Sample records for flux sampling soil

  1. ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  2. ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We

  3. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V. (Knoxville, TN)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  4. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  5. Tank farm backlog soil sample analysis plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlers, J.D., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the measures to collect samples, perform testing on samples, and make decisions to obtain a Contained- in Determination for tank farms backlog soil.

  6. Soil Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs, Idaho:Soil Sampling Jump

  7. Soil samples at the APS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    movement into and about the country. A permit from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) is required to receive these soils unless they are sterilized. More complete...

  8. Homeowner Soil Sample Information Form

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    this step 8 to 10 times in the lawn or garden which is being considered for testing. ? Mix all collected soil thoroughly, removing any roots or other visible plant materials and place 2-3 cups of soil in a quart-sized re-sealable plastic bag. Air...

  9. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  10. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  11. Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammerton, James

    Soil CO2 flux and photoautotrophic community composition in high-elevation, `barren' soil Kristen R of Colorado, Campus Box 450, Boulder, CO 80309, USA. Summary Soil-dominated ecosystems, with little-elevation, subnival zone soil (i.e. elevations higher than the zone of continuous vegetation), the structure

  12. Procedures for sampling radium-contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleischhauer, H.L.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two procedures for sampling the surface layer (0 to 15 centimeters) of radium-contaminated soil are recommended for use in remedial action projects. Both procedures adhere to the philosophy that soil samples should have constant geometry and constant volume in order to ensure uniformity. In the first procedure, a ''cookie cutter'' fashioned from pipe or steel plate, is driven to the desired depth by means of a slide hammer, and the sample extracted as a core or plug. The second procedure requires use of a template to outline the sampling area, from which the sample is obtained using a trowel or spoon. Sampling to the desired depth must then be performed incrementally. Selection of one procedure over the other is governed primarily by soil conditions, the cookie cutter being effective in nongravelly soils, and the template procedure appropriate for use in both gravelly and nongravelly soils. In any event, a minimum sample volume of 1000 cubic centimeters is recommended. The step-by-step procedures are accompanied by a description of the minimum requirements for sample documentation. Transport of the soil samples from the field is then addressed in a discussion of the federal regulations for shipping radioactive materials. Interpretation of those regulations, particularly in light of their application to remedial action soil-sampling programs, is provided in the form of guidance and suggested procedures. Due to the complex nature of the regulations, however, there is no guarantee that our interpretations of them are complete or entirely accurate. Preparation of soil samples for radium-226 analysis by means of gamma-ray spectroscopy is described.

  13. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Lewicki, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki, Et Al.,...

  14. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod L. (Aiken, SC)

    2009-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  15. Site monitoring from soil sample analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Illsley, C.T.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil samples have been collected for the past three years as part of a long range monitoring program. The program was designed to provide information on possible migration of plutonium in soil and to provide data for comparison with the EPA proposed guidance on transuranium elements in the environment. Samples have been collected at six locations west of Indiana Street within the eastern boundaries of the Rocky Flats Plant site. The EPA comparison study has been performed at five sites and the plutonium migration study is underway at the sixth site. The data on plutonium analyses will be compared to the EPA screening level of 0.20 ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/ (74 x 10/sup 8/ Bq/km/sup 2/) in the five boundary sites. Possible migration trends will be examined for the plutonium data on soils from the other site.

  16. aggregate soil samples: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and questionnaires for your own identification. Directions for obtaining soil samples Norton, Jay B. 35 Testing Your Soil: How to Collect and Send Samples Texas A&M University...

  17. Remote sensing of soil radionuclide fluxes in a tropical ecosystem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, B.; Koranda, J.; Robinson, W.; Holladay, G.

    1980-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We are using a transponding geostationary satellite to collect surface environmental data to describe the fate of soil-borne radionuclides. The remote, former atomic testing grounds at the Eniwetok and Bikini Atolls present a difficult environment in which to collect continuous field data. Our land-based, solar-powered microprocessor and environmental data systems remotely acquire measurements of net and total solar radiation, rain, humidity, temperature, and soil-water potentials. For the past year, our water flux model predicts wet season plant transpiration rates nearly equal to the 6 to 7 mm/d evaporation pan rate, which decreases to 2 to 3 mm/d for the dry season. Radioisotopic analysis confirms the microclimate-estimated 1:3 to 1:20 soil to plant /sup 137/Cs dry matter concentration ratio. This ratio exacerbates the dose to man from intake of food plants. Nephelometer measurements of airborne particulates presently indicate a minimum respiratory radiological dose.

  18. Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface regime to examine physical controls on soil CO2 production. Results

  19. Testing Your Soil: How to Collect and Send Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil tests can be used to estimate the kinds and amounts of soil nutrients available to plants and as aids in determining fertilizer needs. This publication covers the three-step procedure for obtaining sample bags and instructions, collecting...

  20. Development of a passive soil gas flux sampler 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuown, Brian C

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flux sampler. A threaded rod was welded perpendicular to the screen, so that it was parallel to the walls of the canister when installed. To set the height of the PGSs from the sampling surface, a bar accommodating 2 PGSs was machined... and soapy water, then dried at 200 C and wrapped in heavy aluminum foil. 23 Active Surface Flux Samplers. Reference samplers used in the field studies were of 2 types, the active tube sampler described in Chapter III, and a full size EIFC as noted...

  1. Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Head of Department) May 1989 ABSTRACT Zinc Sorption by Iron Oxides and Soil Samples. (May 1989) Markku Juhani Yli-Halla, M. S. University of Helsinki, Finland Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard H. Loeppert Zn sorption by synthetic Fe oxide... and soil samples was studied. The purpose was to examine the effect of crystallinity and adsorbed silica on Zn adsorption by synthetic Fe oxide using goethite and ferrihydrite as test materials. Zn sorption by acid soil samples from Finland and a...

  2. Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Waunita Hot Springs Geothermal Area (Ringrose & Pearl, 1981) Exploration...

  3. Soil separator and sampler and method of sampling

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Ritter, Paul D. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil sampler includes a fluidized bed for receiving a soil sample. The fluidized bed may be in communication with a vacuum for drawing air through the fluidized bed and suspending particulate matter of the soil sample in the air. In a method of sampling, the air may be drawn across a filter, separating the particulate matter. Optionally, a baffle or a cyclone may be included within the fluidized bed for disentrainment, or dedusting, so only the finest particulate matter, including asbestos, will be trapped on the filter. The filter may be removable, and may be tested to determine the content of asbestos and other hazardous particulate matter in the soil sample.

  4. forEnvironmentalManagementofMilitaryLands Guide to Sampling Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ....................................................................................................................................4 COMPACTION SAMPLING GUIDELINES resistance, which can be measured using a penetrometer much more rapidly that bulk density samples can to measure soil compaction because of their easy, rapid, and economical operation (Perumpral, 1987

  5. R E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    not considered in accounting for global C fluxes because mineral soil C is commonly thought to be relativelyR E V I E W Mineral soil carbon fluxes in forests and implications for carbon balance assessments of Environment and Natural Resources, 209 Hills Building, University of Vermont, 81 Carrigan Drive, Burlington

  6. Forest soil CO2 flux: uncovering the contribution and environmental responses of ectomycorrhizas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    Forest soil CO2 flux: uncovering the contribution and environmental responses of ectomycorrhizas- standing of the origins and environmental responses of soil CO2 efflux. For example, despite their large biomass, the contribution of ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi to forest soil CO2 efflux and responses to changes

  7. Effects of soil rewetting and thawing on soil gas fluxes: a review of current literature and suggestions for future research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Dong-Gill; Vargas, Rodrigo; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Turetsky, Merritt

    2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Rewetting of dry soils and thawing of frozen soils are short-term, transitional phenomena in terms of hydrology and thermodynamics in soil systems. The impact of these short-term phenomena on larger-scale ecosystem fluxes has only recently been fully appreciated, and a growing number of studies show that these events affect various biogeochemical processes including fluxes of biogenic gases such as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), methane (CH{sub 4}), nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), ammonia (NH{sub 3}) and nitric oxide (NO). Global climate models predict that future climatic change is likely to alter the frequency and intensity of drying-rewetting events and thawing of frozen soils, highlighting the importance of understanding how rewetting and thawing will influence biogenic gas fluxes. Here we summarize findings in an acquired database from 338 studies conducted from 1956-2010, and propose future research questions. Studies have reported conflicting results, ranging from large increases in gas fluxes to non-significant changes following rewetting and thawing in various terrestrial ecosystems. An analysis of published data revealed that CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes increase 7.6 (standard error 1.1) times following rewetting and thawing with no significant difference between these events. We explore possible mechanisms and controls that regulate flux responses, and note that there is a lack of studies on variation of CH{sub 4}, NO and NH{sub 3} fluxes following rewetting and thawing events. High temporal resolution of flux measurements is critical to capture rapid changes in the gas fluxes after these soil perturbations. Finally, we propose that future studies should investigate the interactions between biological (i.e., microbial community) and physical (i.e., gas production, flux, and dissolution) changes in biogenic gas fluxes, and explore synergistic experimental and modelling approaches.

  8. Soil Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Klusman...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Date - 1979 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis A1-horizon soil samples collected in the vicinity of the resurgent dome and a known geothermal source...

  9. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  10. Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical niobium samples used for superconducting radio frequency cavity fabrication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical niobium samples used for superconducting radio.1088/0953-2048/25/6/065014 Flux pinning characteristics in cylindrical niobium samples used for superconducting radio frequency-grain (LG) and fine-grain (FG) niobium samples used for the fabrication of superconducting radio frequency

  11. Soil Sample Questionnaire --Field Crops Sample No. Field Identification Field Size acres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    . Subsoil: (if known) sand gravel clay hardpan lime solid rock 7. Water penetration: rapid moderate slow soil questionnaire on the back of this sheet. Have soil tested at least once every rotation. 2. Sample of the hole and put it in a clean container. Repeat this procedure at 10 or 12 locations in the field. Mix

  12. Spatial variability in soil heat flux at three Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jiquan

    Spatial variability in soil heat flux at three Inner Mongolia steppe ecosystems Changliang Shao a-covariance Grassland Inner Mongolia a b s t r a c t Closing the energy budget at flux measurement sites is problematic system within the footprints of three Eddy-covariance towers located in the steppe of Inner Mongolia

  13. Testing Your Soil: How to Collect and Send Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2002-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    System. 8-99 Level of available soil nutrient Crop yield increase from fertilization V. LOW LOW MEDIUM HIGH V. HIGH E E-534 ping, fertilization, liming, soil types or land use will re- quire several composite samples. The field identification map should...) select the proper test, and complete the information sheet and mail to the Soil, Water, and Forage Testing Laboratory at 345 Heep Center, College Station, TX 77843-2474. Contact the lab at (409) 845-4816, FAX (409) 845-5958, or at the Web site http...

  14. GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

  15. GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

  16. Rapid Determination Of Radiostrontium In Large Soil Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Shaw, Patrick J.

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of radiostrontium in large soil samples has been developed at the Savannah River Environmental Laboratory (Aiken, SC, USA) that allows rapid preconcentration and separation of strontium in large soil samples for the measurement of strontium isotopes by gas flow proportional counting. The need for rapid analyses in the event of a Radiological Dispersive Device (RDD) or Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) event is well-known. In addition, the recent accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 reinforces the need to have rapid analyses for radionuclides in environmental samples in the event of a nuclear accident. The method employs a novel pre-concentration step that utilizes an iron hydroxide precipitation (enhanced with calcium phosphate) followed by a final calcium fluoride precipitation to remove silicates and other matrix components. The pre-concentration steps, in combination with a rapid Sr Resin separation using vacuum box technology, allow very large soil samples to be analyzed for {sup 89,90}Sr using gas flow proportional counting with a lower method detection limit. The calcium fluoride precipitation eliminates column flow problems typically associated with large amounts of silicates in large soil samples.

  17. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR ACTINIDES IN EMERGENCY SOIL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

    2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for samples up to 2 grams in emergency response situations. The actinides in soil method utilizes a rapid sodium hydroxide fusion method, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a streamlined column separation process with stacked TEVA, TRU and DGA Resin cartridges. Lanthanum was separated rapidly and effectively from Am and Cm on DGA Resin. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time. Alpha sources are prepared using cerium fluoride microprecipitation for counting by alpha spectrometry. The method showed high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. This new procedure was applied to emergency soil samples received in the NRIP Emergency Response exercise administered by the National Institute for Standards and Technology (NIST) in April, 2009. The actinides in soil results were reported within 4-5 hours with excellent quality.

  18. Measurement of advective soil gas flux: Results of field and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at a high chamber-flushing rate, are likely to yield flux measurements closer to the true values. Citation: Amonette JE, JL Barr, RL Erikson, LM Dobeck, JL Barr, and JA...

  19. Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma:Laney, 2005)Gas Flux

  20. Atmosphere-soil-stream greenhouse gas fluxes from peatlands 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinsmore, Kerry J.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Peatlands cover approximately 2-3% of the world’s land area yet represent approximately a third of the worlds estimated total soil carbon pool. They therefore play an important role in regulating global atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations...

  1. Self-potential, soil co2 flux, and temperature on masaya volcano, nicaragua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Connor, C.; St-Amand, K.; Stix, J.; Spinner, W.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the spatial relationship between self-potential (SP), soil CO{sub 2} flux, and temperature and the mechanisms that produce SP anomalies on the flanks of Masaya volcano, Nicaragua. We measured SP, soil CO{sub 2} fluxes (<1 to 5.0 x 10{sup 4} g m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), and temperatures (26 to 80 C) within an area surrounding a normal fault, adjacent to Comalito cinder cone (2002-2003). These variables are well spatially correlated. Wavelengths of SP anomalies are {le}100 m, and high horizontal SP gradients flank the region of elevated flux and temperature. Carbon isotopic compositions of soil CO{sub 2} ({delta}{sup 13}C = -3.3 to -1.1{per_thousand}) indicate a deep gas origin. Given the presence of a deep water table (100 to 150 m), high gas flow rates, and subsurface temperatures above liquid boiling points, we suggest that rapid fluid disruption is primarily responsible for positive SP anomalies here. Concurrent measurement of SP, soil CO{sub 2} flux, and temperature may be a useful tool to monitor intrusive activity.

  2. Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vallino, Joseph J.

    Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases Emissions--Carbon Dioxide Emissions--Sequestration and Storage--Biochar--Basalt--Organic Fertilizers, this investigation focuses on the range of potential of different soil additives to enhance sequestration and storage

  3. Above- and below-ground methane fluxes and methanotrophic activity in a landfill-cover soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schroth, M.H., E-mail: martin.schroth@env.ethz.ch [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Eugster, W. [Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 2, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gomez, K.E. [Institute of Biogeochemistry and Pollutant Dynamics, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 16, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Gonzalez-Gil, G. [Laboratory for Environmental Biotechnology, EPF Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne (Switzerland); Niklaus, P.A. [Institute of Agricultural Sciences, ETH Zuerich, Universitaetstrasse 2, 8092 Zuerich (Switzerland); Oester, P. [Oester Messtechnik, Bahnhofstrasse 3, 3600 Thun (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We quantify above- and below-ground CH{sub 4} fluxes in a landfill-cover soil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} loading from the waste body. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Methane loading and emissions are highly variable in space and time. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eddy covariance measurements yield largest estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential methanotrophic activity is high at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. - Abstract: Landfills are a major anthropogenic source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH{sub 4}). However, much of the CH{sub 4} produced during the anaerobic degradation of organic waste is consumed by methanotrophic microorganisms during passage through the landfill-cover soil. On a section of a closed landfill near Liestal, Switzerland, we performed experiments to compare CH{sub 4} fluxes obtained by different methods at or above the cover-soil surface with below-ground fluxes, and to link methanotrophic activity to estimates of CH{sub 4} ingress (loading) from the waste body at selected locations. Fluxes of CH{sub 4} into or out of the cover soil were quantified by eddy-covariance and static flux-chamber measurements. In addition, CH{sub 4} concentrations at the soil surface were monitored using a field-portable FID detector. Near-surface CH{sub 4} fluxes and CH{sub 4} loading were estimated from soil-gas concentration profiles in conjunction with radon measurements, and gas push-pull tests (GPPTs) were performed to quantify rates of microbial CH{sub 4} oxidation. Eddy-covariance measurements yielded by far the largest and probably most representative estimates of overall CH{sub 4} emissions from the test section (daily mean up to {approx}91,500 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), whereas flux-chamber measurements and CH{sub 4} concentration profiles indicated that at the majority of locations the cover soil was a net sink for atmospheric CH{sub 4} (uptake up to -380 {mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}) during the experimental period. Methane concentration profiles also indicated strong variability in CH{sub 4} loading over short distances in the cover soil, while potential methanotrophic activity derived from GPPTs was high (v{sub max} {approx} 13 mmol L{sup -1}(soil air) h{sup -1}) at a location with substantial CH{sub 4} loading. Our results provide a basis to assess spatial and temporal variability of CH{sub 4} dynamics in the complex terrain of a landfill-cover soil.

  4. Nutrient Management for Texas High Plains Cotton Soil Sampling and Testing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Nutrient Management for Texas High Plains Cotton Production Soil Sampling and Testing Soil testing. Phosphorus Phosphorus (P) is important in promoting early rooting. It is involved in plant energy storage

  5. AN IMPROVED TECHNIQUE FOR SOIL SOLUTION SAMPLING IN THE VADOSE ZONE UTILIZING REAL-TIME DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    in the AVMS consist of battery power sources recharged through solar panels mounted near the system to supply compo- nents: (1) data I/O control unit; (2) soil moisture sensors; (3) soil matric potential/storage unit; and (7) associated sample tubing and control wiring (Figure 1). The number of asso- ciated soil

  6. RAPID SEPARATION METHOD FOR 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.; Culligan, B.; Noyes, G.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in soil and sediment samples has been developed at the Savannah River Site Environmental Lab (Aiken, SC, USA) that can be used for large soil samples. The new soil method utilizes an acid leaching method, iron/titanium hydroxide precipitation, a lanthanum fluoride soil matrix removal step, and a rapid column separation process with TEVA Resin. The large soil matrix is removed easily and rapidly using this two simple precipitations with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of interferences. Vacuum box technology and rapid flow rates are used to reduce analytical time.

  7. Methods for preparing comparative standards and field samples for neutron activation analysis of soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glasgow, D.C.; Dyer, F.F.; Robinson, L.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the more difficult problems associated with comparative neutron activation analysis (CNAA) is the preparation of standards which are tailor-made to the desired irradiation and counting conditions. Frequently, there simply is not a suitable standard available commercially, or the resulting gamma spectrum is convoluted with interferences. In a recent soil analysis project, the need arose for standards which contained about 35 elements. In response, a computer spreadsheet was developed to calculate the appropriate amount of each element so that the resulting gamma spectrum is relatively free of interferences. Incorporated in the program are options for calculating all of the irradiation and counting parameters including activity produced, necessary flux/bombardment time, counting time, and appropriate source-to-detector distance. The result is multi-element standards for CNAA which have optimal concentrations. The program retains ease of use without sacrificing capability. In addition to optimized standard production, a novel soil homogenization technique was developed which is a low cost, highly efficient alternative to commercially available homogenization systems. Comparative neutron activation analysis for large scale projects has been made easier through these advancements. This paper contains details of the design and function of the NAA spreadsheet and innovative sample handling techniques.

  8. Status of Baseline Sampling for Elements in Soil and Vegetation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    facility indicate that there are not significant differences in soil residue levels of lithium and manganese between the 50 sites. However, there are significant difference between...

  9. Zinc sorption by iron oxides and soil samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yli-Halla, Markku Juhani

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from the solution by various mechanisms and adsorbed on soil components. The secondary Zn fractions, i. e. , Zn adsorbed by organic matter or oxides or precipitated Zn-containing minerals, are assumed to be in equilibrium with the aqueous... as an indication of precipitation and dissolution (Lindsay, 1972), while the other places emphasis on -surface adsorption and desorption. The precipitation hypothesis postulates that a Zn- containing mineral controls the Zn concentration of the soil solution...

  10. Mean Transmitted Flux in the Ly$\\alpha$ Forest From a Sample of 2QZ Quasars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polinovskyi, G

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The power spectrum of transmitted flux in the Ly$\\alpha$ forest in spectra of distant quasars gives us an information about matter power spectrum on the smallest spatial scales which is very important for testing of different models of dark matter. Only a few independent samples of spectra obtained on diferent instruments have been used for this purpose, thus using of additional independent sample is useful for verification an existing results. We used the data from the 2dF (Two-degree Field) QSO Redshift Survey (2QZ) to obtain the mean transmitted flux for three different redshift bins. After visual inspection and rejection of spectra with broad absorption lines, damped Ly$\\alpha$ systems and low signal-to-noise ratio spectra our final sample contains 655 quasars with redshift range 2.3 $

  11. ATLBS EXTENDED SOURCE SAMPLE: THE EVOLUTION IN RADIO SOURCE MORPHOLOGY WITH FLUX DENSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saripalli, L.; Subrahmanyan, R.; Thorat, K.; Ekers, R. D. [Raman Research Institute, C. V. Raman Avenue, Sadashivanagar, Bangalore 560080 (India); Hunstead, R. W.; Johnston, H. M.; Sadler, E. M., E-mail: lsaripal@rri.res.in [Sydney Institute for Astronomy, School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the Australia Telescope Low Brightness Survey (ATLBS) we present a sample of extended radio sources and derive morphological properties of faint radio sources. One hundred nineteen radio galaxies form the ATLBS Extended Source Sample (ATLBS-ESS) consisting of all sources exceeding 30'' in extent and integrated flux densities exceeding 1 mJy. We give structural details along with information on galaxy identifications and source classifications. The ATLBS-ESS, unlike samples with higher flux-density limits, has almost equal fractions of FR-I and FR-II radio galaxies, with a large fraction of the FR-I population exhibiting 3C31-type structures. Significant asymmetry in lobe extents appears to be a common occurrence in the ATLBS-ESS FR-I sources compared with FR-II sources. We present a sample of 22 FR-Is at z > 0.5 with good structural information. The detection of several giant radio sources, with size exceeding 0.7 Mpc, at z > 1 suggests that giant radio sources are not less common at high redshifts. The ESS also includes a sample of 28 restarted radio galaxies. The relative abundance of dying and restarting sources is indicative of a model where radio sources undergo episodic activity in which an active phase is followed by a brief dying phase that terminates with restarting of the central activity; in any massive elliptical a few such activity cycles wherein adjacent events blend may constitute the lifetime of a radio source and such bursts of blended activity cycles may be repeated over the age of the host. The ATLBS-ESS includes a 2 Mpc giant radio galaxy with the lowest surface brightness lobes known to date.

  12. Category:Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:ConceptualGeothermalInformation DemonstrationsSmartSoil

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - argonne high flux reactor Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for: argonne high flux reactor Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Thirteenth National School on Neutron and X-ray Scattering Summary: Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor...

  14. Determination of Natural Beryllium (Be) in Soil and Swipe Samples Utilizing Yttrium/Beryllium Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Objective: A method to determine whether beryllium (Be) components in surface swipe samples are from a natural source is needed. 2. Methods: Soil samples and surface swipes from area facilities were analyzed for marker elements to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be). To be useful, the natural marker element must be present at reasonably consistent levels across the site, must correlate with the Be concentration, and not have the potential to be present from non-natural sources. 3. Results: The research on marker elements used to identify source pathways for beryllium (Be) concentrations demonstrates a clear correlation between Be and yttrium (Y) in natural soils on the Nevada National Security Site. The Y/Be ratio is proposed as a method to characterize the source of Be in soil and surface swipe samples and to aid in recommendations for follow up actions. Swipe samples are analyzed using an ICP/MS method and compared with results from soil samples. Natural soil constituent levels and the Y/Be Ratio range is determined for the occupied and historical facilities and surrounding areas. Y/Be ratios within the statistical range established indicate the Be is from a natural source. Y/Be ratios lower than this range indicate the presence of another Be source, and may then be correlated to alloy, ceramic, or other operational sources by the ratios of copper, nickel, cobalt, uranium, and/or niobium. Example case studies of evaluations of buildings with historical operational beryllium usage, current ongoing technical processes, and heavy equipment used in large building demolitions are included demonstrating the value of the ratio approach. 4. Conclusions: This differentiation is valuable as there is no known correlation between natural beryllium in soil and beryllium disease.

  15. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, J.; May, C.P.; Pemberton, B.E.; Shinn, J.; Sprague, K.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus. 8 figs.

  16. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, Joseph (105 Michael Ct., Aiken, SC 29801); May, Christopher P. (5002 Hesperus Dr., Columbia, MD 21044); Pemberton, Bradley E. (131 Glencarin Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Shinn, Jim (Box 65, RFD. #1, South Royalton, VT 05068); Sprague, Keith (Box 234 Rte. 14, Brookfield, VT 05036)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus.

  17. EMERGING MODALITIES FOR SOIL CARBON ANALYSIS: SAMPLING STATISTICS AND ECONOMICS WORKSHOP.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIELOPOLSKI, L.

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The workshop's main objectives are (1) to present the emerging modalities for analyzing carbon in soil, (2) to assess their error propagation, (3) to recommend new protocols and sampling strategies for the new instrumentation, and, (4) to compare the costs of the new methods with traditional chemical ones.

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric neutrino flux Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a prediction of a measurable flux of extragalactic high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs... used the result from the SuperKamiokande ... Source: Bahcall, John -...

  19. Estimation of land surface water and energy balance flux components and closure relation using conditional sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farhadi, Leila

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of terrestrial water and energy balance include numerical treatment of heat and moisture diffusion in the soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum. These two diffusion and exchange processes are linked only at a few ...

  20. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal...

  1. Cone penetrometer testing for characterization and sampling of soil and groundwater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edelman, S.H. [Holguin, Fahan and Associates, Inc., Ventura, CA (United States); [Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA (United States); Holguin, A.R. [Holguin, Fahan and Associates, Inc., Ventura, CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Cone penetrometer testing (CPT) is an alternative method to drilling for subsurface characterization of hazardous materials release sites. CPT provides higher quality data at lower cost and with fewer health and safety concerns than conventional drilling. CPT basically consists of pushing a cone-tipped, steel rod into the subsurface soils at a constant velocity and measuring the stresses used for automatic determination of soil types. CPT with concurrent measurement of pore pressure is used for determining hydraulic head and other parameters. Several methods for in situ screening of subsurface contaminants have been added to CPT equipment, including vapor sampling, laser induced fluorescence (LIF), and pore water resistivity. CPT is also used for direct push sampling of soil and groundwater and for installation of small diameter well points. CPT can be used with an assessment strategy that parallels that of conventional drilling; however, the in situ testing capabilities of CPT lend themselves to a more comprehensive assessment strategy that minimizes soil and groundwater sampling. A case study illustrates this comprehensive assessment strategy.

  2. Organic carbon flux at the mangrove soil-water column interface in the Florida Coastal Everglades 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romigh, Melissa Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Coastal outwelling of organic carbon from mangrove wetlands contributes to near-shore productivity and influences biogeochemical cycling of elements. I used a flume to measure fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) between ...

  3. RAPID METHOD FOR PLUTONIUM, AMERICIUM AND CURIUM IN VERY LARGE SOIL SAMPLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of actinides in environmental soil and sediment samples is very important for environmental monitoring. There is a need to measure actinide isotopes with very low detection limits. A new, rapid actinide separation method has been developed and implemented that allows the measurement of plutonium, americium and curium isotopes in very large soil samples (100-200 g) with high chemical recoveries and effective removal of matrix interferences. This method uses stacked TEVA Resin{reg_sign}, TRU Resin{reg_sign} and DGA-Resin{reg_sign} cartridges from Eichrom Technologies (Darien, IL, USA) that allows the rapid separation of plutonium (Pu), americium (Am), and curium (Cm) using a single multistage column combined with alpha spectrometry. The method combines an acid leach step and innovative matrix removal using cerium fluoride precipitation to remove the difficult soil matrix. This method is unique in that it provides high tracer recoveries and effective removal of interferences with small extraction chromatography columns instead of large ion exchange resin columns that generate large amounts of acid waste. By using vacuum box cartridge technology with rapid flow rates, sample preparation time is minimized.

  4. Standard guide for high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometry of soil samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This guide covers the identification and quantitative determination of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in soil samples by means of gamma-ray spectrometry. It is applicable to nuclides emitting gamma rays with an approximate energy range of 20 to 2000 keV. For typical gamma-ray spectrometry systems and sample types, activity levels of about 5 Bq (135 pCi) are measured easily for most nuclides, and activity levels as low as 0.1 Bq (2.7 pCi) can be measured for many nuclides. It is not applicable to radionuclides that emit no gamma rays such as the pure beta-emitting radionuclides hydrogen-3, carbon-14, strontium-90, and becquerel quantities of most transuranics. This guide does not address the in situ measurement techniques, where soil is analyzed in place without sampling. Guidance for in situ techniques can be found in Ref (1) and (2). This guide also does not discuss methods for determining lower limits of detection. Such discussions can be found in Refs (3), (4), (5), and (6). 1.2 This guide can be us...

  5. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Evaluation of Residual Chromium Contamination in the Subsurface Soil at 100-C-7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis to evaluate the extent of hexavalent chromium contamination present in the soil below the 100-C-7 and 100-C-7:1 remedial action waste site excavations.

  6. 31. 4-GHz flux density measurements of a complete sample of sources from the 5-GHz S5 survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geldzahler, B.J.; Kuehr, H.

    1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements at 31.4-GHz (9.5-mm) are presented for the complete sample of 66 radio sources with declinations greater than +70/sup 0/ and 5-GHz flux densities greater than 0.5 Jy. About half the sources have the flat radio spectra characteristic of objects with compact components radiating most strongly in the mid-centimeter wavelength range, and about one third show evidence of very compact components (theta< or approx. =0.//0001) radiating at short centimeter wavelengths regardless of morphological type. The median spectral index of all the sources, the quasars alone, and the galaxies alone tends to flatten with increasing frequency for steep spectrum sources, whereas a steepening was found with increasing frequency for the flat spectrum sources.

  7. Organic carbon flux at the mangrove soil-water column interface in the Florida Coastal Everglades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romigh, Melissa Marie

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and adjacent tidal creek along Shark River, Florida. Shark RiverÂ?s hydrology is influenced by diurnal tides and seasonal rainfall and wind patterns. Samplings were made over multiple tidal cycles in 2003 to include dry, wet, and transitional seasons. Surface...

  8. Historical review of long-term soil sampling for environmental surveillance at the Hanford Site and vicinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, K.R.; Rickard, W.H.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil samples have been collected routinely from the environs of the Hanford Site and analyzed since 1971. Correct interpretation of results depends on samples being collected from the same locations, the locations remaining relatively undisturbed, and collection and analytical procedures remaining the same or being equivalent. Historical files, documents, and annual environmental reports were reviewed to evaluate these factors. It was determined that 20 soil sampling locations, 11 onsite and 9 offsite, were established between 1971 and 1977 and represent long-term sampling locations. Sample collection and analytical procedures have remained essentially the same since 1971. The physical ecological attributes of each long-term soil sampling location were evaluated. During the review of historical records, a few results for 1970, 1971, and 1972 were noted as previously unreported in annual or special reports. These results are included in Appendix A. To complete the record, results previously reported in annual environmental reports are given in Appendix B. Global Positioning System (GPS) reading for 20 long-term soil sampling locations are provided in Appendix C.

  9. Letter Report for Analytical Results for Two Soil Samples Associated with the Westinghouse Hematite Decommisioning Project in Hematite Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Wade

    2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received two soil samples on September 26, 2013 from the Westinghouse Hetnatite Decomminsioning project in Hematite, Missouri. The samples were analyzed for thorium-232, radium-226, uranium-235, and uranium-238 by gamma spectrometry and technetium-99 by liquid scintillation analysis. The samples were received in good condition. The sample collection data and identification numbers are tabulated. Also presented are the gamma spectrometry and technetium-99 data, respectively. The pertinent procedure references are included with the data tables.

