and, (4) to compare the costs of the new methods with traditional chemical ones.

WIELOPOLSKI, L.

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

A FLUX-LIMITED SAMPLE OF z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} EMITTING GALAXIES IN THE CHANDRA DEEP FIELD SOUTH ,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a method for obtaining a flux-limited sample of Ly{alpha} emitters from Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) grism data. We show that the multiple GALEX grism images can be converted into a three-dimensional (two spatial axes and one wavelength axis) data cube. The wavelength slices may then be treated as narrowband images and searched for emission-line galaxies. For the GALEX NUV grism data, the method provides a Ly{alpha} flux-limited sample over the redshift range z = 0.67-1.16. We test the method on the Chandra Deep Field South field, where we find 28 Ly{alpha} emitters with faint continuum magnitudes (NUV > 22) that are not present in the GALEX pipeline sample. We measure the completeness by adding artificial emitters and measuring the fraction recovered. We find that we have an 80% completeness above a Ly{alpha} flux of 10{sup -15} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. We use the UV spectra and the available X-ray data and optical spectra to estimate the fraction of active galactic nuclei in the selection. We report the first detection of a giant Ly{alpha} blob at z < 1, though we find that these objects are much less common at z = 1 than at z = 3. Finally, we compute limits on the z {approx} 1 Ly{alpha} luminosity function and confirm that there is a dramatic evolution in the luminosity function over the redshift range z = 0-1.

Barger, A. J.; Wold, I. G. B. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Cowie, L. L. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Appendix G: Quality Assurance/Quality Control InformationAppendix G.1 Investigating VOC Losses During Postdemonstration Soil Core Recovery and Soil Sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Field procedures for collecting soil cores and soil samples from the steam injection plot were modified in an effort to minimize VOC losses that can occur when sampling soil at elevated temperatures (Battelle, 2001). The primary modifications included: (1) additional personnel safety equipment, such as thermalinsulated gloves for core handling; (2) the addition of a cooling period to bring the soil cores to approximately 20ºC before collecting samples; and (3) capping the core ends while the cores were cooling. Concerns were raised about the possibility that increased handling times during soil coring, soil cooling, and sample collection may result in an increase in VOC losses. An experiment was conducted using soil samples spiked with a surrogate compound to investigate the effectiveness of the field procedures developed for LC34 in minimizing VOC losses. Materials and Methods Soil cores were collected in a 2-inch diameter, 4-foot long acetate sleeve that was placed tightly inside a 2-inch diameter stainless steel core barrel. The acetate sleeve was immediately capped on both ends with a protective polymer covering. The sleeve was placed in an ice bath to cool the heated core to below ambient groundwater temperatures (approximately 20ºC). The temperature of the soil core was monitored during the cooling process with a meat thermometer that was pushed into one end cap (see Figure G-1). Approximately 30 minutes was required to cool each 4-foot long, 2-inch diameter soil core from 50-95ºC to below 20ºC (see Figure G-2). Upon reaching ambient temperature, the core sleeve was then uncapped and cut open along its length to collect the soil sample for contaminant analysis (see Figure G-3).

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Estimation of the Impact of Sampling Errors in the VOS Observations on Air–Sea Fluxes. Part II: Impact on Trends and Interannual Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the same approach as in Part I, here it is shown how sampling problems in voluntary observing ship (VOS) data affect conclusions about interannual variations and secular changes of surface heat fluxes. The largest uncertainties in linear ...

Sergey Gulev; Thomas Jung; Eberhard Ruprecht

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

operations Why we sample surface soil Soil sampling is performed to: Determine radionuclide and chemical concentrations in soil and compare these results to regional...

100

Surface soil sampling plan for the 200-UP-2 operable unit  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the Description of Work (DOW) is to provide detailed guidance for implementation of the field activities outlined in the 200-UP-2 Operable Unit Work Plan. This work plan provides the basis for conducting a limited field investigation (LFI) in the unit, with the DOW outlining the protocols and procedures to be utilized in performing the surface soil sampling. As outlined in the Work Plan, the data to be collected in the LFI will be utilized to determine the need for, and possible selection of, an Interim Remedial Measure (IRM). In order to do that, detailed information on the current nature and extent of contamination in surface soils at selected management units is required for assessment in conjunction with the existing areas of highest concentration for each unit. Field screening efforts using surface radiation surveys will allow for surface soil samples to be collected from those points that represent the highest contaminant concentrations. Analysis of these samples will provide data on the types and concentrations of the contaminants of concern.

Mitchell, R.M.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

RAPID METHOD FOR PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM AND CURIUM IN VERY LARGE SOIL SAMPLES  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of actinides in environmental soil and sediment samples is very important for environmental monitoring. There is a need to measure actinide isotopes with very low detection limits. A new, rapid actinide separation method has been developed and implemented that allows the measurement of plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in very large soil samples (100-200 g) with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and DGA-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multistage column combined with alpha spectrometry. The method combines an acid leach step and innovative matrix removal using cerium fluoride precipitation to remove the difficult soil matrix. This method is unique in that it provides high tracer recoveries and effective removal of interferences with small extraction chromatography columns instead of large ion exchange resin columns that generate large amounts of acid waste. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

Maxwell, S

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

102

Area G perimeter surface-soil and single-stage water sampling: Environmental surveillance for fiscal year 95. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

ESH-19 personnel collected soil and single-stage water samples around the perimeter of Area G at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) during FY 95 to characterize possible radionuclide movement out of Area G through surface water and entrained sediment runoff. Soil samples were analyzed for tritium, total uranium, isotopic plutonium, americium-241, and cesium-137. The single-stage water samples were analyzed for tritium and plutonium isotopes. All radiochemical data was compared with analogous samples collected during FY 93 and 94 and reported in LA-12986 and LA-13165-PR. Six surface soils were also submitted for metal analyses. These data were included with similar data generated for soil samples collected during FY 94 and compared with metals in background samples collected at the Area G expansion area.

Childs, M.; Conrad, R.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Trajectories of loose sand samples in the Phase Space of Soil Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In general, the evolution of soil submitted to simple stress-strain paths is characterised using the 3d phase space (v,p',q) i.e. (specific volume, mean intergranular pressure, deviatoric stress q. When uniaxial compressions is performed at constant lateral pressure p' or at constant mean pressure p', one finds that all trajectories end up at a line of attracting point called the critical-state line via the surface of Roscoe or of Hvorslev depending if the initial volume is the loosest possible one (at a given p') or densest. Trajectories of weakly dense samples are not often reported in this phase space. We find here that they shall present some sigmoid shape as it can be found from soil mechanics argument. This seems to indicate that Roscoe's surface shall exhibit a singularity at the critical point.

P. Evesque

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

104

Area G Perimeter Surface-Soil Sampling Environmental Surveillance for Fiscal Year 1998 Hazardous and Solid Waste Group (ESH-19)  

SciTech Connect

Material Disposal Area G (Area G) is at Technical Area 54 at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Area G has been the principal facility for the disposal of low-level, solid-mixed, and transuranic waste since 1957. It is currently LANL's primary facility for radioactive solid waste burial and storage. As part of the annual environmental surveillance effort at Area G, surface soil samples are collected around the facility's perimeter to characterize possible radionuclide movement off the site through surface water runoff During 1998, 39 soil samples were collected and analyzed for percent moisture, tritium, plutonium-238 and 239, cesium-137 and americium-241. To assess radionuclide concentrations, the results from these samples are compared with baseline or background soil samples collected in an undisturbed area west of the active portion Area G. The 1998 results are also compared to the results from analogous samples collected during 1996 and 1997 to assess changes over this time in radionuclide activity concentrations in surface soils around the perimeter of Area G. The results indicate elevated levels of all the radionuclides assessed (except cesium-137) exist in Area G perimeter surface soils vs the baseline soils. The comparison of 1998 soil data to previous years (1996 and 1997) indicates no significant increase or decrease in radionuclide concentrations; an upward or downward trend in concentrations is not detectable at this time. These results are consistent with data comparisons done in previous years. Continued annual soil sampling will be necessary to realize a trend if one exists. The radionuclide levels found in the perimeter surface soils are above background but still considered relatively low. This perimeter surface soil data will be used for planning purposes at Area G, techniques to prevent sediment tm.nsport off-site are implemented in the areas where the highest radionuclide concentrations are indicated.

Marquis Childs

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

IN SITU NON-INVASIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLE SIZE AND GEOSTATISTICAL CONSIDERATIONS.  

SciTech Connect

I discuss a new approach for quantitative carbon analysis in soil based on INS. Although this INS method is not simple, it offers critical advantages not available with other newly emerging modalities. The key advantages of the INS system include the following: (1) It is a non-destructive method, i.e., no samples of any kind are taken. A neutron generator placed above the ground irradiates the soil, stimulating carbon characteristic gamma-ray emission that is counted by a detection system also placed above the ground. (2) The INS system can undertake multielemental analysis, so expanding its usefulness. (3) It can be used either in static or scanning modes. (4) The volume sampled by the INS method is large with a large footprint; when operating in a scanning mode, the sampled volume is continuous. (5) Except for a moderate initial cost of about $100,000 for the system, no additional expenses are required for its operation over two to three years after which a NG has to be replenished with a new tube at an approximate cost of $10,000, this regardless of the number of sites analyzed. In light of these characteristics, the INS system appears invaluable for monitoring changes in the carbon content in the field. For this purpose no calibration is required; by establishing a carbon index, changes in carbon yield can be followed with time in exactly the same location, thus giving a percent change. On the other hand, with calibration, it can be used to determine the carbon stock in the ground, thus estimating the soil's carbon inventory. However, this requires revising the standard practices for deciding upon the number of sites required to attain a given confidence level, in particular for the purposes of upward scaling. Then, geostatistical considerations should be incorporated in considering properly the averaging effects of the large volumes sampled by the INS system that would require revising standard practices in the field for determining the number of spots to be sampled. It is highly desirable to assess properly the sampled volume for reporting the absolute value of the measured carbon. At the same time, increasing the number of detectors surrounding the NG can reduce error propagation. In the present work, only the volume irradiated by the neutrons was estimated. It should be pointed that the carbon yield is also affected by the neutron energy spectrum that changes with depth. Thus, all these considerations must be considered carefully when evaluating the detectors' configuration and the resulting counting efficiency. In summary, INS system is a novel approach for non-destructive carbon analysis in soil with very unique features. It should contribute in assessing soil carbon inventories and assist in understanding belowground carbon processes. The complexity of carbon distribution in soil requires a special attention when calibrating the INS system, and a consensus developed on the most favorable way to report carbon abundance. Clearly, this will affect the calibration procedures.

WIELOPOLSKI, L.

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Title: Sampling Soil and Vegetation at Facility Sites No.: SOP-5139 Page 2 of 9 Revision: 1 Effective Date: June 24, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Title: Sampling Soil and Vegetation at Facility Sites No.: SOP-5139 Page 2 of 9 Revision: 1 for collecting soil, sediment, and vegetation samples at facilities such as the Material Disposal Area G (Area G the basic requirements for collecting soil, sediment and vegetation samples at certain facilities. Work

107

Forest understory soil temperatures and heat flux calculated using a Fourier model and scaled using a digital camera  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uneven but periodic solar heating of the soil surface due tothe uneven but periodic solar heating of the soil due to a

Graham, Eric; Lam, Yeung; Yuen, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Estimation of the Impact of Sampling Errors in the VOS Observations on Air–Sea Fluxes. Part I: Uncertainties in Climate Means  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sampling uncertainties in the voluntary observing ship (VOS)-based global ocean–atmosphere flux fields were estimated using the NCEP–NCAR reanalysis and ECMWF 40-yr Re-Analysis (ERA-40) as well as seasonal forecasts without data assimilation. Air–...

Sergey Gulev; Thomas Jung; Eberhard Ruprecht

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Estimation of Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes from Soil Surface Temperature Using a Linear Air-Land Heat Transfer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present a linearized model of the heat transfer between the soil layer and the atmosphere. Using this model, the moisture availability at the surface can be estimated from the diurnal variations of the soil surface temperature and ...

Fujio Kimura; Yugo Shimizu

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Sensor-directed response surface sampling designs for characterizing spatial variation in soil properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many applied precision farming applications, remotely sensed survey data are collected specifically because these data correlate well with some soil property of interest. Additionally, a general model for the functional relationship between the soil ... Keywords: Precision agriculture, Response surface design, Salinity, Spatial linear model, Variogram

S. M. Lesch

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Sampling Instruction: Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several types of data are needed to assess the flux of Cr(VI) from the excavation into the groundwater. As described in this plan, these data include (1) temporal Cr(VI) data in the shallow groundwater beneath the pit; (2) hydrologic data to interpret groundwater flow and contaminant transport; (3) hydraulic gradient data; and (4) as a contingency action if necessary, vertical profiling of Cr(VI) concentrations in the shallow aquifer beyond the depth possible with aquifer tubes.

Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories/NM, Tonopah Test Range environs, 1994-2005.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From 1994 through 2005, the Environmental Management Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Tonopah Test Range (TTR), NV, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for the purpose of determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at TTR. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory of metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends which indicated that further investigation may be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Management Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

Deola, Regina Anne; Oldewage, Hans D.; Herrera, Heidi M.; Miller, Mark Laverne

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

SURVEY OF LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYON FOR RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION AND RADIOASSAY TESTS RUN ON SEWER-WATER SAMPLES AND WATER AND SOIL SAMPLES TAKEN FROM LOS ALAMOS AND PUEBLO CANYONS  

SciTech Connect

Chemical sewers and sanitary lines draining the Tech Area, D. P. Site, CMR-12 Laundry, and surrounding residential areas flow into Pueblo and Los Alamos Canyon streams. In order to determine the extent and sources of radioactive contamination in these localities, fluid samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from each of the sewers, soil samples from the ground surrounding the sewer exits, and water and soil samples from selected spots in or near each of the two canyon streams were collected and analyzed for polonium and . plutonium. (W.D.M.)

Kingsley, W.H.; Fox, A.; Tribby, J.F.

1947-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

Measuring the Effects of Disturbance & Climate on the CO2 & Energy Exchange of Ponderosa Pine Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal is to quantify and understand the influence of climate and disturbance on ecosystem processes and thus net carbon uptake by forests. The objective is to combine tower and ground-based observations to quantify the effects of disturbance on processes controlling carbon storage and CO{sub 2} and energy exchange in varying climatic conditions. Specific objectives are: (1) Investigate the effects of logging and fire on carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in chronosequences of ponderosa pine, using consistent methodology; (2) Determine key environmental factors controlling carbon storage and carbon dioxide and energy exchange in these forests through a combination of measurements and process modeling; and (3) Assess spatial variation of the concentrations and transport in complex terrain. The eddy covariance method is used for measurements of CO2, water vapor, and energy exchanges in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests (burned in 2002 wildfire, 10 year-old stand, 90 year-old mature stand). The mature stand has been an AmeriFlux site since 2000 (following previous flux sites in young and old stands initiated in 1996). In addition to the eddy covariance measurements, a large suite of biological processes and ecosystem properties are determined for the purpose of developing independent forest carbon budgets and NEP estimates; these include photosynthesis, stand respiration, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes, annual litterfall, foliar chemistry, and bole increment, and soil organic matter among other parameters. The measurements are being integrated and evaluated with two ecosystem models (BIOME-BGC and SPA). Such analyses are needed to assess regional terrestrial ecosystem carbon budgets. The results will contribute scientific understanding of carbon processes, and will provide comprehensive data sets for forest managers and those preparing national carbon inventories to use in assessments of carbon sequestration in relation to interannual climate variation and disturbance. Frameworks and methodologies developed by the PI will contribute to AmeriFlux Network facility functions for data acquisition, exchange and modeling of results in a broad spectrum of carbon cycle research.

Beverly E. Law; Larry Mahrt

2007-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

116

Chemical Attenuation Coefficients for Boron Using Soil Samples Collected from Selected Power Plant Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains results of laboratory batch equilibrium studies for adsorption of boron by soils from three coal-fired power plant sites and results of long-term leaching of boron from four coal fly ashes. Together this information can be used to more accurately predict long-term release and groundwater transport of boron derived from coal combustion product (CCP) management facilities.

2008-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

117

Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ujic, Predrag; Celikovic, Igor; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

MCNP ESTIMATE OF THE SAMPLED VOLUME IN A NON-DESTRUCTIVE IN SITU SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS.  

SciTech Connect

Global warming, promoted by anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission into the atmosphere, is partially mitigated by the photosynthesis processes of the terrestrial echo systems that act as atmospheric CO{sub 2} scrubbers and sequester carbon in soil. Switching from till to no till soils management practices in agriculture further augments this process. Carbon sequestration is also advanced by putting forward a carbon ''credit'' system whereby these can be traded between CO{sub 2} producers and sequesters. Implementation of carbon ''credit'' trade will be further promulgated by recent development of a non-destructive in situ carbon monitoring system based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). Volumes and depth distributions defined by the 0.1, 1.0, 10, 50, and 90 percent neutron isofluxes, from a point source located at either 5 or 30 cm above the surface, were estimated using Monte Carlo calculations.

WIELOPOLSKI, L.; DIOSZEGI, I.; MITRA, S.

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were utilized onsite, but as one moves to unindustrialized areas on the site, surrounding buffer areas and perimeter location into the more distant sites, concentrations of these radionuclides approach background and cannot be distinguished from fallout activity. More importantly, concentrations in soil and vegetation samples did not exceed environmental benchmark concentrations, and associated exposure to human and ecological receptors were well below levels that are demonstratively hazardous to human health and the environment.

Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C . K W O N * Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mass Models and Sunyaev-Zeldovich Effect Predictions for a Flux Limited Sample of 22 Nearby X-Ray Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We define a 90% complete, volume-limited sample of 31 z<0.1 x-ray clusters and present a systematic analysis of public ROSAT PSPC data on 22 of these objects. Our efforts are undertaken in support of the Penn/OVRO SZE survey, and to this end we present predictions for the inverse Compton optical depth towards all 22 of these clusters. We have performed detailed Monte Carlo simulations to understand the effects of the cluster profile uncertainties on the SZE predictions given the OVRO 5.5-meter telescope beam and switching patterns; we find that the profile uncertainties are one of the least significant components of our error budget for SZE-based distance measurements. We also present baryonic masses and baryon mass fractions derived under the assumption of hydrostatic equilibrium for these 22 clusters. The mean baryonic mass fraction within R_500 \\sim 500 h^-1 kpc is (7.02 \\pm 0.28) x 10^-2 h^-3/2, or (19.8 \\pm 0.8) x 10^-2 for h=0.5. We confirm the Allen et al. (1993) claim of an excess absorbing column density towards Abell 478, but do not find similar anomalies in the other 21 clusters in our sample. We also find some evidence for an excess of soft counts in the ROSAT PSPC data. A measurement of H_o using these models and OVRO SZE determinations will be presented in a second paper.

Brian S. Mason; Steven T. Myers

1999-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Hanford stakeholder participation in evaluating innovative technologies: VOC product line, Passive soil vapor extraction using borehole flux tunable hybrid plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-phased stakeholder participation program was conducted to support the Volatile Organic Compounds Arid Site Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The US DOE`s Office of Technology Development (OTD) sponsored and directed the VOC-Arid ID. Its purpose was to develop and demonstrate new technologies for remediating VOC contamination in soil and ground water. The integrated demonstration, hosted by the Hanford site in Washington State, is being transitioned into the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Plume Focus Area. The Plume Focus Area has the same basic objectives as the ID, but is broader in scope and is a team effort with technology developers and technology users. The objective is to demonstrate a promising technology once, and if results warrant deploy it broadly across the DOE complex and in private sector applications.

Peterson, T.; McCabe, G.; Niesen, K.; Serie, P.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

Maxwell, S.

2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

124

Surface Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface Soil Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and compared to averages over time to see if there are changes in concentrations. Monitoring surface soil LANL has monitored surface soils since the early 1970s. Institutional surface soil samples are collected from 17 on-site, 11 perimeter, and six regional (background) locations every three years.

125

Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate equivalents for the EBIS sample processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate' soil horizon show that model improvements need to be made to capture observed soil carbon cycling and transport processes. Testing and improvement of soil carbon cycling models is a key anticipated output

126

Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Solid-sample geochemistry study of western Dixie Valley, Churchill County, Nevada. Part II. Soil geochemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerous thermal springs present in northern Dixie Valley, Nevada, are the surface expression of a deep-seated geothermal system. The structural setting, a complex asymmetric graben controls the location of surface springs and migration of thermal fluids to the surface. The distribution of arsenic and mercury in the soils of the valley correlates well with the occurrence of structures which may be in communication with the underlying geothermal system. Generally anomalous arsenic values occur along structures near the playa where fine-grained sediments and a high water table occur. Mercury values are uniformly low near the playa but are typically anomalous along structures in the coarser fan deposits. The complementary geochemical signatures of arsenic and mercury which arise from basic differences in elemental chemical behavior have been useful in delineating the structural trends of the valley. The structural model indicated by the geochemistry and results of drilling suggest future targets should be selected east of the Dixie Meadows fault, within the inner graben.

Juncal, R.W. (Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, NV); Bell, E.J.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Reconnaissance for mercury over geothermal areas of the Imperial Valley, California. [Analysis of samples of soil gas and gas from drill holes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine samples of soil gas and gas from drill holes were collected over and near two geothermal anomalies in the Imperial Valley, California, to measure the possible presence of mercury. With the instrumentation used, the smallest quantity of mercury that could be detected was 2 nanograms. No mercury was detected in any sample.

Hinkle, M.E.; Vaughn, W.W.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"  

SciTech Connect

This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

130

Influence of temperature, moisture, and organic carbon on the flux of H/sub 2/ and CO between soil and atmosphere: field studies in subtropical regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Production and deposition rates of atmospheric hydrogen and carbon monoxide were studied during field measurements in subtropical regions, i.e., Transvaal (South Africa), Andalusia (Spain), and the Karoo (South Africa). Measurements were carried out by applying static and equilibrium box techniques. The equilibrium technique has been introduced as a novel method to measure production and destruction rates simultaneously even when soil conditions (e.g., temperature) change during the course of the measurements. Deposition velocities of H/sub 2/ and CO were virtually independent of the soil temperature measured in 3- to 10-mm depths and agreed with those measured in the temperate regions. The deposition velocities were inhibited or stimulated by irrigation water depending on the conditions of the individual field sites. H/sub 2/ production by soil was not observed. By contrast, CO was produced by soil in a dark chemical reaction. Production rates increased exponentially with soil temperatures, giving activation energies of 57-110 kJ mol/sup -1/ and increased linearly with soil organic carbon content. CO production rates followed a diel rhythm parallel to soil surface temperatures. Production generally exceeded CO deposition during the hot hours of the day, so that arid subtropical soils act as a net source of atmospheric CO during this time. On a global basis, CO production by soil may reach source strengths of 30 Tg yr/sup -1/, which is considerably less than the global deposition of CO estimated to be 190-580 Tg yr/sup -1/. Global H/sub 2/ deposition rates were estimated to 70-110 Tg yr/sup -1/.

Conrad, R.; Seiler, W.

1985-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

131

Influence of Land Cover and Soil Moisture on the Horizontal Distribution of Sensible and Latent Heat Fluxes in Southeast Kansas during IHOP_2002 and CASES-97  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analyses of daytime fair-weather aircraft and surface-flux tower data from the May–June 2002 International H2O Project (IHOP_2002) and the April–May 1997 Cooperative Atmosphere Surface Exchange Study (CASES-97) are used to document the role of ...

