National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fluoride hf produced

  1. HYDROGEN FLUORIDE Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) is an extremely

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    HYDROGEN FLUORIDE Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) is an extremely corrosive clear and colorless liquid BE PROVIDED TO INDIVIDUALS WITH EXPOSURE TO HYDROGEN FLOURIDE www.ehs.columbia.edu/HFPolicy.html HF USE. Because hydrogen fluoride can penetrate natural rubber gloves you must use only neoprene or nitrile gloves

  2. Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

    1984-12-21

    This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

  3. Hydrolysis of ZrCl4 and HfCl4: The Initial Steps in the High-Temperature Oxidation of Metal Chlorides to Produce ZrO2 and HfO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Zongtang; Dixon, David A.

    2013-03-08

    The gas-phase hydrolysis of MCl4 (M = Zr, Hf) to produce the initial particles on the way to zirconia and hafnia nanoparticles has been studied with electronic structure theory. The potential energy surfaces, the themochemistry of the reaction species, and the reaction paths for the initial steps of MCl4 reacting with H2O have been calculated. The hydrolysis of MCl4 at higher temperatures begins with the formation of oxychlorohydroxides followed by the elimination of HCl instead of the direct production of MOCl2 and HCl or MO2 and HCl due to the substantial endothermicities associated with the formation of gas-phase MO2. The structural properties and heats of formation of the reactants and products are consistent with the available experimental results. A number of metal oxychlorides (oxychlorohydroxides) intermediate clusters have been studied to assess their role in the production of MO2 nanoparticles. The calculated clustering reaction energies of those intermediates are highly exothermic, so they could be readily formed in the hydrolysis process. These intermediate clusters can be formed exothermically from metal oxychlorohydroxides by the elimination of one HCl or H2O molecule. Our calculations show that the mechanisms leading to the formation of MO2 nanoparticles are complicated and are accompanied by the potential production of a wide range of intermediates, as found for the production of TiO2 particles from the high-temperature oxidation of TiCl4.

  4. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, David F. (630 Sylvan Pl., Batavia, IL 60510); Sparrow, Robert W. (28 Woodlawn Dr., Sturbridge, MA 01566)

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  5. VAPOR PRESSURES OF THE RUBIDIUM FLUORIDE-ZIRCONIUM FLUORIDE AND...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    VAPOR PRESSURES OF THE RUBIDIUM FLUORIDE-ZIRCONIUM FLUORIDE AND LITHIUM FLUORIDE-ZIRCONIUM FLUORIDE SYSTEMS Citation Details In-Document Search Title: VAPOR PRESSURES OF THE...

  6. Magnesium fluoride recovery method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gay, Richard L. (Canoga Park, CA); McKenzie, Donald E. (Woodland Hills, CA)

    1989-01-01

    A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

  7. Fluorohydrogenate Cluster Ions in the Gas Phase: Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry of the [1-Ethyl-3-methylimidazolium+][F(HF)2.3–] Ionic Liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary S. Groenewold; James E. Delmore; Michael T. Benson; Tetsuya Tsuda; Rika Hagiwara

    2013-12-01

    Electrospray ionization of the fluorohydrogenate ionic liquid [1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium][F(HF)2.3] ionic liquid was conducted to understand the nature of the anionic species as they exist in the gas phase. Abundant fluorohydrogenate clusters were produced; however, the dominant anion in the clusters was [FHF-], and not the fluoride-bound HF dimers or trimers that are seen in solution. Density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggest that HF molecules are bound to the clusters by about 30 kcal/mol. The DFT-calculated structures of the [FHF-]-bearing clusters show that the favored interactions of the anions are with the methynic and acetylenic hydrogen atoms on the imidazolium cation, forming planar structures similar to those observed in the solid state. A second series of abundant negative ions was also formed that contained [SiF5-] together with the imidazolium cation and the fluorohydrogenate anions that originate from reaction of the spray solution with silicate surfaces.

  8. Uranyl fluoride luminescence in acidic aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Chemistry Div.

    1996-08-01

    Luminescence emission spectra and decay rates are reported for uranyl species in acidic aqueous solutions containing HF or added NaF. The longest luminescence lifetime, 0.269 {+-} 0.006 ms, was observed from uranyl in 1 M HF + 1 M HClO{sub 4} at 296 K and decreased with increasing temperature. Based on a luminescence dynamics model that assumes equilibrium among electronically excited uranyl fluoride species and free fluoride ion, this long lived uranyl luminescence in aqueous solution is attributed primarily to UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. Studies on the effect of added LiNO{sub 3} or Na{sub 2}WO{sub 4}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O showed relatively weak quenching of uranyl fluoride luminescence which suggests that high sensitivity determination of the UF{sub 6} content of WF{sub 6} gas should be feasible via uranyl luminescence analysis of hydrolyzed gas samples of impure WF{sub 6}.

  9. Fixed bed trapping for gaseous fluoride effluent control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Otey, M.G.; Bayne, C.K.

    1980-06-14

    To comply with future air quality standards for gaseous fluoride emissions at the PGDP, studies are being made to evaluate the most feasible and efficient method of trapping fluorides from the effluents of the different processes. Although this work is in direct support of environmental projects, its results are applicable in other areas. Throughout the diffusion plants there are several areas where fluorides, either single or multiple species, are controlled and/or processed. The solid sorbent studies represent new, promising technology which could have significant impact on the gaseous diffusion plants. Scoping studies of solid sorbents and reaction conditions have been conducted. In a series of statistically designed experiments, the effects of total gas flow, temperature, and fluoride gas flow were studied for eight dry chemicals in a 1-in. diameter fixed bed designed to remove three separate fluoride gas species (hydrogen fluoride (HF), fluorine (F/sub 2/), and chlorine trifluoride (ClF/sub 3/)) from an air stream. The trapping materials selected for the test include two brands of four different material types: soda lime, oolitic calcium carbonate (CaCO/sub 3/), calcium oxide (CaO), and activated alumina (Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/). Additionally, loading factors and material utilization were determined to allow an economic comparison to be made between bed materials.