  10. Results of analyses of fur samples from the San Joaquin Kit Fox and associated soil and water samples from the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1, Tupman, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, G.W. II; Rosen, A.E.; Beauchamp, J.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Kato, T.T. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether analysis of the elemental content of fur from San Joaquin kit foxes (Vulpes macrotis mutica) and of water and soil from kit fox habitats could be used to make inferences concerning the cause of an observed decline in the kit fox population on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Fur samples that had been collected previously from NPR-1, another oil field (NPR-2), and two sites with no oil development were subjected to neutron activation analysis. In addition, soil samples were collected from the home ranges of individual foxes from undisturbed portions of major soil types on NPR-1 and from wastewater samples were collected from tanks and sumps and subjected to neutron activation analysis. Most elemental concentrations in fur were highest at Camp Roberts and lowest on the undeveloped portions of NPR-I. Fur concentrations were intermediate on the developed oil fields but were correlated with percent disturbance and with number of wells on NPR-1 and NPR-2. The fact that most elements covaried across the range of sites suggests that some pervasive source such as soil was responsible. However, fur concentrations were not correlated with soft concentrations. The kit foxes on the developed portion of NPR-1 did not have concentrations of elements in fur relative to other sites that would account for the population decline in the early 1980s. The oil-related elements As, Ba, and V were elevated in fox fur from oil fields, but only As was sufficiently elevated to suggest a risk of toxicity in individual foxes. However, arsenic concentrations suggestive of sublethal toxicity were found in only 0.56% of foxes from developed oil fields, too few to account for a population decline.

  11. Task summary for cone penetrating testing sounding and soil and groundwater sampling Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salmon Site (SS), located in Mississippi, was the site of two nuclear and two gas explosion testes conducted deep underground in the Tatum Salt Dome between 1964 and 1970. As a consequence radionuclides generated during the testing were released into the salt dome. During reentry drilling and other site activities, incidental liquid and solid wastes that contained radioactivity were generated, resulting in some soil, ground water and equipment contamination. US DOE is conducting a series of investigations as a part of the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (under CERCLA) This report summarizes the cone penetrometer testing (CPT) and sampling program conducted in fall 1993, providing a description of the activities and a discussion of the results. The objectives of the CPT program were to determine subsurface conditions and stratification; determine the depth to the potentiometric surface; obtain soil samples from predetermined depths; obtain groundwater samples at predetermined depths.

  12. On the design of a sampling plan to verify compliance with EPA standards for radium-226 in soil at uranium mill tailings remedial action sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, R.O.; Miller, M.L.; Meyer, H.R.

    1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses design aspects of a two-stage compliance sampling program being developed to verify that removal of soil at windblown uranium mill-tailings sites are results in /sup 226/Ra concentrations that meet Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) standards. In the first stage, gamma scans of surface soil would be conducted over the entire remediated region using a tractor-mounted gamma-ray counting system (RTRAK) to measure /sup 214/Bi (Bismuth), which is an indicator of /sup 226/Ra in soil. In the second stage, composite soil samples would be collected from a systematic sample of 10-m by 10-m plots, where the number of plots is determined using a compliance acceptance sampling plan. These soil samples are analyzed for /sup 226/Ra and compared with the EPA standard of 5 pCi/g above background using a selected statistical rule.

  13. Oxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 2. Short-term dynamics of foliar and soil component fluxes in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ehleringer, Jim

    Oxygen isotope content of CO2 in nocturnal ecosystem respiration: 2. Short-term dynamics of foliar; accepted 29 October 2003; published 23 December 2003. [1] The oxygen isotope contents (d18 O) of soil showed enrichment over a 2-week sampling period as the weather became hot and dry (leaves 0.9 to 15

  14. Compost Analysis Samples provided by the Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory at Texas A&M, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mukhtar, Saqib

    Compost Analysis Samples provided by the Soil, Water and Forage Testing Laboratory at Texas A ppm ppm % % dS/m Dairy Manure Compost 0.6171 .2680 1.4345 3.5041 .2737 .4371 319.7 249.1 33.53 173.1 30.0 16.02 9.3 1.280 Dairy Manure Compost 1.0704 .3866 2.4949 6.7455 .5472 .7320 155.6 381.5 47

  15. Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ujic, Predrag; Celikovic, Igor; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

  16. Sampling Instruction: Investigation of Hexavalent Chromium Flux to Groundwater at the 100-C-7:1 Excavation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truex, Michael J.; Vermeul, Vincent R.

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several types of data are needed to assess the flux of Cr(VI) from the excavation into the groundwater. As described in this plan, these data include (1) temporal Cr(VI) data in the shallow groundwater beneath the pit; (2) hydrologic data to interpret groundwater flow and contaminant transport; (3) hydraulic gradient data; and (4) as a contingency action if necessary, vertical profiling of Cr(VI) concentrations in the shallow aquifer beyond the depth possible with aquifer tubes.

  17. Radionuclide Concentrations in Terrestrial Vegetation and Soil Samples On and Around the Hanford Site, 1971 Through 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Poston, Ted M.; Fritz, Brad G.; Bisping, Lynn E.

    2011-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental monitoring is conducted on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site to comply with DOE Orders and federal and state regulations. Major objectives of the monitoring are to characterize contaminant levels in the environment and to determine site contributions to the contaminant inventory. This report focuses on surface soil and perennial vegetation samples collected between 1971 and 2008 as part of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Surface Environmental Surveillance Project performed under contract to DOE. Areas sampled under this program are located on the Hanford Site but outside facility boundaries and on public lands surrounding the Hanford Site. Additional samples were collected during the past 8 years under DOE projects that evaluated parcels of land for radiological release. These data were included because the same sampling methodology and analytical laboratory were used for the projects. The spatial and temporal trends of six radionuclides collected over a 38-year period were evaluated. The radionuclides----cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, plutonium-238, plutonium-239/240, and uranium (reported either as uranium-238 or total uranium)----were selected because they persist in the environment and are still being monitored routinely and reported in Hanford Site environmental reports. All these radionuclides were associated with plutonium production and waste management of activities occurring on the site. Other sources include fallout from atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons, which ended in 1980, and the Chernobyl explosion in 1986. Uranium is also a natural component of the soil. This assessment of soil and vegetation data provides important information on the distribution of radionuclides in areas adjacent to industrial areas, established perimeter locations and buffer areas, and more offsite nearby and distant locations. The concentrations reflect a tendency for detection of some radionuclides close to where they were utilized onsite, but as one moves to unindustrialized areas on the site, surrounding buffer areas and perimeter location into the more distant sites, concentrations of these radionuclides approach background and cannot be distinguished from fallout activity. More importantly, concentrations in soil and vegetation samples did not exceed environmental benchmark concentrations, and associated exposure to human and ecological receptors were well below levels that are demonstratively hazardous to human health and the environment.

  18. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico environs, 1993-2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deola, Regina Anne; Oldewage, Hans D.; Herrera, Heidi; Miller, Mark Laverne

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From 1993 through 2005, the Environmental Management Department of Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico (SNL/NM), has collected soil and sediment samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for the purpose of determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at the Laboratories. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were year-to-year increasing or decreasing trends which indicated that further investigation may be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Management Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to assess potential current operational impacts or to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  19. Chemical analyses of soil samples collected from the Sandia National Laboratories, Kauai Test Facility, HI, 1999-2007.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Mark Laverne

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1999, 2002, and 2007, the Environmental Programs and Assurance Department of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) at the Kauai Test Facility (KTF), HI, has collected soil samples at numerous locations on-site, on the perimeter, and off-site for determining potential impacts to the environs from operations at KTF. These samples were submitted to an analytical laboratory for metal-in-soil analyses. Intercomparisons of these results were then made to determine if there was any statistical difference between on-site, perimeter, and off-site samples, or if there were increasing or decreasing trends that indicated that further investigation might be warranted. This work provided the SNL Environmental Programs and Assurance Department with a sound baseline data reference against which to compare future operational impacts. In addition, it demonstrates the commitment that the Laboratories have to go beyond mere compliance to achieve excellence in its operations. This data is presented in graphical format with narrative commentaries on particular items of interest.

  20. Soil Gas Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,Socorro County, NewInformation Soil Gas

  1. Soil Gas Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox, 1980) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,Socorro County, NewInformation Soil

  2. Soil Sampling At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,Socorro County,LesterInformation Soil

  3. Letter Report for Analytical Results for Two Concrete and Three Soil Samples Associated with the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester Massachusetts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, Wade

    2013-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), under the Oak Ridge Institute tor Science and Education (ORISE) contract, received two concrete core and three soil samples on August 26, 2013 from the Worcester Polytechnic Institute in Worcester, Massachusetts. The samples were received in good condition. The samples were analyzed tor activation and fission products by gamma spectrometry. The sample collection data and identification numbers are tabulated and the gamma spectrometry data are presented. The pertinent procedure reference is included with the data table.

  4. Modifying the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to Simulate Cropland Carbon Flux: Model Development and Initial Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Xuesong; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Arnold, Jeffrey; Williams, Jimmy R.; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change is one of the most compelling modern issues and has important implications for almost every aspect of natural and human systems. The Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) model has been applied worldwide to support sustainable land and water management in a changing climate. However, the inadequacies of the existing carbon algorithm in SWAT limit its application in assessing impacts of human activities on CO2 emission, one important source of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that traps heat in the earth system and results in global warming. In this research, we incorporate a revised version of the CENTURY carbon model into SWAT to describe dynamics of soil organic matter (SOM)- residue and simulate land-atmosphere carbon exchange.

  5. DETERMINATION OF 237NP AND PU ISOTOPES IN LARGE SOIL SAMPLES BY INDUCTIVELY COUPLED PLASMA MASS SPECTROMETRY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, S.

    2010-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method for the determination of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes in large soil samples has been developed that provides enhanced uranium removal to facilitate assay by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). This method allows rapid preconcentration and separation of plutonium and neptunium in large soil samples for the measurement of {sup 237}Np and Pu isotopes by ICP-MS. {sup 238}U can interfere with {sup 239}Pu measurement by ICP-MS as {sup 238}UH{sup +} mass overlap and {sup 237}Np via {sup 238}U peak tailing. The method provides enhanced removal of uranium by separating Pu and Np initially on TEVA Resin, then transferring Pu to DGA resin for additional purification. The decontamination factor for removal of uranium from plutonium for this method is greater than 1 x 10{sup 6}. Alpha spectrometry can also be applied so that the shorter-lived {sup 238}Pu isotope can be measured successfully. {sup 239}Pu, {sup 242}Pu and {sup 237}Np were measured by ICP-MS, while {sup 236}Pu and {sup 238}Pu were measured by alpha spectrometry.

  6. Analysis of water and soil from the wetlands of Upper Three Runs Creek. Volume 2A, Analytical data packages September--October 1991 sampling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haselow, L.A.; Rogers, V.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Riordan, C.J. [Metcalf and Eddy, Inc. (United States); Eidson, G.W.; Herring, M.K. [Normandeau Associates, Inc. (United States)

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shallow water and soils along Upper Three Runs Creek (UTRC) and associated wetlands between SRS Road F and Cato Road were sampled for nonradioactive and radioactive constituents. The sampling program is associated with risk evaluations being performed for various regulatory documents in these areas of the Savannah River Site (SRS). WSRC selected fifty sampling sites bordering the Mixed Waste Management Facility (MWMF), F- and H-Area Seepage Basins (FHSB), and the Sanitary Landfill (SL). The analytical results from this study provided information on the water and soil quality in UTRC and its associated wetlands. The analytical results from this investigation indicated that the primary constituents and radiological indicators detected in the shallow water and soils were tritium, gross alpha, radium 226, total radium and strontium 90. This investigation involved the collection of shallow water samples during the Fall of 1991 and the Spring of 1992 at fifty (50) sampling locations. Sampling was performed during these periods to incorporate high and low water table periods. Samples were collected from three sections along UTRC denoted as Phase I (MWMF), Phase II (FHSB) and Phase III (SL). One vibracored soil sample was also collected in each phase during the Fall of 1991. This document is compiled solely of experimental data obtained from the sampling procedures.

  7. Soil Sampling to Demonstrate Compliance with Department of Energy Radiological Clearance Requirements for the ALE Unit of the Hanford Reach National Monument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fritz, Brad G.; Dirkes, Roger L.; Napier, Bruce A.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Reach National Monument consists of several units, one of which is the Fitzner/Eberhardt Arid Lands Ecology Reserve (ALE) Unit. This unit is approximately 311 km2 of shrub-steppe habitat located to the south and west of Highway 240. To fulfill internal U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements prior to any radiological clearance of land, DOE must evaluate the potential for residual radioactive contamination on this land and determine compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5400.5. Historical soil monitoring conducted on ALE indicated soil concentrations of radionuclides were well below the Authorized Limits. However, the historical sampling was done at a limited number of sampling locations. Therefore, additional soil sampling was conducted to determine if the concentrations of radionuclides in soil on the ALE Unit were below the Authorized Limits. This report contains the results of 50 additional soil samples. The 50 soil samples collected from the ALE Unit all had concentrations of radionuclides far below the Authorized Limits. The average concentrations for all detectable radionuclides were less than the estimated Hanford Site background. Furthermore, the maximum observed soil concentrations for the radionuclides included in the Authorized Limits would result in a potential annual dose of 0.14 mrem assuming the most probable use scenario, a recreational visitor. This potential dose is well below the DOE 100-mrem per year dose limit for a member of the public. Spatial analysis of the results indicated no observable statistically significant differences between radionuclide concentrations across the ALE Unit. Furthermore, the results of the biota dose assessment screen, which used the ResRad Biota code, indicated that the concentrations of radionuclides in ALE Unit soil pose no significant health risk to biota.

  8. Glass flask air sample analysis through Gas Chromatography in India: Implications for constraining CO2 surface fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for an air inlet (equipped with a 7µm filter), a pump and a battery placed below the ON/OFF button, a flow to the site measurements, they are prepared and evacuated. We pump and heat the flasks. During pumping the temperature is +60 dc. Flasks are pumped for 72 hours. Outlook Air sampling started at two new stations, Cape

  9. Soil and soil gas sampling in Old Ellenton, the SRL test site, the fire training area and the miscellaneous chemicals basin. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, D.G. [Univ. of Pittsburgh Applied Research Center, PA (United States)

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil and gas analytical results are presented which were carried out at the SRL site. Gas chromatography was utilized.

  10. Cosmological Implications and Physical Properties of an X-Ray Flux-Limited Sample of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas H. Reiprich

    2003-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The original abstract significantly exceeds the space available here, so here's a brief summary. The abstract is similar to the abstract of astro-ph/0111285 (ApJ, 567, 716) which describes the X-ray galaxy cluster sample HIFLUGCS, the X-ray luminosity--gravitational mass relation, the cluster mass function, and the derived cosmological constraints. Additionally, the fraction of the total gravitating mass in the universe which is contained in intracluster gas is quantified. Furthermore, physical properties of the cluster sample have been studied and analyses of relations between different cluster parameters (including the gas mass fraction, gas temperature, X-ray luminosity, gas mass, gravitational mass, beta, and core radius) are discussed. Also, results from an analysis of XMM-Newton performance verification phase data of Abell 1835 are described.

  11. Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate equivalents for the EBIS sample processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Carbon Modeling (Mac Post) A. Rothamsted model carbon pools and processes. Their approximate' soil horizon show that model improvements need to be made to capture observed soil carbon cycling and transport processes. Testing and improvement of soil carbon cycling models is a key anticipated output

  12. Measurement of natural radioactivity and assessment of radiation hazard indices in soil samples at Pengerang, Kota Tinggi, Johor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Nur Nazihah; Khoo, Kok Siong [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Pengerang area consists of a mix of private plantation, individual residential lots and state land, which is leased for agriculture related activities. The analysis was conducted to determine the specific activity of the initial value and the radiation hazard indices in the surrounding area in Pengerang. This area will be developed into a major downstream for oil and gas. The aims of this preliminary study were 1) to determine the specific activities of {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K of soil samples at six selected areas by Gamma-ray spectrometry and 2) to calculate the radiation hazard indices. The specific activities (Bq/kg) of the samples ranged from 7.08±5.01 to 36.29±25.72 Bq/kg, 5.62±3.98 to 34.53±24.07 Bq/kg, 4.75±3.42 to 24.76±17.66 Bq/kg and 10.58±7.51 to 101.25±72.00 Bq/kg for {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 40}K, respectively. These values were well within the range that reported by UNSCEAR. The study also examined the radiation hazard indices, the mean values obtained were 48.49±28.06 Bq/kg for Radium Equivalent Activity (Raeq), 0.34 Bq/kg for Representative Level Index (I{sub ?}), 21.83 nGy/h for Absorbed dose rates (D), 0.27 mSv/y for Annual Effective Dose Rates (Deff), 0.13 and 0.18 for External Hazards Index (H{sub ex}) and Internal Hazard Index (H{sub in}), respectively. These calculated hazard indices were used to estimate the potential radiological health risk in soil and the dose rates associated with it were well below their permissible limit. The overall findings show that no radiological threat to the health of the population in the study area.

  13. Summary of Inorganic Compositional Data for Groundwater, Soil-Water, and Surface-Water Samples at the Headgate Draw Subsurface Drip Irrigation Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geboy, Nicholas J.; Engle, Mark A.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Zupanic, John W.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a 5-year project on the impact of subsurface drip irrigation (SDI) application of coalbed-methane (CBM) produced waters, water samples were collected from the Headgate Draw SDI site in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming, USA. This research is part of a larger study to understand short- and long-term impacts on both soil and water quality from the beneficial use of CBM waters to grow forage crops through use of SDI. This document provides a summary of the context, sampling methodology, and quality assurance and quality control documentation of samples collected prior to and over the first year of SDI operation at the site (May 2008-October 2009). This report contains an associated database containing inorganic compositional data, water-quality criteria parameters, and calculated geochemical parameters for samples of groundwater, soil water, surface water, treated CBM waters, and as-received CBM waters collected at the Headgate Draw SDI site.

  14. A laboratory comparison of two methods used to estimate the isotopic composition of soil d13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    and concentration gradient as well as to serve as a control for the soil probe. The soil probe produced similar ecosystem metabolism1,2 and geologic processes.3,4 Yet, a clear tech- nique to sample this flux has not emerged. Current methods include deploying static chambers to capture the 13 CO2 gradient evolved from

  15. Final report on the project entitled "The Effects of Disturbance & Climate on Carbon Storage & the Exchanges of CO2 Water Vapor & Energy Exchange of Evergreen Coniferous Forests in the Pacific Northwest: Integration of Eddy Flux, Plant and Soil Measurements at a Cluster of Supersites"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beverly E. Law (PI), Christoph K. Thomas (CoI)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final technical report containing a summary of all findings with regard to the following objectives of the project: (1) To quantify and understand the effects of wildfire on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in a chronosequence of ponderosa pine (disturbance gradient); (2) To investigate the effects of seasonal and interannual variation in climate on carbon storage and the exchanges of energy, CO2, and water vapor in mature conifer forests in two climate zones: mesic 40-yr old Douglas-fir and semi-arid 60-yr old ponderosa pine (climate gradient); (3) To reduce uncertainty in estimates of CO2 feedbacks to the atmosphere by providing an improved model formulation for existing biosphere-atmosphere models; and (4) To provide high quality data for AmeriFlux and the NACP on micrometeorology, meteorology, and biology of these systems. Objective (1): A study integrating satellite remote sensing, AmeriFlux data, and field surveys in a simulation modeling framework estimated that the pyrogenic carbon emissions, tree mortality, and net carbon exchange associated with four large wildfires that burned ~50,000 hectares in 2002-2003 were equivalent to 2.4% of Oregon statewide anthropogenic carbon emissions over the same two-year period. Most emissions were from the combustion of the forest floor and understory vegetation, and only about 1% of live tree mass was combusted on average. Objective (2): A study of multi-year flux records across a chronosequence of ponderosa pine forests yielded that the net carbon uptake is over three times greater at a mature pine forest compared with young pine. The larger leaf area and wetter and cooler soils of the mature forest mainly caused this effect. A study analyzing seven years of carbon and water dynamics showed that interannual and seasonal variability of net carbon exchange was primarily related to variability in growing season length, which was a linear function of plant-available soil moisture in spring and early summer. A multi-year drought (2001-2003) led to a significant reduction of net ecosystem exchange due to carry-over effects in soil moisture and carbohydrate reserves in plant-tissue. In the same forest, the interannual variability in the rate carbon is lost from the soil and forest floor is considerable and related to the variability in tree growth as much as it is to variability in soil climatic conditions. Objective (3): Flux data from the mature ponderosa pine site support a physical basis for filtering nighttime data with friction velocity above the canopy. An analysis of wind fields and heat transport in the subcanopy at the mesic 40-year old Douglas site yielded that the non-linear structure and behavior of spatial temperature gradients and the flow field require enhanced sensor networks to estimate advective fluxes in the subcanopy of forest to close the surface energy balance in forests. Reliable estimates for flux uncertainties are needed to improve model validation and data assimilation in process-based carbon models, inverse modeling studies and model-data synthesis, where the uncertainties may be as important as the fluxes themselves. An analysis of the time scale dependence of the random and flux sampling error yielded that the additional flux obtained by increasing the perturbation timescale beyond about 10 minutes is dominated by random sampling error, and therefore little confidence can be placed in its value. Artificial correlation between gross ecosystem productivity (GEP) and ecosystem respiration (Re) is a consequence of flux partitioning of eddy covariance flux data when GEP is computed as the difference between NEE and computed daytime Re (e.g. using nighttime Re extrapolated into daytime using soil or air temperatures). Tower-data must be adequately spatially averaged before comparison to gridded model output as the time variability of both is inherently different. The eddy-covariance data collected at the mature ponderosa pine site and the mesic Douglas fir site were used to develop and evaluate a new method to extra

  16. Direct measurements of the energy flux due to chemical reactions at the surface of a silicon sample interacting with a SF6 plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dussart, Remi; Pichon, Laurianne E; Bedra, Larbi; Semmar, Nadjib; Lefaucheux, Philippe; Mathias, Jacky; Tessier, Yves; 10.1063/1.2995988

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy exchanges due to chemical reactions between a silicon surface and a SF6 plasma were directly measured using a heat flux microsensor (HFM). The energy flux evolution was compared with those obtained when only few reactions occur at the surface to show the part of chemical reactions. At 800 W, the measured energy flux due to chemical reactions is estimated at about 7 W.cm\\^{-2} against 0.4 W.cm\\^{-2} for ion bombardment and other contributions. Time evolution of the HFM signal is also studied. The molar enthalpy of the reaction giving SiF4 molecules was evaluated and is consistent with values given in literature.

  17. Climatic influences on hillslope soil transport efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schurr, Naomi D. (Naomi Danika)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The soil transport coefficient D represents the relationship between local topographical gradient and soil flux in the landscape evolution model. This work presents new estimates of the soil transport coefficient D at 9 ...

  18. Genotoxicity of soil and sediment samples as measured by the Salmonella mutagenicity and E. coli Prophage-induction assays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Erica Shannon

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) in mutagenesis in the Salmonella/microsome assay. The quantity of organic compounds in the residual amount of waste in the soil was found to de- crease with degradation. Conversely, the mutagenicity per unit weight of residual compounds was found to increase... and pentachloroanisole, ultimately forming CO& and inorganic chloride ions (47). Hydroquinone has not been found to be mutagenic in Salmonella (46). The degradative processes of PCP are influenced by several factors, including the concentration of PCP, pH, temperature...

  19. Technical bases and guidance for the use of composite soil sampling for demonstrating compliance with radiological release criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitkus, Timothy J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This guidance provides information on methodologies and the technical bases that licensees should consider for incorporating composite sampling strategies into final status survey (FSS) plans. In addition, this guidance also includes appropriate uses of composite sampling for generating the data for other decommissioning site investigations such as characterization or other preliminary site investigations.

  20. Genotoxicity of soil and sediment samples as measured by the Salmonella mutagenicity and E. coli Prophage-induction assays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krause, Erica Shannon

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial Shipping Facility QSF 1). . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Genotoxic Responses of S. typhimurium Strain TA98 and E. coli Cells to Waste Extracts from ISF 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . , . 44 Concentrations of PAHs in Samples ISF1 002...-preserving Facility (WPF 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . 16 Gentoxic Responses of S. typhimurium Strain TA98 in and E. coli Cells to Waste Extracts from WPF 1 . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Concentrations of PAHs in Samples WPF1 001 and 007...

  1. Session EP23A. Aeolian Processes and Desert Landscape Development Impact of surface roughness and soil texture on mineral dust emission fluxes modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    and surface properties. The LISA dataset was develo- ped for Northern Africa, Middle East and East Asia in comparison to the LISA dataset over Northern Africa and Middle East. Sensitivity of emissions to several and soil descriptions is estimated over the simulation domain covering Northern Africa and Middle East. AOD

  2. Final report, Ames Mobile Laboratory Project: The development and operation of instrumentation in a mobile laboratory for in situ, real-time screening and characterization of soils using the laser ablation sampling technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, M.S.; Braymen, S.D.

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The main focus of the Ames Laboratory`s Technology Integration Program, TIP, from May 1991 through December 1994 was the development, fabrication, and demonstration of a mobile instrumentation laboratory incorporating rapid in situ sampling systems for safe, rapid, and cost effective soil screening/characterization. The Mobile Demonstration Laboratory for Environmental Screening Technologies, MDLEST, containing the analysis instrumentation, along with surface and subsurface sampling probe prototypes employing the laser ablation sampling technique were chosen to satisfy the particular surface and subsurface soil characterization needs of the various Department of Energy facilities for determining the extent of heavy metal and radionuclide contamination. The MDLEST, a 44 foot long 5th wheel trailer, is easily configured for the analysis instrumentation and sampling system required for the particular site work. This mobile laboratory contains all of the utilities needed to satisfy the operating requirements of the various instrumentation installed. These utilities include, an electric generator, a chilled water system, process gases, a heating/air conditioning system, and computer monitoring and automatic operating systems. Once the MDLEST arrives at the job site, the instrumentation is aligned and calibration is completed, sampling and analysis operations begin. The sample is acquired, analyzed and the results reported in as little as 10 minutes. The surface sampling probe is used in two modes to acquire samples for analysis. It is either set directly on the ground over the site to be sampled, in situ sampling, or in a special fixture used for calibrating the sampling analysis system with standard soil samples, having the samples brought to the MDLEST. The surface sampling probe was used to in situ sample a flat concrete surface (nondestructively) with the ablated sample being analyzed by the instrumentation in the MDLEST.

  3. The consolidation characteristics of undisturbed soil samples of deep formations and their application to problems of regional subsidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfskill, Lyle Anthony

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE CONSOLIDATION CHARACTERISTICS OF UNDISTURBED SOII SAMPLES OF DEEP FORMATIONS AND THEIR APPLICATION TO PROBLEMS OF REGIONAL SUBSIDENCE LYLE ANTHONY WOLFSKILL Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College... OF REGIONAL SUBSIDENCE LYIZ ANTHONY WOLFSKILL Approved as to style and content hy: (C airman f Committee) (Head of Depar ent) ACKNONLEDGEMENTS The author is sincerely grateful for the tireless and expert leadership provided by Mr. Spencer J. Buchanan...

  4. Direct measurements of the energy flux due to chemical reactions at the surface of a silicon sample interacting with a SF6 plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    sample interacting with a SF6 plasma R. Dussarta) , A. L. Thomann, L. E. Pichon, L. Bedra, N. Semmar, P, France Abstract Energy exchanges due to chemical reactions between a silicon surface and a SF6 plasma by quenching with electrons15 . In this letter, we present results obtained when a plasma of SF6 interacts

  5. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  6. Extractable soil phosphorus in Blackland Prairie soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byrd, Robert Claude

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONCLUSIONS . REFERENCES. . APPENDIX. 92 . 94 99 . . 104 Vlh Table LIST OF TABLES Page Extractable soil P ratings for the TAEX, Bray I, Olsen, and TAEX 3 soil P extractants 18 Chemical properties of preliminary soil sample (Fall 1992) taken from..., and 8 0). The authors, however, noted that Olsen and TAEX extractable P also resulted in acceptable correlation values All the above extractants were highly correlated (r& 0. 94) with total P uptake for both the calcareous soil and the slightly acidic...

  7. How Soil Organic Matter Composition Controls Hexachlorobenzene-Soil-Interactions: Adsorption Isotherms and Quantum Chemical Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ashour; Kühn, Oliver

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hazardous persistent organic pollutants (POPs) interact in soil with the soil organic matter (SOM) but this interaction is insufficiently understood at the molecular level. We investigated the adsorption of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) on soil samples with systematically modified SOM. These samples included the original soil, the soil modified by adding a hot water extract (HWE) fraction (soil+3 HWE and soil+6 HWE), and the pyrolyzed soil. The SOM contents increased in the order pyrolyzed soil soil soil+3 HWE soil+6 HWE. For the latter three samples this order was also valid for the HCB adsorption. The pyrolyzed soil adsorbed more HCB than the other samples at low initial concentrations, but at higher concentrations the HCB adsorption became weaker than in the samples with HWE addition. This adsorption behaviour combined with the differences in the chemical composition between the soil samples suggested that alkylated aromatic, phenol, and lignin monomer compounds contributed most to the HC...

  8. IDENTIFICATION Your Sample Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Ag Quad Ln, Blacksburg VA 24061, in sturdy, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and soluble salts) NoCharge $16.00 Organic Matter $4.00 $6.00 Fax with soil sample and form; make check or money order payable to "Treasurer, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE

  9. SOIL INFORMATION Last Lime Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    production. Send samples, forms, and payment to Virginia Tech Soil Testing Lab, 145 Smyth Hall (MC 0465), 185 Industrial Lawns - Bermudagrass Routine (soil pH, P, K, Ca, Mg, Zn, Mn, Cu, Fe, B, and estimated CEC) $10, Virginia Tech." COST PER SAMPLE IN-STATE OUT-OF-STATE SOIL TEST DESIRED AND FEES SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION Your

  10. EVN observations of 6.7 GHz methanol maser polarization in massive star-forming regions III. The flux-limited sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Surcis, G; van Langevelde, H J; Kramer, B Hutawarakorn; Bartkiewicz, A; Blasi, M G

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Theoretical simulations and observations at different angular resolutions have shown that magnetic fields have a central role in massive star formation. Like in low-mass star formation, the magnetic field in massive young stellar objects can either be oriented along the outflow axis or randomly. Measuring the magnetic field at milliarcsecond resolution (10-100 au) around a substantial number of massive young stellar objects permits determining with a high statistical significance whether the direction of the magnetic field is correlated with the orientation of the outflow axis or not. In late 2012, we started a large VLBI campaign with the European VLBI Network to measure the linearly and circularly polarized emission of 6.7 GHz methanol masers around a sample of massive star-forming regions. This paper focuses on the first seven observed sources, G24.78+0.08, G25.65+1.05, G29.86-0.04, G35.03+0.35, G37.43+1.51, G174.20-0.08, and G213.70-12.6. For all these sources, molecular outflows have been detected in the...

  11. KSInglett Page 1 MATH FOR SOIL SCIENTISTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    skills that are most relevant to graduate courses in environmental science including Soil and Water transport 9. Soil temperature, heat capacity and conductivity Unit 3 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL BIOCHEMISTRY 10 and gas fluxes Unit 5 PROBLEM SOLVING IN SOIL CHEMISTRY, FERTILITY, and MANAGEMENT (optional) 19. p

  12. Technical change to the work plan for the remedial investigation of the Salmon Site, Lamar County, Mississippi: Sampling and analysis plan background soil and groundwater study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Salmon Site, formerly known as the Tatum Dome Test Site, is located in south-central Mississippi, southwest of the city of Hattiesburg, in Lamar County. Between 1964 and 1970, two nuclear and two non-nuclear gas explosions were conducted deep underground in the Tatum Salt Dome beneath the site. The tests were performed as part of the former US Atomic Energy Commission`s Vela Uniform Program which was conducted to improve the United States` capability to detect underground nuclear explosions. This document details technical changes to the existing work plan for the remedial investigation of the Salmon Site. A previously conducted Remedial Investigation for the Salmon Site involved the preparation of ecological and human health risk assessments. These risk assessments, which are incorporated into the Remedial Investigation Report, identified several constituents of potential concern (COPC) that could potentially have a negative impact on ecological and human health. These COPC are the primary risk drivers for the Salmon Site; they include arsenic and naturally occurring, gamma-emitting radionuclides. If it can be demonstrated that similar concentrations of these COPCs occur naturally in surrounding areas, they can be removed from consideration in the risk assessments. The purpose of this sampling effort is to collect enough data to prove that the COPCs are naturally occurring and are not a result of the explosives testing activities conducted at the site. This will be accomplished by collecting enough soil samples to have a statistically valid population that can be used to produce defensible comparisons that prove the concentrations identified on site are the same as the background concentrations in surrounding areas.

  13. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  14. Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 Jump to:Garnet Wind Jump2006)Gas

  15. Experiment Hazard Class 15.2 - USDA Soil Permit

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    shipment, and disposal of regulated soil samples. A copy of the current APS USDA Soil Permit must accompany all samples. A copy of the home institution's soil permit is required...

