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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Service Water Piping Guideline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the years 1988 and 1989, EPRI organized the Service Water Working Group (SWWG) to identify and help resolve the many issues surrounding service water (SW) systems in nuclear power plants. One issue identified by the SWWG was corrosion in service water piping systems. Interest in this issue resulted in the development of several technical reports: Guidelines for the Repair/Replacement Welding of Nuclear Service Water Systems, TR-100386; Guide for the Examination of Service Water System Piping, TR-10206...

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Low temperature barrier wellbores formed using water flushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming an opening for a low temperature well is described. The method includes drilling an opening in a formation. Water is introduced into the opening to displace drilling fluid or indigenous gas in the formation adjacent to a portion of the opening. Water is produced from the opening. A low temperature fluid is applied to the opening.

McKinzie, II; John, Billy [Houston, TX; Keltner, Thomas Joseph [Spring, TX

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

3

Statistical estimation of water distribution system pipe break risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The deterioration of pipes in urban water distribution systems is of concern to water utilities throughout the world. This deterioration generally leads to pipe breaks… (more)

Yamijala, Shridhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings Addthis Project Level Medium Energy Savings $8-$12 annually Time to Complete 3 hours for a small house Overall Cost $10-$15 Insulating water pipes can save you water, energy, and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/nsj-images Insulating water pipes can save you water, energy, and money. | Photo courtesy of iStockphoto.com/nsj-images Insulating your hot water pipes reduces heat loss and can raise water temperature 2°F-4°F hotter than uninsulated pipes can deliver, allowing for a lower water temperature setting. You also won't have to wait as long for hot water when you turn on a faucet or showerhead, which helps conserve water. Paying for someone to insulate your pipes-as a project on its own-may

5

AWSWAH - the heat pipe solar water heater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An all weather heat pipe solar water heater (AWSWAH) comprising a collector of 4 m/sup 2/ (43 ft/sup 2/) and a low profile water tank of 160 liters (42 gal.) was developed. A single heat pipe consisting of 30 risers and two manifolds in the evaporator and a spiral condenser was incorporated into the AWSWAH. Condensate metering was done by synthetic fiber wicks. The AWSWAH was tested alongside two conventional solar water heaters of identical dimensions, an open loop system and a closed loop system. It was found that the AWSWAH was an average of 50% more effective than the open system in the temperature range 30-90 /sup 0/C (86-194 /sup 0/F). The closed loop system was the least efficient of the three systems.

Akyurt, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Savings Project: Insulate Hot Water Pipes for Energy Savings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the insulation done during new construction of a home, during other work on your water heater or pipes, or insulating the pipes yourself, is well worth the effort. In special...

7

Microsoft Word - S09629_Flushing2013  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply System Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Plan Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2013 LMS/RVT/S09629 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RVT/S09629 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Plan Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy AWSS Flushing Plan, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2013 Doc. No. S09629 Page i Contents Abbreviations .................................................................................................................................. ii 1.0 Introduction ............................................................................................................................1 2.0 Background ............................................................................................................................1

8

Steam bubble collapse, water hammer and piping network response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Work on steam bubble collapse, water hammer and piping network response was carried out in two closely related but distinct sections. Volume I of ,,is report details the experiments and analyses carried out in conjunction ...

Gruel, R.

9

W-320 waste retrieval sluicing system transfer line flushing volume and frequency calculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The calculations contained in this analysis document establish the technical basis for the volume, frequency, and flushing fluid to be utilized for routine Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) process line flushes. The WRSS was installed by Project W-320, Tank 241-C-106 Sluicing. The double contained pipelines being flushed have 4 inch stainless steel primary pipes. The flushes are intended to prevent hydrogen buildup in the transfer lines and to provide ALARA conditions for maintenance personnel.

Bailey, J.W.

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

W-320 waste retrieval sluicing system transfer line flushing volume and frequency calculation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The calculations contained in this analysis document establish the technical basis for the volume, frequency, and flushing fluid to be utilized for routine Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS) process line flushes. The WRSS was installed by Project W-320, Tank 24 I-C-106 Sluicing. The double contained pipelines being flushed have 4 inch stainless steel primary pipes. The flushes are intended to prevent hydrogen build up in the transfer lines and to provide ALARA conditions for maintenance personnel.

Bailey, J.W.

1997-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

11

What Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and Safe? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and Safe? What Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and Safe? March 17, 2011 - 7:30am Addthis This week, Elizabeth told you about her unfortunate experience with burst pipes this winter. These accidents always seem to happen at the most inconvenient times and can be a real mess to fix and clean up. But there are a few things you can do to prevent them-namely, check your pipes and be sure they are insulated, especially if they are located in cold areas of your home. In addition, insulating your hot water pipes can help you save money and energy on water heating. What have you done to ensure your water pipes are efficient and safe? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

12

What Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and Safe? |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and What Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and Safe? What Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and Safe? March 17, 2011 - 7:30am Addthis This week, Elizabeth told you about her unfortunate experience with burst pipes this winter. These accidents always seem to happen at the most inconvenient times and can be a real mess to fix and clean up. But there are a few things you can do to prevent them-namely, check your pipes and be sure they are insulated, especially if they are located in cold areas of your home. In addition, insulating your hot water pipes can help you save money and energy on water heating. What have you done to ensure your water pipes are efficient and safe? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

13

An Economical Decision Model for Water Pipe Replacement Using the Bayesian Theory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to the limited annual budget for pipeline replacement, the most effective and economical plan is needed to available fund. A variety of factors contribute to pipe breaks, including pipe material, diameter, outer coating, operation pressure, ... Keywords: Bayesian theory, Pipe replacement, Water supply system, Economic, Break factor

Wang Chenwan, Tianqing, Li Ridong, Wei Hongyu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Cool-down and frozen start-up behavior of a grooved water heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A grooved water heat pipe was tested to study its characteristics during the cool-down and start-up periods. The water heat pipe was cooled down from the ambient temperature to below the freezing temperature of water. During the cool-down, isothermal conditions were maintained at the evaporator and adiabatic sections until the working fluid was frozen. When water was frozen along the entire heat pipe, the heat pipe was rendered inactive. The start-up of the heat pipe from this state was investigated under several different operating conditions. The results show the existence of large temperature gradients between the evaporator and the condenser, and the moving of the melting front of the working fluid along the heat pipe. Successful start-up was achieved for some test cases using partial gravity assist. The start-up behavior depended largely on the operating conditions.

Jang, J.H.

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

The effects of an intermittent piped water network and storage practices on household water quality in Tamale, Ghana  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The United Nations Millennium Development Goals include a target to halve the number of people without access to "improved" water sources, which include piped water supply. However, an "improved" source of water does not ...

Vacs Renwick, Deborah Alexandra

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hydrodynamic design loads for the OTEC cold water pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean current and/or plant motion crossflows induce time dependent hydrodynamic loads on the OTEC cold water pipe due to vortex shedding. Design criteria were established for mean and fluctuating loads based on a review of the literature, analysis of test data acquired by SAI under a previous experimental program and an analytical extension of test results to higher Reynolds number. Baseline loads were specified for rigid cylinders in uniform flows. Modifications to the loads by current shear, stratification and cylinder motion, were investigated and final design criteria established. Limited structural response calculations were performed to demonstrate the use of the design criteria and to investigate briefly the possible structural response mode. Comparisons were made with alternate hydrodynamic loads, and recommendations were made for experimental verification.

Hove, D.; Shih, W.; Albano, E.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

What Have You Done to Ensure Your Water Pipes are Efficient and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

help you save money and energy on water heating. What have you done to ensure your water pipes are efficient and safe? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on...

18

Double Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem Specification  

SciTech Connect

The Double-Shell Tank (DST) Diluent and Flush Subsystem is intended to support Waste Feed Delivery. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem specification describes the relationship of this system with the DST System, describes the functions that must be performed by the system, and establishes the performance requirements to be applied to the design of the system. It also provides references for the requisite codes and standards. The DST Diluent and Flush Subsystem will treat the waste for a more favorable waste transfer. This will be accomplished by diluting the waste, dissolving the soluble portion of the waste, and flushing waste residuals from the transfer line. The Diluent and Flush Subsystem will consist of the following: The Diluent and Flush Station(s) where chemicals will be off-loaded, temporarily stored, mixed as necessary, heated, and metered to the delivery system; and A piping delivery system to deliver the chemicals to the appropriate valve or pump pit Associated support structures. This specification is intended to be the basis for new projects/installations. This specification is not intended to retroactively affect previously established project design criteria without specific direction by the program.

GRAVES, C.E.

2000-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

19

OTEC Advanced Composite Cold Water Pipe: Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion can exploit natural temperature gradients in the oceans to generate usable forms of energy (for example, cost-competitive baseload electricity in tropical regions such as Hawaii) free from fossil fuel consumption and global warming emissions.The No.1 acknowledged challenge of constructing an OTEC plant is the Cold Water Pipe (CWP), which draws cold water from 1000m depths up to the surface, to serve as the coolant for the OTEC Rankine cycle. For a commercial-scale plant, the CWP is on the order of 10m in diameter.This report describes work done by LMSSC developing the CWP for LM MS2 New Ventures emerging OTEC business. The work started in early 2008 deciding on the minimum-cost CWP architecture, materials, and fabrication process. In order to eliminate what in previous OTEC work had been a very large assembly/deployment risk, we took the innovative approach of building an integral CWP directly from theOTEC platform and down into the water. During the latter half of 2008, we proceeded to a successful small-scale Proof-of-Principles validation of the new fabrication process, at the Engineering Development Lab in Sunnyvale. During 2009-10, under the Cooperative Agreement with the US Dept. of Energy, we have now successfully validated key elements of the process and apparatus at a 4m diameter scale suitable for a future OTEC Pilot Plant. The validations include: (1) Assembly of sandwich core rings from pre-pultruded hollow 'planks,' holding final dimensions accurately; (2) Machine-based dispensing of overlapping strips of thick fiberglass fabric to form the lengthwise-continuous face sheets, holding accurate overlap dimensions; (3) Initial testing of the fabric architecture, showing that the overlap splices develop adequate mechanical strength (work done under a parallel US Naval Facilities Command program); and (4) Successful resin infusion/cure of 4m diameter workpieces, obtaining full wet-out and a non-discernable knitline between successive stepwise infusions.

Dr. Alan Miller; Matthew Ascari

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

20

A kinetic scheme for unsteady pressurised flows in closed water pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

he aim of this paper is to present a kinetic numerical scheme for the computations of transient pressurised flows in closed water pipes. Firstly, we detail the mathematical model written as a conservative hyperbolic partial differentiel system of equations, and the we recall how to obtain the corresponding kinetic formulation. Then we build the kinetic scheme ensuring an upwinding of the source term due to the topography performed in a close manner described by Perthame et al. using an energetic balance at microscopic level for the Shallow Water equations. The validation is lastly performed in the case of a water hammer in a uniform pipe: we compare the numerical results provided by an industrial code used at EDF-CIH (France), which solves the Allievi equation (the commonly used equation for pressurised flows in pipes) by the method of characteristics, with those of the kinetic scheme. It appears that they are in a very good agreement.

Bourdarias, Christian; Gerbi, Stéphane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Deep water pipe, pump, and mooring study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean engineering issues affecting the design, construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants are of key importance. This study addressed the problems associated with the conceptual design of the deep-water pipe, cold-water-pumping, and platform mooring arrangements. These subsystems fall into a natural grouping since the parameters affecting their design are closely related to each other and to the ocean environment. Analysis and evaluations are provided with a view toward judging the impact of the various subsystems on the overall plant concept and to provide an estimate of material and construction cost. Parametric data is provided that describes mooring line configurations, mooring line loads, cold water pipe configurations, and cold water pumping schemes. Selected parameters, issues, and evaluation criteria are used to judge the merits of candidate concepts over a range of OTEC plant size from 100 MWe to 1000 MWe net output power.

Little, T.E.; Marks, J.D.; Wellman, K.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

At-sea test system point design for a one-third scale cold water pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One step in the development of the technology for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Cold Water Pipes (CWP) is the at-sea testing of a fiberglass reinforced plastic nominal 10-foot diameter pipe. A design procedure and criteria for developing test hardware by scaling down a 30-foot diameter OTEC 10/40 MW Pilot Plant CWP design are presented. An example point design for the pipe, instrumentation to be used during the at-sea tests, and methods for selecting the support platform and mooring are described. The design considered starts with a scale model of a larger prototype, and then is modified to address the problems of fabrication and of survivability and handling during the 1/3rd scale model tests.

Sutherland, W.H. (ed.)

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Appendices to final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOAA/DOE has selected three concepts for a baseline design of the cold water pipe (CWP) for OTEC plants: (1) a FRP CWP of sandwich wall construction suspended from the Applied Physical Laboratory/John Hopkins University (APL/JHU) barge at a site 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil using a horizontal deployment scheme; (2) an elastomer CWP suspended from the APL/JHU barge off the southeast coast of Puerto Rico using either a horizontal or vertical deployment scheme; and (3) a polyethylene CWP (single or multiple pipe) suspended from the Gibbs and Cox spar at the Puerto Rico site using a horizontal deployment scheme. TRW has developed a baseline design for each of these configurations. This volume of the report includes the following appendices: (A) fiberglass reinforced plastic cold water pipe (specification and drawingss); (B) specification for polyethylene CWP; (C) elastomer pipe drawings; (D) drawings for OTEC 10/40 hull/CWP transitions; (E) structural design of OTEC 10/40 CWP support and CWP transitions; (F) universal transition joint for CWP; (G) dynamic spherical seal of CWP; (H) at-sea deployment loads - surface towing loads; (I) OTEC 10/40 CWP deployment up-ending loads; (J) cost estimates for OTEC 10/40 hull/CWP transitions; and (K) OTEC 10/40 CWP deployment scenario and cost estimate. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! World Toilet Day: Celebrate Sanitation and Efficient Flushing! November 15, 2010 - 5:01pm Addthis Scott Minos Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Believe it or not, this Friday, November 19 is World Toilet Day, an annual event hosted by the World Toilet Organization since 2001 to raise awareness for proper sanitation world-wide. From outhouses to water closets, humans devising creative ways to relieve themselves of nature's call can be traced back at least as far as 3,000 B.C., when Scottish settlements featured stone huts equipped with drains extending from recesses in their walls. Later, around 1,700 B.C., the Greeks built definite latrines featuring large, earthenware pans connected

25

Construction and testing of ceramic fabric heat pipe with water working fluid  

SciTech Connect

A prototype ceramic fabric/titanium water heat pipe has been constructed and tested; it transported 25 to 80 W of power at 423 K. Component development and testing is continuing with the aim of providing an improved prototype, with a 38-{mu}m stainless steel linear covered by a biaxially-braided Nextel (trademark of the 3M Co., St. Paul Minnesota) sleeve that is approximately 300-{mu}m thick. This fabric has been tested to 800 K, and its emittance is about 0.5 at that temperature. Advanced versions of the water heat pipe will probably require a coating over the ceramic fabric in order to increase this emittance to the 0.8 to 0.9 range. 2 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.; Cooper, M.F.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Qualification Requirements of Guided Ultrasonic Waves for Inspection of Piping in Light Water Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guided ultrasonic waves (GUW) are being increasingly used for both NDT and monitoring of piping. GUW offers advantages over many conventional NDE technologies due to the ability to inspect large volumes of piping components without significant removal of thermal insulation or protective layers. In addition, regions rendered inaccessible to more conventional NDE technologies may be more accessible using GUW techniques. For these reasons, utilities are increasingly considering the use of GUWs for performing the inspection of piping components in nuclear power plants. GUW is a rapidly evolving technology and its usage for inspection of nuclear power plant components requires refinement and qualification to ensure it is able to achieve consistent and acceptable levels of performance. This paper will discuss potential requirements for qualification of GUW techniques for the inspection of piping components in light water reactors (LWRs). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has adopted ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code requirements in Sections V, III, and XI for nondestructive examination methods, fabrication inspections, and pre-service and in-service inspections. A Section V working group has been formed to place the methodology of GUW into the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code but no requirements for technique, equipment, or personnel exist in the Code at this time.

Meyer, Ryan M.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Doctor, Steven R.; Bond, Leonard J.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Flushing Model of Onslow Bay, North Carolina, Based on Intrusion Volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Onslow Bay, North Carolina, is repeatedly flushed by intrusions of Gulf Stream water. An exponential dilution model based on intrusion models indicates 20–60 days are required for 50% dilution of Bay waters.

Larry P. Atkinson; Leonard J. Pietrafesa

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Design of cold water pipe for sea thermal power plants. Progress report, 1 May 1975--30 May 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the preliminary analysis of design conditions for a 40-ft. diameter, 4000 ft. long, cold water supply pipe for a 100 MW sea thermal power plant. The pipe is assumed to be freely suspended from a floating platform. The design is based on a circular row of tubes with spacers between to form the pipe wall. Internal pressure conditions are calculated for maximum assumed flow rates in the pipe. External pressure distribution is calculated for maximum assumed ocean current velocity. Drag and moment distributions are calculated for the pipe loaded with an assumed current velocity profile and buoyancy distribution. Collapse stability calculations are made for the pipe and for the individual tubes. Tube and spacer interaction stresses are calculated for the combined pressure, bending moment, and tensile loads imposed on the pipe. Preliminary analysis is performed on a flexible pipe support system capable of isolating the pipe from the platform during any sea state likely to be encountered by a sea thermal power plant. It is concluded that the basic design is feasible and justifies more precise analysis.

Anderson, J.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

OTEC cold water pipe design for problems caused by vortex-excited oscillations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vortex-excited oscillations of marine structures result in reduced fatigue life, large hydrodynamic forces and induced stresses, and sometimes lead to structural damage and to diestructive failures. The cold water pipe of an OTEC plant is nominally a bluff, flexible cylinder with a large aspect ratio (L/D = length/diameter), and is likely to be susceptible to resonant vortex-excited oscillations. The objective of this report is to survey recent results pertaining to the vortex-excited oscillations of structures in general and to consider the application of these findings to the design of the OTEC cold water pipe. Practical design calculations are given as examples throughout the various sections of the report. This report is limited in scope to the problems of vortex shedding from bluff, flexible structures in steady currents and the resulting vortex-excited oscillations. The effects of flow non-uniformities, surface roughness of the cylinder, and inclination to the incident flow are considered in addition to the case of a smooth cyliner in a uniform stream. Emphasis is placed upon design procedures, hydrodynamic coefficients applicable in practice, and the specification of structural response parameters relevant to the OTEC cold water pipe. There are important problems associated with in shedding of vortices from cylinders in waves and from the combined action of waves and currents, but these complex fluid/structure interactions are not considered in this report.

Griffin, O. M.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

30

Microsoft Word - S07263_NatFlushing  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Review of the Natural Flushing Review of the Natural Flushing Groundwater Remedy at the Old Rifle Legacy Management Site, Rifle, Colorado July 2011 LMS/RFO/S07263 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFO/S07263 Review of the Natural Flushing Groundwater Remedy at the Old Rifle Legacy Management Site, Rifle, Colorado July 2011 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Review of the Natural Flushing Groundwater Remedy-Old Rifle, Rifle, Colorado July 2011 Doc. No. S07263 Page i Contents Abbreviations ................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v

31

Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report:Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing,U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 8 Support.August 2004

32

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission: copper/water axially-grooved heat pipe topical report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents a summary of the major accomplishments for the development, fabrication, and testing of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes for Selenide Isotopic Generator (SIG) applications. The early development consisted of chemical, physical, and analytical studies to define an axially-grooved tube geometry that could be successfully fabricated and provide the desired long term (up to seven years) performance is presented. Heat pipe fabrication procedures, measured performance and accelerated life testing of heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 conducted at B and K Engineering are discussed. S/N AL-5 was the first axially-grooved copper/water heat pipe that was fabricated with the new internal coating process for cupric oxide (CuO) and the cleaning and water preparation methods developed by Battelle Columbus Laboratories. Heat pipe S/N LT-57 was fabricated along with sixty other axially-grooved heat pipes allocated for life testing at Teledyne Energy Systems. As of June 25, 1979, heat pipes S/Ns AL-5 and LT-57 have been accelerated life tested for 13,310 and 6,292 respectively, at a nominal operating temperature of 225/sup 0/C without any signs of thermal performance degradation. (TFD)

Strazza, N.P.

1979-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

33

Air entrainment in transient flows in closed water pipes: a two-layer approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we first construct a model for transient free surface flows that takes into account the air entrainment by a sytem of 4 partial differential equations. We derive it by taking averaged values of gas and fluid velocities on the cross surface flow in the Euler equations (incompressible for the fluid and compressible for the gas). Then, we propose a mathematical kinetic interpretation of this system to finally construct a well-balanced kinetic scheme having the properties of conserving the still water steady state and possesing an energy. Finally, numerical tests on closed uniforms water pipes are performed and discussed.

Bourdarias, Christian; Gerbi, Stéphane

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Cold Water Pipe Preliminary Design Project. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

NOAA/DOE has selected three concepts for a baseline design of the cold water pipe (CWP) for OTEC plants: (1) a FRP CWP of sandwich wall construction suspended from the Applied Physical Laboratory/John Hopkins University (APL/JHU) barge at a site 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil using a horizontal deployment scheme; (2) an elastomer CWP suspended from the APL/JHU barge off the south-east coast of Puerto Rico using either a horizontal or vertical deployment scheme; and (3) a polyethylene CWP (single or multiple pipe) suspended from the Gibbs and Cox spar at the Puerto Rico site using a horizontal deployment scheme. TRW has developed a baseline design for each of these configurations. Detailed designs and analyses for the FRP, polyethylene, and elastomer concepts, respectively, are described. Each section includes a discussion of fabrication plans and processes, schedules for mobilization of facilities and equipment, installation plans, and cost breakdown. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

Page 5-22- Water Heating Requirements – Glossary/Reference Figure 5-2 – Point of Use Distribution System Pipe Insulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Credit is available for insulation of hot water pipes in addition to insulation required by the mandatory requirements. For systems serving a single dwelling unit, this credit applies only to non-circulating systems. For systems serving multiple dwelling units, there is a pipe insulation credit for recirculating piping external to dwelling units if pipes are insulated to a higher R-value than the mandatory minimum. Installation Criteria (Single Dwelling Unit): Insulation must meet the level required in the mandatory requirements. Note that pipes buried under ceiling insulation can meet the mandatory requirements. Note: Heat tape – electric resistance heating tape wrapped around hot water pipes – may be used only for freeze protection and cannot be used instead of mandatory pipe insulation (see Section §150(j)) or pipe insulation receiving

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

SciTech Connect

Residential water heating is an important consideration in California?s building energy efficiency standard. Explicit treatment of ground-coupled hot water piping is one of several planned improvements to the standard. The properties of water, piping, insulation, backfill materials, concrete slabs, and soil, their interactions, and their variations with temperature and over time are important considerations in the required supporting analysis. Heat transfer algorithms and models devised for generalized, hot water distribution system, ground-source heat pump and ground heat exchanger, nuclear waste repository, buried oil pipeline, and underground electricity transmission cable applications can be adapted to the simulation of under-slab water piping. A numerical model that permits detailed examination of and broad variations in many inputs while employing a technique to conserve computer run time is recommended.

Warner, J.L.; Lutz, J.D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 1. Investigation and evaluation of stress corrosion cracking in piping of boiling water reactor plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IGSCC in BWR piping is occurring owing to a combination of material, environment, and stress factors, each of which can affect both the initiation of a stress-corrosion crack and the rate of its subsequent propagation. In evaluating long-term solutions to the problem, one needs to consider the effects of each of the proposed remedial actions. Mitigating actions to control IGSCC in BWR piping must be designed to alleviate one or more of the three synergistic factors: sensitized material, the convention BWR environment, and high tensile stresses. Because mitigating actions addressing each of these factors may not be fully effective under all anticipated operating conditions, mitigating actions should address two and preferably all three of the causative factors; e.g., material plus some control of water chemistry, or stress reversal plus controlled water chemistry.

Not Available

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Heat Transfer Performance and Piping Strategy Study for Chilled Water Systems at Low Cooling Loads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The temperature differential of chilled water is an important factor used for evaluating the performance of a chilled water system. A low delta-T may increase the pumping energy consumption and increase the chiller energy consumption. The system studied in this thesis is the chilled water system at the Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport (DFW Airport). This system has the problem of low delta-T under low cooling loads. When the chilled water flow is much lower than the design conditions at low cooling loads, it may lead to the laminar flow of the chilled water in the cooling coils. The main objective of this thesis is to explain the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils under low cooling loads. The water side and air side heat transfer coefficients at different water and air flow rates are calculated. The coefficients are used to analyze the heat transfer performance of the cooling coils at conditions ranging from very low loads to design conditions. The effectiveness-number of transfer units (NTU) method is utilized to analyze the cooling coil performance under different flow conditions, which also helps to obtain the cooling coil chilled water temperature differential under full load and partial load conditions. When the water flow rate drops to 1ft/s, laminar flow occurs; this further decreases the heat transfer rate on the water side. However, the cooling coil effectiveness increases with the drop of water flow rate, which compensates for the influence of the heat transfer performance under laminar flow conditions. Consequently, the delta-T in the cooling coil decreases in the transitional flow regime but increases in the laminar flow regime. Results of this thesis show that the laminar flow for the chilled water at low flow rate is not the main cause of the low delta-T syndrome in the chilled water system. Possible causes for the piping strategy of the low delta-T syndrome existing in the chilled water system under low flow conditions are studied in this thesis: (1) use of two way control valves; and (2) improper tertiary pump piping strategy.

Li, Nanxi 1986-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Evaluation of Soil Flushing for Application to the Deep Vadose Zone in the Hanford Central Plateau  

SciTech Connect

Soil flushing was included in the Deep Vadose Zone Treatability Test Plan for the Hanford Central Plateau as a technology with the potential to remove contaminants from the vadose zone. Soil flushing operates through the addition of water, and if necessary an appropriate mobilizing agent, to mobilize contaminants and flush them from the vadose zone and into the groundwater where they are subsequently captured by a pump-and-treat system. There are uncertainties associated with applying soil flushing technology to contaminants in the deep vadose zone at the Hanford Central Plateau. The modeling and laboratory efforts reported herein are intended to provide a quantitative assessment of factors that impact water infiltration and contaminant flushing through the vadose zone and into the underlying groundwater. Once in the groundwater, capture of the contaminants would be necessary, but this aspect of implementing soil flushing was not evaluated in this effort. Soil flushing was evaluated primarily with respect to applications for technetium and uranium contaminants in the deep vadose zone of the Hanford Central Plateau.

Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Z. F.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Schramke, Janet A.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Tartakovsky, Guzel D.; Gordon, Kathryn A.; Last, George V.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Installation Of Service Connections For Sensors Or Transmitters In Buried Water Pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for installing warning units in a buried pipeline. A small hole is drilled in the ground to the pipeline. A collar is affixed to one of the pipes of the pipeline. A valve with an internal passage is connected to the collar. A hole is drilled in the pipe. A warning unit is installed in the pipe by moving the warning unit through the internal passage, the collar, and the hole in the pipe.

Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Cooper, John F. (Oakland, CA)

2006-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

42

Infrared Thermography applied to measurement of Heat transfer coefficient of water in a pipe heated by Joule effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Internal sources of heat are due to convection from flow of the heat transfer fluid through the pipes. Heat (material, diameter, spacing, and burial depth), (4) system flow rates, (5) heat transfer fluid properties · heat transfer fluid = 42% propylene glycol @ a flow rate of 350 gpm · heat pump model = Water Furnace

43

Northward Market Extension for Passive Solar Water Heaters by Using Pipe Freeze Protection with Freeze-Tolerant Piping: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper regarding research in freeze-protection methods that could extend market acceptance for passive solar domestic water heating systems in more northern climates if the U.S.

Burch, J.; Heater, M.; Brandemuhl, M.; Krarti, M.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Model tests of OTEC-1: test of HMB with and without cold water pipes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In early 1977, ERDA began an extensive study of various factors which could effect the early design and deployment of OTEC-1, a test platform for evaluation of one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC heat exchangers. The platform was to consist of the Hughes Mining Barge (HMB) and a 3000 foot deep cold water pipe (CWP). One of the factors to be considered was the motions of the HMB and the motions, loads and stresses of the CWP. Several theoretical methods, including one developed at HYDRONAUTICS, Incorporated were to be used to predict motions and CWP loads and stresses. There existed, however, no model tests or other validation of these theoretical methods. The lack of any validation of the theoretical methods was of some concern as early studies indicated that high CWP bending stresses, in particular, could represent a significant design problem. In early May 1977, HYDRONAUTICS proposed to carry out model tests of a one-fiftieth scale model of the HMB with several CWP models representing relatively rigid (steel) and flexible (glass reinforced plastic GRP) CWP's. This proposal was accepted by ERDA, and the model tests were carried out during June 1977. Preliminary results were provided to ERDA during June and July 1977. This report describes the work carried out and presents and discusses the results, including a comparison of measured and predicted results.

Sheldon, L. R.; Barr, R. A.; O'Dea, J. F.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Ocean thermal energy conversion cold water pipe preliminary design project. Task 2. Analysis for concept selection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful performance of the CWP is of crucial importance to the overall OTEC system; the pipe itself is considered the most critical part of the entire operation. Because of the importance the CWP, a project for the analysis and design of CWP's was begun in the fall of 1978. The goals of this project were to study a variety of concepts for delivering cold water to an OTEC plant, to analyze and rank these concepts based on their relative cost and risk, and to develop preliminary design for those concepts which seemed most promising. Two representative platforms and sites were chosen: a spar buoy of a Gibbs and Cox design to be moored at a site off Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico, and a barge designed by APL/Johns Hopkins University, grazing about a site approximately 200 miles east of the coast of Brazil. The approach was to concentrate on the most promising concepts and on those which were either of general interest or espoused by others (e.g., steel and concrete concepts). Much of the overall attention, therefore, focused on analyzing rigid and compliant wall design, while stockade (except for the special case of the FRP stockade) and bottom-mounted concepts received less attention. A total of 67 CWP concepts were initially generated and subjected to a screening process. Of these, 16 were carried through design analysis, costing, and ranking. Study results are presented in detail. (WHK)

None

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Flushing, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flushing, Michigan: Energy Resources Flushing, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 43.0630833°, -83.8510732° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0630833,"lon":-83.8510732,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

47

Concepts for a bottom-mounted buoyant, stab-in cold water pipe for the OTEC program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A conceptual design for a bottom-mounted, stab-in cold water pipe (CWP) for OTEC is presented. The design concepts used are based on experience gained in the design of marine risers for offshore petroleum production. After a detailed description of the system envisioned and the installation scenario, the status of the major components in the system is discussed relative to the present state of the art in the oil industry. From preliminary structural analyses and cost projections, a comparison is then drawn between the bottom-mounted pipe and free-hanging CWP designs. The comparison shows the bottom-mounted concept to be technically and economically sound, utilizing present oil industry design practices. Finally, recommendations are made for further work to integrate the bottom-mounted CWP concept into the OTEC program.

Pompa, J.A.; Key, J.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DETERMINATION OF LIQUID FILM THICKNESS FOLLOWING DRAINING OF CONTACTORS, VESSELS, AND PIPES IN THE MCU PROCESS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) identified the caustic side solvent extraction (CSSX) process as the preferred technology to remove cesium from radioactive waste solutions at the Savannah River Site (SRS). As a result, Washington Savannah River Company (WSRC) began designing and building a Modular CSSX Unit (MCU) in the SRS tank farm to process liquid waste for an interim period until the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) begins operations. Both the solvent and the strip effluent streams could contain high concentrations of cesium which must be removed from the contactors, process tanks, and piping prior to performing contactor maintenance. When these vessels are drained, thin films or drops will remain on the equipment walls. Following draining, the vessels will be flushed with water and drained to remove the flush water. The draining reduces the cesium concentration in the vessels by reducing the volume of cesium-containing material. The flushing, and subsequent draining, reduces the cesium in the vessels by diluting the cesium that remains in the film or drops on the vessel walls. MCU personnel requested that Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) researchers conduct a literature search to identify models to calculate the thickness of the liquid films remaining in the contactors, process tanks, and piping following draining of salt solution, solvent, and strip solution. The conclusions from this work are: (1) The predicted film thickness of the strip effluent is 0.010 mm on vertical walls, 0.57 mm on horizontal walls and 0.081 mm in horizontal pipes. (2) The predicted film thickness of the salt solution is 0.015 mm on vertical walls, 0.74 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.106 mm in horizontal pipes. (3) The predicted film thickness of the solvent is 0.022 mm on vertical walls, 0.91 mm on horizontal walls, and 0.13 mm in horizontal pipes. (4) The calculated film volume following draining is: (a) Salt solution receipt tank--1.6 gallons; (b) Salt solution feed tank--1.6 gallons; (c) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--1.6 gallons; (d) Contactor drain tank--0.40 gallons; (e) Strip effluent hold tank--0.33 gallons; (f) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--0.37 gallons; (g) Strip effluent decanter--0.14 gallons; (h) Solvent hold tank--0.30 gallon; and (i) Corrugated piping between contactors--16-21 mL. (5) After the initial vessel draining, flushing the vessels with 100 gallons of water using a spray nozzle that produces complete vessel coverage and draining the flush water reduces the source term by the following amounts: (i) Salt solution receipt tank--63X; (ii) Salt solution feed tank--63X; (iii) Decontaminated salt solution hold tank--63X; (iv) Contactor drain tank--250X; (v) Strip effluent hold tank--300X; (vi) Decontaminated salt solution decanter--270X; (vii) Strip effluent decanter--710X; (viii) Solvent hold tank--330X. Understand that these estimates of film thickness are based on laboratory testing and fluid mechanics theory. The calculations assume drainage occurs by film flow. Much of the data used to develop the models came from tests with very ''clean'' fluids. Impurities in the fluids and contaminants on the vessels walls could increase liquid holdup. The application of film thickness models and source term reduction calculations should be considered along with operational conditions and H-Tank Farm/Liquid Waste operating experience. These calculations exclude the PVV/HVAC duct work and piping, as well as other areas that area outside the scope of this report.

Poirier, M; Fernando Fondeur, F; Samuel Fink, S

2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

49

Review of industry efforts to manage pressurized water reactor feedwater nozzle, piping, and feedring cracking and wall thinning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a review of nuclear industry efforts to manage thermal fatigue, flow-accelerated corrosion, and water hammer damage to pressurized water reactor (PWR) feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. The review includes an evaluation of design modifications, operating procedure changes, augmented inspection and monitoring programs, and mitigation, repair and replacement activities. Four actions were taken: (a) review of field experience to identify trends of operating events, (b) review of technical literature, (c) visits to PWR plants and a PWR vendor, and (d) solicitation of information from 8 other countries. Assessment of field experience is that licensees have apparently taken sufficient action to minimize feedwater nozzle cracking caused by thermal fatigue and wall thinning of J-tubes and feedwater piping. Specific industry actions to minimize the wall-thinning in feedrings and thermal sleeves were not found, but visual inspection and necessary repairs are being performed. Assessment of field experience indicates that licensees have taken sufficient action to minimize steam generator water hammer in both top-feed and preheat steam generators. Industry efforts to minimize multiple check valve failures that have allowed backflow of steam from a steam generator and have played a major role in several steam generator water hammer events were not evaluated. A major finding of this review is that analysis, inspection, monitoring, mitigation, and replacement techniques have been developed for managing thermal fatigue and flow-accelerated corrosion damage to feedwater nozzles, piping, and feedrings. Adequate training and appropriate applications of these techniques would ensure effective management of this damage.