  10. Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Solovyov, Vyacheslav (Rocky Point, NY); Wiesmann, Harold (Stony Brook, NY)

    2009-11-24

    The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

  11. Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weil, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

  12. Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

    2011-09-28

    This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

  13. Decay Studies of the New Isotopes Hf-162,hf-163 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrewe, U. J.; Hagberg, E.; Schmeing, H.; Hardy, John C.; Koslowsky, V. T.; Sharma, KS; Clifford, E. T. H.

    1982-01-01

    ) considering interaction between a hydraulic fracture (HF) and a pre-existing NF, has been investigated comprehensively using a two dimensional Displacement Discontinuity Method (DDM) Model in this thesis. The rock is first considered as an elastic impermeable...

  14. Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bartlett, Neil (Orinda, CA); Whalen, J. Marc (Corning, NY); Chacon, Lisa (Corning, NY)

    2000-12-12

    A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

  15. The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of high oxidation state nickel fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chacon, L.C. [Univ. of Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

    1997-12-01

    The research described in this thesis has mainly addressed the challenge of the synthesis of thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides, which cannot be made by traditional thermal methods. A low-temperature approach towards the synthesis of such transition metal fluorides exploits the greater thermodynamic stability of high oxidation states in anions and involves the use of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) as a solvent. The general method consists of combining an aHF soluble starting material (e.g., K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6}) with a Lewis fluoroacid (e.g., BF{sub 3}), which precipitates a neutral polymeric solid state fluoride: 2 K{sup +} + NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} + BF{sub 3} {r_arrow} NiF{sub 4} + 2 BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} + 2 K{sup +}. At room temperature, this reaction yields a different structural phase, with composition K{sub x}NiF{sub 3} (x {approx} 0.18). This material has a pseudo-hexagonal tungsten bronze structure (H{sub 0}-K{sub x}NiF{sub 3}), and is an ionic conductor, probably due to K{sup +} ions hosted in the lattice channels. R-NiF{sub 3} is capable of fluorinating a wide range of inorganic and organic substrates. These reactions have probably shed light on the mechanism of the Simons Electrochemical Fluorination (ECF) Process, an important industrial method of fluorinating organic compounds. It has long been speculated that NiF{sub 3} plays a role in the ECF process, which uses nickel electrodes in aHF solvent. K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} also fluorinates organic compounds in aHF, but interestingly, yields different fluorinated products. The reduction of R-NiF{sub 3} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} during fluorination reactions yields NiF{sub 2}. A method has been developed to regenerate NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} from NiF{sub 2}.

  16. Mechanistic investigation of vinylic carbonfluorine bond activation of perfluorinated cycloalkenes using Cp*2ZrH2 and Cp*2ZrHF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    using Cp*2ZrH2 and Cp*2ZrHF Bradley M. Kraft a , Eric Clot b , Odile Eisenstein b , William W behaves similarly [4]. In contrast, Cp*Rh(PMe3)H2 reacts with C6F6 by way of an SNAr2 attack by its conjugate base to give Cp*Rh(PMe3)(C6F5)H and fluoride ion, resulting in an autocatalytic reaction [5]. Cp

  17. Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Download the...

  18. Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Dean A.

    2011-01-01

    of Neptunium and Plutonium. Edited by OECD Nuclear EnergyComplexation of Plutonium(IV) with Fluoride at Variablehigher temperatures. Key Words: Plutonium (IV) / Fluoride /

  19. Thermodynamic data for uranium fluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitnaker, J.M.

    1983-03-01

    Self-consistent thermodynamic data have been tabulated for uranium fluorides between UF/sub 4/ and UF/sub 6/, including UF/sub 4/ (solid and gas), U/sub 4/F/sub 17/ (solid), U/sub 2/F/sub 9/ (solid), UF/sub 5/ (solid and gas), U/sub 2/F/sub 10/ (gas), and UF/sub 6/ (solid, liquid, and gas). Included are thermal function - the heat capacity, enthalpy, and free energy function, heats of formation, and vaporization behavior.

  20. Collisional quenching of highly rotationally excited HF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Benhui; Forrey, R C; Stancil, P C; Balakrishnan, N

    2015-01-01

    Collisional excitation rate coefficients play an important role in the dynamics of energy transfer in the interstellar medium. In particular, accurate rotational excitation rates are needed to interpret microwave and infrared observations of the interstellar gas for nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium line formation. Theoretical cross sections and rate coefficients for collisional deexcitation of rotationally excited HF in the vibrational ground state are reported. The quantum-mechanical close-coupling approach implemented in the nonreactive scattering code MOLSCAT was applied in the cross section and rate coefficient calculations on an accurate 2D HF-He potential energy surface. Estimates of rate coefficients for H and H$_2$ colliders were obtained from the HF-He collisional data with a reduced-potential scaling approach. The calculation of state-to-state rotational quenching cross sections for HF due to He with initial rotational levels up to $j=20$ were performed for kinetic energies from 10$^{-5}$ to 15000...

  1. Method for fluorination of actinide fluorides and oxyfluorides using O/sub 2/F/sub 2/

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eller, P.G.; Malm, J.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1984-08-01

    The present invention relates generally to methods of fluorination and more particularly to the use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ for the preparation of actinide hexafluorides, and for the extraction of deposited actinides and fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof from reaction vessels. The experiments set forth hereinabove demonstrate that the room temperature or below use of O/sub 2/F/sub 2/ will be highly beneficial for the preparation of pure actinide hexafluorides from their respective tetrafluorides without traces of HF being present as occurs using other fluorinating agents: and decontamination of equipment previously exposed to actinides: e.g., walls, feed lines, etc.

  2. Transition metal fluorides: from superconductors to multiferroics. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drathen, Christina

    2013-06-29

    Transition metal fluorides represent an important family of complex solids displaying a variety of different properties and interesting phenomena. Despite their remarkable behaviour, these classes of materials have not ...