Margaret A. LeMone; Fei Chen; Joseph G. Alfieri; Mukul Tewari; Bart Geerts; Qun Miao; Robert L. Grossman; Richard L. Coulter

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

{sup 137}Cs concentration in soil samples from an early survey of Hiroshima atomic bomb and cumulative dose estimation from the fallout  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low background gamma-ray measurement has been performed to determine the {sup 137}Cs content in soil samples collected in a very early survey of the Hiroshima atomic bomb. These soil samples were collected just 3 d after the explosion within 5 km from the hypocenter and were not exposed to the global fallout from nuclear weapon tests. Out of 22 samples, {sup 137}Cs was detected for 11 samples, and their radionactivities ranged from 0.16-10.6mBq g{sup {minus}1} at the time of the measurement. A comparison of the {sup 137}Cs deposition with the rainfall area within Hiroshima city indicates that the rainfall area was wider than the previously proposed one. Cumulative exposure by the fallout has been estimated to be 0.31 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (0.12 R) 1.0 mC kg{sup {minus}1} (4 R) in the heavy fallout area. 20 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Iwatani, Kazuo; Hasai, Hiromi [Hiroshima Univ., Kagamiyama (Japan)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Definition: Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Gas Sampling Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system. Various methods are applied to obtain samples used for determination of the composition of gases present in soils or hydrothermal discharges. The flux of volatile gases emitted from a hydrothermal system can also be determined by measuring the flow of gases at specific locations and comparing it to average background emissions. Anomalously high gas flux can provide an indication of hydrothermal activity at depth that is otherwise not apparent. Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

134

Computing Surface Fluxes from Mesonet Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By using air–vegetation–soil layer coupled model equations as weak constraints, a variational method is developed to compute sensible and latent heat fluxes from conventional observations obtained at meteorological surface stations. This method ...

Binbin Zhou; Qin Xu

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Development testing of the chemical analysis automation polychlorinated biphenyl standard analysis method during surface soils sampling at the David Witherspoon 1630 site  

SciTech Connect

The Chemical Analysis Automation (CAA) project is developing standardized, software-driven, site-deployable robotic laboratory systems with the objective of lowering the per-sample analysis cost, decreasing sample turnaround time, and minimizing human exposure to hazardous and radioactive materials associated with DOE remediation projects. The first integrated system developed by the CAA project is designed to determine polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) content in soil matrices. A demonstration and development testing of this system was conducted in conjuction with surface soil characterization activities at the David Witherspoon 1630 Site in Knoxville, Tennessee. The PCB system consists of five hardware standard laboratory modules (SLMs), one software SLM, the task sequence controller (TSC), and the human-computer interface (HCI). Four of the hardware SLMs included a four-channel Soxhlet extractor, a high-volume concentrator, a column cleanup, and a gas chromatograph. These SLMs performed the sample preparation and measurement steps within the total analysis protocol. The fifth hardware module was a robot that transports samples between the SLMs and the required consumable supplies to the SLMs. The software SLM is an automated data interpretation module that receives raw data from the gas chromatograph SLM and analyzes the data to yield the analyte information. The TSC is a software system that provides the scheduling, management of system resources, and the coordination of all SLM activities. The HCI is a graphical user interface that presents the automated laboratory to the analyst in terms of the analytical procedures and methods. Human control of the automated laboratory is accomplished via the HCI. Sample information required for processing by the automated laboratory is entered through the HCI. Information related to the sample and the system status is presented to the analyst via graphical icons.

Hunt, M.A.; Klatt, L.N.; Thompson, D.H. [and others

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy Balance and Carbon Dioxide Flux in Conventional and No-Till Maize Fields in Lesotho, Southern Africa.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The capacity of soils to sequester carbon is currently of scientific interest because soil management impacts carbon dioxide flux and can mitigate the effects… (more)

Bruns, Wendy Anne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Technical bases and guidance for the use of composite soil sampling for demonstrating compliance with radiological release criteria  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guidance provides information on methodologies and the technical bases that licensees should consider for incorporating composite sampling strategies into final status survey (FSS) plans. In addition, this guidance also includes appropriate uses of composite sampling for generating the data for other decommissioning site investigations such as characterization or other preliminary site investigations.

Vitkus, Timothy J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

138

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2003.04.02 - 2003.09.02 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Ecosystem-atmosphere exchange of carbon, water, and energy varies with climate, soil, and land management, in ways 1) that influence the CO2 flux and planetary boundary layer CO2 concentration in ARM CART and 2) that we can model and predict. This activity repeated portable flux system measurements that we performed in spring 2002, by continuing measurements of the spatial heterogeneity of carbon, water, and energy fluxes in fields surrounding the ARM SGP Central Facility (CF).

139

A Survey of z~6 Quasars in the SDSS Deep Stripe: I. a Flux-Limited Sample at z_{AB}<21  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the discovery of five quasars at z~6 selected from 260 deg^2 of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) southern survey, a deep imaging survey obtained by repeatedly scanning a stripe along the Celestial Equator. The five quasars with 20=6.0 and =-25.8 is (5.0+/-2.1) x 10^{-9} Mpc^{-3} mag^{-1}. We model the bright-end quasar luminosity function (QLF) at z~6 as a power law Phi(L_{1450}) \\propto L_{1450}^{beta}. The slope beta calculated from a combination of our sample and the luminous SDSS quasar sample is -3.1+/-0.4, significantly steeper than the slope of the QLF at z~4. Based on the derived QLF, we find that the quasar/AGN population cannot provide enough photons to ionize the intergalactic medium (IGM) at z~6 unless the IGM is very homogeneous and the luminosity (L*_{1450}) at which the QLF power law breaks is very low.

Linhua Jiang; Xiaohui Fan; James Annis; Robert H. Becker; Richard L. White; Kuenley Chiu; Huan Lin; Robert H. Lupton; Gordon T. Richards; Michael A. Strauss; Sebastian Jester; Donald P. Schneider

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

The boardman regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible- and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy laboratories, one National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration laboratory, and several universities. The experiment was conducted in a region of severe contrasts in adjacent surface types that accentuated the response of the atmosphere to variable surface forcing. Large values of sensible-heat flux and low values of latent-heat flux characterized a sagebrush steppe area; significantly smaller sensible-heat fluxes and much larger latent-heat fluxes were associated with extensive tracts of irrigated farmland to the north, east, and west of the steppe. Data were obtained from an array of surface flux stations, remote-sensing devices, an instrumented aircraft, and soil and vegetation measurements. The data will be used to address the problem of extrapolating from a limited number of local measurements to area-averaged values of fluxes suitable for use in global climate models. 16 refs., 13 figs.

Doran, J.C.; Hubbe, J.M.; Kirkham, R.R.; Shaw, W.J.; Whiteman, C.D. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Barnes, F.J.; Cooper, D.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Coulter, R.L.; Cook, D.R.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This work addresses the present status and future trends concerning the effect of soils and their cover on the fluxes of greenhouse gases, the surface energy balance and the water balance. Comprising the proceedings of the conference on soils and the greenhouse effect, the book reviews the background of existing research in the field, while also identifying significant gaps in our understanding of the scientific issues and pointing the way to future work. In addition, the contributors discuss a wide range of topics, including geographic quantification of soil properties involved in fluxes of greenhouse gases; measurement of fluxes and extrapolation to smaller scales; remote sensing of land use; and regional estimation of evaporation and energy fluxes. Throughout, the emphasis is on quantification of greenhouse gas fluxes, evapotranspiration, and energy fluxes.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

moisture moisture ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil moisture The moisture of the soil measured near the surface. This includes soil wetness and soil water potential. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System

143

Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

Evan Harpeneau

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Validation and Sensitivity Analysis of a New Atmosphere–Soil–Vegetation Model. Part II: Impacts on In-Canopy Latent Heat Flux over a Winter Wheat Field Determined by Detailed Calculation of Canopy Radiation Transmission and Stomatal Resistance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the validation and sensitivity analysis of an atmosphere–soil–vegetation model. The model consists of one-dimensional multilayer submodels for the atmosphere, soil, and vegetation and a radiation scheme for the transmission ...

Haruyasu Nagai

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fast flux locked loop  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

146

Estimation of Global Ground Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the use of a previously published algorithm for estimating ground heat flux (GHF) at the global scale. The method is based on an analytical solution of the diffusion equation for heat transfer in a soil layer and has been ...

William B. Bennett; Jingfeng Wang; Rafael L. Bras

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Worldwide Organic Soil Carbon and Nitrogen Data  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of soil samples from California. Additional data came from soil surveys of Italy, Greece, Iran, Thailand, Vietnam, various tropical Amazonian areas, and U.S. forests and from...

148

The Impact of Wet Soil and Canopy Temperatures on Daytime Boundary–Layer Growth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of very wet soil and canopy temperatures on the surface sensible heat flux, and on related daytime boundary-layer properties is evaluated. For very wet soils, two winter situations are considered, related to significant changes in soil ...

M. Segal; J. R. Garratt; G. Kallos; R. A. Pielke

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Comparison of Soil Wetness Indices for Inducing Functional Similarity of Hydrologic Response across Sites in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparative ability of four soil wetness indices to normalize soil moisture dependence of rootzone fluxes across a range of sites in Illinois is investigated. The soil wetness indices examined are various transformations of the water stored ...

Jennifer A. Saleem; Guido D. Salvucci

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Geometrical vector flux sinks and ideal flux concentrators  

SciTech Connect

The description of ideal flux concentrators as shapes that do not disturb the geometrical vector flux field is extended to all the known types of ideal flux concentrators. This is accomplished, in part, by the introduction of vector flux sinks.

Greenman, P.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CARBON DIOXIDE FLUXES IN A CENTRAL HARDWOODS OAK-HICKORY FOREST ECOSYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A long-term experiment to measure carbon and water fluxes was initiated in 2004 as part of the Ameriflux network in a second-growth oak-hickory forest in central Missouri. Ecosystem-scale (~ 1 km2) canopy gas exchange (measured by eddy-covariance methods), vertical CO2 profile sampling and soil respiration along with meteorological parameters were monitored continuously. Early results from this forest located on the western margin of the Eastern Deciduous Forest indicated high peak rates of canopy CO2 uptake (35-40 ?mol m-2 s-1) during the growing season. Canopy CO2 profile measurements indicated substantial accumulation of CO2 (~500 ppm) near the surface in still air at night, venting of this buildup in the morning hours under radiation-induced turbulent air flow, and small vertical gradients of CO2 during most of the subsequent light period with minimum CO2 concentrations in the canopy. Flux of CO2 from the soil ranged from 2 to 8 ?mol m-2 s-1 and increased with temperature. Data from this site and others in the network will also allow characterization of regional spatial variation in carbon fluxes as well as inter-annual differences attributable to climatic events such as droughts.

Pallardy, Stephen G. [University of Missouri; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Hanson, Paul J [ORNL; Meyers, T. P. [NOAA ATDD; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Yang, Bai [ORNL; Hosman, K. P. [University of Missouri

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gas Sampling Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Gas Sampling Details Activities (7) Areas (7) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Field Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: High flux can be indicative of conduits for fluid flow. Hydrological: Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Anomalous flux is associated with active hydrothermal activity. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Gas Sampling: Gas sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, and hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface hydrothermal system.

154

Databases and Archives of Air, Soil, Water, Food, Tissue, and Bone Samples for Radioactive Fallout Measurements from the National Urban Security Technology Laboratory (NUSTL)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Please note that all of the programs discussed here and on pages linked from here have been terminated and the information presented is out of date. The laboratory's name was changed in 2009 to NUSTL from EML. Also, EML is no longer the custodian of the physical sample archives listed in these databases. The samples and databases are maintained at DOE's New Brunswick Laboratory.

155

Oceanic Heat Flux Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors review the procedure for the direct calculation of oceanic heat flux from hydrographic measurements and set out the full “recipe” that is required.

Sheldon Bacon; Nick Fofonoff

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

FINGERPRINTING SOILS – A PROOF OF CONCEPT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic soil characterization is an under-explored field in the forensic sciences. One aspect of forensic sciences is Locard’s Exchange Principle, which states that every contact leaves a trace. As soil characterization technology improves, applications of soil forensics can more accurately identify if a soil sample collected from a suspect corresponds to samples collected at a crime scene. This research focuses on the use of visible near and infrared, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VNIR DRS) to develop spectral “fingerprints” of soils. Our hypothesis is that VNIR spectra of soils from a crime scene are unique from other soils, even soils of the same soil series. If soil spectra from a crime scene are unique, this data can be used to accurately assess Locard’s Exchange Principle. Soil samples were collected within in a thirty-mile radius of a designated “crime scene” in the Brazos River floodplain near Texas A

Kobylinski, Catherine

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Correcting eddy-covariance flux underestimates over a grassland.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Independent measurements of the major energy balance flux components are not often consistent with the principle of conservation of energy. This is referred to as a lack of closure of the surface energy balance. Most results in the literature have shown the sum of sensible and latent heat fluxes measured by eddy covariance to be less than the difference between net radiation and soil heat fluxes. This under-measurement of sensible and latent heat fluxes by eddy-covariance instruments has occurred in numerous field experiments and among many different manufacturers of instruments. Four eddy-covariance systems consisting of the same models of instruments were set up side-by-side during the Southern Great Plains 1997 Hydrology Experiment and all systems under-measured fluxes by similar amounts. One of these eddy-covariance systems was collocated with three other types of eddy-covariance systems at different sites; all of these systems under-measured the sensible and latent-heat fluxes. The net radiometers and soil heat flux plates used in conjunction with the eddy-covariance systems were calibrated independently and measurements of net radiation and soil heat flux showed little scatter for various sites. The 10% absolute uncertainty in available energy measurements was considerably smaller than the systematic closure problem in the surface energy budget, which varied from 10 to 30%. When available-energy measurement errors are known and modest, eddy-covariance measurements of sensible and latent heat fluxes should be adjusted for closure. Although the preferred method of energy balance closure is to maintain the Bowen-ratio, the method for obtaining closure appears to be less important than assuring that eddy-covariance measurements are consistent with conservation of energy. Based on numerous measurements over a sorghum canopy, carbon dioxide fluxes, which are measured by eddy covariance, are underestimated by the same factor as eddy covariance evaporation measurements when energy balance closure is not achieved.

Twine, T. E.; Kustas, W. P.; Norman, J. M.; Cook, D. R.; Houser, P. R.; Meyers, T. P.; Prueger, J. H.; Starks, P. J.; Wesely, M. L.; Environmental Research; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; DOE; National Aeronautics and Space Administration; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrationoratory

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

158

Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model  

SciTech Connect

Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

Concentration with uniform flux  

SciTech Connect

A modification of a parabolic cylinder concentrator is developed to procedure uniform flux. The controlling surface equation is given. A three-dimensional ray-trace technique is used to obtain the shape of the image at the focal plane of a thin slice of the mirror. Also, the concentration distribution for uniform flux is given. 1 references, 7 figures.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Prieto, Carlos Allende

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Computing Solar Absolute Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computed color indices and spectral shapes for individual stars are routinely compared with observations for essentially all spectral types, but absolute fluxes are rarely tested. We can confront observed irradiances with the predictions from model atmospheres for a few stars with accurate angular diameter measurements, notably the Sun. Previous calculations have been hampered by inconsistencies and the use of outdated atomic data and abundances. I provide here a progress report on our current efforts to compute absolute fluxes for solar model photospheres. Uncertainties in the solar composition constitute a significant source of error in computing solar radiative fluxes.

Carlos Allende Prieto

2007-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

162

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Cao, Jun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

164

Photovoltaic roof heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ~24°C, indicating that heat conduction was small. T h i sday, indicating large heat conduction a n d storage. Control2.1.3 showed that conduction heat flux through the roof was

Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Statistical uncertainty analysis of radon transport in nonisothermal, unsaturated soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To accurately predict radon fluxes soils to the atmosphere, we must know more than the radium content of the soil. Radon flux from soil is affected not only by soil properties, but also by meteorological factors such as air pressure and temperature changes at the soil surface, as well as the infiltration of rainwater. Natural variations in meteorological factors and soil properties contribute to uncertainty in subsurface model predictions of radon flux, which, when coupled with a building transport model, will also add uncertainty to predictions of radon concentrations in homes. A statistical uncertainty analysis using our Rn3D finite-element numerical model was conducted to assess the relative importance of these meteorological factors and the soil properties affecting radon transport. 10 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

Holford, D.J.; Owczarski, P.C.; Gee, G.W.; Freeman, H.D.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Evaluating the Simulated Seasonality of Soil Moisture with Earth Observation Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A critical function of a land surface scheme, used in climate and weather prediction models, is to partition the energy from insolation into sensible and latent heat fluxes. Many use a soil moisture function to control the surface moisture fluxes ...

Richard J. Ellis; Christopher M. Taylor; Graham P. Weedon; Nicola Gedney; Douglas B. Clark; Sietse Los

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Tower and Aircraft Eddy Covariance Measurements of Water Vapor, Energy, and Carbon Dioxide Fluxes during SMACEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A network of eddy covariance (EC) and micrometeorological flux (METFLUX) stations over corn (Zea mays L.) and soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] canopies was established as part of the Soil Moisture–Atmosphere Coupling Experiment (SMACEX) in ...

J. H. Prueger; J. L. Hatfield; T. B. Parkin; W. P. Kustas; L. E. Hipps; C. M. U. Neale; J. I. MacPherson; W. E. Eichinger; D. I. Cooper

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

An Empirical Latent Heat Flux Parameterization for the Noah Land Surface Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proper partitioning of the surface energy fluxes that drive the evolution of the planetary boundary layer in numerical weather prediction models requires an accurate representation of initial land surface conditions. Unfortunately, soil ...

Christopher M. Godfrey; David J. Stensrud

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

surface temperature surface temperature ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil surface temperature The temperature of the soil measured near the surface. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments AMC : Ameriflux Measurement Component CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation

170

Time Series Analysis of Soil Freeze and Thaw Processes in Indiana  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal cycles of freezing and thawing influence surface energy and water cycle fluxes. Specifically, soil frost can lead to the reduction in infiltration and an increase in runoff response, resulting in a greater potential for soil erosion. An ...

Tushar Sinha; Keith A. Cherkauer

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

On the relationship of soil moisture and extreme temperatures in East China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture conditions affect energy partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes, resulting in a change in surface temperatures. In this study, relationship between antecedent soil moisture conditions (as indicated by the 6-month ...

Lei Meng; Yanjun Shen

172

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

173

ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min  

SciTech Connect

The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

Cook, David

1993-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

174

Flux lattices reformulated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically explore the optical flux lattices produced for ultra-cold atoms subject to laser fields where both the atom-light coupling and the effective detuning are spatially periodic. We analyze the geometric vector potential and the magnetic flux it generates, as well as the accompanying geometric scalar potential. We show how to understand the gauge-dependent Aharonov-Bohm singularities in the vector potential, and calculate the continuous magnetic flux through the elementary cell in terms of these singularities. The analysis is illustrated with a square optical flux lattice. We conclude with an explicit laser configuration yielding such a lattice using a set of five properly chosen beams with two counterpropagating pairs (one along the x axes and the other y axes), together with a single beam along the z axis. We show that this lattice is not phase-stable, and identify the one phase-difference that affects the magnetic flux. Thus armed with realistic laser setup, we directly compute the Chern number...

Juzeli?nas, G

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation and dry periods on two contrasting soils Title Annual grassland resource pools and fluxes: sensitivity to precipitation and dry periods on two contrasting soils Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Sudderth, Erika A., Samuel B. St. Clair, Sarah A. Placella, Stéphanie M. Swarbreck, Cristina Castanha, Donald J. Herman, Marc L. Fischer, Markus Kleber, Erik B. Sudderth, Margaret S. Torn, Mary K. Firestone, Gary L. Andersen, and David D. Ackerly Journal Ecosphere Volume 3 Issue 8 Keywords Avena barbata, Bayesian ANOVA, carbon, climate change, dry periods, Grassland, nitrogen, phenology, precipitation, soil type, water Abstract In ecosystems throughout the world climate models project increased variability in precipitation patterns that may strongly affect the above- and below-ground processes that control carbon, water, and nutrient cycles. Uncertainty about how plant and soil processes respond to wet and dry periods at different times in the growing season is a barrier to understanding how changing rainfall patterns will affect ecosystem function in annual grasslands. We used mesocosm systems to test the sensitivity to mid- and late-season dry periods of twenty response variables related to nitrogen, carbon, and water cycling in Avena barbata monocultures. We compared the responses of individual variables and of grassland systems under low and high cumulative rain treatments and between two contrasting soil types.

176

Sensible Heat Flux Estimated from Routine Meteorological Data by the Resistance Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is described for evaluation of hourly values of the sensible heat flux from routine meteorological data. Use is made of the energy balance at the surface and of the Monteith-Penman formula for estimation of the latent heat flux. The soil ...

R. Berkowicz; L. P. Prahm

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Optical heat flux gauge  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat flux gauge comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figs.

Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

1989-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

178

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Estimated Annual Net Change in Soil Carbon per US County These data represent the estimated net change (Megagram per year) in soil carbon due to changes in the crop type and tillage intensity. Estimated accumulation of soil carbon under Conservation Reserve Program (CRP)lands is included in these estimates. Negative values represent a net flux from the atmosphere to the soil; positive values represent a net flux from the soil to the atmosphere. As such, soil carbon sequestration is represented here as a negative value. The method of analysis is based on empirical relationshipsbetween land management and soil carbon. The method for modeling land management and estimating soil carbonchange, used to generate these data, is described in the following publication:

179

Mapping Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An infrared camera technique designed for remote sensing of air–water heat flux has been developed. The technique uses the differential absorption of water between 3.817 and 4.514 microns. This difference causes each channel’s radiance to ...

Walt McKeown; Richard Leighton

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The Simulation of Surface Heat Fluxes in a Land Surface?Atmosphere Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A modified soil-canopy-boundary layer model based on Ek and Mahrt is presented to simulate surface heat fluxes on a daily basis. The model is validated against independent published bare soil data from Agassiz, Canada, and observations taken over ...

Huang Xinmei; T. J. Lyons

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Direct Estimation of Heat Flux in a Seasonal Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a direct measurement of the turbulent heat flux. The sampling was from a submarine that used a conventional airfoil probe to measure the vertical component of turbulent velocity and a thermistor probe to measure the ...

Hidekatsu Yamazaki; Thomas Osborn

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Detection of lead in soil with excimer laser fragmentation fluorescence spectroscopy (ELFFS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dissolution, chelation, and ion exchange 2,3 . Chemical analysis of soil sample with spectroscopic methods

Choi, J.H.; Damm, C.J.; O'Donovan, N.J.; Sawyer, R.F.; Koshland, C.P.; Lucas, D.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

NEUTRON FLUX INTENSITY DETECTION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of measuring the instantaneous intensity of neutron flux in the core of a nuclear reactor is described. A target gas capable of being transmuted by neutron bombardment to a product having a resonance absorption line nt a particular microwave frequency is passed through the core of the reactor. Frequency-modulated microwave energy is passed through the target gas and the attenuation of the energy due to the formation of the transmuted product is measured. (AEC)

Russell, J.T.

1964-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

184

Using TRMM/TMI to Retrieve Surface Soil Moisture over the Southern United States from 1998 to 2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passive microwave remote sensing has been recognized as a potential method for measuring soil moisture. Combined with field observations and hydrological modeling brightness temperatures can be used to infer soil moisture states and fluxes in ...

H. Gao; E. F. Wood; T. J. Jackson; M. Drusch; R. Bindlish

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Soil Minerals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Minerals Soil Minerals Nature Bulletin No. 707 March 2, 1963 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Seymour Simon, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor SOIL MINERALS We all depend upon the land Our food is obtained from plants and animals -- bread and meat, potatoes and fish, fruit and eggs and milk and the rest of it. Our livestock feed on plants and plant products such as grass and grain. Plants, by means of their root systems, take moisture and nutrients from the soils on which they grow. Their food values, for us or for animals that furnish us food, depend upon the available nutrients in those soils. Soils contain solids, water and air. The solids, the bulk of a soil -- except in purely organic types such as peat and muck -- are mostly mineral materials. Ordinarily they also contain some organic material: decayed and decaying remains of plants and animals.