Shah, V.N.; Ware, A.G.; Porter, A.M.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Detector of the flowing of a fluid in a pipe and energy saving device for a hot water system using this detector  

SciTech Connect

A fluid flow sensor, comprising a tubular element having a greater diameter than and vertically mounted on a pipe for serially interconnecting two portions of this pipe. One portion is connected to the upper end of the tubular element while the other portion is connected to its lower end. A magnetic piston is slidably mounted within the tubular element and is therefore free to move along it. A by-pass conduit interconnects the lower portion of the pipe with the upper portion of the pipe. The piston moves upwardly in the tubular element when the fluid flows. Fluid flows from the portion of the pipe connected at the lower end of the tubular element to the one connected at its upper end through the by-pass. The piston moves downwardly by gravity to the lower end of the tubular element when the fluid stops flowing. A coil wound around a portion of the tubular element produces in electrical signal when the piston moves in the tubular element. The piston has a frustroconical element on each end to absorb shocks which result when the piston seats in each position. This detecting device can be mounted on a hot water supply pipe and used in combination with an electronic circuit for saving energy in operating a hot water system. The electronic circuit allows or prevents the thermostat to control the water heating apparatus.

Lawless, J.

1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

51

Applicability of Related Data, Algorithms, and Models to the Simulation of Ground-Coupled Residential Hot Water Piping in California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outdoor Temperature for District Heating Systems. ” ASHRAEAssessment of Buried District Heating Piping. ” ASHRAE

Warner, J.L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pipe weld crown removal device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a device that provides for grinding down the crown of a pipe weld joining aligned pipe sections so that the weld is substantially flush with the pipe sections joined by the weld. The device includes a cage assembly comprising a pair of spaced cage rings adapted to be mounted for rotation on the respective pipe sections on opposite sides of the weld, a plurality of grinding wheels, supported by the cage assembly for grinding down the crown of the weld, and a plurality of support shafts, each extending longitudinally along the joined pipe sections, parallel thereto, for individually mounting respective grinding wheels. Each end of the support shafts is mounted for rotation in a bearing assembly housed within a radially directed opening in a corresponding one of the cage rings so as to provide radial movement of the associated shaft, and thus of the associated grinding wheel, towards and away from the weld. A first drive sprocket provides rotation of the cage assembly around the pipe sections while a second drive unit, driven by a common motor, provides rotation of the grinding wheels.

Sword, C.K.; Sette, P.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

53

Pipe support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe support for high temperature, thin-walled piping runs such as those used in nuclear systems. A section of the pipe to be supported is encircled by a tubular inner member comprised of two walls with an annular space therebetween. Compacted load-bearing thermal insulation is encapsulated within the annular space, and the inner member is clamped to the pipe by a constant clamping force split-ring clamp. The clamp may be connected to pipe hangers which provide desired support for the pipe.

Pollono, Louis P. (Hempfield Township, Hempfield County, PA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Cost-benefit analysis of cosolvent flushing to treat groundwater contamination source areas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the zone beneath the water table can be a virtually permanent source of groundwater contamination that cannot be remediated by currently available technologies. Cosolvent flushing is a new technology that has the potential to remediate these sites and could pose a solution to the problem of DNAPL source areas. A computer model was developed to determine the cost and time to remediate an aquifer using cosolvent flushing. Included in the model is a module to calculate the costs of recycling the alcohol that is used as the cosolvent. The model was validated using site conditions to a prior study. It was determined that recycling the cosolvent allows cosolvent flushing to be a cost effective alternative to surfactant flushing, another new technology being considered for DNAPL source remediation. Sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted by varying the saturation percentage of contaminant, percentage and type of alcohol used in the cosolvent mixture, site hydraulic conductivity, and the contaminant. Five alcohols were modeled: methanol, ethanol, 1-isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and tert-butyl-alcohol (TBA). 1-Isopropanol, 2-isopropanol, and TBA were always more expensive than methanol and ethanol.

Anason, S.L.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Analysis and design of an in-pipe system for water leak detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Leaks are a major factor for unaccounted water losses in almost every water distribution network. Pipeline leak may result, for example, from bad workmanship or from any destructive cause, due to sudden changes of pressure, ...

Chatzigeorgiou, Dimitris M

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Thermal laminarization of a stratified pipe flow  

SciTech Connect

The present work constitutes a new program that grew out of a scoping assessment by ANL to determine the propensity for pipe stratification to occur in the reactor outlet nozzles and hot-leg piping of a generic LMFBR during events producing reverse pipe flow. This paper focuses on the role that thermal buoyancy plays relative to being able to laminarize a turbulent stratified shear zone in a horizontal pipe. The preceeding can influence the behavior of a pipe stratified-backflow-recirculation zone (cold plenum water down into the hot pipe flow) which developes as the result of a temperature difference between the pipe flow and the plenum.

Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Qualification requirements of guided ultrasonic waves for inspection of piping in light water reactors  

SciTech Connect

It is anticipated that guided ultrasonic wave (GUW) techniques will eventually see widespread application in the nuclear power industry as there are several near-term and future needs that could benefit from the availability of GUW technologies. Already, GUW techniques are receiving consideration for inspecting buried piping at nuclear power plants and future applications may include several Class 1 and 2 components. To accept the results of a nondestructive examination of safety critical components, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission requires that the examinations be performed using qualified equipment, personnel, and procedures. As the use of GUW techniques becomes more frequent, qualification may be required. Performance demonstration has been the approach to qualifying conventional NDE methods in the nuclear power industry. This paper highlights potential issues and research needs associated with facilitating GUW qualification for the nuclear power industry. Parametric studies of essential inspection parameters are necessary to understand their influence on inspection performance. The large volume sampling capability introduces several challenges for qualifying GUW techniques including the quantification of performance, potential interference caused by the presence of multiple flaws in the inspection region, and the practicality of manufacturing several large qualification specimens. Computer simulation may have a significant role in reducing the experimental burden associated with qualifying GUW techniques for nuclear power plant examinations.

Meyer, R. M.; Ramuhalli, P.; Doctor, S. R. [Applied Physics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA 99352 (United States); Bond, L. J. [Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Politics of Pipes: The Persistence of Small Water Networks in Post-Privatization Manila  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity and Water Supply: Evidence from Bangladesh, Cambodia, Kenya, and the Philippines.Philippine Airlines, and Fort Bonifacio (a military base). In response to the 1993 electricity

Cheng, Deborah

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Investigation of a novel façade-based solar loop heat pipe water heating system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Solar thermal is one of the most cost-effective renewable energy technologies, and solar water heating is one of the most popular solar thermal systems. Based… (more)

Wang, Zhangyuan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Heat pipe device and heat pipe fabricating process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An energy saving liquid to liquid heat exchanger for a dishwasher or like device discharging hot waste water comprising a hot water tank for holding the waste water from the dishwasher and having inlet and outlet pipes, a cold water tank for holding the fresh water going to a water heater and having inlet and outlet pipes, the cold water tank disposed on top of the hot water tank, a bundle of heat pipes containing low boiling refrigerant disposed inside of the two tanks so as to extract heat from the hot water tank and give it up to the cold water tank, whereby the temperature of the fresh water leaving the heat exchanger is higher than its entering temperature.

Busch, C.H.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Pipe connector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A safety test facility for testing sodium-cooled nuclear reactor components includes a reactor vessel and a heat exchanger submerged in sodium in the tank. The reactor vessel and heat exchanger are connected by an expansion/deflection pipe coupling comprising a pair of coaxially and slidably engaged tubular elements having radially enlarged opposed end portions of which at least a part is of spherical contour adapted to engage conical sockets in the ends of pipes leading out of the reactor vessel and in to the heat exchanger. A spring surrounding the pipe coupling urges the end portions apart and into engagement with the spherical sockets. Since the pipe coupling is submerged in liquid a limited amount of leakage of sodium from the pipe can be tolerated.

Sullivan, Thomas E. (Evergreen Park, IL); Pardini, John A. (Brookfield, IL)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

OTEC cold water pipe: a survey of available shell analysis computer programs and implications of hydrodynamic loadings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The design and analysis of the cold water pipe (CWP) is one of the most important technological problems to be solved in the OTEC ocean engineering program. Analytical computer models have to be developed and verified in order to provide an engineering approach for the OTEC CWP with regards to environmental factors such as waves, currents, platform motions, etc., and for various structural configurations and materials such as rigid wall CWP, compliant CWP, stockade CWP, etc. To this end, Analysis and Technology, Inc. has performed a review and evaluation of shell structural analysis computer programs applicable to the design of an OTEC CWP. Included in this evaluation are discussions of the hydrodynamic flow field, structure-fluid interaction and the state-of-the-art analytical procedures for analysis of offshore structures. The analytical procedures which must be incorporated into the design of a CWP are described. A brief review of the state-of-the-art for analysis of offshore structures and the need for a shell analysis for the OTEC CWP are included. A survey of available shell computer programs, both special purpose and general purpose, and discussions of the features of these dynamic shell programs and how the hydrodynamic loads are represented within the computer programs are included. The hydrodynamic loads design criteria for the CWP are described. An assessment of the current state of knowledge for hydrodynamic loads is presented. (WHK)

Pompa, J.A.; Allik, H.; Webman, K.; Spaulding, M.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Assessment of US shipbuilding current capability to build a commercial OTEC platform and a cold water pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lowry and Hoffman Associates Inc. (LHA) performed for ORI an analysis of the shipbuilding requirements for constructing an OTEC plant, and the available shipyard assets which could fulfill these requirements. In addition, several shipyards were queried concerning their attitudes towards OTEC. In assessing the shipbuilding requirements for an OTEC plant, four different platform configurations were studied and four different designs of the cold water pipe (CWP) were examined. The platforms were: a concrete ship design proposed by Lockheed; concrete spar designs with internal heat exchangers (IHE) (Rosenblatt) and external heat exchangers (XHE) (Lockheed); and a steel ship design proposed by Gibbs and Cox. The types of materials examined for CWP construction were: steel, fiber reinforced plastic (FPR), elastomer, and concrete. The report is organized io three major discussion areas. All the construction requirements are synthesized for the four platforms and CWPs, and general comments are made concerning their availability in the US. Specific shipbuilders facilities are reviewed for their applicability to building an OTEC plant, an assessment of the shipyards general interest in the OTEC program is presented providing an insight into their nearterm commercial outlook. The method of determining this interest will depend largely on a risk analysis of the OTEC system. Also included are factors which may comprise this analysis, and a methodology to ascertain the risk. In the appendices, various shipyard specifications are presented, shipyard assessment matrices are given, graphs of various shipyard economic outlooks are provided, and definitions of the risk factors are listed. (WHK)

Komelasky, M. C. [ed.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Heat pipe dynamics. Final report, April 30, 1981. [Uses of heat pipe, especially in solar collector  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A heat-pipe flat plate solar collector is constructed like a typical flat plate collector with the exception that individual heat pipes are attached to the collector surface to transfer collected heat via a phase change from collector surface into an attached jacket containing a phase change material. The efficiency of such a collector was measured roughly. Also briefly described are: a heat-pipe heat exchanger, heat-pipe heat exchanger freeze proofing, heat-pipe attic ventilation, transfer of light bulb heat via a heat pipe to heat water, heat recovery via heat pipe, cooling of oil in engines and transmissions via heat pipe, a tracking reflector, automatic sun tracker, single-stroke vacuum pump for heat-pipe manufacture, and heat pipe heat transfer from rock bed. (LEW)

Norman, R.M. Sr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

ANALYSIS OF THE LEACHING EFFICIENCY OF INHIBITED WATER AND TANK SIMULANT IN REMOVING RESIDUES ON THERMOWELL PIPES  

SciTech Connect

A key component for the accelerated implementation and operation of the Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) is the recovery of Tank 48H. Tank 48H is a type IIIA tank with a maximum capacity of 1.3 million gallons. Video inspection of the tank showed that a film of solid material adhered to the tank internal walls and structures between 69 inch and 150 inch levels. From the video inspection, the solid film thickness was estimated to be 1mm, which corresponds to {approx}33 kg of TPB salts (as 20 wt% insoluble solids) (1). This film material is expected to be easily removed by single-rinse, slurry pump operation during Tank 48H TPB disposition via aggregation processing. A similar success was achieved for Tank 49H TPB dispositioning, with slurry pumps operating almost continuously for approximately 6 months, after which time the tank was inspected and the film was found to be removed. The major components of the Tank 49H film were soluble solids - Na{sub 3}H(CO{sub 3}){sub 2} (Hydrated Sodium Carbonate, aka: Trona), Al(OH){sub 3} (Aluminum Hydroxide, aka: Gibbsite), NaTPB (Sodium Tetraphenylborate), NaNO{sub 3} (Sodium Nitrate) and NaNO{sub 2} (Sodium Nitrite) (2). Although the Tank 48H film is expected to be primarily soluble solids, it may not behave the same as the Tank 49H film. There is a risk that material on the internal surfaces of Tank 48H could not be easily removed. As a risk mitigation activity, the chemical composition and leachability of the Tank 48H film are being evaluated prior to initiating tank aggregation. This task investigated the dissolution characteristics of Tank 48H solid film deposits in inhibited water and DWPF recycle. To this end, SRNL received four separate 23-inch long thermowell-conductivity pipe samples which were removed from the tank 48H D2 risers in order to determine: (1) the thickness of the solid film deposit, (2) the chemical composition of the film deposits, and (3) the leaching behavior of the solid film deposit in inhibited water (IW) and in DWPF recycle simulant (3).

Fondeur, F.; White, T.; Oji, L.; Martino, C.; Wilmarth, B.

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

Buried Pipe Guided Wave Examination Reference Document  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the nuclear power fleet has aged, the industry has increased its focus on the integrity of buried piping assets. This is due to recent leaks resulting in unscheduled repair outages and release of tritium into the ground water. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has responded to the emergent issue by developing a buried pipe program, which many plants have implemented or are implementing, as well as projects to assess and develop inspection and repair technologies. There are many buried pipes...

2009-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

67

Dismantling techniques for reactor steel piping  

SciTech Connect

Two cutting techniques have been developed for dismantling the pipes connected to the Japan Power Demonstration Reactor (JPDR) pressure vessel. They are the rotary disk knife cutting system for dismantling relatively large pipes, such as the primary cooling system, and the shaped explosive cutting systems for cutting relatively small pipes in air or water. Basic cutting tests were performed to determine the optimum characteristics of the cutting systems and to conduct a safety evaluation by studying the effects of blasting on surrounding areas. Mock-up tests confirmed the applicability of the newly developed dismantling systems for JPDR dismantlement by successfully cutting test pipes with these systems.

Yanagihara, S.; Hiraga, F.; Nakamura, H. (Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan))

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pipe Freeze Prevention for Passive Solar Water Heaters Using a Room-Air Natural Convection Loop: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Conference paper regarding research in the use of freeze prevention for passive solar domestic water heating systems.

Burch, J.; Heater, M.; Brandemuhl, M.; Krarti, M.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Pipe-Flo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pipe-Flo Pipe-Flo Pipe-flo logo Flow analysis software used to design, optimize, troubleshoot and simulate the operation of piping systems of any size or configuration. PIPE-FLO provides a total picture of the piping system including the flow and pressures in pipelines, along with the interaction of pumps, control valves, and flow meters. PIPE-FLO products are used worldwide in a variety of applications throughout many industries including HVAC, fire sprinkler, wastewater collection and treatment, mining, ultra-pure water, chemical processing, power generation, pulp & paper and general industrial. Screen Shots Keywords piping analysis, pump selection, piping design, hydraulic analysis, pump sizing, pressure drop calculator, hydraulic modeling, steam distribution,

70

Vapor spill pipe monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for continually monitoring the composition of liquefied natural gas flowing from a spill pipe during a spill test by continually removing a sample of the LNG by means of a probe, gasifying the LNG in the probe, and sending the vaporized LNG to a remote ir gas detector for analysis. The probe comprises three spaced concentric tubes surrounded by a water jacket which communicates with a flow channel defined between the inner and middle, and middle and outer tubes. The inner tube is connected to a pump for providing suction, and the probe is positioned in the LNG flow below the spill pipe with the tip oriented partly downward so that LNG is continuously drawn into the inner tube through a small orifice. The probe is made of a high thermal conductivity metal. Hot water is flowed through the water jacket and through the flow channel between the three tubes to provide the necessary heat transfer to flash vaporize the LNG passing through the inner channel of the probe. The gasified LNG is transported through a connected hose or tubing extending from the probe to a remote ir sensor which measures the gas composition.

Bianchini, G.M.; McRae, T.G.

1983-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

71

Novel heat pipe combination  

SciTech Connect

The basic heat pipe principle is employed in a heat pipe combination wherein two heat pipes are combined in opposing relationship to form an integral unit; such that the temperature, heat flow, thermal characteristics, and temperature-related parameters of a monitored environment or object exposed to one end of the heat pipe combination can be measured and controlled by controlling the heat flow of the opposite end of the heat pipe combination.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

72

Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Influence of Feeding Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on ... CFD–Based Modelling on Interfacial Heat Transfer for Water Quenching.

73

Switchable heat pipe assembly  

SciTech Connect

The heat pipe assembly is formed into an H-shape or a Y-shape. The H-shaped configuration comprises two heat pipes, each having condenser and evaporator sections with wicking therein coupled by a tube with wick at their evaporator sections. The Y-shaped configuration utilizes a common evaporator section in place of the two evaporator sections of the H-shaped configuration. In both configurations, the connection between the vapor spaces of the two heat pipes equalizes vapor pressure within the heat pipes. Although both heat pipes have wicks, they have sufficient fluid only to saturate a single pipe. If heat is applied to the condenser section of one of the pipes, this heat pipe becomes inoperative since all the fluid is transferred to the second pipe which can operate with a lower thermal load.

Sun, T.H.; Basiulis, A.

1977-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

74

Insulated pipe clamp design  

SciTech Connect

Thin wall large diameter piping for breeder reactor plants can be subjected to significant thermal shocks during reactor scrams and other upset events. On the Fast Flux Test Facility, the addition of thick clamps directly on the piping was undesired because the differential metal temperatures between the pipe wall and the clamp could have significantly reduced the pipe thermal fatigue life cycle capabilities. Accordingly, an insulated pipe clamp design concept was developed. The design considerations and methods along with the development tests are presented. Special considerations to guard against adverse cracking of the insulation material, to maintain the clamp-pipe stiffness desired during a seismic event, to minimize clamp restraint on the pipe during normal pipe heatup, and to resist clamp rotation or spinning on the pipe are emphasized.

Anderson, M.J.; Hyde, L.L.; Wagner, S.E.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Glass heat pipe evacuated tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, Robert D. (Lakewood, CO); Vansant, James H. (Tracy, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

PipeProbe: a mobile sensor droplet for mapping hidden pipeline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents PipeProbe, a mobile sensor system for determining the spatial topology of hidden water pipelines behind walls. PipeProbe works by dropping a tiny wireless sensor capsule into the source of the water pipelines. As the PipeProbe capsule ... Keywords: constraint satisfaction, mapping water pipeline, sensor inference, wireless sensor networks

Tsung-te (Ted) Lai; Yu-han (Tiffany) Chen; Polly Huang; Hao-hua Chu

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Final Report- Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Final Report - Rejuvenating Permeable Reactive Barriers by Chemical Flushing, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Region 8 Support

78

Heat pipe fabrication  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe is disclosed which is fabricated with an artery arranged so that the warp and weave of the wire mesh are at about a 45/sup 0/ angle with respect to the axis of the heat pipe.

Leinoff, S.; Edelstein, F.; Combs, W.

1977-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

79

Common Types of Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...Reseamed and drifted pipe is similar to casing, but is manufactured and inspected in a manner that assures the well driller that the pipe string will have a predetermined minimum diameter sufficient to permit unrestricted passage of pumps or

80

CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection -  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection - March 29, 2012 CRAD, Nuclear Facility Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection - March 29, 2012 March 29, 2012 Nuclear Facility Construction - Piping and Pipe Supports Inspection Criteria, Approach and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-52, Rev. 0) For the purpose of this criteria review and approach, this Criteria Review and Approach Document (CRAD) includes piping and pipe supports and attachments of the pipe supports to structures (concrete, structural steel, or embed plates). Pipe supports include rigid restraints, welded attachments to piping, struts, snubbers, spring cans, and constant supports. Inspection of pipe whip restraints are also included in this CRAD. Selection of nuclear facility piping systems for inspection should be

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Rotary seal with enhanced lubrication and contaminant flushing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A resilient, ring shaped interference-type hydrodynamic rotary seal having waves on the lubricant side which provide increased film thickness and flushing action by creating contact pressure induced angulated restrictions formed by abrupt restrictive diverters. The angulated restrictions are defined by projecting ridges, corners at the trailing edge of the waves, or simply by use of a converging shape at the trailing edge of the waves which is more abrupt than the gently converging hydrodynamic inlet shape at the leading edge of the waves. The abrupt restrictive diverter performs two functions; a restricting function and a diverting function. The angulated restrictions cause a local film thickness restriction which produces a damming effect preventing a portion of the lubricant from leaking out of the dynamic sealing interface at the trailing edge of the wave, and results in a much thicker lubricant film thickness under the waves. This contributes to more film thickness in the remainder of the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment because film thickness tends to decay gradually rather than abruptly due to the relative stiffness of the seal material. Because of the angle of the abrupt restrictive diverter relative to the relative rotation direction, in conjunction with the restriction or damming effect, a strong diverting action is produced which pumps lubricant across the dynamic sealing interface toward the environment. The lubricant diversion is caused by the component of the rotational velocity tangent to the abrupt restrictive diverter. The component of rotational velocity normal to the abrupt restrictive diverter causes a portion of the lubricant film to be pumped past the abrupt restrictive diverter, thereby assuring adequate lubrication thereof.

Dietle, Lannie L. (Sugar Land, TX)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Influence of Cold Pools Downstream of Mountain Barriers on Downslope Winds and Flushing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of cold pools downstream of mesoscale mountain barriers on downslope winds and flushing is investigated in this study by means of a numerical mesoscale model. The model is compared with existing analytical and numerical solutions. ...

Tsengdar J. Lee; Roger A. Pielke; Robert C. Kessler; John Weaver

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially constructed heat pipe is described for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, D.M.

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

84

Abrasion resistant heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A specially constructed heat pipe for use in fluidized bed combustors. Two distinct coatings are spray coated onto a heat pipe casing constructed of low thermal expansion metal, each coating serving a different purpose. The first coating forms aluminum oxide to prevent hydrogen permeation into the heat pipe casing, and the second coating contains stabilized zirconium oxide to provide abrasion resistance while not substantially affecting the heat transfer characteristics of the system.

Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA)

1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

85

Heat pipe effect in porous medium  

SciTech Connect

In this thesis a parametric study of the thermal and hydrologic characteristics of the fractured porous tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada was conducted. The effects of different fracture and matrix properties including permeability, thermal conductivity, specific heat, porosity, and tortuosity on heat pipe performance in the vicinity of the waste package were observed. Computer simulations were carried out using TOUGH code on a Cray YMP-2 supercomputer. None of the fracture parameters affected the heat pipe performance except the mobility of the liquid in the fracture. Matrix permeability and thermal conductivity were found to have significant effect on the heat pipe performance. The effect of mass injection was studied for liquid water and air injected at the fracture boundary. A high rate of mass injection was required to produce any effect on the heat pipe. The fracture-matrix equilibrium is influenced by the matrix permeability and the matrix thermal conductivity.

Joseph, M.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Internal pipe attachment mechanism  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An attachment mechanism is described for repairing or extending fluid carrying pipes, casings, conduits, etc. utilizing one-way motion of spring tempered fingers to provide a mechanical connection between the attachment mechanism and the pipe. The spring tempered fingers flex to permit insertion into a pipe to a desired insertion depth. The mechanical connection is accomplished by reversing the insertion motion and the mechanical leverage in the fingers forces them outwardly against the inner wall of the pipe. A seal is generated by crushing a sealing assembly by the action of setting the mechanical connection. 6 figures.

Bast, R.M.; Chesnut, D.A.; Henning, C.D.; Lennon, J.P.; Pastrnak, J.W.; Smith, J.A.

1994-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

87

Pre-heater for water heater  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an apparatus for pre-heating water prior to the water entering a conventional water heater comprising: heat exchanger means located inside the attic of a residential dwelling for effecting a heat exchange between hot air; vent pipe means connected to the continuous pipe; drain pipe means connected to the continuous pipe; fourth pipe means connected to the drain pipe means; fifth pipe means connected to the junction of the fourth pipe means; and the water heater means connected to the outlet of the heat exchanger means.

Blount, E.R.

1987-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

88

Heat pipe technology issues  

SciTech Connect

Critical high temperature, high power applications in space nuclear power designs are near the current state of the art of heat pipe technology in terms of power density, operating temperature, and lifetime. Recent heat pipe development work at Los Alamos National Laboratory has involved performance testing of typical space reactor heat pipe designs to power levels in excess of 19 kW/cm/sup 2/ axially and 300 W/cm/sup 2/ radially at temperatures in the 1400 to 1500 K range. Operation at conditions in the 10 kW/cm/sup 2/ range has been sustained for periods of up to 1000 hours without evidence of performance degradation. The effective length for heat transport in these heat pipes was from 1.0 to 1.5 M. Materials used were molybdenum alloys with lithium employed as the heat pipe operating fluid. Shorter, somewhat lower power, molybdenum heat pipes have been life tested at Los Alamos for periods of greater than 25,000 hours at 1700 K with lithium and 20,000 hours at 1500/sup 0/K with sodium. These life test demonstrations and the attendant performance limit investigations provide an experimental basis for heat pipe application in space reactor design and represent the current state-of-the-art of high temperature heat pipe technology.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Heat pipe heat amplifier  

SciTech Connect

In a heat pipe combination consisting of a common condenser section with evaporator sections at either end, two working fluids of different vapor pressures are employed to effectively form two heat pipe sections within the same cavity to support an amplifier mode of operation.

Arcella, F.G.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Heat pipe system  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe diode device for transferring heat from a heat source component to a heat sink wall is described. It contains a heat pipe body member attached to the best source; the heat source having a wall forming at least a portion of the normal evaporator section of the heat pipe diode; a working fluid within the body member; a cover for the heat pipe diode forming at least a portion of the heat sink wall; the cover forming the normal condenser for the heat pipe diode; a wick connected between the condenser and the evaporator of the heat pipe diode; means for retaining the wick adjacent the heat pipe wall; a wick support plate adjacent to the cover; the wick being attached to the support plate; means for holding the wick in contact with the cover; and means, responsive to excessive temperatures at the heat sink wall, for moving the support plate and a portion of the wick away from the cover to thereby substantially reduce heat flow in the reverse direction through said heat pipe diode device.

Kroebig, H.L.; Riha, F.J. III

1974-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

91

Heat pipe methanator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe methanator for converting coal gas to methane. Gravity return heat pipes are employed to remove the heat of reaction from the methanation promoting catalyst, transmitting a portion of this heat to an incoming gas pre-heat section and delivering the remainder to a steam generating heat exchanger.

Ranken, William A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1976-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

92

Unstable heat pipes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat pipes are an important feature of models of vapor-dominated geothermal reservoirs. Numerical experiments reveal that a vapor-dominated heat pipe is unstable if pressure is controlled at shallow levels. This instability is discussed in physical terms, and some implications for geothermal reservoirs are considered. 9 refs., 10 figs.

McGuinness, M.J.; Pruess, K.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Heat pipe development status  

SciTech Connect

Test heat pipes have been operated in the 1400 K to 1700 K range for periods in excess of 20,000 hours with the objective of understanding and controlling corrosion and failure mechanisms. The results of a post test analysis of one of these heat pipes that was operated for 25,216 hours at 1700 K are reviewed and the implications for heat pipe lifetime discussed. An in-process report of an investigation of transient heat pipe behavior is presented. This investigation is being conducted as a result of restart problems encountered during life test of a 2 m. radiation cooled heat pipe. The results of a series of shut-down tests from power and temperature are given and probable causes of the restart problem discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Extendable pipe crawler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe crawler is described having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radially outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of a pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm'-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figures.

Hapstack, M.

1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

95

Extendable pipe crawler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe crawler having a front leg assembly and a back leg assembly connected together by two air cylinders, each leg assembly having four extendable legs and a pair of actuators for sliding the extendable legs radically outward to increase the range of the legs when the pipe crawler enters a section of pipe having a larger diameter. The crawler crawls by inchworm''-like motion, the front leg assembly and back leg assembly alternately engaging and disengaging the wall of the pipe to hold the pipe crawler as the air cylinders alternately advance the front leg assembly and bring up the rear leg assembly. The pair of actuators of each leg assembly are parallel, adjacent and opposing acting so that each slides two adjacent extendable legs radially outward. 5 figs.

Hapstack, M.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

The Advantages of HDPE Piping & Vaults in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First in the world to produce 1600mm PE pipes Production of district heating pipes starts 1984 & telecom · Waste water treatment · House drainage · Under ground ventilation · Renovation · District heating & cooling · Special constructions · Marine intakes and outfalls · Welding, extrusion and blown

97

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, P.R.; McLennan, G.A.

1984-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

98

Fast reactor power plant design having heat pipe heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a pool-type fission reactor power plant design having a reactor vessel containing a primary coolant (such as liquid sodium), and a steam expansion device powered by a pressurized water/steam coolant system. Heat pipe means are disposed between the primary and water coolants to complete the heat transfer therebetween. The heat pipes are vertically oriented, penetrating the reactor deck and being directly submerged in the primary coolant. A U-tube or line passes through each heat pipe, extended over most of the length of the heat pipe and having its walls spaced from but closely proximate to and generally facing the surrounding walls of the heat pipe. The water/steam coolant loop includes each U-tube and the steam expansion device. A heat transfer medium (such as mercury) fills each of the heat pipes. The thermal energy from the primary coolant is transferred to the water coolant by isothermal evaporation-condensation of the heat transfer medium between the heat pipe and U-tube walls, the heat transfer medium moving within the heat pipe primarily transversely between these walls.

Huebotter, Paul R. (Western Springs, IL); McLennan, George A. (Downers Grove, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

SATURATED-SUBCOOLED STRATIFIED FLOW IN HORIZONTAL PIPES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced light water reactor systems are designed to use passive emergency core cooling systems with horizontal pipes that provide highly subcooled water from water storage tanks or passive heat exchangers to the reactor vessel core under accident conditions. Because passive systems are driven by density gradients, the horizontal pipes often do not flow full and thus have a free surface that is exposed to saturated steam and stratified flow is present.

Richard Schultz

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Hot Leg Piping Materials Issues  

SciTech Connect

With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the space nuclear power plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) the reactor outlet piping was recognized to require a design that utilizes internal insulation (Reference c). The initial pipe design suggested ceramic fiber blanket as the insulation material based on requirements associated with service temperature capability within the expected range, very low thermal conductivity, and low density. Nevertheless, it was not considered to be well suited for internal insulation use because its very high surface area and proclivity for holding adsorbed gases, especially water, would make outgassing a source of contaminant gases in the He-Xe working fluid. Additionally, ceramic fiber blanket insulating materials become very friable after relatively short service periods at working temperatures and small pieces of fiber could be dislodged and contaminate the system. Consequently, alternative insulation materials were sought that would have comparable thermal properties and density but superior structural integrity and greatly reduced outgassing. This letter provides technical information regarding insulation and materials issues for the Hot Leg Piping preconceptual design developed for the Project Prometheus space nuclear power plant (SNPP).

V. Munne

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Thermal analysis of a piston cooling system with reciprocating heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

The reciprocating heat pipe is a very promising technology in engine piston cooling, especially for heavy-duty diesel engines. The concept of the reciprocating heat pipe is verified through the experimental observation of a transparent heat pipe and by thermal testing of a copper/water reciprocating heat pipe. A comparative thermal analysis on the reciprocating heat pipe and gallery cooling systems is performed. The approximate analytical results show that the piston ring groove temperature can be significantly reduced using heat pipe cooling technology, which could contribute to an increase in engine thermal efficiency and a reduction in environmental pollution.

Cao, Y.; Wang, Q. [Florida International Univ., Miami, FL (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Piping stress handbook. Second edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abridged volume contains the following: Coefficients of thermal expansion. Allowable stress range for ANSI/ASME Power Piping Code B31.1. Stress intensification and flexibility factors. Pressure and stress ratios. Design criteria for allowable loads, moment, and stresses. Properties of pipe. Weight and dimensions of pipe and components. Pipe support selection and design. Fundamentals of expansion joints. Index.

Helguero, V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Flexible ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Pipe crawlers, pipe inspection {open_quotes}rabbits{close_quotes} and similar vehicles are widely used for inspecting the interior surfaces of piping systems, storage tanks and process vessels for damaged or flawed structural features. This paper describes the design of a flexible, modular ultrasonic pipe inspection apparatus.

Jenkins, C.F.; Howard, B.D.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Subsonic Tests of a Flush Air Data Sensing System Applied to a Fixed-Wing Micro Air Vehicle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flush air data sensing (FADS) systems have been successfully tested on the nose tip of large manned/unmanned air vehicles. In this paper we investigate the application of a FADS system on the wing leading edge of a micro (unmanned) air vehicle (MAV) ... Keywords: Extended minimum resource allocating neural networks, Fault accommodation, Flush air data sensing systems, Micro (unmanned) air vehicle

Ihab Samy; Ian Postlethwaite; Dawei Gu

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Freezable heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe whose fluid can be repeatedly frozen and thawed without damage to the casing. An additional part is added to a conventional heat pipe. This addition is a simple porous structure, such as a cylinder, self-supporting and free standing, which is dimensioned with its diameter not spanning the inside transverse dimension of the casing, and with its length surpassing the depth of maximum liquid.

Ernst, Donald M. (Leola, PA); Sanzi, James L. (Lancaster, PA)

1981-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

107

Have You Looked at Your Pipes Lately? | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Web sites. Addthis Related Articles Turn Down the Temp, But Don't Let Your Pipes Freeze Rooftop solar water heaters need regular maintenance to operate at peak efficiency. |...

108

Heat Pipe Integrated Microsystems  

SciTech Connect

The trend in commercial electronics packaging to deliver ever smaller component packaging has enabled the development of new highly integrated modules meeting the demands of the next generation nano satellites. At under ten kilograms, these nano satellites will require both a greater density electronics and a melding of satellite structure and function. Better techniques must be developed to remove the subsequent heat generated by the active components required to-meet future computing requirements. Integration of commercially available electronics must be achieved without the increased costs normally associated with current generation multi chip modules. In this paper we present a method of component integration that uses silicon heat pipe technology and advanced flexible laminate circuit board technology to achieve thermal control and satellite structure. The' electronics/heat pipe stack then becomes an integral component of the spacecraft structure. Thermal management on satellites has always been a problem. The shrinking size of electronics and voltage requirements and the accompanying reduction in power dissipation has helped the situation somewhat. Nevertheless, the demands for increased onboard processing power have resulted in an ever increasing power density within the satellite body. With the introduction of nano satellites, small satellites under ten kilograms and under 1000 cubic inches, the area available on which to place hot components for proper heat dissipation has dwindled dramatically. The resulting satellite has become nearly a solid mass of electronics with nowhere to dissipate heat to space. The silicon heat pipe is attached to an aluminum frame using a thermally conductive epoxy or solder preform. The frame serves three purposes. First, the aluminum frame provides a heat conduction path from the edge of the heat pipe to radiators on the surface of the satellite. Secondly, it serves as an attachment point for extended structures attached to the satellite such as solar panels, radiators, antenna and.telescopes (for communications or sensors). Finally, the packages make thermal contact to the surface of the silicon heat pipe through soft thermal pads. Electronic components can be placed on both sides of the flexible circuit interconnect. Silicon heat pipes have a number of advantages over heat pipe constructed from other materials. Silicon heat pipes offer the ability to put the heat pipe structure beneath the active components of a processed silicon wafer. This would be one way of efficiently cooling the heat generated by wafer scale integrated systems. Using this technique, all the functions of a satellite could be reduced to a few silicon wafers. The integration of the heat pipe and the electronics would further reduce the size and weight of the satellite.