  16. Final report on the Background Soil Characterization Project at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Volume 1: Results of Field Sampling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watkins, D.R.; Ammons, J.T.; Branson, J.L. [and others

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents, evaluates, and documents data and results obtained in the Background Soil Characterization Project (BSCP). It is intended to be a stand-alone document for application and use in structuring and conducting remedial investigation and remedial action projects in the Environmental Restoration (ER) Program. The objectives of the BSCP consist of the following: determine background concentrations of organics, metals, and radionuclides in natural soils that are key to environmental restoration projects; provide remediation projects with 100% validated data on background concentrations, which are technically and legally defensible; and quantify baseline risks from background constituents for comparison of risks associated with contaminated sites.

  17. Fast flux locked loop

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ganther, Jr., Kenneth R. (Olathe, KS); Snapp, Lowell D. (Independence, MO)

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A flux locked loop for providing an electrical feedback signal, the flux locked loop employing radio-frequency components and technology to extend the flux modulation frequency and tracking loop bandwidth. The flux locked loop of the present invention has particularly useful application in read-out electronics for DC SQUID magnetic measurement systems, in which case the electrical signal output by the flux locked loop represents an unknown magnetic flux applied to the DC SQUID.

  18. RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    RESEARCH ARTICLE A novel soil organic C model using climate, soil type and management data-Verlag, France 2012 Abstract This report evidences factors controlling soil or- ganic carbon at the national scale by modelling data of 2,158 soil samples from France. The global soil carbon amount, of about 1

  19. Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than by enhancing soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Elevated CO2 stimulates grassland soil respiration by increasing carbon inputs rather than It is not clear whether the consistent positive effect of elevated CO2 on soil respiration (soil carbon flux, SCF) results from increased plant and microbial activity due to (i) greater C availability through CO2-induced

  20. Geochemical Analyses of Surface and Shallow Gas Flux and Composition Over a Proposed Carbon Sequestration Site in Eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Parris; Michael Solis; Kathryn Takacs

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Using soil gas chemistry to detect leakage from underground reservoirs (i.e. microseepage) requires that the natural range of soil gas flux and chemistry be fully characterized. To meet this need, soil gas flux (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and the bulk (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}) and isotopic chemistry ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) of shallow soil gases (<1 m, 3.3 ft) were measured at 25 locations distributed among two active oil and gas fields, an active strip mine, and a relatively undisturbed research forest in eastern Kentucky. The measurements apportion the biologic, atmospheric, and geologic influences on soil gas composition under varying degrees of human surface disturbance. The measurements also highlight potential challenges in using soil gas chemistry as a monitoring tool where the surface cover consists of reclaimed mine land or is underlain by shallow coals. For example, enrichment of ({delta}{sup 13}C-CO2) and high CH{sub 4} concentrations in soils have been historically used as indicators of microseepage, but in the reclaimed mine lands similar soil chemistry characteristics likely result from dissolution of carbonate cement in siliciclastic clasts having {delta}{sup 13}C values close to 0{per_thousand} and degassing of coal fragments. The gases accumulate in the reclaimed mine land soils because intense compaction reduces soil permeability, thereby impeding equilibration with the atmosphere. Consequently, the reclaimed mine lands provide a false microseepage anomaly. Further potential challenges arise from low permeability zones associated with compacted soils in reclaimed mine lands and shallow coals in undisturbed areas that might impede upward gas migration. To investigate the effect of these materials on gas migration and composition, four 10 m (33 ft) deep monitoring wells were drilled in reclaimed mine material and in undisturbed soils with and without coals. The wells, configured with sampling zones at discrete intervals, show the persistence of some of the aforementioned anomalies at depth. Moreover, high CO{sub 2} concentrations associated with coals in the vadose zone suggest a strong affinity for adsorbing CO{sub 2}. Overall, the low permeability of reclaimed mine lands and coals and CO2 adsorption by the latter is likely to reduce the ability of surface geochemistry tools to detect a microseepage signal.

  1. Soil Water and Temperature System (SWATS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, D

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The soil water and temperature system (SWATS) provides vertical profiles of soil temperature, soil-water potential, and soil moisture as a function of depth below the ground surface at hourly intervals. The temperature profiles are measured directly by in situ sensors at the Central Facility and many of the extended facilities of the SGP climate research site. The soil-water potential and soil moisture profiles are derived from measurements of soil temperature rise in response to small inputs of heat. Atmospheric scientists use the data in climate models to determine boundary conditions and to estimate the surface energy flux. The data are also useful to hydrologists, soil scientists, and agricultural scientists for determining the state of the soil.

  2. Cancer risks from soil emissions of volatile organic compounds at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibley, V. R., LLNL

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission isolation flux chamber (EIFC) methodology was applied to Superfund investigations at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site 300 to determine if on-site workers were exposed to VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface and what, if any, health risks could be attributed to the inhalation of the VOCs volatilizing from the subsurface. During July and August of 1996, twenty, eighteen, and twenty six VOC soil vapor flux samples were collected in the Building 830, 832, and 854 areas, respectively using EIFCS. The VOC concentrations in the vapor samples were used to calculate soil flux rates which were used as input into an air dispersion model to calculate ambient air exposure-point concentrations. The exposure-point concentrations were compared to EPA Region IX Preliminary Remediation Goals (PRGs). Buildings 830 and 832 exposure-point concentrations were less then the PRGs therefore no cancer risks were calculated. The cancer risks for Building 854 ranged from 1.6 x 10{sup -7} to 2.1 x 10{sup -6}. The resultant inhalation cancer risks were all within the acceptable range, implying that on-site workers were not exposed to VOC vapors volatilizing from the subsurface soil that could have significant cancer risks. Therefore remediation in these areas would not be necessary.

  3. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    designs (relatively) Photovoltaic Solar P a n e l AtmosphereCALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A ThesisABSTRACT OF T H E THESIS Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux by

  4. Artificial Soiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pigments found in soils throughout the United States roughly following the USDA soil taxonomy 11. Ensuring a repeatable test formulation was straightforward when using...

  5. Sensitivity of Surface Flux Simulations to Hydrologic Parameters Based on an Uncertainty Quantification Framework Applied to the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Lin, Guang; Ricciuto, Daniel M.

    2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties in hydrologic parameters could have significant impacts on the simulated water and energy fluxes and land surface states, which will in turn affect atmospheric processes and the carbon cycle. Quantifying such uncertainties is an important step toward better understanding and quantification of uncertainty of integrated earth system models. In this paper, we introduce an uncertainty quantification (UQ) framework to analyze sensitivity of simulated surface fluxes to selected hydrologic parameters in the Community Land Model (CLM4) through forward modeling. Thirteen flux tower footprints spanning a wide range of climate and site conditions were selected to perform sensitivity analyses by perturbing the parameters identified. In the UQ framework, prior information about the parameters was used to quantify the input uncertainty using the Minimum-Relative-Entropy approach. The quasi-Monte Carlo approach was applied to generate samples of parameters on the basis of the prior pdfs. Simulations corresponding to sampled parameter sets were used to generate response curves and response surfaces and statistical tests were used to rank the significance of the parameters for output responses including latent (LH) and sensible heat (SH) fluxes. Overall, the CLM4 simulated LH and SH show the largest sensitivity to subsurface runoff generation parameters. However, study sites with deep root vegetation are also affected by surface runoff parameters, while sites with shallow root zones are also sensitive to the vadose zone soil water parameters. Generally, sites with finer soil texture and shallower rooting systems tend to have larger sensitivity of outputs to the parameters. Our results suggest the necessity of and possible ways for parameter inversion/calibration using available measurements of latent/sensible heat fluxes to obtain the optimal parameter set for CLM4. This study also provided guidance on reduction of parameter set dimensionality and parameter calibration framework design for CLM4 and other land surface models under different hydrologic and climatic regimes.

  6. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0SoilSoils

  7. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0SoilSoils0

  8. Soil Moisture and the Drought in Texas Todd Caldwell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Neutron scatter 50 2 2010 AmeriFlux Dielectric 215 1 2005 NEON ?? 20 1 ~2011 West Texas Mesonet: 79 sitesSoil Moisture and the Drought in Texas Todd Caldwell Bridget Scanlon Michael Young Di Long Water;Soil Moisture and the Drought in Texas I. How is drought linked to water resources? II. Where does soil

  9. Inverse Modeling of Hydrologic Parameters Using Surface Flux and Runoff Observations in the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Yu; Hou, Zhangshuan; Huang, Maoyi; Tian, Fuqiang; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This study demonstrates the possibility of inverting hydrologic parameters using surface flux and runoff observations in version 4 of the Community Land Model (CLM4). Previous studies showed that surface flux and runoff calculations are sensitive to major hydrologic parameters in CLM4 over different watersheds, and illustrated the necessity and possibility of parameter calibration. Two inversion strategies, the deterministic least-square fitting and stochastic Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo (MCMC) - Bayesian inversion approaches, are evaluated by applying them to CLM4 at selected sites. The unknowns to be estimated include surface and subsurface runoff generation parameters and vadose zone soil water parameters. We find that using model parameters calibrated by the least-square fitting provides little improvements in the model simulations but the sampling-based stochastic inversion approaches are consistent - as more information comes in, the predictive intervals of the calibrated parameters become narrower and the misfits between the calculated and observed responses decrease. In general, parameters that are identified to be significant through sensitivity analyses and statistical tests are better calibrated than those with weak or nonlinear impacts on flux or runoff observations. Temporal resolution of observations has larger impacts on the results of inverse modeling using heat flux data than runoff data. Soil and vegetation cover have important impacts on parameter sensitivities, leading to the different patterns of posterior distributions of parameters at different sites. Overall, the MCMC-Bayesian inversion approach effectively and reliably improves the simulation of CLM under different climates and environmental conditions. Bayesian model averaging of the posterior estimates with different reference acceptance probabilities can smooth the posterior distribution and provide more reliable parameter estimates, but at the expense of wider uncertainty bounds.

  10. Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

  11. Harmonic propagation of variability in surface energy balance within a coupled soil-vegetation-atmosphere system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, P.

    [1] The response of a soil-vegetation-atmosphere continuum model to incoming radiation forcing is investigated in order to gain insights into the coupling of soil and atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) states and fluxes. The ...

  12. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore »this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  13. Soil Carbon Accumulation During Temperate Forest Succession

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grogan, Paul

    K7L 3N6, Canada ABSTRACT Carbon sequestration in soils that have previously beendepletedoforganic the soil carbon sequestration potential of such lands by sampling adjacent mature forest and agricultural abandonment is more important than soil type in determining the potential magnitude of carbon sequestration

  14. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Soil Biota USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 8 What are soil biota? Soil biota, the biologically active powerhouse of soil, include an incredible diversity of organisms. Tons of soil biota, including micro

  15. Generation and mobility of radon in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this research include: (1) To determine the processes that cause large seasonal and short-term changes in the radon (Rn) content of soil gases, and to develop methods of predicting and modeling these variations; (2) to evaluate the relation of Rn emanation coefficients to form of radium (Ra) and other U-series decay products, particularly the role of Ra in organic matter and Fe-oxides; (3) to evaluate the conditions in which convection of gas in soil and bedrock may affect soil gas radon availability in houses; and, (4) to collaborate with other DOE researchers on evaluation of Rn flux into houses, using our well characterized soil sites.

  16. Energy Fluxes optimization for PV integrated Rim.Missaoui, Ghaith.Warkozek, Seddik. Bacha, Stphane.Ploix.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -time simulation I. NOMENCLATURE t Sampling step time, [hour]. Sampling time of the anticipatory layer. i, Ksun, : Constants. heater Heat flux given by the radiator. sun Heat flux of sunlight through the window

  17. Exfiltrometer apparatus and method for measuring unsaturated hydrologic properties in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.; Schafer, Annette L.

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Exfiltrometer apparatus includes a container for holding soil. A sample container for holding sample soil is positionable with respect to the container so that the sample soil contained in the sample container is in communication with soil contained in the container. A first tensiometer operatively associated with the sample container senses a surface water potential at about a surface of the sample soil contained in the sample container. A second tensiometer operatively associated with the sample container senses a first subsurface water potential below the surface of the sample soil. A water content sensor operatively associated with the sample container senses a water content in the sample soil. A water supply supplies water to the sample soil. A data logger operatively connected to the first and second tensiometers, and to the water content sensor receives and processes data provided by the first and second tensiometers and by the water content sensor.

  18. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Volume two contains the following appendices: Description of soil sampling sites; sampling narrative; raw data soil background; background data analysis; sitewide background soil sampling plan; and use of soil background data for the detection of contamination at waste management unit on the Hanford Site.

  19. SOIL SAMPLING DERELICT, UNDERUSED AND NEGLECTED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on brownfield land: the site selection and investigation process. Additionally, in-depth information

  20. Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs, Idaho: Energy

  1. Photovoltaic roof heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samady, Mezhgan Frishta

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    e l Atmosphere ceiling, back panel roof, exposed roof insideSAN DIEGO Photovoltaic Roof Heat Flux A Thesis submitted i no n Convection Exposed Roof Temperature Seasonal Temperature

  2. Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jun Cao

    2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

  3. ARM Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) station: surf. heat flux and related data, 30-min

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cook, David

    The Energy Balance Bowen Ratio (EBBR) system produces 30-min estimates of the vertical fluxes of sensible and latent heat at the local surface. Flux estimates are calculated from observations of net radiation, soil surface heat flux, and the vertical gradients of temperature and relative humidity. Meteorological data collected by the EBBR are used to calculate bulk aerodynamic fluxes, which are used in the Bulk Aerodynamic Technique (BA) EBBR value-added product (VAP) to replace sunrise and sunset spikes in the flux data. A unique aspect of the system is the automatic exchange mechanism (AEM), which helps to reduce errors from instrument offset drift.

  4. TEOS 03 Carbon Flux and C Pipe TEOS 03.1 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    almost instantaneously with a number of factors identified in TEOS 02. For this project, we are using all to bring together complementary sensor streams, such as sap flux and soil respiration, into a consistent Systems Figure 1. Goulden flux tower at the James Reserve Figure 2. Hemispherical photograph of AMARSS

  5. Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Net Carbon Flux from US Croplands at 1km2 Resolution. This estimate includes all on-site sources and sinks of carbon Agronomic Feedstock Production and Environmental Impact Analyses ORNL uses high-resolution projections of feedstock production in analyses of soil carbon change, soil erosion, energy use, net

  6. Experimental litterfall manipulation drives large and rapid changes in soil carbon cycling in a wet tropical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Townsend, Alan

    biomass, microbial biomass, soil moisture, and nutrient fluxes. However, the litter manipulations had only, and microbial processes in response to litter manipulation reflect shifts in the quantity rather than quality analysis showed that variations in CO2 fluxes were strongly correlated with microbial biomass pools, soil C

  7. Variations in chemical and physical properties of Amazon forest soils in relation to their genesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soils was the RADAM-BRASIL soil survey (RADAMBRASIL, 1978).this study over the RADAM-BRASIL soil survey Biogeosciences,profiles in the RADAM- BRASIL, their sampling was limited by

  8. N-15 NMR spectra of naturally abundant nitrogen in soil and aquatic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil samples include humic and fulvic acids from the Elliot soil, Minnesota Waskish peat and Florida Pahokee peat, as well as the Summit Hill soil humic acid and the Leonardite...

  9. Cropland Field Monitoring: MMV Page 1 Montana Cropland Enrolled Farm Fields Carbon Sequestration Field Sampling, Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification: Application of Visible-Near Infrared Diffuse Reflectance Spectroscopy (VNIR) and Laser-induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; Ross Bricklemyer; David Brown

    2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    There is growing need for rapid, accurate, and inexpensive methods to measure, and verify soil organic carbon (SOC) change for national greenhouse gas accounting and the development of a soil carbon trading market. Laboratory based soil characterization typically requires significant soil processing, which is time and resource intensive. This severely limits application for large-region soil characterization. Thus, development of rapid and accurate methods for characterizing soils are needed to map soil properties for precision agriculture applications, improve regional and global soil carbon (C) stock and flux estimates and efficiently map sub-surface metal contamination, among others. The greatest gains for efficient soil characterization will come from collecting soil data in situ, thus minimizing soil sample transportation, processing, and lab-based measurement costs. Visible and near-infrared diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (VisNIR) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) are two complementary, yet fundamentally different spectroscopic techniques that have the potential to meet this need. These sensors have the potential to be mounted on a soil penetrometer and deployed for rapid soil profile characterization at field and landscape scales. Details of sensor interaction, efficient data management, and appropriate statistical analysis techniques for model calibrations are first needed. In situ or on-the-go VisNIR spectroscopy has been proposed as a rapid and inexpensive tool for intensively mapping soil texture and organic carbon (SOC). While lab-based VisNIR has been established as a viable technique for estimating various soil properties, few experiments have compared the predictive accuracy of on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Eight north central Montana wheat fields were intensively interrogated using on-the-go and lab-based VisNIR. Lab-based spectral data consistently provided more accurate predictions than on-the-go data. However, neither in situ nor lab-based spectroscopy yielded even semi-quantitative SOC predictions. There was little SOC variability to explain across the eight fields, and on-the-go VisNIR was not able to capture the subtle SOC variability in these Montana soils. With more variation in soil clay content compared to SOC, both lab and on-the-go VisNIR showed better explanatory power. There are several potential explanations for poor on-the-go predictive accuracy: soil heterogeneity, field moisture, consistent sample presentation, and a difference between the spatial support of on-the-go measurements and soil samples collected for laboratory analyses. Though the current configuration of a commercially available on-the-go VisNIR system allows for rapid field scanning, on-the-go soil processing (i.e. drying, crushing, and sieving) could improve soil carbon predictions. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is an emerging elemental analysis technology with the potential to provide rapid, accurate and precise analysis of soil constituents, such as carbon, in situ across landscapes. The research team evaluated the accuracy of LIBS for measuring soil profile carbon in field-moist, intact soil cores simulating conditions that might be encountered by a probe-mounted LIBS instrument measuring soil profile carbon in situ. Over the course of three experiments, more than120 intact soil cores from eight north central Montana wheat fields and the Washington State University (WSU) Cook Agronomy Farm near Pullman, WA were interrogated with LIBS for rapid total carbon (TC), inorganic carbon (IC), and SOC determination. Partial least squares regression models were derived and independently validated at field- and regional scales. Researchers obtained the best LIBS validation predictions for IC followed by TC and SOC. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique, yet LIBS PLS2 models appeared to discriminate IC from TC. Regression coefficients from initial models suggested a reliance upon stoichiometric relationships between carbon (247.8 nm) and other elements

  10. Uranium soils integrated demonstration: Soil characterization project report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cunnane, J.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gill, V.R. [Fernald Environmental Restoration Management Corp., Cincinnati, OH (United States); Lee, S.Y. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Morris, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Nickelson, M.D. [HAZWRAP, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perry, D.L. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Tidwell, V.C. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Integrated Demonstration Program, hosted by the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP), has been established for investigating technologies applicable to the characterization and remediation of soils contaminated with uranium. Critical to the design of relevant treatment technologies is detailed information on the chemical and physical characteristics of the uranium waste-form. To address this need a soil sampling and characterization program was initiated which makes use of a variety of standard analytical techniques coupled with state-of-the-art microscopy and spectroscopy techniques. Sample representativeness is evaluated through the development of conceptual models in an effort to identify and understand those geochemical processes governing the behavior of uranium in FEMP soils. Many of the initial results have significant implications for the design of soil treatment technologies for application at the FEMP.

  11. IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IMPORTED SOIL OR SOIL-FORMING MATERIALS PLACEMENT BPG NOTE 5 Best Practice Guidance for Land of heavy industry. Soil material initially present on a site may have been removed or stored in bunds the original soil that has been stored or importing a soil from elsewhere or using a soil-forming material

  12. APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farrell, Anthony P.

    1 APBI 402 / SOIL 502 SUSTAINABLE SOIL MANAGEMENT TERM 1 - 2014/15 Lead Instructors*: Maja Krzic indicators to assess sustainability of land management practices. Characterize the soil chemical environment 402-Sustainable Soil Management SOIL 502-Advanced Sustainable Soil Management Final exam 35% Final

  13. Radiative Flux Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Long, Chuck [NOAA

    The Radiative Flux Analysis is a technique for using surface broadband radiation measurements for detecting periods of clear (i.e. cloudless) skies, and using the detected clear-sky data to fit functions which are then used to produce continuous clear-sky estimates. The clear-sky estimates and measurements are then used in various ways to infer cloud macrophysical properties.

  14. Changes in soil carbon and nitrogen associated with switchgrass production 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lobo Alonzo, Porfirio Jose

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Greater knowledge of the short- and long-term effects of biomass production practices on soil biological and chemical properties is needed to determine influences on sustainable land management. Soil samples under switchgrass ...

  15. Soils and Environment Soil fertility and soil processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Feifei

    be removed without blasting. Definition of soil #12; Land use planning, urbanization, timber management, landslides, and earthquakes Soils often carry a climatic signal Soil properties related to environmental soil. The fertile soils formed on glacial deposits in the mid-western United States are transported

  16. Particle Size Distribution of Gypseous Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnett, Morgan P.

    2010-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    to conditions in the field. In order to understand the true characterization of the soil and the gypsum particles, the entire soil sample should be analyzed. Four different approaches to the BaCl2 method presented in the literature (Hesse, 1976, Matar...

  17. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Bergfeld...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    thermal gradient in the center of the areas is around 320C m- 1. We estimate total heat loss from the two areas to be about 6.1 and 2.3 MW. Given current thinking on the...

  18. Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - 2013 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis the purpose of this project was to gain new geophysical data in order to add onto existing data and develop a better...

  19. Category:Gas Flux Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model, click here. Category:Conceptual Model Add.pngpage? For detailed information on

  20. Gas Flux Sampling (Evans, Et Al., 2001) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma: EnergyGeothermalEt

  1. Gas Flux Sampling (Klein, 2007) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma:

  2. Gas Flux Sampling (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma:Laney, 2005)

  3. Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2004) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma:Laney, 2005)Gas

  4. Gas Flux Sampling (Lewicki & Oldenburg, 2005) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma:Laney,

  5. Optical heat flux gauge

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noel, B.W.; Borella, H.M.; Cates, M.R.; Turley, W.D.; MacArthur, C.D.; Cala, G.C.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat flux gauge is disclosed comprising first and second thermographic phosphor layers separated by a layer of a thermal insulator, wherein each thermographic layer comprises a plurality of respective thermographic sensors in a juxtaposed relationship with respect to each other. The gauge may be mounted on a surface with the first thermographic phosphor in contact with the surface. A light source is directed at the gauge, causing the phosphors to luminesce. The luminescence produced by the phosphors is collected and its spectra analyzed in order to determine the heat flux on the surface. First and second phosphor layers must be different materials to assure that the spectral lines collected will be distinguishable. 9 figures.

  6. Vitrification testing of soil fines from contaminated Hanford 100 Area and 300 Area soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludowise, J.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The suitability of Hanford soil for vitrification is well known and has been demonstrated extensively in other work. The tests reported here were carried out to confirm the applicability of vitrification to the soil fines (a subset of the Hanford soil potentially different in composition from the bulk soil) and to provide data on the performance of actual, vitrified soil fines. It was determined that the soil fines were generally similar in composition to the bulk Hanford soil, although the fraction <0.25 mm in the 100 Area soil sample appears to differ somewhat from the bulk soil composition. The soil fines are readily melted into a homogeneous glass with the simple additions of CaO and/or Na{sub 2}O. The vitrified waste (plus additives) occupies only 60% of the volume of the initial untreated waste. Leach testing has shown the glasses made from the soil fines to be very durable relative to natural and man-made glasses and has demonstrated the ability of the vitrified waste to greatly reduce the release of radionuclides to the environment. Viscosity and electrical conductivity measurements indicate that the soil fines will be readily processable, although with levels of additives slightly greater than used in the radioactive melts. These tests demonstrate the applicability of vitrification to the contaminated soil fines and the exceptional performance of the waste form resulting from the vitrification of contaminated Hanford soils.

  7. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, William B. (Edgewood, NM); Rodacy, Philip J. (Albuquerque, NM); Phelan, James M. (Bosque Farms, NM); Woodfin, Ronald L. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  8. Stabilization of moduli by fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behrndt, Klaus [Albert-Einstein-Institute, Am Muehlenberg 1, 14476 Golm (Germany)

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to fix the moduli, non-trivial fluxes might the essential input. We summarize different aspects of compactifications in the presence of fluxes, as there is the relation to generalized Scherk-Schwarz reductions and gauged supergravity but also the description of flux-deformed geometries in terms of G-structures and intrinsic torsion.

  9. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality-- Physical and Biological Soil Crusts USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 7 What are soil crusts? A physical crust is a thin layer with reduced porosity and increased density at the surface of the soil. A biological crust

  10. Airborne microwave remote sensing of soil moisture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Quentin Robert

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Studies of Sampling Accuracy Soil Type Variation . Surface Conditions. Lawrence, 1976 Experiment. Finney County, 1976 Experiment Hand County, 1976 Experiment . 1 1 3 4 4 5 7 15 16 16 21 28 31 33 33 33 35 36 36 37 38 39 41 42... 1971 soil and temperature profiles using surface layers 0. 5 cm thick 56 22 Comparison of the response of coherent and noncoherent emissions models for several 1971 soil and temperature profiles using surface layers 1. 0 cm thick . . . . . . . . 57...

  11. Development of a passive soil gas flux sampler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McQuown, Brian C

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the flow system of the active tube sampler. Since inlet and outlet flows to the sampler canister had to be balanced, care was taken to avoid leaking tubing and fittings. The flow balancing provided a de facto leak test, so this source of error...

  12. Long-term Black Carbon Dynamics in Cultivated Soil. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at 8 conversion ages stretching over 100 years and from a forest soil sample from Kenya, were manually picked under a light microscope for characterization and...

  13. Soil Salinity Abatement Following Hurricane Ike 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Ryan

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    . The initial salt levels in November 2008 had an electrical conductivity (ECe) of the inundated soils as high as 26.7 dS/m. Fifty-four percent of the soils sampled in the 0-15 cm horizons and 9% in the 15-30 cm horizons of the edge area had an ECe >= 4 d...

  14. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructure ofIndustrialSupportingAlbedo at theSurface Soil Surface Soil

  15. Multiscale Interactions between Water and Carbon Fluxes and Environmental Variables in A Central U.S. Grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Wilson, Cassandra J.

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    field in the central U.S. Time-series of the entropy of water and carbon fluxes exhibit pronounced annual cycles, primarily explained by the modulation of the diurnal flux amplitude by other variables, such as the net radiation. Entropies of soil...

  16. Soil Landscape Assessment atSoil Landscape Assessment at D I l d L A C d KD I l d L A C d KDog Island Lease Area, Cedar KeyDog Island Lease Area, Cedar Key

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Soil Landscape Assessment atSoil Landscape Assessment at D I l d L A C d KD I l d L A C d KDog Island Lease Area, Cedar KeyDog Island Lease Area, Cedar Key #12;Soil SampleSoil Sample LocationsLocationsLocationsLocations #12;Soil ElevationSoil Elevation (Bathymetry)(Bathymetry)(Bathymetry)(Bathymetry) 1.5 ft NAD881.5 ft

  17. Sampling box

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Terrance D. (617 Chestnut Ct., Aiken, SC 29803); Johnson, Craig (100 Midland Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831-0895)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An air sampling box that uses a slidable filter tray and a removable filter cartridge to allow for the easy replacement of a filter which catches radioactive particles is disclosed.

  18. Generation and mobility of radon in soil. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Objectives of this research include: (1) To determine the processes that cause large seasonal and short-term changes in the radon (Rn) content of soil gases, and to develop methods of predicting and modeling these variations; (2) to evaluate the relation of Rn emanation coefficients to form of radium (Ra) and other U-series decay products, particularly the role of Ra in organic matter and Fe-oxides; (3) to evaluate the conditions in which convection of gas in soil and bedrock may affect soil gas radon availability in houses; and, (4) to collaborate with other DOE researchers on evaluation of Rn flux into houses, using our well characterized soil sites.

  19. Physics of String Flux Compactifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frederik Denef; Michael R. Douglas; Shamit Kachru

    2007-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide a qualitative review of flux compactifications of string theory, focusing on broad physical implications and statistical methods of analysis.

  20. Fluxes, Gaugings and Gaugino Condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. -P. Derendinger; C. Kounnas; P. M. Petropoulos

    2006-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on the correspondence between the N = 1 superstring compactifications with fluxes and the N = 4 gauged supergravities, we study effective N = 1 four-dimensional supergravity potentials arising from fluxes and gaugino condensates in the framework of orbifold limits of (generalized) Calabi-Yau compactifications. We give examples in heterotic and type II orientifolds in which combined fluxes and condensates lead to vacua with small supersymmetry breaking scale. We clarify the respective roles of fluxes and condensates in supersymmetry breaking, and analyze the scaling properties of the gravitino mass.

  1. Arsenic distribution in soils surrounding the Utah copper smelter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, A.L. (Univ. of Utah Coll. of Engineering, Salt Lake City); Rom, W.N.; Glenne, B.

    1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated the extent of arsenic contamination from a Utah copper smelter as reflected by arsenic residue accumulated in the surface soil. The highest arsenic concentrations occurred within 3 km of the smelter. Arsenic soil contamination was evident up to 10 km from the smelter, with the major transport direction being ESE. Data from the subsurface soil samples indicated that arsenic has also leached through the soil.

  2. Soils | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |RippeyInformationSoda Springs, Idaho:Soil Sampling

  3. Letter and Sampling Plan: Soils Review Sampling Plan for the Southeast Drainage and Sampling Notification.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling CorpNewCF INDUSTRIES,L? .-I I2 m.m\ LILTS PlanI9

  4. Sampling and Analysis Instruction for Borehole Sampling at 118-B-1 Burial Ground

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2007-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washington Closure Hanford (WCH) Field Remediation Project has removed all of the disposed materials and contaminated soil from the 118-B-1 Burial Ground with the exception of tritium-contaminated soil that is believed to extend from the bottom of the present excavation to groundwater and is believed to contribute to tritium contamination observed at down-gradient monitoring Well 199-B8-6. This sampling and analysis instruction (SAI) provides the requirements for sample collection and laboratory analysis for characterization of the vertical distribution of tritium contamination in the vadose zone soil below the 118-B-1 Burial Ground remedial action excavation.

  5. Digital soil mapping: Towards a multiple-use Soil Information System D G Rossiter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, D G "David"

    Lecturer Semana de la Geomática Santa Fé de Bogotá, Colombia 08­August­2005 Abstract: In recent years digital remote sensing of soil properties; (3) geo- statistical interpolation and sampling design; (4 (both urban and rural) as well as more traditional agricultural users of soil resource inventories. All

  6. Part I. Ecological Sites and Soil Part II. A Framework for Soil and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , alkalinity, CaCO3 · Available water capacity · Water table depth · Run-off, run-in · Parent material · Other measures Samples for Organic carbon, POM, N, SAR, CaCO3, CEC, etc Infiltration, Ksat Soil stability

  7. Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software0 Soil

  8. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Backyard Guide to Healthy Soil and Higher Yields, by JohnInstitute. Start with the Soil, by Grace Gershuny. Emmaus,Institute. 1993. The Soul of Soil: A Guide to Ecological

  9. High Heat Flux Components Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitley, J.B.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose is the development of the technologies necessary to design, build and operate high heat flux components such as actively cooled limiters, divertor collector plates, R.F. antennas, mirror end cells, mirror halo collectors, direct convertor collectors, and neutral beam dumps. These components require an integrated design that considers the plasma-materials interaction (PMI) issues, heat removal problems and materials issues (including possible low Z coatings and claddings). As a general definition, high heat flux components see heat fluxes ranging from 1 to 100 MW/m/sup 2/. Suitable materials include copper and copper alloys.

  10. Organochlorine insecticide residues in soil and earthworms in the Delhi area, India, August-October 1974

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, D.V.; Mittal, P.K.; Agarwal, H.C.; Pillai, M.K.

    1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DDT residues in soil and earthworms from 50 sites in Delhi were monitored. DDT was detected in all but two samples each of soil and earthworms. Among DDT residues, p,p'-DDE was most common and was found in 48 samples each of soil and earthworms; p,p'-DDT was detected in only 43 soil samples and 46 earthworm samples. p,p'-TDE and o,p'-DDT were also present in smaller concentrations in 29 and 15 soil samples and in 43 and 25 earthworm samples, respectively. Maximum total DDT concentration of 2.6 ppm was detected in the soil from Durga Nagar in the vicinity of a DDT factory. The highest concentration of 37.7 ppm total DDT in earthworms was also obtained from the same site. The maximum concentration factor found in the earthworms was 551. The total DDT concentration in the earthworms and soil showed significant correlation.