  3. Observation of scattering and absorption centers in lead fluoride crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patrick Achenbach

    2006-06-22

    For the first time, lead fluoride is used as a fast and compact material in electromagnetic calorimetry. Excellent optical and mechanical properties of the pure Cherenkov crystals are necessary for the A4 collaboration to perform a measurement of the nucleon's strange form factors. Visible scattering and absorption centers as well as surface damages have been investigated to characterize the quality of more than one thousand crystals. Besides, transmittance measurements have been performed on all crystals to reveal absorption bands produced by intrinsic or impurity related point-structure defects. As a consequence, 89 crystals had to be replaced by the Chinese manufacturer SICCAS.

  4. Acidizing of Sandstone Reservoirs Using HF and Organic Acids 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Fei

    2012-10-19

    Mud acid, which is composed of HCl and HF, is commonly used to remove the formation damage in sandstone reservoirs. However, many problems are associated with HCl, especially at high temperatures. Formic-HF acids have served as an alternative...

  5. Ternary ceramic alloys of Zr-Ce-Hf oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becher, P.F.; Funkenbusch, E.F.

    1990-11-20

    A ternary ceramic alloy is described which produces toughening of zirconia and zirconia composites through the stress transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase. This alloy, having the general formula Ce[sub x]Hf[sub y]Zr[sub 1[minus]x[minus]y]O[sub 2], is produced through the addition of appropriate amounts of ceria and hafnia to the zirconia. Typically, improved toughness is achieved with about 5 to about 15 mol % ceria and up to about 40 mol % hafnia. The preparation of alloys of these compositions are given together with data as to the densities, tetragonal phase content, hardness and fracture toughness. The alloys are useful in preparing zirconia bodies as well as reinforcing ceramic composites. 1 fig.

  6. Ternary ceramic alloys of ZR-CE-HF oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Becher, Paul F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Funkenbusch, Eric F. (White Bear Lake, MN)

    1990-01-01

    A ternary ceramic alloy which produces toughening of zirconia and zirconia composites through the stress transformation from tetragonal phase to monoclinic phase. This alloy, having the general formula Ce.sub.x Hf.sub.y Zn.sub.1-x-y O.sub.2, is produced through the addition of appropriate amounts of ceria and hafnia to the zirconia. Typically, improved toughness is achieved with about 5 to about 15 mol % ceria and up to about 40 mol % hafnia. The preparation of alloys of these compositions are given together with data as to the densities, tetragonal phase content, hardness and fracture toughness. The alloys are useful in preparing zirconia bodies as well as reinforcing ceramic composites.

  7. WAVE-DRIVEN SURFACE FROM HF RADAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miami, University of

    FEATURE INTERNAL CURRENTS WAVE-DRIVEN SURFACE FROM HF RADAR By Lynn K. Shay Observations from recent experiments · . . have revealed internal wave signatures. SURFACE CURRENTobservations from high oscillations are within the inter- nal wave continuum from the buoyancy to the in- ertial frequencies

  8. Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

    1982-01-01

    Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

  9. Rare earth/iron fluoride and methods for making and using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Neveda, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA)

    1991-12-17

    A particulate mixture of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, where RE is a rare earth element, is reacted with an excess of HF acid to form an insoluble fluoride compound (salt) comprising REF.sub.3 and FeF.sub.3 present in solid solution in the REF.sub.3 crystal lattice. The REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound is dried to render it usable as a reactant in the thermite reduction process as well as other processes which require an REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 mixture. The dried REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound comprises about 5 weight % to about 40 weight % of FeF.sub.3 and the balance REF.sub.3 to this end.

  10. Infrared study on room-temperature atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} using tetrakis(ethylmethylamino)hafnium and remote plasma-excited oxidizing agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanomata, Kensaku [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jonan, Yonezawa 992-8510, Japan and Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Ohba, Hisashi; Pungboon Pansila, P.; Ahmmad, Bashir; Kubota, Shigeru; Hirahara, Kazuhiro; Hirose, Fumihiko, E-mail: fhirose@yz.yamagata-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Yamagata University, 4-3-16 Jonan, Yonezawa 992-8510 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Room-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} was examined using tetrakis (ethylmethylamino)hafnium (TEMAH) and remote plasma-excited water and oxygen. A growth rate of 0.26?nm/cycle at room temperature was achieved, and the TEMAH adsorption and its oxidization on HfO{sub 2} were investigated by multiple internal reflection infrared absorption spectroscopy. It was observed that saturated adsorption of TEMAH occurs at exposures of ?1?×?10{sup 5}?L (1 L?=?1?×?10{sup ?6} Torr s) at room temperature, and the use of remote plasma-excited water and oxygen vapor is effective in oxidizing the TEMAH molecules on the HfO{sub 2} surface, to produce OH sites. The infrared study suggested that Hf–OH plays a role as an adsorption site for TEMAH. The reaction mechanism of room temperature HfO{sub 2} ALD is discussed in this paper.

  11. Krypton Fluoride Laser Driven Inertial Fusion Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems San Ramon CA January 29, 2011 presented by John Sethian1 Krypton Fluoride Laser Driven Inertial Fusion Energy Presented to NAS Committee on the Prospects POWER PLANT: Attractive Technology #12;6 Outline S. ObenschainVision of R&D path to Inertial Fusion

  12. Quantum mechanical force field for hydrogen fluoride with explicit electronic polarization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazack, Michael J. M.; Gao, Jiali

    2014-05-28

    The explicit polarization (X-Pol) theory is a fragment-based quantum chemical method that explicitly models the internal electronic polarization and intermolecular interactions of a chemical system. X-Pol theory provides a framework to construct a quantum mechanical force field, which we have extended to liquid hydrogen fluoride (HF) in this work. The parameterization, called XPHF, is built upon the same formalism introduced for the XP3P model of liquid water, which is based on the polarized molecular orbital (PMO) semiempirical quantum chemistry method and the dipole-preserving polarization consistent point charge model. We introduce a fluorine parameter set for PMO, and find good agreement for various gas-phase results of small HF clusters compared to experiments and ab initio calculations at the M06-2X/MG3S level of theory. In addition, the XPHF model shows reasonable agreement with experiments for a variety of structural and thermodynamic properties in the liquid state, including radial distribution functions, interaction energies, diffusion coefficients, and densities at various state points.