Gass, K.; Robertson, P.J.; Shul, R.; Tigges, C.

1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Heat Pipe Performance Enhancement with Binary Mixture Fluids that Exhibit Strong Concentration Marangoni Effects.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This research investigates the impact of Marangoni phenomena, with low mixture concentrations of alcohol and water, to enhance thermal transport capability of gravity-assisted heat pipes.… (more)

Armijo, Kenneth Miguel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Effect of Working Fluid and Fluid Loading on the Performance of Rotating Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The steady state heat transfer performance of axially rotating heat pipes with methanol, ethanol and water as working fluid was measured for rotational speeds… (more)

Home, Deepayan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Removal of contaminants from fine-grained soils using electrokinetic flushing. Semiannual report, July 1 through December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report details the status of work conducted on the use of electrokinetics (EK) to remediate a fine grained soil contaminated with lead. The experimental work entails soil collection and characterization, soil adsorption and desorption of lead, and experimental setup construction and testing. Test soil was collected from Northern Erie County, New York and underwent standard preparation and physical/chemical characterization. The soil is a silt loam with a low hydraulic permeability ({approx} 10{sup {minus}7} cm/s), a large amount of fine materials, moderate organic carbon content, and a moderately high cation exchange capacity (CEC). The soil has a low indigenous lead content and is slightly acidic. The soil was artificially contaminated with lead to concentrations of 95, 800, and 7,600 mg Pb/kg soil. Lead desorption experiments were conducted using several concentrations of HCl, HNO{sub 3}, EDTA, CaCl{sub 2}, acetic acid, and tap water. HCl, HNO{sub 3}, and EDTA desorbed the majority of the soil-bound lead. Acetic acid and CaCl{sub 2} were less effective while tap water was ineffective. An experimental apparatus consisting of a consolidation unit and electrokinetic (EK) soil reactor to mimic EK flushing in the field was designed and constructed. The experimental unit underwent testing to determine if water could be moved through the soil under an applied electric current. Significant quantities of water were moved through soil. Based on limited results, water movement increased with increased conductivity. The pH and conductivity of the reservoir waters were monitored during the reactor testing. With time, the pH at the cathode dropped to less than 4 and at the anode was raised to about 10. Conductivities of the two reservoirs increased from their initial values because of ion migration from the soil into the reservoirs and the increase in either H{sup +} and OH{sup {minus}}.

Reed, B.E.; Berg, M.T.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Glass-heat-pipe evacuated-tube solar collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A glass heat pipe is adapted for use as a solar energy absorber in an evacuated tube solar collector and for transferring the absorbed solar energy to a working fluid medium or heat sink for storage or practical use. A capillary wick is formed of granular glass particles fused together by heat on the inside surface of the heat pipe with a water glass binder solution to enhance capillary drive distribution of the thermal transfer fluid in the heat pipe throughout the entire inside surface of the evaporator portion of the heat pipe. Selective coatings are used on the heat pipe surface to maximize solar absorption and minimize energy radiation, and the glass wick can alternatively be fabricated with granular particles of black glass or obsidian.

McConnell, R.D.; VanSant, J.H.

1981-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

113

Apparatus for moving a pipe inspection probe through piping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are disclosed for controllably moving devices for cleaning or inspection through piping systems, including piping systems with numerous piping bends therein, by using hydrostatic pressure of a working fluid introduced into the piping system. The apparatus comprises a reservoir or other source for supplying the working fluid to the piping system, a launch tube for admitting the device into the launcher and a reversible, positive displacement pump for controlling the direction and flow rate of the working fluid. The device introduced into the piping system moves with the flow of the working fluid through the piping system. The launcher attaches to the valved ends of a piping system so that fluids in the piping system can recirculate in a closed loop. The method comprises attaching the launcher to the piping system, supplying the launcher with working fluid, admitting the device into the launcher, pumping the working fluid in the direction and at the rate desired so that the device moves through the piping system for pipe cleaning or inspection, removing the device from the launcher, and collecting the working fluid contained in the launcher. 8 figs.

Zollinger, W.T.; Appel, D.K.; Lewis, G.W.

1995-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

114

Heat pipes and use of heat pipes in furnace exhaust  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An array of a plurality of heat pipe are mounted in spaced relationship to one another with the hot end of the heat pipes in a heated environment, e.g. the exhaust flue of a furnace, and the cold end outside the furnace. Heat conversion equipment is connected to the cold end of the heat pipes.

Polcyn, Adam D. (Pittsburgh, PA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

115

Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

67   3.2.3 Temperature-gradient (heat-pipe)water management ( e.g . , heat-pipe effect), examination ofsubstantially due to this heat-pipe effect. Due to the

Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

117

Piping inspection instrument carriage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, an instrument carriage for inspection of piping, comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including, an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360[degrees] about its axis.

Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.; Zollinger, W.T.; Heckendorn, F.M. II; Park, L.R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Piping inspection instrument carriage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, an instrument carriage for inspection of piping, comprises front and rear leg assemblies for engaging the interior of the piping and supporting and centering the carriage therein, an instrumentation arm carried by a shaft system running from front to rear leg assemblies. The shaft system has a screw shaft for moving the arm axially and a spline gear for moving the arm azimuthally. The arm has a pair of air cylinders that raise and lower a plate in the radial direction. On the plate are probes including, an eddy current probe and an ultrasonic testing probe. The ultrasonic testing probe is capable of spinning 360{degrees} about its axis.

Hapstack, M.; Talarek, T.R.; Zollinger, W.T.; Heckendorn, F.M. II; Park, L.R.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

119

Variable conductance heat pipe enhancement  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a heat pipe. It comprises a tubular hollow heat pipe having an evaporator end and an opposite condenser end, the heat pipe having a cross-sectional area and having a condenser length extending from the condenser end the condenser length including an active length where evaporated fluid condenses; an evaporatable and condensable fluid in the heat pipe for evaporating when receiving heat near the evaporation end and for condensing when giving up heat in the active length; a noncondensable gas near the condenser end and in the condenser length of the heat pipe; a restriction member fixed in the heat pipe near the condenser end, the restriction member extending only along a portion of the condenser length and being spaced away from the evaporation end of the heat pipe, the restriction member having a varied cross-sectional area along the length of the restriction member which is less than the cross-sectional area of the heat pipe for confining the gas and a portion of the fluid in the active condenser length, to an area around the restriction member and in the heat pipe; and a fixed ligament connected between the restriction member and the heat pipe for fixing the restriction member in the heat pipe, the ligament being fixed between the condenser end of the heat pipe end and an end of the restriction member which is closest to the condenser end.

Kneidel, K.E.

1991-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

120

Heat pipe applications workshop report  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings of the Heat Pipe Applications Workshop, held at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory October 20-21, 1977, are reported. This workshop, which brought together representatives of the Department of Energy and of a dozen industrial organizations actively engaged in the development and marketing of heat pipe equipment, was convened for the purpose of defining ways of accelerating the development and application of heat pipe technology. Recommendations from the three study groups formed by the participants are presented. These deal with such subjects as: (1) the problem encountered in obtaining support for the development of broadly applicable technologies, (2) the need for applications studies, (3) the establishment of a heat pipe technology center of excellence, (4) the role the Department of Energy might take with regard to heat pipe development and application, and (5) coordination of heat pipe industry efforts to raise the general level of understanding and acceptance of heat pipe solutions to heat control and transfer problems.

Ranken, W.A.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Niobium 1% zirconium/potassium and titanium/potassium life-test heat pipe design and testing  

SciTech Connect

Experimental lifetime performance studies currently in progress use Niobium-1% Zirconium (Nb-1Zr) and Titanium (Ti) heat pipes with potassium (K) as the working fluid. A heat pipe life-test matrix has been developed for testing the heat pipes. Because the corrosion rates in alkali metal heat pipes are affected by temperature and working fluid evaporation flux, the variable parameters of the experimental matrix are established as steady operating temperature and input heat flux density. Total impurity inventory is a factor in corrosion rate so impurity levels are being evaluated in the heat pipe materials before and after testing. Eight Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes were designed, fabricated, and tested. Two of the heat pipes have completed testing whereas the other six are currently in test. These are gravity-assist heat pipes operating in a reflux mode. The heat pipes are tested by sets, one set of two and two sets of three heat pipes. Three Ti/K heat pipes are also in life test. These heat pipes are tested as a set in a horizontal position in a capillary pumped annular flow mode. Each of the heat pipes is encapsulated in a quartz vacuum container with a water calorimeter over the vacuum container for power throughput measurements. Thermocouples are attached to the heat pipes for measuring temperature. Heat input to the heat pipes is via an rf coil. The heat pipes are operating at between 800 and 900 K, with heat input fluxes of 13.8 to 30 W/sq cm. Of the Nb-1Zr/K heat pipes, two of the heat pipes have been in operation for 14,000 hours, three over 10,000 hours, and three over 7,000 hours. The Ti/K heat pipes have been in operation for 1,266 hours. 5 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Instantaneous gas water heater  

SciTech Connect

Hot water supply temperature is set by a temperature setting device in response to an instantaneous flow rate signal from a water flow rate sensor arranged in a water supply pipe and a feeding water temperature signal from a feeding water temperature sensor which are compared with a predetermined hot water supply temperature and calculated in a control unit. A proportional valve and other devices in a gas supply pipe are controlled in response to the result of the comparison and calculation to define a required volume of gas for ignition and heating. At the same time, a fan damper is controlled by a damper control device so as to adjust the volume of combustion air. A signal representing discharging hot water temperature from a discharging hot water temperature sensor arranged in a hot water feeding pipe is fed back to the control unit and calculated therein, and a valve in the hot water supply pipe is adjusted in response to the result of calculation to attain the desired hot water supply temperature. In order to prevent freezing in the system in winter season, a signal from a thermostat in the water feeding pipe is transmitted to a heater arranged in an air supply chamber so as to heat a heat exchanger pipe and, at the same time, heaters arranged in the water feeding pipe and the hot water supply pipe are also controlled to prevent freezing.

Tsutsui, O.; Kuwahara, H.; Murakami, Sh.; Yasunaga, Sh.

1985-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

123

Drill pipe protector development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Geothermal Drilling Organization (GDO), formed in the early 1980s by the geothermal industry and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Division, sponsors specific development projects to advance the technologies used in geothermal exploration, drilling, and production phases. Individual GDO member companies can choose to participate in specific projects that are most beneficial to their industry segment. Sandia National Laboratories is the technical interface and contracting office for the DOE in these projects. Typical projects sponsored in the past have included a high temperature borehole televiewer, drill bits, muds/polymers, rotary head seals, and this project for drill pipe protectors. This report documents the development work of Regal International for high temperature geothermal pipe protectors.

Thomerson, C.; Kenne, R. [Regal International Corp., Corsicanna, TX (United States); Wemple, R.P. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [ed.] [and others

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis - Nuclear Engineering Multimedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Director's Welcome Organization Achievements Highlights Fact Sheets, Brochures & Other Documents Multimedia Library About Nuclear Energy Nuclear Reactors Designed by Argonne Argonne's Nuclear Science and Technology Legacy Opportunities within NE Division Visit Argonne Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Celebrating the 70th Anniversary of Chicago Pile 1 (CP-1) Argonne OutLoud on Nuclear Energy Argonne Energy Showcase 2012 Engineering Analysis Multimedia Bookmark and Share EA Multimedia, a collection of videos and audios featuring activities related to the Engineering Analysis Department Pipe-to-pipe impact analysis Quicktime video Quicktime Format - High Bandwidth | Size: 12 MB | Bit Rate:

125

Assessment of the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process for Mitigating Primary Water Stress Corrosion Cracking in Nickel Alloy Butt Welds in Piping Systems Approved for Leak-Before-Break  

SciTech Connect

This report provides an assessment of the use of Mechanical Stress Improvement Process to reduce, or decrease, stress-driven degradation, i.e., primary water stress corrosion cracking.

Sullivan, Edmund J.; Anderson, Michael T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Pipe Insulation Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pipe Insulation Economies is a computer program written in IBM basic to simplify the economic insulation thickness for an insulated pipe. Many articles have been written on this subject, from simple nomographs to a small book written in 1976 by the Federal Energy Administration, called "Economic Thickness for Industrial Insulation (ETI)." This paper is meant to fall somewhere between these extremes without sacrificing the accuracy necessary for economic considerations. Within this text, insulation is dealt with not as a material but as a method to slow heat transfer. To simplify the various mechanisms by which heat is transferred, the variable "thermal conductivity" is used. This is modeled for average insulation temperature. Another variable which has caused problems in the past is the ambient air film coefficient, or surface resistance. This program deals with this coefficient by making an initial assumption, then using an iterative process to refine the actual values before making the economic calculations. The program will use the input data to determine first of all the heat loss in BTU per hr/ft. of pipe. Using this result the lowest annual cost, therefore the most economical insulation thickness, is determined.

Schilling, R. E.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Transient performance investigation of a space power system heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

Start-up, shut-down, and peak power tests have been conducted with a molybdenum-lithium heat pipe at temperatures to 1500 K. The heat pipe was radiation coupled to a water cooled calorimeter for the tests with rf induction heating used for the input to the evaporator region. Maximum power throughput in the tests was 36.8 kw corresponding to a power density of 23 kw/cm/sup 2/ for the 1.4 cm diameter vapor space of the annular wick heat pipe. The corresponding evaporator flux density was approximately 150 w/cm/sup 2/ over an evaporator length of 40 cm at peak power. Condenser length for the tests was approximately 3.0 m. A variable geometry radiation shield was used to vary the load on the heat pipe during the tests. Results of the tests showed that liquid depletion in the evaporator region of the heat pipe could occur in shut-down and prevent restart of the heat pipe. Changes in surface emissivity of the heat pipe condenser surface were shown to affect the shut-down and re-start limits. 12 figs.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2004 through September 30, 2005 and contains the following discussions: (1) Qualification Testing; (2) Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; (3) Field Test Demonstration; and (4) Commercial order for SR-CDP from Torch International. The objective of this contract is to develop and demonstrate ''cost effective'' Composite Drill Pipe. It is projected that this drill pipe will weigh less than half of its steel counter part. The resultant weight reduction will provide enabling technology that will increase the lateral distance that can be reached from an offshore drilling platform and the depth of water in which drilling and production operations can be carried out. Further, composite drill pipe has the capability to carry real time signal and power transmission within the pipe walls. CDP can also accommodate much shorter drilling radius than is possible with metal drill pipe. As secondary benefits, the lighter weight drill pipe can increase the storage capability of floating off shore drilling platforms and provide substantial operational cost savings.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Steve Loya

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Heat pipe technology for coal-fired power systems  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of heat pipe R and D activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the 1977 to 1984 time period. The heat pipe development efforts were associated with a variety of DOE supported projects involving coal-fired prime movers for stationary power generation. The role of heat pipes for these power systems is in their potential application as thermal transport systems for integrating fluidized bed combustors (FBC) with prime movers ranging from Stirling engines in total energy systems (approx.10 MWe) to closed-cycle gas turbines in central power plants (approx.1000 MWe). The results of initial investigations at ANL demonstrated that high-temperature sodium heat pipes provided the best heat exchanger technology for integrating Stirling engines with coal-fired FBC systems. A major accomplishment included the development and validation of a computer code (ANL/HTP) which calculates heat pipe operating limits and other significant characteristics necessary for power plant design. A number of developmental and prototype heat pipes were designed and fabricated through a subcontract effort with Thermacore, Inc., and delivered to ANL for performance testing. Preliminary test results from ANL's Heat Pipe Test Facility, using induction heating and a gas-water calorimeter to establish energy balances, are given in the report. Test data obtained to date are consistent with ANL/HTP code predictions. 47 refs., 53 figs., 22 tabs.

Uherka, K.L.; Holtz, R.E.; McLennan, G.A.; Koehl, E.R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Cost-effective solar collectors using heat pipes. Interim progress report No. 2, April 1978-September 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heat pipe fluid-vessel combinations continued to be life tested at design and stagnation conditions for time periods exceeding 14,000 hours. Additional testing was carried out at the lower end of the environment temperature range by freeze-thaw testing of several water heat pipes. Additional fluids search work resulted in developing a procedure to purify trimethylborate. Eight trimethylborate heat pipes were fabricated and installed in a modified GE TC-100 solar panel. Solar performance tests were performed on the heat pipe collector and a standard TC-100 collector. Heat pipe collector performance exceeded 90% of the TC-100. A source of water compatible steel, NP454, was identified as was an experimental tubing manufacturer. The current availability of NP454 and the successful demonstration of antifreeze mechanisms lays the ground work for testing a heat pipe collector using water heat pipes.

Ernst, D.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

ELDON water heater  

SciTech Connect

Experience with the installation of an ELDON water heater in the TLC Services, Inc. laundry facility is reported. Piping diagram and pictures are included. (MHR)

Wood, H.E.

1980-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

132

Investigation of the heat pipe arrays for convective electronic cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combined experimental and analytical investigation was conducted to evaluate a heat pipe convective cooling device consisting of sixteen small copper/water heat pipes mounted vertically in a 4x4 array 25.4 mm square. The analytical portion of the investigation focused on determination of the maximum heat transport capacity and the resistance of the individual heat pipes. The resistance of each beat pipe was found to be 2.51 K/Watt, or more than 3 times smaller than the resistance produced by a solid copper rod with the same dimensions. The maximum predicted heat rejection for the module was over 50 Watts, or a power density in excess of 7.75 Watts/CM2. In the experimental portion of the investigation, two different modules were tested. The first module utilized ten circular aluminum fins mounted on the condenser end of each heat pipe to enhance heat rejection, while the second contained only the sixteen copper/water heat pipes. The effects of flow velocity, input power, and base plate temperature on the overall thermal resistance and the heat rejection capacity were determined, as well as the pressure drop resulting from each module. The finned heat pipe array was found to have a lower overall thermal resistance and thus, a higher heat rejection capacity, but also resulted in a significantly larger pressure drop than the array without fins. The results of the heat pipe array experiments were also compared with experimental and empirical results obtained from flow over a flat plate 25.4 mm square.

Howard, Alicia Ann Harris

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

134

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Futhermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swages end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

135

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

136

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat pipe support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation Emerging Technologies Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's...

138

Pipe crawler with stabilizing midsection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe crawler is described having a midsection that provides the stability and flexibility to allow the pipe crawler to negotiate curved and uneven segments of piping while traveling through piping systems. The pipe crawler comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a midsection with a gimbal at each end for connecting the midsection to the front and rear leg assemblies in a flexible manner, and an air cylinder for changing the distance between the front and rear leg assemblies. The pipe crawler moves in ''inch worm'' fashion with the front and rear leg assemblies alternating between an extended and a retracted position as the air cylinder moves the retracted leg assembly forward. The midsection has a plurality of legs extending radially for holding the midsection within a maximum displacement from the piping axis so that the gimbals are not pivoted to extreme angles where they might lock up or seize. When the midsection is displaced sufficiently, its legs with wheels on each end engage the interior surface of the piping and prevent further displacement. Using two gimbals divides the angle between the planes defined by the front and rear leg assemblies which also helps to prevent excessive gimbal pivoting. 5 figures.

Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

139

Geothermal district piping - A primer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transmission and distribution piping constitutes approximately 40 -60% of the capital costs of typical geothermal district heating systems. Selections of economical piping suitable for the fluid chemistry is critical. Presently, most piping (56%) in geothermal systems is of asbestos cement construction. Some fiberglass (19%) and steel (19%) is also in use. Identification of an economical material to replace asbestos cement is important to future project development. By providing information on relative costs, purchase considerations, existing material performance and new products, this report seeks to provide a background of information to the potential pipe purchaser. A brief discussion of the use of uninsulated piping in geothermal district heating systems is also provided. 5 refs., 19 figs., 1 tab.

Rafferty, K.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The conversion of radiant heat to electricity by a heat pipe-turbogenerator combination is described. The heat pipe-tubogenerator assembly is suitably externally insulated, as by a vacuum shield, to prevent heat losses and heat is recovered from the condenser portion of the heat pipe and returned to the evaporator portions. An application of the generic invention is discussed which it is employed on wall or roof portions of a building and serves as at least a partial supporting structure for these. In another application the solar heat pipe feedback turbogenerator may be incorporated in or used with reflective means, such as reflective sheet material of large area positioned to direct solar radiation onto the evaporator section of the heat pipe. The reflective means may be changed in position to follow the sun to produce maximum power during operation.

Decker, B.J.

1978-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Promethus Hot Leg Piping Concept  

SciTech Connect

The Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommended the development of a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton energy conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for NASA's Project Prometheus. The section of piping between the reactor outlet and turbine inlet, designated as the hot leg piping, required unique design features to allow the use of a nickel superalloy rather than a refractory metal as the pressure boundary. The NRPCT evaluated a variety of hot leg piping concepts for performance relative to SNPP system parameters, manufacturability, material considerations, and comparison to past high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) practice. Manufacturability challenges and the impact of pressure drop and turbine entrance temperature reduction on cycle efficiency were discriminators between the piping concepts. This paper summarizes the NRPCT hot leg piping evaluation, presents the concept recommended, and summarizes developmental issues for the recommended concept.

AM Girbik; PA Dilorenzo

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

142

Functional capability of piping systems  

SciTech Connect

General Design Criterion I of Appendix A to Part 50 of Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations requires, in part, that structures, systems, and components important to safety be designed to withstand the effects of earthquakes without a loss of capability to perform their safety function. ne function of a piping system is to convey fluids from one location to another. The functional capability of a piping system might be lost if, for example, the cross-sectional flow area of the pipe were deformed to such an extent that the required flow through the pipe would be restricted. The objective of this report is to examine the present rules in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, and potential changes to these rules, to determine if they are adequate for ensuring the functional capability of safety-related piping systems in nuclear power plants.

Terao, D.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Pressure vessel and piping codes  

SciTech Connect

Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code contains simplified design formulas for placing bounds on the plastic deformations in nuclear power plant piping systems. For Class 1 piping a simple equation is given in terms of primary load stress indices (B/sub 1/ and B/sub 2/) and nominal pressure and bending stresses. The B/sub 1/ and B/sub 2/ stress indices reflect the capacities of various piping products to carry load without gross plastic deformation. In this paper, the significance of the indices, nominal stresses, and limits given in the Code for Class 1 piping and corresponding requirements for Class 2 and Class 3 piping are discussed. Motivation behind recent (1978-1981) changes in the indices and in the associated stress limits is presented.

Moore, S.E.; Rodabaugh, E.C.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Heat pipe technology quarterly literature review. Volume 1, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 110 citations is presented. The citations are arranged in five sections on general information on heat pipes, heat pipe applications, heat pipe theory, heat pipe design, development, and fabrication, and heat pipe testing and operation.

Srinivasan, R.; Gonzales, R.W. (eds.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Comparison of heat transfer in solar collectors with heat pipe versus flow through absorbers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analysis of heat transfer in solar collectors with heat pipe absorbers is compared to that for collectors with flow through absorbers. Both pumped and thermosiphon systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids are discussed. In these applications the heat pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat pipe condenser and system manifold. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow through absorber.

Hull, J.R.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Centrifugal Modeling of Seismic Behavior of Large-Diameter Pipe in Liquefiable Soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thick, was used to create a water-tight containment for the saturated sand deposit in the lami- nar box pipe in a laminar box under 30g gravitational field. The ground was prepared with Nevada sand in a fine sand. The pipe had adequate factor of safety to resist flotation under static conditions. However

Ling, Hoe I.

147

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

148

Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA); Wetmore, Sherman B. (Westminster, CA); McNary, James F. (Santa Ana, CA)

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

149

Crimp sealing of tubes flush with or below a fixed surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for crimp sealing and severing tubes flush or below a fixed surface. Tube crimping below a fixed surface requires an asymmetric die and anvil configuration. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes. This asymmetric die and anvil is used when a ductile metal tube and valve assembly are attached to a pressure vessel which has a fixed surface around the base of the tube at the pressure vessel. A flat anvil is placed against the tube. Die guides are placed against the tube on a side opposite the anvil. A pinch-off die is inserted into the die guides against the tube. Adequate clearance for inserting the die and anvil around the tube is needed below the fixed surface. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes.

Fischer, J.E.; Walmsley, D.; Wapman, P.D.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

150

Crimp sealing of tubes flush with or below a fixed surface  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for crimp sealing and severing tubes flush or below a fixed surface. Tube crimping below a fixed surface requires an asymmetric die and anvil configuration. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes. This asymmetric die and anvil is used when a ductile metal tube and valve assembly are attached to a pressure vessel which has a fixed surface around the base of the tube at the pressure vessel. A flat anvil is placed against the tube. Die guides are placed against the tube on a side opposite the anvil. A pinch-off die is inserted into the die guides against the tube. Adequate clearance for inserting the die and anvil around the tube is needed below the fixed surface. The anvil must be flat so that, after crimping, it may be removed without deforming the crimped tubes. 8 figs.

Fischer, J.E.; Walmsley, D.; Wapman, P.D.

1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

151

Micro-Columnated Loop Heat Pipe: The Future of Electronic Substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loop Heat Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Heat Pipes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of operation of a heat pipe [13]. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dhillon, Navdeep Singh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Waste heat recovery system having thermal sleeve support for heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A system for recovering waste heat from a stream of heated gas is disclosed. The system includes a convection heat transfer chamber, a boiler tank, and a plurality of heat pipes thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. Each of the heat pipes includes an evaporator section which is disposed in heat transfer relation with a stream of heated gas flowing through the convection heat transfer chamber, and a condenser section disposed in heat transfer relation with a volume of water contained within the boiler tank. The boiler tank is provided with a header plate having an array of heat pipe openings through which the heat pipes project. A heat support sleeve is received in each heat pipe opening in sealed engagement with the header plate, with the heat pipes projecting through the support sleeves and thermally interconnecting the convection heat transfer chamber with the boiler tank. An intermediate portion of each heat pipe is received in sealed engagement with its associated support sleeve. In a preferred embodiment, heat transfer through the support sleeve is minimized in an arrangement in which each heat pipe opening is reduced by a stepped bore with the support sleeve connected in threaded, sealed engagement with the stepped bore. Furthermore, in this arrangement, the support sleeve has swaged end portions which project beyond the header plate and engage the heat pipe on opposite sides at points which are remote with respect to the support sleeve/header plate interface. One of the swaged end portions is sealed against the heat pipe in a fluid-tight union within the boiler tank. The support sleeve is radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe, and is also radially spaced with respect to the heat pipe opening whereby heat transfer through the walls of the heat pipe to the support sleeve and to the header plate is minimized by concentric annular air gaps.

McCurley, J.

1984-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

153

Selenide isotope generator for the Galileo Mission. Axially-grooved heat pipe: accelerated life test results  

SciTech Connect

The results through SIG/Galileo contract close-out of accelerated life testing performed from June 1978 to June 1979 on axially-grooved, copper/water heat pipes are presented. The primary objective of the test was to determine the expected lifetime of axially-grooved copper/water heat pipes. The heat pipe failure rate, due to either a leak or a build-up of non-condensible gas, was determined. The secondary objective of the test was to determine the effects of time and temperature on the thermal performance parameters relevant to long-term (> 50,000 h) operation on a space power generator. The results showed that the gas generation rate appears to be constant with time after an initial sharp rise although there are indications that it drops to approximately zero beyond approx. 2000 h. During the life test, the following pipe-hours were accumulated: 159,000 at 125/sup 0/C, 54,000 at 165/sup 0/C, 48,000 at 185/sup 0/C, and 8500 at 225/sup 0/C. Heated hours per pipe ranged from 1000 to 7500 with an average of 4720. Applying calculated acceleration factors yields the equivalent of 930,000 pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C. Including the accelerated hours on vendor tested pipes raises this number to 1,430,000 pipe-hours at 125/sup 0/C. It was concluded that, for a heat pipe temperature of 125/sup 0/C and a mission time of 50,000 h, the demonstrated heat pipe reliability is between 80% (based on 159,000 actual pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C) and 98% (based on 1,430,000 accelerated pipe-h at 125/sup 0/C). Measurements indicate some degradation of heat transfer with time, but no detectable degradation of heat transport. (LCL)

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

CX-005514: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

2F Evaporator Feed Pump Flush Water Piping Pipe SupportCX(s) Applied: B2.5Date: 02/03/2011Location(s): Aiken, South CarolinaOffice(s): Environmental Management, Savannah River Operations Office

155

Heat pipe transient response approximation.  

SciTech Connect

A simple and concise routine that approximates the response of an alkali metal heat pipe to changes in evaporator heat transfer rate is described. This analytically based routine is compared with data from a cylindrical heat pipe with a crescent-annular wick that undergoes gradual (quasi-steady) transitions through the viscous and condenser boundary heat transfer limits. The sonic heat transfer limit can also be incorporated into this routine for heat pipes with more closely coupled condensers. The advantages and obvious limitations of this approach are discussed. For reference, a source code listing for the approximation appears at the end of this paper.

Reid, R. S. (Robert Stowers)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Light pipe - design for efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high cost and availability of materials which are clear enough to transmit light without absorption has limited the idea of piping large-scale quantities of light. The light pipe uses the principle of Total Internal Reflection, with the light guided by very accurate prisms. The transmission of light directed into the end of a Light Pipe at an angle of less than 27.6 degrees is theoretically 100% efficient. The author describes its uses and advantages for lighting offices, cold storage areas, difficult access and hazardous areas, and for solar lighting. Future directions will be to improve the economics and accuracy of the technology. 4 references, 2 figures.

Hockey, S.N.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Leachate storage transport tanker loadout piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report shows the modifications to the W-025 Trench No. 31 leachate loadout discharge piping, and also the steps involved in installing the discharge piping, including dimensions and welding information. The installation of the discharge pipe should be done in accordance to current pipe installation standards. Trench No. 31 is a radioactive mixed waste land disposal facility.

Whitlock, R.W.

1994-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

158

10 MWe solar pilot plant, Daggett, California. Flushing and steam blows preoperational test procedure 980. Revision: 0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prescribed steps are given for flushing and steam blowing the condenser hotwell, deaerator, inline demineralizers, thermal storage subsystem flash tank, and steam lines of the Barstow Solar Pilot Plant. Included are acceptance criteria, precautions, a list of test equipment, initial conditions, procedures and data collection, and system restoration. (LEW)

Williams, D.L.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Training reduces stuck pipe costs and incidents  

SciTech Connect

Properly administered initial and refresher stuck pipe training courses have dramatically reduced the cost and number of stuck pipe incidents for many companies worldwide. These training programs have improved operator and contractor crew awareness of stuck pipe risks and fostered a team commitment in averting such incidents. The success is evident in the achievements of the companies sponsoring such training. Preventing and minimizing stuck pipe is the most significant benefit of stuck pipe training, but crews also benefit from becoming more knowledgeable about the drilling program and equipment operation. The paper discusses stuck pipe costs, stuck pipe training, prevention of stuck pipes, well bore stability, geopressured formation, reactive formation, reactive formations, unconsolidated formations, mobile formations, fractured and faulted formations, differential sticking, 8 other causes of stuck pipe, and freeing stuck pipe.

Watson, B. (Global Marine Drilling Co., Houston, TX (United States)); Smith, R. (Randy Smith Drilling School, Lafayette, LA (United States))

1994-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nitrogen heat pipe for cryocooler thermal shunt  

SciTech Connect

A nitrogen heat pipe was designed, built and tested for the purpose of providing a thermal shunt between the two stages of a Gifford-McMahan (GM) cryocooler during cooldown. The nitrogen heat pipe has an operating temperature range between 63 and 123 K. While the heat pipe is in the temperature range during the system cooldown, it acts as a thermal shunt between the first and second stage of the cryocooler. The heat pipe increases the heat transfer to the first stage of the cryocooler, thereby reducing the cooldown time of the system. When the heat pipe temperature drops below the triple point, the nitrogen working fluid freezes, effectively stopping the heat pipe operation. A small heat leak between cryocooler stages remains because of axial conduction along the heat pipe wall. As long as the heat pipe remains below 63 K, the heat pipe remains inactive. Heat pipe performance limits were measured and the optimum fluid charge was determined.

Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Green, G.F.; Roth, E.W. [Naval Surface Warfare Center, Annapolis, MD (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Compilation of EPRI High Energy Piping Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for highenergy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utilitys inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, many major failures of fossil highenergy piping have been associated with flowaccelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seamwelded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these welldocumented failures, most utilities experience failures of supp...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

162

B Plant process piping replacement feasibility study  

SciTech Connect

Reports on the feasibility of replacing existing embedded process piping with new more corrosion resistant piping between cells and between cells and a hot pipe trench of a Hanford Site style canyon facility. Provides concepts for replacement piping installation, and use of robotics to replace the use of the canyon crane as the primary means of performing/supporting facility modifications (eg, cell lining, pipe replacement, equipment reinstallation) and operational maintenenace.

Howden, G.F.

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

163

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

1980-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

164

Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe with an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough. 4 figs.

Shirey, R.A.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

165

Heat Pipes: An Industrial Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews the basics of heat pipe exchangers. Included are how they are constructed, how they operate, where they have application, and various aspects of evaluating a potential application. After discussing the technical aspects of heat pipe exchangers, an industrial case history is presented. The case history involves a retrofit project which added heat pipes to five natural draft process heaters with a combined heat duty of 150 M Btu/hr. A heat recovery of 15 M Btu/hr has resulted from the flue gas/combustion air interchange. The paper will include design considerations, and operating and maintenance history since early 1980. A second application for heat pipes with a 12 M Btu/hr duty installed in 1983 will also be discussed.

Murray, F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Corrugated pipe adhesive applicator apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for coating selected portions of the troughs of a corrugated pipe within an adhesive includes a support disposed within the pipe with a reservoir containing the adhesive disposed on the support. A pump, including a spout, is utilized for supplying the adhesive from the reservoir to a trough of the pipe. A rotatable applicator is supported on the support and contacts the trough of the pipe. The applicator itself is sized so as to fit within the trough, and contacts the adhesive in the trough and spreads the adhesive in the trough upon rotation. A trough shield, supported by the support and disposed in the path of rotation of the applicator, is utilized to prevent the applicator from contacting selected portions of the trough. A locator head is also disposed on the support and provides a way for aligning the spout, the applicator, and the trough shield with the trough.

Shirey, Ray A. (North Grafton, MA)

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

167

Embedded Pipe Dose Calculation Method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear plants contain thousands of feet of process piping embedded in walls, ceilings, and floors, many of which have radioactive contamination on internal surfaces. Decommissioning of these plants requires determining the level and character of contamination and removing the activity to levels commensurate with requirements for disposal or release. This report investigates and evaluates some measurement techniques for determining activities on internal surfaces of embedded piping through a series of co...

2000-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

168

Heat pipe turbine vane cooling  

SciTech Connect

The applicability of using heat pipe principles to cool gas turbine vanes is addressed in this beginning program. This innovative concept involves fitting out the vane interior as a heat pipe and extending the vane into an adjacent heat sink, thus transferring the vane incident heat transfer through the heat pipe to heat sink. This design provides an extremely high heat transfer rate and a uniform temperature along the vane due to the internal change of phase of the heat pipe working fluid. Furthermore, this technology can also eliminate hot spots at the vane leading and trailing edges and increase the vane life by preventing thermal fatigue cracking. There is also the possibility of requiring no bleed air from the compressor, and therefore eliminating engine performance losses resulting from the diversion of compressor discharge air. Significant improvement in gas turbine performance can be achieved by using heat pipe technology in place of conventional air cooled vanes. A detailed numerical analysis of a heat pipe vane will be made and an experimental model will be designed in the first year of this new program.