  11. Trap cultures reveal higher species richness of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in comparison to soil samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    samples in the Phoenix metropolitan area.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes mycorrhizal fungal and dark septate endophytes colonization of plant roots from urban desert preserves (Brundett 1999). Dark septate endophytes (DSE) are another type of root colonizing fungi mainly classified

  12. The Solar Wind Energy Flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chat, G Le; Meyer-Vernet, N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar-wind energy flux measured near the ecliptic is known to be independent of the solar-wind speed. Using plasma data from Helios, Ulysses, and Wind covering a large range of latitudes and time, we show that the solar-wind energy flux is independent of the solar-wind speed and latitude within 10%, and that this quantity varies weakly over the solar cycle. In other words the energy flux appears as a global solar constant. We also show that the very high speed solar-wind (VSW > 700 km/s) has the same mean energy flux as the slower wind (VSW < 700 km/s), but with a different histogram. We use this result to deduce a relation between the solar-wind speed and density, which formalizes the anti-correlation between these quantities.

  13. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Soybean Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  14. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Forage Breeding Committee Membership Dr. Joseph Bouton - committee chair Dr. Brian Schwartz Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Center

  15. Functional and taxonomic diversity of microbial communities in reclaimed East Texas lignite mine soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peach, Allen Edward

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-year study was conducted at Big Brown lignite mine in Freestone County, Texas, to determine the influence of surface mining and reclamation on the functional and taxonomic diversity in soil microbial communities. Quarterly soil samples were...

  16. Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Environmental Soil Chemistry Second Edition Environmental Soil Chemistry illustrates fundamental principles of soil chemistry with respect to environmental reactions between soils and other natural contemporary training in the basics of soil chemistry and applications to real-world environmental concerns

  17. Historic climate change impacts on soil frost in the Mid-Western

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherkauer, Keith

    1 Historic climate change impacts on soil frost in the Mid-Western United States Tushar Sinha #12;4 Why do we care about soil frost ? · Effects energy and water balance fluxes · Snowmelt events by as much as two weeks · In North Central United States (from 1948 ­ 1988) (Lettenmaier et al., 1994

  18. Production of CO2 in Soil Profiles of a California Annual Grassland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fierer, Noah

    Production of CO2 in Soil Profiles of a California Annual Grassland Noah Fierer,1 * Oliver A play a key role in the global cycling of carbon (C), storing organic C, and releasing CO2 to the atmosphere. Although a large number of studies have focused on the CO2 flux at the soil­air inter- face

  19. Soil Testing and Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciocan-Fontanine, Ionut

    Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Copyright © 2014 University of Minnesota Soil Testing and Research Analytical Laboratory Department of Soil, Water and Climate College of Food payable to the University of Minnesota We also accept the following credit cards: Soil Testing

  20. Indiana Soil and Landscape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    Indiana Soil and Landscape Evaluation Manual Version 1.0 D.P. Franzmeier G.C. Steinhardt D soil scientists to be the state soil. The scale on the gray panel is in decimeters and feet. The upper 18 inches (46 cm) of the soil formed in Wisconsinan age loess, and the lower part formed

  1. A comparison of methods for determining the adsorption of pentachlorophenol on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Eva Lorine

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) . . . . . . . . . . . 90 8 Values of Kd (ml/g) calculated from soil extraction and soil pore water samples from the unsaturated surface soil cores . 92 9 Results of PCP analysis on ped face and soil matrix samples for the undisturbed surface soil cores run under... adsorption para meters for the range of conditions expected in the field [Relyea et al, 19RO]. The adsorption of a chemical by soil is usually quantified by an empirical distribution ccefficient, Kd, which is defined as: Kd ? m ass of solute on solid hase...

  2. Measurement and Partitioning of in situ Carbon Fluxes in Turfgrasses D.J. Bremer*, J.M. Ham, and K. Su*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    procedure was developed that accounted for this small soil flux. Licor6400 Custom Chamber FlowMeter Voltage) that illustrate the design of a pressurized chamber system. A variable flow air pump and manometer were used. 1). · Measurements collected at Rocky Ford Turfgrass Research Center, Manhattan, KS. · Soil type

  3. Thermality of the Hawking flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Is the Hawking flux "thermal"? Unfortunately, the answer to this seemingly innocent question depends on a number of often unstated, but quite crucial, technical assumptions built into modern (mis-)interpretations of the word "thermal". The original 1850's notions of thermality --- based on classical thermodynamic reasoning applied to idealized "black bodies" or "lamp black surfaces" --- when supplemented by specific basic quantum ideas from the early 1900's, immediately led to the notion of the black-body spectrum, (the Planck-shaped spectrum), but "without" any specific assumptions or conclusions regarding correlations between the quanta. Many (not all) modern authors (often implicitly and unintentionally) add an extra, and quite unnecessary, assumption that there are no correlations in the black-body radiation; but such usage is profoundly ahistorical and dangerously misleading. Specifically, the Hawking flux from an evaporating black hole, (just like the radiation flux from a leaky furnace or a burning lump of coal), is only "approximately" Planck-shaped over a bounded frequency range. Standard physics (phase space and adiabaticity effects) explicitly bound the frequency range over which the Hawking flux is "approximately" Planck-shaped from both above and below --- the Hawking flux is certainly not exactly Planckian, and there is no compelling physics reason to assume the Hawking photons are uncorrelated.

  4. Unusual persistence of DDT in some western USA soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hitch, R.K.; Day, H.R. (Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Agricultural use of DDT (1,1,1-trichloro-2,2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethane) was canceled in 1972. By the late 1970's and early 1980's, the National Soils Monitoring Program of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was consistently finding higher soil residues of the degradate DDE (1,1-dichloro 2,2-bis (p-chlorophenyl) ethylene) than of parent DDT. Similarly, the US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) had been finding during the late 1970's that DDT and related compounds had been decreasing in birds throughout the US. During 1984 and 1985, the EPA and the agriculture departments of Texas and New Mexico, in response to the FWS, conducted soil sampling in 13 areas where contaminated birds had been collected. It was agreed that soil samples containing higher levels of DDT than DDE would serve as a possible indicator of illegal DDT use. This was an intensive soil sampling program; over 236 fields were sampled. A controversy developed as to whether high ratios of DDT and DDE might corroborate the accusations of recent illegal use of DDT products. Dell City area soils containing higher levels of DDT than of DDE became classified as suspicious soils. Soils bearing the expected higher level of DDE were dubbed as normal. To resolve the controversy, the authors, in 1989, conducted a DDT soil metabolism study with representative samples of the suspicious and normal soils. It was felt that a soil metabolism study could, once and for all, determine if there was, indeed, something unusual about the rate at which the suspicious soils degrade DDT.

  5. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume tracking methodology helped the USACE Buffalo District track soil quantity changes from projected excavation work over time and across space, providing the basis for an explanation of some of the project cost and schedule variances.

  6. CONTAM 03 Embedded Networked Sensing in Soils: A Stochastic Data Assimilation Approach to Network Design and Real-time State and Parameter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    of soil state and flux are improved when soil hydraulic parameters are updated. CONTAM 03.3 System(s Design and Real-time State and Parameter Estimation CONTAM 03.1 Overview The County Sanitation District the groundwater beneath the irrigated lands. Thus, a monitoring and modeling system providing real-time soil state

  7. Temperature-associated increases in the global soil respiration record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Thomson, Allison M.

    2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration (RS), the flux of CO2 from the soil surface to the atmosphere, comprises the second-largest terrestrial carbon flux, but its dynamics are incompletely understood, and the global flux remains poorly constrained. Ecosystem warming experiments, modelling analyses, and biokinetics all suggest that RS should change with climate. This has been difficult to confirm observationally because of the high spatial variability of RS, inaccessibility of the soil medium, and inability of remote sensing instruments to measure large-scale RS fluxes. Given these constraints, is it possible to discern climate-driven changes in regional or global RS fluxes in the extant four-decade record of RS chamber measurements? Here we use a database of worldwide RS observations, matched with high-resolution historical climate data, to show a previously unknown temporal trend in the RS record after accounting for mean annual climate, leaf area, nitrogen deposition, and changes in CO2 measurement technique. Air temperature anomaly (deviation from the 1961-1990 mean) is significantly and positively correlated with changes in RS fluxes; both temperature and precipitation anomalies exert effects in specific biomes. We estimate that the current (2008) annual global RS flux is 98±12 Pg and has increased 0.1 Pg yr-1 over the last 20 years, implying a global RS temperature response (Q10) of 1.5. An increasing global RS flux does not necessarily constitute a positive feedback loop to the atmosphere; nonetheless, the available data are consistent with an acceleration of the terrestrial carbon cycle in response to global climate change.

  8. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, Roland (Chicago, IL); Gleckman, Philip L. (Chicago, IL); O'Gallagher, Joseph J. (Flossmoor, IL)

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes.

  9. High flux solar energy transformation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Winston, R.; Gleckman, P.L.; O'Gallagher, J.J.

    1991-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are multi-stage systems for high flux transformation of solar energy allowing for uniform solar intensification by a factor of 60,000 suns or more. Preferred systems employ a focusing mirror as a primary concentrative device and a non-imaging concentrator as a secondary concentrative device with concentrative capacities of primary and secondary stages selected to provide for net solar flux intensification of greater than 2000 over 95 percent of the concentration area. Systems of the invention are readily applied as energy sources for laser pumping and in other photothermal energy utilization processes. 7 figures.

  10. Beta ray flux measuring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Impink, Jr., Albert J. (Murrysville, PA); Goldstein, Norman P. (Murrysville, PA)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A beta ray flux measuring device in an activated member in-core instrumentation system for pressurized water reactors. The device includes collector rings positioned about an axis in the reactor's pressure boundary. Activated members such as hydroballs are positioned within respective ones of the collector rings. A response characteristic such as the current from or charge on a collector ring indicates the beta ray flux from the corresponding hydroball and is therefore a measure of the relative nuclear power level in the region of the reactor core corresponding to the specific exposed hydroball within the collector ring.

  11. Naval submarine base Kings Bay and Bangor soil evaluations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Joseph; Patteson, Raymond; Wesenberg, Donald L.; Attaway, Stephen W.

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides soil evaluation and characterization testing for the submarine bases at Kings Bay, Georgia, and Bangor, Washington, using triaxial testing at high confining pressures with different moisture contents. In general, the samples from the Bangor and Kings Bay sites appeared to be stronger than a previously used reference soil. Assuming the samples of the material were representative of the material found at the sites, they should be adequate for use in the planned construction. Since soils can vary greatly over even a small site, a soil specification for the construction contractor would be needed to insure that soil variations found at the site would meet or exceed the requirements. A suggested specification for the Bangor and Kings Bay soils was presented based on information gathered from references plus data obtained from this study, which could be used as a basis for design by the construction contractor.

  12. High resolution analysis of soil elements with laser-induced breakdown

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ebinger, Michael H. (Santa Fe, NM); Harris, Ronny D. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a system and method of detecting a concentration of an element in a soil sample wherein an opening or slot is formed in a container that supports a soil sample that was extracted from the ground whereupon at least a length of the soil sample is exposed via the opening. At each of a plurality of points along the exposed length thereof, the soil sample is ablated whereupon a plasma is formed that emits light characteristic of the elemental composition of the ablated soil sample. Each instance of emitted light is separated according to its wavelength and for at least one of the wavelengths a corresponding data value related to the intensity of the light is determined. As a function of each data value a concentration of an element at the corresponding point along the length of the soil core sample is determined.

  13. Copyright 2008 Soil Science Society of America, 677 S. Segoe Road, Madison, WI 53711, USA. Methods of Soil Analysis. Part 5. Mineralogical Methods. SSSA Book Series, no. 5.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    . Methods of Soil Analysis. Part 5. Mineralogical Methods. SSSA Book Series, no. 5. Chapter 2 Preparing Soils for Mineralogical Analyses D. A. SOUKUP, University of Nevada, Las Vegas B. J. BUCK, University of soil mineralogical analysis. The use of pre- treatments is often necessary to facilitate sample

  14. Potassium sources and availability in three East Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hons, F. M

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -flow or displacement, centrifugation, compaction or compressi. on, molecular adsorption, and suction. According to Pearson (1971), displacement is the preferred method as it presents less chance for altering the composition of the soil solution. In this procedure... LITERATURE REVIEW MATERIALS AND METHODS Sampling Site and Procedure Soil pH Determinations Soil Solution Displacement Exchangeable Cations Exchangeable and Solution Aluminum Mineralogy Total Potassium Feldspar Potassium 10 10 11 12 13 14 15...

  15. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  16. Soil chemical properties of the residuum of Callaway County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, T.C. (REACT Environmental Engineers, St. Louis, MO (United States)); Bolter, E. (Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil samples of Callaway County, Missouri, were analyzed for soil pH, clay mineralogy, free iron and manganese oxides, total organic carbon content (TOC), and cation exchange capacity (CEC). The soil samples represent Ordovician, Devonian, Mississippian and Pennsylvanian residuum. In addition, alluvium, loess, colluvium and glacial till samples were analyzed. The clay minerals consist of kaolinite, illite, smectite and illite-smectite mixed layers, iron and manganese oxide content ranges from 0.137 to 2.87% and 0.003 to 0.082% respectively, while TOC values range from 0.03 to 3.00%. The CEC values show a wide range from 5 to 89 milliequivalent/100 grams. The influence of the different soil constituents on the adsorption capacity of the soils is evaluated.

  17. Soil washing technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suer, A.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Restoration Engineering (ERE) continues to review innovative, efficient, and cost effective technologies for SRS soil and/or groundwater remediation. As part of this effort, this technical evaluation provides review and the latest information on the technology for SRS soil remediation. Additional technology evaluation reports will be issued periodically to update these reports. The purpose of this report is to review the soil washing technology and its potential application to SRS soil remediation. To assess whether the Soil Washing technology is a viable option for SRS soil remediation, it is necessary to review the technology/process, technology advantages/limitations, performance, applications, and cost analysis.

  18. Abbreviated sampling and analysis plan for planning decontamination and decommissioning at Test Reactor Area (TRA) facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective is to sample and analyze for the presence of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents within certain areas of the Test Reactor Area (TRA), prior to D and D activities. The TRA is composed of three major reactor facilities and three smaller reactors built in support of programs studying the performance of reactor materials and components under high neutron flux conditions. The Materials Testing Reactor (MTR) and Engineering Test Reactor (ETR) facilities are currently pending D/D. Work consists of pre-D and D sampling of designated TRA (primarily ETR) process areas. This report addresses only a limited subset of the samples which will eventually be required to characterize MTR and ETR and plan their D and D. Sampling which is addressed in this document is intended to support planned D and D work which is funded at the present time. Biased samples, based on process knowledge and plant configuration, are to be performed. The multiple process areas which may be potentially sampled will be initially characterized by obtaining data for upstream source areas which, based on facility configuration, would affect downstream and as yet unsampled, process areas. Sampling and analysis will be conducted to determine the level of gamma emitting isotopes and hazardous constituents present in designated areas within buildings TRA-612, 642, 643, 644, 645, 647, 648, 663; and in the soils surrounding Facility TRA-611. These data will be used to plan the D and D and help determine disposition of material by D and D personnel. Both MTR and ETR facilities will eventually be decommissioned by total dismantlement so that the area can be restored to its original condition.

  19. Dynamics of CO2 fluxes and concentrations during a shallow subsurface CO2 release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J.L.; Hilley, G.E.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A field facility located in Bozeman, Montana provides the opportunity to test methods to detect, locate, and quantify potential CO2 leakage from geologic storage sites. From 9 July to 7 August 2008, 0.3 t CO2 d{sup -1} were injected from a 100-m long, {approx}2.5 m deep horizontal well. Repeated measurements of soil CO2 fluxes on a grid characterized the spatio-temporal evolution of the surface leakage signal and quantified the surface leakage rate. Infrared CO2 concentration sensors installed in the soil at 30 cm depth at 0 to 10 m from the well and at 4 cm above the ground at 0 and 5 m from the well recorded surface breakthrough of CO2 leakage and migration of CO2 leakage through the soil. Temporal variations in CO2 concentrations were correlated with atmospheric and soil temperature, wind speed, atmospheric pressure, rainfall, and CO2 injection rate.

  20. Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

    2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

  1. Overview of different aspects of climate change effects on soils.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (?400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2 and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils, are the subject of active current investigations with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries and identifies key research needs required to understand the effects of climate change on soils.

  2. ARSENIC HYPERACCUMULATION BY Pteris vittata L. AND ITS POTENTIAL FOR PHYTOREMEDIATION OF ARSENIC-CONTAMINATED SOILS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    needed assistance in harvesting ferns and soil sampling. I also wish to thank the past and present ...............................................................................................8 Arsenic in Water.................

  3. Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Soil Test P vs. Total P in Wisconsin Soils Larry G. Bundy & Laura W. Good Department of Soil Science University of Wisconsin-Madison #12;Introduction · Soil test P is often measured · Little information is available on total P content of soils · Why do we care about total P now? ­ Soil total P

  4. A baseline characterization of trace elements in Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frybarger, Mary Rita

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A baseline survey of concentrations of Mn, Fe, Zn, Cu, Se, As, Cd, Cr, Co, Pb, Ba, and Ni was performed for 100 soils from seven Land Resource Areas of Texas. Nearly 300 soil samples from the upper, middle, and lower depths of selected pedons were...

  5. Systematic Variability of Soil Hydraulic Conductivity Across Three Vertisol Catenas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera, Leonardo Daniel

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .......................................................... 16 Saturated Hydraulic Conductivity Measurements .......................... 19 Soil Sampling and Analysis ............................................................ 22 ROSETTA Modeling... properties. Manure application improved aggregation, decreased bulk density, and increased the hydraulic conductivity of the soil. Conventional tillage treatments had the highest bulk densities and lowest infiltration rates. Effects of Landscape Position...

  6. PhD Studentship in Soil Biogeochemistry Duration: 3 Years

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stell, John

    management actions for reducing the impacts of reactive N on environmental quality. The student will carry background in environmental science and an interest in soil biogeochemistry. Field work may involve samplingPhD Studentship in Soil Biogeochemistry Duration: 3 Years Application Deadline: July 10, 2014

  7. TECHNICAL REPORTS Continuous measurement of soil N2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    TECHNICAL REPORTS 606 Continuous measurement of soil N2 O emissions is needed to constrain N2 O constraint on estimates of N loss to the atmosphere and N2 O emission factors. Approximately 95% of soil N2 O simple methodology, and require no electrical power. However, manual sampling usually provides a low

  8. An Analysis of Fluxes by Duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul S. Aspinwall

    2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    M-theory on K3xK3 with non-supersymmetry-breaking G-flux is dual to M-theory on a Calabi-Yau threefold times a 2-torus without flux. This allows for a thorough analysis of the effects of flux without relying on supergravity approximations. We discuss several dual pairs showing that the usual rules of G-flux compactifications work well in detail. We discuss how a transition can convert M2-branes into G-flux. We see how new effects can arise at short distances allowing fluxes to obstruct more moduli than one expects from the supergravity analysis.

  9. The IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, D B; Kim, D C; Surace, J A; Soifer, B T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IRAS flux densities, redshifts, and infrared luminosities are reported for all sources identified in the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS), a complete flux-limited survey of all extragalactic objects with total 60 micron flux density greater than 5.24 Jy, covering the entire sky surveyed by IRAS at Galactic latitude |b| > 5 degrees. The RBGS includes 629 objects, with a median (mean) sample redshift of 0.0082 (0.0126) and a maximum redshift of 0.0876. The RBGS supersedes the previous two-part IRAS Bright Galaxy Samples, which were compiled before the final ("Pass 3") calibration of the IRAS Level 1 Archive in May 1990. The RBGS also makes use of more accurate and consistent automated methods to measure the flux of objects with extended emission. Basic properties of the RBGS sources are summarized, including estimated total infrared luminosities, as well as updates to cross-identifications with sources from optical galaxy catalogs established using the NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database (NED). In addition...

  10. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  11. Nitrification in Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1920-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    have a high nitrificati is the balmcing of these extremes which redlices the average le between acid ancl non-acid soils. C03TPOSITION OF SOILS TVITFI LOW AND HIGH NITRIFIC-4TION. Table 11 contains the chemical composition of soils having low nitl... are subsoils. Subsoils thus possess nnu~nally high and unusually low nitrification. Table 11.-Chemical composition of soils with nitrification below 10 . I Average .............................. Nitri- fication 7164 7090 4596' 5710 4645 3976 3657 3...

  12. Environmental surveillance master sampling schedule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bisping, L E

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental surveillance of the Hanford Site and surrounding areas is conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This document contains the planned schedule for routine sample collection for the Surface Environmental Surveillance Project (SESP) and Ground-Water Monitoring Project. Samples for radiological analyses include Air-Particulate Filter, gases and vapor; Water/Columbia River, Onsite Pond, Spring, Irrigation, and Drinking; Foodstuffs/Animal Products including Whole Milk, Poultry and Eggs, and Beef; Foodstuffs/Produce including Leafy Vegetables, Vegetables, and Fruit; Foodstuffs/Farm Products including Wine, Wheat and Alfalfa; Wildlife; Soil; Vegetation; and Sediment. Direct Radiation Measurements include Terrestrial Locations, Columbia River Shoreline Locations, and Onsite Roadway, Railway and Aerial, Radiation Surveys.

  13. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  14. Managing Soil Salinity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Pitt, John L.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    helps the water move downward through the soil. While deep tillage will help temporarily, the parts of the soil not permanently broken up may reseal. Leaching: Leaching can be used to reduce the salts in soils. You must add enough low-salt water...

  15. UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    UNSATURATED SOIL MECHANICS IMPLEMENTATION DURING PAVEMENT CONSTRUCTION QUALITY ASSURANCE Mn !! Performance Based Construction QA !! Unsaturated Soil Mechanics !! What We've Learned !! Next Steps #12.6-6.0 5 - 7 19 0.8 5 7 - 9 24 1.1 4 9 - 11 28 1.2 4 #12;Unsaturated Soil Mechanics #12;Fundamentals

  16. Heisenberg groups and noncommutative fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freed, Daniel S. [Department of Mathematics, University of Texas at Austin, TX 78712 (United States)]. E-mail: dafr@math.utexas.edu; Moore, Gregory W. [Department of Physics, Rutgers University, Piscataway, NJ 08854-8019 (United States); Segal, Graeme [All Souls College, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a group-theoretical approach to the formulation of generalized abelian gauge theories, such as those appearing in string theory and M-theory. We explore several applications of this approach. First, we show that there is an uncertainty relation which obstructs simultaneous measurement of electric and magnetic flux when torsion fluxes are included. Next, we show how to define the Hilbert space of a self-dual field. The Hilbert space is Z{sub 2}-graded and we show that, in general, self-dual theories (including the RR fields of string theory) have fermionic sectors. We indicate how rational conformal field theories associated to the two-dimensional Gaussian model generalize to (4k+2)-dimensional conformal field theories. When our ideas are applied to the RR fields of string theory we learn that it is impossible to measure the K-theory class of a RR field. Only the reduction modulo torsion can be measured.

  17. COMPOST INFORMATION SHEET MSU SOIL & PLANT NUTRIENT LABORATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rufus

    COMPOST INFORMATION SHEET MSU SOIL & PLANT NUTRIENT LABORATORY 1066 BOGUE ST. ROOM A81 EAST LANSING _______________________________________________________________________ SAMPLE IDENTIFICATION:___________________________ COUNTY: ________________ COMPOST TYPE: LEAF COMPOST MSW COMPOST MANURE COMPOST OTHER: (specify) ____________________________________________________ TEST

  18. Evaluation of Environmental Quality and Evolution in Urban Soils of Qingdao City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Environmental Quality and Evolution in Urban Soils of Qingdao City Yao DeLi Gongsheng districts of Qingdao city. A total of 319 surface soil samples (at 0~10cm depth) were taken with a density of human activities on the soils environmental quality in mathematics? #12;

  19. Forestry, Wildlife and Fisheries Graduate Seminar "Trees Adaptation to Mercury Contaminated Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    in contaminated soil with heavy metals is mainly due to phenotypic plasticity and/or microbial community microscope. Soil Sampling · Physio-chemical components of the soil will be determined. ­ pH, water content of mercury is mainly within the below ground components of the tree seedlings. Methodology ­Growth Chamber

  20. Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Reconnaissance Soil Geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Reconnaissance soil geochemistry at the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Site, Fremont County.....................................................................................................................................................link Figures Figure 1. Location of 19 soil samples collected from the Riverton Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial

  1. Center vortices as composites of monopole fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deldar, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the relation between the flux of a center vortex obtained from the center vortex model and the flux formed between monopoles obtained from the Abelian gauge fixing method. Motivated by the Monte Carlo simulations which have shown that almost all monopoles are sitting on the top of vortices, we construct the fluxes of center vortices for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups using fractional fluxes of monopoles. Then, we compute the potentials in the fundamental representation induced by center vortices and fractional fluxes of monopoles. We show that by combining the fractional fluxes of monopoles one can produce the center vortex fluxes for $SU(3)$ gauge group in a "center vortex model". Comparing the potentials, we conclude that the fractional fluxes of monopoles attract each other.

  2. 2392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 41, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 Soil Moisture Mapping Using ESTAR Under

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2392 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 41, NO. 10, OCTOBER 2003 Soil of the entire region. Index Terms--Microwave, remote sensing, soil moisture. I. INTRODUCTION THE FUNDAMENTAL regional heat fluxes [15], and to validate distributed land surface models in order to study the scaling

  3. The trade-off between growth rate and yield in microbial communities and the consequences for under-snow soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Steven K.

    at the ecosystem and global scales, representing about half of total CO2 flux from soils (Hanson et al. 2000 of soil microbial communities. In particular, the rate and efficiency of growth determine how much CO2 unit substrate consumed) convert a larger fraction of substrate into CO2 during growth, and so respire

  4. Sampling diffusive transition paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Miller III, Thomas

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sampling di?usive transition paths Thomas F. Miller III ?the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for thedynamics I. INTRODUCTION Transition path sampling (TPS) is a

  5. Iodine in Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Fudge, J. F. (Joseph Franklin)

    1939-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , while the quantity of iodine in spinach bore a close relation to the quantity of iodine in the soil. The action. of the added iodine differed with the kind of soil. Hercus and Roberts (12) state that loam has a marked retentive power for soluble... in surface soils by soil types High 1 0 1 p. *. rn. Low p. p. m. .- 1.1 ........ 1.6 2.5 0.8 1.5 ........ ........ 1.1 ........ 2.0 East Texas Timber Country Upland soils with friable subsoils: Bowie fine sandy loam...

  6. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  7. High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material High Heat Flux Thermoelectric Module Using Standard Bulk Material Presents high heat flux thermoelectric module design...

  8. Estimation of advective fluxes from CO2 flux profile observations at the Cabauw Tower

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Estimation of advective fluxes from CO2 flux profile observations at the Cabauw Tower Kasper O profile observations at the Cabauw Tower Version 1.0 Date April 2012 Status Final #12;#12;Estimation of Advective Fluxes from CO2 Flux Profile Observations at the Cabauw Tower Master of Science Thesis Kasper O

  9. A method of measuring velocity of sound in soil samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matzen, Walter T

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 0% feet per second. In the brass bar: (Figure 11) g ? $. 71 feet h = 2?300 cycles v = 10, 8% feet per second . 20 ?l6 0 ' ISO Q I8o q ISO 0 ISO 0 ISO PHASE SHIFT L8 DEGREE Figure 10. Helation of, Frequejncy to Phase Shift iri steel . 'Tuhe.... '28 26 20 18 16 0 leO P IBo 0 . ' l80: 0, ' ']80, 0 iS'o pigure' ll. Relation of Frequee'cg, to Pha'ss Shift; iri Brass 'Bar. 1 Again, the velocity in brass, given by Carlin as 14. , 500 feet per second, is a reasonable check. In the aluminum...

  10. Soil Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,Socorro County, NewInformation

  11. Soil Sampling At Molokai Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,Socorro County,Lester Meadow AreaMolokai

  12. Soil Separator and Sampler and Method of Sampling - Energy Innovation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9MorganYou areInnovation Portal Software

  13. Variability in the carbon isotopic composition of foliage carbon pools (soluble carbohydrates, waxes) and respiration fluxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Timothy

    , waxes) and respiration fluxes in southeastern U.S. pine forests Behzad Mortazavi,1,2,3 Maureen H. ConteCSC), and waxes (dCW)) and respiratory carbon (foliage (dCFR), soil (dCSR) and ecosystem 13 CO2 (dCER)) for two-alkanoic acid wax molecular cluster was twice that observed for dCOM and the predominant C22­26 compound cluster

  14. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Introduction USDA, Natural Resources of the soil, the vegetation, the water, and the air as well as the ecological processes of the rangeland ecosystem are balanced and sustained. What is soil? Soil is a dynamic resource that supports plants

  15. Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mladenoff, David

    Soil Horizons Some Noteworthy Soil Science in Wisconsin Alfred E. Hartemink The impact and benefits of soil science have only partly been documented. Here I highlight four noteworthy soil science achievements from the state of Wisconsin that took place between 1870 and the early 1980s: (i) the first soil

  16. Remediating pesticide contaminated soils using solvent extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sahle-Demessie, E.; Meckes, M.C.; Richardson, T.L. [National Management Research Lab., Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Bench-scale solvent extraction studies were performed on soil samples obtained from a Superfund site contaminated with high levels of p,p{prime}-DDT, p,p{prime}-DDE and toxaphene. The effectiveness of the solvent extraction process was assessed using methanol and 2-propanol as solvents over a wide range of operating conditions. It was demonstrated that a six-stage methanol extraction using a solvent-to-soil ratio of 1.6 can decrease pesticide levels in the soil by more than 99% and reduce the volume of material requiring further treatment by 25 times or more. The high solubility of the pesticides in methanol resulted in rapid extraction rates, with the system reaching quasi-equilibrium state in 30 minutes. The extraction efficiency was influenced by the number of extraction stages, the solvent-to-soil ratio, and the soil moisture content. Various methods were investigated to regenerate and recycle the solvent. Evaporation and solvent stripping are low cost and reliable methods for removing high pesticide concentrations from the solvent. For low concentrations, GAC adsorption may be used. Precipitating and filtering pesticides by adding water to the methanol/pesticide solution was not successful when tested with soil extracts. 26 refs., 10 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Constraints on neutrino oscillation parameters from the measurement of day-night solar neutrino fluxes at Super-Kamiokande

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; Y. Fukuda; T. Hayakawa; E. Ichihara; K. Inoue

    1998-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for day-night variations in the solar neutrino flux resulting from neutrino oscillations has been carried out using the 504 day sample of solar neutrino data obtained at Super-Kamiokande. The absence of a significant day-night variation has set an absolute flux independent exclusion region in the two neutrino oscillation parameter space.

  18. Construction, monitoring, and performance of two soil liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krapac, I.G.; Cartwright, K.; Hensel, B.R.; Herzog, B.L.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A prototype and large-scale soil liner were constructed to test whether compacted soil barriers in cover and liner systems could be built to meet the standard set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for saturated hydraulic conductivity. In situ ponded infiltration rates into the prototype liner were measured and water containing fluorescein and rhodamine WT dyers was allowed to infiltrate in the prototype liner. Although the liner met the USEPA conductivity requirement, the dye flow paths indicated a need for better bonding between lifts and a reduction in soil clod sizes. These observations suggested that if soil liners are to perform according to design specifications, soil processing prior to construction and rigid construction QA/QC are necessary. The large-scale liner (7.3 c 14.6 {times} 0.9 m) consisted of six 15-cm compacted lifts. Full-scale equipment was used for compaction, and construction practices were modified on the basis of experience gained from the prototype liner study. The work conducted so far indicates that compacted soil barriers can be constructed to meet the saturated hydraulic conductivity requirements established by the USEPA. Questions regarding methodologies to collect in situ infiltration data have arisen from the research. Differences have been noted in infiltration fluxes, as measured by different types of infiltrometers. Perturbations in measurements of infiltration rates and soil tensions have been correlated with barometric pressure fluctuations and/or temperature changes in the liner.