  13. Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) phase inversion coating as a diffusion layer to enhance the cathode performance in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropylene) phase inversion coating as a diffusion layer, University Park, PA 16802, United States h i g h l i g h t s A PVDF-HFP phase inversion coating produced good resistance to water leakage. The PVDF-HFP phase inversion coating enabled higher power production

  14. Dispersion of UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosol and HF vapor in the operating floor during winter ventilation at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Chen, N.C.J.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Keith, K.D.; Schmidt, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Carter, J.C. [J.C. Carter Associates, Inc., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-12-30

    The gaseous diffusion process is currently employed at two plants in the US: the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant and the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant. As part of a facility-wide safety evaluation, a postulated design basis accident involving large line-rupture induced releases of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) into the process building of a gaseous diffusion plant (GDP) is evaluated. When UF{sub 6} is released into the atmosphere, it undergoes an exothermic chemical reaction with moisture (H{sub 2}O) in the air to form vaporized hydrogen fluoride (HF) and aerosolized uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}). These reactants disperse in the process building and transport through the building ventilation system. The ventilation system draws outside air into the process building, distributes it evenly throughout the building, and discharges it to the atmosphere at an elevated temperature. Since air is recirculated from the cell floor area to the operating floor, issues concerning in-building worker safety and evacuation need to be addressed. Therefore, the objective of this study is to evaluate the transport of HF vapor and UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} aerosols throughout the operating floor area following B-line break accident in the cell floor area.

  15. Examination of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2014-01-01

    The need for high efficiency power conversion and energy transport systems is increasing as world energy use continues to increase, petroleum supplies decrease, and global warming concerns become more prevalent. There are few heat transport fluids capable of operating above about 600oC that do not require operation at extremely high pressures. Liquid fluoride salts are an exception to that limitation. Fluoride salts have very high boiling points, can operate at high temperatures and low pressures and have very good heat transfer properties. They have been proposed as coolants for next generation fission reactor systems, as coolants for fusion reactor blankets, and as thermal storage media for solar power systems. In each case, these salts are used to either extract or deliver heat through heat exchange equipment, and in order to design this equipment, liquid salt heat transfer must be predicted. This paper discusses the heat transfer characteristics of liquid fluoride salts. Historically, heat transfer in fluoride salts has been assumed to be consistent with that of conventional fluids (air, water, etc.), and correlations used for predicting heat transfer performance of all fluoride salts have been the same or similar to those used for water conventional fluids an, water, etc). A review of existing liquid salt heat transfer data is presented, summarized, and evaluated on a consistent basis. Less than 10 experimental data sets have been found in the literature, with varying degrees of experimental detail and measured parameters provided. The data has been digitized and a limited database has been assembled and compared to existing heat transfer correlations. Results vary as well, with some data sets following traditional correlations; in others the comparisons are less conclusive. This is especially the case for less common salt/materials combinations, and suggests that additional heat transfer data may be needed when using specific salt eutectics in heat transfer equipment designs. All of the data discussed above were taken under forced convective conditions (both laminar and turbulent). Some recent data taken at ORNL under free convection conditions are also presented and results discussed. This data was taken using a simple crucible experiment with an instrumented nickel heater inserted in the salt to induce natural circulation within the crucible. The data was taken over a temperature range of 550oC to 650oC in FLiNaK salt. This data covers both laminar and turbulent natural convection conditions, and is compared to existing forms of natural circulation correlations.

  16. The system ammonium fluoride-hydrogen fluoride-water at zero degrees centigrade and at minus twenty degrees centigrade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buettner, John Philip

    1961-01-01

    THE SYSTEM AMMONIUM FLUORIDE-HYDROGEN FLUORIDE- WATER AT ZERO DEGREES CENTIGRADE AND AT MINUS TWENTY DEGREES CENTIGRADE A Thesis by John Philip Buettner Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas... fluorides as solid phases at either temperature. TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction. Experimental Procedure. Analytical Procedure. Results Table I, Data at O'C. Table II, Data at -20 'C Table IIa, Data at -20 CD ~ Table III, Analytical Data...

  17. Wind turbine impacts on HF radar ocean surface measurements in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyatt, Lucy

    Wind turbine impacts on HF radar ocean surface measurements in Liverpool Bay Alice Robinson School. The characterisation of the wind turbine interference is assessed and the radar cross section estimated. The modulation with wind turbine interference in a HF radar footprint are made. #12;Contents Contents iv List of Tables vii

  18. HfB2 and HfBN hard coatings by chemical vapor deposition S. Jayaraman a,c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girolami, Gregory S.

    are popular materials for hard and environmental coat- ings [1­16]. Applications include cutting tools, wearHfB2 and Hf­B­N hard coatings by chemical vapor deposition S. Jayaraman a,c , J.E. Gerbi a,c , Y rights reserved. Keywords: Hafnium diboride; Hafnium borohydride; CVD; Hard coating; Nanoindentation

  19. Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

    2011-09-12

    The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

  20. Hydrogen Fluoride Capture by Imidazolium Acetate Ionic Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaban, Vitaly

    2015-01-01

    Extraction of hydrofluoric acid (HF) from oils is a drastically important problem in petroleum industry, since HF causes quick corrosion of pipe lines and brings severe health problems to humanity. Some ionic liquids (ILs) constitute promising scavenger agents thanks to strong binding to polar compounds and tunability. PM7-MD simulations and hybrid density functional theory are employed here to consider HF capture ability of ILs. Discussing the effects and impacts of the cation and the anion separately and together, I will evaluate performance of imidazolium acetate and outline systematic search guidelines for efficient adsorption and extraction of HF.