Langston, L.; Faghri, A. [Connecticut Univ., Storrs, CT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Piping inspection round robin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The piping inspection round robin was conducted in 1981 at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to quantify the capability of ultrasonics for inservice inspection and to address some aspects of reliability for this type of nondestructive evaluation (NDE). The round robin measured the crack detection capabilities of seven field inspection teams who employed procedures that met or exceeded the 1977 edition through the 1978 addenda of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Section 11 Code requirements. Three different types of materials were employed in the study (cast stainless steel, clad ferritic, and wrought stainless steel), and two different types of flaws were implanted into the specimens (intergranular stress corrosion cracks (IGSCCs) and thermal fatigue cracks (TFCs)). When considering near-side inspection, far-side inspection, and false call rate, the overall performance was found to be best in clad ferritic, less effective in wrought stainless steel and the worst in cast stainless steel. Depth sizing performance showed little correlation with the true crack depths.

Heasler, P.G.; Doctor, S.R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Internal cathodic protection of cement-lined steel pipes  

SciTech Connect

Internally coated, cement-lined, carbon steel pipes have been used extensively for ballast- and service-water systems offshore. Mechanical cracking of the lining, undercutting, and erosion have resulted in corrosion and system leaks. Cathodic protection is one alternative that has been evaluated as a solution. Cathodic protection normally gives limited protection when applied internally to a pipeline system. Tests have been performed to evaluate this hypothesis and the possibility of improved current distribution due to the cement lining. This paper presents the test results as well as a solution to the problem. Internally coated, cement-lined steel pipes are used for ballast-water, service-water, and fire-water systems in the offshore oil and gas production industry.

Jensen, F.O. (Sharpnord Corrosion, P.O. Box 46, 3971 Langesund (NO)); Tems, R.D. (Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., P.O. Box 510, 4001 Stavanger (NO))

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Transient heat pipe investigations for space power systems  

SciTech Connect

A 4-meter long, high temperature, high power, molybdenum-lithium heat pipe has been fabricated and tested in transient and steady state operation at temperatures to 1500 K. Maximum power throughput during the tests was approximately 37 kW/cm/sup 2/ for the 1.4 cm diameter vapor space of the annular wick heat pipe. The evaporator flux density for the tests was 150.0 W/cm/sup 2/ over a length of 40 cm. Condenser length was approximately 3.0 m with radiant heat rejection from the condenser to a coaxial, water cooled radiation calorimeter. A variable radiation shield, controllable from the outside of the vacuum enclosure, was used to vary the load on the heat pipe during the tests. 1 ref., 9 figs.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Modeling of pulsating heat pipes.  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a computer model that describes the behavior of pulsating heat pipes (PHP). The purpose of the project was to develop a highly efficient (as compared to the heat transfer capability of solid copper) thermal groundplane (TGP) using silicon carbide (SiC) as the substrate material and water as the working fluid. The objective of this project is to develop a multi-physics model for this complex phenomenon to assist with an understanding of how PHPs operate and to be able to understand how various parameters (geometry, fill ratio, materials, working fluid, etc.) affect its performance. The physical processes describing a PHP are highly coupled. Understanding its operation is further complicated by the non-equilibrium nature of the interplay between evaporation/condensation, bubble growth and collapse or coalescence, and the coupled response of the multiphase fluid dynamics among the different channels. A comprehensive theory of operation and design tools for PHPs is still an unrealized task. In the following we first analyze, in some detail, a simple model that has been proposed to describe PHP behavior. Although it includes fundamental features of a PHP, it also makes some assumptions to keep the model tractable. In an effort to improve on current modeling practice, we constructed a model for a PHP using some unique features available in FLOW-3D, version 9.2-3 (Flow Science, 2007). We believe that this flow modeling software retains more of the salient features of a PHP and thus, provides a closer representation of its behavior.

Givler, Richard C.; Martinez, Mario J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Probabilistic pipe fracture evaluations for leak-rate-detection applications  

SciTech Connect

Regulatory Guide 1.45, {open_quotes}Reactor Coolant Pressure Boundary Leakage Detection Systems,{close_quotes} was published by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in May 1973, and provides guidance on leak detection methods and system requirements for Light Water Reactors. Additionally, leak detection limits are specified in plant Technical Specifications and are different for Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWRs). These leak detection limits are also used in leak-before-break evaluations performed in accordance with Draft Standard Review Plan, Section 3.6.3, {open_quotes}Leak Before Break Evaluation Procedures{close_quotes} where a margin of 10 on the leak detection limit is used in determining the crack size considered in subsequent fracture analyses. This study was requested by the NRC to: (1) evaluate the conditional failure probability for BWR and PWR piping for pipes that were leaking at the allowable leak detection limit, and (2) evaluate the margin of 10 to determine if it was unnecessarily large. A probabilistic approach was undertaken to conduct fracture evaluations of circumferentially cracked pipes for leak-rate-detection applications. Sixteen nuclear piping systems in BWR and PWR plants were analyzed to evaluate conditional failure probability and effects of crack-morphology variability on the current margins used in leak rate detection for leak-before-break.

Rahman, S.; Ghadiali, N.; Paul, D.; Wilkowski, G. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Heat pipes for enhanced cooldown of cyrogenic systems  

SciTech Connect

In many important cryogenic applications the use of liquid cryogens for system cooling are either not feasible or are unsuitable. In such cases a cryogenic refrigeration system or multi stage cryocooler must be employed to provide the necessary cooling. To shorten cooldown time for such a system, especially if the thermal mass is large, a thermal shunt directly connecting the first stage of the cryocooler to the load during cooldown is desirable. This thermal shunt allows effective utilization of the greater cooling power available from the first stage of the cryocooler early in the cooldown. Upon reaching operating temperature, the thermal shunt must exhibit a high resistance to thermally isolate the first stage of the cryocooler from the load. Heat pipes are well suited to achieve these objectives. The Advanced Lightweight Influence Sweep System (ALISS), under development by the U.S. Navy for shallow water magnetic mine countermeasures, employs a large, conductively cooled, superconducting magnet that must be cooled from 300 to 4.2 K. Cryogenic heat pipes acting as cryocooler thermal shunts are used to shorten the cooldown time. Ethane, nitrogen and oxygen were evaluated as possible working fluids. A thermal model of the ALISS was developed to evaluate the cooldown performance of various heat pipe combinations. In conjunction with heat pipe performance tests, this model was used to select a suitable design for the heat pipe thermal shunts.

Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Daney, D.E.; Daugherty, M.A.; Green, G.F.; Chafe, J.; Heiberger, M.; Langhorn, A.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Methods for Cleaning and Evaluating Pipe-Type Cable Pipes for Retrofit with Extruded Dielectric Cable Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes studies of pipe cleaning, "pigging," inspecting, and testing pipe-type cable pipes for re-conditioning as conduits compatible with extruded dielectric cables.

2001-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

Barclay, J.A.; Prenger, F.C. Jr.

1985-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

177

Magnetic refrigeration apparatus with heat pipes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic refrigerator operating in the 4 to 20 K range utilizes heat pipes to transfer heat to and from the magnetic material at the appropriate points during the material's movement. In one embodiment circular disks of magnetic material can be interleaved with the ends of the heat pipes. In another embodiment a mass of magnetic material reciprocatingly moves between the end of the heat pipe of pipes that transmits heat from the object of cooling to the magnetic material and the end of the heat pipe or pipes that transmits heat from the magnetic material to a heat sink.

Barclay, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, Jr., F. Coyne (Madison, WI)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Pipe crawler with extendable legs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a pipe crawler for moving through a pipe in inchworm fashion having front and rear leg assemblies separated by air cylinders to increase and decrease the spacing. between assemblies. Each leg of the four legs of an assembly is moved between a wall-engaging, extended position and a retracted position by a separate air cylinder. The air cylinders of the leg assemblies are preferably arranged in pairs of oppositely directed cylinders with no pair laying in the same axial plane as another pair. Therefore, the cylinders can be as long as a leg assembly is wide and the crawler can crawl through sections of pipes where the diameter is twice that of other sections. The crawler carries a valving system, a manifold to distribute air supplied by a single umbilical air hose to the various air cylinders in a sequence controlled electrically by a controller. The crawler also utilizes a rolling mechanism, casters in this case, to reduce friction between the crawler and pipe wall thereby further extending the range of the pipe crawler.

Zollinger, W.T.

1991-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Circulo: Saving Energy with Just-In-Time Hot Water Recirculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The average home in the US flushes 1000's of gallons of water down the drain each year while standing at the fixture and waiting for hot water. Some households use a pump for hot water recirculation (HWR) to ensure that hot water is always immediately ... Keywords: Energy and Water Conservation, Hot Water Recirculation

Andrew Frye, Michel Goraczko, Jie Liu, Anindya Prodhan, Kamin Whitehouse

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Operation characteristics of cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to investigate the operation characteristics of a cylindrical miniature grooved heat pipe using aqueous CuO nanofluid as the working fluid at some steady cooling conditions. The experiments were carried out under both the steady operation process and the unsteady startup process. The experiment results show that substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid can apparently improve the thermal performance of the heat pipe for steady operation. The total heat resistance and the maximum heat removal capacity of the heat pipe using nanofluids can maximally reduce by 50% and increase by 40% compared with that of the heat pipe using water, respectively. For unsteady startup process, substituting the nanofluid for water as the working fluid, cannot only improve the thermal performance, but also reduce significantly the startup time. (author)

Wang, Guo-Shan; Song, Bin; Liu, Zhen-Hua [School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 200240 Shanghai (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis of heat-pipe absorbers in evacuated-tube solar collectors  

SciTech Connect

Heat transfer in evacuated-tube solar collectors with heat-pipe absorbers is compared with that for similar collectors with flow-through absorbers. In systems that produce hot water or other heated fluids, the heat-pipe absorber suffers a heat transfer penalty compared with the flow-through absorber, but in many cases the penalty can be minimized by proper design at the heat-pipe condenser and system manifold. The heat transfer penalty decreases with decreasing collector heat loss coefficient, suggesting that evacuated tubes with optical concentration are more appropriate for use with heat pipes than evacuated or nonevacuated flat-plate collectors. When the solar collector is used to drive an absorption chiller, the heat-pipe absorber has better heat transfer characteristics than the flow-through absorbers.

Hull, J.R.; Schertz, W.W.; Allen, J.W.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Alternate Water Supply System  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Alternate Water Supply Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1570 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management U.S. Department of Energy This page intentionally left blank DOE-LM/1570-2008 Alternate Water Supply System Flushing Report Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site January 2008 Work Performed by S.M. Stoller Corporation under DOE Contract No. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Grand Junction, Colorado This page intentionally left blank

183

Heat pipe thermal control of irradiation capsules  

SciTech Connect

From 1st international heat pipe conference; Stuttgart, F.R. Germany (15 Oct 1973). The use of heat pipes to control the temperature of irradiation capsules containing fast breeder reactor structural materials is discussed. (TFD)

Deverall, J.E.

1974-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

184

Flat heat pipe design, construction, and analysis  

SciTech Connect

This paper details the design, construction and partial analysis of a low temperature flat heat pipe in order to determine the feasibility of implementing flat heat pipes into thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion systems.

Voegler, G.; Boughey, B.; Cerza, M.; Lindler, K.W.

1999-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

185

PICEP: Pipe Crack Evaluation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a computer program that calculates the crack-opening area, the critical (stable) crack length and the two-phase flow rate through cracks in ductile stainless steel pipes and steam generator tubes. The program is useful in performing leak-before-break calculations in order to demonstrate detectable leak rates prior to a through-wall flaw reaching critical size. Necessary input to the code includes a definition of material properties, loads, thermal-hydraulic conditions, pipe geometry, and crack orientation. User information is provided in the report.

Norris, D.; Okamoto, A.; Chexal, B.; Griesbach, T.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Geographic Resource Map of Frozen Pipe Probabilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation slide details a resource map showing the probability of frozen pipes in the geographic United States.

187

Guide for Piping Stress Analysis and Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report gives recommendations for piping analysis methods and integration with inspection and operating data to give estimates of risk and remaining life. The scope of the document is as follows: Objectives of piping assessment Selected literature review of assessment practices for piping and other relevant components Failure modes Inspection and operating data Piping analysis: methods and data Risk assessment Integration of analysis, inspection, and operating data for assessments and recommendations...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

188

Reduce Pumping Costs through Optimum Pipe Sizing  

SciTech Connect

BestPractices Program tip sheet discussing pumping system efficiency by reducing pumping costs through optimum pipe sizing.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Structural Assessment of Small Bore Feeder Piping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frasheri MIE491 - Capstone Team 9 March 2012 Client: W. Reinhardt Industry Partner: Candu Energy Inc. Supervisor: A. N. Sinclair CASE ONE CANDU REACTORS HAVE 380+ SMALL BORE FEEDER PIPES. THE PIPES PIPES AND VALIDATE COMPUTATIONAL METHODS COMPARED TO FULL SCALE TESTS TO FAILURE. THE CLIENT CANDU

190

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1975 - 1976  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtakes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1977  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.Thermograph record of intake water at Pacific Gas andtemperatures and water samples at the intake pipe to their

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Pressure difference-based sensing of leaks in water distribution networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Human society and civilization rely on the constant availability of fresh water. In regions where a local source of potable water is not available, a transportation and distribution pipe system is employed. When these pipes ...

Kornmayer, Páll Magnús

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Analysis of Cracked Pipe Weldments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI estimation formulas for predicting loads necessary for crack initiation and instability can facilitate leak-before-break analysis of cracked nuclear piping. Finite-element calculations carried out in this study verified the accuracy of these formulas for analyzing through-the-wall cracks in bimetallic weldments.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (< 30 psi) is less than half the pressure on the 7th floor (>80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Wynkoop Building Performance Measurement: Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the water analysis performance for the Denver, Colorado Wynkoop Building. The Wynkoop Building (Figure 1) was built in 2006 as the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Region 8 Headquarters intended to house over 900 occupants in the 301,292 gross square feet (248,849 rentable square feet). The building was built on a brownfield in the Lower Downtown Historic District as part of an urban redevelopment effort. The building was designed and constructed through a public-private partnership with the sustainable design elements developed jointly by General Services Administration (GSA) and EPA. That partnership is still active with all parties still engaged to optimize building operations and use the building as a Learning Laboratory. The building design achieved U.S. Green Building Council Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design for New Construction (LEED-NC) Gold Certification in 2008 (Figure 2) and a 2008 EPA Energy Star Rating of 96 with design highlights that include: (1) Water use was designed to use 40% less than a typical design baseline. The design included low flow fixtures, waterless urinals and dual flush toilets; (2) Native and adaptive vegetation were selected to minimize the need for irrigation water for landscaping; and (3) Energy use intensity was modeled at 66.1 kBtus/gross square foot, which is 39% better than ASHRAE 90.1 1999. The Wynkoop Building water use (10 gallons/square foot) was measured at lower than industry average (15 gallons/square foot) and GSA goals (13 gallons/square foot), however, it was higher than building management expected it would be. The type of occupants and number of occupants can have a significant impact on fixture water use. The occupancy per floor varied significantly over the study time period, which added uncertainty to the data analysis. Investigation of the fixture use on the 2nd, 5th, and 7th floors identified potential for water use reduction if the flush direction of the dual-flush toilet handles was reversed. The building management retrofitted the building's toilets with handles that operated on reduced flush when pushed down (0.8 gallons) and full flush when pulled up (1.1 gallons). The water pressure on the 5th floor (80 psi). The measured water savings post-retrofit was lower on the 5th floor than the 7th floor. The differences in water pressure may have had an impact on the quantity of water used per floor. The second floor water use was examined prior to and following the toilet fixture retrofit. This floor is where conference rooms for non-building occupants are available for use, thus occupancy is highly variable. The 3-day average volume per flush event was higher post-retrofit (0.79 gallons per event), in contrast to pre-retrofit (0.57 gallons per event). There were 40% more flush events post retrofit, which impacted the findings. Water use in the third floor fitness center was also measured for a limited number of days. Because of water line accessibility, only water use on the men's side of the fitness center was measured and from that the total fitness center water use was estimated. Using the limited data collected, the fitness center shower water use is approximately 2% of the whole building water use. Overall water use in the Wynkoop Building is below the industry baseline and GSA expectations. The dual flush fixture replacement appears to have resulted in additional water savings that are expected to show a savings in the total annual water use.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Kora, Angela R.

2012-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

196

Benchmark analysis for the design of piping systems in advanced reactors  

SciTech Connect

To satisfy the need for the verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boding water reactor standard design, three piping benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set. A summary description of each problem and some sample results are included.

Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Shounien Hou (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Benchmark analysis for the design of piping systems in advanced reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To satisfy the need for the verification of the computer programs and modeling techniques that will be used to perform the final piping analyses for an advanced boding water reactor standard design, three piping benchmark problems were developed. The problems are representative piping systems subjected to representative dynamic loads with solutions developed using the methods being proposed for analysis for the advanced reactor standard design. It will be required that the combined license holders demonstrate that their solutions to these problems are in agreement with the benchmark problem set. A summary description of each problem and some sample results are included.

Bezler, P.; DeGrassi, G.; Braverman, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Shounien Hou [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Determination of petroleum pipe scale solubility in simulated lung fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) exists in connate waters and, under the right conditions during oil drilling, can plate out on the interior surfaces of oil and gas industry equipment. Once deposited, this material is commonly referred to as ??scale.?? This thesis is concerned with the presence of 226Ra in scale deposited on the inner surfaces of oil drilling pipes and the internal dose consequences of inhalation of that scale once released. In the process of normal operation, barium sulfate scale with a radium component adheres to the inside of downhole tubulars in oil fields. When crude flow is diminished below acceptable operational requirements, the pipe is sent to a descaling operation to be cleaned, most likely by a method known as rattling. The rattling process generates dust. This research investigated the chemical composition of that aerosol and measured the solubility of pipe scale from three oilfield formations. Using standard in-vitro dissolution experimental equipment and methods, pipe scale is introduced into simulated lung fluid over a two-week period. These samples are analyzed using quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS), known for very low detection limits. Analysis reveals virtually no 226Ra present in the lung fluid exposed to pipe scale. Sample measurements were compared against background measurements using Student??s t test, which revealed that nearly all the samples were statistically insignificant in comparison to the lung fluid blanks. This statistical test proves within a 95% confidence interval that there is no 226Ra present in the lung fluid samples. These results indicate that inhaled NORM pipe scale should be classified as Class S and serve to further confirm the extreme insolubility of petroleum pipe scale. For dose calculations, the S classification means that the lung is the main organ of concern. Radium-226 from petroleum pipe scale does not solubilize in the interstitial lung fluid, and does not, therefore, enter the bloodstream via respiratory pathways. Since there is no removal by dissolution, the 500 day biological half-life implied by the S classification is based solely on the mechanical transport of 226Ra out of the lungs by phagocytosis or the mucociliary escalator.

Cezeaux, Jason Roderick

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

200

Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen therefrom at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate.

Bitensky, Mark W. (Los Alamos, NM); Yoshida, Tatsuro (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Method for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells by flushing with inert gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed using oxygen removal for extending the useful shelf-life of refrigerated red blood cells. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. Preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels and reduction in hemolysis and in membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time is achieved by removing oxygen from the red blood cells at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing with an inert gas. Adenosine triphosphate levels of the stored red blood cells are boosted in some samples by addition of ammonium phosphate. 4 figs.

Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved evaporator section is described for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes. 1 figure.

Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

203

Dual manifold heat pipe evaporator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved evaporator section for a dual manifold heat pipe. Both the upper and lower manifolds can have surfaces exposed to the heat source which evaporate the working fluid. The tubes in the tube bank between the manifolds have openings in their lower extensions into the lower manifold to provide for the transport of evaporated working fluid from the lower manifold into the tubes and from there on into the upper manifold and on to the condenser portion of the heat pipe. A wick structure lining the inner walls of the evaporator tubes extends into both the upper and lower manifolds. At least some of the tubes also have overflow tubes contained within them to carry condensed working fluid from the upper manifold to pass to the lower without spilling down the inside walls of the tubes.

Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Rawlinson, K. Scott (Albuquerque, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Heat-Pipe Wick Characterization  

SciTech Connect

The development of liquid metal heat-pipes for use in solar powered Stirling engines has led to an in-depth analysis of heat-pipe wick properties. To model the flow of liquid sodium through the wick its two-phase permeability measurement is of interest. The permeability will be measured by constructing a test cell made up of a wick sample sintered to a manifold. Measuring the volumetric flow rate through the wick will allow for a determination of the wick's permeability as a function of pressure. Currently, simple estimates of permeability as a function of vapor fraction of a porous media are being used as a model to calculate the two-phase permeability. The above mentioned experiment will be used to test the existing formulas validity. The plan is to make use of a known procedure for testing permeability and apply those techniques to a felt-metal wick. The results will be used to verify and/or modify the two-phase permeability estimates. With the increasing desire to replace directly illuminated engines with the much more efficient heat-pipe apparatus it is inherently clear that the usefulness of known wick properties will make wick permeability design a simpler process.

JONES II,JERRY LEE

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

205

Heat-Pipe Wick Characterization  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The development of liquid metal heat-pipes for use in solar powered Stirling engines has led to an in-depth analysis of heat-pipe wick properties. To model the flow of liquid sodium through the wick its two-phase permeability measurement is of interest. The permeability will be measured by constructing a test cell made up of a wick sample sintered to a manifold. Measuring the volumetric flow rate through the wick will allow for a determination of the wick's permeability as a function of pressure. Currently, simple estimates of permeability as a function of vapor fraction of a porous media are being used as a model to calculate the two-phase permeability. The above mentioned experiment will be used to test the existing formulas validity. The plan is to make use of a known procedure for testing permeability and apply those techniques to a felt-metal wick. The results will be used to verify and/or modify the two-phase permeability estimates. With the increasing desire to replace directly illuminated engines with the much more efficient heat-pipe apparatus it is inherently clear that the usefulness of known wick properties will make wick permeability design a simpler process.

JONES II,JERRY LEE

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Gas release driven dynamics in research reactors piping  

SciTech Connect

Analysis of the physical and chemical processes of radiolysis gas production, air absorption, diffusion controlled gas release and transport in the coolant cleaning system of the research reactor FRM II, which is now being in routine power operation in Munich, Germany, lead to the following conclusions: 1) The steady state pressure distribution in the siphon pipe allows that the horizontal part of the siphon pipe is filled with air. The air is isolated by about 1 m water column from the main pipe of the coolant cleaning system (CCS). This is a stable steady state. It has two positive impacts on the normal operation of the CCS: (a) there is effectively no bypass flow; (b) The air can not be transported through the pipe and therefore no deterioration of the pump performance is expected from the function of the siphon pipe. 2) Radiolysis gas production for coolant, that initially does not contain dissolved air, does not lead to any problem for the system. The gases are dissolved in the coolant at 2.2 bar and are not released for pressures reduction to about 1 bar, which is the minimum pressure in the CCS. 3) Assuming hypothetically a radiolysis gas production for coolant, which initially does contain dissolved air close to its saturation, leads to gas slug formation and its transport up to the pump. This could reduce the pump head and could lead to distortion of the normal operation. Systematic measurement of the hydrogen in the primary system at 100% power indicated, that this state is not realized in the system. The observed H{sub 2} concentration was between 0.016 e-6 and 0.380 e-6 which is of no concern at all. (authors)

Kolev, Nikolay Ivanov; Roloff-Bock, Iris; Schlicht, Gerhard [Framatome ANP, P.O. Box 3220, D-91058, Erlangen (Germany)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Heat pipe theory and practice: a sourcebook  

SciTech Connect

An introduction to heat pipe operating principles, types, and applications followed by a comprehensive treatment of heat pipe theory, design, and manufacture are presented. The organization of heat pipe theory provides parallel treatment of the fundamental laws of thermodynamics, heat transfer, fluid mechanics, and materials science during heat pipe analysis. For the problem-solving convenience of practicing engineers, design procedures are developed summarizing theoretical information. Methods of summarizing voluminous research information are presented in detail. Current practices in the manufacture of heat pipes are described. Current and potential applications of the heat pipe to energy systems discussed are: heat exchangers, heat recovery for HVAC systems, residential buildings, industrial processes, gasification plants, and thermal storage subsystems.

Chi, S.W.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Piping inspection carriage having axially displaceable sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pipe inspection instrument carriage is described for use with a pipe crawler for performing internal inspections of piping surfaces. The carriage has a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly and a central support connecting the two assemblies and for mounting an instrument arm having inspection instruments. The instrument arm has a Y-arm mounted distally thereon for axially aligning the inspection instrumentation and a mounting block, a linear actuator and axial movement arm for extending the inspection instruments radially outward to operably position the inspection instruments on the piping interior. Also, the carriage has a rotation motor and gear assembly for rotating the central support and the front leg assembly with respect to the rear leg assembly so that the inspection instruments azimuthally scan the piping interior. The instrument carriage allows performance of all piping inspection operations with a minimum of moving parts, thus decreasing the likelihood of performance failure. 4 figures.

Zollinger, W.T.; Treanor, R.C.

1994-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

209

Model falsification diagnosis and sensor placement for leak detection in pressurized pipe networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressurized pipe networks used for fresh-water distribution can take advantage of recent advances in sensing technologies and data-interpretation to evaluate their performance. In this paper, a leak-detection and a sensor placement methodology are proposed ... Keywords: Data interpretation, Leak detection, Sensor placement, System identification, Water distribution

James-A. Goulet, Sylvain Coutu, Ian F. C. Smith

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver. 7 figs.

Drumheller, D.S.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

211

Downhole pipe selection for acoustic telemetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for transmitting signals along a downhole string including a plurality of serially connected tubular pipes such as drill or production pipes, a transmitter for transmitting a signal along the string and a receiver for receiving the signal placed along the string at a location spaced from said transmitting means, wherein the pipes between the transmitter and the receiver are ordered according to length of tube to minimize loss of signal from said transmitter to said receiver.

Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

BOA II: Asbestos Pipe-Insulation Removal Robot System. Innovative Technology Summary Report.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this task is to develop and demonstrate a mechanical, asbestos-removal system that can be remotely operated without a containment area. The technology, known as BOA, consists of a pipe-crawler removal head and a boom vehicle system with dual robots. BOA's removal head can be remotely placed on the outside of the pipe and can crawl along the pipe, removing lagging and insulation. The lagging and insulation is cut using a hybrid endmill water-jet cutter and then diced into 2-inch cube sections of ACM. These ACM sections are then removed from the pipe using a set of blasting fan- spray nozzles, vacuumed off through a vacuum hose, and bagged. Careful attention to vacuum and entrapment air flow ensures that the system can operate without a containment area while meeting local and federal standards for fiber count.

None

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Development of a cryogenic heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

Heat pipe operating characteristics can be used to advantage in cryogenic systems. Diode operation of the heat pipe, the ability to conduct heat in one direction only, is useful in protecting the heat load if the heat sink temperature rises above the load temperature. Because of this, the heat pipe can be made to act as a thermal switch. A screened-wick, inverted-artery, cryogenic heat pipe was designed, fabricated, and tested. The tests were first conducted with hydrogen and then with oxygen as the working fluid. Heat pipe performance limits were measured as a function of operating temperature, and startup from both the supercritical and the frozen state was demonstrated. The heat pipe was designed to operate as a thermal diode, and transient tests were used to determine the turndown ratio. The heat pipe test results were correlated with the Los Alamos heat pipe computer code and good agreement was obtained between the predicted and measured performance. The heat pipe was developed for spacecraft sensor cooling applications. Test results show significant performance advantages over solid conductors.

Prenger, F.C.; Stewart, W.F.; Runyan, J.E.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Pipe Designer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

leg in the system. You can also analyze hybrid systems consisting of new and existing piping and reverse-return layouts The familiar, intuitive Windows user interface will...

215

NETL: News Release - Intelligent Pipe Technology Communicates...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May 4, 2005 Intelligent Pipe Technology Communicates Faster than Internet Technology on Verge of Commercialization Provides Fast, Reliable Communication During Downhole Drilling...

216

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Pipe Designer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and closed systems using virtually any fluid with known viscosity and specific gravity. Enter coil flow rates and pressure drops along with pipe lengths -- the program will...

217

Aircraft Thermal Management Using Loop Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis was to determine the feasibility of using loop heat pipes to dissipate waste heat from power electronics to the skin… (more)

Fleming, Andrew J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Experimental Investigation of Bendable Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Heat pipes are highly conductive heat transfer devices. They use the latent heat of the working fluid for efficient heat transfer over a very small… (more)

ODHEKAR, DHANANJAY

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

A HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPING SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

Leishear, R.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

220

Apparatus for screwing pipes together  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A power tongs for threadedly connecting together pipes which are to constitute casings for boreholes has a platform for a reciprocable slide which supports a power-driven threading clamp and a counter device. The clamp and the counter device are connected to each other by several level compensating hydraulic cylinders each of which is movable horizontally within limits relative to the slide against the opposition of resilient support elements. The upper end portions of the cylinders are connected to a holding plate for the clamp.

Reinholdt, B.; Bock, H. -Ch.

1985-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Heat-Pipe Development for Advanced Energy Transport Concepts Final Report Covering the Period January 1999 through September 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes work in the Heat-pipe Technology Development for the Advanced Energy Transport Concepts program for the period January 1999 through September 2001. A gas-loaded molybdenum-sodium heat pipe was built to demonstrate the active pressure-control principle applied to a refractory metal heat pipe. Other work during the period included the development of processing procedures for and fabrication and testing of three types of sodium heat pipes using Haynes 230, MA 754, and MA 956 wall materials to assess the compatibility of these materials with sodium. Also during this period, tests were executed to measure the response of a sodium heat pipe to the penetration of water.

R.S.Reid; J.F.Sena; A.L.Martinez

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Capacity Testing of Cured-in-Place Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes results of capacity testing of cured-in-place pipe (CIPP). Degradation of buried piping is a major issue facing nuclear power plant owners, and many plants will require repair or replacement of existing carbon steel piping components. Relining corroded steel pipe with cured-in-place pipe is an attractive and cost-effective alternative to replacing in-ground pipe.

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

Analysis of Pipe Supports with a Trunnion Welded to the Main Piping Run  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One configuration of pipe support that is gaining popularity, particularly on main steam and hot reheat high-energy piping, is the trunnion. In a trunnion support system, load is transferred from the main pipe to a hanger system through trunnions welded to the main pipe run. Welded trunnions are used in a variety of support configurations, and, in several cases, the support frame around the trunnion would have to be dismantled to permit inspection of the pipe-to-trunnion weld. In other ...

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

224

Heat transfer. [heat transfer roller employing a heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A heat transfer roller embodying a heat pipe is disclosed. The heat pipe is mounted on a shaft, and the shaft is adapted for rotation on its axis.

Sarcia, D.S.

1978-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

225

Heat pipe with embedded wick structure  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas.

Adkins, Douglas Ray (Albuquerque, NM); Shen, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Tuck, Melanie R. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Grafe, V. Gerald (Corrales, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Heat pipe with embedded wick structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas. 7 figs.

Adkins, D.R.; Shen, D.S.; Tuck, M.R.; Palmer, D.W.; Grafe, V.G.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

227

Heat pipe with embedded wick structure  

SciTech Connect

A heat pipe has an embedded wick structure that maximizes capillary pumping capability. Heat from attached devices such as integrated circuits evaporates working fluid in the heat pipe. The vapor cools and condenses on a heat dissipation surface. The condensate collects in the wick structure, where capillary pumping returns the fluid to high heat areas.

Adkins, Douglas Ray (Albuquerque, NM); Shen, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Tuck, Melanie R. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Grafe, V. Gerald (Corrales, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Geothermal drill pipe corrosion test plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plans are presented for conducting a field test of drill pipe corrosion, comparing air and nitrogen as drilling fluids. This test will provide data for evaluating the potential of reducing geothermal well drilling costs by extending drill pipe life and reducing corrosion control costs. The 10-day test will take place during fall 1980 at the Baca Location in Sandoval County, New Mexico.

Caskey, B.C.; Copass, K.S.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

ULTRASONIC INSPECTION OF A SECTION OF THE NS SAVANNAH PRIMARY PIPING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

A section of NS Savannah primary pipe and part of a primary system gate valve were examined ultrasonically to determine whether a fluctuating flow of low- temperature makeup water entering through a nozzle in the valve hsnd damaged the components during service. Examination was prompted by failure of a Vallecitos Boiling Water Reactor (VBWR) recirculating pipe in which makeup water was introduced under conditions similar to those in the Savannah. The ultrasonic equipment was calibrated on spare components. The calibration standards, 11-mil- deep chisel marks in the pipe and 25-mil-deep marks in the valve, were more stringent than those used to calibrate equipment for inspection of components at the time of manufacture. The inspections of components conducted aboard ship are therefore thought to be more exacting than those performed on the original equipment. Ultrasonic inspections of the failed VBWR pipe completely defined the areas of defective material that led to the failure. The VBWR results, together with experience gained by Babcock & Wilcox, indicate that the inspections of Savannah's components were both applicable andd definitive. Since no indications of discontinuities were found in the valve or the pipe, both components are considered to be sound and unaffected by service. (auth)

Johnson, C.R.

1963-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Hydrogen Piping Experience in Chevron Refining  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Piping Piping Experience in Chevron Refining Ned Niccolls Materials Engineer Chevron Energy Technology Company Hydrogen Pipeline Working Group Workshop August 30-31, 2005 Outline 2 Overall perspectives from long term use of hydrogen piping in refining. Piping specifications and practices. The (few) problem areas. Related industry work: American Petroleum Institute corrosion and materials work on high temperature hydrogen attack. Overall Perspectives 3 Few problems with hydrogen piping operating at ambient to at least 800F and pressures up to at least 3000psia as long as we stay within well- defined limits H2S contamination presents many more problems, beyond the scope of this talk We will note a couple of specific vulnerabilities Refining tracks materials performance in

231

Heat pipe nuclear reactor for space power  

SciTech Connect

A heat-pipe cooled nuclear reactor has been designed to provide 3.2 MW(t) to an out-of-core thermionic conversion system. The reactor is a fast reactor designed to operate at a nominal heat pipe temperature of 1675/sup 0/K. Each reactor fuel element consists of a hexagonal molybdenum block which is bonded along its axis to one end of a molybdenum, lithium vapor, heat pipe. The block is perforated with an array of longitudinal holes which are loaded with UO/sub 2/ pellets. The heat pipe transfers heat directly to a string of six thermionic converters which are bonded along the other end of the heat pipe. An assembly of 90 such fuel elements forms a hexagonal core. The core is surrounded by a thermal radiation shield, a thin thermal neutron absorber and a BeO reflector containing boron loaded control drums.

Koenig, D.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Rotating heat pipe for air-conditioning  

SciTech Connect

A unique rotary hermetic heat pipe is disclosed for transferring heat from an external source to an external heat sink. The heat pipe has a tapered condensing surface which is curved preferably to provide uniform pumping acceleration, the heat pipe being rotated at a velocity such that the component of centrifugal acceleration in an axial direction parallel to the tapered surface is greater than lG and so that the condensing surface is kept relatively free of liquid at any attitude. The heat pipe may be incorporated in an air conditioning apparatus so that it projects through a small wall opening. In the preferred air conditioning apparatus, a hollow hermetic air impeller is provided which contains a liquefied gaseous refrigerant, such as freon, and means are provided for compressing the refrigerant in the evaporator region of the heat pipe.

Gray, V.H.

1976-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

233

Solar Heat-Pipe Receiver Wick Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Stirling-cycle engines have been identified as a promising technology for the conversion of concentrated solar energy into usable electrical power. In previous experimented work, we have demonstrated that a heat pipe receiver can significantly improve system performance-over a directly-illuminated heater head. The design and operating conditions of a heat pipe receiver differ significantly from typical laboratory heat pipes. New wick structures have been developed to exploit the characteristics of the solar generation system. Typically, these wick structures allow vapor generation within the wick. Conventional heat pipe models do not handle this enhancement yet it can more than double the performance of the wick. In this study, I develop a steady-state model of a boiling-enhanced wick for a solar heat pipe receiver. The model is used for design-point calculations and is written in FORTRAN90. Some limited comparisons have been made with actual test data.