186

Electroslag remelting with used fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ukranian Scientific-Research Institute of Specialty Steel collaborated with plants engaged in the production of quality metals to introduce a low-waste electroslag remelting (ESR) technology employing used fluxes. It was established that the fluoride (type ANF-1) and fluoride-oxide (type ANF-6) fluxes which are widely used in ESR still have a high content of calcium fluoride and alumina and a low impurity content after 8-10 h of ESR. In the ESR of steels with used fluxes, the content of monitored components in the final slags changes negligibly, while the content of most impurities decreases. The used flux is also characterized by a low concentration of phosphorus and sulfur. It was found that flux can be used 3-5 times when it makes up 50% of the flux mixture in the charge. The savings realized from the use of spent flux in ESR amounts to 4-9 rubles/ton steel.

Yakovlev, N.F.; Sokha, Yu.S.; Oleinik, Yu.S.; Prokhorov, A.N.; Ol'shanskaya, T.V.

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Effects of Vegetation Clumping on Two–Source Model Estimates of Surface Energy Fluxes from an Agricultural Landscape during SMACEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of nonrandom leaf area distributions on surface flux predictions from a two-source thermal remote sensing model are investigated. The modeling framework is applied at local and regional scales over the Soil Moisture–Atmosphere ...

Martha C. Anderson; J. M. Norman; William P. Kustas; Fuqin Li; John H. Prueger; John R. Mecikalski

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

A Numerical Modeling System of the Hydrological Cycle for Estimation of Water Fluxes in the Huaihe River Plain Region, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To analyze the water budget under human influences in the Huaihe River plain region in China, the authors have developed a numerical modeling system that integrates water flux algorithms into a platform created by coupling a soil moisture model ...

Xi Chen; Yongqin David Chen; Zhicai Zhang

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

High flux reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high flux reactor is comprised of a core which is divided into two symetric segments housed in a pressure vessel. The core segments include at least one radial fuel plate. The spacing between the plates functions as a coolant flow channel. The core segments are spaced axially apart such that a coolant mixing plenum is formed between them. A channel is provided such that a portion of the coolant bypasses the first core section and goes directly into the mixing plenum. The outlet coolant from the first core segment is mixed with the bypass coolant resulting in a lower inlet temperature to the lower core segment.

Lake, James A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Heath, Russell L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Liebenthal, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID); DeBoisblanc, Deslonde R. (Summit, NJ); Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Parsons, Kent (Idaho Falls, ID); Ryskamp, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wadkins, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harker, Yale D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fillmore, Gary N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Oh, Chang H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

Not Available

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

192

Physics of String Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

193

Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)  

SciTech Connect

There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

195

In situ separation of root hydraulic redistribution of soil water from liquid and vapor transport  

SciTech Connect

Nocturnal increases in water potential ( ) and water content (WC) in the upper soil profile are often attributed to root water efflux into the soil, a process termed hydraulic lift or hydraulic redistribution (HR). We have previously reported HR values up to ~0.29 mm day-1 in the upper soil for a seasonally dry old-growth ponderosa pine site. However, unsaturated liquid or vapor flux of water between soil layers independent of roots also contributes to the diurnal patterns in WC, confounding efforts to determine the actual magnitude of HR. In this study, we estimated liquid (Jl) and vapor (Jv) soil water fluxes and their impacts on quantifying HR in situ by applying existing data sets of , WC, temperature (T) and soil physical properties to soil water transport equations. Under moist conditions, Jl between layers was estimated to be larger than necessary to account for measured nocturnal increases in WC of upper soil layers. However, as soil drying progressed unsaturated hydraulic conductivity declined rapidly such that Jl was irrelevant (< 2E-06 cm hr-1 at 0-60 cm depths) to total water flux by early August. In surface soil at depths above 15 cm, large T fluctuations can impact Jv leading to uncertainty concerning the role, if any, of HR in nocturnal WC dynamics. Vapor flux was estimated to be the highest at the shallowest depths measured (20 - 30 cm) where it could contribute up to 40% of hourly increases in nocturnal soil moisture depending on thermal conditions. While both HR and net soil water flux between adjacent layers contribute to WC in the 15-65 cm soil layer, HR was the dominant process and accounted for at least 80% of the diurnal increases in WC. While the absolute magnitude of HR is not easily quantified, total diurnal fluctuations in upper soil water content can be quantified and modeled, and remain highly applicable for establishing the magnitude and temporal dynamics of total ecosystem water flux.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Brooks, J Renee [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Corvallis, OR; Dragila, Maria [Oregon State University, Corvallis; Meinzer, Rick [USDA Forest Service

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ARM - Measurement - Latent heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsLatent heat flux govMeasurementsLatent heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Latent heat flux The time rate of flow for the specific enthalpy difference between two phases of a substance at the same temperature, typically water. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

197

Solar proton fluxes since 1956  

SciTech Connect

The fluxes of protons emitted during solar flares since 1956 were evaluated. The depth-versus-activity profiles of /sup 56/Co in several lunar rocks are consistent with the solar-proton fluxes detected by experiments on several satellites. Only about 20% of the solar-proton-induced activities of /sup 22/Na and /sup 55/Fe in lunar rocks from early Apollo missions were produced by protons emitted from the sun during solar cycle 20 (1965--1975). The depth-versus-activity data for these radionuclides in several lunar rocks were used to determine the fluxes of protons during solar cycle 19 (1954--1964). The average proton fluxes for cycle 19 are about five times those for both the last million years and for cycle 20. These solar-proton flux variations correlate with changes in sunspot activity.

Reedy, R.C.

1977-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

198

ARM - Measurement - Sensible heat flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govMeasurementsSensible heat flux govMeasurementsSensible heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Sensible heat flux The time rate of flow for the energy transferred from a warm or hot surface to whatever is touching it, typically air. Categories Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System EBBR : Energy Balance Bowen Ratio Station

199

Application of Gaussian Error Propagation Principles for Theoretical Assessment of Model Uncertainty in Simulated Soil Processes Caused by Thermal and Hydraulic Parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Statistical uncertainty in soil temperature and volumetric water content and related moisture and heat fluxes predicted by a state-of-the-art soil module [embedded in a numerical weather prediction (NWP) model] is analyzed by Gaussian error-...

Nicole Mölders; Mihailo Jankov; Gerhard Kramm

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Continental scale estimastes of the biotic carbon flux from land cover change: 1850 to 1980  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes a Numeric Data Package (NDP) that contains annual carbon flux estimates from land cover change for nine regions of the world (i.e., North America, Europe, the Former Soviet Union, Pacific Developed Region, China, South and Central America, North Africa-Middle East, Tropical Africa, and South and Southeast Asia). Annual rates of land cover change and vegetation-soil response curves for each region and ecosystem are included in the database. The vegetation-soil curves are used in a bookkeeping carbon model to estimate the carbon flux with the atmosphere from the clearing or degradation of vegetation, cultivation of soils, decay of dead vegetation, and the recovery of abandoned lands. The model calculates the net flux of carbon in each region based on land cover change rates and vegetation-soil response curves for the period 1850 to 1980 (a few regions have WA cover records beginning in 1700 and carbon flux estimates ending in 1990). These data were collected and modeled in an attempt to reduce the uncertainty associated with the magnitude and time course of the flux of carbon from terrestrial vegetation to the atmosphere.

Daniels, R.C. [ed.] [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Houghton, R.A.; Hackler, J.L. [Woods Hole Research Center, MA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Real-time measurement of soil attributes using on-the-go near infrared reflectance spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spatial variability of soil attributes is cost prohibitive to characterize using traditional soil sampling and laboratory analysis. Yet, the potential benefit of managing soils on a site-specific basis has been recognized. In addition, measurement ... Keywords: Decision support, Fuzzy clusters, Mapping soil properties, Precision agriculture, Principal component analysis, Soil sensors

C. D. Christy

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Hydrate Formation and Dissociation in Simulated and Field Samples  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Instrument Scientist: Ovidiu Garlea General Structure Analysis System3009-S3015 (2005) #12;Sample Handling 23 Special Thanks to the HFIR sample environment team: Chris

204

Anthrax Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anthrax Anthrax Sampling and Decontamination: Technology Trade-Offs Phillip N. Price, Kristina Hamachi, Jennifer McWilliams, and Michael D. Sohn Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley CA 94720 September 12, 2008 This work was supported by the Office of Science, Office of High Energy Physics, Homeland Security under the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH1123. Contents 1 Executive Summary 3 1.1 How much sampling is needed to decide if a building is safe? . . . . . . . 3 1.1.1 Sampling Nomogram . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 How many characterization samples should be taken? . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 What decontamination method should be used? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.4 Post-decontamination sampling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 1.5 What are rules of thumb for cost and effort? . . . . . . . . . . . .

205

Partitioning in trees and soil (PiTS) - a experimental approach to improve knowledge of forest carbon dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Summary The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on belowground C flux. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. A soil pit was dug adjacent to the trees to provide greater access belowground. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential, sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil C exchange rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The 13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. These data detail the timing and relative magnitude of C flux through a young pine stand in relation to environmental conditions. Refinement of belowground sampling will be necessary to adequately separate and quantify the flux of recently fixed C into roots, and fate of that new C as respiratory, mycorrhizal or exudative release, storage or partitioning into new root biomass.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Evans, R [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Estimation of Surface Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors reconsider the problem of estimating the sensible heat transfer at the earth's surface from direct measurements of turbulent fluxes in the atmospheric boundary layer. For simplicity, only horizontally homogeneous conditions are ...

Jielun Sun; Steven K. Esbensen; L. Mahrt

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Solar Wind Energy Flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Grid-Averaged Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the inadequacies of formulations for surface fluxes for use in numerical models of atmospheric flow. The difficulty is that numerical models imply spatial averaging over each grid area. Existing formulations am based on the ...

L. Mahrt

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Surface and Soil Cleanup at Brookhaven National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surface and Soil Projects Surface and Soil Projects placeholder Aerial view of capped landfills A major part of the overall site cleanup involved addressing contaminated soils, underground tanks, and waste storage areas. All of the major soil projects have now been completed, with the exception of some soils that will need to be cleaned up during the decommissioning of the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor and High Flux Beam Reactor. Following are a list of major surface and soil cleanup projects that have been completed since 1994: Three out-of-service 100,000 gallon aboveground waste tanks were removed and disposed of at a licensed off-site disposal facility. Sixteen underground storage tanks (USTs) were removed between 1988 and 2005 under the cleanup program. The project included the removal, transportation, and disposal of the tanks and approximately 4,000 cubic yards of soil and debris.

210

Sampling box  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Greenhouse gas fluxes following tillage and wetting in a wheat-fallow cropping system  

SciTech Connect

Little is known about the relative contributions of episodic tillage and precipitation events to annual greenhouse gas emissions from soil. Consequently, the authors measured carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), and methane (CH{sub 4}) fluxes from soil in a wheat-fallow cropping system in western Nebraska using vented surface chambers, before and immediately after tillage and wetting with 5.1 cm of water, during the fallow period in 1995/1996. Replicated fallow management treatments included no-tillage, subtillage, and plow representing a wide range in degree of soil disturbance. Soil bulk density, water-filled pore space, electrical conductivity (EC{sub 1:1}), nitrate (NO{sub 3}), and pH within the top 30.5 cm soil, and soil temperature at 0 to 7.6 cm were measured to assess their correlation with variations in gas flux and tillage and wetting. Atmospheric concentrations above the soil (at {approximately} 40 cm) increased by 15% for CO{sub 2} and 9 to 31% for N{sub 2}O and 6 to 16% for CH{sub 4} within 1 min after tillage and returned to background concentrations within 2 h. Except immediately after tillage, net CH{sub 4} flux was negative, from the atmosphere into soil, and is referred to as CH{sub 4} uptake. Overall, increases (1.5--4-fold) in CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O losses from soil, and CH{sub 4} uptake by soil were short lived and returned to background levels within 8 to 24 h after tillage. Losses of CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O increased to 1.7 and 5 times background emissions, respectively, for 24 h following wetting, while CH{sub 4} uptake declined by about 60% for 3 to 14 d after wetting. Water-filled pore space in the surface soil fell below 60% within 24 h after saturation and exhibited an inverse relationship (R{sup 2} = 0.66) with CH{sub 4} uptake. A significant decline in soil NO{sub 3} and EC{sub 1:1} in the top 7.6 cm occurred following wetting. Under the experimental conditions, and the expected frequency of tillage and wetting events, failure to include these short-lived episodic gas pulses in annual flux estimations may underestimate annual CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O loss up to 13 and 24%, respectively, and overestimate CH{sub 4} uptake by up to 18% in this cropping system.

Kessavalou, A.; Drijber, R.A. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Dept. of Agronomy; Doran, J.W. [Dept. of Agriculture, Lincoln, NE (United States)]|[Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States); Mosier, A.R. [Dept. of Agriculture, Fort Collins, CO (United States)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

Field, J.G.

1994-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Soils Collections Project Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Collections Soil Collections Soil Collections Overview Soil covers a major portion of the Earth's surface, and is an important natural resource that either directly or indirectly supports most of the planet's life. Soil is a mixture of mineral and organic materials plus air and water. The contents of soil vary by location and are constantly changing. The ORNL DAAC Soil Collections archive contains data on the physical and chemical properties of soils, including: soil carbon and nitrogen soil water-holding capacity soil respiration soil texture Most data sets are globally gridded, while a few are of a regional nature. Get Soils Data Find and order data sets: See list of data sets and download data Browse Soils Data Holdings by selected attributes Retrieve Soils data by FTP browse

214

A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Data > Regional/Global > Soil Collections > Guide Document Home > Data > Regional/Global > Soil Collections > Guide Document A Global Database of Soil Respiration Data, Version 2.0 Get Data Revision date: February 24, 2012 Summary This data set provides an updated soil respiration database (SRDB), a near-universal compendium of published soil respiration (RS) data. Soil respiration, the flux of autotrophically- and heterotrophically-generated CO2 from the soil to the atmosphere remains the least well-constrained component of the terrestrial C cycle. The database encompasses all published studies that report at least one of the following data measured in the field (not laboratory): annual RS, mean seasonal RS, a seasonal or annual partitioning of RS into its sources fluxes, RS temperature response (Q10), or RS at 10 degrees C. SRDB's orientation is thus to seasonal and

215

Implications of Parameter Uncertainty on Soil Moisture Drought Analysis in Germany  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulated soil moisture is increasingly used to characterize agricultural droughts but its parametric uncertainty, which essentially affects all hydrological fluxes and state variables, is rarely considered for identifying major drought events. In ...

Luis Samaniego; Rohini Kumar; Matthias Zink

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

DISCONNECTING OPEN SOLAR MAGNETIC FLUX  

SciTech Connect

Disconnection of open magnetic flux by reconnection is required to balance the injection of open flux by coronal mass ejections and other eruptive events. Making use of recent advances in heliospheric background subtraction, we have imaged many abrupt disconnection events. These events produce dense plasma clouds whose distinctive shape can now be traced from the corona across the inner solar system via heliospheric imaging. The morphology of each initial event is characteristic of magnetic reconnection across a current sheet, and the newly disconnected flux takes the form of a 'U-'shaped loop that moves outward, accreting coronal and solar wind material. We analyzed one such event on 2008 December 18 as it formed and accelerated at 20 m s{sup -2} to 320 km s{sup -1}, thereafter expanding self-similarly until it exited our field of view 1.2 AU from the Sun. From acceleration and photometric mass estimates we derive the coronal magnetic field strength to be 8 {mu}T, 6 R{sub Sun} above the photosphere, and the entrained flux to be 1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} Wb (1.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx). We model the feature's propagation by balancing inferred magnetic tension force against accretion drag. This model is consistent with the feature's behavior and accepted solar wind parameters. By counting events over a 36 day window, we estimate a global event rate of 1 day{sup -1} and a global solar minimum unsigned flux disconnection rate of 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} Wb yr{sup -1} (6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx yr{sup -1}) by this mechanism. That rate corresponds to {approx} - 0.2 nT yr{sup -1} change in the radial heliospheric field at 1 AU, indicating that the mechanism is important to the heliospheric flux balance.

DeForest, C. E.; Howard, T. A.; McComas, D. J. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States)

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O' Gallagher, J.J.

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

218

High flux solar energy transformation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O' Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

219

Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHS) in Surface Soil in Illinois  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One hundred sixty soil samples were collected and analyzed from sites in the State of Illinois as part of EPRI's nationwide study of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in surface soil. The samples were collected from 10 pseudo-randomly selected locations in 16 pseudo-randomly selected populated areas throughout the State, excluding the City of Chicago. At each location, the soils were logged and samples were collected from 0 to 15 cm below ground surface. At the laboratory, the soil samples were ana...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

220

Evaluating the JULES Land Surface Model Energy Fluxes Using FLUXNET Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface energy flux measurements from a sample of 10 flux network (FLUXNET) sites selected to represent a range of climate conditions and biome types were used to assess the performance of the Hadley Centre land surface model (Joint U.K. Land ...

Eleanor Blyth; John Gash; Amanda Lloyd; Matthew Pryor; Graham P. Weedon; Jim Shuttleworth

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation...

222

Selective leaching of uranium from uranium-contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

Three soils and a sediment contaminated with uranium were used to determine the effectiveness of sodium carbonate and citric acid leaching to decontaminate or remove uranium to acceptable regulatory levels. The objective was to selectively extract uranium using a soil washing/extraction process without seriously degrading the soil`s physicochemical characteristics or generating a secondary waste form that would be difficult to manage and/or dispose of. Two of the soils were surface soils from the DOE facility formerly called the Feed Materials Production Center (FMPC) at Fernald, Ohio. One of the soils is from near the Plant 1 storage pad and the other soil was taken from near a waste incinerator used to burn low-level contaminated trash. The third soil was a surface soil from an area formally used as a landfarm for the treatment of spent oils at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The sediment sample was material sampled from a storm sewer sediment trap at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. Uranium concentrations in the Fernald soils ranged from 450 to 550 {mu}g U/g of soil while the samples from the Y-12 Plant ranged from 150 to 200 {mu}g U/g of soil.

Francis, C.W.; Mattus, A.J.; Farr, L.L.; Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Elless, M.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge Associated Universities, Inc., TN (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Trapped-flux superconducting memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A memory cell based on trapped flux in superconductors has been built and tested. The cell is constructed entirely by vacuum evaporation of thin films and can be selected by coincident current or by other techniques, with drive-current requirements less ...

J. W. Crowe

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

The Boardman Regional Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A field campaign was carried out near Boardman, Oregon, to study the effects of subgrid-scale variability of sensible-and latent-heat fluxes on surface boundary-layer properties. The experiment involved three U.S. Department of Energy ...

J. C. Doran; J. M. Hubbe; R. R. Kirkham; W. J. Shaw; C. D. Whiteman; F. J. Barnes; D. Cooper; W. Porch; R. L. Coutler; D. R. Cook; R. L. Hart; W. Gao; T. J. Martin; J. D. Shannon; T. L. Crawford; D. D. Baldocchi; R. J. Dobosy; T. P. Meyers; L. Balick; W. A. Dugas; R. Hicks; L. Fritschen; L. Hipps; E. Swiatek; K. E. Kunkel

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The Antarctic Zone Flux Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In winter the eastern Weddell Sea in the Atlantic sector of the Southern Ocean hosts some of the most dynamic air-ice-sea interactions found on earth. Sea ice in the region is kept relatively thin by heat flux from below, maintained by upper-...

M. G. McPhee; S. F. Ackley; P. Guest; T. P. Stanton; B. A. Huber; D. G. Martinson; J. H. Morison; R. D. Muench; L. Padman

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

227

Superconducting flux flow digital circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

229

Landscape level differences in soil carbon and nitrogen: implications for soil carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to understand how land cover and topography act, independently or together, as determinants of soil carbon and nitrogen storage over a complex terrain. Such information could help to direct land management for the purpose of carbon sequestration. Soils were sampled under different land covers and at different topographic positions on the mostly forested 14,000 ha Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, USA. Most of the soil carbon stock, to a 40-cm soil depth, was found to reside in the surface 20 cm of mineral soil. Surface soil carbon and nitrogen stocks were partitioned into particulate ({ge}53 {micro}m) and mineral-associated organic matter (<53 {micro}m). Generally, soils under pasture had greater nitrogen availability, greater carbon and nitrogen stocks, and lower C:N ratios than soils under transitional vegetation and forests. The effects of topography were usually secondary to those of land cover. Because of greater soil carbon stocks, and greater allocation of soil carbon to mineral-associated organic matter (a long-term pool), we conclude that soil carbon sequestration, but not necessarily total ecosystem carbon storage, is greater under pastures than under forests. The implications of landscape-level variation in soil carbon and nitrogen for carbon sequestration are discussed at several different levels: (1) nitrogen limitations to soil carbon storage; (2) controls on soil carbon turnover as a result of litter chemistry and soil carbon partitioning; (3) residual effects of past land use history; and (4) statistical limitations to the quantification of soil carbon stocks.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Evaluating Soil Water Content in a WRF-NOAH Downscaling Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil water content (SWC) depends on and impacts the energy flux partitioning at the land atmosphere interface. Above all, the latent heat flux is limited by SWC of the root zone on the one hand side and radiation on the other hand side. Therefore ...

Peter Greve; Kirsten Warrach-Sagi; Volker Wulfmeyer

231

Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Mesoscale Simulation of Rapid Soil Drying and Its Implications for Predicting Daytime Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rapid soil-surface drying, which is called “decoupling,” accompanied by an increase in near-surface air temperature and sensible heat flux, is typically confined to the top 1–2 cm of the soil, while the deeper layers remain relatively moist. ...

Joseph A. Santanello Jr.; Toby N. Carlson

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Category:Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Category Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Field Sampling page? For detailed information on Field Sampling as exploration techniques, click here. Category:Field Sampling Add.png Add a new Field Sampling Technique Subcategories This category has the following 2 subcategories, out of 2 total. G [×] Gas Sampling‎ 3 pages W [×] Water Sampling‎ 2 pages Pages in category "Field Sampling" The following 4 pages are in this category, out of 4 total. G Gas Sampling R Rock Sampling S Soil Sampling W Water Sampling Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Field_Sampling&oldid=689818" Category: Field Techniques

234

Solar Glare and Flux Mapping  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SGFMT Home SGFMT Home Register Glare Analysis Solar Glare Hazard Analysis SGHAT 1.0 (old) Empirical Glare Analysis Analytical Glare Analysis PHLUX Mapping Reflectivity Calculator References Contact Us Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tools Measurement of reflected solar irradiance is receiving significant attention by industry, military, and government agencies to assess potential impacts of glint and glare from growing numbers of solar power installations around the world. In addition, characterization of the incident solar flux distribution on central receivers for concentrating solar power applications is important to monitor and maintain system performance. This website contains tools to evaluate solar glare and receiver irradiance. Register to access the tools Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool

235

The role of trace gas flux networks in biogeosciences  

SciTech Connect

Vast networks of meteorological sensors ring the globe, providing continuous measurements of an array of atmospheric state variables such as temperature, humidity, rainfall, and the concentration of carbon dioxide [New etal., 1999; Tans etal., 1996]. These measurements provide input to weather and climate models and are key to detecting trends in climate, greenhouse gases, and air pollution. Yet to understand how and why these atmospheric state variables vary in time and space, biogeoscientists need to know where, when, and at what rates important gases are flowing between the land and the atmosphere. Tracking trace gas fluxes provides information on plant or microbial metabolism and climate-ecosystem interactions. The existence of trace gas flux networks is a relatively new phenomenon, dating back to research in 1984. The first gas flux measurement networks were regional in scope and were designed to track pollutant gases such as sulfur dioxide, ozone, nitric acid, and nitrogen dioxide. Atmospheric observations and model simulations were used to infer the depositional rates of these hazardous chemicals [Fowler etal., 2009; Meyers etal., 1991]. In the late 1990s, two additional trace gas flux measurement networks emerged. One, the United States Trace Gas Network (TRAGNET), was a short-lived effort that measured trace gas emissions from the soil and plants with chambers distributed throughout the country [Ojima etal., 2000]. The other, FLUXNET, was an international endeavor that brought many regional networks together to measure the fluxes of carbon dioxide, water vapor, and sensible heat exchange with the eddy covariance technique [Baldocchi etal., 2001]. FLUXNET, which remains active today, currently includes more than 400 tower sites, dispersed across most of the world's climatic zones and biomes, with sites in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia. More recently, several specialized networks have emerged, including networks dedicated to urban areas (Urban Fluxnet), nitrogen compounds in Europe (NitroEurope), and methane (MethaneNet). Technical Aspects of Flux Networks Eddy covariance flux measurements are the preferred method by which biogeoscientists measure trace gas exchange between ecosystems and the atmosphere [Baldocchi, 2003].