  1. Effects of fluoride emissions on enzyme activity in metabolism of agricultural plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeri, P.B.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of fluoride on the activity of malatedehydrogenase (MDH) in rape seed and rye grass have been investigated. Fluoride, which has been absorbed from the air, seems to act differently from fluoride added to the soil. The action of airborne fluoride compounds resorbed by the plant on the activity of MDH significantly correlated with the distance from an aluminum plant, crop yield, and fluoride content. 5 references, 5 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Continuous production of granular or powder Ti, Zr and Hf or their alloy products

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR)

    1993-01-01

    A continuous process for producing a granular metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr or Hf under conditions that provide orderly growth of the metal free of halide inclusions comprising: a) dissolving a reducing metal selected from the group consisting of Na, Mg, Li or K in their respective halide salts to produce a reducing molten salt stream; b) preparing a second molten salt stream containing the halide salt of Ti, Zr or Hf; c) mixing and reacting the two molten streams of steps a) and b) in a continuous stirred tank reactor; d) wherein steps a) through c) are conducted at a temperature range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. so that a weight percent of equilibrium solubility of the reducing metal in its respective halide salt varies from about 1.6 weight percent at about 900.degree. C. to about 14.4 weight percent at about 1062.degree. C.; and wherein a range of concentration of the halide salt of Ti, Zn or Hf in molten halides of Na, Mg, Li or K is from about 1 to about 5 times the concentration of Na, Mg, Li or K; e) placing the reacted molten stream from step c) in a solid-liquid separator to recover an impure granular metal product by decantation, centrifugation, or filtration; and f) removing residual halide salt impurity by vacuum evaporator or inert gas sweep at temperatures from about 850.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. or cooling the impure granular metal product to ambient temperature and water leaching off the residual metal halide salt.

  3. High-power ELF radiation generated by modulated HF heating of the ionosphere can cause Earthquakes, Cyclones and localized heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    transmitter radiates a strong beam of high- frequency (HF) waves modulated at ELF. This HF heating modulates-frequency (HF) radiation in the megahertz range [7]. This heating modulates the electron's temperature in the D

  4. Electrical breakdown and ultrahigh electrical energy density in poly,,vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoropropylene... copolymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    Electrical breakdown and ultrahigh electrical energy density in poly,,vinylidene fluoride. Zhang1,3,a 1 Department of Electrical Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park investigates the electrical breakdown of a polar fluoropolymer, poly vinylidene fluoride

  5. Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal for parametric X-ray (PXR) production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal for parametric X-ray (PXR) production B. Sones *, Y. Danon, R 2004 Abstract Parametric X-ray (PXR) production is reported using lithium fluoride (LiF) as a target

  6. HF Radio in the International Information Infrastructure Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    HF Radio in the International Information Infrastructure Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State into the rapidly expanding global Internet. 1. INTRODUCTION Advancements in the international information network and the Internet (the latter relying largely upon the services of the former). However, some

  7. Interactions Among Ionospheric Propagation, HF Modems, and Data Protocols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Mexico State University Abstract The well-known challenges in using the ionospheric skywave channel to Internet-style network- and ap- plication-layer protocols, which have been designed with reliable, high that will form the basis of reliable Internet operation via next-generation HF radio networks. Introduction

  8. ARQ PROTOCOL FEATURES FOR HF RADIO LINKS Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    ARQ PROTOCOL FEATURES FOR HF RADIO LINKS Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State University ABSTRACT The explosion of interest in using Internet-style applica- tions over wireless links prompts investigation links with Internet-style workloads. The investigation is focused on high-frequency radio links

  9. ELF/VLF PHASED ARRAY GENERATION VIA FREQUENCY-MATCHED STEERING OF A CONTINUOUS HF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -OFF modulation of this HF energy can impose an ELF/VLF alternating current onto those natural currents. This technique turns the lower atmosphere into a large antenna, which radiates energy downward into the Earth.6 MW HAARP HF heating facility in Alaska, we show that proper utilization of motion of the HF beam can

  10. Hydrogen desorption from hydrogen fluoride and remote hydrogen plasma cleaned silicon carbide (0001) surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, Sean W. Tanaka, Satoru; Davis, Robert F.; Nemanich, Robert J.

    2015-09-15

    Due to the extreme chemical inertness of silicon carbide (SiC), in-situ thermal desorption is commonly utilized as a means to remove surface contamination prior to initiating critical semiconductor processing steps such as epitaxy, gate dielectric formation, and contact metallization. In-situ thermal desorption and silicon sublimation has also recently become a popular method for epitaxial growth of mono and few layer graphene. Accordingly, numerous thermal desorption experiments of various processed silicon carbide surfaces have been performed, but have ignored the presence of hydrogen, which is ubiquitous throughout semiconductor processing. In this regard, the authors have performed a combined temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation of the desorption of molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and various other oxygen, carbon, and fluorine related species from ex-situ aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and in-situ remote hydrogen plasma cleaned 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces. Using XPS, the authors observed that temperatures on the order of 700–1000?°C are needed to fully desorb C-H, C-O and Si-O species from these surfaces. However, using TPD, the authors observed H{sub 2} desorption at both lower temperatures (200–550?°C) as well as higher temperatures (>700?°C). The low temperature H{sub 2} desorption was deconvoluted into multiple desorption states that, based on similarities to H{sub 2} desorption from Si (111), were attributed to silicon mono, di, and trihydride surface species as well as hydrogen trapped by subsurface defects, steps, or dopants. The higher temperature H{sub 2} desorption was similarly attributed to H{sub 2} evolved from surface O-H groups at ?750?°C as well as the liberation of H{sub 2} during Si-O desorption at temperatures >800?°C. These results indicate that while ex-situ aqueous HF processed 6H-SiC (0001) surfaces annealed at <700?°C remain terminated by some surface C–O and Si–O bonding, they may still exhibit significant chemical reactivity due to the creation of surface dangling bonds resulting from H{sub 2} desorption from previously undetected silicon hydride and surface hydroxide species.

  11. EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold.

  12. FLUORIDE ION COMPLEXATION BY STIBONIUM LEWIS ACIDSTOWARD APPLICATION IN BIOIMAGING 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Merid 1989-

    2011-05-06

    Fluoride has proven to be a helpful anion in improving dental health when added to drinking water and toothpaste but extremely detrimental to the body at higher concentrations. Its isotope 18F is useful as a labeling agent in PET imaging. Due...

  13. Structural studies of magnesium nitride fluorides by powder neutron diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brogan, Michael A.; Hughes, Robert W.; Smith, Ronald I.; Gregory, Duncan H.