Andraka, C.E.

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

Residual stresses and stress corrosion cracking in pipe fittings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Residual stresses can play a key role in the SCC performance of susceptible materials in PWR primary water applications. Residual stresses are stresses stored within the metal that develop during deformation and persist in the absence of external forces or temperature gradients. Sources of residual stresses in pipe fittings include fabrication processes, installation and welding. There are a number of methods to characterize the magnitude and orientation of residual stresses. These include numerical analysis, chemical cracking tests, and measurement (e.g., X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction, strain gage/hole drilling, strain gage/trepanning, strain gage/section and layer removal, and acoustics). This paper presents 400 C steam SCC test results demonstrating that residual stresses in as-fabricated Alloy 600 pipe fittings are sufficient to induce SCC. Residual stresses present in as-fabricated pipe fittings are characterized by chemical cracking tests (stainless steel fittings tested in boiling magnesium chloride solution) and by the sectioning and layer removal (SLR) technique.

Parrington, R.J.; Scott, J.J.; Torres, F.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Multiprobe Water Quality Data from the Tracy Fish Collection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Format txt(csv) License Spatial data were collected with a multi-parameter water quality sonde installed in a perforated pipe located behind the trash rack and...

236

Heat pipe reactors for space power applications  

SciTech Connect

A family of heat pipe reactors design concepts has been developed to provide heat to a variety of electrical conversion systems. Three power plants are described that span the power range 1-500 kW(e) and operate in the temperature range 1200 to 1700/sup 0/K. The reactors are fast, compact, heat-pipe cooled, high-temperature nuclear reactors fueled with fully enriched refractory fuels, UC-ZrC or UO/sub 2/. Each fuel element is cooled by an axially located molybdenum heat pipe containing either sodium or lithium vapor.

Koenig, D.R.; Ranken, W.A.; Salmi, E.W.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Heat pipe testing program test plan  

SciTech Connect

A test plan is given which describes the tests to be conducted on several typical solar receiver heat pipes. The hardware to be used, test fixtures and rationale of the test program are discussed. The program objective is to perform life testing under simulated receiver conditions, and to conduct performance tests with selected heat pipes to further map their performance, particularly with regard to their transient behavior. Performance requirements are defined. Test fixtures designed for the program are described in detail, and their capabilities for simulating the receiver conditions and their limitations are discussed. The heat pipe design is given. (LEW)

Bienert, W.B.

1980-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

New and Underutilized Technology: Wrap Around Heat Pipes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following information outlines key deployment considerations for wrap around heat pipes within the Federal sector.

239

Heat-pipe effect on the transport of gaseous radionuclides released from a nuclear waste container  

SciTech Connect

When an unsaturated porous medium is subjected to a temperature gradient and the temperature is sufficiently high, vadose water is heated and vaporizes. Vapor flows under its pressure gradient towards colder regions where it condenses. Vaporization and condensation produce a liquid saturation gradient, creating a capillary pressure gradient inside the porous medium. Condensate flows towards the hot end under the influence of a capillary pressure gradient. This is a heat pipe in an unsaturated porous medium. We study analytically the transport of gaseous species released from a spent-fuel waste package, as affected by a time-dependent heat pipe in an unsaturated rock. For parameter values typical of a potential repository in partially saturated fractured tuff at Yucca Mountain, we found that a heat pipe develops shortly after waste is buried, and the heat-pipe`s spatial extent is time-dependent. Water vapor movements produced by the heat pipe can significantly affect the migration of gaseous radionuclides. 12 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

Zhou, W.; Chambre, P.L.; Pigford, T.H.; Lee, W.W.L.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Dry Pipe Sprinkler Piping Replacement Project (4588), 4/30/2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipe System Sprinkler Piping Replacement Projects (4588) Pipe System Sprinkler Piping Replacement Projects (4588) Program or Field Office: Y-12 Site Office Location(s) (City/County/State): Oak Ridge, Anderson County, Tennessee Proposed Action Description: Submit by E-mail The proposed action is to replace sections of dry pipe system sprinkler piping which include heads, hangers, fittings, and valves. Categorical Exclusion(s) Applied: 81.3- Routine maintenance For the complete DOE National Environmental Policy Act regulations regarding categorical exclusions, including the full text of each categorical exclusion, see Subpart D of I 0 CFR Part I 021. Regulatory Requirements in 10 CFR 1021.410(b): (See full text in regulation) [{Jrhe proposal fits within a class of actions that is listed in Appendix A orB to 10 CFR Part 1021, Subpart D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Corrosion of Buried Steel Pipes Used With Transmission Pipe-Type Cable Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although pipe-type underground transmission cables were designed with a life expectancy of 40 years, many of these cables have reached this threshold and are still performing satisfactorily. The buried steel pipes that surround the cables are protected by coatings and cathodic-protection systems. These protective systems need to be routinely inspected and maintained in order to extend their own life expectancy and thereby protect the cables within the steel pipes. This report provides research results an...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Demand Water Heater Basics Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

243

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics Tankless Demand Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 2:57pm Addthis Illustration of an electric demand water heater. At the top of the image, the heating unit is shown. Cold water flows in one end of a pipe, flows through and around several curved pipes over the heating elements, and out the other end as hot water. Beneath the heating unit, a typical sink setup is shown. The sink has two pipes coming out the bottom, one for the hot water line and one for the cold water line. Both pipes lead to the heating unit, which is installed in close proximity to the area of hot water use, and is connected to a power source (110 or 220 volts). Demand (tankless or instantaneous) water heaters have heating devices that are activated by the flow of water, so they provide hot water only as

244

Fossil Plant High Energy Piping Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for high-energy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utility's inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, a number of major failures of fossil high-energy piping have been associated with flow-accelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seam-welded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these well-documented failures, most utilities experience fai...

2007-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fossil Plant High-Energy Piping Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for high-energy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utility's inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, a number of major failures of fossil high-energy piping have been associated with flow-accelerated corrosion of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seam-welded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these well-documented failures, most utilities experience fai...

2007-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

246

Analysis of chlorinated polyvinyl chloride pipe burst problems :Vasquez residence system inspection.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the investigation regarding the failure of CPVC piping that was used to connect a solar hot water system to standard plumbing in a home. Details of the failure are described along with numerous pictures and diagrams. A potential failure mechanism is described and recommendations are outlined to prevent such a failure.

Black, Billy D.; Menicucci, David F.; Harrison, John (Florida Solar Energy Center)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Dehumidifying Heat Pipes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dehumidifying Heat Pipes Dehumidifying Heat Pipes Dehumidifying Heat Pipes June 24, 2012 - 4:32pm Addthis In order to make a room comfortable in hot, humid climates, an air conditioner must lower the indoor humidity level as well as the air temperature. If an air conditioner fails to lower the humidity adequately, the air will be cool, but will feel uncomfortably damp. Inappropriately sized air conditioners are prone to this problem; large units quickly cool the air, but cycle off before they can properly dehumidify it. In extremely humid climates, even correctly sized air conditioning equipment could fail to maintain a home at a comfortable humidity level. One technology that addresses this problem is the dehumidifying heat pipe, a device that enables an air conditioner to dehumidify better and still

248

M-25, BUTT WELDS IN PROCESS PIPING  

SciTech Connect

Metal-arc and inert-gas shielded tungsten-arc processes were compared for circumferential butt welding of austenitic stainless steel process pipe. Inert-gas tungsten-arc welding was superior to other techniques. (C.J.G.)

Litman, A.P.

1958-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

249

Heat pipe dehumidification for supermarket energy savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the possibility of using a heat pipe installed in the air conditioning unit of a supermarket to increase the level of dehumidification of the inside air. This dehumidification is expected to reduce the ...

Oliver, Eric M. (Eric Michael)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Reliability Estimation for Double Containment Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Double walled or double containment piping is considered for use in the ITER international project and other next-generation fusion device designs to provide an extra barrier for tritium gas and other radioactive materials. The extra barrier improves confinement of these materials and enhances safety of the facility. This paper describes some of the design challenges in designing double containment piping systems. There is also a brief review of a few operating experiences of double walled piping used with hazardous chemicals in different industries. This paper recommends approaches for the reliability analyst to use to quantify leakage from a double containment piping system in conceptual and more advanced designs. The paper also cites quantitative data that can be used to support such reliability analyses.

L. Cadwallader; T. Pinna

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation David M. Hess InnoSense LLC david.hess@innosense.us, 310-530-2011 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office...

252

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Aerogel Impregnated Polyurethane Piping and Duct Insulation David M. Hess InnoSense LLC david.hess@innosense.us, 310-530-2011 April 4, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Develop an efficient insulation system that will adhere to housing duct work and pipe structures while conforming to complex geometries. New insulations must increase the R-value of existing materials and be easy to apply or retrofit to existing structures.

253

Dynamic simulation recalls condensate piping event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes how experience gained from simulating and reconstructing a condensate piping event will be used by Consolidated Edison to analyze control system problems. A cooperative effort by Con Edison and the Chemical Engineering Department at Polytechnic University used modular modeling system to investigate the probable cause of a Con Edison condensate piping event. Con Edison commissioned the work to serve as a case study for the more general problem of control systems analysis using dynamic simulation and MMS.

Farrell, R.J.; Reneberg, K.O. (Polytechnic Univ., Brooklyn, NY (United States)); Moy, H.C. (Consolidated Edison Co., New York, NY (United States))

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Seismic analysis of piping with nonlinear supports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The modeling and results of nonlinear time-history seismic analyses for three sizes of pipelines restrained by mechanical snubbes are presented. Numerous parametric analyses were conducted to obtain sensitivity information which identifies relative importance of the model and analysis ingredients. Special considerations for modeling the pipe clamps and the mechanical snubbers based on experimental characterization data are discussed. Comparisions are also given of seismic responses, loads and pipe stresses predicted by standard response spectra methods and the nonlinear time-history methods.

Barta, D.A.; Huang, S.N.; Severud, L.K.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

DEVELOPMENT OF TECHNOLOGY TO REMOTELY NAVIGATE VERTICAL PIPE ARRAYS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Situations exist around the Savannah River Site (SRS) and the Department of Energy (DOE) complex where it is advantageous to remotely navigate vertical pipe arrays. Specific examples are waste tanks in the SRS Tank Farms, which contain horizontal cooling coils at the tank bottom, vertical cooling coils throughout and a limited number of access points or ''risers''. These factors limit accessibility to many parts of these tanks by conventional means. Pipe Traveler technology has been developed to address these issues. The Pipe Traveler addresses these issues by using the vertical cooling coils as its medium of travel. The unit operates by grabbing a pipe using dual grippers located on either side of the equipment. Once securely attached to the pipe a drive wheel is extended to come in contact with the pipe. Rotation of the drive wheel causes the unit to rotate around the pipe. This action is continued until the second set of grippers is aligned with the next pipe. Extension pistons are actuated to extend the second set of grippers in contact with a second pipe. The second set of grippers is then actuated to grasp the pipe. The first set of grippers releases the original pipe and the process is repeated until the unit reaches its desired location. Once at the tool deployment location the desired tool may be used. The current design has proven the concept of pipe-to-pipe navigation. Testing of the Pipe Traveler has proven its ability to transfer itself from one pipe to another.

Krementz, D.; Immel, D.; Vrettos, N.; Nance, T.; Marzolf, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Conceptual design of a heat pipe radiator  

SciTech Connect

A conceptual design of a waste heat radiator has been developed for a thermoelectric space nuclear power system. The basic shape of the heat pipe radiator was a frustum of a right circular cone. The design included stringer heat pipes to carry reject heat from the thermoelectric modules to the radiator skin that was composed of small-diameter, thin-walled cross heat pipes. The stringer heat pipes were armored to resist puncture by a meteoroid. The cross heat pipes were designed to provide the necessary unpunctured radiating area at the mission end with a minimum initial system mass. Several design cases were developed in which the individual stringer survival probabilities were varied and the radiator system mass was calculated. Results are presented for system mass as a function of individual stringer survival probability for six candidate container materials, three candidate heat pipe fluids, two radiator operating temperatures, two meteoroid shield types, and two radiating surface cases. Results are also presented for radiator reject heat as a function of system mass, area, and length for three system sizes.

Bennett, G.A.

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Primary Piping Static Test Design Request  

SciTech Connect

It is requested that a design be initiated for the primary piping static test. This test is necessary to provide information as to the reliability of the pipe subjected to reactor operating conditions. The test conditions are as follows: temperature - 2000 F (isothermal), pressure effective - 42 psi, and test time - 10,000 hours. It will be necessary to test two sizes of pipe as shown on the preliminary piping layout (2.250-inch O.D. x .095-inch wall and 3 1/2 SCH. 10 pipe). The test specimens shall be jacketed in an inconel containment vessel. The test rig should be similar to the design of the 4-inch pressure vessels (T-1030244). In addition an outer containment vessel constructed of stainless steel must be provided around the clam shell heaters and the inconel containment vessel. This is to provide an inert atmosphere for the inconel vessel. Provisions should be made in the design for a 1/4-inch clad thermocouple. It is planned to use the pipe test as a vehicle for studying experimental Tc's (Cb-Mo and W-W.26% Re).

O' Brien, R.W.

1961-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

258

Optimal insulation of pipes and tanks for solar heating systems. Topical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compact and time effective insulation design procedure for solar heating system piping and water-filled thermal storage tanks was developed. Recognizing the particular sensitivity of solar systems to cost, the economic aspect of the problem is treated by a comprehensive present-value life-cycle cost analysis. In the development of the method, a numerical sensitivity analysis was performed to determine the relative effects of all relevant independent variables (within their pertinent ranges) on piping and tank heat transfer coefficient values.

Jones, G F; Lior, N

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Fundamental heat transfer experiments of heat pipes for turbine cooling  

SciTech Connect

Fundamental heat transfer experiments were carried out for three kinds of heat pipes that may be applied to turbine cooling in future aero-engines. In the turbine cooling system with a heat pipe, heat transfer rate and start-up time of the heat pipe are the most important performance criteria to evaluate and compare with conventional cooling methods. Three heat pipes are considered, called heat pipe A, B, and C, respectively. All heat pipes have a stainless steel shell and nickel sintered powder metal wick. Sodium (Na) was the working fluid for heat pipes A and B; heat pipe C used eutectic sodium-potassium (NaK). Heat pipes B and C included noncondensible gas for rapid start-up. There were fins on the cooling section of heat pipes. In the experiments, an infrared image furnace supplied heat to the heat pipe simulating turbine blade surface conditions. In the results, heat pipe B demonstrated the highest heat flux of 17 to 20 W/cm{sup 2}. The start-up time was about 6 minutes for heat pipe B and about 6 minutes for heat pipe A. Thus, adding noncondensible gas effectively reduced start-up time. Although NaK is a liquid phase at room temperature, the start-up time of heat pipe C (about 7 to 8 minutes) was not shorter than the heat pipe B. The effect of a gravitational force on heat pipe performance was also estimated by inclining the heat pipe at an angle of 90 deg. There was no significant gravitational dependence on heat transport for heat pipes including noncondensible gas.

Yamawaki, S. [Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Yoshida, T.; Taki, M.; Mimura, F. [National Aerospace Lab., Tokyo (Japan)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

A Temperature-Profile Method for Estimating Flow Processes in Geologic Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

change and capillarity—the heat pipe effect, Int. J. Heatgeothermal reservoirs as heat pipes in fractured porousProcesses in Geologic Heat Pipes Jens T. Birkholzer Ernest

Birkholzer, Jens T.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR THE DETECTION OF LEAKS IN PIPE LINES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for detecting leaks in pipe lines carrying fluid. The steps include the following: injecting a radioactive solution into a fluid flowing in the line; flushing the line clear of the radioactive solution; introducing a detector-recorder unit, comprising a radioactivity radiation detector and a recorder which records the detector signal over a time period at a substantially constant speed, into the line in association with a go-devil capable of propelling the detector-recorder unit through the line in the direction of the fluid flow at a substantia1ly constant velocity; placing a series of sources of radioactivity at predetermined distances along the downstream part of the line to make a characteristic signal on the recorder record at intervals corresponding to the location of said sources; recovering the detector-recorder unit at a downstream point along the line; transcribing the recorder record of any radioactivity detected during the travel of the detector- recorder unit in terms of distance along the line. (AEC)

Jefferson, S.; Cameron, J.F.

1961-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

262

Apparatus and method for detecting leaks in piping  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and device are disclosed for detecting the location of leaks along a wall or piping system, preferably in double-walled piping. The apparatus comprises a sniffer probe, a rigid cord such as a length of tube attached to the probe on one end and extending out of the piping with the other end, a source of pressurized air and a source of helium. The method comprises guiding the sniffer probe into the inner pipe to its distal end, purging the inner pipe with pressurized air, filling the annulus defined between the inner and outer pipe with helium, and then detecting the presence of helium within the inner pipe with the probe as is pulled back through the inner pipe. The length of the tube at the point where a leak is detected determines the location of the leak in the pipe. 2 figures.

Trapp, D.J.

1994-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Testing of advanced ceramic fabric heat pipe for a Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

The development and application of Stirling engines for space power production requires concomitant development of an advanced heat rejection system. We are currently involved in the design, development, and testing of advanced ceramic fabric (ACF) water heat pipes for optimal heat rejection from the Stirling cycle without the use of hazardous working fluids such as mercury. Our testing to-date has been with a 200-{mu}m thick titanium heat pipe utilizing Nextel {trademark} fabric as both the outer structural component and as a wick. This heat pipe has been successfully started up from a frozen condition against a negative 4 degree tilt (i.e., fluid return to evaporator was against gravity), with 75 W heat input, in ambient air. In a horizontal orientation, up to 100 W heat input was tolerated without experiencing dryout. 7 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Antoniak, Z.I.; Webb, B.J.; Bates, J.M.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Development and extended operation of a high power radiation loaded heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

A high temperature, high power molybdenum-lithium heat pipe has been fabricated and tested at 1500 K for 1700 hours with radiant heat rejection. Power throughput during the test was approximately 14 kW, corresponding to an axial flux density of 11 kW/cm/sup 2/ for the 1.59 cm diameter heat pipe. Radial flux density was 70 W/cm/sup 2/ over an evaporator length of 40.0 cm. Condenser length was approximately 150 cm with radiant heat rejection from the condenser to a coaxial water cooled radiation calorimeter. A plasma sprayed, high emissivity coating was used on the condenser surface to increase the radiant heat rejection during the tests. The heat pipe was operated for 514 hours at steady state conditions before being damaged during a planned shutdown for test equipment maintenance. The damage was repaired and the initial 1000 hour test period completed without further incident. After physical examination of the heat pipe at 1000 hours the test was resumed and the heat pipe operated at the same conditions for an additional 700 hours before conclusion of this test phase.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Runyan, J.R.; Martinez, H.E.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Cost-effective solar collectors using heat pipes. Interim progress report No. 1, September 1977-March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective is the demonstration of high performance, cost effective non-concentrating solar collectors using heat pipes. The end products will be directly applicable for efficient use with absorption and Rankine cycle chillers. Evacuated tubular solar collectors were selected as the only economical non-concentrating approach capable of efficient operation of chillers. The General Electric TC family of collectors was chosen because of their superior performance and compatibility with heat pipe integration. The system was designed and specified. This work included the integration of the heat pipe with the evacuated tubular solar collector and the pumped loop heat removal mechanism. To date, two heat pipe fluid-envelope combinations look attractive: water-aluminum bearing steel and ethanol-low carbon steel. The jury is still out on the ability for the water-aluminum bearing steel to survive freezing cycles and for ethanol-low carbon steel to withstand predicted 400/sup 0/C stagnation temperatures. Full scale cost analysis was not completed for either case. Two 4' x 4' panels, each with ten tubular collectors fitted with heat pipes, were erected at Thermacore to test various aspects of the heat pipe and its integration into the collector-pumped loop system.

Ernst, D.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe configuration is described for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2 to 3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area.

Werner, R.W.; Hoffman, M.A.

1981-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

267

Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe configuration for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor is disclosed. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2--3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area. 4 figs.

Werner, R.W.; Hoffman, M.A.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Heat pipes for use in a magnetic field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe configuration for use in a magnetic field environment of a fusion reactor. Heat pipes for operation in a magnetic field when liquid metal working fluids are used are optimized by flattening of the heat pipes having an unobstructed annulus which significantly reduces the adverse side region effect of the prior known cylindrically configured heat pipes. The flattened heat pipes operating in a magnetic field can remove 2--3 times the heat as a cylindrical heat pipe of the same cross sectional area.

Werner, Richard W. (San Ramon, CA); Hoffman, Myron A. (Davis, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

STATE OF CALIFORNIA DOMESTIC HOT WATER (DHW)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Heater Type CEC Certified Mfr Name & Model Number Distribution Type (Std, Point-of- Use, etc; and Pipe insulation for steam hydronic heating systems or hot water systems >15 psi, meets the requirements six or fewer dwelling units which have (1) less than 25' of distribution piping outdoors; (2) zero

270

Solar Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics Solar Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:01pm Addthis Illustration of an active, closed loop solar water heater. A large, flat panel called a flat plate collector is connected to a tank called a solar storage/backup water heater by two pipes. One of these pipes runs through a cylindrical pump into the bottom of the tank, where it becomes a coil called a double-wall heat exchanger. This coil runs up through the tank and out again to the flat plate collector. Antifreeze fluid runs only through this collector loop. Two pipes run out the top of the water heater tank; one is a cold water supply into the tank, and the other sends hot water to the house. Solar water heaters use the sun's heat to provide hot water for a home or

271

Mapping hidden water pipelines using a mobile sensor droplet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study presents several extensions to our previous work on the PipeProbe system, a mobile sensor system for identifying the spatial topology of hidden water pipelines (i.e., non-moldable pipes such as copper and PVC) behind walls or under floors ... Keywords: Wireless sensor networks, constraint satisfaction, mapping water pipeline, sensor inference

Ted Tsung-Te Lai; Wei-Ju Chen; Yu-Han Tiffany Chen; Polly Huang; Hao-Hau Chu

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Corrugated Pipe as a Beam Dechirper  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the use of a metallic pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of passively dechirping, through its wakefield, a short, intense electron bunch. The corrugated pipe is attractive for this purpose because its wake: (i) has near maximal possible amplitude for a given aperture and (ii) has a relatively large oscillation wave length, even when the aperture is small. We showed how the corrugated structure can satisfy dechirping requirements encountered in the NGLS project at LBNL. We found that a linear chirp of -40 MeV/mm can be induced by an NGLS-like beam, by having it pass through a corrugated, metallic pipe of radius 3 mm, length 8.2 m, and corrugation parameters full depth 450 {mu}m and period 1000 {mu}m. This structure is about 15 times as effective in the role of dechirper as an S-band accelerator structure used passively.

Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

273

Industrial Waste Heat Recovery Using Heat Pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For almost a decade now, heat pipes with secondary finned surfaces have been utilized in counter flow heat exchangers to recover sensible energy from industrial exhaust gases. Over 3,000 such heat exchangers are now in service, recovering an estimated energy equivalent of nearly 1.1 million barrels of oil annually. Energy recovered by these units has been used to either preheat process supply air or to heat plant comfort make-up air. Heat pipe heat exchangers have been applied to an ever-expanding variety of industrial processes. One notable application in recent years has been for combustion airs preheat of fired heaters in petroleum refineries and petrochemical plants. Another recent development has been a waste heat recovery boiler using heat pipes. This device has a number of advantageous features. Field operational experience of several units in service has been excellent.

Ruch, M. A.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Flow Rate Measurement Using {sup 99m}Tc Radiotracer Method in a Pipe Installation  

SciTech Connect

Flow rate is a significant parameter for managing processes in chemical processing plants and water processing facility. Accurate measurement of the flow rate allows engineers to monitor the delivery of process material, which in turn impacts a plant's capacity to produce their products. One of the available methods for determining the flow rate of a process material is by introducing a radiotracer to the system that mimics the material's flow pattern. In this study, a low activity Technetium-99m radioisotope was injected into a water piping setup and the 2'' x 2'' NaI (Tl) detectors were calibrated to detect spectrum peaks at specific points of the pipe installation. Using pulse velocity method, water flow rate was determined to be 11.3 litres per minute. For the sampling method, at different pump capacity, the flow rate was 15.0 litres per minute.

Sipaun, S. M.; Bakar, A. Q. Abu; Othman, N.; Shaari, M. R.; Adnan, M. A. K. [Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Bangi (Malaysia); Yusof, J. Mohd; Demanah, R. [Waste and Environmental Technology Divison, Malaysian Nuclear Agency, 43000 Bangi (Malaysia)

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

275

Neutron imaging of alkali metal heat pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature heat pipes are two-phase, capillary driven heat transfer devices capable of passively providing high thermal fluxes. Such a device using a liquid-metal coolant can be used as a solution for successful thermal management on hypersonic flight vehicles. Imaging of the liquid-metal coolant inside will provide valuable information in characterizing the detailed heat and mass transport. Neutron imaging possesses an inherent advantage from the fact that neutrons penetrate the heat pipe metal walls with very little attenuation, but are significantly attenuated by the liquid metal contained inside. Using the BT-2 beam line at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) in Gaithersburg, Maryland, preliminary efforts have been conducted on a nickel-sodium heat pipe. The contrast between the attenuated beam and the background is calculated to be approximately 3%. This low contrast requires sacrifice in spatial or temporal resolution so efforts have since been concentrated on lithium (Li) which has a substantially larger neutron attenuation cross section. Using the CG-1D beam line at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, the first neutron images of high-temperature molybdenum (Mo)-Li heat pipes have been achieved. The relatively high neutron cross section of Li allows for the visualization of the Li working fluid inside the heat pipes. The evaporator region of a gravity assisted cylindrical heat pipe prototype 25 cm long was imaged from start-up to steady state operation up to approximately 900 C. In each corner of the square bore inside, the capillary action raises the Li meniscus above the bulk Li pool in the evaporator region. As the operational temperature changes, the meniscus shapes and the bulk meniscus height also changes. Furthermore, a three-dimensional tomographic image is also reconstructed from the total of 128 projection images taken 1.4o apart in which the Li had already cooled and solidified.

Kihm, Ken [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Kirchoff, Eric [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Golden, Matt [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Rosenfeld, J. [Thermacore Inc.; Rawal, S. [Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company; Pratt, D. [United States Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Walker, Lakeisha MH [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Hussey, Dan [NIST Center for Neutron Research (NCRN), Gaithersburg, MD

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

High temperature heat pipe experiments in low earth orbit  

SciTech Connect

Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most high power space power system designs, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro-gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation for testing in low earth orbit. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will be tested aborad the Space Shuttle in 1995. Three heat pipes will be tested in a cargo bay Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The heat pipes are SST/potassium, each with a different wick structure; homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap, the heat pipes have been designed, fabricated, and ground tested. In this paper, the heat pipe designs are specified, and transient and steady-state ground test data are presented.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Critchley, E. (Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Application of Heat Pipes to the ATSF Spacecraft  

SciTech Connect

The Applications Technology Satellite (ATS) heat pipe program is an extensive effort requiring the fabrication and testing of more than 300 flight qualified heat pipes. The spacecraft itself contains 55 heat pipes in three configurations and 13 sizes. The design selected for ATS was an axially groved 6061 aluminum-ammonia heat pipe. Several developmental programs and extensive testing, including individual heat pipes, heat pipes bonded into honeycomb panels, and a large number of life tests, were included within the overall effort. Results are presented for the thermal modeling of the heat pipes with the spacecraft. Results of thermal-vacuum testing of a thermal structural model and sounding rocket testing of the ATS axially grooved pipe are also discussed. Several problems including hydrogen gas generation, were encountered during the course of the program. The steps taken to solve these problems may be applicable to future programs.

Berger, M.E.; Kelly, W.H.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High temperature heat pipe experiments in low earth orbit  

SciTech Connect

Although high temperature, liquid metal heat pipe radiators have become a standard component on most high power space power system designs, there is no experimental data on the operation of these heat pipes in a zero gravity or micro-gravity environment. Experiments to benchmark the transient and steady state performance of prototypical heat pipe space radiator elements are in preparation for testing in low earth orbit. It is anticipated that these heat pipes will be tested aborad the Space Shuttle in 1995. Three heat pipes will be tested in a cargo bay Get Away Special (GAS) canister. The heat pipes are SST/potassium, each with a different wick structure; homogeneous, arterial, and annular gap, the heat pipes have been designed, fabricated, and ground tested. In this paper, the heat pipe designs are specified, and transient and steady-state ground test data are presented.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Critchley, E. [Phillips Lab., Kirtland AFB, NM (United States)

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Smoothing of pipe system completion processes in a shipyard environment/  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to a number of different production issues, the manufacture of template pipes is often delayed. These delays hold up pipe system completion on board the ships in production and can delay payments from the Ministry of ...

Zojwalla, Shaheen J. (Shaheen Joyab), 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Development and Testing of Insulated Drill Pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has comprised design, analysis, laboratory testing, and field testing of insulated drill pipe (IDP). This paper will briefly describe the earlier work, but will focus on results from the recently-completed field test in a geothermal well. Field test results are consistent with earlier analyses and laboratory tests, all of which support the conclusion that insulated drill pipe can have a very significant effect on circulating fluid temperatures. This will enable the use of downhole motors and steering tools in hot wells, and will reduce corrosion, deterioration of drilling fluids, and heat-induced failures in other downhole components.

Champness, T.; Finger, J.; Jacobson, R.

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Report of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission Piping Review Committee. Volume 4. Evaluation of other loads and load combinations  

SciTech Connect

Six topical areas were covered by the Task Group on Other Dynamic Loads and Load Combinations as described below: Event Combinations - dealing with the potential simultaneous occurrence of earthquakes, pipe ruptures, and water hammer events in the piping design basis; Response Combinations - dealing with multiply supported piping with independent inputs, the sequence of combinations between spacial and modal components of response, and the treatment of high frequency modes in combination with low frequency modal responses; Stress Limits/Dynamic Allowables - dealing with inelastic allowables for piping and strain rate effects; Water Hammer Loadings - dealing with code and design specifications for these loadings and procedures for identifying potential water hammer that could affect safety; Relief Valve Opening and Closing Loads - dealing with the adequacy of analytical tools for predicting the effects of these events and, in addition, with estimating effective cycles for fatigue evaluations; and Piping Vibration Loads - dealing with evaluation procedures for estimating other than seismic vibratory loads, the need to consider reciprocating and rotary equipment vibratory loads, and high frequency vibratory loads. NRC staff recommendations or regulatory changes and additional study appear in this report.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Heat pipe technology. Quarterly update, March 31, 1976  

SciTech Connect

Heat Pipe Technology is a continuing bibliographic summary of research on heat pipes. The first volume was published in the spring of 1971 and is cumulative through March of that year. The 1971, 1972, 1973 and 1974 Annual Supplements have been published and distributed. This update to Heat Pipe Technology cites the additional references identified during January, February and March of 1976. It is intended to provide ''current awareness'' to heat pipe researchers.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Fire Testing of High-Density Polyethylene Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results in this report are intended to demonstrate a method that can be used to protect high-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping located aboveground from postulated fire events. This includes protecting both pipe and pipe fittings (for example, elbows, tees, and valves) from the fire environmentincluding the heat transmitted from pipe supportsand preventing the fire environment from passing through building wall or floor penetrations. The report is intended to be complementary to other ongoing Electr...

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Impacts of Soil and Pipe Thermal Conductivity on Performance of Horizontal Pipe in a Ground-source Heat Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the composition and thermal property of soil are discussed. The main factors that impact the soil thermal conductivity and several commonly-used pipe materials are studied. A model of heat exchanger with horizontal pipes of ground-source heat pump is developed. The impact of soil thermal conductivity and pipe thermal conductivity on the soil temperature field around the buried pipe, and the thermal performance of the heat exchanger are simulated. The simulation results show that with the increase of soil thermal conductivity, heat transfer quantity obviously increases, and the temperature of soil around pipe decrease under winter conditions. The temperature field varies relatively faster with thermal conductivity in the site nearer to the buried pipe. With the increase of pipe thermal conductivity, heat transfer quantity and the mean temperature of the buried pipe's outside surface all increase.

Song, Y.; Yao, Y.; Na, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Gary Phetteplace August 1995 Optimal Design of Piping Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gary Phetteplace August 1995 Optimal Design of Piping Systems for District Heating CRRELREPORT95 First, a method for determining the optimal size for a single pipe segment in a district heating system be feasible for designing the piping networks for district heating systems of moderate size, and its major

286

Evacuated-Tube Heat-Pipe Solar Collectors Applied to the Recirculation Loop in a Federal Building: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, simulation, construction, and initial performance of a solar water heating system (a 360-tube evacuated-tube heat-pipe solar collector, 54 m2 in gross area, 36 m2 in net absorber area) installed at the top of the hot water recirculation loop in the Social Security Administration's Mid-Atlantic Center in Philadelphia. When solar energy is available, water returning to the hot water storage tank is heated by the solar array. This new approach, in contrast to the more conventional approach of preheating incoming water, is made possible by the thermal diode effect of heat pipes and low heat loss from evacuated-tube solar collectors. The simplicity of this approach and its low installation costs support the deployment of solar energy in existing commercial buildings, especially where the roof is some distance away from the water heating system, which is often in the basement. Initial performance measurements of the system are reported.

Walker, A.; Mahjouri, F.; Stiteler, R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

ANL/NE-12/43 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ANLNE-1243 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program - R&D Roadmap for Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of Fatigue Damage in Piping ...

288

Testing of a sodium heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The operation of a heat pipe with both thermal radiation and convection heat rejection has been experimentally examined. The thermal radiation heat rejection conditions are similar to those which would be experienced in a space environment. The experimental results show good agreement with the analytical model. 3 refs., 2 figs.

Holtz, R.E.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Silicon heat pipes for cooling electronics  

SciTech Connect

The increasing power density of integrated circuits (ICs) is creating the need for improvements in systems for transferring heat away from the chip. In earlier investigations, diamond films were used to conduct heat from ICs and spread the energy across a heat sink. The authors` investigation has indicated that a 635 {mu}m (25 mil) thick silicon substrate with embedded heat pipes could perform this task better than a diamond film. From their study, it appears that the development of a heat-pipe heat-spreading system is both technically and commercially feasible. The major challenge for this heat-spreading system is to develop an effective wick structure to transport liquid to the heated area beneath the chip. This paper discusses the crucial design parameters for this heat-pipe system, such as the required wick properties, the material compatibility issues, and the thermal characteristics of the system. The paper also provides results from some recent experimental activities at Sandia to develop these heat-pipe heat spreader systems.

Adkins, D.R.; Shen, D.S.; Palmer, D.W.; Tuck, M.R.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

ASBESTOS PIPE-INSULATION REMOVAL ROBOT SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

This final topical report details the development, experimentation and field-testing activities for a robotic asbestos pipe-insulation removal robot system developed for use within the DOE's weapon complex as part of their ER and WM program, as well as in industrial abatement. The engineering development, regulatory compliance, cost-benefit and field-trial experiences gathered through this program are summarized.

Unknown

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

Buried Pipe Condition Assessment with Instrumented Vehicles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the evaluation of two technologies for the examination of buried piping in nuclear power plants. As part of this program, the electromagnetic and ultrasonic instrumented vehicles made by Hydroscope and Ucisco were used to examine two buried pipelines at the Palo Verde Nuclear Station.

2003-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

292

Improved Design Tools for Surface Water and Standing Column Well...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

up to the level of the water table. Water is circulated from the well through the heat pump in an open-loop pipe circuit. Compared to closed-loop systems, the SCW system...