Baldocch, Dennis [Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management, University of California, Berkeley,; Reichstein, Markus [Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry; Papale, D. [University of Tuscia; KOTEEN, LAURIE [University of California, Berkeley; VARGAS, RODRIGO [Ensenada Center for Scientific Research and Higher Education (CICESE); Agarwal, D.A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Cook, Robert B [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Urban Cloud Condensation Nuclei Spectral Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectral flux and the condensation nuclei (CN) flux from an urban area are determined from in situ aircraft measurements at Denver, Colorado. The concentration differences between upwind and downwind cross ...

Paul R. Frisbie; James G. Hudson

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

When Are Eddy Tracer Fluxes Directed Downgradient?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the direction of eddy tracer fluxes are examined using eddy-resolving isopycnic experiments for a cyclic zonal channel. Eddy fluxes are directed downgradient on average when either (i) there is a Lagrangian increase in ...

Chris Wilson; Richard G. Williams

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A summary of the methodologies used to estimate the soil fertility and soil loss constraints on crop residue removal for energy production is presented. Estimates of excess residue are developed for wheat in north-central Oklahoma and for corn and soybeans in central Iowa. These sample farming situations are analyzed in other research in the Analysis Division of the Solar Energy Research Institute.

Flaim, S.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

High-flux solar photon processes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was commissioned by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of identifying high-flux photoprocesses that would lead to beneficial national and commercial applications. The specific focus on high-flux photoprocesses is based on the recent development by NREL of solar concentrator technology capable of delivering record flux levels. We examined photolytic and photocatalytic chemical processes as well as photothermal processes in the search for processes where concentrated solar flux would offer a unique advantage. 37 refs.

Lorents, D C; Narang, S; Huestis, D C; Mooney, J L; Mill, T; Song, H K; Ventura, S [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

CRTF Real-Time Aperture Flux system  

SciTech Connect

The Real-Time Aperture Flux system (TRAF) is a test measurement system designed to determine the input power/unit area (flux density) during solar experiments conducted at the Central Receiver Test Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The RTAF is capable of using both thermal sensors and photon sensors to determine the flux densities in the RTAF measuring plane. These data are manipulated in various ways to derive input power and flux density distribution to solar experiments.

Davis, D.B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Maximizing Buoyancy Flux across Layered Geostrophic Sections  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For layered analogues of the ocean stratification, the problem of maximizing buoyancy flux across a section with zero mass flux is considered. The two layer situation on an f-plane is particularly simple and it is shown that the buoyancy flux is ...

Nelson G. Hogg; Henry M. Stommel

1990-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF WATER AND SOLUTE FLUXES USING A PASSIVE SURFACE WATER FLUX METER J Surface Water Flux Meter (PSFM). Current techniques for estimating contaminant mass inputs to impaired flux meter, MS Thesis, UF. This work was supported by the United States Department of Agriculture

Watson, Craig A.

243

The effect of young biochar on soil respiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low temperature pyrolysis of organic material produces biochar, a charcoal like substance. Biochar is being promoted as a soil amendment to enhance soil quality, it is also seen as a mechanism of lomg-term sequestration of carbon. Our experiments tested the hypothesis that biochar is inert in soil. However, we measured an increase in CO2 production from soils after biochar amendment which increased with increasing rates of biochar. The ?13C signature of the CO2 evolved in the first several days of the incubation was the same as the ?13C signature of the biochar, confirming that biochar contributed to the CO2 flux. This effect diminished by day 6 of the incubation suggesting that most of the biochar C is slowly decomposing. Thus, aside from this short term mineralization increasing soil C with biochar may indeed be a long term C storage mechanism.

Smith, Jeffery L.; Collins, Harold P.; Bailey, Vanessa L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

Sparks, Donald L.

245

Chromo-Electric flux tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The profiles of the chromo-electric field generated by static quark-antiquark, $Q{\\bar Q}$ and three-quark, $QQQ$ sources are calculated in Coulomb gauge. Using a variational ansatz for the ground state, we show that a flux tube-like structure emerges and combines to the ``Y''-shape field profile for three static quarks. The properties of the chromo-electric field are, however, not expected to be the same as those of the full action density or the Wilson line and the differences are discussed.

Patrick O. Bowman; Adam P. Szczepaniak

2004-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Transfer of Dissolved Cs-137 from Soil to Plants  

SciTech Connect

Rapidly maturing plants were grown simultaneously at the same experimental sites under natural conditions at the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. Roots of the plants were side by side in the soil. During two seasons we selected samples of the plants and of the soils several times every season. Content of Cs-137 in the plant and in the soil solution extracted from the samples of soils was measured. Results of measurements of the samples show that, for the experimental site, Cs-137 content in the plant varies with date of the sample selection. The plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio depends strongly on the date of selection and also on the type of soil. After analysis of the data we conclude that Cs-137 plant uptake is approximately proportional to the content of dissolved Cs-137 in the soil per unit of volume, and the plant:soil solution Cs-137 concentration ratio for the soil is approximately proportional to the soil moisture. (authors)

Prorok, V.V.; Melnichenko, L.Yu. [Department of Physics, Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv, 2, build. 1 Acad. Glushkov prospect, Kyiv-680 MSP (Ukraine); Mason, C.F.V. [Research Applications Corporation, 148 Piedra Loop, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Ageyev, V.A.; Ostashko, V.V. [Institute for Nuclear Research, 47 Nauky prospect, Kyiv-680 MSP (Ukraine)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

SOIL HEALTH AND SOIL QUALITY: A REVIEW  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil health is defined as the continued capacity of soil to function as a vital living system, by recognizing that it contains biological elements that are key to ecosystem function within land-use boundaries (Doran and Zeiss, 2000; Karlen et al., 2001). These functions are able to sustain biological productivity of soil, maintain the quality of surrounding air and water environments, as well as promote plant, animal, and human health (Doran et al., 1996). The concept of soil quality emerged in the literature in the early 1990s (Doran and Safely, 1997; Wienhold et al., 2004), and the first official application of the term was approved by the Soil Science Society of America Ad Hoc Committee on Soil Quality (S-581) and discussed by Karlen et al., (1997). Soil quality was been defined as ‘‘the capacity of a reference soil to function, within natural or managed ecosystem boundaries, to sustain plant and animal productivity, maintain or enhance water and air quality, and support human health and habitation.’ ’ Subsequently the two terms are used interchangeably (Karlen et al., 2001) although it is important to distinguish that, soil quality is related to soil function (Karlen et al., 2003; Letey et al, 2003), whereas soil

James Kinyangi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Reading Comprehension - Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Soil What Is Soil? Soil is the loose top layer of Earth's surface. Plants depend on soil. It holds them up. It provides them with food and water. Soil is made of _________ fungi humus particles . These very small pieces mostly come from rocks broken down by weathering. Other soil particles come from rotting remains of plants and animals. The part of soil that comes from living things is called _________ loam organic matter texture . Soil Life Many small organisms live in soil. They include worms, bacteria, and fungi. _________ Fungi Humus Particles are like plants, but they aren't green. And they have no leaves, flowers, or roots. The organisms feed on dead plants and animals. They cause them to _________ decay loam particles , or break down. The decayed plant and animal matter is called _________ fungi humus

249

Evaluation of Different Soil Carbon Determination Methods  

SciTech Connect

Determining soil carbon (C) with high precision is an essential requisite for the success of the terrestrial C sequestration program. The informed choice of management practices for different terrestrial ecosystems rests upon accurately measuring the potential for C sequestration. Numerous methods are available for assessing soil C. Chemical analysis of field-collected samples using a dry combustion method is regarded as the standard method. However, conventional sampling of soil and their subsequent chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. Furthermore, these methods are not sufficiently sensitive to identify small changes over time in response to alterations inmanagement practices or changes in land use. Presently, several different in situ analytic methods are being developed purportedly offering increased accuracy, precision and cost-effectiveness over traditional ex situ methods. We consider that, at this stage, a comparative discussion of different soil C determination methods will improve the understanding needed to develop a standard protocol.

Chatterjee, Dr Amitava [Ohio State University; Lal, Dr R [Ohio State University; Wielopolski, Dr L [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Ebinger, Dr Michael H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In September 2008 Hurricane Ike hit the Texas Gulf Coast with a force stronger than the category 2 storm at which it was rated. With a 3.8 m (12.5 ft) storm surge, the agricultural industry in the area was devastated. The goal of this research was to determine the length of time required to reduce the salt levels brought by the storm surge to near pre-hurricane levels. To do this, four sets of samples were taken across two years and analyzed for salinity using the saturated paste extract method. The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 79% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 30% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In April 2009, 38% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 13% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 71% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 39% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By December 2009, none of the soils sampled in the edge area had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. In the surge area 21% of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 33% in the 15-30 cm horizons had an ECe >= 4 dS/m. By October 2010, all soils sampled had leached sufficient salts to be classified as non-saline to very slightly saline soils. Utilizing the November 2008 data set, 28 random samples were selected for exchangeable Na percent (ESP) in order to develop the ESP-SAR (Na adsorption ratio) predictive equation, ESP= 1.19(SAR)^0.82. The SAR-ESP relationship is statistically significant (95% confidence level), with a correlation coefficient of 0.964 (df=26).

Mueller, Ryan

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

AN ESTIMATE OF THE DETECTABILITY OF RISING FLUX TUBES  

SciTech Connect

The physics of the formation of magnetic active regions (ARs) is one of the most important problems in solar physics. One main class of theories suggests that ARs are the result of magnetic flux that rises from the tachocline. Time-distance helioseismology, which is based on measurements of wave propagation, promises to allow the study of the subsurface behavior of this magnetic flux. Here, we use a model for a buoyant magnetic flux concentration together with the ray approximation to show that the dominant effect on the wave propagation is expected to be from the roughly 100 m s{sup -1} retrograde flow associated with the rising flux. Using a B-spline-based method for carrying out inversions of wave travel times for flows in spherical geometry, we show that at 3 days before emergence the detection of this retrograde flow at a depth of 30 Mm should be possible with a signal-to-noise level of about 8 with a sample of 150 emerging ARs.

Birch, A. C.; Braun, D. C. [NWRA, CoRA Division, 3380 Mitchell Lane, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States); Fan, Y., E-mail: aaronb@cora.nwra.co [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

253

Soil microbial biomass: an estimator of soil development in reclaimed lignite mine soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A two-year study was conducted at the Big Brown lignite mine in Fairfield, Texas, to determine the rate and extent of recovery of the soil microbial biomass (SMB) in mixed overburden. The relationships between SMB carbon (SMBC), basal respiration and soil organic carbon (SOC) accretion was evaluated using the respiratory quotient (qCO2) and the ratio of the SMB to SOC (SMBC:SOC ratio). Newly leveled, 1-, 3-, 5-, 10-, 15-, and 23-year-old reclaimed mixed overburden as well as an unmined soil were sampled bimonthly to measure SMIBC and other parameters. Three methods [chloroform fumigation incubation (FI), chloroform fumigation extraction (FE), and substrate-induced respiration (SIR)] were used to measure SMB and compared as estimators of SMB in reclaimed mine soils. Basal respiration (CO2 evolved from untreated soil), metabolic quotient (i.e. specific respiratory activity; qCO2; C02 produced per unit mass of SMB), and the SMBC:SOC ratio (the abundance of SMB relative to SOC) were used to determine trends in microbial biomass dynamics relative to SOC accumulation. A nearly linear increase in SMB was observed over the chronosequence of mine soils (r--O.98 to 0.99) for each of the three biomass methods. Mean values of SMB from 12 sample dates ranged from 41 pg SMIBC g-1 at the 0-year site to 291 ptg SMBC g-' at the 23-year site. The unmined reference soil averaged 84 jig SMBC g-1 through the period of the study. The qCO2 declined from 0.24 to 0. 12 Mg C02-C Mg SMBC d-' during the first year and tended to stabilize near 0.06 to 0.09 as reclaimed sites matured. The ratios of SMBC:SOC increased linearly with age of site through 23 years (r--O. 97). A substantial amount of seasonal variation in SMB was observed during the two-year study. Older sites (15-and 23-years) showed significant fluctuations of SMB that correlated well with the growing season of Coastal bermudagrass. Microbial biomass peaked during mid to late summer and declined to a minimum during the cold, wet winter months. Younger sites were less affected by seasonal influences, and changes at these sites appeared more related to changes in soil moisture.

Swanson, Eric Scott

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models  

SciTech Connect

In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

256

Mass Transport within Soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physic

McKone, Thomas E.

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Predicting Low Flux High - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High flux can access high fluence, but such TTS data is under-predicted by current ... on Defect Migration and Void Formation using the Phase Field Method.

258

Flux: for brass quintet with analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper will examine the piece Flux: for Brass Quintet, completed in the spring of 2010 by Robert DeVet. It will first examine the system… (more)

Devet, Robert

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

260

Vector Representation of Trade Cumulus Thermodynamic Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vector representation of the BOMEX thermodynamic budget data is presented which shows graphically the relationship of the fluxes and the mean layer structure.

Alan K. Betts

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HFIR Working with HFIR Neutron imaging offers new tools for exploring artifacts and ancient technology Home | User Facilities | HFIR HFIR | High Flux Isotope Reactor SHARE The High...

262

Evaluating the Performance of a Surface Barrier on Reducing Soil-Water Flow  

SciTech Connect

One of the most common effective techniques for contaminant remediation in the vadose zone is to use a surface barrier to reduce or eliminate soil-water flow to reduce the contaminant flux to the underlying groundwater. Confirming the reduction of the soil-water flux rate is challenging because of the difficulty of determining the very low soil-water flux beneath the barrier. We propose a hydraulic-conductivity factor, fK, as a conservative indicator for quantifying the reduction of soil-water flow. The factor can be calculated using the measured soil-water content or pressure but does not require the knowledge of the saturated hydraulic conductivity or the hydraulic gradient. The formulas were tested by comparing with changes in hydraulic conductivity, K, from a drainage experiment. The pressure-based formula was further applied to evaluate the performance of the interim surface barrier at T Tank Farm on Hanford Site. Three years after barrier emplacement, the hydraulic conductivity decreased by a factor between 3.8 and 13.0 at the 1-, 2- and 5-m depths. The difference between the conductivity-reduction factor and the flux-rate-reduction factor, fq, was quantified with a numerical simulation. With the calculated fK, the numerically determined fK/fq ratio, and the assumed pre-barrier soil-water flux rate of 100 mm yr-1, the estimated soil-water flux rate 3 years after barrier emplacement was no more than 8.5 mm yr-1 at or above the 5-m depth.

Zhang, Z. F.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Field, Jim G.; Parker, Danny L.; Clayton, Ray E.

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

A Comparison of Latent Heat Fluxes over Global Oceans for Four Flux Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ocean surface latent heat flux (LHF) plays an essential role in global energy and water cycle variability. In this study, monthly LHF over global oceans during 1992–93 are compared among Goddard Satellite-Based Surface Turbulent Fluxes, ...

Shu-Hsien Chou; Eric Nelkin; Joe Ardizzone; Robert M. Atlas

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

What is a flux tube? On the magnetic field topology of buoyant flux structures Fausto Cattaneo study the topology of field lines threading buoyant magnetic flux struc- tures. The magnetic structures ­ Sun: interior ­ Sun: magnetic fields ­ Stars: spots 1 Current address: Department of Mathematics

266

Skew Fluxes in Polarized Wave Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scalar flux due to small amplitude waves that exhibit a preferred sense of rotation or polarization is shown to consist of a component. FS, that is skewed, being everywhere orthogonal to the mean scalar gradient, Q. The skew flux is ...

John F. Middleton; John W. Loder

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

METHOD AND FLUX COMPOSITION FOR TREATING URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

ABS>A flux composition is described fer use with molten uranium or uranium alloys. The flux consists of about 46 weight per cent calcium fiuoride, 46 weight per cent magnesium fluoride and about 8 weight per cent of uranium tetrafiuoride.

Foote, F.

1958-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

ARM - Evaluation Product - Critical soil quantities for describing land  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land ProductsCritical soil quantities for describing land properties Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Critical soil quantities for describing land properties 1994.01.01 - 2012.12.31 Site(s) SGP General Description The ARMBELAND is a subset of the ARM Best Estimate (ARMBE) products for supporting community land-atmospheric research and land model developments. It contains several critical soil quantities that ARM has been measuring for many years for describing land properties. The quantities in ARMBE-Land are averaged over one hour time interval, consistent with other ARMBE datasets. It is recommended to use with other ARMBE data products such as ARMBECLDRAD (cloud and radiative fluxes) and ARMBEATM (surface

269

High resolution analysis of soil elements with laser-induced breakdown  

SciTech Connect

The invention is a system and method of detecting a concentration of an element in a soil sample wherein an opening or slot is formed in a container that supports a soil sample that was extracted from the ground whereupon at least a length of the soil sample is exposed via the opening. At each of a plurality of points along the exposed length thereof, the soil sample is ablated whereupon a plasma is formed that emits light characteristic of the elemental composition of the ablated soil sample. Each instance of emitted light is separated according to its wavelength and for at least one of the wavelengths a corresponding data value related to the intensity of the light is determined. As a function of each data value a concentration of an element at the corresponding point along the length of the soil core sample is determined.

Ebinger, Michael H. (Santa Fe, NM); Harris, Ronny D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

270

Soil chemical properties of the residuum of Callaway County, Missouri  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil samples of Callaway County, Missouri, were analyzed for soil pH, clay mineralogy, free iron and manganese oxides, total organic carbon content (TOC), and cation exchange capacity (CEC). The soil samples represent Ordovician, Devonian, Mississippian and Pennsylvanian residuum. In addition, alluvium, loess, colluvium and glacial till samples were analyzed. The clay minerals consist of kaolinite, illite, smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers, iron and manganese oxide content ranges from 0.137 to 2.87% and 0.003 to 0.082% respectively, while TOC values range from 0.03 to 3.00%. The CEC values show a wide range from 5 to 89 milliequivalent/100 grams. The influence of the different soil constituents on the adsorption capacity of the soils is evaluated.

Biggs, T.C. (REACT Environmental Engineers, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Bolter, E. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

High Flux Beam Reactor | Environmental Restoration Projects ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reports HFBR Waste Loading Area, Soil Remediation (PDF) - July 2009 HFBR Decommissioning Project, Removal of the Control Rod Blades and Beam Plugs (PDF) - January 2010...

272

Experimental unsaturated soil mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this general report, experimental systems and procedures of investigating the hydro-mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented. The water retention properties of unsaturated soils are commented and linked to various physical parameters and properties of the soils. Techniques of controlling suction are described together with their adaptation in various laboratory testing devices. Some typical features of the mechanical behaviour of unsaturated soils are presented within an elasto-plastic framework. An attempt to describe the numerous and significant recent advances in the investigation of the behaviour of unsaturated soils, including the contributions to this Conference, is proposed.

Delage, Pierre

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

ON THE ERUPTION OF CORONAL FLUX ROPES  

SciTech Connect

We present three-dimensional MHD simulations of the evolution of the magnetic field in the corona where the emergence of a twisted magnetic flux tube is driven at the lower boundary into a pre-existing coronal potential arcade field. Through a sequence of simulations in which we vary the amount of twisted flux transported into the corona before the emergence is stopped, we investigate the conditions that lead to a dynamic eruption of the resulting coronal flux rope. It is found that the critical condition for the onset of eruption is for the center of the flux rope to reach a critical height at which the corresponding potential field declines with height at a sufficiently steep rate, consistent with the onset of the torus instability of the flux rope. In some cases, immediately after the emergence is stopped, the coronal flux rope first settles into a quasi-static rise with an underlying sigmoid-shaped current layer developing. Preferential heating of field lines going through this current layer may give rise to the observed quiescent X-ray sigmoid loops before eruption. Reconnections in the current layer during the initial quasi-static stage is found to add detached flux to the coronal flux rope, allowing it to rise quasi-statically to the critical height and dynamic eruption of the flux rope then ensues. By identifying field lines whose tops are in the most intense part of the current layer during the eruption, we deduce the evolution and morphology of the post-flare X-ray loops and the flare ribbons at their footpoints.

Fan, Y. [High Altitude Observatory, National Center for Atmospheric Research, 3080 Center Green Drive, Boulder, CO 80301 (United States)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

CO{sub 2} flux measurements across portions of the Dixie Valley geothermal system, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A map of the CO{sub 2} flux across a newly formed area of plant kill in the NW part of the Dixie Valley geothermal system was constructed to monitor potential growth of a fumarole field. Flux measurements were recorded using a LI-COR infrared analyzer. Sample locations were restricted to areas within and near the dead zone. The data delineate two areas of high CO{sub 2} flux in different topographic settings. Older fumaroles along the Stillwater range front produce large volumes of CO{sub 2} at high temperatures. High CO{sub 2} flux values were also recorded at sites along a series of recently formed ground fractures at the base of the dead zone. The two areas are connected by a zone of partial plant kill and moderate flux on an alluvial fan. Results from this study indicate a close association between the range front fumaroles and the dead zone fractures. The goals of this study are to characterize recharge to the geothermal system, provide geochemical monitoring of reservoir fluids and to examine the temporal and spatial distribution of the CO{sub 2} flux in the dead zone. This paper reports the results of the initial CO{sub 2} flux measurements taken in October, 1997.

Bergfeld, D.; Goff, F. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Earth and Environmental Sciences Div.; Janik, C.J. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Johnson, S.D. [Oxbow Power Services, Reno, NV (United States)

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

275

FLUX EMERGENCE IN A MAGNETIZED CONVECTION ZONE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the influence of a dynamo magnetic field on the buoyant rise and emergence of twisted magnetic flux ropes and their influence on the global external magnetic field. We ran three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations using the ASH code (anelastic spherical harmonics) and analyzed the dynamical evolution of such buoyant flux ropes from the bottom of the convection zone until the post-emergence phases. The global nature of this model can only very crudely and inaccurately represent the local dynamics of the buoyant rise of the implanted magnetic structure, but nonetheless allows us to study the influence of global effects, such as self-consistently generated differential rotation and meridional circulation, and of Coriolis forces. Although motivated by the solar context, this model cannot be thought of as a realistic model of the rise of magnetic structures and their emergence in the Sun, where the local dynamics are completely different. The properties of initial phases of the buoyant rise are determined essentially by the flux-rope's properties and the convective flows and consequently are in good agreement with previous studies. However, the effects of the interaction of the background dynamo field become increasingly strong as the flux ropes evolve. During the buoyant rise across the convection zone, the flux-rope's magnetic field strength scales as B{proportional_to}{rho}{sup {alpha}}, with {alpha} {approx}current density is observed to precede flux emergence at all longitudes. The geometry, latitude, and relative orientation of the flux ropes with respect to the background magnetic field influences the resulting rise speeds, zonal flow amplitudes (which develop within the flux ropes), and the corresponding surface signatures. This influences the morphology, duration and amplitude of the surface shearing, and the Poynting flux associated with magnetic flux-rope emergence. The emerged magnetic flux influences the system's global polarity, leading in some cases to a polarity reversal while inhibiting the background dynamo from doing so in others. The emerged magnetic flux is slowly advected poleward while being diffused and assimilated by the background dynamo field.