    2012-01-15

    Samples of ternary nitride fluorides, Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF have been prepared by solid state reaction of Mg{sub 3}N{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} at 1323-1423 K and investigated by powder X-ray and powder neutron diffraction techniques. Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} is cubic (space group: Pm3m) and has a structure related to rock-salt MgO, but with one cation site vacant. Mg{sub 2}NF is tetragonal (space group: I4{sub 1}/amd) and has an anti-LiFeO{sub 2} related structure. Both compounds are essentially ionic and form structures in which nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered. The nitride fluorides show temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour between 5 and 300 K. - Graphical abstract: Definitive structures of the ternary magnesium nitride fluorides Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and the lower temperature polymorph of Mg{sub 2}NF have been determined from powder neutron diffraction data. The nitride halides are essentially ionic and exhibit weak temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Definitive structures of Mg{sub 3}NF{sub 3} and Mg{sub 2}NF were determined by neutron diffraction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nitride and fluoride anions are crystallographically ordered in both structures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both compounds exhibit weak, temperature independent paramagnetic behaviour. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The compounds are essentially ionic with ionicity increasing with F{sup -} content.

  14. Graphene-Study, Kaprun, March 27th 2015, noise / ballistics in graphene, B. Plaais 1/80 WP4 -HF Electronics HF-Graphene Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaçais, Bernard

    Graphene-Study, Kaprun, March 27th 2015, noise / ballistics in graphene, B. Plaçais 1/80 WP4 - HF Electronics HF-Graphene Electronics noise (L1) ballistic's (L2) (electron-phonon) (Dirac Fermion Optics) Bernard Plaçais placais@lpa.ens.fr #12;Graphene-Study, Kaprun, March 27th 2015, noise / ballistics

  15. Surface Functionalization of Silicon Nanoparticles Produced by Laser-Driven Pyrolysis of Silane followed by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    Surface Functionalization of Silicon Nanoparticles Produced by Laser-Driven Pyrolysis of Silane. In Final Form: March 15, 2004 CO2 laser induced pyrolysis of silane was used to produce silicon quantities of silicon nanoparticles by laser-driven pyrolysis of silane followed by an HF- HNO3 etching

  16. The system silver fluoride - hydrogen fluoride - water at zero degrees centigrade and at minus fifteen degrees centigrade 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Hiram Jack

    1959-01-01

    Q the. ~ateia qo5he fiuox'lde- kydrogen f1uortd~ter at sero and ninne 1'ifteen degreea ientigrade, 4 grdrofluorio acid, anhydrous, (HP'? Qeners1 Chemica1? Reagent Crade)? hydrofluoric acid? ?queous? (HF/ Aes? IhdcNr and Adsmson, , Reagent Credo...

  17. Analysis of Third-Generation HF ALE Technologies Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Analysis of Third-Generation HF ALE Technologies Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State University · Higher throughput for short and long data messages · Better support for Internet protocols

  18. Survey reveals nature of corrosion in HF alky units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobis, J.D. (BP Oil Co., Marcus Hook, PA (United States)); Clarida, D.R. (Conoco Inc., Ponca City, OK (United States)); Richert, J.P. (Saudi Aramco/Mobil, Yanbu (Saudi Arabia))

    1995-03-06

    The results of a National Association of Corrosion Engineers survey of 62 HF alkylation units reveal relatively low incidence of service-related cracking of carbon steel. Hydrogen blistering, however, is prevalent, especially in the main acid circuit and overhead condensers. Based on these and other survey results, several recommendations are made to enable refiners to monitor and reduce corrosion in these special units. The paper discusses the survey results, construction materials, post-weld heat treatments, small-diameter piping, construction inspection, bolting, gaskets, block valves, maintenance practices, cracking, blistering, areas of vulnerability, and recommendations.

  19. Grout formulation for disposal of low-level and hazardous waste streams containing fluoride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDaniel, E.W.; Sams, T.L.; Tallent, O.K.

    1987-06-02

    A composition and related process for disposal of hazardous waste streams containing fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. the presence of fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. The presence of fluoride in waste materials acts as a set retarder and as a result, prevents cement-based grouts from setting. This problem is overcome by the present invention wherein calcium hydroxide is incorporated into the dry-solid portion of the grout mix. The calcium hydroxide renders the fluoride insoluble, allowing the grout to set up and immobilize all hazardous constituents of concern. 4 tabs.

  20. Photochemical oxygenation of a technetium fluoride using F{sub 2} and O{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beitz, J.V.; Williams, C.W.

    1996-10-01

    Photochemical conversion of technetium fluorides and oxyfluorides is largely uninvestigated. Because technetium was introduced into U.S. uranium enrichment plants, decommissioning and decontamination of these plants will involve technetium fluorides and oxyfluorides. Photochemical conversion of such compounds may facilitate waste minimization and cost avoidance goals during plant clean-up. Photochemical fluorination using ultraviolet photolysis of a mixture of fluorine and oxygen gases is an effective means of converting solid, nonvolatile fluorides of fight actinides, such as U, Np, and Pu, into volatile hexafluorides thereby removing surface radioactive contamination. Our studies involved the interaction of ultraviolet light, oxygen, and fluorine with technetium fluoride.

  1. Thermodynamics of neptunium(V) fluoride and sulfate at elevated temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

    2006-01-01

    Rao, O. Tochiyama; “Chemical Thermodynamics of Compounds andUpdate on the chemical thermodynamics of uranium, neptunium,Thermodynamics of Neptunium(V) Fluoride and Sulfate at

  2. Metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Stanislaus S. (Stony Brook, NY); Mao, Yuanbing (Los Angeles, CA)

    2009-08-18

    The present invention includes pure single-crystalline metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures, and methods of making same. These nanostructures include nanorods and nanoarrays.