293

Water Safety Plan Implementation: Huaquillas, Ecuador and Aguas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and a consequent risk of in-pipe recontamination(2) ­ Reduced availability and lower volume use, which adversely Handbook for Communicable Disease ­ Described water related disease breakdown: waterborne, water- washed

294

Energy-efficient water heating  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet describes how to reduce the amount of hot water used in faucets and showers, automatic dishwashers, and washing machines; how to increase water-heating system efficiency by lowering the water heater thermostat, installing a timer and heat traps, and insulating hot water pipes and the storage tank; and how to use off-peak power to heat water. A resource list for further information is included.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Heat pipe technology development for high temperature space radiator applications  

SciTech Connect

Technology requirements for heat pipe radiators, potentially among the lightest weight systems for space power applications, include flexible elements, and improved specific radiator performance(kg/kW). For these applications a flexible heat pipe capable of continuous operation through an angle of 180/sup 0/ has been demonstrated. The effect of bend angle on the heat pipe temperature distribution is reviewed. An analysis of lightweight membrane heat pipe radiators that use surface tension forces for fluid containment has been conducted. The design analysis of these lightweight heat pipes is described and a potential application in heat rejection systems for space nuclear power plants outlined.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.; Elder, M.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fossil Plant High-Energy Piping Damage: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condition assessment programs for high-energy piping systems are often a major aspect of a fossil utilitys inspection and maintenance program. In the past 30 years, a number of major failures of fossil high-energy piping have been associated with flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) of feedwater piping, creep failures of longitudinal seam-welded hot reheat and main steam piping, and corrosion fatigue/thermal failures of cold reheat steam piping. In addition to these well-documented failures, most utilities e...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

297

Safe water storage in Kenya's modified clay pot : standardization, tap design, and cost recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the main components necessary for providing safe drinking water for users who lack piped water in the home is the ability to safely store it in the home. Users in the Nyanza Province of Kenya frequently carry water ...

Young, Suzanne E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Surface Water Temperatures and Salinities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1987  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1989  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1974  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Surface Water Temperatures, Salinities and Densities At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1988  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

off the rocks near the water intake for the laboratory. Thethat monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.at the intake pipe to their aquarium water system located in

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Surface Water Temperatures At Shore Stations, United States West Coast 1973  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that monitors the cooling intake water for the generators.takes daily water temperatures at the intake pipe to theirof hot water is outside the bay, the intake temperatures are

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

NONE

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Insights Gained from Ultrasonic Testing of Piping Welds Subjected to the Mechanical Stress Improvement Process  

SciTech Connect

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is assisting the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in developing a position on the management of primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in leak-before-break piping systems. Part of this involves determining whether inspections alone, or inspections plus mitigation, are needed. This work addresses the reliability of ultrasonic testing (UT) of cracks that have been mitigated by the mechanical stress improvement process (MSIP). The MSIP has been approved by the NRC (NUREG-0313) since 1986 and modifies residual stresses remaining after welding with compressive, or neutral, stresses near the inner diameter surface of the pipe. This compressive stress is thought to arrest existing cracks and inhibit new crack formation. To evaluate the effectiveness of the MSIP and the reliability of ultrasonic inspections, flaws were evaluated both before and after MSIP application. An initial investigation was based on data acquired from cracked areas in 325-mm-diameter piping at the Ignalina Nuclear Power Plant (INPP) in Lithuania. In a follow-on exercise, PNNL acquired and evaluated similar UT data from a dissimilar metal weld (DMW) specimen containing implanted thermal fatigue cracks. The DMW specimen is a carbon steel nozzle-to-safe end-to-stainless steel pipe section that simulates a pressurizer surge nozzle. The flaws were implanted in the nozzle-to-safe end Alloy 82/182 butter region. Results are presented on the effects of MSIP on specimen surfaces, and on UT flaw responses.

Anderson, Michael T.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Crawford, Susan L.; Diaz, Aaron A.; Moran, Traci L.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Water Resources Milind Sohoni  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111111111111111111111 111111111111111111 Massive Rock Well Fractured Basalt WT Soil of fractured basalt. Fractures and layer-junctions important for seepage. Note seepage face. Soil layers lined, and is typically pebbles. The water collects in the main column and is fed up through the delivery pipe

Sohoni, Milind

306

Water Heating | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Heating Water Heating Water Heating Infographic: Water Heaters 101 Everything you need to know about saving money on water heating costs Read more Selecting a New Water Heater Tankless? Storage? Solar? Save money on your water heating bill by choosing the right type of energy-efficient water heater for your needs. Read more Sizing a New Water Heater When buying a new water heater, bigger is not always better. Learn how to buy the right size of water heater. Read more You can reduce your monthly water heating bills by selecting the appropriate water heater for your home or pool and by using some energy-efficient water heating strategies. Some simple do-it-yourself projects, like insulating hot water pipes and lowering your water heating temperature, can also help you save money and energy on your water heating.

307

Virtual Measurement in Pipes, Part 1: Flowing Bottom Hole Pressure Under Multi-Phase Flow and Inclined Wellbore Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the utmost importance in maximizing the reservoir energy in naturally flowing and artificial lift wells as the number of variables increases. Many parameters could be involved in these types of problems, such as gas information such as oil, gas and water flow rates, temperature, oil and gas gravity, pipe length, surface

Mohaghegh, Shahab

308

Automated welding of nuclear piping systems  

SciTech Connect

Automated welding, or more broadly, automatic and mechanized welding processes, has found a role in nuclear power plant fabrication. This role has expanded from a rare or isolated application to relatively frequent usage in the last five years. More importantly, it is envisioned that use of automated welding will be increasing at an accelerated rate as broader exposure to this technology is achieved. Among the various pipe welding processes, the only one which has been developed for mechanized and automated nuclear piping welding is the gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) process. This development has occurred in the past 10 to 15 years through the steady improvement and commmercialization of orbiting welding heads. Improvements in GTAW power supplies, control systems, etc., have aided this commercialization but the main element and pacing item has been the welding head itself. In order to review the status of mechanized and automated nuclear pipe welding, the topics of basic process equipment, joint design, fit-up requirements, welding parameters, and producibility will be addressed. In addition, anticipated future developments in automated systems will be discussed.

Hood, D.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Evaluation of Trenchless Installation Technology for Radioactive Wastewater Piping Applications  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM) cleanup mission at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) includes dispositioning facilities, contaminated legacy materials/waste, and contamination sources and remediation of soil under facilities, groundwater, and surface water to support final Records of Decision (RODs). The Integrated Facilities Disposition Project (IFDP) is a roughly $15B project for completion of the EM mission at Oak Ridge, with a project duration of up to 35 years. The IFDP Mission Need Statement - Critical Decision-0 (CD-0) - was approved by DOE in July 2007, and the IFDP Alternative Selection and Cost Range - Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) - was approved in November 2008. The IFDP scope includes reconfiguration of waste collection and treatment systems as needed to complete the IFDP remediation and decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) missions in a safe and cost-effective manner while maintaining compliance with all governing regulations and bodies and preserving the support of continuing operations at ORNL. A step in the CD-1 approval process included an external technical review (ETR) of technical approaches proposed in the CD-1 document related to the facility reconfiguration for the ORNL radioactive waste and liquid low-level waste management systems. The ETR team recommended that the IFDP team consider the use of trenchless technologies for installing pipelines underground in and around contaminated sites as part of the alternatives evaluations required in support of the CD-2 process. The team specifically recommended evaluating trenchless technologies for installing new pipes in existing underground pipelines as an alternative to conventional open trench installation methods. Potential benefits could include reduction in project costs, less costly underground piping, fewer disruptions of ongoing and surface activities, and lower risk for workers. While trenchless technologies have been used extensively in the sanitary sewer and natural gas pipeline industries, they have been used far less in contaminated environments. Although trenchless technologies have been used at ORNL in limited applications to install new potable water and gas lines, the technologies have not been used in radioactive applications. This study evaluates the technical risks, benefits, and economics for installing gravity drained and pressurized piping using trenchless technologies compared to conventional installation methods for radioactive applications under ORNL geological conditions. A range of trenchless installation technologies was reviewed for this report for general applicability for replacing existing contaminated piping and/or installing new pipelines in potentially contaminated areas. Installation methods that were determined to have potential for use in typical ORNL contaminated environments were then evaluated in more detail for three specific ORNL applications. Each feasible alternative was evaluated against the baseline conventional open trench installation method using weighted criteria in the areas of environment, safety, and health (ES&H); project cost and schedule; and technical operability. The formulation of alternatives for evaluation, the development of selection criteria, and the scoring of alternatives were performed by ORNL staff with input from vendors and consultants. A description of the evaluation methodology and the evaluation results are documented in the following sections of this report.

Robinson, Sharon M [ORNL; Jubin, Robert Thomas [ORNL; Patton, Bradley D [ORNL; Sullivan, Nicholas M [ORNL; Bugbee, Kathy P [ORNL

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Electrically heated liquid tank employing heat pipe heat transfer means  

SciTech Connect

The heating apparatus for applying heat to the interior of a chamber includes a modular, removable, electrical, heat-producing unit and a heat pipe mountable in a wall of the chamber with one end of the pipe arranged to receive heat from the electrical heat producing unit exterior of the housing and with another end of the pipe constructed and arranged to apply heat to the medium within the chamber. The heat pipe has high conductivity with a low temperature differential between the ends thereof and the heat producing unit includes an electric coil positioned about and removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe. The electric coil is embedded in a high thermal conducitivity, low electrical conductivity filler material which is surrounded by a low thermal conductivity insulating jacket and which is received around a metal core member which is removably secured to the one end of the heat pipe.

Shutt, J.R.

1978-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

Review of liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect

A survey of space-power related liquid metal heat pipe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory is presented. Heat pipe development at Los Alamos has been on-going since 1963. Heat pipes were initially developed for thermionic nuclear-electrical power production in space. Since then Los Alamos has developed liquid metal heat pipes for numerous applications related to high temperature systems in both the space and terrestrial environments. Some of these applications include thermionic electrical generators, thermoelectric energy conversion (both in-core and direct radiation), thermal energy storage, hypersonic vehicle leading edge cooling, and heat pipe vapor laser cells. Some of the work performed at Los Alamos has been documented in internal reports that are often little-known. A representative description and summary of progress in space-related liquid metal heat pipe technology is provided followed by a reference section citing sources where these works may be found. 53 refs.

Reid, R.S.; Merrigan, M.A.; Sena, J.T.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Pipe overpack container for transuranic waste storage and shipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Pipe Overpack Container is described for transuranic waste storage and shipment. The system consists of a vented pipe component which is positioned in a vented, insulated 55 gallon steel drum. Both the vented pipe component and the insulated drum are capable of being secured to prevent the contents from leaving the vessel. The vented pipe component is constructed of 1/4 inch stainless steel to provide radiation shielding, thus allowing shipment having high Americium-241 content. Several Pipe Overpack Containers are then positioned in a type B, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved, container. In the current embodiment, a TRUPACT-II container was employed and a maximum of fourteen Pipe Overpack Containers were placed in the TRUPACT-II. The combination received NRC approval for the shipment and storage of transuranic waste.

Geinitz, R.R.; Thorp, D.T.; Rivera, M.A.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

313

Pipe overpack container for trasuranic waste storage and shipment  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Pipe Overpack Container for transuranic waste storage and shipment. The system consists of a vented pipe component which is positioned in a vented, insulated 55 gallon steel drum. Both the vented pipe component and the insulated drum are capable of being secured to prevent the contents from leaving the vessel. The vented pipe component is constructed of 1/4 inch stainless steel to provide radiation shielding. Thus, allowing shipment having high Americium-241 content. Several Pipe Overpack Containers are then positioned in a type B, Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) approved, container. In the current embodiment, a TRUPACT-II container was employed and a maximum of fourteen Pipe Overpack Containers were placed in the TRUPACT-II. The combination received NRC approval for the shipment and storage of transuranic waste.

Geinitz, Richard R. (Arvada, CO); Thorp, Donald T. (Broomfield, CO); Rivera, Michael A. (Boulder, CO)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Heat Pipe Technology for Energy Conservation in the Process Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many applications for heat pipe technology have emerged in the relatively short time this technology has been known. Heat pipes incorporated in heat exchangers have been used in tens of thousands of successful heat recovery systems. These systems range from residential and commercial air-to-air heat exchangers to giant air preheaters for the process and utility industries. The heat pipe offers a unique, efficient heat transfer device that can recover valuable thermal energy resulting in reduced equipment and operating costs. Q-dot is the world leader in heat pipe technology and we have applied our expertise in engineering heat recovery products for the process industry. This paper discusses two such products, the heat pipe air preheater and waste heat recovery boiler. These heat pipe products have been used in many successful installations all over the world and some important, distinctive features of these systems will be presented.

Price, B. L. Jr.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

A Gas-Fired Heat Pipe Zone Heater  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A gas-fired vented zone heater has recently been developed by the Altar Corporation for Colorado State University (CSU) under a Gas Research Institute (GRI) contract. The unit war developed for auxiliary heating applications in passive solar buildings. An early prototype was tested at Altas and operated as expected. The final model was shipped to CSU in December 1983 for testing in the REPEAT Facility at CSU. A heat pipe extends through the wall to the outside of the building. It has a modest water charge which can freeze repeatedly with no damage, since the heat pips is only partially filled. Firing efficiency at 4,000 Btu/b (1.17 kW thermal) is approximately 80%. The unit features a 3 foot by 3 foot radiator mounted inside the room to be heated, and is thermostatically controlled. Ignition is accomplished with an electronic sparker (pilot). The radiator typically operates at 150-180°F (65-82°C), and has been operated at between 2,000 and 5,000 Btu/h (0.6-1.47 kW). Results of testing the vented heat pipe zone heater at CSU arm presented. Also, a method for determining the optimal combination of zone heater, passive solar heating and energy conservation measures has been developed. Nomographs have been developed that may be used by a building designer to determine the optimal combination of zone heater size, passive solar system size, and energy conservation measures for given types of passive solar heating systems in selected locations. A representative nomograph is presented along with a design example.

Winn, C. B.; Burns, P.; Guire, J.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Sizing the first flush and its effect on the storage-reliability-yield behavior of rainwater harvesting in Rwanda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rainwater harvesting is a technology used to supply water for domestic purposes in developing countries. Rooftop rainwater harvesting involves collection of rainwater from a rooftop via a guttering system and storage in a ...

Doyle, Kelly C. (Kelly Carroll)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Integrated manufacturing system of high-pressure FRP pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to realise industrialised manufacturing of epoxy FRP pipes, the manufacturing system which can accomplish winding, internal heating curing and extraction processes by only one machine tool was developed. The winding motion control is undertaken ... Keywords: FEM, FRP pipes, blowing control, cooling control, curing control, embedded controllers, fibreglass reinforced plastics, finite element method, high-pressure pipes, integrated manufacturing, internal heating curing, motion control, simulation, thermochemical modelling, winding

Bo You; Jiazhong Xu; Xiongjian Wang

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Balance of Plant Corrosion -- The Buried Pipe Reference Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007, EPRI conducted two workshops in which the integrity of buried pipes was identified as a significant issue for nuclear power plants. One result of the workshops was that EPRI was asked to sponsor development of a recommendations document to help plant engineers prevent and mitigate degradation and leaks in buried pipes. EPRI report 1016456, Recommendations for an Effective Program to Control the Degradation of Buried and Underground Piping and Tanks, was prepared to address that need. In 2010, EP...

2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

319

Remediation of Embedded Piping: Trojan Nuclear Plant Decommissioning Experience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Characterization, decontamination, survey, and/or removal of contaminated embedded piping can have a substantial financial impact on decommissioning projects, depending on the project approach. This report presents a discussion of the Trojan Embedded Pipe Remediation Project (EPRP) activities, including categorization and characterization of affected piping, modeling for the proposed contamination acceptance criteria, and evaluations of various decontamination and survey techniques. The report also descr...

2000-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources Best Management Practice: Alternate Water Sources October 8, 2013 - 9:50am Addthis Many Federal facilities may have water uses that can be met with non-potable water from alternate water sources. Potentially available alternative water sources for Federal sources include municipal-supplied reclaimed water, treated gray water from on-site sanitary sources, and storm water. Overview On-site alternative water sources are most economic if included in the original design. Common uses for these sources include landscape irrigation, ornamental pond and fountain filling, cooling tower make-up, and toilet and urinal flushing. Municipal-Supplied Reclaimed Water Municipal supplied reclaimed water has been treated and recycled for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Effect of Environment on Fatigue Usage for Piping and Nozzles at Oconee Units 1, 2, and 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an evaluation of stainless steel components in a pressurized water reactor and the effects of the water environment on the ASME Code Class 1 fatigue evaluation. The report provides an approach that can be used to evaluate the combination of quasi-steady, thermal transient, and dynamic loading effects to develop an environmental correction factor (Fen) that can be applied to individual load set pairs. The approach is applied to both nozzle and piping components and shows that environ...

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

322

Preferential flow paths and heat pipes: Results from laboratory experiments on heat-driven flow in natural and artificial rock fractures  

SciTech Connect

Water flow in fractures under the conditions of partial saturation and thermal drive may lead to fast flow along preferential localized pathways and heat pipe conditions. Water flowing in fast pathways may ultimately contact waste packages at Yucca Mountain and transport radionuclides to the accessible environment. Sixteen experiments were conducted to visualize liquid flow in glass fracture models, a transparent epoxy fracture replica, and a rock/replica fracture assembly. Spatially resolved thermal monitoring was performed in seven of these experiments to evaluate heat-pipe formation. Depending on the fracture apertures and flow conditions, various flow regimes were observed including continuous rivulet flow for high flow rates, intermittent rivulet flow and drop flow for intermediate flow rates, and film flow for low flow rates and wide apertures. These flow regimes were present in both fracture models and in the replica of a natural fracture. Heat-pipe conditions indicated by low thermal gradients were observed in five experiments. Conditions conducive to heat-pipe formation include an evaporation zone, condensation zone, adequate space for vapor and liquid to travel, and appropriate fluid driving forces. In one of the two experiments where heat pipe conditions were not observed, adequate space for liquid-vapor counterflow was not provided. Heat pipe conditions were not established in the other, because liquid flow was inadequate to compensate for imbibition and the quantity of heat contained within the rock.

Kneafsey, T.J.; Pruess, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sodium and lithium corrosion in molybdenum heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Sodium and lithium corrosin in molybdenum heat pipes has been shown to be impurity dependent rather than solubility dependent. Impurities represent the major contributors to corrosion in the heat pipes tested. Our experiments have shown no evidence of direct solution of molybdenum by either sodium or lithium. Analysis has suggested that a critical concentration of impurities is required to initiate corrosion. Thus it appears that corrosion in Mo/Na and Mo/Li heat pipes can be controlled if impurity concentration can be limited by removal of impurities from the working fluid and heat pipe components prior to operation or by internal gettering during operation.

Lundberg, L.B.; Merrigan, M.A.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Polyethylene Pipe Failure in the Arctic - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the current study, a new high density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe in the Arctic region of ... Heat Tint Effects on General Corrosion Resistance of Stainless Steels .

325

Nondestructive Evaluation: Ultrasonic Examination Techniques for High Density Polyethylene Pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe has been used as a replacement material for buried carbon steel pipe in non-safety-related systems. Using the current butt fusion procedure that uses heat and pressure to melt and join two sections of plastic pipe, concerns have been raised that would indicate that the presence of decreased bond strength when the welding parameters for fusion set forth by the plastic pipe industry were not followed. Currently two utilities, Ameren UE at Callaway and Duke-Energy at Ca...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

ID Cladding of Pipe Using Resistance Seam Processing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, Edison Welding Institute as developed a new technology for cladding of such pipe. This technology incorporates a resistance seam welding approach,

327

International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This is the final report of the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) Program. The IPIRG Program was an international group program managed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and funded by a consortium of organizations from nine nations: Canada, France, Italy, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The program objective was to develop data needed to verify engineering methods for assessing the integrity of circumferentially-cracked nuclear power plant piping. The primary focus was an experimental task that investigated the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping systems subjected to high-rate loadings typical of seismic events. To accomplish these objectives a pipe system fabricated as an expansion loop with over 30 meters of 16-inch diameter pipe and five long radius elbows was constructed. Five dynamic, cyclic, flawed piping experiments were conducted using this facility. This report: (1) provides background information on leak-before-break and flaw evaluation procedures for piping, (2) summarizes technical results of the program, (3) gives a relatively detailed assessment of the results from the pipe fracture experiments and complementary analyses, and (4) summarizes advances in the state-of-the-art of pipe fracture technology resulting from the IPIRG program.

Wilkowski, G.; Schmidt, R.; Scott, P. [and others

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Magnetohydrodynamic power generation, electromagnetic pumps, heat pipes, and thermionic convertors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basic principles of operation, components, and design of MHD generators, electromagnetic pumps, heat pipes and thermionic converters are described. 66 references. (WHK)

Pierson, E.S.; Bonyhady, K.A.; Dunn, P.F.; Nathenson, R.D.; Uherka, K.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Life Assessment Methods for Power Plant Piping and Tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...life prediction High-temperature crack growth methods ):36, Ref 35Similar to gas turbine blades, piping and tubing in steamlines, heaters,

330

Toward Active Monitoring of Piping Using Ultrasonic Guided Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Piping in nuclear power plants is exposed to severe environmental conditions so that it is very susceptible to failure caused by the growth of defects. Thus

Joon?Soo Park; Young H. Kim; Sung?Jin Song; Jae?Hee Kim; Heung?Seop Eom; Kwang?Hee Im

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

NETL: News Release - Pipe Locating Sensor Could Help Prevent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ceramic, Plastic and Metallic Objects DES PLAINS, IL - Successful early tests of a pipeline sensor that locates plastic, ceramic and metallic underground pipes could help reduce...

332

FEM Analysis of Pipe Reduction Forming Process for Increasing of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a method of reducing a pipe to obtain a desired diameter, Kiuchi et al. propose a planetary ... Alloy Parts Heat Treatment Temperature Monitoring System.

333

Experimental and computational studies of loop heat pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Computational and experimental investigations of fluid flow and heat transfer aspects of loop heat pipes (LHPs) are presented in this thesis. The overall goal is… (more)

Atabaki, Nima.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Fabrication, Filling, Sealing and Testing of Micro Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Micro heat pipes are small and passive heat transfer devices. Research is going on in its applications ranging from using them in high powered electronic… (more)

NADGAUDA, OMKAR

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Investigation of Unusual “Sharkskin” Corrosion in Drawn Copper Pipes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloy Parts Heat Treatment Temperature Monitoring System · Analysis of ... FEM Analysis of Pipe Reduction Forming Process for Increasing of Wall Thickness.

336

Inspecting the Circulating Water System at Crystal River Unit 3 for Evidence of Microbial Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water line inspections at the Florida Power Company Crystal River unit 3 revealed microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) in welded regions of inlet piping. Recommendations for decreasing MIC in those regions include removal of inlet pipe girth welds, rewelding with high-nickel filler rods, and treating cooling water with biocides.

1989-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

Heat pipe with improved wick structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved planar heat pipe wick structure having projections formed by micromachining processes. The projections form arrays of interlocking, semi-closed structures with multiple flow paths on the substrate. The projections also include overhanging caps at their tops to increase the capillary pumping action of the wick structure. The capped projections can be formed in stacked layers. Another layer of smaller, more closely spaced projections without caps can also be formed on the substrate in between the capped projections. Inexpensive materials such as Kovar can be used as substrates, and the projections can be formed by electrodepositing nickel through photoresist masks.

Benson, David A. (Albuquerque, NM); Robino, Charles V. (Albuquerque, NM); Palmer, David W. (Albuquerque, NM); Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Performance correlations for high temperature potassium heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Potassium heat pipes designed for operation at a nominal temperature of 775K have been developed for use in a heat pipe cooled reactor design. The heat pipes operate in a gravity assist mode with a maximum required power throughput of approximately 16 kW per heat pipe. Based on a series of sub-scale experiments with 2.12 and 3.2 cm diameter heat pipes the prototypic heat pipe diameter was set at 5.7 cm with a simple knurled wall wick used in the interests of mechanical simplicity. The performance levels required for this design had been demonstrated in prior work with gutter assisted wicks and emphasis in the present work was on the attainment of similar performance with a simplified wick structure. The wick structure used in the experiment consisted of a pattern of knurled grooves in the internal wall of the heat pipe. The knurl depth required for the planned heat pipe performance was determined by scaling of wick characteristic data from the sub-scale tests. These tests indicated that the maximum performance limits of the test heat pipes did not follow normal entrainment limit predictions for textured wall gravity assist heat pipes. Test data was therefore scaled to the prototype design based on the assumption that the performance was controlled by an entrainment parameter based on the liquid flow depth in the groove structure. This correlation provided a reasonable fit to the sub-scale test data and was used in scale up of the design from the 8.0 cm/sup 2/ cross section of the largest sub-scale heat pipe to the 25.5 cm/sup 2/ cross section prototype. Correlation of the model predictions with test data from the prototype is discussed.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat pipe topical, appendices  

SciTech Connect

Work performed by Dynatherm Corporation for Teledyne Isotopes during a program entitled ''Heat Pipe Fabrication, Associated Technical Support and Reporting'' is reported. The program was initiated on November 29, 1972; the main objectives were accomplished with the delivery of the heat pipes for the HPG. Life testing of selected heat pipe specimens is continuing to and beyond the present date. The program consisted of the following tasks: Heat Pipe Development of Process Definition; Prototype Heat Pipes for Fin Segment Test; HPG Heat Pipe Fabrication and Testing; Controlled Heat Pipe Life Test; and Heat Pipe Film Coefficient Determination. (TFD)

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat pipe topical, appendices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Work performed by Dynatherm Corporation for Teledyne Isotopes during a program entitled ''Heat Pipe Fabrication, Associated Technical Support and Reporting'' is reported. The program was initiated on November 29, 1972; the main objectives were accomplished with the delivery of the heat pipes for the HPG. Life testing of selected heat pipe specimens is continuing to and beyond the present date. The program consisted of the following tasks: Heat Pipe Development of Process Definition; Prototype Heat Pipes for Fin Segment Test; HPG Heat Pipe Fabrication and Testing; Controlled Heat Pipe Life Test; and Heat Pipe Film Coefficient Determination. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Integrated heat pipe-thermal storage system performance evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Performance verification tests of an integrated heat pipe-thermal energy storage system have been conducted. This system is being developed as a part of an Organic Rankine Cycle-Solar Dynamic Power System (ORC-SDPS) receiver for future space stations. The integrated system consists of potassium heat pipe elements that incorporate thermal energy storage (TES) canisters within the vapor space along with an organic fluid (toluene) heater tube used as the condenser region of the heat pipe. During the insolation period of the earth orbit, solar energy is delivered to the surface of the heat pipe elements of the ORC-SDPS receiver and is internally transferred by the potassium vapor for use and storage. Part of the thermal energy is delivered to the heater tube and the balance is stored in the TES units. During the eclipse period of the orbit, the stored energy in the TES units is transferred by the potassium vapor to the toluene heater tube. A developmental heat pipe element was fabricated that employs axial arteries and a distribution wick connecting the wicked TES units and the heater to the solar insolation surface of the heat pipe. Tests were conducted to verify the heat pipe operation and to evaluate the heat pipe/TES units/heater tube operation by interfacing the heater unit to a heat exchanger.

Keddy, E.; Sena, J.T.; Merrigan, M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Liquid metal heat pipe behavior under transient cooling and heating  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the results of an experimental investigation of the transient behavior of a liquid metal heat pipe. A 0.457 m long, screen-wick, sodium heat pipe with 0.0127 m outer diameter was tested in sodium loop facility. The heat pipe reversed under a pulse heat load applied at the condenser. The time at which the heat pipe reversed was dependent of the heat pipe properties, the sodium loop flow rate and heating conditions at the condenser. The start-up and the operational shut-down by forced cooling of the condenser were also studied. During the start-up process, at least part of the heat pipe was active. The active region extended gradually down to the end of the condenser until all working fluid in the heat pipe was molten. With forced cooling at the condenser, the heat pipe approached its heat transport limit before section of the condenser became frozen. The measured heat transport limit was in agreement with the theoretical value. 5 refs.

Nguyen, H.X.; Hahn, T.O.; Hahn, O.J.; Chow, L.C.; Tagavi, K.A.; Morgan, M.J. (Kentucky, University, Lexington (United States) USAF, Wright Laboratory, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

October 15, 2001 PRE-INSULATED UNDERGROUND PIPE FOR STEAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SERVICE PART 1 ­ GENERAL 1.01 SUMMARY Underground steam and condensate distribution systems includingOctober 15, 2001 02558-1 PRE-INSULATED UNDERGROUND PIPE FOR STEAM AND CONDENSATE SERVICE CONSTRUCTION STANDARD SPECIFICATION SECTION 02558 PRE-INSULATED UNDERGROUND PIPE FOR STEAM AND CONDENSATE

344

CODIFICATION OF FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITE PIPING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the overall project is to successfully adapt spoolable FRP currently used in the oil industry for use in hydrogen pipelines. The use of FRP materials for hydrogen service will rely on the demonstrated compatibility of these materials for pipeline service environments and operating conditions. The ability of the polymer piping to withstand degradation while in service, and development of the tools and data required for life management are imperative for successful implementation of these materials for hydrogen pipeline. The information and data provided in this report provides the technical basis for the codification for fiber reinforced piping (FRP) for hydrogen service. The DOE has invested in the evaluation of FRP for the delivery for gaseous hydrogen to support the development of a hydrogen infrastructure. The codification plan calls for detailed investigation of the following areas: System design and applicable codes and standards; Service degradation of FRP; Flaw tolerance and flaw detection; Integrity management plan; Leak detection and operational controls evaluation; Repair evaluation. The FRP codification process started with commercially available products that had extensive use in the oil and gas industry. These products have been evaluated to assure that sufficient structural integrity is available for a gaseous hydrogen environment.

Rawls, G.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Prospects for Social Business in Peri-Urban Water Supply: Employment and Household Welfare Impacts of the Grameen Veolia Venture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as pipes, spigots and jars. Masons are essential toselling water delivered in jars. These alterations to thethe program launched a jar business in peri-urban centers

Pierce, Gregory

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Surveillance Guide - OPS 9.18 Equipment and Piping Labeling  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING EQUIPMENT AND PIPING LABELING 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. This surveillance provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities 2.2 DOE-STD-1044-93, Guide to Good Practices for Equipment and Piping Labeling 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance is conducted to implement requirements of the Functions, Requirements and Authorities Manual, Section 20,

347

CRAD, Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan CRAD, Equipment and Piping Labeling Assessment Plan Performance Objective: To verify that facility equipment and piping are labeled in a manner such that facility personnel are able to positively identify equipment they operate. To ensure that an effective labeling program is in effect to reduce operator and maintenance errors from incorrect identification of equipment, to increase training effectiveness by tracing the actual facility system as opposed to tracing its schematic, and to reduce personnel exposure to radiation and hazardous materials. This assessment provides a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of the contractor's program for labeling equipment and piping and for establishing compliance with DOE requirements.

348

Analysis of the transient compressible vapor flow in heat pipe  

SciTech Connect

The transient compressible one-dimensional vapor flow dynamics in a heat pipe is modeled. The numerical results are obtained by using the implicit non-iterative Beam-Warming finite difference method. The model is tested for simulated heat pipe vapor flow and actual vapor flow in cylindrical heat pipes. A good comparison of the present transient results for the simulated heat pipe vapor flow with the previous results of a two-dimensional numerical model is achieved and the steady state results are in agreement with the existing experimental data. The transient behavior of the vapor flow under subsonic, sonic, and supersonic speeds and high mass flow rates are successfully predicted. The one-dimensional model also describes the vapor flow dynamics in cylindrical heat pipes at high temperatures.

Jang, J.H.; Faghri, A. [Wright State Univ., Dayton, OH (United States); Chang, W.S. [Wright Research and Development Center, Wright-Patterson, OH (United States)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Long titanium heat pipes for high-temperature space radiators  

SciTech Connect

Titanium heat pipes are being developed to provide light weight, reliable heat rejection devices as an alternate radiator design for the Space Reactor Power System (SP-100). The radiator design includes 360 heat pipes, each of which is 5.2 m long and dissipates 3 kW of power at 775 K. The radiator heat pipes use potassium as the working fluid, have two screen arteries for fluid return, a roughened surface distributive wicking system, and a D-shaped cross-section container configuration. A prototype titanium heat pipe, 5.5-m long, has been fabricated and tested in space-simulating conditions. Results from startup and isothermal operation tests are presented. These results are also compared to theoretical performance predictions that were used to design the heat pipe initially.

Girrens, S.P.; Ernst, D.M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Heat pipe cooling for scramjet engines. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid metal heat pipe cooling systems have been investigated for the combustor liner and engine inlet leading edges of scramjet engines for a missile application. The combustor liner is cooled by a lithium-TZM molybdenum annular heat pipe, which incorporates a separate lithium reservoir. Heat is initially absorbed by the sensible thermal capacity of the heat pipe and liner, and subsequently by the vaporization and discharge of lithium to the atmosphere. The combustor liner temperature is maintained at 3400 F or less during steady-state cruise. The engine inlet leading edge is fabricated as a sodium-superalloy heat pipe. Cooling is accomplished by radiation of heat from the aft surface of the leading edge to the atmosphere. The leading edge temperature is limited to 1700 F or less. It is concluded that heat pipe cooling is a viable method for limiting scramjet combustor liner and engine inlet temperatures to levels at which structural integrity is greatly enhanced.

Silverstein, C.C.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

352

Review of the Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping and Pipe Supports, September 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Savannah River Site, Salt Waste Processing Facility, Construction Quality of Piping & Pipe Supports September 2012 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Enforcement and Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 Scope.................................................................................................................................................... 1 3.0 Background .......................................................................................................................................... 1

353

Design and technology of heat pipes for cooling and heat exchange  

SciTech Connect

This new book presents a comprehensive account of heat pipe design, technology, and operation. It is based on insights and techniques developed by the author during more than twenty years of investigating high-performance heat pipe systems. The book provides information on a unique device with the capability to transport heat isothermally at high rates with no external power input. Emphasis is on high-performance liquid metal heat pipes, although nonliquid metal heat pipes are treated, as well. The first three chapters deal with the nonmathematical background for understanding heat pipe operation and heat transport capability. Remaining chapters detail heat pipe characteristics and design methods. Of special interest are simplified equations for obtaining heat pipe heat transport limits, heat pipe heat exchangers, heat pipe transient behavior, and inverted (nonwetting) heat pipes. Operational boundaries on heat pipe temperature and heat transport rate are described, and step-by-step procedures are given for involved calculations.

Silverstein, C.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Characterization of Pipes, Drain Lines, and Ducts using the Pipe Explorer System  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

MC/30172-97/C0803 MC/30172-97/C0803 Title: Characterization of Pipes, Drain Lines, and Ducts Using the Pipe Explorer System TM Authors: C.D. Cremer D.T. Kendrick E. Cramer Contractor: Science and Engineering Associates, Inc. 6100 Uptown Blvd, NE Albuquerque, NM 87100 Contract Number: DE-AC21-93MC30172 Conference: Industry Partnerships to Deploy Environmental Technology Conference Location: Morgantown, West Virginia Conference Dates: October 22-24, 1996 Conference Sponsor: Morgantown Energy Technology Center Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any

355

Persistence of a pinch in a pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The response of low-dimensional solid objects combines geometry and physics in unusual ways, exemplified in structures of great utility such as a thin-walled tube that is ubiquitous in nature and technology. Here we provide a particularly surprising consequence of this confluence of geometry and physics in tubular structures: the anomalously large persistence of a localized pinch in an elastic pipe whose effect decays very slowly as an oscillatory exponential with a persistence length that diverges as the thickness of the tube vanishes, which we confirm experimentally. The result is more a consequence of geometry than material properties, and is thus equally applicable to carbon nanotubes as it is to oil pipelines.