Pinto, R. F.; Brun, A. S., E-mail: rui.pinto@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM Paris-Saclay, CEA/Irfu Universite Paris-Diderot CNRS/INSU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook  

SciTech Connect

The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

Cook, DR

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

277

Intercomparison of Various Surface Latent Heat Flux Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Japanese Ocean Flux Data Sets with use of Remote Sensing Observations (J-OFURO) latent heat flux field is compared with the Hamburg Ocean–Atmosphere Parameters and Fluxes from Satellite Data (HOAPS), the Goddard Satellite-Based Surface ...

Masahisa Kubota; Atsuko Kano; Hidenori Muramatsu; Hiroyuki Tomita

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Gravity Wave 1-leat Fluxes: A Lagrangian Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of a vertically propagating, internal gravity wave on the vertical flux of potential temperature (heat) is considered by averaging the local heat flux vector over a potential temperature surface. This approach gives the wave heat flux ...

Lawrence Coy; David C. Fritts

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Acceptance sampling methods for sample results verification  

SciTech Connect

This report proposes a statistical sampling method for use during the sample results verification portion of the validation of data packages. In particular, this method was derived specifically for the validation of data packages for metals target analyte analysis performed under United States Environmental Protection Agency Contract Laboratory Program protocols, where sample results verification can be quite time consuming. The purpose of such a statistical method is to provide options in addition to the ``all or nothing`` options that currently exist for sample results verification. The proposed method allows the amount of data validated during the sample results verification process to be based on a balance between risks and the cost of inspection.

Jesse, C.A.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Role of organic soils in the world carbon cycle: problem analysis and research needs  

SciTech Connect

In May 1979, The Institute of Ecology held a workshop to determine the role of organic soils in the global carbon cycle and to ascertain their past, present and future significance in world carbon flux. Wetlands ecologists and soil scientists who participated in the workshop examined such topics as Soils as Sources of Atmospheric CO/sub 2/, Organic Soils, Primary Production and Growth of Wetlands Ecosystems, and Management of Peatlands. The major finding of the workshop is that the organic soils are important in the overall carbon budget. Histosols and Gleysols, the major organic soil deposits of the world, normally sequester organic carbon fixed by plants. They may now be releasing enough carbon to account for nearly 10% of the annual rise in atmospheric content of CO/sub 2/.

Armentano, T.V. (ed.)

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Cloud Identification for ERBE Radiative Flux Retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Derivation of top of atmosphere radiative fluxes requires the use of measured satellite radiances and assumptions about the anisotropy of the Earth's radiation field. The primary modification of the Earth's anisotropy is caused by variations in ...

Bruce A. Wielicki; Richard N. Green

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A low cost high flux solar simulator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

Codd, Daniel S.

284

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

depending on local availability. An automated version of the soil textural classification triangle shownNeill, J. (1994). Reclaiming disturbed land for forestry. Forestry Commission Bulletin 110. HMSO, London

286

Search for stable Strange Quark Matter in lunar soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results from a search for strangelets (small chunks of Strange Quark Matter) in lunar soil using the Yale WNSL accelerator as a mass spectrometer. We have searched over a range in mass from A=42 to A=70 amu for nuclear charges 5, 6, 8, 9, and 11. No strangelets were found in the experiment. For strangelets with nuclear charge 8, a concentration in lunar soil higher than $10^{-16}$ is excluded at the 95% confidence level. The implied limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays is the most sensitive to date for the covered range and is relevant to both recent theoretical flux predictions and a strangelet candidate event found by the AMS-01 experiment.

Ke Han; Jeffrey Ashenfelter; Alexei Chikanian; William Emmet; Evan Finch; Andreas Heinz; Jes Madsen; Richard Majka; Benjamin Monreal; Jack Sandweiss

2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

287

Search for stable Strange Quark Matter in lunar soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report results from a search for strangelets (small chunks of Strange Quark Matter) in lunar soil using the Yale WNSL accelerator as a mass spectrometer. We have searched over a range in mass from A=42 to A=70 amu for nuclear charges 5, 6, 8, 9, and 11. No strangelets were found in the experiment. For strangelets with nuclear charge 8, a concentration in lunar soil higher than $10^{-16}$ is excluded at the 95% confidence level. The implied limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays is the most sensitive to date for the covered range and is relevant to both recent theoretical flux predictions and a strangelet candidate event found by the AMS-01 experiment.

Han, Ke; Chikanian, Alexei; Emmet, William; Finch, Evan; Heinz, Andreas; Madsen, Jes; Majka, Richard; Monreal, Benjamin; Sandweiss, Jack

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

RADIATION FROM COMOVING POYNTING FLUX ACCELERATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with particle-in-cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison; Noguchi, Koichi [Rice University, Houston TX 77005-1892 (United States)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

289

Radiation from Comoving Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the radiation power output when electrons are accelerated by a relativistic comoving kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these analytic results with Particle-In-Cell simulations. We also derive analytically the critical frequency of the radiation spectrum. Potential astrophysical applications of these results are discussed. A quantitative model of gamma-ray bursts based on the breakout of kinetic Poynting flux is presented.

Liang, Edison

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 23 Plant and Soil An International Journal on Plant-Soil Relationships ISSN 0032-079X Plant Soil DOI 10.1007/s11104-012-1353-x Seedling growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree growth and soil nutrient availability in exotic and native tree species: implications for afforestation

Neher, Deborah A.

291

Sigma Mesa: Background elemental concentrations in soil and vegetation, 1979  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In 1979, soil and vegetation samples were collected on Sigma Mesa to provide background data before construction on the mesa. Elemental data are presented for soil, grass, juniper, pinon pine, and oak. None of the data looks out of the ordinary. The purpose of the sampling program was to acquire, before any disturbance, a set of data to be used as background for future impact analysis. 6 refs., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

Ferenbaugh, R.W.; Gladney, E.S.; Brooks, G.H. Jr.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil  

SciTech Connect

Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

293

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

294

John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Flux Coupling Machines and Switched Reluctance Motors to Replace Permanent Magnets in Electric Vehicles John Hsu, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Flux Coupling Machines and...

295

Electric Flux Tube in Magnetic Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study a methodical problem related to the magnetic scenario recently suggested and initiated by the authors \\cite{Liao_ES_mono} to understand the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma (sQGP): the electric flux tube in monopole plasma. A macroscopic approach, interpolating between Bose condensed (dual superconductor) and classical gas medium is developed first. Then we work out a microscopic approach based on detailed quantum mechanical calculation of the monopole scattering on electric flux tube, evaluating induced currents for all partial waves. As expected, the flux tube looses its stability when particles can penetrate it: we make this condition precise by calculating the critical value for the product of the flux tube size times the particle momentum, above which the flux tube dissolves. Lattice static potentials indicate that flux tubes seem to dissolve at $T>T_{dissolution} \\approx 1.3 T_c$. Using our criterion one gets an estimate of the magnetic density $n\\approx 4.4 \\sim 6.6 fm^{-3}$ a...

Liao Jin Feng

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Groundwater Sampling and Analysis Sourcebook for Nuclear Power Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This sourcebook provides technical guidance and best practices for groundwater sampling and analysis at nuclear power plants. Robust sampling and analysis protocols are required to ensure accurate characterization of radionuclides in groundwater.BackgroundNuclear power plants implement groundwater protection programs to minimize contamination of on-site soil and groundwater, and to prevent the off-site migration of licensed material through groundwater ...

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

297

Modeling and application of soil moisture at varying spatial scales with parameter scaling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation focuses on characterization of subpixel variability within a satellite-based remotely sensed coarse-scale soil moisture footprint. The underlying heterogeneity of coarse-scale soil moisture footprint is masked by the area-integrated properties within the sensor footprint. Therefore, the soil moisture values derived from these measurements are an area average. The variability in soil moisture within the footprint is introduced by inherent spatial variability present in rainfall, and geophysical parameters (vegetation, topography, and soil). The geophysical parameters/variables typically interact in a complex fashion to make soil moisture evolution and dependent processes highly variable, and also, introduce nonlinearity across spatio-temporal scales. To study the variability and scaling characteristics of soil moisture, a quasi-distributed Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere-Transfer (SVAT) modeling framework is developed to simulate the hydrological dynamics, i.e., the fluxes and the state variables within the satellite-based soil moisture footprint. The modeling framework is successfully tested and implemented in different hydroclimatic regions during the research. New multiscale data assimilation and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) techniques in conjunction with the SVAT modeling framework are developed to quantify subpixel variability and assess multiscale soil moisture fields within the coarse-scale satellite footprint. Reasonable results demonstrate the potential to use these techniques to validate multiscale soil moisture data from future satellite mission e.g., Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission of NASA. The results also highlight the physical controls of geophysical parameters on the soil moisture fields for various hydroclimatic regions. New algorithm that uses SVAT modeling framework is also proposed and its application demonstrated, to derive the stochastic soil hydraulic properties (i.e., saturated hydraulic conductivity) and surface features (i.e., surface roughness and volume scattering) related to radar remote sensing of soil moisture.

Das, Narendra Narayan

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 | Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sample Preparation Laboratory Training - Course 204 Who Should Attend This course is mandatory for: SLAC employees and non-employees who need unescorted access to SSRL or LCLS...

299

ENVIRONMENTAL EVALUATION FOR UTILIZATION OF ASH IN SOIL STABILIZATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA) approved the use of coal ash in soil stabilization, indicating that environmental data needed to be generated. The overall project goal is to evaluate the potential for release of constituents into the environment from ash used in soil stabilization projects. Supporting objectives are: (1) To ensure sample integrity through implementation of a sample collection, preservation, and storage protocol to avoid analyte concentration or loss. (2) To evaluate the potential of each component (ash, soil, water) of the stabilized soil to contribute to environmental release of analytes of interest. (3) To use laboratory leaching methods to evaluate the potential for release of constituents to the environment. (4) To facilitate collection of and to evaluate samples from a field runoff demonstration effort. The results of this study indicated limited mobility of the coal combustion fly ash constituents in laboratory tests and the field runoff samples. The results presented support previous work showing little to negligible impact on water quality. This and past work indicates that soil stabilization is an environmentally beneficial CCB utilization application as encouraged by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This project addressed the regulatory-driven environmental aspect of fly ash use for soil stabilization, but the demonstrated engineering performance and economic advantages also indicate that the use of CCBs in soil stabilization can and should become an accepted engineering option.

David J. Hassett; Loreal V. Heebink

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

APPENDIX K: SOILS INFORMATION  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

limitations affecting various uses. Soil scientists observed the steepness, length, and shape of the slopes; the general pattern of drainage; the kinds of crops and native plants;...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Building Fertile Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

Lindsey, Ann

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Sampling Turbulent Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently it has been argued that in many regions of the ocean the Osborn–Cox model accurately determines the total long-term diapycnal flux of a tracer ? if the mean gradient and dissipation in the model are long-time averages. The mean gradient ...

Russ E. Davis

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Measurement of the Atmospheric $?_e$ flux in IceCube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496 $\\pm$ 66(stat.) $\\pm$ 88(syst.) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range.

IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose1; S. Boser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Diaz-Velez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegard; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glusenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; A. Gross; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Klas; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Kohne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Kopke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lunemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Meszaros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Perez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Radel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schoneberg; L. Schonherr; A. Schonwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stoss; E. A. Strahler; R. Strom; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge1; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

304

Soil–Atmosphere Exchange of Nitrous Oxide, Nitric Oxide, Methane, and Carbon Dioxide in Logged and Undisturbed Forest in the Tapajos National Forest, Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective logging is an extensive land use in the Brazilian Amazon region. The soil–atmosphere fluxes of nitrous oxide (N2O), nitric oxide (NO), methane (CH4), and carbon dioxide (CO2) are studied on two soil types (clay Oxisol and sandy loam ...

Michael Keller; Ruth Varner; Jadson D. Dias; Hudson Silva; Patrick Crill; Raimundo Cosme de Oliveira Jr.; Gregory P. Asner

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Modeling of Energy, Water, and CO2 Flux in a Temperate Grassland Ecosystem with SiB2: May–October 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Simple Biosphere Model, version 2 (SiB2), was designed for use within atmospheric general circulation models as a soil–vegetation–atmosphere transfer scheme that includes CO2 flux prediction. A stand-alone version of SiB2 was used to simulate ...

G. D. Colello; C. Grivet; P. J. Sellers; J. A. Berry

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Mercury In Soils Of The Long Valley, California, Geothermal System | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In Soils Of The Long Valley, California, Geothermal System In Soils Of The Long Valley, California, Geothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Mercury In Soils Of The Long Valley, California, Geothermal System Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: An evaluation of the Hg distribution in soils of the Long Valley, California, geothermal area, was made. A1-horizon soil samples were collected utilizing a grid system from the resurgent dome area and the Long Valley area. In addition, samples were collected in five traverses across three fault systems and four traverses across east-west-oriented gullies to measure the importance of aspect. Additional samples were collected in an analysis of variance design to evaluate natural variability in soil composition with sampling interval distance. The primary objectives of this

307

Micrometeorological and Soil Data for Calculating Evapotranspiration for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada 2002-05.  

SciTech Connect

Micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at two instrumented sites on Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site, January 1, 2002/August 23, 2005. Data collected at each site include net radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity at two heights; wind speed and direction; subsurface soil heat flux; subsurface soil temperature; volumetric soil water; and matric water potential. These data were used to estimate 20-minute average and daily average evapotranspiration values. The data presented in this report are collected and calculated evapotranspiration rates.

Guy A. DeMeo; Alan L. Flint; Randell J. Laczniak; Walter E. Nylund

2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

308

Underground particle fluxes in the Soudan mine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This is a summary of our knowledge of the underground particle fluxes in the vicinity of Soudan 2 and of the future MINOS detector. It includes a brief description of the measured muon fluxes and of the gamma ray spectra deduced from measurements of 238 U, 232 Th and 40 K concentrations in the rock. Counting rates in gaseous and scintillation detectors are estimated. Some data on what is known about the chemical composition of the local rocks are included; these are relevant to an understanding of the underground muon rates and also to a calculation of low energy neutron fluxes. 1 Introduction As plans for the MINOS detector and for the excavation of a new detector hall progress, some people have begun asking what is known of the fluxes of various particles underground. The muon flux is relevant for possibly calibrating and certainly for monitoring the long term behavior of the detector. It will likely be the determining factor in the eventual trigger rate if the MINOS det...

Keith Ruddick; Keith Ruddick; Th

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Vaporization, dispersion, and radiant fluxes from LPG spills. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect

Both burning and non-burning spills of LPG (primarily propane) were studied. Vaporization rates for propane spills on soil, concrete, insulating concrete, asphalt, sod, wood, and polymer foams were measured. Thermal conductivity, heat transfer coefficients, and steady state vaporization rates were determined. Vapor concentrations were measured downwind of open propane pools and a Gaussian dispersion model modified for area sources provided a good correlation of measured concentrations. Emitted and incident radiant fluxes from propane fires were measured. Simplified flame radiation models were adequate for predicting radiant fluxes. Tests in which propane was sprayed into the air showed that at moderately high spray rates all the propane flashed to vapor or atomized; no liquid collected on the ground.

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Effects of Heavy, Tracked-Vehicle Disturbance on Forest Soil Properties at Fort Benning, Georgia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to describe the effects of heavy, tracked-vehicle disturbance on various measures of soil quality in training compartment K-11 at Fort Benning, Georgia. Predisturbance soil sampling in April and October of 2002 indicated statistically significant differences in soil properties between upland and riparian sites. Soil density was less at riparian sites, but riparian soils had significantly greater C and N concentrations and stocks than upland soils. Most of the C stock in riparian soils was associated with mineral-associated organic matter (i.e., the silt + clay fraction physically separated from whole mineral soil). Topographic differences in soil N availability were highly dependent on the time of sampling. Riparian soils had higher concentrations of extractable inorganic N than upland soils and also exhibited significantly greater soil N availability during the spring sampling. The disturbance experiment was performed in May 2003 by driving a D7 bulldozer through the mixed pine/hardwood forest. Post-disturbance sampling was limited to upland sites because training with heavy, tracked vehicles at Fort Benning is generally confined to upland soils. Soil sampling approximately one month after the experiment indicated that effects of the bulldozer were limited primarily to the forest floor (O-horizon) and the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil. O-horizon dry mass and C stocks were significantly reduced, relative to undisturbed sites, and there was an indication of reduced mineral soil C stocks in the disturbance zone. Differences in the surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil also indicated a significant increase in soil density as a result of disturbance by the bulldozer. Although there was some tendency for greater soil N availability in disturbed soils, the changes were not significantly different from undisturbed controls. It is expected that repeated soil disturbance over time, which will normally occur in a military training area, would simply intensify the changes in soil properties that were measured following a one-time soil disturbance at the K-11 training compartment. The experiment was also useful for identifying soil measurements that are particularly sensitive to disturbance and therefore can be used successfully as indicators of a change in soil properties as a result of heavy, tracked-vehicle traffic at Fort Benning. Measurements related to total O-horizon mass and C concentrations or stocks exhibited changes that ranged from {approx}25 to 75% following the one-time disturbance. Changes in surface (0-10 cm) mineral soil density or measures of surface soil C and N following the disturbance were less remarkable and ranged from {approx}15 to 45% (relative to undisturbed controls). Soil N availability (measured as initial extractable soil N or N production in laboratory incubations) was the least sensitive and the least useful indicator for detecting a change in soil quality. Collectively, the results suggest that the best indicators of a change in soil quality will be found at the soil surface because there were no statistically significant effects of bulldozer disturbance at soil depths below 10 cm.

Garten, C.T.,JR.

2004-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Micrometeorological Facility for Eddy Flux Measurements of CO2 and H2O  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based eddy flux system which is used to measure the CO2 and H2O exchange between the atmosphere and the biosphere is described. Fluctuations of CO2, H2O, air temperature and atmospheric turbulence are sampled at frequencies up to 50 Hz. ...

F. Chahuneau; R. L. Desjardins; R. Verdon; E. Brach

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Bounds on the Solar Antineutrino total Flux and Energy spectrum from the SK experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A search for inverse beta decay electron antineutrinos has been carried out using the 825 days sample of solar data obtained at SK. The absence of a significant signal, that is, contributions to the total SK background and their angular variations has set upper bounds on a) the absolute flux of solar antineutrinos originated from ${}^8 B$ neutrinos $\\Phi_{\\bar{\

E. Torrente-Lujan

1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

313

Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 6 Energy Flux We discuss various ways of describing energy flux and related quantities. 6.0.1 Energy Current Density The energy current density is given by the Poynting vector S = E Ã? H (6.1) where all quantities are real. The Poynting vector gives the instantaneous lo- cal energy current density

Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

314

OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A MAGNETIC FLUX ROPE ERUPTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fields of the flux rope were partly opened due to magnetic reconnection. Subject headings: Sun: flares to escape with a fairly small reconnection rate in the vertical current sheet created below. Magnetic flux an interesting flux rope eruption model for fast CMEs, in which a flux rope is in a specific sling-shot field

315

Heterotic type IIA duality with fluxes - towards the complete story  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we study the heterotic type IIA duality when fluxes are turned on. We show that many of the known fluxes are dual to each other and claim that certain fluxes on the heterotic side require that the type IIA picture is lifted to M or even F-theory compactifications with geometric fluxes.

Andrei Micu

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

316

A survey on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations in soil in Chiang-Mai, Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil samples were collected at 30 sampling sites along roadsides in the city of Chiang-Mai, Thailand, in February 1996, and concentrations of 16 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were determined. The distribution of PAH concentration in the soil samples was almost log-normal for all PAHs. Concentrations of pyrene (Py) and fluoranthene (Fluor) were the highest, followed by those of benzo[ghi]perylene and coronene (Cor). Since PAH concentrations were highest on the roadside where the traffic density was high, vehicles were the main determinants of PAH concentration in soil in Chiang-Mai. Significant correlations among PAH concentrations were found for almost all PAHs. PAH profiles in the air were different from those in the soil. For example, relative benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) concentration in the soil was significantly lower than that in the air. Relative concentrations of Fluor, Py, chrysene, and Cor in the soil were considerably higher than those in the air, due presumably to their difference in photochemical reactivities and in sources. The sampling of soil has advantages relative to that of air: (1) collection of soil is easy; (2) it needs no special equipment and electricity; (3) it takes little time; and (4) it can be collected anywhere. Therefore PAH analysis in soil was useful as a proxy-screening tool for air pollution levels with consideration of compositional differences between soil and air samples.

Amagai, Takashi; Takahashi, Yukari; Matsushita, Hidetsuru [Univ. of Shizuoka (Japan); Morknoy, D.; Sukasem, P.; Taucanon, M. [Technopolis, Pathumthani (Thailand). Environmental Research and Training Center

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Operation Redwing. Project 2. 52. Neutron-induced soil radioactivity  

SciTech Connect

Soil samples were exposed to neutron radiation from Shot Cherokee to help establish the importance of neutron-induced residual gamma radiation. After exposure and recovery, the samples had no detectable activity because the slant range to the nearest sample was nearly 3.5 miles, due to an error in bomb drop. After this failure, an experiment was designed in the field for Shot Yuma in order that induced-activity data could be obtained for a soil other than Nevada Test Site soil. Samples of sodium, manganese, and coral sand from Site Sally were exposed above and below the surface at a slant range of 120 yards. The difference between the effects of pure fission and fission-fusion neutron spectra on induced activity in soil was not measured, since the soil samples on Shot Cehrokee were not activated. However, a method for predicting neutron-induced gamma-radiation intensities was tested for coral soil on Shot Yuma. Predicted values were within + or - 50% of induced dose rates inferred from field measurements.