  3. Strong H...F hydrogen bonds as synthons in polymeric quantum magnets: structural, magnetic, and theoretical characterization of [Cu(HF)(pyrazine)]SbF, [CuF(HF)(FH)(pyrazine)].(SbF), and [CuAg(HF)(pyrazine)](SbF).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; Funk, K. A.; Southerland, H. I.; Twamley, B.; Lancaster, T.; Blundell, S. J.; Baker, P. J.; Pratt, F. L.; Singleton, J.; McDonald, R. D.; Goddard, P. A.; Sengupta, P.; Batista, C. D.; Ding, L.; Lee, C.; Whangbo, M.-H.; Franke, I.; Cox, S.; Baines, C.; Trail, D.; Eastern Washington Univ.; Univ. of Idaho; Oxford Univ.; Rutherford Appleton Lab.; LANL; Univ. of Southern California; North Carolina State Univ.; Paul Scherrer Inst.

    2009-01-01

    Three Cu{sup 2+}-containing coordination polymers were synthesized and characterized by experimental (X-ray diffraction, magnetic susceptibility, pulsed-field magnetization, heat capacity, and muon-spin relaxation) and electronic structure studies (quantum Monte Carlo simulations and density functional theory calculations). [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]SbF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine) (1a), [Cu{sub 2}F(HF)(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 4}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (1b), and [CuAg(H{sub 3}F{sub 4})(pyz){sub 5}](SbF{sub 6}){sub 2} (2) crystallize in either tetragonal or orthorhombic space groups; their structures consist of 2D square layers of [M(pyz){sub 2}]{sup n+} that are linked in the third dimension by either HF{sub 2}{sup -} (1a and 1b) or H{sub 3}F{sub 4}{sup -} (2). The resulting 3D frameworks contain charge-balancing SbF{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every void. Compound 1b is a defective polymorph of 1a, with the difference being that 50% of the HF{sub 2}{sup -} links are broken in the former, which leads to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion and d{sub x{sup 2}-y{sup 2}} orbital ordering. Magnetic data for 1a and 1b reveal broad maxima in x at 12.5 and 2.6 K and long-range magnetic order below 4.3 and 1.7 K, respectively, while 2 displays negligible spin interactions owing to long and disrupted superexchange pathways. The isothermal magnetization, M(B), for 1a and 1b measured at 0.5 K reveals contrasting behaviors: 1a exhibits a concave shape as B increases to a saturation field, B{sub c}, of 37.6 T, whereas 1b presents an unusual two-step saturation in which M(B) is convex until it reaches a step near 10.8 T and then becomes concave until saturation is reached at 15.8 T. The step occurs at two-thirds of M{sub sat}, suggesting the presence of a ferrimagnetic structure. Compound 2 shows unusual hysteresis in M(B) at low temperature, although x vs T does not reveal the presence of a magnetic phase transition. Quantum Monte Carlo simulations based on an anisotropic cubic lattice were applied to the magnetic data of 1a to afford g = 2.14, J = ?13.4 K (Cu-pyz-Cu), and J = ?0.20 K (Cu?F {hor_ellipsis} H {hor_ellipsis} F?Cu), while x vs T for 1b could be well reproduced by a spin-1/2 Heisenberg uniform chain model for g = 2.127(1), J{sub 1} = ?3.81(1), and zJ{sub 2} = ?0.48(1) K, where J{sub 1} and J{sub 2} are the intra- and interchain exchange couplings, respectively, which considers the number of magnetic nearest-neighbors (z). The M(B) data for 1b could not be satisfactorily explained by the chain model, suggesting a more complex magnetic structure in the ordered state and the need for additional terms in the spin Hamiltonian. The observed variation in magnetic behaviors is driven by differences in the H {hor_ellipsis} F hydrogen-bonding motifs.

  4. Phosphonic-Based HF Acid: Interactions With Clay Minerals And Flow In Sandstone Cores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Lijun

    2015-05-13

    , phosphonic-based HF acid systems (HF and a phosphonic acid) have been used as an alternative to mud acid. However, very limited research has been performed to investigate the interactions of phosphonic-based acid systems with clay minerals in sandstone...

  5. Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkwood, Sheila

    Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes Tadahiko Ogawa1 (200x) xx:1­8 Finland HF and Esrange MST radar observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes Tadahiko in Finland are presented. The echoes were detected at four frequencies of 9, 11, 13 and 15 MHz at slant

  6. Measurement and analysis of muonic x rays of 176,177,178,179,180Hf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y.; Steffen, R.M.; Shera, E.B.; Reuter, W.; Hoehn, M.V.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1984-07-01

    Monopole and quadrupole charge distributions of /sup 176/Hf, /sup 177/Hf, /sup 178/Hf, /sup 179/Hf, and /sup 180/Hf were investigated by muonic atom K and L x-ray measurements. The model-independent Barrett charge radii R/sub k/ and the isotope shifts ..delta..R/sub k/ were measured, and values of and ..delta.. were deduced. A weak odd-even staggering of the nuclear charge radii was observed for the series /sup 176 -178/Hf and /sup 178 -180/Hf. A large negative isomer shift was observed in the 2/sup +/ state of the /sup 176/Hf nucleus, a fact that existing theories do not explain. The quadrupole moments of the first excited states of the hafnium nuclei were determined to be Q/sup 176/(2/sup +/) = -2.10(2) e b, Q/sup 177/((9/2)/sup -/) = 1.30(2) e b, Q/sup 178/(2/sup +/) = -2.02(2) e b, Q/sup 179/((11/2)/sup +/) = 1.88(3) e b, and Q/sup 180/(2/sup +/) = -2.00(2) e b. These quadrupole moments and the simultaneously determined B(E2) values for the respective nuclei are in satisfactory agreement with the predictions of the axially symmetric rotor model.