L. Mahadevan; A. Vaziri; Moumita Das

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

356

Challenges with jointed-pipe underbalanced operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Successful underbalanced operations demand a systematic approach with integration of engineering, operations, production, reservoir, and geology. There are significant advantages to underbalanced drilling (UD). Formation damage can be minimized if proper circulating fluids and operating parameters are chosen; there is an opportunity for reservoir evaluation and characterization while drilling; lost circulation and differential sticking can be avoided, combined with improvements in drilling rate of penetration (ROP); and it also provides an alternative method of well control. This paper discusses engineering challenges and considerations for underbalanced operations using multiphase flow as well as advances made during UD with rotary jointed pipe. Excluding air, mist, and foam, underbalanced techniques with multiphase fluids are reviewed. Much of the discussion and concepts also apply to coiled-tubing underbalanced operations.

Saponja, J.

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Methodology for Use of Reclaimed Water at Federal Locations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Carson Golf Course, irrigated with reclaimed water. Fort Carson Golf Course, irrigated with reclaimed water. Water can be reused in three main ways: 1. Water Recycle: Discharge water from an application or process is used again in the same application, such as recycling the final laundry rinse water for the next cycle. 2. On-site Water Reuse: Discharge water from one application or process that is captured, minimally treated, and is utilized in another application. Examples include gray water (1) reused for toilet or urinal flushing. 3. Water Reclaim: Also termed, reclaimed wastewater, is effluent generated by a wastewater treat- ment facility that is treated to a level that is appropriate for use in another application. Examples

358

The Economics of Steam Vs. Electric Pipe Heating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To properly design a pipe heating system, the basic principles of heat transfer from an insulated pipe must be understood. The three methods of heat flow are conduction, convection (both forced and natural) and radiation. The total heat loss from a pipe must be determined first, since this is the heat which must be replaced to maintain a pipe at a given temperature. A steam heating system requires an analysis of the heat loss from the pipe as well as an analysis of the capacity of the heating system. The economics of steam heat include the accessories as well as the inefficiencies of steam heat. The design of an electric heating system normally involves far fewer components and engineering complexities than does a comparable steam system. The basic system is comprised of the heater, controls and connection accessories. Today there are several economic trade-offs to be made in selecting a pipe heating system. These involve engineering and design costs, maintenance costs, installation costs and energy costs. The economic trade-offs to be made in selecting a pipe heating system do not universally favor one system over another for all cases.

Schilling, R. E.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking collaborative research and licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,839,282 entitled "Capacitance Probe for Detection of Anomalies in Nonmetallic Plastic Pipe." Disclosed in this patent is an analysis of materials using a capacitive sensor to detect anomalies in nonmetallic plastic pipe through comparison of measured capacitances. The capacitive sensor is used in conjunction with a capacitance measurement device, a location device, and a processor to generate a capacitance versus location output for the detection and localization of anomalies

360

Natural Gas Pipe Line Companies (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pipe Line Companies (Connecticut) Pipe Line Companies (Connecticut) Natural Gas Pipe Line Companies (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Public Utilities Regulatory Authority These regulations list standards and considerations for the design, construction, compression, metering, operation, and maintenance of natural gas pipelines, along with procedures for records, complaints, and service

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Vibration test plan for a space station heat pipe subassembly  

SciTech Connect

This test plan describes the Sundstrand portion of task two of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) contract 9-x6H-8102L-1. Sundstrand Energy Systems was awarded a contract to investigate the performance capabilities of a potassium liquid metal heat pipe as applied to the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) solar dynamic power system for the Space Station. The test objective is to expose the heat pipe subassembly to the random vibration environment which simulates the space shuttle launch condition. The results of the test will then be used to modify as required future designs of the heat pipe.

Parekh, M.B. [Sundstrand Energy Systems, Rockford, IL (United States)

1987-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

362

ANALYSIS OF OFF-GRID, OFF-PIPE HOUSING FOR HOT-HUMID AND HOT-ARID CLIMATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper investigates the feasibility of off-grid, off-pipe housing in hot-humid and hot-arid climates in the U.S. The study aims to eliminate the need for non-renewable sources of energy and municipal water in residences by using off-grid, off-pipe design approach. To accomplish this, a 2001 International Energy Conservation Code compliant house in Houston, TX and Phoenix, AZ was simulated to determine the base-case energy and water use. Based on the availability of on-site renewable energy and water sources (i.e., solar, wind and biomass and rainfall) in these locations, energy and water efficiency measures were selected in order to reduce the energy and water use to a level that could be met solely by on-site renewable resources. Finally, the sizing of the renewable energy and rainwater harvesting systems was performed to provide for daily needs as well as cumulative needs during the critical periods, in order to achieve complete self sufficiency in terms of energy and water use. The analysis was performed by integrating the results of DOE-2.1e, F-Chart and PV F-Chart programs, and cumulative rainwater supply and water demand analysis. The simulation results demonstrate the differences between the priorities for energy efficiency, water-efficiency and renewable energy measures in hot-humid and hot-arid climates.

Malhotra, M.; Haberl, J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Materials Reliability Program: Validation of Welding Residual Stress Models for PWR Piping Dissimilar Metal Welds (MRP-271)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The residual stresses imparted by the welding process are a principal factor in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) of Dissimilar Metal (DM) piping butt welds in PWRs. Analytical models are frequently used to simulate the welding process in order to predict the residual stress distribution in the weld and base material as an input to crack growth calculations. The crack growth calculations have demonstrated a high sensitivity to the welding residual stress distribution inputs. As part of the ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

SWEEP - Save Water & Energy Education Program  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this study was to develop, monitor, analyze, and report on an integrated resource-conservation program highlighting efficient residential appliances and fixtures. The sites of study were 50 homes in two water-constrained communities located in Oregon. The program was designed to maximize water savings to these communities and to serve as a model for other communities seeking an integrated approach to energy and water resource efficiency. The program included the installation and in-place evaluation of energy- and water-efficient devices including the following: horizontal axis clothes washers (and the matching clothes dryers), resource-efficient dishwashers, an innovative dual flush low-flow toilet, low-flow showerheads, and faucet aerators. The significance of this activity lies in its integrated approach and unique metering evaluation of individual end-use, aggregated residential total use, and system-wide energy and water benefits.

Sullivan, Gregory P.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Hillman, Tim C.; Hadley, Adam; Ledbetter, Marc R.; Payson, David R.

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

365

Pantex erects nearly 400 piping metal supports | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

erects nearly 400 piping metal supports | National Nuclear Security erects nearly 400 piping metal supports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex erects nearly 400 piping metal supports Pantex erects nearly 400 piping metal supports Posted By Office of Public Affairs Workers at the Pantex Plant are in the process of erecting nearly 400 metal

366

Pantex erects nearly 400 piping metal supports | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

erects nearly 400 piping metal supports | National Nuclear Security erects nearly 400 piping metal supports | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex erects nearly 400 piping metal supports Pantex erects nearly 400 piping metal supports Posted By Office of Public Affairs Workers at the Pantex Plant are in the process of erecting nearly 400 metal

367

Sizing Relationships for Pipe Wall Preheater-710 Reactor Experiment  

SciTech Connect

Relationships presented as curves are given that permit selection of preheater pipe diameters and lengths consistent with objective pressure drops, wall temperatures, and heat addition. The data are for 710 reactor experiment coolant and operating conditions.

Moon, C.W.

1965-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

368

High temperature heat pipes for waste heat recovery  

SciTech Connect

Operation of heat pipes in air at temperatures above 1200/sup 0/K has been accomplished using SiC as a shell material and a chemical vapor deposit (CVD) tungsten inner liner for protection of the ceramic from the sodium working fluid. The CVD tungsten has been used as a distribution wick for the gravity assisted heat pipe through the development of a columnar tungsten surface structure, achieved by control of the metal vapor deposition rate. Wick performance has been demonstrated in tests at approximately 2 kW throughput with a 19-mm-i.d. SiC heat pipe. Operation of ceramic heat pipes in repeated start cycle tests has demonstrated their ability to withstand temperature rise rates of greater than 1.2 K/s.

Merrigan, M.A.; Keddy, E.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Information and self-selection in the PIPE market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PIPEs (Private Investments in Public Equity) are unique in that they are negotiated privately between sophisticated investors and the public firm. As a result, the issue price deviates from the firm's stock price, often ...

Koshal, Amit

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Evaluation of Stress Corrosion Cracking Susceptibility of Drill Pipe ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

G-105 and S-135 grades of drill pipe steels have been used to study the effect of temperature and solution chemistry on the stress corrosion cracking behavior of ...

371

Selection of minimum earthquake intensity in calculating pipe failure probabilities  

SciTech Connect

In a piping reliability analysis, it is sometimes necessary to specify a minimum ground motion intensity, usually the peak acceleration, below which the ground motions are not considered as earthquakes and, hence, are neglected. The calculated probability of failure of a piping system is dependent on this selected minimum earthquake intensity chosen for the analysis. A study was conducted to determine the effects of the minimum earthquake intensity on the probability of pipe failure. The results indicated that the probability of failure of the piping system is not very sensitive to the variations of the selected minimum peak ground acceleration. However, it does have significant effects on various scenarios that make up the system failure.

Lo, T.Y.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Evaluation of Pipe-Type Cable Joint Restraint Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Joints in underground transmission pipe-type cables must be designed to accommodate the thermomechanical forces created as a cable heats and cools in operation. This report details an investigation of several joint restraining designs and recommends one design.

1990-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

373

Tornadogenesis with and without a Dynamic Pipe Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic pipe effect (DPE) has been used previously to explain the descent from aloft of tornadic vortex signatures (TVSs), and presumably embryonic tornadoes, prior to the near-ground spinup of the tornado. But for many tornadoes the TVS ...

R. Jeffrey Trapp; Robert Davies-Jones

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Composite drill pipe and method for forming same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lightweight and durable drill pipe string capable of short radius drilling formed using a composite pipe segment formed to include tapered wall thickness ends that are each defined by opposed frustoconical surfaces conformed for self-aligning receipt and intimate bonding contact within an annular space between corresponding surfaces of a coaxially nested set of metal end pieces and a set of nonconductive sleeves. The distal peripheries of the nested end pieces and sleeves are then welded to each other and the sandwiched and bonded portions are radially pinned. The composite segment may include imbedded conductive leads and the axial end portions of the end pieces are shaped to form a threaded joint with the next pipe assembly that includes contact rings in the opposed surfaces of the pipe joint for contact together.

Leslie, James C; Leslie, II, James C; Heard, James; Truong, Liem V; Josephson, Marvin

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

375

NETL: News Release - Carbon Fiber Drill Pipe Demonstrates Resiliency...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lightweight drill pipe, made of space-age carbon fiber composites rather than traditional steel, is a step closer to becoming a major government-industry R&D success story. The...

376

Flow modification in McGill Heat Pipes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A heat pipe is a heat transfer device of very high thermal conductance that features two-phase flow. Research at McGill University has led to the… (more)

Lee, JuHee, 1973-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Seismic Capacity of Threaded, Brazed, and Grooved Pipe Joints  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEISMIC CAPACITY OF THREADED, BRAZED AND GROOVED PIPE JOINTS Brent Gutierrez, PhD, PE George Antaki, PE, F.ASME DOE NPH Conference October 25-26, 2011 Motivation * Understand the...

378

Solid0Core Heat-Pipe Nuclear Batterly Type Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was devoted to a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of designing an Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor to have a solid core from which heat is removed by liquid-metal heat pipes (HP).

Ehud Greenspan

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Membrane heat pipe development for space radiator applications  

SciTech Connect

A self-deploying membrane heat pipe (SMHP) is being designed and fabricated to operate in an in-cabin experiment aboard a STS flight. The heat pipe comprises a mylar membrane with a woven fabric arterial wick and R-11 as the working fluid. Preliminary results indicate that this SMHP design will successfully expand and retract in response to an applied heat load; the retraction force is provided by a constant force spring.

Woloshun, K.; Merrigan, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Commercial high efficiency dehumidification systems using heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

An improved heat pipe design using separately connected two-section one-way flow heat pipes with internal microgrooves instead of wicks is described. This design is now commercially available for use to increase the dehumidification capacity of air conditioning systems. The design also includes a method of introducing fresh air into buildings while recovering heat and controlling the humidity of the incoming air. Included are applications and case studies, load calculations and technical data, and installation, operation, and maintenance information.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Performance characteristics of gravity-assisted, potassium heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Experiments with potassium-stainless steel gravity-assisted heat pipes were performed. Performance limitations due to entrainment or flooding of the liquid return flow are compared with analytical model predictions. The effect of heated pool height was investigated and problems with surface wetting are discussed. A comparison between entrainment limits for smooth-walled and textured-walled heat pipes was made and a minimum internal surface texturing depth is suggested.

Prenger, F.C.; Keddy, E.S.; Sena, J.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Heat pipe thermal control of slender optics probes  

SciTech Connect

The thermal design for a stereographic viewing system is presented. The design incorporates an annular heat pipe and thermal isolation techniques. Test results are compared with design predictions for a prototype configuration. Test data obtained during heat pipe startup showing temperature gradients along the evaporator wall are presented. Correlations relating maximum wall temperature differences to a liquid Reynolds number were obtained at low power levels. These results are compared with Nusselt's Falling Film theory.

Prenger, F.C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

DEVELOPMENT OF A PIPE CUT AND SEAL DIE  

SciTech Connect

A die was developed which will cut and seal the severed ends of 1 1/2 in. schedule 80, 347H stainless steel pipe. Some development work was done on dies for use on 1 1/2 in. outside diameter x 0.065 wall tube. Very limited work was done on dies for use on 2 1/2 in. schedule l60 pipe. (auth)

Wade, E.E.

1961-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

384

Heat pipe radiation cooling evaluation: Task 2 concept studies report  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the result of Task 2, Concept Studies for Heat Pipe Radiation Cooling (HPRC), which was performed for Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract 9-XT1-U9567. Studies under a prior contract defined a reference HPRC conceptual design for hypersonic aircraft engines operating at Mach 5 and an altitude of 80,000 ft. Task 2 involves the further investigation of heat pipe radiation cooling (HPRC) systems for additional design and operating conditions.

Silverstein, C.C.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Development and Manufacture of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2005 through September 30, 2006 and contains the following discussions: Qualification Testing; Prototype Development and Testing of ''Smart Design'' Configuration; Field Test Demonstration; Development of Ultra-Short Radius Composite Drill Pipe (USR-CDP); and Development of Smart USR-CDP.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie, II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard

2006-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

386

Corrosion Effects and Prevention in Pipe-Type Cable Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the initial stages of a project on detecting and monitoring coating-system flaw development in pipe-type cable through novel methods of electrochemistry. One key preliminary accomplishment was the development of a way to create flaws of known size and location in sample pipes to make it possible to evaluate new techniques to detect disbonded coatings in the field.BackgroundDisbonded coating systems on ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

387

Stress Indices for Straight Pipe with Trunnion Attachments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides equations based on experimental and test data for determining B and C stress indices and the flexibility factor, k, for straight pipe with trunnions (or hollow circular cross-section welded attachments). The report contains explicit modifications to ASME Code Cases 391 and 392 for qualification of trunnions on pipe. It also provides flexibility equations for a more accurate evaluation of these configurations.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

388

Analytical considerations in the code qualification of piping systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper addresses several analytical topics in the design and qualification of piping systems which have a direct bearing on the prediction of stresses in the pipe and hence on the application of the equations of NB, NC and ND-3600 of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. For each of the analytical topics, the paper summarizes the current code requirements, if any, and the industry practice.

Antaki, G.A.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heater Basics August 19, 2013 - 3:03pm Addthis Illustration of a tankless coil water heater. The heater is box-shaped, and has two pipes sticking out one end: one a cold water inlet, and one a hot water outlet. These pipes lead into the heater to a cylindrical coil called a heat exchanger. Long tubes surrounding the heat exchanger are labeled the heated water jacket. At the bottom of the box is a row of small flames, called the boiler heat source. Tankless coil and indirect water heaters use a home or building's space heating system to heat water as part of an integrated or combination water and space heating system. How Tankless Coil and Indirect Water Heaters Work A tankless coil water heater uses a heating coil or heat exchanger

390

Ceramic heat pipes for high temperature heat removal  

SciTech Connect

Difficulties in finding metal or protected metal components that exhibit both strength and corrosion resistance at high temperature have severely restricted the application of effective heat recovery techniques to process heat furnaces. A potential method of overcoming this restriction is to use heat pipes fabricated from ceramic materials to construct counterflow recuperators. A development program has been initiated to demonstrate the technical and eventually the economical feasibility of ceramic heat pipes and ceramic heat pipe recuperators. The prime candidate for heat pipe construction is SiC. Closed-end tubes of this material have been prepared by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). These tubes were lined internally with tungsten by a subsequent CVD operation, partially filled with sodium, and sealed by brazing a tungsten lined SiC plug into the open-end with a palladium--cobalt alloy. Heat pipes constructed in this manner have been successfully operated in vacuum at temperatures of 1225/sup 0/K and in air at a temperature of 1125/sup 0/K. The heat source used initially for the air testing was an induction heated metallic sleeve in thermal contact with the test unit. Subsequent testing has shown that a silicon carbide heat pipe can be successfully operated with natural gas burners providing the input heat. Methods of fabricating and testing these devices are described.

Keddy, E.S.; Ranken, W.A.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Flexible pipe crawling device having articulated two axis coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for moving through the linear and non-linear segments of piping systems. The apparatus comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a mechanism for extension and retraction of the front and rear leg assembles with respect to each other, such as an air cylinder, and a pivoting joint. One end of the flexible joint attaches to the front leg assembly and the other end to the air cylinder, which is also connected to the rear leg assembly. The air cylinder allows the front and rear leg assemblies to progress through a pipe in "inchworm" fashion, while the joint provides the flexibility necessary for the pipe crawler to negotiate non-linear piping segments. The flexible connecting joint is coupled with a spring-force suspension system that urges alignment of the front and rear leg assemblies with respect to each other. The joint and suspension system cooperate to provide a firm yet flexible connection between the front and rear leg assemblies to allow the pivoting of one with respect to the other while moving around a non-linear pipe segment, but restoring proper alignment coming out of the pipe bend.

Zollinger, William T. (Martinez, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

NASA Lewis steady-state heat pipe code users manual  

SciTech Connect

The NASA Lewis heat pipe code has been developed to predict the performance of heat pipes in the steady state. The code can be used as a design tool on a personal computer or, with a suitable calling routine, as a subroutine for a mainframe radiator code. A variety of wick structures, including a user input option, can be used. Heat pipes with multiple evaporators, condensers, and adiabatic sections in series and with wick structures that differ among sections can be modeled. Several working fluids can be chosen, including potassium, sodium, and lithium, for which the monomer-dimer equilibrium is considered. The code incorporates a vapor flow algorithm that treats compressibility and axially varying heat input. This code facilitates the determination of heat pipe operating temperatures and heat pipe limits that may be encountered at the specified heat input and environment temperature. Data are input to the computer through a user-interactive input subroutine. Output, such as liquid and vapor pressures and temperatures, is printed at equally spaced axial positions along the pipe as determined by the user.

Tower, L.K. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Brook Park, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center Group; Baker, K.W. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Cleveland, OH (United States). Lewis Research Center; Marks, T.S. [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Flexible pipe crawling device having articulated two axis coupling  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for moving through the linear and non-linear segments of piping systems. The apparatus comprises a front leg assembly, a rear leg assembly, a mechanism for extension and retraction of the front and rear leg assembles with respect to each other, such as an air cylinder, and a pivoting joint. One end of the flexible joint attaches to the front leg assembly and the other end to the air cylinder, which is also connected to the rear leg assembly. The air cylinder allows the front and rear leg assemblies to progress through a pipe in inchworm' fashion, while the joint provides the flexibility necessary for the pipe crawler to negotiate non-linear piping segments. The flexible connecting joint is coupled with a spring-force suspension system that urges alignment of the front and rear leg assemblies with respect to each other. The joint and suspension system cooperate to provide a firm yet flexible connection between the front and rear leg assemblies to allow the pivoting of one with respect to the other while moving around a non-linear pipe segment, but restoring proper alignment coming out of the pipe bend. 4 figures.

Zollinger, W.T.

1994-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

An investigation of corrosion in liquid-metal heat pipes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research is underway to develop a 75-kW heat pipe to transfer solar energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. The high flux levels and high total power level encountered in this application have made it necessary to use a high-performance wick structure with fibers on the order of 4 to 8 microns in diameter. This fine wick structure is highly susceptible to corrosion damage and plugging, as dissolved contaminants plate out on the evaporator surface. Normal operation of the heat pipe also tends to concentrate contaminants in localized areas of the evaporator surface where heat fluxes are the highest. Sandia National Laboratories is conducting a systematic study to identify procedures that reduce corrosion and contamination problems in liquid-metal heat pipes. A series of heat pipes are being tested to explore different options for cleaning heat-pipe systems. Models are being developed to help understand the overall importance of operating parameters on the life of heat-pipe systems. In this paper, the authors present their efforts to reduce corrosion damage.

Adkins, D.R.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Andraka, C.E.; Showalter, S.K.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Cordiero, P.G.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

User’s Guide for the Repair of Buried Piping: Recommended Approach for the Selection and Application of Repair Methods to Restore Degraded Buried Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to industry initiatives to address the structural and leakage integrity of buried piping, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) published Recommendations for an Effective Program to Control the Degradation of Buried Pipe (1016456) in 2008. Recommendations for an Effective Program to Control the Degradation of Buried Pipe suggests methods that plant engineers can use to prevent or mitigate degradation and leaks in buried pipes; however, the descriptions of the ...

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

396

Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

INSTALLATION CERTIFICATE CF-6R-MECH-01 Domestic Hot Water (DHW) (Page 1 of 2)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: Heater Type CEC Certified Mfr Name & Model Number Distribution Type (Std, Point-of- Use, etc; and Pipe insulation for steam hydronic heating systems or hot water systems >15 psi, meets the requirements or fewer dwelling units which have (1) less than 25' of distribution piping outdoors; (2) zero distribution

398

Mexssub responds to shallow pipe corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mexssub recently came to the aid of the Mexican state-owned oil company Pemex to repair corrosion problems on a 36-inch sour gas pipeline located in the Atasta-Ciudad Pemex corridor. Mexssub began development of a sleeve system in 1982 in an effort to develop solutions for risers located in the Campeche Bay area. High operating temperatures of these risers was causing failures of the protective coating and accelerated corrosion to the riser at the splash zone. The sleeve system and flexible habitat developed by Mexssub during this research program allowed the repair of these risers in situ and without suspending production. The sleeve system developed by Mexssub is a welded oversize sleeve with a specially formulated epoxy resin injected into the annular space. The epoxy resin completely integrates the sleeve and the pipe, providing structural reinforcement. This technology was demonstrated to Pemex at the Mexssub testing facility in Lerma, Mexico in 1986. In 1987 the Mexssub Sleeve System was approved by the Mexican Petroleum Institute and actual field repairs were initiated. To date, Mexssub has made in excess of 72 repairs in situ without suspending production on risers up to 36-inch diameter. Additionally, the sleeve system has been installed on 50 new risers prior to their installation in the field.

Cajiga, A.; Perez, V.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Heat pipe cooling of metallurgical furnace equipment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current water-cooling technology used in the metallurgical industry poses a major safety concern. In addition, these systems are expensive to operate and result in significant… (more)

Navarra, Pietro, 1979-

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Buildings Energy Data Book: 8.4 WaterSense  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

4 WaterSense 4 WaterSense March 2012 8.4.1 WaterSense List of Covered Products and Efficiency Specifications Covered Product Lavatory Faucets (1) Toilets (2) Urinals Shower Heads Irrigation Control Equipment (3) Pre-Rinse Spray Valves (4) Water Softeners - (4) - WaterSense Landscape Irrigation Partners as of February 2012: 2001 (5) Note(s): Source(s): In Progress 1) GPM = gallons per minute. 2) GPF = gallons per flush. 3) Mulitiple criteria for irrigation includes requirements for percentage reduction in irrigation adequacy and irrigation excess, as well as conformance to supplemental capability requirements 4) Final criteria for these categories have not been set. These are criteria levels that WaterSense is considering. 5) WaterSense qualifies individuals as partners via private programs certified by WaterSense.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Testing of Stirling engine solar reflux heat-pipe receivers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alkali metal heat-pipe receivers have been identified as a desirable interface to couple a Stirling-cycle engine with a parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflux receiver provides power nearly isothermally to the engine heater heads while de-coupling the heater head design from the solar absorber surface design. The independent design of the receiver and engine heater head leads to high system efficiency. Heat pipe reflux receivers have been demonstrated at approximately 30 kW{sub t} power throughput by others. This size is suitable fm engine output powers up to 10 kW{sub e}. Several 25-kW{sub e}, Stirling-cycle engines exist, as well as designs for 75-kW{sub t} parabolic dish solar concentrators. The extension of heat pipe technology from 30 kW{sub t} to 75 kW{sub t} is not trivial. Heat pipe designs are pushed to their limits, and it is critical to understand the flux profiles expected from the dish, and the local performance of the wick structure. Sandia has developed instrumentation to monitor and control the operation of heat pipe reflux receivers to test their throughput limits, and analytical models to evaluate receiver designs. In the past 1.5 years, several heat pipe receivers have been tested on Sandia`s test bed concentrators (TBC`s) and 60-kW{sub t} solar furnace. A screen-wick heat pipe developed by Dynatherm was tested to 27.5 kW{sub t} throughput. A Cummins Power Generation (CPG)/Thermacore 30-kW{sub t} heat pipe was pushed to a throughput of 41 kW{sub t} to verify design models. A Sandia-design screen-wick and artery 75-kW{sub t} heat pipe and a CPG/Thermacore 75-kW{sub t} sintered-wick heat pipe were also limit tested on the TBC. This report reviews the design of these receivers, and compares test results with model predictions.

Rawlinson, S.; Cordeiro, P.; Dudley, V.; Moss, T.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

TA-2 Water Boiler Reactor Decommissioning Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final report addresses the Phase 2 decommissioning of the Water Boiler Reactor, biological shield, other components within the biological shield, and piping pits in the floor of the reactor building. External structures and underground piping associated with the gaseous effluent (stack) line from Technical Area 2 (TA-2) Water Boiler Reactor were removed in 1985--1986 as Phase 1 of reactor decommissioning. The cost of Phase 2 was approximately $623K. The decommissioning operation produced 173 m{sup 3} of low-level solid radioactive waste and 35 m{sup 3} of mixed waste. 15 refs., 25 figs., 3 tabs.

Durbin, M.E. (ed.); Montoya, G.M.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Heat-pipe development for high-temperature recuperator application  

SciTech Connect

Heat pipes have been developed for operation in oxidizing atmospheres at temperatures above 1100/sup 0/K. The heat pipes comprise a metallic liner and wick structure with a protective outer shell of an oxidation resistant material. The working fluids used in the heat pipes are alkali metals. A number of configurations have been evaluated, ranging from pipes using a metallic inner liner of a chemically vapor deposited (CVD) refractory metal applied to ceramic tubing, to one utilizing ferrous materials with an outer layer of a developed oxide. A promising intermediate configuration consisting of free-standing refractory tubing covered with a layered structure of fine grain, equi-axed CVD silicon carbide has also been evaluated. The test heat pipe was fabricated using low-carbon, arc-cast molybdenum tubing and a wick composed of 150 mesh molybdenum screen. Hafnium gettering was used with sodium working fluid. Assembly of the pipe was by electron beam welding. Following closure and capping of the fill tube the assembly was operated in a vacuum for several hours prior to the chemical vapor deposition of the exterior ceramic coating. After coating, the pipe was operated in air and in combustion gases for performance evaluation. The use of iron-chromium-aluminum alloys as container materials for operating in high temperature oxidizing and sulfiding gas streams has been investigated. Alloys of this type develop heavy, protective oxide surface layers when exposed to high temperature oxidizing atmospheres, and are commonly used in electrical heating elements because of their exceptional oxidation resistance.

Merrigan, M.; Dunwoody, W.; Lundberg, L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

BWRVIP-34-A: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, Technical Basis for Part Circumference Weld Overlay Repair of Vessel Internal Core Sp ray Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Boiling Water Reactor Vessel and Internals Project (BWRVIP), formed in June 1994, is an association of utilities focused exclusively on boiling water reactor (BWR) vessel and internals issues. This report summarizes the results of the design and analysis activities and the testing programs conducted to provide BWR utilities with a contingency repair option for internal core spray piping for BWR2/6 plants. A previous version of this report was published as BWRVIP-34 (TR-108198). This report (BWRVIP-34...

2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

405

Tritium transport in the NuMI decay pipe region - modeling and comparison with experimental data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NuMI (Neutrinos at Main Injector) beam facility at Fermilab is designed to produce an intense beam of muon neutrinos to be sent to the MINOS underground experiment in Soudan, Minnesota. Neutrinos are created by the decay of heavier particles. In the case of NuMI, the decaying particles are created by interaction of high-energy protons in a target, creating mostly positive pions. These particles can also interact with their environment, resulting in production of a variety of short-lived radionuclides and tritium. In the NuMI beam, neutrinos are produced by 120 GeV protons from the Fermilab Main Injector accelerator which are injected into the NuMI beam line using single turn extraction. The beam line has been designed for 400 kW beam power, roughly a factor of 2 above the initial (2005-06) running conditions. Extracted protons are bent downwards at a 57mr angle towards the Soudan Laboratory. The meson production target is a 94 cm segmented graphite rod, cooled by water in stainless tubes on the top and bottom of the target. The target is followed by two magnetic horns which are pulsed to 200 kA in synchronization with the passage of the beam, producing focusing of the secondary hadron beam and its daughter neutrinos. Downstream of the second horn the meson beam is transported for 675 m in an evacuated 2 m diameter beam (''decay'') pipe. Subsequently, the residual mesons and protons are absorbed in a water cooled aluminum/steel absorber immediately downstream of the decay pipe. Some 200 m of rock further downstream ranges out all of the residual muons. During beam operations, after installation of the chiller condensate system in December 2005, the concentration of tritiated water in the MINOS sump flow of 177 gpm was around 12 pCi/ml, for a total of 0.010 pCi/day. A simple model of tritium transport and deposition via humidity has been constructed to aid in understanding how tritium reaches the sump water. The model deals with tritium transported as HTO, water in which one hydrogen atom has been replaced with tritium. Based on concepts supported by the modeling, a dehumidification system was installed during May 2006 that reduced the tritium level in the sump by a factor of two. This note is primarily concerned with tritium that was produced in the NuMI target pile, carried by air flow into the target hall and down the decay pipe passageway (where most of it was deposited). The air is exhausted through the existing air vent shaft EAV2 (Figure 1).

Hylen, J.; Plunkett, R.; /Fermilab

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

Gluntz, D.M.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

408

Parallel-flow and counterflow conjugate convection in a vertical pipe  

SciTech Connect

The present paper investigate the problem of interaction (coupling) of forced convection inside a vertical pipe and natural convection outside the pipe. Both the cases of counterflow and parallel flow are considered. The problem finds applications in heat exchanger apparatuses of various types where a warm (cold) fluid is flowing inside a conductive pipe bathed in or surrounded by a colder (warmer) fluid. Clearly, the heat transfer through the pipe wall is a direct result of the interaction between the forced convection inside the pipe and the natural convection outside the pipe.

Libera, J.; Poulikakos, D. (Univ. of Illinois, Chicago (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Development and Manufacture of Cost-Effective Composite Drill Pipe  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Composite Products and Technology, Inc. (ACPT) has developed composite drill pipe (CDP) that matches the structural and strength properties of steel drill pipe, but weighs less than 50 percent of its steel counterpart. Funding for the multiyear research and development of CDP was provided by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy through the Natural Gas and Oil Projects Management Division at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). Composite materials made of carbon fibers and epoxy resin offer mechanical properties comparable to steel at less than half the weight. Composite drill pipe consists of a composite material tube with standard drill pipe steel box and pin connections. Unlike metal drill pipe, composite drill pipe can be easily designed, ordered, and produced to meet specific requirements for specific applications. Because it uses standard joint connectors, CDP can be used in lieu of any part of or for the entire steel drill pipe section. For low curvature extended reach, deep directional drilling, or ultra deep onshore or offshore drilling, the increased strength to weight ratio of CDP will increase the limits in all three drilling applications. Deceased weight will reduce hauling costs and increase the amount of drill pipe allowed on offshore platforms. In extreme extended reach areas and high-angle directional drilling, drilling limits are associated with both high angle (fatigue) and frictional effects resulting from the combination of high angle curvature and/or total weight. The radius of curvature for a hole as small as 40 feet (12.2 meters) or a build rate of 140 degrees per 100 feet is within the fatigue limits of specially designed CDP. Other properties that can be incorporated into the design and manufacture of composite drill pipe and make it attractive for specific applications are corrosion resistance, non-magnetic intervals, and abrasion resistance coatings. Since CDP has little or no electromagnetic force fields up to 74 kilohertz (KHz), a removable section of copper wire can be placed inside the composite pipe to short the tool joints electrically allowing electromagnetic signals inside the collar to induce and measure the same within the rock formation. By embedding a pair of wires in the composite section and using standard drill pipe box and pin ends equipped with a specially developed direct contact joint electrical interface, power can be supplied to measurement-while-drilling (MWD) and logging-while-drilling (LWD) bottom hole assemblies. Instantaneous high-speed data communications between near drill bit and the surface are obtainable utilizing this 'smart' drilling technology. The composite drill pipe developed by ACPT has been field tested successfully in several wells nationally and internationally. These tests were primarily for short radius and ultra short radius directional drilling. The CDP in most cases performed flawlessly with little or no appreciable wear. ACPT is currently marketing a complete line of composite drill collars, subs, isolators, casing, and drill pipe to meet the drilling industry's needs and tailored to replace metal for specific application requirements.

James C. Leslie

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Application of bounding spectra to seismic design of piping based on the performance of above ground piping in power plants subjected to strong motion earthquakes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report extends the potential application of Bounding Spectra evaluation procedures, developed as part of the A-46 Unresolved Safety Issue applicable to seismic verification of in-situ electrical and mechanical equipment, to in-situ safety related piping in nuclear power plants. The report presents a summary of earthquake experience data which define the behavior of typical U.S. power plant piping subject to strong motion earthquakes. The report defines those piping system caveats which would assure the seismic adequacy of the piping systems which meet those caveats and whose seismic demand are within the bounding spectra input. Based on the observed behavior of piping in strong motion earthquakes, the report describes the capabilities of the piping system to carry seismic loads as a function of the type of connection (i.e. threaded versus welded). This report also discusses in some detail the basic causes and mechanisms for earthquake damages and failures to power plant piping systems.

Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (United States)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Have You Looked at Your Pipes Lately? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Have You Looked at Your Pipes Lately? Have You Looked at Your Pipes Lately? Have You Looked at Your Pipes Lately? March 14, 2011 - 1:27pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory You know, it doesn't matter that some of you are probably already thinking about spring. It doesn't matter that the bulk of winter is over for a lot of you. I'm going to say this anyway, because sometime, someday, it might be useful. Or, well, it might not be if you live in Florida. But for the rest of you, I will repeat this suggestion: Check the insulation on your pipes! You see, early this February we had a nasty bit of weather here in Colorado. One day the low was somewhere near -15°F, and the high was a balmy -2°F. The next day, when it reached a scalding 6-or-so degrees, a pipe in my apartment exploded.