Cowan, M.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Real Time Flux Control in PM Motors  

SciTech Connect

Significant research at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Power Electronics and Electric Machinery Research Center (PEEMRC) is being conducted to develop ways to increase (1) torque, (2) speed range, and (3) efficiency of traction electric motors for hybrid electric vehicles (HEV) within existing current and voltage bounds. Current is limited by the inverter semiconductor devices' capability and voltage is limited by the stator wire insulation's ability to withstand the maximum back-electromotive force (emf), which occurs at the upper end of the speed range. One research track has been to explore ways to control the path and magnitude of magnetic flux while the motor is operating. The phrase, real time flux control (RTFC), refers to this mode of operation in which system parameters are changed while the motor is operating to improve its performance and speed range. RTFC has potential to meet an increased torque demand by introducing additional flux through the main air gap from an external source. It can augment the speed range by diverting flux away from the main air gap to reduce back-emf at high speeds. Conventional RTFC technology is known as vector control [1]. Vector control decomposes the stator current into two components; one that produces torque and a second that opposes (weakens) the magnetic field generated by the rotor, thereby requiring more overall stator current and reducing the efficiency. Efficiency can be improved by selecting a RTFC method that reduces the back-emf without increasing the average current. This favors methods that use pulse currents or very low currents to achieve field weakening. Foremost in ORNL's effort to develop flux control is the work of J. S. Hsu. Early research [2,3] introduced direct control of air-gap flux in permanent magnet (PM) machines and demonstrated it with a flux-controlled generator. The configuration eliminates the problem of demagnetization because it diverts all the flux from the magnets instead of trying to oppose it. It is robust and could be particularly useful for PM generators and electric vehicle drives. Recent efforts have introduced a brushless machine that transfers a magneto-motive force (MMF) generated by a stationary excitation coil to the rotor [4]. Although a conventional PM machine may be field weakened using vector control, the air-gap flux density cannot be effectively enhanced. In Hsu's new machine, the magnetic field generated by the rotor's PM may be augmented by the field from the stationery excitation coil and channeled with flux guides to its desired destination to enhance the air-gap flux that produces torque. The magnetic field can also be weakened by reversing the current in the stationary excitation winding. A patent for advanced technology in this area is pending. Several additional RTFC methods have been discussed in open literature. These include methods of changing the number of poles by magnetizing and demagnetizing the magnets poles with pulses of current corresponding to direct-axis (d-axis) current of vector control [5,6], changing the number of stator coils [7], and controlling the air gap [8]. Test experience has shown that the magnet strengths may vary and weaken naturally as rotor temperature increases suggesting that careful control of the rotor temperature, which is no easy task, could yield another method of RTFC. The purpose of this report is to (1) examine the interaction of rotor and stator flux with regard to RTFC, (2) review and summarize the status of RTFC technology, and (3) compare and evaluate methods for RTFC with respect to maturity, advantages and limitations, deployment difficulty and relative complexity.

Otaduy, P.J.

2005-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

319

Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

320

Practical reporting times for environmental samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Preanalytical holding times for environmental samples are specified because chemical and physical characteristics may change between sampling and chemical analysis. For example, the Federal Register prescribes a preanalytical holding time of 14 days for volatile organic compounds in soil stored at 4{degrees}C. The American Society for Testing Materials (ASTM) uses a more technical definition that the preanalytical holding time is the day when the analyte concentration for an environmental sample falls below the lower 99% confidence interval on the analyte concentration at day zero. This study reviews various holding time definitions and suggest a new preanalytical holding time approach using acceptable error rates for measuring an environmental analyte. This practical reporting time (PRT) approach has been applied to nineteen volatile organic compounds and four explosives in three environmental soil samples. A PRT nomograph of error rates has been developed to estimate the consequences of missing a preanalytical holding time. This nomograph can be applied to a large class of analytes with concentrations that decay linearly or exponentially with time regardless of sample matrices and storage conditions.

Bayne, C.K.; Schmoyer, D.D.; Jenkins, R.A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of military training on indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this research was to investigate the effects of soil disturbance on several key indicators of soil quality at Fort Benning, Georgia. Military activities at Fort Benning that result in soil disturbance include infantry, artillery, wheeled, and tracked vehicle training. Soil samples were collected along a disturbance gradient that included: (1) reference sites, (2) light military use, (3) moderate military use, (4) heavy military use, and (5) remediated sites. With the exception of surface soil bulk density, measured soil properties at reference and light use sites were similar. Relative to reference sites, greater surface soil bulk density, lower soil carbon concentrations, and less carbon and nitrogen in particulate organic matter (POM) were found at moderate use, heavy use, and remediated sites. Studies along a pine forest chronosequence indicated that carbon stocks in POM gradually increased with stand age. An analysis of soil C:N ratios, as well as soil carbon concentrations and stocks, indicated a recovery of soil quality at moderate military use and remediated sites relative to heavy military use sites. Measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen are ecological indicators that can be used by military land managers to identify changes in soil from training activities and to rank training areas on the basis of soil quality.

Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Ashwood, Tom L [ORNL; Dale, Virginia H [ORNL

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Fine Particles in Soils  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fine Particles in Soils Fine Particles in Soils Nature Bulletin No. 582 November 28, 1959 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Daniel Ryan, President Roberts Mann, Conservation Editor David H. Thompson, Senior Naturalist FINE PARTICLES IN SOILS If a farmer, while plowing, is visited in the field by another farmer, invariably the visitor will pick up a handful of turned over earth and knead it with his fingers while they talk. The "feel" of it tells him a lot about the texture and structure of that soil. He knows that both are important factors in the growth of plants and determine the crops that may be obtained from the land. Soil is a combination of three different things About half of it is solid matter; the other half consists of air and water The solid portion is composed of organic and inorganic materials.

323

Soil Classification Using GATree  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper details the application of a genetic programming framework for classification of decision tree of Soil data to classify soil texture. The database contains measurements of soil profile data. We have applied GATree for generating classification decision tree. GATree is a decision tree builder that is based on Genetic Algorithms (GAs). The idea behind it is rather simple but powerful. Instead of using statistic metrics that are biased towards specific trees we use a more flexible, global metric of tree quality that try to optimize accuracy and size. GATree offers some unique features not to be found in any other tree inducers while at the same time it can produce better results for many difficult problems. Experimental results are presented which illustrate the performance of generating best decision tree for classifying soil texture for soil data set.

Bhargavi, P

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO, South Pole and Pyhäsalmi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino fluxes for the neutrino experiments proposed at INO, South Pole and Pyh\\"asalmi. Neutrino fluxes have been obtained using ATMNC, a simulation code for cosmic ray in the atmosphere. Even using the same primary flux model and the interaction model, the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes are different for the different sites due to the geomagnetic field. The prediction of these fluxes in the present paper would be quite useful in the experimental analysis.

M. Sajjad Athar; M. Honda; T. Kajita; K. Kasahara; S. Midorikawa

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Energy flux limitation by tame turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-linear theory of energy flux limitation by ion acoustic turbulence is presented. This distribution function is modelled by a Maxwellian plus an additional piece which carries a heat flux Q. By taking the fourth moment of the Vlasov equation one finds the anomalous thermal conductivity K approximately 3 v/sub e/ delta/sub De/ (e phi/T/sub e/)$sup -2$. Other moments treated self-consistently include anomalous ion heating, electron cooling, current generation and enhanced inverse bremsstrahlung due to the nonthermal ion fluctuations. (auth)

Manheimer, W.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10{sup {minus}5} to 10{sup 3} N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10`s of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

328

Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer - a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10[sup [minus]5] to 10[sup 3] N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in an intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

Zonca, F.; Cohen, S.A.; Bennett, T.; Timberlake, J.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Standard test method for measurement of soil resistivity using the two-electrode soil box method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers the equipment and a procedure for the measurement of soil resistivity, for samples removed from the ground, for use in the control of corrosion of buried structures. 1.2 Procedures allow for this test method to be used n the field or in the laboratory. 1.3 The test method procedures are for the resistivity measurement of soil samples in the saturated condition and in the as-received condition. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Soil resistivity values are reported in ohm-centimeter. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Determination of the potential for release of mercury from combustion product amended soils: Part 1 - Simulations of beneficial use  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a project that assessed the potential for mercury (Hg) release to air and water from soil amended with combustion products to simulate beneficial use. Combustion products (ash) derived from wood, sewage sludge, subbituminous coal, and a subbituminous coal-petroleum coke mixture were added to soil as agricultural supplements, soil stabilizers, and to develop low permeability surfaces. Hg release was measured from the latter when intact and after it was broken up and mixed into the soil. Air-substrate Hg exchange was measured for all materials six times over 24 hr, providing data that reflected winter, spring, summer, and fall meteorological conditions. Dry deposition of atmospheric Hg and emission of Hg to the atmosphere were both found to be important fluxes. Measured differences in seasonal and diel (24 hr) fluxes demonstrated that to establish an annual estimate of air-substrate flux from these materials data on both of these time steps should be collected. Air-substrate exchange was highly correlated with soil and air temperature, as well as incident light. Hg releases to the atmosphere from coal and wood combustion product-amended soils to simulate an agricultural application were similar to that measured for the unamended soil, whereas releases to the air for the sludge-amended materials were higher. Hg released to soil solutions during the Synthetic Precipitation Leaching Procedure for ashamended materials was higher than that released from soil alone. On the basis of estimates of annual releases of Hg to the air from the materials used, emissions from coal and wood ash-amended soil to simulate an agricultural application could simply be re-emission of Hg deposited by wet processes from the atmosphere; however, releases from sludge-amended materials and those generated to simulate soil stabilization and disturbed low-permeability pads include Hg indigenous to the material. 37 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

Mae Sexauer Gustin; Jody Ericksen; George C. Fernandez [University of Nevada-Reno, Reno, NV (United States). Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

331

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Sampling at the Sampling at the Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site September 2013 LMS/SBS/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Shirley Basin South, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065426 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Shirley Basin South, Wyoming, Disposal Site Sample Location Map ............................................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

332

X-ray Microspectroscopy and Chemical Reactions in Soil Microsites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soils provide long-term storage of environmental contaminants, which helps to protect water and air quality and diminishes negative impacts of contaminants on human and ecosystem health. Characterizing solid-phase chemical species in highly complex matrices is essential for developing principles that can be broadly applied to the wide range of notoriously heterogeneous soils occurring at the earth's surface. In the context of historical developments in soil analytical techniques, we describe applications of bulk-sample and spatially resolved synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) for characterizing chemical species of contaminants in soils, and for determining the uniqueness of trace-element reactivity in different soil microsites. Spatially resolved X-ray techniques provide opportunities for following chemical changes within soil microsites that serve as highly localized chemical micro- (or nano-)reactors of unique composition. An example of this microreactor concept is shown for micro-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of metal sulfide oxidation in a contaminated soil. One research challenge is to use information and principles developed from microscale soil chemistry for predicting macroscale and field-scale behavior of soil contaminants.

D Hesterberg; M Duff; J Dixon; M Vepraskas

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

Hazen, T.C.

1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

334

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Carbon from Changing Pasture to an Energy Crop biogeochemical cycles and global greenhouse gas budgets. Energy cane (Saccharum officinarum L.) is a sugarcane changing land from grazed pasture to energy cane would affect greenhouse gas (CO2, CH4 and N2O) fluxes

DeLucia, Evan H.

335

Analysis of soil and water at the Four Mile Creek seepline near the F- and H-Areas of SRS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several soil and water samples were collected along the Four Mile Creek (FMC) seepline at the F and H Areas of the Savannah River Site. The samples were analyzed for concentrations of metals, radionuclides, and inorganic constituents. The results of the analyses are summarized for the soil and water samples.

Haselow, J.S.

2000-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Damage to lightly loaded structures, paving and service piping in areas of expansive clay soils has occurred throughout the world. The cause of this damage has been the inability to accurately model expansive soil movement so that foundations are adequately designed to withstand the movement. The amount and rate of differential soil movement for expansive soils is due to a combination of soil characteristics, namely: suction compression index, unsaturated permeability, and diffusivity. Currently, geotechnical engineers run tests to measure the soil properties required to estimate differential soil movements. However, there seems to be apprehension toward attempting these soil movement calculations due to the perceived complexity of the calculations or a simple lack of understanding of the theory. The procedures delineating the step by step process used to calculate suction profiles and volume strains of expansive soils is presented. These procedures include the methodology to predict soil heave and shrink underneath shallow foundations which generate maximum center lift and maximum edge lift slab distortion modes. The main contributions of this research are: equations and procedures to calculate the equilibrium suction profile and depth to constant suction for a particular soil profile and location, equations to calculate the horizontal velocity flow of water in unsaturated soils, the methodology to predict differential soil movement shortly after a slab has been constructed and before the soil under the slab has reached an equilibrium moisture content, and the procedures to apply differential soil movement theory to soil profiles with shallow foundation design.

Naiser, Donald David

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen associated with switchgrass production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Greater knowledge of the short- and long-term effects of biomass production practices on soil biological and chemical properties is needed to determine influences on sustainable land management. Soil samples under switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.), other forage grasses, cultivated crops, and forest were collected seasonally at six locations. Soil organic C (SOC), total N, soil microbial biomass C (SMBC) and N (SMBN), soil mineralizable C and N, and basal soil respiration (BSR) were in general greatest under long-term coastal bermudagrass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] pasture (>40 years), second highest under Alamo switchgrass and kleingrass (Panicum coloratum L.) planted in 1992 and forest, followed by Alamo switchgrass planted in 1997, and was lowest under the cultivated soils. Soil organic C at 0-5 cm was 42-220% greater in soils under Alamo switchgrass planted in 1992 than cultivated soils, except at College Station where SOC values under Alamo planted in 1992 and the cultivated rotation were not significantly different. Although the rotation treatment is cultivated at this location, two high residue crops are used, wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) and sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench.]. Similar trends were noted for total N, SMBC, SMBN, mineralizable C and N, BSR, and the ratio of SMBC/SOC. Insufficient information was collected in this study to determine whether the parameters evaluated for forest and switchgrass were different. In addition to its high yield potential, adaptation to marginal sites and tolerance to water and nutrient limitations, switchgrass appeared to be a competitive crop in terms of land sustainability, resulting in enhanced soil quality characteristics compared to long-term cultivated soils.

Lobo Alonzo, Porfirio Jose

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flux Power Incorporated Flux Power Incorporated Jump to: navigation, search Name Flux Power Incorporated Place Vista, California Zip 92081 Product California-based FLux Ppower was created in late-2009 to provide monitoring, diagnostics and charging technology aimed at extending the life of lithium-ion batteries. The company signed a supply deal with Wheego in January 2010. Coordinates 37.989712°, -93.665689° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.989712,"lon":-93.665689,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

340

Radiation from Kinetic Poynting Flux Acceleration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive analytic formulas for the power output and critical frequency of radiation by electrons accelerated by relativistic kinetic Poynting flux, and validate these results with Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We find that the in-situ radiation power output and critical frequency are much below those predicted by the classical synchrotron formulae. We discuss potential astrophysical applications of these results.

Edison Liang; Koichi Noguchi

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Gradiometric flux qubits with tunable gap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For gradiometric three-Josephson-junction flux qubits, we perform a systematic study on the tuning of the minimal transition frequency, the so-called qubit gap. By replacing one of the qubit's Josephson junctions by a dc SQUID, the critical current of this SQUID and, in turn, the qubit gap can be tuned in situ by a control flux threading the SQUID loop. We present spectroscopic measurements demonstrating a well-defined controllability of the qubit gap between zero and more than 10 GHz. In the future, this enables one to tune the qubit into and out of resonance with other superconducting quantum circuits, while operating the qubit at its symmetry point with optimal dephasing properties. The experimental data agree very well with model calculations based on the full qubit Hamiltonian. From a numerical fit, we determine the Josephson coupling and the charging energies of the qubit junctions. The derived values agree well with those measured for other junctions fabricated on the same chip. We also demonstrate the biasing of gradiometric flux qubits near the symmetry point by trapping an odd number of flux quanta in the gradiometer loop. In this way, we study the effect of the significant kinetic inductance, thereby obtaining valuable information for the qubit design.

M. J. Schwarz; J. Goetz; Z. Jiang; T. Niemczyk; F. Deppe; A. Marx; R. Gross

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

A Convective Transport Theory for Surface Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a boundary layer in free convection where turbulent thermal structures communicate information between the surface and the interior of the mixed layer, it is hypothesized that the surface momentum flux can be parameterized by u*2 = bDwBMML, ...

Roland B. Stull

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO (EFRC) proposes to license, construct, and operate a conventional acid leach uranium and vanadium mill storage pad, and access roads. The mill is designed to process ore containing uranium and vanadium

344

Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

Pinnau, Ingo (Austin, TX); Koros, William J. (Austin, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Rain sampling device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

346

Impact of Sun-Synchronous Diurnal Sampling on Tropical TOA Flux Interannual Variability and Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite observations of the earth’s radiation budget (ERB) are a critical component of the climate observing system. Recent observations have been made from sun-synchronous orbits, which provide excellent spatial coverage with global ...

Patrick C. Taylor; Norman G. Loeb

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Quality Reference Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Peer-reviewed fats and oils related performance-based control samples for lab quality assurance and quality control. Quality Reference Samples Certified Reference Materials (CRM) aocs certified Certified Reference Materials chemists CRM fat fats lab labo

348

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information documented on the field data sheets? Yes 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? NA Sample chilling was not required....

349

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites November 2013 LMS/SRE/SRW/S0913 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-September 2013, Slick Rock, Colorado November 2013 RIN 13095593 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Slick Rock East and West, Colorado, Processing Sites, Sample Location Map .............................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

350

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Old and New Rifle, Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites August 2013 LMS/RFN/RFO/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Rifle, Colorado August 2013 RIN 13065380 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Sample Location Map, New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ........................................................5 Sample Location Map, Old Rifle, Colorado, Processing Site ..........................................................6 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9

351

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site November 2013 LMS/TUB/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August 2013, Tuba City, Arizona November 2013 RIN 13085553 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Tuba City, Arizona, Disposal Site, Sample Location Map ..............................................................7 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................9 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist ...........................................................11

352

September 2004 Water Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and October 2013 and October 2013 Groundwater Sampling at the Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site December 2013 LMS/BLU/S00813 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-August and October 2013, Bluewater, New Mexico December 2013 RIN 13085537 and 13095651 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Private Wells Sampled August 2013 and October 2013, Bluewater, NM, Disposal Site ................3 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................5 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................7

353

Kinetics of Potassium Desorption in Soil using Miscible Displacement1 D. L. SPARKS, L. W. ZELAZNY, AND D. C. MARTENSZ  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Potassium Desorption in Soil using Miscible Displacement1 D. L. SPARKS, L. W. ZELAZNY, and B22t horizons of two Dothan (Plinthic Pa- leudults) soils. Aluminum- and calcium- saturated samples was subsequently de- sorbed suggesting K adsorption-desorption in the Dothan soils was reversible. A linear

Sparks, Donald L.

354

Surface Heat Flux Variations across the Kuroshio Extension as Observed by Surface Flux Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wintertime sea surface heat flux variability across the Kuroshio Extension (KE) front is analyzed using data from the Kuroshio Extension Observatory (KEO) buoy in the Kuroshio recirculation gyre south of the KE front and from the Japan Agency for ...

Masanori Konda; Hiroshi Ichikawa; Hiroyuki Tomita; Meghan F. Cronin

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part II: Latent Heat Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of the recent ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Departmental Research Initiative, an aircraft was instrumented to carry out direct turbulent flux measurements in the high wind boundary layer of a hurricane. ...

William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Jeffrey R. French; Cyril McCormick; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

Todreas, Neil E.

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Riverton, Wyoming, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site September 2013 LMS/RVT/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Riverton, Wyoming September 2013 RIN 13065379 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site, Sample Location Map .........................................................5 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11

358

Sampling community structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a novel method, based on concepts from expander graphs, to sample communities in networks. We show that our sampling method, unlike previous techniques, produces subgraphs representative of community structure in the original network. These ... Keywords: clustering, community detection, complex networks, graphs, sampling, social networks

Arun S. Maiya; Tanya Y. Berger-Wolf

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR PRELIMINARY DESIGN STUDY  

SciTech Connect

A comparison of possible types of research reactors for the production of transplutonium elements and other isotopes indicates that a flux-trap reactor consisting of a beryllium-reflecteds light-water-cooled annular fuel region surrounding a light-water island provides the required thermal neutron fluxes at minimum cost. The preliminary desigu of such a reactor was carried out on the basis of a parametric study of the effect of dimensions of the island and fuel regions heat removal rates, and fuel loading on the achievable thermal neutmn fluxes in the island and reflector. The results indicate that a 12- to 14-cm- diam. island provides the maximum flux for a given power density. This is in good agreement with the US8R critical experiments. Heat removal calculations indicate that average power densities up to 3.9 Mw/liter are achievable with H/ sub 2/O-cooled, platetype fuel elements if the system is pressurized to 650 psi to prevent surface boiling. On this basis, 100 Mw of heat can be removed from a 14-cm-ID x 36-cm-OD x 30.5-cm-long fuel regions resulting in a thermal neutron flux of 3 x 10/sup 15/ in the island after insertion of 100 g of Cm/sup 244/ or equivalent. The resulting production of Cf/sup 252/ amounts to 65 mg for a 1 1/2- year irradiation. Operation of the reactor at the more conservative level of 67 Mw, providing an irradiation flux of 2 x 10/sup 15/ in the islands will result in the production of 35 mg of Cf/sup 252/ per 18 months from 100 g of Cm/sup 244/. A development program is proposed to answer the question of the feasibility of the higher power operation. In addition to the central irradiation facility for heavyelement productions the HFIR contains ten hydraulic rabbit tubes passing through the beryllium reflector for isotope production and four beam holes for basic research, Preliminary estimates indicate that the cost of the facility, designed for an operating power level of 100 Mw, will be approximately 2 million. (auth)

Lane, J.A.; Cheverton, R.D.; Claiborne, G.C.; Cole, T.E.; Gambill, W.R.; Gill, J.P.; Hilvety, N.; McWherther, J.R.; Vroom, D.W.

1959-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

360

Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils  

SciTech Connect

Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.

Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Particle-Size-Distribution of Nevada Test Site Soils  

SciTech Connect

The amount of each size particle in a given soil is called the particle-size distribution (PSD), and the way it feels to the touch is called the soil texture. Sand, silt, and clay are the three particle sizes of mineral material found in soils. Sand is the largest sized particle and it feels gritty; silt is medium sized and it feels floury; and clay is the smallest and if feels sticky. Knowing the particle-size distribution of a soil sample helps to understand many soil properties such as how much water, heat, and nutrients the soil will hold, how fast water and heat will move through the soil, and what kind of structure, bulk density and consistence the soil will have. Furthermore, the native particle-size distribution of the soil in the vicinity of ground zero of a nuclear detonation plays a major role in nuclear fallout. For soils that have a high-sand content, the near-range fallout will be relatively high and the far-range fallout will be relatively light. Whereas, for soils that have a high-silt and high-clay content, the near-range fallout will be significantly lower and the far-range fallout will be significantly higher. As part of a program funded by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA), the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has recently measured the PSDs from the various major areas at the Nevada Test Site where atmospheric detonations and/or nuclear weapon safety tests were performed back in the 50s and 60s. The purpose of this report is to document those results.

Spriggs, G; Ray-Maitra, A

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

362

APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil APS Protocols for Handling, Storage, and Disposal of Untreated Foreign Soil and Regulated Domestic Soil Arrival of New Samples: Unpack shipping containers. Treat any ice/melted water immediately. Decontaminate any "blue ice" packets with 70% ethyl alcohol. Collect any loose soil from container and heat-treat immediately. Immediately decontaminate shipping containers. Heat-treat wooden, metal, or cardboard shipping containers (using lowest heat). Treat plastic containers and coolers with 70% ethyl alcohol. Storage of Samples: Store dry samples in the locked storage cabinet in Room 431Z021 until they can be delivered to the appropriate beamline for analysis. Label containers with origin and arrival date. Log samples into the APS Soil Inventory book maintained in 431Z021.

363

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Kunkel, K.E. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Surface fluxes important to cloud development  

SciTech Connect

To address some of the issues in scaling and averaging of measurements, collaborative field campaigns were conducted in June 1991 and 1992 by the DOE laboratories funded under the ARM program. We selected a site in Boardman, OR, with two distinct regions where the sensible and latent heat fluxes would differ sharply and where each region was sufficiently extensive for full development of boundary layers and for utilizing aircraft-mounted instrument systems (Barnes et al. 1992, Doran et al. 1992). Measurements were clustered along a 16-km transect across adjoining irrigated farmland and semi-arid rangeland regions that allowed the collaborating teams to conduct a variety of studies relating to overall goals. The Los Alamos team efforts were focused on assessing the effects of different surface characteristics on fluxes of heat and water vapor.