  19. Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    Department of Crop and Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil Science/Soil Quality/Soil Physics Position Summary: Plastic mulches are used in agriculture to conserve water, suppress weeds, and increase soil temperatures. However, plastic mulches need to be disposed off at the end

  20. Irrigation Monitoring with Soil Water Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Porter, Dana; Peries, Xavier

    2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    and another at 24 or 36 inches deep for deeper rooted field crops. n Use a 7 ?8-inch auger that has the same diameter as the tube to dig a hole to the desired depth (minus the height of the ceramic tip). Finish the pre-hole with a smaller diameter probe... widely used of all gravimetric methods for measuring soil water. A soil sample can be taken with an auger or tube sampler. It is placed in a container and weighed, and is dried in an oven at 105?C until a constant weight is obtained (normally after 24...

  1. Building Fertile Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindsey, Ann

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    soil amendments such as compost, manure, cover crops, andare some readily available sources: j Compost is rich inorganic matter, and making compost is a great way to recycle

  2. Deposition and resuspension of antimony-125 and cesium-137 in the soil-plant system in the environment of a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghuman, G.S. [Savannah State Coll., GA (United States); Motes, B.G.; Fernandez, S.J.; Weesner, F.J.; McManus, G.J.; Wilcox, C.M. [Idaho Research Center, Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Nuclear and Environmental Measurements Section

    1989-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies were conducted during the summer of 1987 to characterize the levels of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs releases and the distribution of the two radionuclides in vegetation and soil at distances of 0.45 and 0.75 km from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant stack. Samples were collected of sagebrush, wheatgrass, and rabbitbrush and their leaves, stems, roots, and litter were separated. Vegetation samples were dried at 70{degree}C for 48 hours, ground, and concentrations of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs were determined by gamma spectrometry. Soil samples were collected from the surface to a depth of 18 cm (at 3 cm increments), dried at 45{degree}C, and the concentrations of {sup 125}Sb and {sup 137}Cs measured in the same manner as for vegetation samples. Results showed that the activity of {sup 125}Sb was higher in the leaves than in the stem and roots. Total activity of {sup 125}Sb (1041.77 Bq m{sup {minus}2}) was distributed as 33.4% in vegetation and 66.6% in soil. Deposition of airborne {sup 125}Sb measured through absorption by transplanted vegetation was about one Bq m{sup {minus}2} day{sup {minus}1}. The resuspension rate of {sup 125}Sb from vegetation determined by an air-flux chamber positioned over sagebrush plants was less than 61 x 10{sup {minus}11} sec{sup {minus}1}. Cesium-137 concentrations were lower in the leaves than in the stems and roots indicating slow movement through plant tissues.

  3. Standard test method for measurement of soil resistivity using the two-electrode soil box method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the equipment and a procedure for the measurement of soil resistivity, for samples removed from the ground, for use in the control of corrosion of buried structures. 1.2 Procedures allow for this test method to be used n the field or in the laboratory. 1.3 The test method procedures are for the resistivity measurement of soil samples in the saturated condition and in the as-received condition. 1.4 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. Soil resistivity values are reported in ohm-centimeter. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and to determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  4. SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

  5. Soil and Water Conservation (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) were established in the 1930s to develop comprehensive programs and plans to conserve soil resources, control and prevent soil erosion, prevent floods...

  6. Soil and Water Conservation (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board is established to encourage and oversee soil-conserving land-use practices, and to provide for the conservation of soil and related resources and...

  7. Atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honda, Morihiro [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwa-no-ha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    To illustrate the calculation of the atmospheric neutrino flux, we briefly explain our calculation scheme and important components, such as primary cosmic ray spectra, interaction model, and geomagnetic model. Then, we calculate the atmospheric neutrino flux at INO site in our calculation scheme. We compare the calculated atmospheric neutrino fluxes predicted at INO with those at other major neutrino detector sites, especially that at SK site.

  8. Search for stable Strange Quark Matter in lunar soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ke Han; Jeffrey Ashenfelter; Alexei Chikanian; William Emmet; Evan Finch; Andreas Heinz; Jes Madsen; Richard Majka; Benjamin Monreal; Jack Sandweiss

    2009-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results from a search for strangelets (small chunks of Strange Quark Matter) in lunar soil using the Yale WNSL accelerator as a mass spectrometer. We have searched over a range in mass from A=42 to A=70 amu for nuclear charges 5, 6, 8, 9, and 11. No strangelets were found in the experiment. For strangelets with nuclear charge 8, a concentration in lunar soil higher than $10^{-16}$ is excluded at the 95% confidence level. The implied limit on the strangelet flux in cosmic rays is the most sensitive to date for the covered range and is relevant to both recent theoretical flux predictions and a strangelet candidate event found by the AMS-01 experiment.

  9. On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

    2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

  10. Fluxing agent for metal cast joining

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gunkel, Ronald W. (Lower Burrell, PA); Podey, Larry L. (Greensburg, PA); Meyer, Thomas N. (Murrysville, PA)

    2002-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of joining an aluminum cast member to an aluminum component. The method includes the steps of coating a surface of an aluminum component with flux comprising cesium fluoride, placing the flux coated component in a mold, filling the mold with molten aluminum alloy, and allowing the molten aluminum alloy to solidify thereby joining a cast member to the aluminum component. The flux preferably includes aluminum fluoride and alumina. A particularly preferred flux includes about 60 wt. % CsF, about 30 wt. % AlF.sub.3, and about 10 wt. % Al.sub.2 O.sub.3.

  11. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  12. Agroforestry system effects on soil characteristics of tropical soils in the Sarapiqui Region of Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tornquist, Carlos G.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P, soil organic C (SOC) and total Kjehdahl N (TKN)] and biological parameters (minerahzable C and N, microbial biomass C and N). Agroforestry plots, adjacent pasture areas and one undisturbed forest site were sampled (i) to 10 cm for bulk density...

  13. Subsidence of residual soils in a karst terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drumm, E.C.; Kane, W.F.; Ben-Hassine, J.; Scarborough, J.A. (Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (USA)); Ketelle, R.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA))

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Siting and operating landfills for solid waste disposal in eastern Tennessee that can operate with minimum impact on groundwater is problematic. The operational requirement of thick, excavational soils and the regulatory requirement of a buffer between disposal units and an aquifer result in siting most operating East Tennessee landfills in outcrop areas of the Knox Group. However, the common occurrence of karst terrain and sinkholes in the Knox Group indicates the vulnerability of such sites to rapid groundwater recharge and flow and the potential for subsidence or collapse of soil into bedrock cavities. To address the potential for subsidence or collapse of soils at the East Chestnut Ridge site on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR), the following activities and analyses were completed: The locations of karst features on the site were determined by field reconnaissance; several sinkholes were selected for detailed examination; soil boring, sampling, and physical testing were performed in soils located within, adjacent to, and outside of sinkholes to characterize soil strength at various depths; detailed plane surveys were made for 11 sinkholes to measure accurately their dimension and shape for use in determining profile functions for subsidence basins at the site; The stress-deformation response of a typical soil profile overlying a hypothetical bedrock cavity was analyzed numerically for a range of soil thickness and a range of cavity radii. A consistent estimate of the relationship between subsidence basin dimension, soil thickness, and cavity radius has been derived. 30 refs., 41 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in bold and acronyms are defined in Chapter 32, Glossary and Acronyms. Chapter 14 Geology and Soils This chapter describes existing geological and soil conditions in the...

  15. Soil and Water Conservation (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Indiana Association of Soil and Water Conservation Districts is an association of the 92 soil and water conservation districts, each representing one of the 92 Indiana counties.

  16. Soil Conservation Districts Law (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation establishes a soil and water conservation division within the Iowa Department of Agriculture, as well as local soil and water conservation districts. The regulations accompanying...

  17. Ra-226 radioassay of soil and tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabau, C.S.; Rayno, D.R.; Kretz, N.D.; Zelle, P.W.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of inactive uranium tailings piles have shown that tailings sands containing Ra-226 and other radionuclides may be dispersed by wind and water erosion, causing contamination of adjacent areas. To conduct an effective cleanup operation, it is necessary that boundaries of contamination be well defined. To accomplish this, data from surface gamma-ray surveys made under the Measurement Monitoring Program of the US DOE's Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project (UMTRAP) are first used to delineate a general outline of the contaminated area. Then, data from portable scintillometer surveys and from sealed-can gamma-ray analyses of soil samples are used to more precisely define the perimeter of Ra-226 contamination. These field measurements are supported by radiochemical analyses of randomly selected samples. Because of its adaptability to the widely varying chemical composition of the material in these samples, the complexing agent EDTA is used in a complexometric leaching procedure to analyze Ra-226. By this procedure, natural concentrations of Ra-226 in soil (approx. 1 pCi/g) can be measured routinely. The potential limit of detection is in the 0.1 to 0.5 pCi/g range. Details of the method, which includes leaching of radium followed by radon de-emanation, are described. Comparative data for various soil and tailings samples are presented.

  18. Comparison of the high temperature heat flux sensor to traditional heat flux gages under high heat flux conditions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanchat, Thomas K.; Hanks, Charles R.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four types of heat flux gages (Gardon, Schmidt-Boelter, Directional Flame Temperature, and High Temperature Heat Flux Sensor) were assessed and compared under flux conditions ranging between 100-1000 kW/m2, such as those seen in hydrocarbon fire or propellant fire conditions. Short duration step and pulse boundary conditions were imposed using a six-panel cylindrical array of high-temperature tungsten lamps. Overall, agreement between all gages was acceptable for the pulse tests and also for the step tests. However, repeated tests with the HTHFS with relatively long durations at temperatures approaching 1000%C2%B0C showed a substantial decrease (10-25%) in heat flux subsequent to the initial test, likely due to the mounting technique. New HTHFS gages have been ordered to allow additional tests to determine the cause of the flux reduction.

  19. On-Farm Soil Monitoring for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holland, Jeffrey

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Soil quality and soil management resources the air which helps build soil organic matter and tilth, and sustains the soil resource for future generations and other species. Improving and protecting soil quality can help support sustainable crop

  20. Sampling Report: Engineering Soil Sampling for the Quarry Northeast Slope. DOE/OR/21548-600.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon, Mississippi,

  1. Sampling Report: Southeast Drainage Soils Sampling Report. DOE/OR/21548-650

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;:: A'Salmon, Mississippi,

  2. NON-DESTRUCTIVE SOIL CARBON ANALYZER.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WIELOPOLSKI,L.MITRA,S.HENDREY,G.ORION,I.ROGERS,H.TORBERT,A.PRIOR,S.RUNION,B.

    2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the feasibility, calibration, and safety considerations of a non-destructive, in situ, quantitative, volumetric soil carbon analytical method based on inelastic neutron scattering (INS). The method can quantify values as low as 0.018 gC/cc, or about 1.2% carbon by weight with high precision under the instrument's configuration and operating conditions reported here. INS is safe and easy to use, residual soil activation declines to background values in under an hour, and no radiological requirements are needed for transporting the instrument. The labor required to obtain soil-carbon data is about 10-fold less than with other methods, and the instrument offers a nearly instantaneous rate of output of carbon-content values. Furthermore, it has the potential to quantify other elements, particularly nitrogen. New instrumentation was developed in response to a research solicitation from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE LAB 00-09 Carbon Sequestration Research Program) supporting the Terrestrial Carbon Processes (TCP) program of the Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The solicitation called for developing and demonstrating novel techniques for quantitatively measuring changes in soil carbon. The report includes raw data and analyses of a set of proof-of-concept, double-blind studies to evaluate the INS approach in the first phase of developing the instrument. Managing soils so that they sequester massive amounts of carbon was suggested as a means to mitigate the atmospheric buildup of anthropogenic CO{sub 2}. Quantifying changes in the soils' carbon stocks will be essential to evaluating such schemes and documenting their performance. Current methods for quantifying carbon in soil by excavation and core sampling are invasive, slow, labor-intensive and locally destroy the system being observed. Newly emerging technologies, such as Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and Near-Infrared Spectroscopy, offer soil-carbon analysis; however, these also are invasive and destructive techniques. The INS approach permits quantification in a relatively large volume of soil without disrupting the measurement site. The technique is very fast and provides nearly instantaneous results thereby reducing the cost, and speeding up the rate of analysis. It also has the potential to cover large areas in a mobile scanning mode. These capabilities will significantly advance the tracking carbon sequestration and offer a tool for research in agronomy, forestry, soil ecology and biogeochemistry.

  3. Measuring soil moisture with imaging radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubois, P.C.; Zyl, J. van [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.] [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.; Engman, T. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An empirical algorithm for the retrieval of soil moisture content and surface Root Mean Square (RMS) height from remotely sensed radar data was developed using scatterometer data. The algorithm is optimized for bare surfaces and requires two copolarized channels at a frequency between 1.5 and 11 GHz. It gives best results for kh {le} 2.5, {mu}{sub {upsilon}}{le}35%, and {theta}{ge}30{degree}. Omitting the usually weaker hv-polarized returns makes the algorithm less sensitive to system cross-talk and system noise, simplify the calibration process and adds robustness to the algorithm in the presence of vegetation. However, inversion results indicate that significant amounts of vegetation (NDVI>0.4) cause the algorithm to underestimate soil moisture and overestimate RMS height. A simple criteria based on the {sigma}{sub hv}{sup 0}/{sigma}{sub vv}{sup 0} ratio is developed to select the areas where the inversion is not impaired by the vegetation. The inversion accuracy is assessed on the original scatterometer data sets but also on several SAR data sets by comparing the derived soil moisture values with in-situ measurements collected over a variety of scenes between 1991 and 1994. Both spaceborne (SIR-C) and airborne (AIRSAR) data are used in the test. Over this large sample of conditions, the RMS error in the soil moisture estimate is found to be less than 4.2% soil moisture.

  4. ESPC IDIQ Contract Sample

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document displays a sample indefinite delivery, indefinite quantity (IDIQ) energy savings performance contract (ESPC).

  5. Soil Segregation Methods for Reducing Transportation and Disposal Costs - 13544

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frothingham, David; Andrews, Shawn; Barker, Michelle; Boyle, James; Buechi, Stephen; Graham, Marc; Houston, Linda; Polek, Michael; Simmington, Robert; Spector, Harold [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Elliott, Robert 'Dan' [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States)] [U.S. Army Reserve, 812A Franklin St.,Worcester, MA 01604 (United States); Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) sites where the selected alternative for contaminated soil is excavation and off-site disposal, the most significant budget items of the remedial action are the costs for transportation and disposal of soil at an off-site facility. At these sites, the objective is to excavate and dispose of only those soils that exceed derived concentration guideline levels. In situ soil segregation using gross gamma detectors to guide the excavation is often challenging at sites where the soil contamination is overlain by clean soil or where the contaminated soil is located in isolated, subsurface pockets. In addition, data gaps are often identified during the alternative evaluation and selection process, resulting in increased uncertainty in the extent of subsurface contamination. In response, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Buffalo District is implementing ex situ soil segregation methods. At the remediated Painesville Site, soils were excavated and fed through a conveyor-belt system, which automatically segregated them into above- and below-cleanup criteria discharge piles utilizing gamma spectroscopy. At the Linde Site and the Shallow Land Disposal Area (SLDA) Site, which are both in the remediation phase, soils are initially segregated during the excavation process using gross gamma detectors and then transported to a pad for confirmatory manual surveying and sampling. At the Linde Site, the ex situ soils are analyzed on the basis of a site-specific method, to establish compliance with beneficial reuse criteria that were developed for the Linde remediation. At the SLDA Site, the ex situ soils are surveyed and sampled based on Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) final status survey guidance to demonstrate compliance with the derived concentration guideline levels. At all three sites, the ex situ soils that meet the site- specific DCGLs are retained on-site and used as backfill material. This paper describes the ex situ soil segregation methods, the considerations of each method, and the estimated cost savings from minimizing the volume of soil requiring transportation and off-site disposal. (authors)

  6. Data system for automatic flux mapping applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Couch, R.D.; Kasinoff, A.M.; Neuner, J.A.; Oates, R.M.

    1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In an automatic flux mapping system utilizing a microprocessor for control and data information processing, signals from the incore detectors providing the flux mapping operation are converted to a frequency link and are made available to the microprocessor via a programmable timer thus minimizing the participation of the microprocessor so that the microprocessor can be made more available to satisfy other tasks.

  7. URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    URANIUM MILL TAILINGS RADON FLUX CALCULATIONS PIÃ?ON RIDGE PROJECT MONTROSE COUNTY, COLORADO Inc. (Golder) was commissioned by EFRC to evaluate the operations of the uranium mill tailings storage in this report were conducted using the WISE Uranium Mill Tailings Radon Flux Calculator, as updated on November

  8. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    roots, rills, gullies, wind scours, and soil deposition reflect such processes as runoff and erosion. Waterflow patterns X X 3. Pedestals and/or terracettes X X 4. Bare ground X X 5. Gullies X X 6. Wind. Compaction layer X X X 12. Functional/structural groups X 13. Plant mortality/ decadence X 14. Litter amount

  9. Soil organic matter factions of no-tilled and tilled soils and their reactivity with herbicides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stearman, G.K.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Properties of soil humic fractions were determined on surface and 7.5-15.0 cm soil samples of continuously (7-year) no-tilled and tilled cotton, corn, and soybean plots in West Tennessee. Soil humic and fulvic acid were extracted by standard methods and the humic acid was characterized by /sup 13/C-NMR spectroscopy, titration of total acidity and carboxyl groups, and infrared and elemental analysis. Humic acid composition differed by depth and crop. Small differences were observed between tillage systems. Humic acid aliphatic and aromatic carbons ranged from 48 to 65% and 25 to 40% of total peak area, respectively. The humic acids extracted from soils with larger amounts of carbon had larger aliphatic to aromatic ratios, indicating less decomposed organic matter. Carboxyl groups of the humic acids ranged from 9 to 13% and samples from tilled soil had slightly greater amounts of carboxyl and aromatic groups. Carboxyl group determinations by /sup 13/C-NMR, compared more closely with total acidity determinations by titration than with carboxyl determinations by titration. All infrared spectra were similar. Elemental composition of humic acid averaged C, 52.7%, 5.6%; N, 4.8%, and 36.9%.

  10. Micrometeorological and Soil Data for Calculating Evapotranspiration for Rainier Mesa, Nevada Test Site, Nevada 2002-05.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guy A. DeMeo; Alan L. Flint; Randell J. Laczniak; Walter E. Nylund

    2006-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Micrometeorological and soil-moisture data were collected at two instrumented sites on Rainier Mesa at the Nevada Test Site, January 1, 2002/August 23, 2005. Data collected at each site include net radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity at two heights; wind speed and direction; subsurface soil heat flux; subsurface soil temperature; volumetric soil water; and matric water potential. These data were used to estimate 20-minute average and daily average evapotranspiration values. The data presented in this report are collected and calculated evapotranspiration rates.

  11. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Compaction USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 4 What is compaction? Soil compaction occurs when moist or wet soil aggregates are pressed together and the pore space between them is reduced. Compaction changes

  12. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Water Erosion USDA, Natural Resources and removal of soil material by water. The process may be natural or accelerated by human activity. The rate of erosion may be very slow to very rapid, depending on the soil, the local landscape, and weather conditions

  13. Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis -Chemistry Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beth Brockett SOIL 502 Soil Quality Analysis - Chemistry Case Study "Sustainability Street are represented by the Podzolic Order, and more specifically form part of the Bose Soil Management Group) with a limited decomposer community dominated by fungi. Any remnants of native soil at the Sustainability Street

  14. PHELIX for flux compression studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turchi, Peter J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, Christopher L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reinovsky, Robert E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reass, William A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, Jeffrey R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oro, David M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Merrill, Frank E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    PHELIX (Precision High Energy-density Liner Implosion eXperiment) is a concept for studying electromagnetic implosions using proton radiography. This approach requires a portable pulsed power and liner implosion apparatus that can be operated in conjunction with an 800 MeV proton beam at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The high resolution (< 100 micron) provided by proton radiography combined with similar precision of liner implosions driven electromagnetically can permit close comparisons of multi-frame experimental data and numerical simulations within a single dynamic event. To achieve a portable implosion system for use at high energy-density in a proton laboratory area requires sub-megajoule energies applied to implosions only a few cms in radial and axial dimension. The associated inductance changes are therefore relatively modest, so a current step-up transformer arrangement is employed to avoid excessive loss to parasitic inductances that are relatively large for low-energy banks comprising only several capacitors and switches. We describe the design, construction and operation of the PHELIX system and discuss application to liner-driven, magnetic flux compression experiments. For the latter, the ability of strong magnetic fields to deflect the proton beam may offer a novel technique for measurement of field distributions near perturbed surfaces.

  15. SoilSciSubjAreas.doc September 12, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    ) Soldat, Douglas J. (turfgrass and urban soils) Soil Pedology Bockheim, James G. (pedology/forest soils

  16. Visual Sample Plan Version 1.0 User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davidson, James R.; Hassig, Nancy L.; Wilson, John E.; Gilbert, Richard O.

    2001-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This user's guide describes Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Version 1.0 and provides instructions for using the software. VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to environmental decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 1.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (95, 98, Millenium Edition, 2000, and Windows NT). Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to any two-dimensional geographical population to be sampled (e.g., surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, building surfaces, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality.

  17. The effect of soil water upon soil albedo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graser, Elizabeth Annette

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SOIL WATER UPON SOIL ALBEDO A Thesis by ELIZABETH ANNETTE GRASER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A/M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 19S1 Major Sub...]ect: Soil Science THE EFFECT OF SOIL WATER UPON SOIL ALBEDO A Thesis by ELI ZABETH ANNETTE GRASER Approved as to style and content by: arrman of Committee Mem er Rem er ea o epar nt August 1981 The Effect of Soil Water upon Soil Albedo. (August...

  18. The role of soil in NBT applications to landmine detection problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obhodas, Jasmina; Sudac, Davorin; Nad, Karlo; Valkovic, Vlado [Department of Experimental Physics, Ruder Boskovic Institute, Bijenicka c.54, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Nebbia, Giancarlo; Viesti, Giuseppe [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Padova, Via Marzolo 8, 35100 Padova (Italy)

    2003-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term observations of soil water content as well as determination of physical and chemical properties of different types of soils in Croatia were made in order to provide the necessary background information for landmine explosive detection. Soil water content is the key attribute of soil as a background in neutron backscattering technique (NBT) landmine detection application. If the critical value of the soil water content is reached, the detection of landmine explosives is not possible. It is recommended that soil moisture content for NBT application does not exceed 0.1 kg.kg-1 [1]. Nineteen representative samples of different soil types from different parts of Croatia were collected in order to establish soil bank with the necessary physical and chemical properties determined for each type of soil. In addition soil water content was measured on daily and weekly basis on several locations in Croatia. This procedure also included daily soil moisture measurements in the test field made of different types of soils from several locations in Croatia. This was done in order to evaluate the behavior of different types of soils under the same weather conditions.

  19. Reducing Contingency through Sampling at the Luckey FUSRAP Site - 13186

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frothingham, David; Barker, Michelle; Buechi, Steve [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States)] [U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Buffalo District, 1776 Niagara St., Buffalo, NY 14207 (United States); Durham, Lisa [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)] [Argonne National Laboratory, Environmental Science Division, 9700 S. Cass Ave., Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typically, the greatest risk in developing accurate cost estimates for the remediation of hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste sites is the uncertainty in the estimated volume of contaminated media requiring remediation. Efforts to address this risk in the remediation cost estimate can result in large cost contingencies that are often considered unacceptable when budgeting for site cleanups. Such was the case for the Luckey Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) site near Luckey, Ohio, which had significant uncertainty surrounding the estimated volume of site soils contaminated with radium, uranium, thorium, beryllium, and lead. Funding provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) allowed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to conduct additional environmental sampling and analysis at the Luckey Site between November 2009 and April 2010, with the objective to further delineate the horizontal and vertical extent of contaminated soils in order to reduce the uncertainty in the soil volume estimate. Investigative work included radiological, geophysical, and topographic field surveys, subsurface borings, and soil sampling. Results from the investigative sampling were used in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory's Bayesian Approaches for Adaptive Spatial Sampling (BAASS) software to update the contaminated soil volume estimate for the site. This updated volume estimate was then used to update the project cost-to-complete estimate using the USACE Cost and Schedule Risk Analysis process, which develops cost contingencies based on project risks. An investment of $1.1 M of ARRA funds for additional investigative work resulted in a reduction of 135,000 in-situ cubic meters (177,000 in-situ cubic yards) in the estimated base volume estimate. This refinement of the estimated soil volume resulted in a $64.3 M reduction in the estimated project cost-to-complete, through a reduction in the uncertainty in the contaminated soil volume estimate and the associated contingency costs. (authors)

  20. Summary Soil respiration is controlled by soil temperature, soil water, fine roots, microbial activity, and soil physical and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Ronald C.

    content, and root density and activity, and thus changes soil respiration. We measured soil respiration of thin- ning. Thinning did not change the sensitivity of soil respiration to temperature or to water content, and soil physi- cal and chemical properties, result in high variability in and sensitivity

  1. UNDERSTANDING SOIL Larry G. Bundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    available for plant uptake, extraction, or measured by soil test. #12;Phosphorus (P) Loss Processes slowly soluble compounds: Sorbed P ·Clays ·Al and Fe oxides Secondary P minerals (precipitation #12;Effect of soil extraction time on water extractable soil P concentration for two soils. 22 24 26

  2. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Irrigation Specialist Committee Membership Dr. John Beasley - committee chair Dr. Jared Whitaker Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University: (229) 386-7308 Fax: (912) 681-0376 Dr. Robert Carrow Dr. Mark Risse Department of Crop & Soil Sciences

  3. Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Chapter 21 Digital Soil Mapping: Interactions with and Applications for Hydropedology J.A. Thompson,1, * S. Roecker,2 S. Grunwald3 and P.R. Owens4 ABSTRACT Spatial information on soils, particularly hydrologic and hydromorphic soil properties, is used to understand and assess soil water retention, flooding

  4. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Quantitative Genomics Committee Membership Dr. Scott Jackson - committee chair Dr. Peng-Wah Chee Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Horticulture Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia 2360 Rainwater Rd

  5. Kinetics of Cd Release from Some Contaminated Calcareous Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sajadi Tabar, S.; Jalali, M., E-mail: jalali@basu.ac.ir [Bu-Ali Sina University, Department of Soil Science, College of Agriculture (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of soils with heavy metals may pose long-term risk to groundwater quality leading to health implications. Bioavailability of heavy metals, like cadmium (Cd) is strongly affected by sorption and desorption processes. The release of heavy metals from contaminated soils is a major contamination risks to natural waters. The release of Cd from contaminated soils is strongly influenced by its mobility and bioavailability. In this study, the kinetics of Cd desorption from ten samples of contaminated calcareous soils, with widely varying physicochemical properties, were studied using 0.01 M EDTA extraction. The median percentage of Cd released was about 27.7% of the total extractable Cd in the soils. The release of Cd was characterized by an initial fast release rate (of labile fractions) followed by a slower release rate (of less labile fractions) and a model of two first-order reactions adequately describes the observed release of Cd from the studied soil samples. There was positive correlation between the amount of Cd released at first phase of release and Cd in exchangeable fraction, indicating that this fraction of Cd is the main fraction controlling the Cd in the kinetic experiments. There was strongly negative correlation between the amount of Cd released at first and second phases of release and residual fraction, suggesting that this fraction did not contribute in Cd release in the kinetic experiments. The results can be used to provide information for evaluation of Cd potential toxicity and ecological risk from contaminated calcareous soils.

  6. Technical background document for draft soil screening level guidance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document provides technical details of the derivation of the September 30, 1993, draft Soil Screening Levels (SSLs) Guidance for Superfund (PB93-963508). The document is presented in two sections. Section I defines SSL and provides background information on the development of SSLs and their application and implementation at Superfund sites, including sampling schemes for measuring SSL attainment. It also provides draft SSLs developed for 30 chemicals. Section II provides the technical basis for the development of SSLs addressing direct ingestion of soil, inhalation of volatiles and fugitive dust, and the soil-to-ground-water exposure pathway, including the assumptions and theories used the their development.

  7. Constraints on the ionizing flux emitted by T Tauri stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. D. Alexander; C. J. Clarke; J. E. Pringle

    2005-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of ultraviolet observations of T Tauri Stars (TTS). By analysing emission measures taken from the literature we derive rates of ionizing photons from the chromospheres of 5 classical TTS in the range ~10^41-10^44 photons/s, although these values are subject to large uncertainties. We propose that the HeII/CIV line ratio can be used as a reddening-independent indicator of the hardness of the ultraviolet spectrum emitted by TTS. By studying this line ratio in a much larger sample of objects we find evidence for an ionizing flux which does not decrease, and may even increase, as TTS evolve. This implies that a significant fraction of the ionizing flux from TTS is not powered by the accretion of disc material onto the central object, and we discuss the significance of this result and its implications for models of disc evolution. The presence of a significant ionizing flux in the later stages of circumstellar disc evolution provides an important new constraint on disc photoevaporation models.

  8. Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossiter, D G "David"

    Husnjak et al., 2004. Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia Page 1 ISRIC World Soil Information Country Series Soil inventory and soil classification in Croatia: historical review, current classification in Croatia Page 2 Summary An historical overview of soil survey and soil classification activities

  9. Origin of color centers in the flux-grown europium gallium garnet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrovsky, A. S.; Arkhipkin, V. G.; Bezmaternykh, L. N.; Gudim, I. A.; Krylov, A. S. [L. V. Kirensky Institute of Physics, Akademgorodok, Krasnoyarsk 660036, Russia and Siberian Federal University, Krasnoyarsk 660079 (Russian Federation); Vagizov, F. [Department of Physics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77840 (United States)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Europium gallium garnet (EuGG) single crystals were grown from fluxes with various contents. Optical absorption spectra of EuGG grown from a flux containing calcium show an additional band in the ultraviolet and blue regions of the spectra as compared to the case of a calcium-free flux. Moessbauer spectra of the samples grown from the fluxes with different additives show no signs of other valence states of the europium ions except for 3+. However, they indicate changes in the crystal field due to the entrance of additive ions. The nature of the additional absorption must be the same as that for calcium-doped gadolinium gallium garnet, i.e., anion vacancies. Moessbauer isotope shifts and quadrupole splitting for EuGG are determined.

  10. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, D.A.; Tomich, S.D.; Glover, D.W.; Allen, E.V.; Hales, J.M.; Dana, M.T.

    1991-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of the precipitation from the chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device. 11 figures.

  11. Rain sampling device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Danny A. (Richland, WA); Tomich, Stanley D. (Richland, WA); Glover, Donald W. (Prosser, WA); Allen, Errol V. (Benton City, WA); Hales, Jeremy M. (Kennewick, WA); Dana, Marshall T. (Richland, WA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention constitutes a rain sampling device adapted for independent operation at locations remote from the user which allows rainfall to be sampled in accordance with any schedule desired by the user. The rain sampling device includes a mechanism for directing wet precipitation into a chamber, a chamber for temporarily holding the precipitation during the process of collection, a valve mechanism for controllably releasing samples of said precipitation from said chamber, a means for distributing the samples released from the holding chamber into vessels adapted for permanently retaining these samples, and an electrical mechanism for regulating the operation of the device.

  12. Evaluation of Three Field-Based Methods for Quantifying Soil Carbon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Rice, Charles W.; Wielopolski, Lucien; Ebinger, Michael H.; Reeves, James B.; Thomson, Allison M.; Harris, Ron; Francis, Barry; Mitra, S.; Rappaport, Aaron; Etchevers, Jorge; Sayre, Ken D.; Govaerts, Bram; McCarty, G. W.

    2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Three advanced technologies to measure soil carbon (C) density (g C m22) are deployed in the field and the results compared against those obtained by the dry combustion (DC) method. The advanced methods are: a) Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), b) Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and c) Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). The measurements and soil samples were acquired at Beltsville, MD, USA and at Centro International para el Mejoramiento del Ma?´z y el Trigo (CIMMYT) at El Bata´n, Mexico. At Beltsville, soil samples were extracted at three depth intervals (0–5, 5–15, and 15–30 cm) and processed for analysis in the field with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. The INS instrument determined soil C density to a depth of 30 cm via scanning and stationary measurements. Subsequently, soil core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for soil bulk density (kg m23), C concentration (g kg21) by DC, and results reported as soil C density (kg m22). Results from each technique were derived independently and contributed to a blind test against results from the reference (DC) method. A similar procedure was employed at CIMMYT in Mexico employing but only with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. Following conversion to common units, we found that the LIBS, DRIFTS, and INS results can be compared directly with those obtained by the DC method. The first two methods and the standard DC require soil sampling and need soil bulk density information to convert soil C concentrations to soil C densities while the INS method does not require soil sampling. We conclude that, in comparison with the DC method, the three instruments (a) showed acceptable performances although further work is needed to improve calibration techniques and (b) demonstrated their portability and their capacity to perform under field conditions.