412

Fracture toughness evaluations of TP304 stainless steel pipes  

SciTech Connect

In the IPIRG-1 program, the J-R curve calculated for a 16-inch nominal diameter, Schedule 100 TP304 stainless steel (DP2-A8) surface-cracked pipe experiment (Experiment 1.3-3) was considerably lower than the quasi-static, monotonic J-R curve calculated from a C(T) specimen (A8-12a). The results from several related investigations conducted to determine the cause of the observed toughness difference are: (1) chemical analyses on sections of Pipe DP2-A8 from several surface-cracked pipe and material property specimen fracture surfaces indicate that there are two distinct heats of material within Pipe DP2-A8 that differ in chemical composition; (2) SEN(T) specimen experimental results indicate that the toughness of a surface-cracked specimen is highly dependent on the depth of the initial crack, in addition, the J-R curves from the SEN(T) specimens closely match the J-R curve from the surface-cracked pipe experiment; (3) C(T) experimental results suggest that there is a large difference in the quasi-static, monotonic toughness between the two heats of DP2-A8, as well as a toughness degradation in the lower toughness heat of material (DP2-A8II) when loaded with a dynamic, cyclic (R = {minus}0.3) loading history.

Rudland, D.L.; Brust, F.W.; Wilkowski, G.M. [Battelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Heat pipe cooling system for underground, radioactive waste storage tanks  

SciTech Connect

An array of 37 heat pipes inserted through the central hole at the top of a radioactive waste storage tank will remove 100,000 Btu/h with a heat sink of 70/sup 0/F atmospheric air. Heat transfer inside the tank to the heat pipe is by natural convection. Heat rejection to outside air utilizes a blower to force air past the heat pipe condenser. The heat pipe evaporator section is axially finned, and is constructed of stainless steel. The working fluid is ammonia. The finned pipes are individually shrouded and extend 35 ft down into the tank air space. The hot tank air enters the shroud at the top of the tank and flows downward as it is cooled, with the resulting increased density furnishing the pressure difference for circulation. The cooled air discharges at the center of the tank above the sludge surface, flows radially outward, and picks up heat from the radioactive sludge. At the tank wall the heated air rises and then flows inward to comple the cycle.

Cooper, K.C.; Prenger, F.C.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Neutronic and thermal design considerations for heat-pipe reactors  

SciTech Connect

SABRE (Space-Arena Baseline Reactor) is a 100-kW/sub e/, heat-pipe-cooled, beryllium-reflected, fast reactor that produces heat at a temperature of 1500/sup 0/K and radiatively transmits it to high-temperature thermoelectric (TE) conversion elements. The use of heat pipes for core heat removal eliminates single-point failure mechanisms in the reactor cooling system, and provides minimal temperature drop radiative coupling to the TE array, as well as automatic, self-actuating removal of reactor afterheat. The question of how the failure of a fuel module heat pipe will affect neighboring fuel modules in the core is discussed, as is fission density peaking that occurs at the core/reflector interface. Results of neutronic calculations of the control margin available are described. Another issue that is addressed is that of helium generation in the heat pipes from neutron reactions in the core with the heat pipe fluid. Finally, the growth potential of the SABRE design to much higher powers is examined.

Ranken, W.A.; Koenig, D.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Nuclear reaction analysis of hydrogen in SSC beam pipe materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To control the photodesorption of molecular hydrogen, it is advantageous to reduce the amount of hydrogen in candidate SSC beam pipe materials and identify those procedures that: (1) lead to contamination of the beam pipe surface or materials, (2) would reduce the amount of hydrogen on the surface or in the bulk and (3) could be used for in-situ cleaning during Collider assembly or during Collider maintenance. Nuclear Reaction Analysis (NRA) can be used to quantitatively measure the amount of hydrogen on the surface or within half a micron of the surface. The present report discusses data that has been obtained for candidate SSC beam pipe materials (Nitronix 40 Stainless Steel, Nitronix 40 SS coated with electrodeposited copper (Silvex process)), oxygen-free high conductivity copper (Hitachi 101 OFHC) and several miscellaneous samples. The work demonstrates the potential of the technique for characterizing the hydrogen concentration of accelerator beam pipe materials, for assisting in the development of better vacuum system materials for TeV-scale accelerators, and for the development of better beam pipe construction or maintenance procedures for future accelerator projects.

Ruckman, M.W.; Strongin, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Lanford, W.A. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States). Dept. of Physics

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Life Prediction of Composite Armor in an Unbonded Flexible Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Composite materials are under consideration for the replacement of steel helical tendons in unbonded flexible pipes utilized by the offshore oil industry. Higher strength to weight ratios and increased corrosion resistance are the primary advantages of a composite material for this application. The current study focuses on the life prediction of a PPS/AS-4 carbon fiber composite proposed for the above employment. In order to accomplish this task, the properties of the material were experimentally characterized at varying temperatures, aging times and loadings. An analytic technique was developed to predict tensile rupture behavior from bend-compression rupture data. In comparison to tensile rupture tests, bend-compression rupture data collection are uncomplicated and efficient; thus, this technique effectively simplifies and accelerates the material characterization process. The service life model for the flexible pipe composite armor was constructed with MRLife, a well established performance simulation code for material systems developed by the Materials Response Group at Virginia Tech. In order to validate MRLife for the current material, experimental data are compared to life prediction results produced by the code. MRLife was then applied to predict the life of the flexible pipe composite armor in an ocean environment. This analysis takes into account the flexible pipe structure and the environmental and mechanical loading history of an ocean service location. Several parameter studies of a flexible pipe in a hypothetical environment were conducted. These analyses highlight certain loadings and conditions which are particularly detrimental to the life of the material.

Kenneth L. Reifsnider; Michael W. Hyer; Scott L. Hendricks; James S. Loverich; James S. Loverich

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Micro loop heat pipe evaporator coherent pore structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Loop heat pipes seem a promising approach for application in modern technologies where such thermal devices as cooling fans and radiators cannot satisfy overall requirements. Even though a loop heat pipe has a big potential to remove the thermal energy from a high heat flux source, the heat removal performance of heat pipes cannot be predicted well since a first principles of evaporation has not been established. An evaporation model based on statistical rate theory has been recently suggested by Ward and developed for a single pore by Oinuma. A loop heat pipe with coherent pore wick structure has been proposed as a design model. To limit product development risk and to enhance performance assurance, design model features and performance parameters have been carefully reviewed during the concept development phase and have been deliberately selected so as to be well-founded on the limited existing loop heat pipe knowledge base. A first principles evaporation model has been applied for evaporator geometry optimization. A number of iteration calculations have been performed to satisfy design and operating limitations. A set of recommendations for design optimization has been formulated. An optimal model has been found and proposed for manufacture and experimental investigation.

Alexseev, Alexandre Viktorovich

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Lessons Learned From Implementation of Westinghouse Owners Group Risk-Informed Inservice Inspection Methodology for Piping  

SciTech Connect

Risk-informed inservice inspection (ISI) programs have been in use for over seven years as an alternative to current regulatory requirements in the development and implementation of ISI programs for nuclear plant piping systems. Programs using the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) (now known as the Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group - PWROG) risk-informed ISI methodology have been developed and implemented within the U.S. and several other countries. Additionally, many plants have conducted or are in the process of conducting updates to their risk-informed ISI programs. In the development and implementation of these risk-informed ISI programs and the associated updates to those programs, the following important lessons learned have been identified and are addressed. Concepts such as 'loss of inventory', which are typically not modeled in a plant's probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) model for all systems. The importance of considering operator actions in the identification of consequences associated with a piping failure and the categorization of segments as high safety significant (HSS) or low safety significant (LSS). The impact that the above considerations have had on the large early release frequency (LERF) and categorization of segments as HSS or LSS. The importance of automation. Making the update process more efficient to reduce costs associated with maintaining the risk-informed ISI program. The insights gained are associated with many of the steps in the risk-informed ISI process including: development of the consequences associated with piping failures, categorization of segments, structural element selection and program updates. Many of these lessons learned have impacted the results of the risk-informed ISI programs and have impacted the updates to those programs. This paper summarizes the lessons learned and insights gained from the application of the WOG risk-informed ISI methodology in the U.S., Europe and Asia. (authors)

Stevenson, Paul R.; Haessler, Richard L. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC (United States); McNeill, Alex [Dominion Energy, Innsbrook Technical Center (United States); Pyne, Mark A. [Duke Energy (United States); West, Raymond A. [Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. - Dominion Generation (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Urban Water Conservation along the Rio Grande  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Not long ago, conversations on urban water demand were not only rare but dull. Today, especially in the West and Southwest, these conversations can turn into heated debates. The question of who has enough water for the future has pitted urban interests against agriculture and financial resources against cultural values. Water supply is finite, even if it is part of a cycle. Water may be plentiful in some places and scarce in others. Until we are ready to make water conservation a pattern of behavior to use less water, our demand will continue to grow as our population grows. Although water conservation is not an answer to all growth, it does offer an alternative to acquiring some new water supplies. Water conservation is almost always the least expensive water supply alternative. Water conservation can have two definitions. First and most often, conservation is considered a reduction in the amount of water used. Each person uses less. An alternative definition implies more efficient use of water. We waste less. Less waste can be attributed to best management practices, more efficient hardware or literally less water running into the streets from irrigation systems. Urban water conservation incorporates watersaving measures and incentives for the home, on the landscape and throughout the city water distribution system. It is easy to differentiate between water-saving measures and incentives. A water-saving measure such as a water-efficient toilet reduces the amount used each and every time it is flushed. Or, a rain sensor turns off a sprinkler system during rain showers. In contrast, incentives encourage the wise use of water through education, ordinances or scheduling. Educational programs suggest water reductions in the landscape, ordinances mandate how much turf is planted, and schedules tell homeowners when to irrigate. Combined, measures and incentives provide a water conservation program.

Silvey, Valeen; Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce; Runyan, Craig

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Heat pipe effects in nuclear waste isolation: a review  

SciTech Connect

The existence of fractures favors heat pipe development in a geologic repository as does a partially saturated medium. A number of geologic media are being considered as potential repository sites. Tuff is partially saturated and fractured, basalt and granite are saturated and fractured, salt is unfractured and saturated. Thus the most likely conditions for heat pipe formation occur in tuff while the least likely occur in salt. The relative permeability and capillary pressure dependences on saturation are of critical importance for predicting thermohydraulic behavior around a repository. Mineral redistribution in heat pipe systems near high-level waste packages emplaced in partially saturated formations may significantly affect fluid flow and heat transfer processes, and the chemical environment of the packages. We believe that a combined laboratory, field, and theoretical effort will be needed to identify the relevant physical and chemical processes, and the specific parameters applicable to a particular site. 25 refs., 1 fig.

Doughty, C.; Pruess, K.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Modelling the mass migration phenomena in partially frozen heat pipes  

SciTech Connect

Liquid metal heat pipes operated at power throughputs well below their design point and with sink temperatures below the freezing temperature of the working fluid may fail as a result of the working fluid migrating to a cold region within the pipe, freezing there, and not returning to the evaporator section. Eventually, sufficient working fluid inventory may be lost to the cold region to cause a local dry-out condition in the evaporator. A joint experimental and analytical effort by the Air Force Phillips Laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory is underway to investigate this phenomena. This paper presents an analytical model developed to describes this phenomena. The model provides for analytic determination of heat pipe temperature profiles, freeze-front locations and mass migration rates.

Keddy, M.D.; Merrigan, M.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Critchley, E. [Phillips Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

MegaPipe: the MegaCam image stacking pipeline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the MegaPipe image processing pipeline at the Canadian Astronomical Data Centre (CADC). The pipeline takes multiple images from the MegaCam mosaic camera on CFHT and combines them into a single output image. MegaPipe takes as input detrended MegaCam images and does a careful astrometric and photometric calibration on them. The calibrated images are then resampled and combined into image stacks. MegaPipe is run on PI data by request, data from large surveys (the CFHT Legacy Survey and the Next Generation Virgo Survey) and all non-proprietary MegaCam data in the CFHT archive. The stacked images and catalogs derived from these images are available through the CADC website. Currently, 1500 square degrees have been processed.

Gwyn, Stephen D J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Numerical analysis of vapor flow in a micro heat pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vapor flow in a flat plate micro heat pipe with both uniform and linear heat flux boundary conditions has been numerically analyzed. For both types of boundary conditions, the Navier-Stokes equations with steady incompressible two-dimensional flow were solved using the SIMPLE method. The results indicate that the pressure, shear stress, and friction factor under linear heat flux boundary conditions are considerably smoother, and hence, more closely approximate the real situation. As the heat flux increases, the pressure drop increases, but the friction factor demonstrates only a slight change for different heat flux conditions. The size and shape of the micro heat pipe vapor space was shown to have a significant influence on the vapor flow behavior for micro heat pipes. When the vapor space area decreases, the pressure drop, shear stress, and friction factor all significantly increase.

Liu, Xiaoqin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Terahertz Radiation from a Pipe with Small Corrugations  

SciTech Connect

We have studied through analytical and numerical methods the use of a relativistic electron bunch to drive a metallic beam pipe with small corrugations for the purpose of generating terahertz radiation. For the case of a pipe with dimensions that do not change along its length, we have shown that - with reasonable parameters - one can generate a narrow-band radiation pulse with frequency {approx}1 THz, and total energy of a few milli-Joules. The pulse length tends to be on the order of tens of picoseconds. We have also shown that, if the pipe radius is tapered along its length, the generated pulse will end up with a frequency chirp; if the pulse is then made to pass through a compressor, its final length can be reduced to a few picoseconds and its peak power increased to 1 GW. We have also shown that wall losses tend to be significant and need to be included in the structure design.

Bane, K.L.F.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics Conventional Storage Water Heater Basics July 30, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Illustration showing the components of a storage water heater. On top of the tank are two thin pipes; one pipe is the hot water outlet, and the other is the cold water inlet. A large pipe in the middle is called a vent pipe. A pressure/temperature relief valve is also on top of the tank and is connected to an open pipe that runs down the side of the tank. Another valve near the bottom of the outside of the tank is the thermostat and gas valve. A cutout shows the parts inside the tank, which include a large tube called a flue tube/heat exchanger. Inside this tube is a jagged insert called a flue baffle. Beside the flue tube/heat exchanger is a thin tube called the anode rod. At the bottom of the tank is a gas burner, and beneath the burner are combustion air openings.

426

Felt-metal-wick heat-pipe solar receiver  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reflux heat-pipe receivers have been identified as a desirable interface to couple a Stirling-cycle engine with a parabolic dish solar concentrator. The reflux receiver provides power nearly isothermally to the engine heater heads while decoupling the heater head design from the solar absorber surface design. The independent design of the receiver and engine heater head leads to higher system efficiency. Heat pipe reflux receivers have been demonstrated at approximately 65 kW{sub t} power throughput. Several 25 to 30-kW{sub e} Stirling-cycle engines are under development, and will soon be incorporated in commercial dish-Stirling systems. These engines will require reflux receivers with power throughput limits reaching 90-kW{sub t}. The extension of heat pipe technology from 60 kW{sub t} to 100 kW{sub t} is not trivial. Current heat pipe wick technology is pushed to its limits. It is necessary to develop and test advanced wick structure technologies to perform this task. Sandia has developed and begun testing a Bekaert Corporation felt metal wick structure fabricated by Porous Metal Products Inc. This wick is about 95% porous, and has liquid permeability a factor of 2 to 8 times higher than conventional technologies for a given maximum pore radius. The wick has been successfully demonstrated in a bench-scale heat pipe, and a full-scale on-sun receiver has been fabricated. This report details the wick design, characterization and installation into a heat pipe receiver, and the results of the bench-scale tests are presented. The wick performance is modeled, and the model results are compared to test results.

Andraka, C.E.; Adkins, D.R.; Moss, T.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Cole, H.M. [Porous Metal Products, Jacksboro, TX (United States); Andreas, N.H. [Bekaert Corp., Marietta, GA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Heat Pipe Performance Enhancement with Binary Mixture Fluids that Exhibit Strong Concentration Marangoni Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

inclined, gravity-assisted, brass heat pipe with a 0.05M 2-inclined, gravity-assisted, brass heat pipe, with a 0.05M 2-Evaporator c Condenser Br Brass adia Adiabatic in input cold

Armijo, Kenneth Miguel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

DEVELOPMENT AND MANUFACTURE OF COST EFFECTIVE COMPOSITE DRILL PIPE  

SciTech Connect

This technical report presents the engineering research, process development and data accomplishments that have transpired to date in support of the development of Cost Effective Composite Drill Pipe (CDP). The report presents progress made from October 1, 2003 through September 30, 2004 and contains the following discussions: (1) Direct Electrical Connection for Rotary Shoulder Tool Joints; (2) Conductors for inclusion in the pipe wall (ER/DW-CDP); (3) Qualify fibers from Zoltek; (4) Qualify resin from Bakelite; (5) First commercial order for SR-CDP from Integrated Directional Resources (SR-CDP); and (6) Preparation of papers for publication and conference presentations.

James C. Leslie; James C. Leslie II; Lee Truong; James T. Heard; Peter Manekas

2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

429

Assessing Equivalent Viscous Damping Using Piping System test Results  

SciTech Connect

The specification of damping for nuclear piping systems subject to seismic-induced motions has been the subject of many studies and much controversy. Damping estimation based on test data can be influenced by numerous factors, consequently leading to considerable scatter in damping estimates in the literature. At present, nuclear industry recommendations and nuclear regulatory guidance are not consistent on the treatment of damping for analysis of nuclear piping systems. Therefore, there is still a need to develop a more complete and consistent technical basis for specification of appropriate damping values for use in design and analysis. This paper summarizes the results of recent damping studies conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

Nie, J.; Morante, R.

2010-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

PICEP: Pipe Crack Evaluation Program (Revision 1): Special report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes software for calculating single- or two-phase flow through cracks in pipes and steam generator tubes. Options are available for calculating the crack-opening area and the critical (stable) crack length. The program is useful in performing leak-before-break analysis to demonstrate detectable leak rates prior to crack growth instability. Input to the code includes material properties, loads, thermal-hydraulic conditions, pipe geometry, and crack type and orientation. Theory and user information are provided in this report. 16 refs., 7 figs.

Norris, D.M.; Chexal, B.

1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Standardized method for developing stress intensification factors for piping components  

SciTech Connect

At present, neither the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for Nuclear Power Plant Components (ASME B PV Code Section 3) nor the B31 codes for industrial piping provide a methodology for experimental determination of i-factors. This report examines the basis for the present Code fatigue rules and how the original i-factors were determined. It then provides a set of proposed additions to the code, Appendix 2, to guide users in developing i-factors. Such an appendix, with minor modification, can also be used by the B31 industrial piping codes.

Rodabaugh, E.C. (Rodabaugh (E.C.), Dublin, OH (United States))

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Insulation of Pipe Bends Improves Efficiency of Hot Oil Furnaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic analyses of processes indicated low furnace efficiencies on certain hot oil furnaces. Further investigation, which included Infrared (IR) thermography testing of several furnaces, identified extremely hot surfaces on the outside of the convective sections. Consultation with the furnace manufacturer then revealed that furnaces made in the 1960's tended to not insulate the pipe bends in the convective section. When insulation was added within the covers of the pipe bends on one furnace, the energy efficiency improved by approximately 11%. The total savings are approximately 14,000 Million Btu/yr on one furnace. Insulation will be applied to several other furnaces at the site.

Haseltine, D. M.; Laffitte, R. D.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

An Analysis of Off-Grid, Off-Pipe Housing in Six U.S. Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation addresses the issues of climate change and depletion of non-renewable resources of energy and water, and aims at eliminating the use of non-renewable resources of energy and water for the building operation in single-family detached residences in the U.S. With this aim, this study investigated the feasibility of the off-grid, off-pipe design approach in six climate locations across the U.S. to achieve self-sufficiency in a house for building energy, indoor water use, and household wastewater and sewage disposal using only on-site available renewable resources. For the analysis, a 2,500 ft2, 2000/2001 International Energy Conservation Code standard reference house with typical building and usage characteristics was selected as the base case. The six U.S. climate locations included: Minneapolis, MN, Boulder, CO, Atlanta, GA, Houston, TX, Phoenix, AZ, and Los Angeles, CA. The renewable resources considered for this study included: solar radiation, wind, biomass for building energy needs; rainwater for indoor water use. In addition, the building site was considered for the disposal of household wastewater and sewage. The selected climate locations provided different scenarios in terms of base-case building energy needs and availability of renewable resources. Depending on these, energy and water efficiency measures were selected for reducing the building needs. For the reduced building needs, the sizing of systems for self-sufficiency was performed, including: solar thermal system for building’s space heating and water heating needs, photovoltaic and wind power systems for building’s electricity needs; rainwater harvesting system for indoor water needs; and septic system for the on-site disposal of household wastewater and sewage. In this manner, an integrated analysis procedure was developed for the analysis and design of off-grid, off-pipe homes, and was demonstrated for six U.S. climate locations. The results of the analysis indicated that achieving self-sufficiency for energy, water and sewage disposal was possible in all climates provided the systems for the collection and storage of renewable resources were large. On the other hand, the utilization of these systems was small for locations, where the year-to-year and seasonal variations in the weather conditions and availability of climate resources was large. For increased system utilization, minimization of the peak building needs, utilization of harvested energy for secondary purposes, and considering alternative systems for such applications are preferred.

Malhotra, Mini

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

An Analysis of Off-grid, Off-pipe Housing in Six U.S. Climates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation addresses the issues of climate change and depletion of non-renewable resources of energy and water, and aims at eliminating the use of non-renewable resources of energy and water for the building operation in single-family detached residences in the U.S. With this aim, this study investigated the feasibility of the off-grid, off-pipe design approach in six climate locations across the U.S. to achieve self-sufficiency in a house for building energy, indoor water use, and household wastewater and sewage disposal using only on-site available renewable resources. For the analysis, a 2,500 ft2, 2000/2001 International Energy Conservation Code standard reference house with typical building and usage characteristics was selected as the base case. The six U.S. climate locations included: Minneapolis, MN, Boulder, CO, Atlanta, GA, Houston, TX, Phoenix, AZ, and Los Angeles, CA. The renewable resources considered for this study included: solar radiation, wind, biomass for building energy needs; rainwater for indoor water use. In addition, the building site was considered for the disposal of household wastewater and sewage. The selected climate locations provided different scenarios in terms of base-case building energy needs and availability of renewable resources. Depending on these, energy and water efficiency measures were selected for reducing the building needs. For the reduced building needs, the sizing of systems for self-sufficiency was performed, including: solar thermal system for building’s space heating and water heating needs, photovoltaic and wind power systems for building’s electricity needs; rainwater harvesting system for indoor water needs; and septic system for the on-site disposal of household wastewater and sewage. In this manner, an integrated analysis procedure was developed for the analysis and design of off-grid, off-pipe homes, and was demonstrated for six U.S. climate locations. The results of the analysis indicated that achieving self-sufficiency for energy, water and sewage disposal was possible is all climates provided the systems for the collection and storage of renewable resources were large. On the other hand, the utilization of these systems was small for locations, where the year-to-year and seasonal variations in the weather conditions and availability of climate resources was large. For increased system utilization, minimization of the peak building needs, utilization of harvested energy for secondary purposes, and considering alternative systems for such applications are preferred.

Malhotra, Mini

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Computer Based Training (CBT) Buried Pipe Condition Assessment and Repair, Version 1.0  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this training module is to provide an understanding of the inspection of buried piping. Course 1 of the course covers initial direct condition assessment of excavated buried pipe. Course 2 covers buried pipe coating repairs and final as-left inspections of piping. The CBT includes graphics, interactive features, and review questions to help the student better understand the subject. Windows XP, Vista, 7

2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

436

Margins for an in-plant piping system under dynamic loading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to verify that piping designed according to current practice does indeed have a large margin against failure and to quantify the excess capacity for piping and dynamic pipe supports on the basis of data obtained in a series of high-level seismic experiments (designated SHAM) on an in-plant piping system at the HDR (Heissdampfreaktor) Test Facility in Germany. 4 refs., 6 tabs.

Kot, C.A.; Srinivasan, M.G.; Hsieh, B.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Using Acoustic Emission Principles for Leak Detection on Buried Pipe with Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. nuclear power industry is actively managing the threat of corrosion on buried and underground piping and tanks in response to industry initiative NEI 09-14, Guideline for the Management of Underground Piping and Tank Integrity. A key element of these programs is the inspection of pipe to detect degradation.The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has been evaluating and reporting on inspection technologies that may have viability for nuclear buried pipe inspection ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

438

Recommendations for an Effective Program to Control the Degradation of Buried Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In May 2007, EPRI conducted a Nuclear Power Plants Piping Integrity Workshop in which the integrity of buried pipes was identified as one of the top priorities. In October 2007, EPRI conducted a follow-up Workshop on Buried Pipe attended by more than 40 representatives from utilities and EPRI. At the conclusion of the October 2007 meeting, the utility attendees unanimously recommended that EPRI sponsor the development of a recommendations document for buried pipe to help plant engineers prevent and mitig...

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

439

Heat pipe technology: a bibliography with abstracts. Quarterly update, January-March 1980  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography of 111 citations on heat pipe technology, including a large number of citations on heat pipe uses in energy conservation and solar energy, is presented as a first quarter 1980 update in the Heat Pipe Technology Bibliographic series. (LCL)

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Interfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Introduction The cost of energy to pump oil through a pipe line is greatly reduced if the ow is not turbulent in this area, in part, because oil companies have only recently considered pumping oil through pipesInterfacial Mixing in Viscous Pipe Flows Interim report to Imperial Oil D. Van Vliet and B. R

Sutherland, Bruce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flush water piping" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Application of the Leak-Before-Break Approach to BWR Piping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

By applying the leak-before-break approach in BWR safety evaluations, utilities can justify eliminating many pipe whip restraints and jet impingement shields. The report details a sample analysis of recirculation piping in a General Electric BWR and offers a procedure for ranking plant piping systems for analysis.

1987-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

442

Sources of uncertainty in the calculation of loads on supports of piping systems  

SciTech Connect

Loads on piping systems are obtained from an analysis of the piping system. The piping system analysis involves uncertainties from various sources. These sources of uncertainties are discussed and ranges of uncertainties are illustrated by simple examples. The sources of uncertainties are summarized and assigned a judgmental ranking of the typical relative significance of the uncertainty.

Rodabaugh, E.C.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Optimum Piping Design on Offshore Platform Based on Improved Adaptive Genetic Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For solving the problems of low efficiency and high cost in piping design process on offshore drilling platform, the design of manifold optimum piping was taken as research objective, a mathematical model was established with the controlled objects of ... Keywords: offshore platform, manifold piping, genetic algorithm, encouraging function

Yi Peng; Liu Yancong; Shi Yongjun; Lun Guande

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Analysis of a flexible polymeric film with imbedded micro heat pipes for spacecraft radiators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In response to the pursuit of interplanetary travel and a continuous human presence in space, there is increasing focus within the space industry on spacecraft designs that change configuration within the space environment. Flexible thermal radiators are being developed to accommodate deployment mechanisms. An analytical model suggests that a lightweight polymeric material with imbedded micro heat pipe arrays can meet heat dissipation requirements while contributing less mass than competing flexible materials. The heat pipe capillary limit is evaluated as a function of temperature using two candidate working fluids. Using water, maximum heat transport is 18 mW per channel at 140° to 160° C. Maximum heat transport using methanol is 2.2 mW at 120° C: an order-of-magnitude difference. A thermal circuit model translates heat transport per channel into total radiator capacity as a function of heat source temperature and environmental sink temperature. Using water as the working fluid, radiator capacity varies from 6.0 kW to 12.2 kW for source temperatures from 20° to 50° C. For source temperatures 40° C and higher, capacity meets or exceeds the dissipation requirements of a reference spacecraft design. Methanol is not recommended as a working fluid because it produces radiator capacities two to three times lower than when water is used. Although thermal control system specifications constrain the micro heat pipe operating range, design changes directed at alleviating capillary limitations should increase radiator capacity. Technical issues for further investigation include effects of film billowing; performance limitations related to vapor viscosity; working fluid diffusion; and chemical reactivity between the case and working fluid. Compared to a competing graphite fiber weave, the polymeric material has an effective conductivity over ten times higher. Its area power density (kW/m²) is 18% to 60% lower than the graphite weave, but its mass power density (kW/kg) is several times higher. Greater flexibility and lower mass make it more amenable to structural integration than the graphite material. Recently developed space-stable polymers offer resistance to harsh temperature and radiation environments, helping to clear the path toward a more extensive use of polymers within the space industry.

McDaniels, Deborah Marie

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Capping of Water Wells for Future Use  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water wells that are not being used, but that might be needed in the future, can be sealed with a cap that covers the top of the well casing pipe to prevent unauthorized access and contamination of the well. This publication explains how to cap a well safely and securely.

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

446

Heating and cooling the Raft River geothermal transite pipe line  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary transient heat transfer analysis to aid in defining operating limits for the 4000-foot-long transite pipe line at the Raft River geothermal test site was completed. The heat transfer problem was to determine the time required to cool down the line from a 285/sup 0/F operating temperature to 50/sup 0/F and the time to heat up the line from 50/sup 0/F to 285/sup 0/F such that the temperature differential across the pipe wall will not exceed 25/sup 0/F. The pipe and the surrounding soil was modeled with a two-dimensional heat transfer computer code assuming constant convective heat transfer at the soil-atmosphere interface. The results are sensitive to the soil thermal conductivity used in the calculation and imply that measurement of soil thermal conductivity used in the calculation and imply that measurement of soil thermal properties should be made in order to refine the calculations. Also, the effect of variable convective heat transfer at the soil surface should be investigated. However, the results reported here indicate the order of magnitude to be expected for cool-down and heat-up times when operating the transite pipe at the stated condition.

Shaffer, C.J.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure is directed to an entirely passive heat pipe apparatus capable of operating against gravity for vertical distances in the order of 3 to 7 meters and more. A return conduit into which an inert gas is introduced is used to lower the specific density of the working fluid so that it may be returned a greater vertical distance from condenser to evaporator.

Koenig, Daniel R. (Santa Fe, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Nondestructive Evaluation Instrument Surveillance Test on 26-Inch Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tests simulating an operating-reactor environment provided valuable information on crack initiation and growth as well as on continuous on-line monitoring. This pioneering research has resulted in an industry standard that will reduce the costs and complexity of piping inspection and repair.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Nondestructive Evaluation: Buried Pipe NDE Reference Guide--Revision 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The infrastructure of today’s fleet of nuclear power plants has been in place for several decades. Aging mechanisms have had time to potentially challenge the structural and leakage integrity of systems, structures, and components, such as buried piping and tanks. Instances of inadvertent release of fluid containing small amounts of radioactive effluents into the surrounding soil have resulted. Although it is ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

450

Nondestructive Evaluation: Development of NDE Techniques for Detection of Outside Diameter Stress Corrosion Cracking on Stainless St eel Pipe Under Pipe Clamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commercial nuclear power industry has been dealing with stress corrosion cracking (SCC) for almost 50 years. This project worked to develop nondestructive examination (NDE) techniques for detecting outside diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) and pitting under pipe clamps or pipe hangers on Type 304 stainless steel piping. The NDE techniques to be evaluated for this application include conventional pulse-echo ultrasonics (PE UT), phased array ultrasonics (PA UT), guided wave, forward ...

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

451

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

452

Heat Pipe Solar Receiver Development Activities at Sandia National Laboratories  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Over the past decade, Sandia National Laboratories has been involved in the development of receivers to transfer energy from the focus of a parabolic dish concentrator to the heater tubes of a Stirling engine. Through the isothermal evaporation and condensation of sodium. a heat-pipe receiver can efficiently transfer energy to an engine's working fluid and compensate for irregularities in the flux distribution that is delivered by the concentrator. The operation of the heat pipe is completely passive because the liquid sodium is distributed over the solar-heated surface by capillary pumping provided by a wick structure. Tests have shown that using a heat pipe can boost the system performance by twenty percent when compared to directly illuminating the engine heater tubes. Designing heat pipe solar receivers has presented several challenges. The relatively large area ({approximately}0.2 m{sup 2}) of the receiver surface makes it difficult to design a wick that can continuously provide liquid sodium to all regions of the heated surface. Selecting a wick structure with smaller pores will improve capillary pumping capabilities of the wick, but the small pores will restrict the flow of liquid and generate high pressure drops. Selecting a wick that is comprised of very tine filaments can increase the permeability of the wick and thereby reduce flow losses, however, the fine wick structure is more susceptible to corrosion and mechanical damage. This paper provides a comprehensive review of the issues encountered in the design of heat pipe solar receivers and solutions to problems that have arisen. Topics include: flow characterization in the receiver, the design of wick systems. the minimization of corrosion and dissolution of metals in sodium systems. and the prevention of mechanical failure in high porosity wick structures.

Adkins, D.R.; Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Rawlinson, K.S.; Showalter, S.K.

1999-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

453

Assembly and testing of a composite heat pipe thermal intercept for HTS current leads  

SciTech Connect

We are building high temperature superconducting (HTS) current leads for a demonstration HTS-high gradient magnetic separation (HGMS) system cooled by a cryocooler. The current leads are entirely conductively cooled. A composite nitrogen heat pipe provides efficient thermal communication, and simultaneously electrical isolation, between the lead and an intermediate temperature heat sink. Data on the thermal and electrical performance of the heat pipe thermal intercept are presented. The electrical isolation of the heat pipe was measured as a function of applied voltage with and without a thermal load across the heat pipe. The results show the electrical isolation with evaporation, condensation and internal circulation taking place in the heat pipe.

Daugherty, M.A.; Daney, D.E.; Prenger, F.C.; Hill, D.D.; Williams, P.M.; Boenig, H.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Heat Pipe Technology, a bibliography with abstracts, quarterly update. Quarterly report No. 3  

SciTech Connect

Heat Pipe Technology is a continuing bibliographic summary of research on the subject of the heat pipe. The first volume was published in the spring of 1971 and is cumulative through March of that year. The 1971, 1972, 1973 and 1974 Annual Supplements have been published and distributed. Additional copies are available from the Technology Application Center. This update to Heat Pipe Technology cites the additional references identified during July, August, and September of 1975. It is the third in a 1975 quarterly series intended to provide 'current awareness' to heat pipe researchers. No Heat Pipe related patents were included in this issue.

1975-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

455

Effect of seawater environmental exposure on fatigue properties of polyethylene pipe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One laboratory study at NIT was reported to show an unexpected decrease in crystallinity for a polyethylene material exposed to fatigue loading in a synthetic seawater solution. High density polyethylene Sclairpipe, from the OTEC-1 cold water pipe, was evaluated for resistance to corrosion fatigue in natural seawater. Intermediate crystallinity measurements (via bulk density) showed no effect of corrosion fatigue exposure. Heat of fusion (a relative indicator of crystallinity) also showed no effect of the exposure. Seawater exposure produced no significant change in tensile strength. One failure was observed during the corrosion fatigue tests and was attributed to porosity observed by fractography. These data suggest that high density polyethylene is not significantly sensitive to degradation of fatigue strength in natural seawater.

Tipton, D G

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Condensation induced water hammer safety  

SciTech Connect

Condensation induced water hammer events in piping systems can cause catastrophic steam system failures which can result in equipment damage, personal injury, and even death. As an industry, we have learned to become accustomed to the ''banging'' that we often hear in our steam piping systems, and complacent in our actions to prevent it. It is unfortunate that lives are lost needlessly, as this type of water hammer event is preventable if one only applies some basic principles when operating and maintaining their steam systems. At the U. S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site where I work, there was one such accident that occurred in 1993 which took the life of a former co-worker and friend of mine. Hanford was established as part of the Manhattan Project during World War II. it is a 560 square mile complex located along the banks of the Columbia River in Southeastern Washington State. For almost 45 years, hanford's mission was to produce weapons grade plutonium for our nations defense programs. Today, Hanford no longer produces plutonium, but is focused on site clean-up and economic diversification. Hanford still uses steam for heating and processing activities, utilizing over 20 miles of piping distribution systems similar to those found in industry. Although these aging systems are still sound, they cannot stand up to the extreme pressure pulses developed by a condensation induced water hammer.

Gintner, M.A.

1997-03-10T23:59:59.000Z