Barnes, F.J.; Porch, W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Kunkel, K.E. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

MAGNETIC FLUX CONSERVATION IN THE HELIOSHEATH  

SciTech Connect

Voyager 1(V1) and Voyager 2(V2) have observed heliosheath plasma since 2005 December and 2007 August, respectively. The observed speed profiles are very different at the two spacecrafts. Speeds at V1 decreased to zero in 2010 while the average speed at V2 is a constant 150 km s{sup -1} with the direction rotating tailward. The magnetic flux is expected to be constant in these heliosheath flows. We show that the flux is constant at V2 but decreases by an order of magnitude at V1, even after accounting for divergence of the flows and changes in the solar field. If reconnection were responsible for this decrease, the magnetic field would lose 70% of its free energy to reconnection and the energy density released would be 0.6 eV cm{sup -3}.

Richardson, J. D. [Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burlaga, L. F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 673, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Decker, R. B. [Applied Physics Laboratory, The Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, MD 20723 (United States); Drake, J. F. [Department of Physics and Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Ness, N. F. [Institute for Astrophysics and Computational Sciences, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Opher, M., E-mail: jdr@space.mit.edu, E-mail: lburlagahsp@verizon.net, E-mail: robert.decker@jhuapl.edu, E-mail: drake@umd.edu, E-mail: nfnudel@yahoo.com, E-mail: mopher@bu.edu [Astronomy Department, Boston University, 675 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, MA 02215 (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

E. -I. Esch; T. J. Bowles; A. Hime; A. Pichlmaier; R. Reifarth; H. Wollnik

2004-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

367

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to ?vert = (3.10 +0.05 ?0.07) 10?7 s ?1 cm ?2 sr ?1.

E. -i. Esch A; T. J. Bowles A; A. Hime A; A. Pichlmaier A; R. Reifarth A; H. Wollnik B

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

The Cosmic Ray Muon Flux at WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work a measurement of the muon intensity at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, NM, USA is presented. WIPP is a salt mine with a depth of 655 m. The vertical muon flux was measured with a two panels scintillator coincidence setup to Phi_{vert}=3.10(+0.05/-0.07)*10^(-7)s^(-1)cm^(-2)sr^(-1).

Esch, E I; Hime, A; Pichlmaier, A; Reifarth, R; Wollnik, H

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Sampling diffusive transition paths  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

370

ORNL DAAC, Arctic Tundra Flux Data, February 2002  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

atmospheric fluxes in the Arctic tundra are now available on-line. The newly released data set "Arctic Tundra Flux Study in the Kuparuk River Basin (Alaska), 1994-1996" contains...

371

High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) | Nuclear Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Flux Isotope Reactor High Flux Isotope Reactor May 30, 2013 The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) first achieved criticality on August 25, 1965, and achieved full power in August 1966. It is a versatile 85-MW isotope production, research, and test reactor with the capability and facilities for performing a wide variety of irradiation experiments and a world-class neutron scattering science program. HFIR is a beryllium-reflected, light water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type swimming pool reactor that uses highly enriched uranium-235 as fuel. HFIR typically operates seven 23-to-27 day cycles per year. Irradiation facility capabilities include Flux trap positions: Peak thermal flux of 2.5X1015 n/cm2/s with similar epithermal and fast fluxes (Highest thermal flux available in the

372

Stability-Dependent Exchange Coefficients for Air–Sea Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study introduces exchange coefficients for wind stress (CD), latent heat flux (CL), and sensible heat flux (CS) over the global ocean. They are obtained from the state-of-the-art Coupled Ocean–Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) bulk ...

A. Birol Kara; Harley E. Hurlburt; Alan J. Wallcraft

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Spatial Distribution of Surface Fluxes Estimated from Remotely Sensed Variables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study relates surface fluxes to remotely sensed variables over well-defined variations of surface wetness and vegetation. The surface fluxes are estimated from repeated Twin Otter aircraft flights at 33 m above the surface after correcting ...

Jielun Sun; L. Mahrt

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

BOREAS SSA-YJP Tower Flux Data Revised  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tower Flux Data Revised A revised version of the BOREAS TF04 tower flux data is now available from the ORNL DAAC. Data providers have revised the data set entitled "BOREAS TF-04...

375

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding internal wave generation, propagation, and dissipation. In this paper, the estimation of internal wave energy fluxes u?p? from ocean observations that may be sparse in either time or depth ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Float Observations of the Southern Ocean. Part II: Eddy Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorer (ALACE) floats are used to examine eddy fluxes in the Southern Ocean. Eddy fluxes are calculated from differences between ALACE float data and mean fields derived from hydrographic atlas data or ...

Sarah T. Gille

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Sensible and Latent Heat Flux Measurements over the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This papar presents an extensive act of sensible heat (Reynolds flux and dissipation methods) and latent heat (dissipation method) flux measurements from a stable deep water tower and from ships on the deep sea. Operational difficulties ...

W. G. Large; S. Pond

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Global Character of the Flux of Downward Longwave Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Four different types of estimates of the surface downwelling longwave radiative flux (DLR) are reviewed. One group of estimates synthesizes global cloud, aerosol, and other information in a radiation model that is used to calculate fluxes. Because ...

Graeme L. Stephens; Martin Wild; Paul W. Stackhouse Jr.; Tristan L’Ecuyer; Seiji Kato; David S. Henderson

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Enhanced flux balance analysis to model metabolic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flux Balance Analysis (FBA) is a widely used technique to predict rates of reactions in metabolic networks in cells under steady state using only stoichiometric information about the reactions. In this work, we introduce Enhanced Flux Balance Analysis ...

Nishanth Ulhas Nair; Navin Goyal; Nagasuma R. Chandra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

GCM-Simulated Surface Energy Fluxes in Climate Change Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The changes in the surface energy fluxes calculated with a general circulation model under increased levels of carbon dioxide concentration are analyzed and related to the simulation of these fluxes under present-day conditions. It is shown that ...

Martin Wild; Atsumu Ohmura; Ulrich Cubasch

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Evaluation of HOAPS-3 Ocean Surface Freshwater Flux Components  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, latent heat flux and precipitation over the global ocean surface can be determined from microwave satellite data as a basis for estimating the related fields of the ocean surface freshwater flux. The Hamburg Ocean Atmosphere Parameters and ...

Axel Andersson; Christian Klepp; Karsten Fennig; Stephan Bakan; Hartmut Grassl; Jörg Schulz

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy Flux and Wavelet Diagnostics of Secondary Mountain Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, aircraft data from mountain waves have been primarily analyzed using velocity and temperature power spectrum and momentum flux estimation. Herein it is argued that energy flux wavelets (i.e., pressure–velocity wavelet cross-...

Bryan K. Woods; Ronald B. Smith

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Reflected Fluxes for Broken Clouds over a Lambertian Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflected fluxes are calculated for broken cloudiness (i.e., nonplane parallel) as a function of cloud cover, cloud optical depth, solar zenith angle and surface albedo. These calculations extend previous results for broken cloud reflected fluxes ...

Ronald M. Welch; Bruce A. Wielicki

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Spatial Variation in Turbulent Heat Fluxes in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution underway shipboard atmospheric and oceanic observations collected in Drake Passage from 2000 to 2009 are used to examine the spatial scales of turbulent heat fluxes and flux-related state variables. The magnitude of the seasonal ...

ChuanLi Jiang; Sarah T. Gille; Janet Sprintall; Kei Yoshimura; Masao Kanamitsu

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Entry, Flux, and Exit of Potential Vorticity in Ocean Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flux form of the potential vorticity (PV) equation is employed to derive simple expressions for the boundary and interior flux of PV in ocean circulation using Bernoulli functions. The formulas are discussed and physically interpreted and ...

John Marshall; Daniel Jamous; Johan Nilsson

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Factors Controlling ERBE Longwave Clear Sky and Cloud Forcing Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The factors controlling the Earth Radiation Budget satellite (ERBS) longwave clear sky and cloud-forcing fluxes are investigated using statistical analyses of the ERBS fluxes with International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) cloud ...

Bryan C. Weare

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) Soil Erosion and Sediment Control Act, Soil and Water Conservation District, and Council on Soil and Water Conservation Regulations (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity

388

Straw Compost and Bioremediated Soil as Inocula for the Bioremediation of Chlorophenol-Contaminated Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Straw compost and bioremediated soil as inocula for the bioremediation of chlorophenol-contaminated soil.

M M Laine; K S Jorgensen; M. Minna; Laine; Kirsten S. Jørgensen

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Superconductor with Improved Flux Pinning and Reduced AC ...  

Superconductor with Improved Flux ... involve ramped magnetic or oscillating magnetic fields or require that the HTS wire carry alternating current ...

390

High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

Cameron, C.P.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Green River, Utah, Disposal Site August 2013 LMS/GRN/S00613 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy DVP-June 2013, Green River, Utah August 2013 RIN 13065402 Page i Contents Sampling Event Summary ...............................................................................................................1 Data Assessment Summary ..............................................................................................................7 Water Sampling Field Activities Verification Checklist .............................................................9 Laboratory Performance Assessment ........................................................................................11 Sampling Quality Control Assessment ......................................................................................18

392

Beacon Project - Unpredictable Sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... or undetected tampering), with the random number generator used for sampling can lead to erroneous estimates of the percentage of faulty parts. ...

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

393

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... result of neutrons with incident energies higher than ... between the sample position and the detector bank. ... 60 to 300 seconds per energy point and ...

394

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

field procedures? Yes List any Program Directives or other documents, SOPs, instructions. Work Order Letter dated May 1, 2013. Program Directive SHL 2013 01. 2. Were the sampling...

395

FANS - Sample Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... This is achieved by placing a cadmium shield between the sample position and the detector bank. In order to place the ...

396

Averaging-Related Biases in Monthly Latent Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seasonal-to-multidecadal applications that require ocean surface energy fluxes often require accuracies of surface turbulent fluxes to be 5 W m?2 or better. While there is little doubt that uncertainties in the flux algorithms and input data can ...

Paul J. Hughes; Mark A. Bourassa; Jeremy J. Rolph; Shawn R. Smith

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

POLOIDAL FLUX LINKAGE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INTERNATIONAL THERMONUCLEAREXPERIMENTAL REACTOR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the poloidal flux linkage requirements for the current ramp-up and for the flat-top phase of the proposed [2] and JSOLVER [3] to calculate the flux linkage requirements during the current ramp-up and steady regarding the plasma ramp-up time, and the amount of flux linkage change that the poloidal field coil system

399

Model of Trace Gas Flux in Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical model of the turbulent flux in the three-layer boundary system is presented. Turbulence is described as a presence of the nonzero vorticity. Generalized advection-diffusion-reaction equation is derived for arbitrary number components in the flux. The fluxes in the layers are objects for matching requirements on the boundaries between the layers.

I. I. Vasenev; I. S. Nurgaliev

2013-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

400

Soil mechanics and analysis of soils overlying cavitose bedrock  

SciTech Connect

The stability of the residual soils existing at the West Chestnut Ridge Site, Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee, was evaluated. The weathered bedrock below this residual soil contains numerous solution cavities, and several karst features were identified. The West Chestnut Ridge site was evaluated with respect to deformation and collapse of the residual soil into the bedrock cavities. A finite element analysis investigated the effects of bedrock cavity radius, thickness of soil overburden, and surface surcharge upon the deformational and stability characteristics of the residual soil. The results indicate that for small cavity radii, the thickness of the soil cover has little effect on the zone of yielded soil. For large cavity radii, a smaller zone of distressed soil occurs under thick soil cover than under thin soil cover. Dimensionless curves are presented to enable the prediction of the vertical extent of the zone of yielded soil for a range of site geometries. Although the thick soil deposits (100 feet or greater) typically found on the ridges result in high stresses adjacent to the cavity, the area of the distressed or yielded soil is small and unlikely to extend to the surface. In addition, the surface deformation or subsidence is expected to be minimal. Thus, the siting of waste facilities on the ridges where the overburden is maximum would tend to reduce the effects of deformation into the cavities. 29 refs., 37 figs., 7 tabs.

Drumm, E.C.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ARM - Field Campaign - Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign govCampaignsPrecision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Precision Gas Sampling (PGS) Validation Field Campaign 2004.04.15 - 2004.12.15 Lead Scientist : Marc Fischer For data sets, see below. Description Accurate prediction of the regional responses of CO2 flux to changing climate, land use, and management requires models that are parameterized and tested against measurements made in multiple land cover types and over seasonal to inter-annual time scales. Models predicting fluxes for un-irrigated agriculture were posed with the challenge of characterizing the onset and severity of plant water stress. We conducted a study that quantified the spatial heterogeneity and temporal variations in land

402

Comparing Aircraft-Based Remotely Sensed Energy Balance Fluxes with Eddy Covariance Tower Data Using Heat Flux Source Area Functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an effort to better evaluate distributed airborne remotely sensed sensible and latent heat flux estimates, two heat flux source area (footprint) models were applied to the imagery, and their pixel weighting/integrating functionality was ...

JoséL. Chávez; Christopher M. U. Neale; Lawrence E. Hipps; John H. Prueger; William P. Kustas

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Measuring Spectral Actinic Flux and Irradiance: Experimental Results from the Actinic Flux Determination from Measurements of Irradiance (ADMIRA) Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from the Actinic Flux Determination from Measurements of Irradiance (ADMIRA) campaign to measure spectral global UV irradiance and actinic flux at the ground, beneath an atmosphere well defined by supporting measurements. ...

A. R. Webb; A. F. Bais; M. Blumthaler; G-P. Gobbi; A. Kylling; R. Schmitt; S. Thiel; F. Barnaba; T. Danielsen; W. Junkermann; A. Kazantzidis; P. Kelly; R. Kift; G. L. Liberti; M. Misslbeck; B. Schallhart; J. Schreder; C. Topaloglou

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Boosted Fast Flux Loop Alternative Cooling Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Test Loop (GTL) Project was instituted to develop the means for conducting fast neutron irradiation tests in a domestic radiation facility. It made use of booster fuel to achieve the high neutron flux, a hafnium thermal neutron absorber to attain the high fast-to-thermal flux ratio, a mixed gas temperature control system for maintaining experiment temperatures, and a compressed gas cooling system to remove heat from the experiment capsules and the hafnium thermal neutron absorber. This GTL system was determined to provide a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) flux greater than 1.0E+15 n/cm2-s with a fast-to-thermal flux ratio in the vicinity of 40. However, the estimated system acquisition cost from earlier studies was deemed to be high. That cost was strongly influenced by the compressed gas cooling system for experiment heat removal. Designers were challenged to find a less expensive way to achieve the required cooling. This report documents the results of the investigation leading to an alternatively cooled configuration, referred to now as the Boosted Fast Flux Loop (BFFL). This configuration relies on a composite material comprised of hafnium aluminide (Al3Hf) in an aluminum matrix to transfer heat from the experiment to pressurized water cooling channels while at the same time providing absorption of thermal neutrons. Investigations into the performance this configuration might achieve showed that it should perform at least as well as its gas-cooled predecessor. Physics calculations indicated that the fast neutron flux averaged over the central 40 cm (16 inches) relative to ATR core mid-plane in irradiation spaces would be about 1.04E+15 n/cm2-s. The fast-to-thermal flux ratio would be in excess of 40. Further, the particular configuration of cooling channels was relatively unimportant compared with the total amount of water in the apparatus in determining performance. Thermal analyses conducted on a candidate configuration showed the design of the water coolant and Al-Hf alloy heat sink system is capable of maintaining all system components below their maximum temperature limits. The maximum temperature of this conduction cooling system, 224.2°C (435.6 °F) occurs in a small, localized region in the heat sink structure near the core mid-plane. The total coolant flow rate requirement for this configuration is 207 L/min (54.7 gpm). The calculated Flow Instability Ratio and Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio for this configuration under nominal conditions are 6.5 and 8.0, respectively, which safely exceed the minimum values of 2.0. Materials and fabrication issues inspection revealed that the neutron absorber would probably best be made from powdered Al3Hf mixed with aluminum powder and extruded or hot isostatically pressed. Although Al3Hf has not been specifically studied extensively, its mechanical and chemical properties should be very much like Al3Zr, which has been studied. Its behavior under irradiation should be very satisfactory, and resistance to corrosion will be investigated to a limited extent in planned miniplate irradiation tests in ATR. Pressurized water systems needed to effect heat removal are already available in the ATR complex, and mixed gas temperature control systems needed to trim experiment temperatures have been engineered and need only be fabricated and installed. In sum, it appears the alternately cooled configuration arrived at can be very successful. The cost estimate for this configuration indicates to

Glen R. Longhurst; Donna Post Guillen; James R. Parry; Douglas L. Porter; Bruce W. Wallace

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Land Cover Differences in Soil Carbon and Nitrogen at Fort Benning, Georgia  

SciTech Connect

Land cover characterization might help land managers assess the impacts of management practices and land cover change on attributes linked to the maintenance and/or recovery of soil quality. However, connections between land cover and measures of soil quality are not well established. The objective of this limited investigation was to examine differences in soil carbon and nitrogen among various land cover types at Fort Benning, Georgia. Forty-one sampling sites were classified into five major land cover types: deciduous forest, mixed forest, evergreen forest or plantation, transitional herbaceous vegetation, and barren land. Key measures of soil quality (including mineral soil density, nitrogen availability, soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as properties and chemistry of the O-horizon) were significantly different among the five land covers. In general, barren land had the poorest soil quality. Barren land, created through disturbance by tracked vehicles and/or erosion, had significantly greater soil density and a substantial loss of carbon and nitrogen relative to soils at less disturbed sites. We estimate that recovery of soil carbon under barren land at Fort Benning to current day levels under transitional vegetation or forests would require about 60 years following reestablishment of vegetation. Maps of soil carbon and nitrogen were produced for Fort Benning based on a 1999 land cover map and field measurements of soil carbon and nitrogen stocks under different land cover categories.

Garten Jr., C.T.

2004-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Zero-flux planes, flux reversals and diffusion paths in ternary and quaternary diffusion  

SciTech Connect

During isothermal multicomponent diffusion, interdiffusion fluxes of individual components can go to zero at zero-flux planes (ZFP) and exhibit flux reversals from one side to the other of such planes. Interdiffusion fluxes as well as the locations and compositions of ZFPs for components are determined directly from the concentration profiles of diffusion couples without the need for prior knowledge of interdiffusion coefficients. The development and identification of ZFPs is reviewed with the aid of single phase and two-phase diffusion couples investigated in the Cu-Ni-Zn system at 775/sup 0/C. ZFP locations in the diffusion zone nearly correspond to sections where the activity of a component is the same as its activity in either of the terminal alloys of a couple. Path slopes at ZFPs are uniquely dictated by the atomic mobility and thermodynamic data for the components. Discontinuous flux reversals for the components can also occur at interfaces in multiphase couples. Identification of ZFPs is also presented for diffusion in the Cu-Ni-Zn-Mn quaternary system. Analytical representation of diffusion paths for both ternary and quaternary diffusion couples is presented with the aid of characteristic path parameters.

Dayananda, M.A.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

407

Optimisation of a transverse flux linear PM generator using 3D Finite Element Analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Several transverse flux and longitudinal flux linear generator topologies exist for freepiston Stirling engine applications. In this thesis the transverse flux permanent magnet… (more)

Schutte, Jacques

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Microscopic characterization of radionuclide contaminated soils to assist remediation efforts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination of optical, scanning, and analytical electron microscopies have been used to describe the nature of radionuclide contamination at several sites. These investigations were conducted to provide information for remediation efforts. This technique has been used successfully with uranium-contaminated soils from Fernald, OH, and Portsmouth, OH, thorium-contaminated soil from a plant in Tennessee, plutonium-contamination sand from Johnston Island in the Pacific Ocean, and incinerator ash from Los Alamos, NM. Selecting the most suitable method for cleaning a particular site is difficult if the nature of the contamination is not understood. Microscopic characterization allows the most appropriate method to be selected for removing the contamination and can show the effect a particular method is having on the soil. A method of sample preparation has been developed that allows direct comparison of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images, enabling characterization of TEM samples to be more representative of the bulk sample.

Buck, E.C.; Brown, N.R.; Dietz, N.L.; Fortner, J.A.; Bates, J.K.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Treaty verification sample analysis program analytical results: UNSCOM 65 samples. Final report, December 1993-January 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nineteen samples from the United Nations Special Commission 65 on Iraq (UNSCOM 65) were analyzed for chemical warfare (CW) related compounds using a variety of highly sophisticated spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques. The samples consisted of six water, six soil, two vegetation, one cloth, one wood, and two mortar shell crosscut sections. No sulfur or nitrogen mustards, Lewsite, or any of their degradation products were detected. No nerve agents were observed, and no tin was detected precluding the presence of stannic chloride, a component of NC, a World War I choking agent. Diethyl phosphoric acid was unambiguously identified in three water samples, and ethyl phosphoric acid was tentatively identified, at very low levels, in one water sample. These phosphoric acids are degradation products of Amiton, many commercially available pesticides, as well as Tabun, and impurities in munitions-grade Tabun. No definitive conclusions concerning the source of these two chemicals could be drawn from the analytical results.

Szafraniec, L.L.; Beaudry, W.T.; Bossle, P.C.; Durst, H.D.; Ellzy, M.W.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

XANES Identification of Plutonium Speciation in RFETS Samples  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using primarily X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) with standards run in tandem with samples, probable plutonium speciation was determined for 13 samples from contaminated soil, acid-splash or fire-deposition building interior surfaces, or asphalt pads from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). Save for extreme oxidizing situations, all other samples were found to be of Pu(IV) speciation, supporting the supposition that such contamination is less likely to show mobility off site. EXAFS analysis conducted on two of the 13 samples supported the validity of the XANES features employed as determinants of the plutonium valence.

LoPresti, V.; Conradson, S.D.; Clark, D.L.

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

411

New Soil Property Database Improves Oklahoma Mesonet Soil Moisture Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil moisture data from the Oklahoma Mesonet are widely used in research efforts spanning many disciplines within Earth Sciences. These soil moisture estimates are derived by translating measurements of matric potential into volumetric water ...

Bethany L. Scott; Tyson E. Ochsner; Bradley G. Illston; Christopher A. Fiebrich; Jeffery B. Basara; Albert J. Sutherland

412

Sampling system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

413

Monthly Simulation of Surface Layer Fluxes and Soil Properties during FIFE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Global change and regional climate experiments with atmospheric numerical models rely on the parameterization of the surface boundary in order to evaluate impact on society and agriculture. In this paper, several surface modeling strategies have ...

Michael G. Bosilovich; Wen-yih Sun

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

2003 CBECS Sample Design  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Technical Information > Sample Design Technical Information > Sample Design How the Survey Was Conducted 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Sample Design Introduction The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) is conducted quadrennially by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to provide basic statistical information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings. The survey is based upon a sample of commercial buildings selected according to the sample design requirements described below. A “building,” as opposed to an “establishment,” is the basic unit of analysis for the CBECS because the building is the energy-consuming unit. The 2003 CBECS was the eighth survey conducted since 1979

415

Biological sample collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A biological sample collector is adapted to a collect several biological samples in a plurality of filter wells. A biological sample collector may comprise a manifold plate for mounting a filter plate thereon, the filter plate having a plurality of filter wells therein; a hollow slider for engaging and positioning a tube that slides therethrough; and a slide case within which the hollow slider travels to allow the tube to be aligned with a selected filter well of the plurality of filter wells, wherein when the tube is aligned with the selected filter well, the tube is pushed through the hollow slider and into the selected filter well to sealingly engage the selected filter well and to allow the tube to deposit a biological sample onto a filter in the bottom of the selected filter well. The biological sample collector may be portable.