  13. Soil Erosion (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Board of Water and Soil Resources has adopted a model ordinance to serve as the minimum standard for local governments, which are asked to implement standards and administrative procedures...

  14. Deployment of an innovative thermally enhanced soil mixing process augmented with zero-valent iron.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, P. L.

    1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative in-situ soil treatment process, referred to as soil mixing/thermally enhanced soil vapor extraction (SM/TESVE), was used to remediate the 317 Area of Argonne National Laboratory-East (i.e., Argonne), which is contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Following the initial soil treatment, polishing was required to reduce residual concentrations of contaminants. A study of polishing methods was conducted. It determined that injecting metallic iron particles into the soil, in conjunction with soil mixing, would reduce residual VOC concentrations more effectively than the original conventional soil ventilation approach. After the effectiveness of iron injection was verified, it replaced the soil ventilation step. The modified process involved mixing the soil while hot air and steam were injected into it. Off-gases were captured in a hood over the treatment area. During this process, an iron slurry, consisting of up to 50% iron particles in water with guar gum added as a thickening agent, was injected and mixed into the soil by the mixing equipment. Approximately 6,246 m{sup 3} (8, 170 yd{sup 3}) of soil was treated during this project. Confirmatory samples were then collected. In these samples, VOC concentrations were usually reduced by more than 80%.

  15. Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 22922299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miksik, Ivan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil Biology & Biochemistry 38 (2006) 2292­2299 Modifications of degradation-resistant soil organic matter by soil saprobic microfungi Veronika R eza´ c ova´ a,b,Ã, Hana Hrs elova´ a , Hana Gryndlerova in their solutions and in sterile soil by microfungal species and two well-known HA degraders were studied

  16. Saving our soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandy, A. Stuart; Billings, Sharon A.; Richter Dan

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    when we consider how important the world’s soils are to human civilization. Within the next several decades, about 9–10 billion people will increasingly require food, timber, fiber, and bioenergy, as well as related ecosystem ser- vices... producers, motivated by short-term finances, increase inputs of fertilizers and pesticides to maximize yields, frequently with adverse environmental impacts. Subsistence farmers coax decreasing crop yields from soils that can no longer be managed sustainably...

  17. Potential dentrification rates of Texas soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Shu-Chun Dolores

    1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - tory because it did not adequa. tely reseal after punc*uring (Fig. 3). Leakage was reduced by placing silicone seal on the serum cap after sampling bu* there was still too much leakage for the planned experiment. A sampling port designed from... in the con*ainer was resealed af'ter each puncture by applying silicone rubber glue over the punc*ure mark on the stopper. All of the soils had measurable ra*es of denitrifi- cation after only 2 days incubation (Figs. ii. -11 (p. 19- 26) and Appendix...

  18. COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gering, Jon C.

    COMPUTER SCIENCE SAMPLE PROGRAM (First Math Course MATH 198) This sample program suggests one way CS 181: Foundations of Computer Science II CS 180: Foundations of Computer Science I CS 191

  19. SOIL QUALITY AND CROP Dick Wolkowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    Protection Soil pH Crop residue Tillage intensity Soil test P and K Water availability Bulk density Soil SOIL QUALITY Inherent properties Texture Organic matter Aggregation Water holding capacity - Nutrient cycling - 1 g of soil has 100,000,000 bacteria #12;Water Soil particle Plant root SOIL IS HABITAT

  20. acids soils ph: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil Sciences PhD Graduate Research Assistantship: Soil ScienceSoil QualitySoil Physics Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: Department of Crop and Soil...

  1. High-Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet describes a high-flux, microchannel solar receiver project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by Oregon State University, is working to demonstrate a microchannel-based solar receiver capable of absorbing high solar flux, while using a variety of liquid and gaseous working fluids. High-flux microchannel receivers have the potential to dramatically reduce the size and cost of a solar receiver by minimizing re-radiation and convective losses.

  2. Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System (ECOR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, DR

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The eddy correlation (ECOR) flux measurement system provides in situ, half-hour measurements of the surface turbulent fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, latent heat, and carbon dioxide (CO2) (and methane at one Southern Great Plains extended facility (SGP EF) and the North Slope of Alaska Central Facility (NSA CF). The fluxes are obtained with the eddy covariance technique, which involves correlation of the vertical wind component with the horizontal wind component, the air temperature, the water vapor density, and the CO2 concentration.

  3. LETTER REPORT. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY RESULTS OF SOILS ASSOCIATED WITH THE ARGYLE STREET SEWER LINE AT THE UNITED NUCLEAR CORPORATION NAVAL PRODUCTS SITE, NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Wade C.

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the United Nuclear Corporation (UNC) Naval Products site on three separate occasions during the months of October and November 2011. The purpose of these visits was to conduct confirmatory surveys of soils associated with the Argyle Street sewer line that was being removed. Soil samples were collected from six different, judgmentally determined locations in the Argyle Street sewer trench. In addition to the six soil samples collected by ORISE, four replicate soil samples were collected by Cabrera Services, Inc. (CSI) for analysis by the ORISE laboratory. Replicate samples S0010 and S0011 were final status survey (FSS) bias samples; S0012 was an FSS systematic sample; and S0015 was a waste characterization sample. Six soil samples were also collected for background determination. Uranium-235 and uranium-238 concentrations were determined via gamma spectroscopy; the spectra were also reviewed for other identifiable photopeaks. Radionuclide concentrations for these soil samples are provided. In addition to the replicate samples and the samples collected by ORISE, CSI submitted three soil samples for inter-laboratory comparison analyses. One sample was from the background reference area, one was from waste characterization efforts (material inside the sewer line), and one was a FSS sample. The inter-laboratory comparison analyses results between ORISE and CSI were in agreement, except for one sample collected in the reference area. Smear results For Argyle Street sewer pipes are tabulated.

  4. Measurement of the Atmospheric $?_e$ flux in IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose1; S. Boser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Diaz-Velez; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegard; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glusenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Gora; D. Grant; A. Gross; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; O. Jlelati; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Klas; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Kohne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Kopke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Lunemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Meszaros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; S. Panknin; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Perez de los Heros; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Radel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schoneberg; L. Schonherr; A. Schonwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stoss; E. A. Strahler; R. Strom; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge1; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first measurement of the atmospheric electron neutrino flux in the energy range between approximately 80 GeV and 6 TeV, using data recorded during the first year of operation of IceCube's DeepCore low energy extension. Techniques to identify neutrinos interacting within the DeepCore volume and veto muons originating outside the detector are demonstrated. A sample of 1029 events is observed in 281 days of data, of which 496 $\\pm$ 66(stat.) $\\pm$ 88(syst.) are estimated to be cascade events, including both electron neutrino and neutral current events. The rest of the sample includes residual backgrounds due to atmospheric muons and charged current interactions of atmospheric muon neutrinos. The flux of the atmospheric electron neutrinos is consistent with models of atmospheric neutrinos in this energy range. This constitutes the first observation of electron neutrinos and neutral current interactions in a very large volume neutrino telescope optimized for the TeV energy range.

  5. Crop and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grünwald, Niklaus J.

    and Soil Science Degree Checklist Name: ____________________________ ID Intensive (SOIL 325) (3) _______ HHS 231 ­ Lifetime Fitness for Health (2. Global Issues (3) (*soil science electives meeting requirement) _______ Science

  6. Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McCray, S.B.

    1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

  7. A low cost high flux solar simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Codd, Daniel S.

    A low cost, high flux, large area solar simulator has been designed, built and characterized for the purpose of studying optical melting and light absorption behavior of molten salts. Seven 1500 W metal halide outdoor ...

  8. Accumulation of surface-applied agricultural limestone in acid soils of east Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Earl Raymond

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    limestone sample, the lime dealer who supplied the sample, and its source is found in Appendix A. Analyses of Agricultural t, imestone Analyses performed on each sample of agricultural limestone includea: total dissolution analysis, x-ray diffraction... in the surface of limed soils than in the surface of unlimed soils, and a greater proportion of exchange sites were occupied by Ca2+ in the surface of limed soils than in the subsurface. Aluminum saturation was high enough in the subsoil of some sites...

  9. Bounds on the Solar Antineutrino total Flux and Energy spectrum from the SK experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Torrente-Lujan

    1999-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A search for inverse beta decay electron antineutrinos has been carried out using the 825 days sample of solar data obtained at SK. The absence of a significant signal, that is, contributions to the total SK background and their angular variations has set upper bounds on a) the absolute flux of solar antineutrinos originated from ${}^8 B$ neutrinos $\\Phi_{\\bar{\

  10. Bacteriophage Flux in Endosymbionts (Wolbachia): Infection Frequency, Lateral Transfer, and Recombination Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bordenstein, Seth

    specialized genomes of bacterial endosymbionts typically lack one of the major contributors of genomic flux have, to the contrary, been influential in the genome evolution of the most prevalent bacterial than previously recognized, occurring in at least 89% (35/39) of the sampled genomes. Second, we show

  11. Physical modeling of the soil swelling curve vs. the shrinkage curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chertkov, V Y

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical understanding of the links between soil swelling, texture, structure, cracking, and sample size is of great interest for the physical understanding of many processes in the soil-air-water system and for applications in civil, agricultural, and environmental engineering. The background of this work is an available chain of interconnected physical shrinkage curve models for clay, intra-aggregate matrix, aggregated soil without cracks, and soil with cracks. The objective of the work is to generalize these models to the case of swelling, and to construct the physical-swelling-model chain with a step-by-step transition from clay to aggregated soil with cracks. The generalization is based on thorough accounting for the analogies and differences between shrinkage and swelling and the corresponding use, modification, or replacement of the soil shrinkage features. Two specific soil swelling features to be used are: (i) air entrapping in pores of the contributing clay; and (ii) aggregate destruction with the f...

  12. au flux diffus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contribution of the GRB prompt and scattered emissions to the measured extragalactic gamma-ray flux. To estimate this contribution we optimistically require that the energy flux...

  13. Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape034hsu2011p.pdf More Documents & Publications Integration of Novel Flux Coupling Motor and Current Source Inverter Novel Flux Coupling...

  14. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR...

  15. CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Engineering - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G...

  16. SUBSURFACE COLLOIDS: STABILITY, SAMPLING, AND TRANSPORT UNDER GRAVITATIONAL AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flury, Markus

    and warm friendship. I also wish to extend my appreciation to the EMSP (Environmental Management ScienceSUBSURFACE COLLOIDS: STABILITY, SAMPLING, AND TRANSPORT UNDER GRAVITATIONAL AND CENTRIFUGAL for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY WASHINGTON STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Crop and Soil Sciences August

  17. A correlation between soil descriptions and {sup 226}Ra concentrations in Florida soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, D.P.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The soil radium content in Florida is highly variable. The range in radium concentrations, where the samples involved in this study are concerned, is from 0.1 pCi/g to 18.5 pCi/g. Low {sup 226}Ra concentrations (0.1 to 5 pCi/g) are evidenced in sands, moderate concentrations (5 to 11 pCi/g) are found in silt and gravel, and high {sup 226}Ra concentrations (>11 pCi/g) are found in soil horizons with shell, clay, and strata with phosphate. Strata containing phosphate yields a high concentration of {sup 226}Ra. The information obtained in this study, soil descriptions with their corresponding {sup 226}Ra concentrations, comes from geological cores drilled by geotechnical consultants with gamma spectrometry analysis performed by high resolution gamma spectroscopy. Concentration; of {sup 226}Ra generally increase with depth. These cores are usually terminated at 20 feet deep, with some cores being shallower than this due to hitting bedrock or encountering the water table. These frequency distributions give the core-logging geologist an approximate concentration of {sup 226}Ra based on the description of the soil. Since the correlation of {sup 226}Ra and soil descriptions can be used as a tool in assigning indoor radon potential, this study is of importance to land managers, contractors, developers, and regulating agencies who are attempting to place standards on tracts of land with {sup 226}Ra concentration used as a criterion.

  18. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organicsmore »present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.« less

  19. Rapid determination of actinides in asphalt samples

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Maxwell, Sherrod L.; Culligan, Brian K.; Hutchison, Jay B.

    2014-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A new rapid method for the determination of actinides in asphalt samples has been developed that can be used in emergency response situations or for routine analysis If a radiological dispersive device (RDD), Improvised Nuclear Device (IND) or a nuclear accident such as the accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant in March, 2011 occurs, there will be an urgent need for rapid analyses of many different environmental matrices, including asphalt materials, to support dose mitigation and environmental clean up. The new method for the determination of actinides in asphalt utilizes a rapid furnace step to destroy bitumen and organics present in the asphalt and sodium hydroxide fusion to digest the remaining sample. Sample preconcentration steps are used to collect the actinides and a new stacked TRU Resin + DGA Resin column method is employed to separate the actinide isotopes in the asphalt samples. The TRU Resin plus DGA Resin separation approach, which allows sequential separation of plutonium, uranium, americium and curium isotopes in asphalt samples, can be applied to soil samples as well.

  20. Procedures to predict vertical differential soil movement for expansive soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naiser, Donald David

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Damage to lightly loaded structures, paving and service piping in areas of expansive clay soils has occurred throughout the world. The cause of this damage has been the inability to accurately model expansive soil movement so that foundations...

  1. Search for Diffuse Astrophysical Neutrino Flux Using Ultra-High-Energy Upward-Going Muons in Super-Kamiokande I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; M. E. C. Swanson

    2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Many astrophysical models predict a diffuse flux of high-energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei and other extra-galactic sources. At muon energies above 1 TeV, the upward-going muon flux induced by neutrinos from active galactic nuclei is expected to exceed the flux due to atmospheric neutrinos. We have performed a search for this astrophysical neutrino flux by looking for upward-going muons in the highest energy data sample from the Super-Kamiokande detector using 1679.6 live days of data. We found one extremely high energy upward-going muon event, compared with an expected atmospheric neutrino background of 0.46 plus or minus 0.23 events. Using this result, we set an upper limit on the diffuse flux of upward-going muons due to neutrinos from astrophysical sources in the muon energy range 3.16-100 TeV.

  2. Soil Characterization at the Linde FUSRAP Site and the Impact on Soil Volume Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyle, J.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The former Linde site in Tonawanda, New York is currently undergoing active remediation of Manhattan Engineering District's radiological contamination. This remediation is authorized under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The focus of this paper will be to describe the impact of soil characterization efforts as they relate to soil volume estimates and project cost estimates. An additional objective is to stimulate discussion about other characterization and modeling technologies, and to provide a ''Lessons Learned'' scenario to assist in future volume estimating at other FUSRAP sites. Initial soil characterization efforts at the Linde FUSRAP site in areas known to be contaminated or suspected to be contaminated were presented in the Remedial Investigation Report for the Tonawanda Site, dated February 1993. Results of those initial characterization efforts were the basis for soil volume estimates that were used to estimate and negotiate the current remediation contract. During the course of remediation, previously unidentified areas of contamination were discovered, and additional characterization was initiated. Additional test pit and geoprobe samples were obtained at over 500 locations, bringing the total to over 800 sample locations at the 135-acre site. New data continues to be collected on a routine basis during ongoing remedial actions.

  3. Utilization of a duckweed bioassay to evaluate leaching of heavy metals in smelter contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Youngman, A.L.; Lydy, M.J. [Wichita State Univ., KS (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Williams, T.L. [Laidlaw Environmental Services, Wichita, KS (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether a duckweed bioassay could be used to evaluate the downward migration of heavy metals in smelter soils. The duckweed bioassay was initially used to evaluate elutriates prepared from samples of smelter soils. These initial tests verified that the elutriates would elicit toxic responses. Elutriate testing was followed with an evaluation of leachate from untreated soil cores or soil cores that had been amended with organic matter either unplanted or planted to a grass-forb seed mixture. There was an inverse linear relationship between heavy-metal concentrations in leachate and NOEC and IC{sub 50} values expressed as percentages among all soil cores. Based on these preliminary duckweed bioassays, there were no differences between soil types or organic amended or non-amended soil, but leachate from vegetated soil cores were less toxic than were leachates from non-vegetated soil cores. Overall, the duckweed bioassays were useful in detecting heavy metal availability in elutriate and leachate samples from smelter soils.

  4. SAMPLE EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES STATEMENTSSAMPLE EXPECTED LEARNING OUTCOMES STATEMENTS The following pages depict some sample expected learning outcome statements from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    the past and the present · Write an essay defining a pluralistic society and its relationship to our samples · List the primary, secondary and micro nutrients present in soil · Identify and describe land: · Describe the digestive system · Explain the steps involved in metabolism and the ways energy is derived

  5. Production flux of sea spray aerosol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Leeuw, G.; Lewis, E.; Andreas, E. L.; Anguelova, M. D.; Fairall, C. W.; O’Dowd, C.; Schulz, M.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2011-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Knowledge of the size- and composition-dependent production flux of primary sea spray aerosol (SSA) particles and its dependence on environmental variables is required for modeling cloud microphysical properties and aerosol radiative influences, interpreting measurements of particulate matter in coastal areas and its relation to air quality, and evaluating rates of uptake and reactions of gases in sea spray drops. This review examines recent research pertinent to SSA production flux, which deals mainly with production of particles with r{sub 80} (equilibrium radius at 80% relative humidity) less than 1 {micro}m and as small as 0.01 {micro}m. Production of sea spray particles and its dependence on controlling factors has been investigated in laboratory studies that have examined the dependences on water temperature, salinity, and the presence of organics and in field measurements with micrometeorological techniques that use newly developed fast optical particle sizers. Extensive measurements show that water-insoluble organic matter contributes substantially to the composition of SSA particles with r{sub 80} < 0.25 {micro}m and, in locations with high biological activity, can be the dominant constituent. Order-of-magnitude variation remains in estimates of the size-dependent production flux per white area, the quantity central to formulations of the production flux based on the whitecap method. This variation indicates that the production flux may depend on quantities such as the volume flux of air bubbles to the surface that are not accounted for in current models. Variation in estimates of the whitecap fraction as a function of wind speed contributes additional, comparable uncertainty to production flux estimates.

  6. DETERMINATION OF THE SWELL-STRESS CURVE OF AN EXPANSIVE SOIL USING CENTRIFUGE TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    DETERMINATION OF THE SWELL-STRESS CURVE OF AN EXPANSIVE SOIL USING CENTRIFUGE TECHNOLOGY project was conducted on the use of centrifuge technology to characterize the expansive properties of a soil sample in the centrifuge. This paper focuses on the analysis of testing results, specifically how

  7. Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brunsell, Nathaniel A.; Gillies, Robert R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the variability across different spatial res- olutions in input data translates into variation across scales in modeled output. This issue is of prime im- portance to the remote sensing community involved in the modeling of land–atmosphere interactions...1212 VOLUME 4J O U R N A L O F H Y D R O M E T E O R O L O G Y q 2003 American Meteorological Society Length Scale Analysis of Surface Energy Fluxes Derived from Remote Sensing NATHANIEL A. BRUNSELL* Department of Plants, Soils, and Biometeorology...

  8. Subsurface Temperature, Moisture, Thermal Conductivity and Heat Flux, Barrow, Area A, B, C, D

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Cable, William; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    Subsurface temperature data are being collected along a transect from the center of the polygon through the trough (and to the center of the adjacent polygon for Area D). Each transect has five 1.5m vertical array thermistor probes with 16 thermistors each. This dataset also includes soil pits that have been instrumented for temperature, water content, thermal conductivity, and heat flux at the permafrost table. Area C has a shallow borehole of 2.5 meters depth is instrumented in the center of the polygon.

  9. Soil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and to be blown away. A cover of plants disrupts the force of the wind. Soils are more susceptible to wind erosionSoil Quality Information Sheet Rangeland Soil Quality--Wind Erosion USDA, Natural Resources Conservation Service May 2001 Rangeland Sheet 10 What is wind erosion? Wind erosion is the physical wearing

  10. soils.ifas.ufl.edu Soil & Water Science Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    interested in courses that emphasize sustainability, resource management, valuation of ecosystem servicessoils.ifas.ufl.edu UF/IFAS Soil & Water Science Department DISTANCE EDUCATION GRADUATE PROGRAMS #12;SOIL AND WATER SCIENCE DEPARTMENT The Soil and Water Science Department at the University of Florida

  11. Soils in the Riparian Incorporating Soil Dynamics into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    distribution (salt moves with water) ­Anaerobic conditions ­Ponding and flooding #12;Dynamics of Soil Wetness environment · Salinity is transient, but moves slowest through clayey sediments (as does the water) · System in riparian areas #12;Soil Map Reliability · Soils in riparian settings (level, near water) often dramatically

  12. Soil and Water Conservation (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Florida’s 62 Soil and Water Conservation Districts were established in 1937 under Chapter 582 Florida Statutes. The law was based on federal model legislation to establish Soil and Water...

  13. Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald...

  14. Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

  15. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil...

  16. The Chemical Composition of Some Soils of Angelina, Brazoria, Cameron, Cherokee, Delta, Lamar, Hidalgo, Lavaca, Montgomery, Nacogdoches, Robertson, Rusk, Webb and Wilson Counties.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1909-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . They are found mostly in the coastal plains and are especially abundant irl East Texas. These soils are better suited to fruit and truck than to corn arltl cotton. TABLE 3-AVERAGE PERCENTAGE COMPOSITION TYPICAL SOILS -p - Norfolk fine sandy loam (5 samples...) ...... / .021 .06 09 . .081' .03 Norfolk fine sand (5 samples) ............ .02 .021 : 081 .061 .06 Susquehanna fine sandy loam (3 samples. . Lufkin fine sandy loam (3 samples). ...... Lufkin clay (2 samples ................... Orangeburg fine sandy loam (6...

  17. Uranium-contaminated soils: Ultramicrotomy and electron beam analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buck, E.C.; Dietz, N.L.; Bates, J.K.; Cunnane, J.C.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranium-contaminated soils from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fernald Site, Ohio, have been examined by a combination of scanning electron microscopy with backscattered electron imaging (SEM/BSE) and analytical electron microscopy (AEM). The inhomogeneous distribution of particulate uranium phases in the soil required the development of a method for using ultramicrotomy to prepare transmission electron microscopy (TEM) thin sections of the SEM mounts. A water-miscible resin was selected that allowed comparison between SEM and TEM images, permitting representative sampling of the soil. Uranium was found in iron oxides, silicates (soddyite), phosphates (autunites), and fluorite (UO{sub 2}). No uranium was detected in association with phyllosilicates in the soil.

  18. Plasma treatment of INEL soil contaminated with heavy metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Detering, B.A.; Batdorf, J.A.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INEL soil spiked with inorganic salts of chromium, lead, mercury, silver, and zinc was melted in a 150 kW plasma furnace to produce a glassy slag product. This glassy slag is an environmentally safe waste form. In order to reduce the melting temperature of the soil, sodium carbonate was added to half of the test batches. Random sample from each batch of glassy slag product were analyzed by an independent laboratory for total metals concentration and leachability of metals via the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) toxicity characterization leaching procedure (RCLP) tests. These tests showed the residual metals were very tightly bound to the slag matrix and were within EPA TCLP limits under these test conditions. Additionally, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and emissions dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) analysis of the vitrified soil also confirmed that the added metals present in the vitrified soil were totally contained in the crystalline phase as distinct oxide crystallites.

  19. Results of Remediation and Verification Sampling for the 600-270 Horseshoe Landfill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. S. Thompson

    2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of the 2005 remedial action and verification soil sampling conducted at the 600-270 waste site after removal of soil containing residual concentrations of dichlorodiphenyl trichloroethane and its breakdown products dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethylene and dichlorodiphenyl dichloroethane. The remediation was performed in response to post-closure surface soil sampling performed between 1998 and 2003 that indicated the presence of residual DDT contamination exceeding the Record of Decision for the 1100 Area National Priorities List site cleanup criteria of 1 mg/kg that was established for the original 1994 cleanup activities.

  20. Sampling system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Decker, David L.; Lyles, Brad F.; Purcell, Richard G.; Hershey, Ronald Lee

    2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present disclosure provides an apparatus and method for coupling conduit segments together. A first pump obtains a sample and transmits it through a first conduit to a reservoir accessible by a second pump. The second pump further conducts the sample from the reservoir through a second conduit.

  1. Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ronquist, Fredrik

    /Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

  2. Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    1 Soil protection major Prof. Dani Or Soil and Terrestrial Environmental Physics CHN F 29.1 Universitätstrasse 16 8092 Zürich dani.or@env.ethz.ch +41 44 633 60 15 Objectives of soil protection major · understand composition and structure of soil · study key processes in soils and their relation to soil

  3. Influence of attrition scrubbing, ultrasonic treatment, and oxidant additions on uranium removal from contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timpson, M.E.; Elless, M.P.; Francis, C.W.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the Uranium in Soils Integrated Demonstration Project being conducted by the US Department of Energy, bench-scale investigations of selective leaching of uranium from soils at the Fernald Environmental Management Project site in Ohio were conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Two soils (storage pad soil and incinerator soil), representing the major contaminant sources at the site, were extracted using carbonate- and citric acid-based lixiviants. Physical and chemical processes were used in combination with the two extractants to increase the rate of uranium release from these soils. Attrition scrubbing and ultrasonic dispersion were the two physical processes utilized. Potassium permanganate was used as an oxidizing agent to transform tetravalent uranium to the hexavalent state. Hexavalent uranium is easily complexed in solution by the carbonate radical. Attrition scrubbing increased the rate of uranium release from both soils when compared with rotary shaking. At equivalent extraction times and solids loadings, however, attrition scrubbing proved effective only on the incinerator soil. Ultrasonic treatments on the incinerator soil removed 71% of the uranium contamination in a single extraction. Multiple extractions of the same sample removed up to 90% of the uranium. Additions of potassium permanganate to the carbonate extractant resulted in significant changes in the extractability of uranium from the incinerator soil but had no effect on the storage pad soil.

  4. UNDERSTANDING SOIL Larry G. Bundy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    available for plant uptake, extraction, or measured by soil test. #12;Phosphorus (P) Loss Processes slowly soluble compounds: § Sorbed P · Clays · Al and Fe oxides § Secondary P minerals (precipitation/Lancaster/Madison (r2 = 0.65) n = 119 #12;Effect of soil extraction time on water extractable soil P concentration

  5. LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LUNAR SOIL SIMULATION and TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS by W. David Carrier, III Lunar Geotechnical.0 RECOMMENDED LUNAR SOIL TRAFFICABILITY PARAMETERS Table 9.14 in the Lunar Sourcebook (Carrier et al. 1991, p. 529) lists the current recommended lunar soil trafficability parameters: bc = 0.017 N/cm2 bN = 35° K

  6. GUIDE TO GRADUATE SOIL SCIENCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    GUIDE TO GRADUATE PROGRAMS in AGRONOMY and SOIL SCIENCE Updated July 2011 THE DEPARTMENT OF CROP AND SOIL SCIENCES THE PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY PARK, PA #12;iiii Guide to Graduate Programs in Agronomy and Soil Science Table of Contents Introduction

  7. Characterizing the Environmental Availability of Trace Metals in Savannah River Site Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serkiz, S.M.

    1999-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    An eight step sequential extraction technique was used to characterize the environmental availability of trace metals from background and waste site soil samples collected from the US Department of Energy's Savannah River Site (SRS).

  8. Gas Flux Sampling At Brady Hot Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 Jump to:Garnet Wind Jump

  9. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Bergfeld, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 Jump to:Garnet Wind Jump2006) |

  10. Gas Flux Sampling At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Lewicki, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489InformationFrenchtown, NewG22 Jump to:Garnet Wind Jump2006)

  11. Gas Flux Sampling At Akutan Fumaroles Area (Kolker, Et Al., 2010) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma:Laney,Energy

  12. Gas Flux Sampling At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County, Oklahoma:Laney,EnergyWarrior

  13. Gas Flux Sampling At Desert Peak Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,

  14. Gas Flux Sampling At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Iovenitti, Et Al., 2013)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open Energy Information

  15. Gas Flux Sampling At Haleakala Volcano Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open Energy Information

  16. Gas Flux Sampling At Hualalai Northwest Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open Energy

  17. Gas Flux Sampling At Kawaihae Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open EnergyKawaihae Area

  18. Gas Flux Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Thomas, 1986) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open EnergyKawaihae AreaOpen

  19. Gas Flux Sampling At Lahaina-Kaanapali Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open EnergyKawaihae

  20. Gas Flux Sampling At Lightning Dock Area (Cunniff & Bowers, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open EnergyKawaihaeEnergy

  1. Gas Flux Sampling At Lualualei Valley Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| Open

  2. Gas Flux Sampling At Maui Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt Maui Area (DOE GTP)

  3. Gas Flux Sampling At Mauna Loa Northeast Rift Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt Maui Area (DOE

  4. Gas Flux Sampling At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt Maui Area

  5. Gas Flux Sampling At Mokapu Penninsula Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt Maui

  6. Gas Flux Sampling At Olowalu-Ukumehame Canyon Area (Thomas, 1986) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt MauiEnergy

  7. Gas Flux Sampling At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt MauiEnergyEnergy

  8. Gas Flux Sampling At Steamboat Springs Area (Lechler And Coolbaugh, 2007) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°,Park, Texas: EnergyGarvin County,| OpenAt MauiEnergyEnergyOpen

  9. Geochemical Cycling of Iodine Species in Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Moran, J E; Blackwood, V

    2007-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Iodine is an important element in studies of environmental protection and human health, global-scale hydrologic processes and nuclear nonproliferation. Biogeochemical cycling of iodine in soils is complex, because iodine occurs in multiple oxidation states and as inorganic and organic species that may be hydrophilic, atmophilic, and biophilic. In this study, we applied new analytical techniques to study the content and speciation of stable iodine in representative surface soils, and sorption and transport behavior of iodine species (iodide, iodate, and 4-iodoaniline) in sediments collected at numerous nuclear facilities in the United States, where anthropogenic {sup 129}I from prior nuclear fuel processing activities poses an environmental risk. The surface soil samples were chosen for their geographic locations (e.g., near the ocean or nuclear facilities) and for their differing physico-chemical characteristics (organic matter, texture, etc). Extracted solutions were analyzed by IC and ICP-MS methods to determine iodine concentrations and to examine iodine speciation (iodide, iodate, and organic iodine). In natural soils, iodine is mostly (nearly 90% of total iodine) present as organic species, while inorganic iodine becomes important (up to 50%) only in sediments with low organic matter. Results from laboratory column studies, aimed at examining transport of different iodine species, showed much greater retardation of 4-iodoaniline than iodide or iodate. Careful attention must be given to potential interconversion among species when interpreting the biogeochemical behavior of iodine in the environment. In addition to speciation, input concentration and residence time effects will influence the biogeochemical cycling of anthropogenic 129I deposited on surface soils.

  10. Coronal mass ejections and magnetic flux buildup in the heliosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    electron heat flux. The first panel shows the preeruption heliospheric flux, which consists of the an open the observed doubling in the magnetic field intensity at 1 AU over the solar cycle. Such timescales signatures; no flux buildup results. The dynamic simulation yields a solar cycle flux variation with high

  11. A b s t r a c t. The paper presents a comparison of particle size distributions of 23 mineral soils from SE Poland obtained by the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    fraction (sand). K e y w o r d s: mineral soils, particle size distribution, laser diffraction, areometric soils (Orthic Luvisols) and 1 black earth (Mollic Gleysol). Air-dry soil samples were sieved on 2 mm was prepared using distilled water as the liquid phase. To improve the credibility of results, the measurement

  12. Soil Remediation Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manlapig, D. M.; Williamsws

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soils contaminated with petroleum by-products can now be effectively remediated using a variety of technologies. Among these are in-situ bioremediation, land farming, and landfill/replacing of soil. The range of efficiencies and cost effectiveness of these technologies has been well documented. Exsorbet Plus is showing promise as an in-situ bioremediation agent. It is made of naturally grown Spaghnum Peat Moss which has been activated for encapsulation and blended with nitrogen-rich fertilizer. In its initial field test in Caracas, Venezuela, it was able to remediate crude oil-contaminated soil in 90 days at less than half of the cost of competing technologies. Waste Solutions, Corp and the US Department of Energy signed a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement to test Exsorbet Plus at the Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center near Casper, Wyoming. As part of the test, soil contaminated with crude oil was treated with Exsorbet Plus to aid the in-situ bioremediation process. Quantitative total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) measurements were acquired comparing the performance of Exsorbet Plus with an adjacent plot undergoing unaided in-situ bioremediation.