Murphy, Gloria A. (French Camp, CA)

2010-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

416

Sample Changes and Issues  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sample and Model Issues Sample and Model Issues Summary Our comprehensive review of the EIA 914 has confirmed that discrepancies can arise between estimates for December of one year and January of the next. These are most evident for Texas estimates between December 2008 and January 2009. Reports now available from HPDI show that production for all the companies we sampled in both 2008 and 2009 rose by about 60 million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d) in January and that total production in Texas rose by a similar amount. Our estimate was a decrease of 360 MMcf/d. Why the difference? Computationally, EIA-914 estimates depend on two factors: * Reports from the companies in the survey sample * An expansion factor to estimate total production from the sample's reported

417

Sample push out fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention generally relates to the remote removal of pelletized samples from cylindrical containment capsules. V-blocks are used to receive the samples and provide guidance to push out rods. Stainless steel liners fit into the v-channels on the v-blocks which permits them to be remotely removed and replaced or cleaned to prevent cross contamination between capsules and samples. A capsule holder securely holds the capsule while allowing manual up/down and in/out movement to align each sample hole with the v-blocks. Both end sections contain identical v-blocks; one that guides the drive out screw and rods or manual push out rods and the other to receive the samples as they are driven out of the capsule.

Biernat, John L.

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Plant Communities, Soil Carbon, and Soil Nitrogen Properties in a ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brye KR, Kucharik CJ (2003) Carbon and nitrogen sequestration in two prairie topochronosequences on contrasting soils in Southern. Wisconsin. American ...

419

Spatially averaged heat flux and convergence measurements at the ARM regional flux experiment  

SciTech Connect

Cloud formation and its relation to climate change is the greatest weakness in current numerical climate models. Surface heat flux in some cases causes clouds to form and in other to dissipate and the differences between these cases are subtle enough to make parameterization difficult in a numerical model. One of the goals of the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement program is to make long term measurements at representative sites to improve radiation and cloud formation parameterization. This paper compares spatially averaged optical measurements of heat flux and convergence with a goal of determining how point measurements of heat fluxes scale up to the larger scale used for climate modeling. It was found that the various optical techniques used in this paper compared well with each other and with independent measurements. These results add confidence that spatially averaging optical techniques can be applied to transform point measurements to the larger scales needed for mesoscale and climate modeling. 10 refs., 6 figs. (MHB)

Porch, W.; Barnes, F.; Buchwald, M.; Clements, W.; Cooper, D.; Hoard, D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Doran, C.; Hubbe, J.; Shaw, W. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Coulter, R.; Martin, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Kunkel, K. (Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

A correlation between soil descriptions and {sup 226}Ra concentrations in Florida soils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The soil radium content in Florida is highly variable. The range in radium concentrations, where the samples involved in this study are concerned, is from 0.1 pCi/g to 18.5 pCi/g. Low {sup 226}Ra concentrations (0.1 to 5 pCi/g) are evidenced in sands, moderate concentrations (5 to 11 pCi/g) are found in silt and gravel, and high {sup 226}Ra concentrations (>11 pCi/g) are found in soil horizons with shell, clay, and strata with phosphate. Strata containing phosphate yields a high concentration of {sup 226}Ra. The information obtained in this study, soil descriptions with their corresponding {sup 226}Ra concentrations, comes from geological cores drilled by geotechnical consultants with gamma spectrometry analysis performed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy. Concentration; of {sup 226}Ra generally increase with depth. These cores are usually terminated at 20 feet deep, with some cores being shallower than this due to hitting bedrock or encountering the water table. These frequency distributions give the core-logging geologist an approximate concentration of {sup 226}Ra based on the description of the soil. Since the correlation of {sup 226}Ra and soil descriptions can be used as a tool in assigning indoor radon potential, this study is of importance to land managers, contractors, developers, and regulating agencies who are attempting to place standards on tracts of land with {sup 226}Ra concentration used as a criterion.

Harrison, D.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Field Studies of Soil Vapor Intrusion at a Vacant Manufactured Gas Plant (MGP) Site in Wisconsin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comprehensive two-phase field-based research program was completed at a former manufactured gas plant (MGP) site located in Wisconsin during the summer of 2008. The purpose of this ongoing research study is to develop improved approaches and methodologies for characterizing the potential for vapor intrusion (VI) at MGP sites. This report describes the methods, results, and limited data interpretation of Phase I (Passive Soil Gas Survey) and Phase II (Soil, Groundwater, and Soil Gas Sampling) at the vac...

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL The High Flux Isotope Reactor at ORNL Aerial of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site The High Flux Isotope Reactor site is located on the south side of the ORNL campus and is about a three-minute drive from her sister neutron facility, the Spallation Neutron Source. Operating at 85 MW, HFIR is the highest flux reactor-based source of neutrons for research in the United States, and it provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world. The thermal and cold neutrons produced by HFIR are used to study physics, chemistry, materials science, engineering, and biology. The intense neutron flux, constant power density, and constant-length fuel cycles are used by more than 500 researchers each year for neutron scattering research into

423

Lyman Alpha Flux Power Spectrum and Its Covariance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the flux power spectrum and its covariance using simulated Lyman alpha forests. We find that pseudo-hydro techniques are good approximations of hydrodynamical simulations at high redshift. However, the pseudo-hydro techniques fail at low redshift because they are insufficient for characterizing some components of the low-redshift intergalactic medium, notably the warm-hot intergalactic medium. Hence, to use the low-redshift Lyman alpha flux power spectrum to constrain cosmology, one would need realistic hydrodynamical simulations. By comparing one-dimensional mass statistics with flux statistics, we show that the nonlinear transform between density and flux quenches the fluctuations so that the flux power spectrum is much less sensitive to cosmological parameters than the one-dimensional mass power spectrum. The covariance of the flux power spectrum is nearly Gaussian. As such, the uncertainties of the underlying mass power spectrum could still be large, even though the flux power spectrum can be p...

Zhan, H; Eisenstein, D J; Katz, N; Zhan, Hu; Dave, Romeel; Eisenstein, Daniel; Katz, Neal

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Trapped Quintessential Inflation from Flux Compactifications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quintessential inflation is studied using a string modulus as the inflaton - quintessence field. It is assumed that the modulus crosses an enhanced symmetry point (ESP) in field space. Particle production at the ESP temporarily traps the modulus resulting in a period of inflation. After reheating, the modulus freezes due to cosmological friction at a large value, such that its scalar potential is dominated by contributions due to fluxes in the extra dimensions. The modulus remains frozen until the present, when it can become quintessence.

Konstantinos Dimopoulos

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Prompt muon contribution to the flux underwater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present high energy spectra and zenith-angle distributions of the atmospheric muons computed for the depths of the locations of the underwater neutrino telescopes. We compare the calculations with the data obtained in the Baikal and the AMANDA muon experiments. The prompt muon contribution to the muon flux underwater due to recent perturbative QCD-based models of the charm production is expected to be observable at depths of the large underwater neutrino telescopes. This appears to be probable even at rather shallow depths (1-2 km), provided that the energy threshold for muon detection is raised above $\\sim 100$ TeV.

T. S. Sinegovskaya; S. I. Sinegovsky

2000-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

426

Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction  

SciTech Connect

Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

427

Soil Characterization at the Linde FUSRAP Site and the Impact on Soil Volume Estimates  

SciTech Connect

The former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York is currently undergoing active remediation of Manhattan Engineering District's radiological contamination. This remediation is authorized under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The focus of this paper will be to describe the impact of soil characterization efforts as they relate to soil volume estimates and project cost estimates. An additional objective is to stimulate discussion about other characterization and modeling technologies, and to provide a ''Lessons Learned'' scenario to assist in future volume estimating at other FUSRAP sites. Initial soil characterization efforts at the Linde FUSRAP site in areas known to be contaminated or suspected to be contaminated were presented in the Remedial Investigation Report for the Tonawanda Site, dated February 1993. Results of those initial characterization efforts were the basis for soil volume estimates that were used to estimate and negotiate the current remediation contract. During the course of remediation, previously unidentified areas of contamination were discovered, and additional characterization was initiated. Additional test pit and geoprobe samples were obtained at over 500 locations, bringing the total to over 800 sample locations at the 135-acre site. New data continues to be collected on a routine basis during ongoing remedial actions.

Boyle, J.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

428

Soil Characterization at the Linde FUSRAP Site and the Impact on Soil Volume Estimates  

SciTech Connect

The former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York is currently undergoing active remediation of Manhattan Engineering District's radiological contamination. This remediation is authorized under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The focus of this paper will be to describe the impact of soil characterization efforts as they relate to soil volume estimates and project cost estimates. An additional objective is to stimulate discussion about other characterization and modeling technologies, and to provide a ''Lessons Learned'' scenario to assist in future volume estimating at other FUSRAP sites. Initial soil characterization efforts at the Linde FUSRAP site in areas known to be contaminated or suspected to be contaminated were presented in the Remedial Investigation Report for the Tonawanda Site, dated February 1993. Results of those initial characterization efforts were the basis for soil volume estimates that were used to estimate and negotiate the current remediation contract. During the course of remediation, previously unidentified areas of contamination were discovered, and additional characterization was initiated. Additional test pit and geoprobe samples were obtained at over 500 locations, bringing the total to over 800 sample locations at the 135-acre site. New data continues to be collected on a routine basis during ongoing remedial actions.

Boyle, J.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

429

Some Geotechnical Properties of Palm Biodiesel Contaminated Mining Sand and Weathered Granite Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oil-pollution due to accidental during transportation or leakage from storage not only brings large damage to the environments, but it also affects the geotechnical properties of soil. Hence, an extensive laboratory testing program was carried out to investigate the geotechnical properties on palm biodiesel contaminated weathered granite soil and mining sand. A series of laboratory experiments has been carried out by using a direct simple shear device on clean and contaminated soil samples. The contaminated soil samples were mixed with palm biodiesel in the amount 5%, 10 % and 15 % by dry weight. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of palm biodiesel contamination on the mining sand and weathered granite soil samples. The overall results indicated decrease of shear strength with increasing palm biodiesel contents.

Yue Ling

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Title Carbon, water, and heat flux responses to experimental burning and drought in a tallgrass prairie Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Fischer, Marc L., Margaret S. Torn, David P. Billesbach, Geoffrey Doyle, Brian Northup, and Sebastien C. Biraud Journal Agricultural and Forest Meteorology Volume 166-167 Pagination 169-174 Keywords Carbon exchange, eddy covariance, Fire, Grassland, Prairie, Water stress Abstract Drought and fire are common disturbances to grassland ecosystems. We report two years of eddy covariance ecosystem-atmosphere fluxes and biometric variables measured in nearby burned and unburned pastures in the US Southern Great Plains. Over the course of the experiment, annual precipitation (∼600 mm yr-1) was lower than the long term mean (∼860 mm yr-1). Soil moisture decreased from productive conditions in March 2005 dry, unproductive conditions during the growing season starting in March 2006. Just prior to the burn in early March 2005, burned and unburned pastures contained 520 ± 60 and 360 ± 40 g C m-2 of total above ground biomass (AGB) and litter, respectively. The fire removed approximately 200 g C m-2 of litter and biomass. In the 2005 growing season following the burn, maximum green AGB was 450 ± 60 and 270 ± 40 g C m-2, with corresponding cumulative annual net ecosystem carbon exchange (NEE) of -330 and -150 g C m-2 for the burned and unburned pastures, respectively. In contrast to NEE, cumulative mean sensible heat and water fluxes were approximately equal in both pastures during the growing season, suggesting either an increase in water use efficiency or a decrease in evaporation in the burned relative to the unburned pasture. In the 2006 growing season, dry conditions decreased carbon uptake and latent heat, and increased sensible heat fluxes. Peak AGB was reduced to 210 ± 30 g C m-2 and 140 ± 30 g C m-2 in the burned and unburned pastures, respectively, while NEE was near zero. These results suggest that the lack of precipitation was responsible for most of the interannual variation in carbon exchange for these un-irrigated prairie pastures.

431

How Sample Completeness Affects Gamma-Ray Burst Classification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unsupervised pattern recognition algorithms support the existence of three gamma-ray burst classes; Class I (long, large fluence bursts of intermediate spectral hardness), Class II (short, small fluence, hard bursts), and Class III (soft bursts of intermediate durations and fluences). The algorithms surprisingly assign larger membership to Class III than to either of the other two classes. A known systematic bias has been previously used to explain the existence of Class III in terms of Class I; this bias allows the fluences and durations of some bursts to be underestimated (Hakkila et al., ApJ 538, 165, 2000). We show that this bias primarily affects only the longest bursts and cannot explain the bulk of the Class III properties. We resolve the question of Class III existence by demonstrating how samples obtained using standard trigger mechanisms fail to preserve the duration characteristics of small peak flux bursts. Sample incompleteness is thus primarily responsible for the existence of Class III. In order to avoid this incompleteness, we show how a new dual timescale peak flux can be defined in terms of peak flux and fluence. The dual timescale peak flux preserves the duration distribution of faint bursts and correlates better with spectral hardness – 2 – (and presumably redshift) than either peak flux or fluence. The techniques presented here are generic and have applicability to the studies of other transient events. The results also indicate that pattern recognition algorithms are sensitive to sample completeness; this can influence the study of large astronomical databases such as those found in a Virtual Observatory.

Jon Hakkila; Timothy W. Giblin; Richard J. Roiger; David J. Haglin; William S. Paciesas; Charles A. Meegan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

LETTER REPORT. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS OF SOILS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ARGYLE STREET SEWER LINE AT THE UNITED NUCLEAR CORPORATION NAVAL PRODUCTS SITE, NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT  

SciTech Connect

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Naval Products site on three separate occasions during the months of October and November 2011. The purpose of these visits was to conduct confirmatory surveys of soils associated with the Argyle Street sewer line that was being removed. Soil samples were collected from six different, judgmentally determined locations in the Argyle Street sewer trench. In addition to the six soil samples collected by ORISE, four replicate soil samples were collected by Cabrera Services, Inc. (CSI) for analysis by the ORISE laboratory. Replicate samples S0010 and S0011 were final status survey (FSS) bias samples; S0012 was an FSS systematic sample; and S0015 was a waste characterization sample. Six soil samples were also collected for background determination. Uranium-235 and uranium-238 concentrations were determined via gamma spectroscopy; the spectra were also reviewed for other identifiable photopeaks. Radionuclide concentrations for these soil samples are provided. In addition to the replicate samples and the samples collected by ORISE, CSI submitted three soil samples for inter-laboratory comparison analyses. One sample was from the background reference area, one was from waste characterization efforts (material inside the sewer line), and one was a FSS sample. The inter-laboratory comparison analyses results between ORISE and CSI were in agreement, except for one sample collected in the reference area. Smear results For Argyle Street sewer pipes are tabulated.

Adams, Wade C.

2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Soils and the greenhouse effect  

SciTech Connect

This book contains the following topics; Global distribution of the major soils and land cover types, Geographic quantification of soil and changes on their properties, Sources and sinks of greenhouse gases, Partitioning of solar energy, Soils, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Carbon dioxide, Greenhouse gasfluxes: Methane.

Bouwman, A.F.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

was not identified at many groundwater locations. 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? Yes 19. Were water levels measured...

435

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

436

SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS  

SciTech Connect

Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

437

Experimental and Computational Study of the Flux Spectrum in Materials Irradiation Facilities of the High Flux Isotope Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report compares the available experimental neutron flux data in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to computational models of the HFIR loosely based on the experimental loading of cycle 400. Over the last several decades, many materials irradiation experiments have included fluence monitors which were subsequently used to reconstruct a coarse-group energy-dependent flux spectrum. Experimental values for thermal and fast neutron flux in the flux trap about the midplane are found to be 1.78 0.27 and 1.05 0:06 1E15 n/cm sec, respectively. The reactor physics code MCNP is used to calculate neutron flux in the HFIR at irradiation locations. The computational results are shown to correspond to closely to experimental data for thermal and fast neutron flux with calculated percent differences ranging from 0:55 13.20%.

McDuffee, Joel Lee [ORNL; Daly, Thomas F [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Liquid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

Larson, L.L.

1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

440

Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uranium-contaminated soils from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging (SEM/BSE) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The inhomogeneous distribution of particulate uranium phases in the soil required the development of a method for using ultramicrotomy to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections of the SEM mounts. A water-miscible resin was selected that allowed comparison between SEM and TEM images, permitting representative sampling of the soil. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite (UO{sub 2}). No uranium was detected in association with phyllosilicates in the soil.

Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flux sampling soil" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Evaluation of the mercury soil mapping geothermal exploration techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to evaluate the suitability of the soil mercury geochemical survey as a geothermal exploration technique, soil concentrations of mercury are compared to the distribution of measured geothermal gradients at Dixie Valley, Nevada; Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah; and Noya, Japan. Zones containing high-mercury values are found to closely correspond to high geothermal gradient zones in all three areas. Moreover, the highest mercury values within the anomalies are found near the wells with the highest geothermal gradient. Such close correspondence between soil concentrations of mercury and high-measured geothermal gradients strongly suggests that relatively low-cost soil mercury geochemical sampling can be effective in identifying drilling targets within high-temperature areas.

Matlick, J.S.; Shiraki, M.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Plasma treatment of INEL soil contaminated with heavy metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

INEL soil spiked with inorganic salts of chromium, lead, mercury, silver, and zinc was melted in a 150 kW plasma furnace to produce a glassy slag product. This glassy slag is an environmentally safe waste form. In order to reduce the melting temperature of the soil, sodium carbonate was added to half of the test batches. Random sample from each batch of glassy slag product were analyzed by an independent laboratory for total metals concentration and leachability of metals via the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) toxicity characterization leaching procedure (RCLP) tests. These tests showed the residual metals were very tightly bound to the slag matrix and were within EPA TCLP limits under these test conditions. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and emissions dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the vitrified soil also confirmed that the added metals present in the vitrified soil were totally contained in the crystalline phase as distinct oxide crystallites.

Detering, B.A.; Batdorf, J.A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

RHIZOSPHERE MICROBIOLOGY OF CHLORINATED ETHENE CONTAMINATED SOILS: EFFECTS ON PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID CONTENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Microbial degradation of chlorinated ethenes (CE) in rhizosphere soils was investigated at seepline areas impacted by CE plumes. Successful bioremediation of CE in rhizosphere soils is dependent on microbial activity, soil types, plant species, and groundwater CE concentrations. Seepline soils were exposed to trichloroethylene (TCE) and perchloroethylene (PCE) in the 10-50 ppb range. Greenhouse soils were exposed to 2-10 ppm TCE. Plants at the seepline were poplar and pine while the greenhouse contained sweet gum, willow, pine, and poplar. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) analyses were performed to assess the microbial activity in rhizosphere soils. Biomass content was lowest in the nonvegetated control soil and highest in the Sweet Gum soil. Bacterial rhizhosphere densities, as measured by PLFA, were similar in different vegetated soils while fungi biomass was highly variable. The PLFA soil profiles showed diverse microbial communities primarily composed of Gram-negative bacteria. Adaptation of the microbial community to CE was determined by the ratio of {omega}7t/{omega}7c fatty acids. Ratios (16:1{omega}7v16:1{omega}7c and 18:l{omega}7t/18:1{omega}7c) greater than 0.1 were demonstrated in soils exposed to higher CE concentrations (10-50 ppm), indicating an adaptation to CE resulting in decreased membrane permeability. Ratios of cyclopropyl fatty acids showed that the vegetated control soil sample contained the fastest microbial turnover rate and least amount of environmental stress. PLFA results provide evidence that sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) are active in these soils. Microcosm studies with these soils showed CE dechlorinating activity was occurring. This study demonstrates microbial adaptation to environmental contamination and supports the application of natural soil rhizosphere activity as a remedial strategy.

Brigmon, R. L.; Stanhopc, A.; Franck, M. M.; McKinsey, P. C.; Berry, C. J.

2005-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

444

AQUEOUS Pb REDUCTION IN Pb-CONTAMINATED SOILS BY FLORIDA PHOSPHATE ROCKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

battery-cracking site in situ using a phosphate additive costs as little as $55 Mg-1 soil (Showdhury et al and kinetics of reactions between PR and soils. Our results demonstrate that PR has a potential to cost sample, obtained from a former battery-cracking site in Florida, had Pb concentra- tions up to 135 000 mg

Ma, Lena

445

Turbulent Fluxes in the Hurricane Boundary Layer. Part I: Momentum Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important outcome from the ONR-sponsored Coupled Boundary Layer Air–Sea Transfer (CBLAST) Hurricane Program is the first-ever direct measurements of momentum flux from within hurricane boundary layers. In 2003, a specially instrumented NOAA P3 ...

Jeffrey R. French; William M. Drennan; Jun A. Zhang; Peter G. Black

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

FLUX MEASUREMENTS FROM A TALL TOWER IN A COMPLEX LANDSCAPE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy and representativeness of flux measurements from a tall tower in a complex landscape was assessed by examining the vertical and sector variability of the ratio of wind speed to momentum flux and the ratio of vertical advective to eddy flux of heat. The 30-60 m ratios were consistent with theoretical predictions which indicate well mixed flux footprints. Some variation with sector was observed that were consistent with upstream roughness. Vertical advection was negligible compared with vertical flux except for a few sectors at night. This implies minor influence from internal boundary layers. Flux accuracy is a function of sector and stability but 30-60 m fluxes were found to be generally representative of the surrounding landscape. This paper will study flux data from a 300 m tower, with 4 levels of instruments, in a complex landscape. The surrounding landscape will be characterized in terms of the variation in the ratio of mean wind speed to momentum flux as a function of height and wind direction. The importance of local advection will be assessed by comparing vertical advection with eddy fluxes for momentum and heat.

Kurzeja, R.; Weber, A.; Chiswell, S.; Parker, M.

2010-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

447

Variability of Gas Composition and Flux Intensity in Natural Marine Hydrocarbon Seeps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas composition and flux intensity in natural marineof gas composition and flux intensity in natural marine

Clark, J F; Schwager, Katherine; Washburn, Libe

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil.

Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Combined effects of short-term rainfall patterns and soil texture on nitrogen cycling -- A Modeling Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Precipitation variability and magnitude are expected to change in many parts of the world over the 21st century. We examined the potential effects of intra-annual rainfall patterns on soil nitrogen (N) transport and transformation in the unsaturated soil zone using a deterministic dynamic modeling approach. The model (TOUGHREACT-N), which has been tested and applied in several experimental and observational systems, mechanistically accounts for microbial activity, soil-moisture dynamics that respond to precipitation variability, and gaseous and aqueous tracer transport in the soil. Here, we further tested and calibrated the model against data from a precipitation variability experiment in a tropical system in Costa Rica. The model was then used to simulate responses of soil moisture, microbial dynamics, nitrogen (N) aqueous and gaseous species, N leaching, and N trace-gas emissions to changes in rainfall patterns; the effect of soil texture was also examined. The temporal variability of nitrate leaching and NO, N{sub 2}, and N{sub 2}O effluxes were significantly influenced by rainfall dynamics. Soil texture combined with rainfall dynamics altered soil moisture dynamics, and consequently regulated soil N responses to precipitation changes. The clay loam soil more effectively buffered water stress during relatively long intervals between precipitation events, particularly after a large rainfall event. Subsequent soil N aqueous and gaseous losses showed either increases or decreases in response to increasing precipitation variability due to complex soil moisture dynamics. For a high rainfall scenario, high precipitation variability resulted in as high as 2.4-, 2.4-, 1.2-, and 13-fold increases in NH{sub 3}, NO, N{sub 2}O and NO{sub 3}{sup -} fluxes, respectively, in clay loam soil. In sandy loam soil, however, NO and N{sub 2}O fluxes decreased by 15% and 28%, respectively, in response to high precipitation variability. Our results demonstrate that soil N cycling responses to incre