  13. Waste classification sampling plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landsman, S.D.

    1998-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this sampling is to explain the method used to collect and analyze data necessary to verify and/or determine the radionuclide content of the B-Cell decontamination and decommissioning waste stream so that the correct waste classification for the waste stream can be made, and to collect samples for studies of decontamination methods that could be used to remove fixed contamination present on the waste. The scope of this plan is to establish the technical basis for collecting samples and compiling quantitative data on the radioactive constituents present in waste generated during deactivation activities in B-Cell. Sampling and radioisotopic analysis will be performed on the fixed layers of contamination present on structural material and internal surfaces of process piping and tanks. In addition, dose rate measurements on existing waste material will be performed to determine the fraction of dose rate attributable to both removable and fixed contamination. Samples will also be collected to support studies of decontamination methods that are effective in removing the fixed contamination present on the waste. Sampling performed under this plan will meet criteria established in BNF-2596, Data Quality Objectives for the B-Cell Waste Stream Classification Sampling, J. M. Barnett, May 1998.

  14. Soil damping constants related to common soil properties in sands and clays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, Gary Clive

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resisting force approaches a static value: paretic = K I, et ting Pd ~ ic equal R. in equation 1 from Smith's mathcma- dynnmic r. tical model and s?b . tituting equation. 2 and 3 into 1, thc neak dynamic resistance of the soil i Pdynamic = Pstetic... device) to 12 inches. In dense sands this weight was not sufficiently large to fail the sample when 2'-4" SCALE: V2" = I'-0 RELEASE MECHANISM I 20 9. 0 FRAME TO STOP FALL ING WEIGHT l65 LB FRAME RUBBER PADS TRIAXI*L CELL AND SAMPLE O IK...

  15. Uniform flux dish concentrators for photovoltaic application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgensen, G; Wendelin, T

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have designed a unique and innovative molded dish concentrator capable of producing a uniform flux profile on a flat target plane. Concentration levels of 100--200 suns, which are uniform over an area of several square inches, can be directly achieved for collection apertures of a reasonable size ({approximately}1.5-m diameter). Such performance would be immediately applicable to photovoltaic (PV) use. Economic concerns have shown that the proposed approach would be less expensive thatn Fresnel lens concepts or other dish concentrator designs that require complicated and costly receivers to mix the flux to obtain a uniform distribution. 12 refs.

  16. Plasma momentum meter for momentum flux measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zonca, Fulvio (Rome, IT); Cohen, Samuel A. (Hopewell, NJ); Bennett, Timothy (Princeton, NJ); Timberlake, John R. (Allentown, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Invention comprises an instrument in which momentum flux onto a biasable target plate is transferred via a suspended quartz tube onto a sensitive force transducer--a capacitance-type pressure gauge. The transducer is protected from thermal damage, arcing and sputtering, and materials used in the target and pendulum are electrically insulating, rigid even at elevated temperatures, and have low thermal conductivity. The instrument enables measurement of small forces (10.sup.-5 to 10.sup.3 N) accompanied by high heat fluxes which are transmitted by energetic particles with 10's of eV of kinetic energy in a intense magnetic field and pulsed plasma environment.

  17. Dual neutron flux/temperature measurement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.; Simpson, M.L.; McElhaney, S.A.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Simultaneous measurement of neutron flux and temperature is provided by a single sensor which includes a phosphor mixture having two principal constituents. The first constituent is a neutron sensitive 6LiF and the second is a rare-earth activated Y203 thermophosphor. The mixture is coated on the end of a fiber optic, while the opposite end of the fiber optic is coupled to a light detector. The detected light scintillations are quantified for neutron flux determination, and the decay is measured for temperature determination. 3 figs.

  18. Spatial Distribution Of Cs-137 In Surface Soils On Some Central Rhodopes Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hristov, Hr. G.; Srentz, A. K.; Balabanov, N. P. [Plovdiv University, 24 Tzar Assen Str., 4000 Plovdiv (Bulgaria)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of investigation are soils from region around village Kiselchovo, town Smolyan, villages Narechen, Bachkovo, Laki, Kosovo, Dobralak, Central Rhodopes region. The samples have been collected from natural soils at a depth of 0-10 cm. The samples have been analyzed for the content of technogenical radionuclide Cs-137. The measurements were taken by precise gamma ray spectrometer. Based on the conducted research an inference can be made that there are radioactive contamination (up to 30 times over the background level)

  19. Geochemical study of lead in soils from West Dallas, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibrahim, N.M.; Carter, J.L. (Univ. of Texas, Dallas, TX (United States). Programs in Geosciences)

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil samples from West Dallas near the RSR smelter were collected and tested to see the content, source, and mobility of lead. 30 cm and 90 cm long cores were cut into 1 cm long pieces and each piece analyzed separately. The results showed that 90%--95% of the lead is readily extractable in cold dilute nitric acid. The lateral distribution of lead in West Dallas indicates an exponential-like decrease with distance from the RSR smelter. Concentrations greater than 500 ppm occur in soils below 10 cm within 1,000 feet of the smelter. In the vicinity of the smelter (300 feet radius), soil cores with total lead content as high as 18,000 ppm in the top 15 cm were obtained. At a distance of 2,400 feet of the smelter the lead in the soil amounts to 400 ppm and drops to 270 ppm at 4,000 feet. The total lead content with depth, correlates with previous clean-up and civil activities in the area: (1) where the soil is original, the lead concentration decreases exponentially with depth; (2) where the soil was cleaned up, the top 10 cm are devoid of lead but are underlain by soil whose lead content varies in response to distance from the smelter; (3) where the top soil had been disturbed (removed, replaced, mixed, etc.) as a result of civil works, the lead content is relatively lower than 1 (above). The underlying insitu soils exhibit similar lead concentration as those in 2 (above).

  20. The Basicity of Texas Soils.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach); Carlyle, E. C. (Elmer Cardinal)

    1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    basicity is here used to mean the bases which neutralize dilute nitric acid, sulphuric acid or similar acids, as measured by titra- tion of the acid after contact with the soil. It is recognized that this does not correctly represent the real basicity... of the soil and other circumstances. The use of nitrate of soda on acid soils tends to reduce the acidity. A mixture of nitrate of soda and sulphate of ammonia in proper proportions will not affect the acidity of the soil. THE BASICITY OF TEXAS SOILS 7...

  1. Enhanced Attenuation Technologies: Passive Soil Vapor Extraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vangelas, K.; Looney, B.; Kamath, R.; Adamson, D.; Newell, C.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Passive soil vapor extraction (PSVE) is an enhanced attenuation (EA) approach that removes volatile contaminants from soil. The extraction is driven by natural pressure gradients between the subsurface and atmosphere (Barometric Pumping), or by renewable sources of energy such as wind or solar power (Assisted PSVE). The technology is applicable for remediating sites with low levels of contamination and for transitioning sites from active source technologies such as active soil vapor extraction (ASVE) to natural attenuation. PSVE systems are simple to design and operate and are more cost effective than active systems in many scenarios. Thus, PSVE is often appropriate as an interim-remedial or polishing strategy. Over the past decade, PSVE has been demonstrated in the U.S. and in Europe. These demonstrations provide practical information to assist in selecting, designing and implementing the technology. These demonstrations indicate that the technology can be effective in achieving remedial objectives in a timely fashion. The keys to success include: (1) Application at sites where the residual source quantities, and associated fluxes to groundwater, are relatively low; (2) Selection of the appropriate passive energy source - barometric pumping in cases with a deep vadose zone and barrier (e.g., clay) layers that separate the subsurface from the atmosphere and renewable energy assisted PSVE in other settings and where higher flow rates are required. (3) Provision of sufficient access to the contaminated vadose zones through the spacing and number of extraction wells. This PSVE technology report provides a summary of the relevant technical background, real-world case study performance, key design and cost considerations, and a scenario-based cost evaluation. The key design and cost considerations are organized into a flowchart that dovetails with the Enhanced Attenuation: Chlorinated Organics Guidance of the Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC). The PSVE flowchart provides a structured process to determine if the technology is, or is not, reasonable and defensible for a particular site. The central basis for that decision is the expected performance of PSVE under the site specific conditions. Will PSVE have sufficient mass removal rates to reduce the release, or flux, of contamination into the underlying groundwater so that the site can meet it overall remedial objectives? The summary technical information, case study experiences, and structured decision process provided in this 'user guide' should assist environmental decision-makers, regulators, and engineers in selecting and successfully implementing PSVE at appropriate sites.

  2. Radionuclide concentrations in terrestrial vegetation and soil on and around the Hanford Site, 1983 through 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poston, T.M.; Antonio, E.J.; Cooper, A.T.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report reviews concentrations of {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, U isotopes, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in soil and vegetation samples collected from 1983 through 1993 during routine surveillance of the Hanford Site. Sampling locations were grouped in study areas associated with operational areas on the Site. While radionuclide concentrations were very low and representative of background concentrations from historic fallout, some study areas on the Site contained slightly elevated concentrations compared to other study areas onsite and offsite. The 100 Areas had concentrations of {sup 60}Co comparable to the minimum detectable concentration of 0.02 pCi/g in soil. Concentrations of {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239,240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am in 200 Area soils were slightly elevated. The 300 Area had a slight elevation of U in soil. These observations were expected because many of the sampling locations were selected to monitor specific facilities or operations at the operational areas. Generally, concentrations of the radionuclides studied were greater and more readily measured in soil samples compared to vegetation samples. The general pattern of concentrations of radionuclide concentrations in vegetation by area mirrored that observed in soil. Declines in {sup 90}Sr in soil appear to be attributed to radioactive decay and possibly downward migration out of the sampling horizon. The other radionuclides addressed in this report strongly sorb to soil and are readily retained in surface soil. Because of their long half-lives compared to the length of the study period, there was no significant indication that concentrations of U isotopes and Pu isotopes were decreasing over time.

  3. Sample Changes and Issues

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    EIA-914 Survey and HPDI. Figure 2 shows how this could change apparent production. The blue line shows the reported sample production as it would normally be reported under the...

  4. Water Sample Concentrator

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Automated portable device that concentrates and packages a sample of suspected contaminated water for safe, efficient transport to a qualified analytical laboratory. This technology will help safeguard against pathogen contamination or chemical and biolog

  5. Dissolution actuated sample container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; McCoy, Frank T.

    2013-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample collection vial and process of using a vial is provided. The sample collection vial has an opening secured by a dissolvable plug. When dissolved, liquids may enter into the interior of the collection vial passing along one or more edges of a dissolvable blocking member. As the blocking member is dissolved, a spring actuated closure is directed towards the opening of the vial which, when engaged, secures the vial contents against loss or contamination.

  6. SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS PROTOCOLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jannik, T; P Fledderman, P

    2007-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiological sampling and analyses are performed to collect data for a variety of specific reasons covering a wide range of projects. These activities include: Effluent monitoring; Environmental surveillance; Emergency response; Routine ambient monitoring; Background assessments; Nuclear license termination; Remediation; Deactivation and decommissioning (D&D); and Waste management. In this chapter, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance programs at nuclear operating facilities and radiological sampling and analysis plans for remediation and D&D activities will be discussed.

  7. TANK 5 SAMPLING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrettos, N; William Cheng, W; Thomas Nance, T

    2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Tank 5 at the Savannah River Site has been used to store high level waste and is currently undergoing waste removal processes in preparation for tank closure. Samples were taken from two locations to determine the contents in support of Documented Safety Analysis (DSA) development for chemical cleaning. These samples were obtained through the use of the Drop Core Sampler and the Snowbank Sampler developed by the Engineered Equipment & Systems (EES) group of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL).

  8. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, L.L.

    1984-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed. 5 figs.

  9. Liquid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Larson, Loren L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A conduit extends from a reservoir through a sampling station and back to the reservoir in a closed loop. A jet ejector in the conduit establishes suction for withdrawing liquid from the reservoir. The conduit has a self-healing septum therein upstream of the jet ejector for receiving one end of a double-ended cannula, the other end of which is received in a serum bottle for sample collection. Gas is introduced into the conduit at a gas bleed between the sample collection bottle and the reservoir. The jet ejector evacuates gas from the conduit and the bottle and aspirates a column of liquid from the reservoir at a high rate. When the withdrawn liquid reaches the jet ejector the rate of flow therethrough reduces substantially and the gas bleed increases the pressure in the conduit for driving liquid into the sample bottle, the gas bleed forming a column of gas behind the withdrawn liquid column and interrupting the withdrawal of liquid from the reservoir. In the case of hazardous and toxic liquids, the sample bottle and the jet ejector may be isolated from the reservoir and may be further isolated from a control station containing remote manipulation means for the sample bottle and control valves for the jet ejector and gas bleed.

  10. Effect of Increasing Nitrogen Deposition on Soil Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Shengmu; Xue, Kai; He, Zhili; VanNostrand, Joy D.; Liu, Jianshe; Hobbie, Sarah E.; Reich, Peter B.; Zhou, Jizhong

    2010-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasing nitrogen deposition, increasing atmospheric CO2, and decreasing biodiversity are three main environmental changes occurring on a global scale. The BioCON (Biodiversity, CO2, and Nitrogen) ecological experiment site at the University of Minnesota's Cedar Creek Ecosystem Science Reserve started in 1997, to better understand how these changes would affect soil systems. To understand how increasing nitrogen deposition affects the microbial community diversity, heterogeneity, and functional structure impact soil microbial communities, 12 samples were collected from the BioCON plots in which nitrogenous fertilizer was added to simulate the effect of increasing nitrogen deposition and 12 samples from without added fertilizer. DNA from the 24 samples was extracted using a freeze-grind protocol, amplified, labeled with a fluorescent dye, and then hybridized to GeoChip, a functional gene array containing probes for genes involved in N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. Detrended correspondence analysis (DCA) of all genes detected was performed to analyze microbial community patterns. The first two axes accounted for 23.5percent of the total variation. The samples fell into two major groups: fertilized and non-fertilized, suggesting that nitrogenous fertilizer had a significant impact on soil microbial community structure and diversity. The functional gene numbers detected in fertilized samples was less that detected in non-fertilizer samples. Functional genes involving in the N cycling were mainly discussed.

  11. Geochemical and physical properties of soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Ramdeen, M.; Pickett, J. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Rogers, V. (Soil Conservation Service, Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Site Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Scott, M.T.; Shirley, P.A. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (USA))

    1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of the unimpacted soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been completed. The maximum, minimum, median, standard deviation, and mean values for metals, radionuclides, inorganic anions, organic compounds, and agricultural indicator parameters are summarized for six soil series that were identified as representative of the 29 soil series at SRS. The soils from unimpacted areas of SRS are typical of soils found in moderately aggressive weathering environments, including the southeastern United States. Appendix 8 organic compounds were detected in all samples. Since these constituents are not generally present in soil, this portion of the investigation was intended to assess possible laboratory artifacts. An additional objective of the SRS Soil Study was to determine if the composition of the split spoon sampler biased chemical analysis of the soils. Twenty-five duplicate samples were analyzed for a number of metals, radiological and agricultural parameters, and organics by two laboratories currently contracted with to analyze samples during waste site characterization. In all cases, the absolute values of the average differences are relatively small compared to the overall variability in the population. 31 refs., 14 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. Physical modeling of the soil swelling curve vs. the shrinkage curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Y. Chertkov

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical understanding of the links between soil swelling, texture, structure, cracking, and sample size is of great interest for the physical understanding of many processes in the soil-air-water system and for applications in civil, agricultural, and environmental engineering. The background of this work is an available chain of interconnected physical shrinkage curve models for clay, intra-aggregate matrix, aggregated soil without cracks, and soil with cracks. The objective of the work is to generalize these models to the case of swelling, and to construct the physical-swelling-model chain with a step-by-step transition from clay to aggregated soil with cracks. The generalization is based on thorough accounting for the analogies and differences between shrinkage and swelling and the corresponding use, modification, or replacement of the soil shrinkage features. Two specific soil swelling features to be used are: (i) air entrapping in pores of the contributing clay; and (ii) aggregate destruction with the formation of new aggregate surfaces. The input for the prediction of the swelling curve of an aggregated soil coincides with that of the available model of the shrinkage curve. The analysis of available data on the maximum shrink-swell cycle of two soils with different texture and structure, accounting for sample size is conducted as applied to swelling curves and to the residual crack volume and maximum-swelling-volume decrease after the shrink-swell cycle. Results of the analysis show evidence in favor of the swelling model chain.

  13. Type A verification report for the high flux beam reactor stack and grounds, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M.

    2012-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1 requires independent verification (IV) of DOE cleanup projects (DOE 2011). The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has been designated as the responsible organization for IV of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Stack and Grounds area at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The IV evaluation may consist of an in-process inspection with document and data reviews (Type A Verification) or a confirmatory survey of the site (Type B Verification). DOE and ORISE determined that a Type A verification of the documents and data for the HFBR Stack and Grounds: Survey Units (SU) 6, 7, and 8 was appropriate based on the initial survey unit classification, the walkover surveys, and the final analytical results provided by the Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA). The HFBR Stack and Grounds surveys began in June 2011 and were completed in September 2011. Survey activities by BSA included gamma walkover scans and sampling of the as-left soils in accordance with the BSA Work Procedure (BNL 2010a). The Field Sampling Plan - Stack and Remaining HFBR Outside Areas (FSP) stated that gamma walk-over surveys would be conducted with a bare sodium iodide (NaI) detector, and a collimated detector would be used to check areas with elevated count rates to locate the source of the high readings (BNL 2010b). BSA used the Mult- Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM) principles for determining the classifications of each survey unit. Therefore, SUs 6 and 7 were identified as Class 1 and SU 8 was deemed Class 2 (BNL 2010b). Gamma walkover surveys of SUs 6, 7, and 8 were completed using a 2?2 NaI detector coupled to a data-logger with a global positioning system (GPS). The 100% scan surveys conducted prior to the final status survey (FSS) sampling identified two general soil areas and two isolated soil locations with elevated radioactivity. The general areas of elevated activity identified were investigated further with a collimated NaI detector. The uncollimated average gamma count rate was less than 15,000 counts per minute (cpm) for the SU 6, 7, and 8 composite area (BNL 2011a). Elevated count rates were observed in portions of each survey unit. The general areas of elevated counts near the Building 801 ventilation and operations and the entry to the Stack were determined to be directly related to the radioactive processes in those structures. To compensate for this radioactive shine, a collimated or shielded detector was used to lower the background count rate (BNL 2011b and c). This allowed the surveyor(s) to distinguish between background and actual radioactive contamination. Collimated gamma survey count rates in these shine affected areas were below 9,000 cpm (BNL 2011a). The average background count rate of 7,500 cpm was reported by BSA for uncollimated NaI detectors (BNL 2011d). The average collimated background ranged from 4,500-6,500 cpm in the westernmost part of SU 8 and from 2,000-3,500 cpm in all other areas (BNL 2011e). Based on these data, no further investigations were necessary for these general areas. SU 8 was the only survey unit that exhibited verified elevated radioactivity levels. The first of two isolated locations of elevated radioactivity had an uncollimated direct measurement of 50,000 cpm with an area background of 7,500 cpm (BNL 2011f). The second small area exhibiting elevated radiation levels was identified at a depth of 6 inches from the surface. The maximum reported count rate of 28,000 cpm was observed during scanning (BNL 2011g). The affected areas were remediated, and the contaminated soils were placed in an intermodal container for disposal. BSA's post-remediation walkover surveys were expanded to include a 10-foot radius around the excavated locations, and it was determined that further investigation was not required for these areas (BNL 2011 f and g). The post-remediation soil samples were collected and analyzed with onsite gamma spectroscopy equipment. These samples were also included with the FSS s

  14. PreparationSampleGuide:StartQuickISX Sample Preparation Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    straining the sample through a 70 micron nylon mesh strainer. If sample aggregation is a problem, we suggest

  15. SYNOPTIC MAPPING OF CHROMOSPHERIC MAGNETIC FLUX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, C. L. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Harvey, J. W.; Pietarila, A., E-mail: cljin@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: jharvey@nso.edu, E-mail: apietarila@nso.edu [National Solar Observatory, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We used daily full-disk Ca II 854.2 nm magnetograms from the Synoptic Optical Long Term Investigations of the Sun (SOLIS) facility to study the chromospheric magnetic field from 2006 April through 2009 November. We determined and corrected previously unidentified zero offsets in the SOLIS magnetograms. By tracking the disk passages of stable unipolar regions, the measured net flux densities were found to systematically decrease from the disk center to the limb by a factor of about two. This decrease was modeled using a thin flux tube model with a difference in signal formation height between the center and limb sides. Comparison of photospheric and chromospheric observations shows that their differences are largely due to horizontal spreading of magnetic flux with increasing height. The north polar magnetic field decreased nearly linearly with time during our study period while the south polar field was nearly constant. We used the annual change in the viewing angle of the polar regions to estimate the radial and meridional components of the polar fields and found that the south polar fields were tilted away from the pole. Synoptic maps of the chromospheric radial flux density distribution were used as boundary conditions for extrapolation of the field from the chromosphere into the corona. A comparison of modeled and observed coronal hole boundaries and coronal streamer positions showed better agreement when using the chromospheric rather than the photospheric synoptic maps.

  16. EUV mirror based absolute incident flux detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berger, Kurt W.

    2004-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for the in-situ monitoring of EUV radiation flux includes an integrated reflective multilayer stack. This device operates on the principle that a finite amount of in-band EUV radiation is transmitted through the entire multilayer stack. This device offers improvements over existing vacuum photo-detector devices since its calibration does not change with surface contamination.

  17. Energies of Quantum QED Flux Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H Weigel

    2006-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk I present recent studies on vacuum polarization energies and energy densities induced by QED flux tubes. I focus on comparing three and four dimensional scenarios and the discussion of various approximation schemes in view of the exact treatment.

  18. Flux tubes in the SU(3) vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario S. Cardaci; Paolo Cea; Leonardo Cosmai; Rossella Falcone; Alessandro Papa

    2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the distribution of the chromoelectric field generated by a static quark-antiquark pair in the SU(3) vacuum. We find that the transverse profile of the flux tube resembles the dual version of the Abrikosov vortex field distribution and give an estimate of the London penetration length in the confined vacuum.

  19. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    1 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY'S HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR Compiled by S. M. Shapiro I. PICTORIAL with fiberglass insulation and a protective aluminum skin. The reactor vessel is shaped somewhat like a very large at the spherical end. It is located at the center of the reactor building and is surrounded by a lead and steel

  20. Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheludev, Nikolay

    Flux Exclusion Superconducting Quantum Metamaterial: Towards Quantum-level Switching V. Savinov1, they require extremely high levels of nanofabrication. Here we introduce a new quantum superconducting properties of the mac- roscopic quantum state of superconducting carriers1 , and essentially plasmonic nature

  1. ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments?

  2. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  3. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E. (Newport News, VA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  4. Predicting decadal trends and transient responses of radiocarbon storage and fluxes in a temperate forest soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sierra, C. A; Trumbore, S. E; Davidson, E. A; Frey, S. D; Savage, K. E; Hopkins, F. M

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon cycling in a temperate forest: radiocarbon-based es- timates of residence times, sequestration

  5. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, E.D.

    1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

  6. Fluid sampling system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

  7. Hanford Site background: Part 1, Soil background for nonradioactive analytes. Revision 1, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The determination of soil background is one of the most important activities supporting environmental restoration and waste management on the Hanford Site. Background compositions serve as the basis for identifying soil contamination, and also as a baseline in risk assessment processes used to determine soil cleanup and treatment levels. These uses of soil background require an understanding of the extent to which analytes of concern occur naturally in the soils. This report documents the results of sampling and analysis activities designed to characterize the composition of soil background at the Hanford Site, and to evaluate the feasibility for use as Sitewide background. The compositions of naturally occurring soils in the vadose Zone have been-determined for-nonradioactive inorganic and organic analytes and related physical properties. These results confirm that a Sitewide approach to the characterization of soil background is technically sound and is a viable alternative to the determination and use of numerous local or area backgrounds that yield inconsistent definitions of contamination. Sitewide soil background consists of several types of data and is appropriate for use in identifying contamination in all soils in the vadose zone on the Hanford Site. The natural concentrations of nearly every inorganic analyte extend to levels that exceed calculated health-based cleanup limits. The levels of most inorganic analytes, however, are well below these health-based limits. The highest measured background concentrations occur in three volumetrically minor soil types, the most important of which are topsoils adjacent to the Columbia River that are rich in organic carbon. No organic analyte levels above detection were found in any of the soil samples.

  8. Immobilization of uranium in contaminated soil by natural apatite addition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrdakovic Popic, Jelena; Stojanovic, Mirjana; Milosevic, Sinisa; Iles, Deana; Zildzovic, Snezana [Institute for Technology of Nuclear and other Mineral Raw Materials, Franche d' Epere 86, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Available in abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The goal of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of Serbian natural mineral apatite as soil additive for reducing the migration of uranium from contaminated sediments. In laboratory study we investigated the sorption properties of domestic apatite upon different experimental conditions, such as pH, adsorbent mass, reaction period, concentration of P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite, solid/liquid ratio. In second part of study, we did the quantification of uranium in soil samples, taken from uranium mine site 'Kalna', by sequential extraction method. The same procedure was, also, used for uranium determination in contaminated soil samples after apatite addition, in order to determine the changes in U distribution in soil fraction. The obtained results showed the significant level of immobilization (96.7%) upon certain conditions. Increase of %P{sub 2}O{sub 5} in apatite and process of mechano-chemical activation led to increase of immobilization capacity from 17.50% till 91.64%. The best results for uranium binding were obtained at pH 5.5 and reaction period 60 days (98.04%) The sequential extraction showed the presence of uranium (48.2%) in potentially available soil fractions, but with the apatite addition uranium content in these fractions decreased (30.64%), what is considering environmental aspect significant fact. In situ immobilization of radionuclide using inexpensive sequestering agents, such as apatite, is very adequate for big contaminated areas of soil with low level of contamination. This investigation study on natural apatite from deposit 'Lisina' Serbia was the first one of this type in our country. Key words: apatite, uranium, immobilization, soil, contamination. (authors)

  9. Viscous sludge sample collector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beitel, George A [Richland, WA

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vertical core sample collection system for viscous sludge. A sample tube's upper end has a flange and is attached to a piston. The tube and piston are located in the upper end of a bore in a housing. The bore's lower end leads outside the housing and has an inwardly extending rim. Compressed gas, from a storage cylinder, is quickly introduced into the bore's upper end to rapidly accelerate the piston and tube down the bore. The lower end of the tube has a high sludge entering velocity to obtain a full-length sludge sample without disturbing strata detail. The tube's downward motion is stopped when its upper end flange impacts against the bore's lower end inwardly extending rim.

  10. Experimental Scattershot Boson Sampling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco Bentivegna; Nicolò Spagnolo; Chiara Vitelli; Fulvio Flamini; Niko Viggianiello; Ludovico Latmiral; Paolo Mataloni; Daniel J. Brod; Ernesto F. Galvão; Andrea Crespi; Roberta Ramponi; Roberto Osellame; Fabio Sciarrino

    2015-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Boson Sampling is a computational task strongly believed to be hard for classical computers, but efficiently solvable by orchestrated bosonic interference in a specialised quantum computer. Current experimental schemes, however, are still insufficient for a convincing demonstration of the advantage of quantum over classical computation. A new variation of this task, Scattershot Boson Sampling, leads to an exponential increase in speed of the quantum device, using a larger number of photon sources based on parametric downconversion. This is achieved by having multiple heralded single photons being sent, shot by shot, into different random input ports of the interferometer. Here we report the first Scattershot Boson Sampling experiments, where six different photon-pair sources are coupled to integrated photonic circuits. We employ recently proposed statistical tools to analyse our experimental data, providing strong evidence that our photonic quantum simulator works as expected. This approach represents an important leap toward a convincing experimental demonstration of the quantum computational supremacy.

  11. The effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on the critical heat flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todreas, Neil E.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A systematic experimental and analytic investigation of the effect of nonuniform axial heat flux distribution on critical heat rilux was performed with water in the quality condition. Utilizing a model which ascribes the ...

  12. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  13. A dual-pass variational data assimilation framework for estimating soil moisture profiles from AMSR-E microwave

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    influences the partitioning of surface available energy into sensible and latent heat fluxes and henceA dual-pass variational data assimilation framework for estimating soil moisture profiles from AMSR, we have designed a dual-pass assimilation (DP-En4DVar) framework to optimize the model state

  14. Electrochemical Processes for In-Situ Treatment of Contaminated Soils - Final Report - 09/15/1996 - 01/31/2001

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Chin-Pao

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will study electrochemical processes for the in situ treatment of soils contaminated by mixed wastes, i.e., organic and inorganic. Soil samples collected form selected DOE waste sites will be characterized for specific organic and metal contaminants and hydraulic permeability. The soil samples are then subject to desorption experiments under various physical-chemical conditions such as pH and the presence of surfactants. Batch electro-osmosis experiments will be conducted to study the transport of contaminants in the soil-water systems. Organic contaminants that are released from the soil substrate will be treated by an advanced oxidation process, i.e., electron-Fantan. Finally, laboratory reactor integrating the elector-osmosis and elector-Fantan processes will be used to study the treatment of contaminated soil in situ.

  15. Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Case Study Compacted Soil Liner Interface Strength Importance Timothy D. Stark, F.ASCE1 ; Hangseok interface is not the geomembrane (GM)/compacted low-permeability soil liner (LPSL) but a soil­soil interface placing the cover soil from bottom to top. DOI: 10.1061/(ASCE)GT.1943-5606 .0000556. © 2012 American

  16. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist Tifton campus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Cotton Physiologist ­ Tifton campus Committee Membership Dr. Stanley Culpepper - committee chair Dr. John Beasley Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia-SE District University

  17. In-situ vitrification of soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brouns, Richard A. (Kennewick, WA); Buelt, James L. (Richland, WA); Bonner, William F. (Richland, WA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

  18. CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    CROP & SOIL SCIENCES Water Policy and Management Committee Membership Dr. David Radcliffe - committee chair Dr. George Vellidis Department of Crop & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences & Soil Sciences Department of Crop & Soil Sciences University of Georgia University of Georgia Stripling

  19. Adaptive Sampling approach to environmental site characterization: Phase 1 demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floran, R.J.; Bujewski, G.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, R.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technology demonstration that optimizes sampling strategies and real-time data collection was carried out at the Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB) RB-11 Radioactive Burial Site, Albuquerque, New Mexico in August 1994. The project, which was funded by the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP), involved the application of a geostatistical-based Adaptive Sampling methodology and software with on-site field screening of soils for radiation, organic compounds and metals. The software, known as Plume{trademark}, was developed at Argonne National Laboratory as part of the DOE/OTD-funded Mixed Waste Landfill Integrated Demonstration (MWLID). The objective of the investigation was to compare an innovative Adaptive Sampling approach that stressed real-time decision-making with a conventional RCRA-driven site characterization carried out by the Air Force. The latter investigation used a standard drilling and sampling plan as mandated by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). To make the comparison realistic, the same contractors and sampling equipment (Geoprobe{reg_sign} soil samplers) were used. In both investigations, soil samples were collected at several depths at numerous locations adjacent to burial trenches that contain low-level radioactive waste and animal carcasses; some trenches may also contain mixed waste. Neither study revealed the presence of contaminants appreciably above risk based action levels, indicating that minimal to no migration has occurred away from the trenches. The combination of Adaptive Sampling with field screening achieved a similar level of confidence compared to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) investigation regarding the potential migration of contaminants at the site.

  20. Environmental Science: Sample Pathway

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Bennett

    Environmental Science: Sample Pathway Semester I Semester II Freshman Year CGS Core CGS Core GE 100 & 124) MA 115 Statistics Summer Environmental Internship Junior Year CH 171 Chem for Health Sciences CH in Environmental Sciences is 17 courses. Courses taken to satisfy CAS major requirements (required, principal, core

  1. Tolerance of spring wheat to a salt-fluxing residue containing potassium and magnesium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahler, R.L.; Menser, H.A.; Lutcher, L.K.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field and greenhouse studies were conducted in Idaho in 1985 to document the maximum levels of a salt fluxing residue (slag) material that can be safely applied to agricultural soils without reducing spring wheat (Triticum aestivum) growth. The slag material, which contains significant quantities of Mg and K, was applied to Mission (coarse-silty, mixed, frigid Andic Fragiochrepts) and Palouse (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxerolls) silt loam soils at rates ranging from 0 to 40,000 kg/ha. Parameters evaluated included: (1) germination, (2) plant vigor, (3) yield, and (4) soil and plant tissue K, Ca and Mg. Under field conditions slag application rates of 4000 and 8000 kg/ha reduced wheat stands and vigor; however, yields were not adversely affected when compared with the control. Application rates in excess of 8000 kg/ha resulted in reduced germination, plant vigor, and yield and are consequently not recommended. Greenhouse studies provided further evidence to substantiate the field results.

  2. Atmospheric State, Cloud Microphysics and Radiative Flux

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Mace, Gerald

    Atmospheric thermodynamics, cloud properties, radiative fluxes and radiative heating rates for the ARM Southern Great Plains (SGP) site. The data represent a characterization of the physical state of the atmospheric column compiled on a five-minute temporal and 90m vertical grid. Sources for this information include raw measurements, cloud property and radiative retrievals, retrievals and derived variables from other third-party sources, and radiative calculations using the derived quantities.

  3. ARM - PI Product - Radiative Flux Analysis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheatProductsISDACProductsRadiative Flux Analysis ARM

  4. Soil structure interaction for shrink-swell soils a new design procedure for foundation slabs on shrink-swell soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelmalak, Remon Melek

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    diffusion soil volume change model starts with proposing a new laboratory test to determine the coefficient of unsaturated diffusivity for intact soils. Then, it introduces the development of a cracked soil diffusion factor, provides a chart for it...

  5. Plant and Soil VIII, no. 3 March 1957 PROBLEMS OF SOIL TESTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Plant and Soil VIII, no. 3 March 1957 PROBLEMS OF SOIL TESTING ON CALCAREOUS SOILS by DAN H. YAALON The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel Chemically and mineralogically the soils of arid and semiarid of limestone, most of the soils are calcareous. Extensive leaching may have removed the CaCO3 from the soil

  6. Original article Soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest: dependence on soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Soil CO2 efflux in a beech forest: dependence on soil temperature and soil water 1998) Abstract - Our objective was to quantify the annual soil carbon efflux in a young beech forest in north-eastern France (Hesse Forest, Euroflux site FR02) from measurements of soil CO, efflux. Soil CO

  7. Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management -Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omiecinski, Curtis

    Recommended Academic Plan for the Environmental Resource Management - Soil Science Option (E R M/SOIL of Calculus I or MATH 140* (GQ) Calculus With Analytic Geometry I 4 SOILS 101 (GN) Introductory Soil Science 3 AG 150S (First-Year Seminar) Be a Master Student! 2 SOILS 102 Introductory Soil Science Laboratory 1

  8. Visual Sample Plan Version 7.0 User's Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matzke, Brett D.; Newburn, Lisa LN; Hathaway, John E.; Bramer, Lisa M.; Wilson, John E.; Dowson, Scott T.; Sego, Landon H.; Pulsipher, Brent A.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    User's guide for VSP 7.0 This user's guide describes Visual Sample Plan (VSP) Version 7.0 and provides instructions for using the software. VSP selects the appropriate number and location of environmental samples to ensure that the results of statistical tests performed to provide input to risk decisions have the required confidence and performance. VSP Version 7.0 provides sample-size equations or algorithms needed by specific statistical tests appropriate for specific environmental sampling objectives. It also provides data quality assessment and statistical analysis functions to support evaluation of the data and determine whether the data support decisions regarding sites suspected of contamination. The easy-to-use program is highly visual and graphic. VSP runs on personal computers with Microsoft Windows operating systems (XP, Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8). Designed primarily for project managers and users without expertise in statistics, VSP is applicable to two- and three-dimensional populations to be sampled (e.g., rooms and buildings, surface soil, a defined layer of subsurface soil, water bodies, and other similar applications) for studies of environmental quality. VSP is also applicable for designing sampling plans for assessing chem/rad/bio threat and hazard identification within rooms and buildings, and for designing geophysical surveys for unexploded ordnance (UXO) identification.

  9. Application of an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay for the Analysis of Paraquat in Human-Exposure Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    into plant root systems because it is quickly and strongly adsorbed to clay and soil organic matter (Tucker methods for detection of paraquat in water, food, and biological samples are based either

  10. Surface Magnetic Flux Maintenance In Quiet Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Iida

    2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate surface processes of magnetic patches, namely merging, splitting, emergence, and cancellation, by using an auto-detection technique. We find that merging and splitting are locally predominant in the surface level, while the frequencies of the other two are less by one or two orders of magnitude. The frequency dependences on flux con- tent of surface processes are further investigated. Based on these observations, we discuss a possible whole picture of the maintenance. Our conclusion is that the photospheric magnetic field structure, especially its power-law nature, is maintained by the processes locally in the surface not by the interactions between different altitudes. We suggest a scenario of the flux maintenance as follows: The splitting and merging play a crucial role for the generation of the power-law distribution, not the emergence nor cancellation do. This power-law distribution results in another power-law one of the cancellation with an idea of the random convective transport. The cancellation and emergence have a common value for the power-law indices in their frequency distributions, which may suggest a "recycle of fluxes by submergence and re-emergence".

  11. Coupling spin ensembles via superconducting flux qubits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yueyin Qiu; Wei Xiong; Lin Tian; J. Q. You

    2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a hybrid quantum system consisting of spin ensembles and superconducting flux qubits, where each spin ensemble is realized using the nitrogen-vacancy centers in a diamond crystal and the nearest-neighbor spin ensembles are effectively coupled via a flux qubit.We show that the coupling strengths between flux qubits and spin ensembles can reach the strong and even ultrastrong coupling regimes by either engineering the hybrid structure in advance or tuning the excitation frequencies of spin ensembles via external magnetic fields. When extending the hybrid structure to an array with equal coupling strengths, we find that in the strong-coupling regime, the hybrid array is reduced to a tight-binding model of a one-dimensional bosonic lattice. In the ultrastrong-coupling regime, it exhibits quasiparticle excitations separated from the ground state by an energy gap. Moreover, these quasiparticle excitations and the ground state are stable under a certain condition that is tunable via the external magnetic field. This may provide an experimentally accessible method to probe the instability of the system.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLING AND ANALYSIS - GETTING IT RIGHT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CONNELL CW

    2008-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State was established in the 1940s as part of the Manhattan Project. Hanford's role was to produce weapons-grade nuclear material for defense, and by 1989, when the Site's mission changed from operations to cleanup, Hanford had produced more than 60 percent of the nation's plutonium. The legacy of Hanford's production years is enormous in terms of nuclear and hazardous waste, especially the 270 billion gallons of contaminated groundwater and the 5 million cubic yards of contaminated soil. Managing the contaminated soil and groundwater are particularly important because the Columbia River, the lifeblood of the northwest and the nation's eighth largest river, bounds the Site. Fluor Hanford's Soil & Groundwater Remediation Project (S&GRP) integrates all of the activities that deal with remediating and monitoring the groundwater across the Site. The S&GRP uses a detailed series of steps to record, track, and verify information. The Sample and Data Management (SDM) Process consists of 10 integrated steps that start with the data quality objectives process that establishes the mechanism for collecting the right information with the right people. The process ends with data quality assessment, which is used to ensure that all quantitative data (e.g., field screening, fixed laboratory) are the right type, and of adequate quality to support the decision-making process. Steps 3 through 10 of the process are production steps and are integrated electronically. The detailed plans, procedures, and systems used day-to-day by the SDM process require a high degree of accuracy and reliability. Tools must be incorporated into the processes that minimize errors. This paper discusses all of the elements of the SDM process in detail.

  13. High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark | ornl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Flux Isotope Reactor named Nuclear Historic Landmark The High Flux Isotope Reactor vessel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory resides in a pool of water illuminated by the blue...

  14. Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rachid, Caio T. C. C.; Balieiro, Fabiano C.; Fonseca, Eduardo S.; Peixoto, Raquel Silva; Chaer, Guilherme M.; Tiedje, James M.; Rosado, Alexandre S.

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Fungi are ubiquitous and important contributors to soil nutrient cycling, playing a vital role in C, N and P turnover, with many fungi having direct beneficial relationships with plants. However, the factors that modulate the soil fungal community are poorly understood. We studied the degree to which the composition of tree species affected the soil fungal community structure and diversity by pyrosequencing the 28S rRNA gene in soil DNA. We were also interested in whether intercropping (mixed plantation of two plant species) could be used to select fungal species. More than 50,000 high quality sequences were analyzed from three treatments:more »monoculture of Eucalyptus; monoculture of Acacia mangium; and a mixed plantation with both species sampled 2 and 3 years after planting. We found that the plant type had a major effect on the soil fungal community structure, with 75% of the sequences from the Eucalyptus soil belonging to Basidiomycota and 19% to Ascomycota, and the Acacia soil having a sequence distribution of 28% and 62%, respectively. The intercropping of Acacia mangium in a Eucalyptus plantation significantly increased the number of fungal genera and the diversity indices and introduced or increased the frequency of several genera that were not found in the monoculture cultivation samples. Our results suggest that management of soil fungi is possible by manipulating the composition of the plant community, and intercropped systems can be a means to achieve that.« less

  15. Collection Policy: Crop and Soil Sciences Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angenent, Lars T.

    silage utilization by dairy cows o Phytoremediation of heavy metal and radionuclide contaminated soils/environmental biophysics related to soil quality and fertility o Mechanisms by which soil minerals can decompose or modify

  16. Soil Conservation Districts Law (North Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter aims to provide for the conservation of the soil and soil resources of this state and for the control and prevention of soil erosion, and to preserve the state's natural resources,...

  17. Soil stabilization properties of flexible intruders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luginbuhl, Katharine

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many locations, soil is held in place by the roots of plants. When these plants are removed or die, the soil loses its cohesive strength and erodes away. We seek to create artificial soil stabilizers that use the same ...

  18. Temperture and composition dependence of the high flux plasma sputtering yield of Cu-Li binary alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauss, A.R.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Gruen, D.M.; Conn, R.W.; Goebel, D.M.; Hirooka, Y.; Leung, W.K.; Bohdansky, J.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High flux deuterium plasma sputtering and ion beam experiments have been performed on Cu-Li alloys to determine if the reduction in copper erosion previously predicted and observed in low flux ion beam experiments occurs at particle fluxes representative of an RFP first wall or tokamak limiter. Partial sputtering yields of the copper and lithium components have been measured as a function of alloy composition and sample temperature using optical plasma emission spectroscopy, weight loss and catcher foil techniques. It is found that the lithium sputtering yield increases with increasing sample temperature while the copper yield decreases by as much as two orders of magnitude. The temperature required to obtain the reduction in copper erosion is found to be a function of bulk lithium concentration. Consequences of these experimental results for anticipated erosion/redeposition properties are calculated, and the Cu-Li alloy in found to compare favorably with conventional low-Z materials.

  19. Characterization of sampling cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Murray Edward

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Farland, who' provided an excellent opportunity for the enhancement of my engineering career. To Dr. Best for his patient snd competent assistance in this project. To Dr. Parish who gave his service to my graduate committee. To Bob DeOtte and Carlos Ortiz... in air sampling standards, several different samplers have been developed which utilize either inertial impaction or cyclonic flow fractionation techniques. For example, a 10 pm cutpoint size selective inlet was developed by McFarland, Ortiz...

  20. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Furth, Harold P. (Princeton, NJ); Janos, Alan C. (East Windsor, NJ); Uyama, Tadao (Osaka, JP); Yamada, Masaaki (Lawrenceville, NJ)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  1. Post-Award Deliverables Sample (Second Part of Sample Deliverables...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    samplereptgrqmts.doc More Documents & Publications ESPC Sample Deliverables for Task Orders (IDIQ Attachment. J-4) Sample Statement of Work - Standard Service Offerings for...

  2. Microbial Carbon Cycling in Permafrost-Affected Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vishnivetskaya, T. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liebner, Susanne [University of Tromso, Norway; Wilhelm, Ronald [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec; Wagner, Dirk [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Potsdam, Germany

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arctic plays a key role in Earth s climate system as global warming is predicted to be most pronounced at high latitudes and because one third of the global carbon pool is stored in ecosystems of the northern latitudes. In order to improve our understanding of the present and future carbon dynamics in climate sensitive permafrost ecosystems, present studies concentrate on investigations of microbial controls of greenhouse gas fluxes, on the activity and structure of the involved microbial communities, and on their response to changing environmental conditions. Permafrost-affected soils can function as both a source and a sink for carbon dioxide and methane. Under anaerobic conditions, caused by flooding of the active layer and the effect of backwater above the permafrost table, the mineralization of organic matter can only be realized stepwise by specialized microorganisms. Important intermediates of the organic matter decomposition are hydrogen, carbon dioxide and acetate, which can be further reduced to methane by methanogenic archaea. Evolution of methane fluxes across the subsurface/atmosphere boundary will thereby strongly depend on the activity of anaerobic methanogenic archaea and obligately aerobic methane oxidizing proteobacteria, which are known to be abundant and to significantly reduce methane emissions in permafrost-affected soils. Therefore current studies on methane-cycling microorganisms are the object of particular attention in permafrost studies, because of their key role in the Arctic methane cycle and consequently of their significance for the global methane budget.

  3. The response of soil CO2 ux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    The response of soil CO2 ¯ux to changes in atmospheric CO2, nitrogen supply and plant diversity J O. Paul, MN 55108 USA Abstract We measured soil CO2 ¯ux over 19 sampling periods that spanned two growing three major anthropogenic global changes: atmos- pheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration, nitrogen (N

  4. Cs deposition and vertical migration in soils from Argentina J. Juri Ayub, M. Rizzotto, J. Toso, H. Velasco

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    1 137 Cs deposition and vertical migration in soils from Argentina J. Juri Ayub, M. Rizzotto, J), Universidad Nacional de San Luis. CONICET. Ejército de los Andes 950, 5700 San Luis, Argentina Abstract. Vertical migration of 137 Cs global fallout was studied in soils from Argentina. The sampling area

  5. Soil stabilization using oil-shale solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turner, J.P. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Civil and Archeological Engineering)

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil-shale solid wastes are evaluated for use as soil stabilizers. A laboratory study consisted of the following tests on compacted samples of soil treated with water and spent oil shale: unconfined compressive strength, moisture-density relationships, wet-dry and freeze-thaw durability, and resilient modulus. Significant increases in strength, durability, and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a silty sand with combusted western oil shale. Moderate increases in durability and resilient modulus were obtained by treating a highly plastic clay with combusted western oil shale. Solid waste from eastern oil shale appears to be feasible for soil stabilization only if limestone is added during combustion. Testing methods, results, and recommendations for mix design of spent shale-stabilized pavement subgrades are presented and the mechanisms of spent-shale cementation are discussed.

  6. Bioavailability of freshly added and aged naphthalene in soils under gastric pH conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Z.; Simkins, S.; Xing, B.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bioavailability of hydrophobic organic chemicals decreases with aging in soil because of sequestration. However, assessments of the risk of exposure to contaminated soils are usually dependent on either chemical concentrations, which are measured using vigorous extraction methods, or models that assume an equilibrium without considering the actual conditions. The objective of this research was to determine the availability and desorption kinetics of freshly added and aged naphthalene from a peat and a mineral soil; naphthalene was desorbed into solutions with pH levels that approximate those found in different gastric regions. Soil and peat samples were spiked with radiolabeled and unlabeled naphthalene at 2 and 20 {micro}g/g and were aged from 0 to 135 d. Desorption kinetics were determined using a simulated stomach solution and a neutral solution that represented the pH of intestinal conditions and most soils. Peat sorbed much more naphthalene than did soil, and it allowed little desorption. Though both acidic and neutral extracting solutions could desorb naphthalene, little apparent effect of aging was observed in peat, whereas desorption from soil declined markedly with aging. In addition, the percentage of naphthalene that desorbed from soil was greater for the higher incubation concentration. The desorption of naphthalene from the peat and soil was higher into the neutral solution than into the gastric solution. These results suggest that aging, exposure conditions, concentration effect, and organic matter content should be taken into account in predictive models and risk assessments.

  7. Decoupled Sampling for Graphics Pipelines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ragan-Kelley, Jonathan Millar

    We propose a generalized approach to decoupling shading from visibility sampling in graphics pipelines, which we call decoupled sampling. Decoupled sampling enables stochastic supersampling of motion and defocus blur at ...

  8. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, David R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis.

  9. Fluid sampling apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeamans, D.R.

    1998-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporation of a bellows in a sampling syringe eliminates ingress of contaminants, permits replication of amounts and compression of multiple sample injections, and enables remote sampling for off-site analysis. 3 figs.

  10. tice sites of calcium carbonate and affect Mars' soil geochemistry, and calcium carbonate can

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kounaves, Samuel P.

    tice sites of calcium carbonate and affect Mars' soil geochemistry, and calcium carbonate can sample. 18. Estimation of the concentration of calcium carbonate in the sample is uncertain because qualification model (17). Other carbonates have decomposition temperatures that are lower than that of calcite

  11. The Severity of Smouldering Peat Fires and Damage to the Forest Soil 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rein, Guillermo; Cleaver, Natalie; Ashton, Clare; Pironi, Paolo; Torero, Jose L

    and the large loss of soil mass but poorly documented in the literature. A series of smouldering experiments with boreal peat have been conducted under laboratory conditions to quantify these effects using small-scale samples. Peat samples of 100 mm by 100 mm...

  12. Development of a combined soil-wash/in-furnace vitrification system for soil remediation at DOE sites. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pegg, I.L.; Guo, Y.; Lahoda, E.J.; Lai, Shan-Tao; Muller, I.S.; Ruller, J. [GTS Duratek, Columbia, MD (United States); Grant, D.C. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Science and Technology Center

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses research and development of technologies for treatment of radioactive and hazardous waste streams at DOE sites. Weldon Spring raffinate sludges were used in a direct vitrification study to investigate their use as fluxing agents in glass formulations when blended with site soil. Storm sewer sediments from the Oak Ridge, TN, Y-12 facility were used for soil washing followed by vitrification of the concentrates. Both waste streams were extensively characterized. Testing showed that both mercury and uranium could be removed from the Y-12 soil by chemical extraction resulting in an 80% volume reduction. Thermal desorption was used on the contaminant-enriched minority fraction to separate the mercury from the uranium. Vitrification tests demonstrated that high waste loading glasses could be produced from the radioactive stream and from the Weldon Spring wastes which showed very good leach resistance, and viscosities and electrical conductivities in the range suitable for joule-heated ceramic melter (JHCM) processing. The conceptual process described combines soil washing, thermal desorption, and vitrification to produce clean soil (about 90% of the input waste stream), non-radioactive mercury, and a glass wasteform; the estimated processing costs for that system are about $260--$400/yd{sup 3}. Results from continuous melter tests performed using Duratek`s advanced JHCM (Duramelter) system are also presented. Since life cycle cost estimates are driven largely by volume reduction considerations, the large volume reductions possible with these multi-technology, blended waste stream approaches can produce a more leach resistant wasteform at a lower overall cost than alternative technologies such as cementation.

  13. AmeriFlux Network Data from the ORNL AmeriFlux Website

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The AmeriFlux network was established in 1996 to provide continuous observations of ecosystem level exchanges of CO2, water, energy and momentum spanning diurnal, synoptic, seasonal, and interannual time scales. It is fed by sites from North America, Central America, and South America. DOE's CDIAC stores and maintains AmeriFlux data, and this web site explains the different levels of data available there, with links to the CDIAC ftp site. A separate web-based data interface is also provided; it allows users to graph, query, and download Level 2 data for up to four sites at a time. Data may be queried by site, measurement period, or parameter. More than 550 site-years of level 2 data are available from AmeriFlux sites through the interface.

  14. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology, possibly one under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID), will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in January 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here. A second sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL in August 2011 for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are also reported here.

  15. Germanium-76 Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, and the first one gram sample was received from the supplier for analysis on April 24, 2011. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility, a DOE user facility at PNNL, was used to make the required isotopic and chemical purity measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR. The results of this first analysis are reported here.

  16. Stack sampling apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lind, Randall F; Lloyd, Peter D; Love, Lonnie J; Noakes, Mark W; Pin, Francois G; Richardson, Bradley S; Rowe, John C

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for obtaining samples from a structure includes a support member, at least one stabilizing member, and at least one moveable member. The stabilizing member has a first portion coupled to the support member and a second portion configured to engage with the structure to restrict relative movement between the support member and the structure. The stabilizing member is radially expandable from a first configuration where the second portion does not engage with a surface of the structure to a second configuration where the second portion engages with the surface of the structure.

  17. Draft Sample Collection Instrument

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197E T ADRAFTJanuaryDominionDowDepartmentPublic5 5Sample

  18. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7 AugustAFRICAN3u ;;;::Sampling at the Sherwood,

  19. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the

  20. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at the4

  1. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling at

  2. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,Sampling

  3. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTuba

  4. September 2004 Water Sampling

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTuba City, Arizona, DisposalFourthN V O 1CentralGroundwater,SamplingTubaand

  5. Soil and plant responses from land application of saline-sodic waters: Implications of management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, G.F.; King, L.A.; Ganjegunte, G.K. [University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Department for Renewable Resources

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Land application of co-produced waters from coalbed natural gas (CBNG) wells is one management option used in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana. Unfortunately the co-produced CBNG waters may be saline and/or sodic. The objective of this study was to examine the effects of irrigation with CBNG waters on soils and plants in the PRB. Soil properties and vegetation responses resulting from 1 to 4 yr of saline sodic water (electrical conductivity (EC) 1.6-4.8 dS m{sup -1} sodium adsorption ratio (SAR), 17-57 mmol L- applications were studied during 2003 and 2004 field seasons on sites (Ustic Torriorthent Haplocambid, Haplargid and Paleargid) representing native range grasslands seeded grass hayfields and alfalfa hayfields. Parameters measured from each irrigated site were compared directly with representative non-irrigated sites. Soil chemical and physical parameters including pH, EC, SAR, exchangeable sodium percent, texture, bulk density, infiltration and Darcy flux rates, were measured at various depth intervals to 120 cm. Mulitple-year applications of saline sodic water produced consistent trends of increased soil EC AND SAR values to depths of 30 cm reduced surface infiltration rates and lowered Darcy flux rates to 120 cm. Significant differences (p {le} 0.05) were determined between irrigated and non-irrigated areas for EC, SAR infiltration rates and Darcy flux (p {le} 0.10) at most sites. Saline sodic CBNG water applications significantly increased native perennial grass biomass production and cover on irrigated as compared with non-irrigated sites; however overall species evenness decreased. Biological effects were variable and complex reflecting site-specific conditions and water and soil management strategies.

  6. Micromorphology and Stable Isotope Geochemistry of Historical Pedogenic Siderite Formed in PAH-Contaminated Alluvial Clay Soils, Tennessee, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Driese, S.G.; Ludvigson, Greg A.; Roberts, Jennifer A.; Fowle, David A.; Gonzalez, Luis A.; Smith, Jon Jay; Vulava, V.M.; McKay, L.D.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Alluvial clay soil samples from six boreholes advanced to depths of 400–450 cm (top of limestone bedrock) from the Chattanooga Coke Plant (CCP) site were examined micromorphologically and geochemically in order to determine if pedogenic siderite (Fe...

  7. SU(2) Flux Distributions on Finite Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng, Y; Peng, Yingcai; Haymaker, Richard W.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied SU(2) flux distributions on four dimensional euclidean lattices with one dimension very large. By choosing the time direction appropriately we can study physics in two cases: one is finite volume in the zero temperature limit, another is finite temperature in the the intermediate to large volume limit. We found that for cases of beta > beta crit there is no intrinsic string formation. Our lattices with beta > beta crit belong to intermediate volume region, and the string tension in this region is due to finite volume effects. In large volumes we found evidence for intrinsic string formation.

  8. Semiconducting glasses with flux pinning inclusions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, William L. (Pasadena, CA); Poon, Siu-Joe (Palo Alto, CA); Duwez, Pol E. (Pasadena, CA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of amorphous superconducting glassy alloys containing 1% to 10% by volume of flux pinning crystalline inclusions have been found to have potentially useful properties as high field superconducting magnet materials. The alloys are prepared by splat cooling by the piston and anvil technique. The alloys have the composition (TM).sub.90-70 (M).sub.10-30 where TM is a transition metal selected from at least one metal of Groups IVB, VB, VIB, VIIB or VIIIB of the Periodic Table such as Nb, Mo, Ru, Zr, Ta, W or Re and M is at least one metalloid such as B, P, C, N, Si, Ge or Al.

  9. Resonant absorption in dissipative flux tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safari, H; Karami, K; Sobouti, Y

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oscillations of coronal loops are believed to be the primary cause of the solar corona heating. We study the resonant absorbtion of MHD waves in magnetized flux tubes with graded densities across the cross section of the tube. Within the approximation that resistive and viscous processes are operative in thin layers surrounding the singularities of the MHD equations, we give the full spectrum of the eigenfrequencies, damping rates, as well as, the eigenfields of the normal MHD modes of the tube. Both surface and body modes are analyzed and the contribution of each class to heating of the corona is commented on.

  10. Cosmic-ray Muon Flux In Belgrade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banjanac, R.; Dragic, A.; Jokovic, D.; Udovicic, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Puzovic, J.; Anicin, I. [Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Two identical plastic scintillator detectors, of prismatic shape (50x23x5)cm similar to NE102, were used for continuous monitoring of cosmic-ray intensity. Muon {delta}E spectra have been taken at five minute intervals, simultaneously from the detector situated on the ground level and from the second one at the depth of 25 m.w.e in the low-level underground laboratory. Sum of all the spectra for the years 2002-2004 has been used to determine the cosmic-ray muon flux at the ground level and in the underground laboratory.

  11. Contactless heat flux control with photonic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Abdallah, Philippe

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to control electric currents in solids using diodes and transistors is undoubtedly at the origin of the main developments in modern electronics which have revolutionized the daily life in the second half of 20th century. Surprisingly, until the year 2000 no thermal counterpart for such a control had been proposed. Since then, based on pioneering works on the control of phononic heat currents new devices were proposed which allow for the control of heat fluxes carried by photons rather than phonons or electrons. The goal of the present paper is to summarize the main advances achieved recently in the field of thermal energy control with photons.

  12. Flux Power Incorporated | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergyInformationOpenOpenFlux Power

  13. ARM - Field Campaign - ISDAC - Hemispheric Flux Spectroradiometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5govCampaignsFall- Hemispheric Flux

  14. Evaluation of soil washing for radiologically contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gombert, D. II

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil washing has been applied internationally to decontaminate soils due to the widespread increase in environmental awareness manifested in the United States by promulgation of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, yet we continue to lack understanding on why the technique works in one application and not in another. A soil washing process typically integrates a variety of modules, each designed to decontaminate the matrix by destroying a particular phase or segregating a particle size fraction in which the contaminants are concentrated. The more known about how the contaminants are fixed, the more likely the process will succeed. Much can be learned from bioavailability studies on heavy metals in soils. Sequential extraction experiments designed to destroy one fixation mechanism at a time can be used to determine how contaminants are bound. This knowledge provides a technical basis for designing a processing strategy to efficiently decontaminate soil while creating a minimum of secondary wastes. In this study, a soil from the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory was physically and chemically characterized, then sequentially extracted to determine if soil washing could be effectively used to remove cesium, cobalt and chromium.

  15. NID Copper Sample Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kouzes, Richard T.; Zhu, Zihua

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current focal point of the nuclear physics program at PNNL is the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR, and the follow-on Tonne-Scale experiment, a large array of ultra-low background high-purity germanium detectors, enriched in 76Ge, designed to search for zero-neutrino double-beta decay (0???). This experiment requires the use of germanium isotopically enriched in 76Ge. The DEMONSTRATOR will utilize 76Ge from Russia, but for the Tonne-Scale experiment it is hoped that an alternate technology under development at Nonlinear Ion Dynamics (NID) will be a viable, US-based, lower-cost source of separated material. Samples of separated material from NID require analysis to determine the isotopic distribution and impurities. The MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR is a DOE and NSF funded project with a major science impact. DOE is funding NID through an SBIR grant for development of their separation technology for application to the Tonne-Scale experiment. The Environmental Molecular Sciences facility (EMSL), a DOE user facility at PNNL, has the required mass spectroscopy instruments for making these isotopic measurements that are essential to the quality assurance for the MAJORANA DEMONSTRATOR and for the development of the future separation technology required for the Tonne-Scale experiment. A sample of isotopically separated copper was provided by NID to PNNL for isotopic analysis as a test of the NID technology. The results of that analysis are reported here.

  16. Sample holder with optical features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milas, Mirko; Zhu, Yimei; Rameau, Jonathan David

    2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample holder for holding a sample to be observed for research purposes, particularly in a transmission electron microscope (TEM), generally includes an external alignment part for directing a light beam in a predetermined beam direction, a sample holder body in optical communication with the external alignment part and a sample support member disposed at a distal end of the sample holder body opposite the external alignment part for holding a sample to be analyzed. The sample holder body defines an internal conduit for the light beam and the sample support member includes a light beam positioner for directing the light beam between the sample holder body and the sample held by the sample support member.

  17. Rate controlling model for bioremediation of oil contaminated soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, K.Y.; Annamali, S.N.; Hopper, J.R. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model of bio-remediation of hydrocarbons in a soil matrix has been developed to predict the rate controlling step and the remediation rate during the bioremediation of a contaminated soil. The model is based on mass transfer of oxygen and oil into the aqueous solution in the soil matrix and the biodegradation of the hydrocarbons in the aqueous solution. Monod's equation was used to describe the biodegradation rate in aqueous solution while the mass transfer equations were used to describe the mass transfer rates of oxygen and oil in the soil matrix. Results from model calculations indicate that the bio-remediation rate increases and approaches a limiting value when one of the rates becomes controlling. When the parameters of the site soil samples are measured and the solubilities of oxygen and oil in aqueous solution are obtained, the bioremediation rate can be predicted by this model. The rate controlling step of the bioremediation site may be identified quickly and steps to improve the bioremediation rate can be recommended. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Waste minimization in analytical chemistry through innovative sample preparation techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L. L.

    1998-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Because toxic solvents and other hazardous materials are commonly used in analytical methods, characterization procedures result in significant and costly amount of waste. We are developing alternative analytical methods in the radiological and organic areas to reduce the volume or form of the hazardous waste produced during sample analysis. For the radiological area, we have examined high-pressure, closed-vessel microwave digestion as a way to minimize waste from sample preparation operations. Heated solutions of strong mineral acids can be avoided for sample digestion by using the microwave approach. Because reactivity increases with pressure, we examined the use of less hazardous solvents to leach selected contaminants from soil for subsequent analysis. We demonstrated the feasibility of this approach by extracting plutonium from a NET reference material using citric and tartaric acids with microwave digestion. Analytical results were comparable to traditional digestion methods, while hazardous waste was reduced by a factor often. We also evaluated the suitability of other natural acids, determined the extraction performance on a wider variety of soil types, and examined the extraction efficiency of other contaminants. For the organic area, we examined ways to minimize the wastes associated with the determination of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in environmental samples. Conventional methods for analyzing semivolatile organic compounds are labor intensive and require copious amounts of hazardous solvents. For soil and sediment samples, we have a method to analyze PCBs that is based on microscale extraction using benign solvents (e.g., water or hexane). The extraction is performed at elevated temperatures in stainless steel cells containing the sample and solvent. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS) was used to quantitate the analytes in the isolated extract. More recently, we developed a method utilizing solid-phase microextraction (SPME) for natural water samples. In this SPME technique, a fused-silica fiber coated with a polymeric film is exposed to the sample, extraction is allowed to take place, and then the analytes are thermally desorbed for GC analysis. Unlike liquid-liquid extraction or solid-phase extraction, SPME consumes all of the extracted sample in the analysis, significantly reducing the required sample volume.

  19. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Golden, Jeffry

    2007-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacts a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.

  20. Process for the solvent extraction for the radiolysis and dehalogenation of halogenated organic compounds in soils, sludges, sediments and slurries

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mincher, Bruce J. (3705 Creekside Dr., Idaho Falls, ID 83404); Curry, Randy Dale (1104 Merrill Ct., Columbia, MO 65203); Clevenger, Thomas E. (2512 Bluff Blvd., Columbia, MO 65201); Golden, Jeffry (12612 Cedarbrook La., Laurel, MD 20708)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A process of extracting halogenated organic compounds, and particularly PCBs, from soil, sediment, slurry, sludge and dehalogenating the compounds contacting a contaminated soil sample with an extraction medium of a mixture of an alkane and a water miscible alcohol. The organic compounds dissolve in the extraction medium which is separated from the soil by passing water upwardly through the soil. The extraction medium floats to the surface of the water and is separated. Thereafter, the extraction medium containing the halogenated organic contaminants is subjected to ionizing radiation to radiolytically dehalogenate the compounds.