  7. Effects of heat treatment and HF etching on the strength of silica lightguides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthewson, M. John

    Effects of heat treatment and HF etching on the strength of silica lightguides C. R. Kurkjian, M. J, heating of a fiber to moderate temperatures (~300 600 C), for instance during the soldering of pigtails-lowering defects. In this paper we discuss early results from the literature on the effects of heating and HF

  8. Crystal structure of Si-doped HfO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Lili [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); School of Information Science and Technology, Northwest University, Xi'an 710127 (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Nelson, Matthew; Fancher, Chris M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Aldridge, Henry [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Iamsasri, Thanakorn; Forrester, Jennifer S.; Jones, Jacob L., E-mail: jacobjones@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Nishida, Toshikazu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Moghaddam, Saeed [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-01-21

    Si-doped HfO{sub 2} was prepared by solid state synthesis of the starting oxides. Using Rietveld refinement of high resolution X-ray diffraction patterns, a substitutional limit of Si in HfO{sub 2} was determined as less than 9 at.?%. A second phase was identified as Cristobalite (SiO{sub 2}) rather than HfSiO{sub 4}, the latter of which would be expected from existing SiO{sub 2}-HfO{sub 2} phase diagrams. Crystallographic refinement with increased Si-dopant concentration in monoclinic HfO{sub 2} shows that c/b increases, while ? decreases. The spontaneous strain, which characterizes the ferroelastic distortion of the unit cell, was calculated and shown to decrease with increasing Si substitution.

  9. Safety Slide 1 Hydrofluoric (HF) Acid Hazards http://www.emsworld.com/web/online/Education/Hydrofluoric-Acid-/5$12949

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Robert E.

    Safety Slide 1 ­ Hydrofluoric (HF) Acid Hazards http://www.emsworld.com/web may be delayed for up to 24 hours, even with dilute solutions. HF burns affect deep tissue layers

  10. Hydrogen bonding between neon and hydrogen fluoride M. Losonczy and J. W. Moskowitz*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillinger, Frank

    Hydrogen bonding between neon and hydrogen fluoride M. Losonczy and J. W. Moskowitz* Chemistry of hydrogen fluoride. The results exhibit formation of a linear hydrogen bond. Although this bond is weak (0.234 kcal!mole), its strength exceeds that found earlier for the neon-water hydrogen bond. I. INTRODUCTION

  11. Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlegel, H. Bernhard

    Molecular Dynamics of Methylamine, Methanol, and Methyl Fluoride Cations in Intense 7 Micron Laser of methylamine (CH3NH2 + ), methanol (CH3OH+ ), and methyl fluoride (CH3F+ ) cations by short, intense laser 7 m laser pulses. This work is motivated by recent studies of methanol cations by Yamanouchi and co

  12. Effect of heat treatment on Si electrodes using polyvinylidene fluoride binder , L. Christensenb

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hewitt, Kevin

    1 Effect of heat treatment on Si electrodes using polyvinylidene fluoride binder Jing Lia , L and adhesion tests. It is suggested that heat treatment improves the binder distribution, the adhesion performance of Si electrodes using polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) binder heated at different temperatures

  13. Formation of Tetrafluorobenzyne by -Fluoride Elimination in Zirconium-Perfluorophenyl Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    Formation of Tetrafluorobenzyne by -Fluoride Elimination in Zirconium-Perfluorophenyl Complexes concurrently by hydride attack on the aro- matic ring and fluoride abstraction by zirconium. In the second a zirconium-benzyne complex, and finally, inser- tion of benzyne into the Zr-H bond to give Cp*2Zr- (C6H5)F

  14. Radiative cooling test facility and performance evaluation of 4-MIL aluminized polyvinyl fluoride and white-paint surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruskopf, M.S.; Berdahl, P.; Martin, M.; Sakkal, F.; Sobolewski, M.

    1980-11-01

    A test facility designed to measure the amount of radiative cooling a specific material or assembly of materials will produce when exposed to the sky is described. Emphasis is placed upon assemblies which are specifically designed to produce radiative cooling and which therefore offer promise for the reduction of temperatures and/or humidities in occupied spaces. The hardware and software used to operate the facility are documented and the results of the first comprehensive experiments are presented. A microcomputer-based control/data acquisition system was employed to study the performance of two prototype radiator surfaces: 4-mil aluminized polyvinyl fluoride (PVF) and white painted surfaces set below polyethylene windscreens. The cooling rates for materials tested were determined and can be approximated by an equation (given). A computer model developed to simulate the cooling process is presented. (MCW)

  15. Microstructure–property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf shape memory alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coughlin, D. R.; Casalena, L.; Yang, F.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-09-18

    NiTiHf alloys exhibit remarkable shape memory and pseudoelastic properties that are of fundamental interest to a growing number of industries. In this study, differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal compression tests have revealed that the 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf alloy has useful shape memory properties that include a wide range of transformation temperatures as well as highly stable pseudoelastic behavior. These properties are governed by short-term aging conditions, which may be tailored to control transformation temperatures while giving rise to exceptionally high austenite yield strengths which aid transformation stability. The yield strength of the austenite phase can reach 2.1 GPa by aging for 3hrs at 500°C, while aging for 3hrs at 700°C produced an alloy with an austenite finish temperature (A f ) of 146°C. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy has revealed a new precipitate phase, H-phase, under the homogenized and extruded condition and the aged 3 hrs at 500°C condition, but only the previously identified H-phase precipitate was observed after aging at temperatures of 600°C and 700°C for 3 hrs. Finally, dislocation analysis indicated that plastic deformation of the austenite phase occurred by <100> type slip, similar to that observed in binary NiTi.

  16. Microstructure–property relationships in a high-strength 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf shape memory alloy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Coughlin, D. R.; Casalena, L.; Yang, F.; Noebe, R. D.; Mills, M. J.

    2015-09-18

    NiTiHf alloys exhibit remarkable shape memory and pseudoelastic properties that are of fundamental interest to a growing number of industries. In this study, differential scanning calorimetry and isothermal compression tests have revealed that the 51Ni–29Ti–20Hf alloy has useful shape memory properties that include a wide range of transformation temperatures as well as highly stable pseudoelastic behavior. These properties are governed by short-term aging conditions, which may be tailored to control transformation temperatures while giving rise to exceptionally high austenite yield strengths which aid transformation stability. The yield strength of the austenite phase can reach 2.1 GPa by aging for 3hrsmore »at 500°C, while aging for 3hrs at 700°C produced an alloy with an austenite finish temperature (A f ) of 146°C. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy has revealed a new precipitate phase, H-phase, under the homogenized and extruded condition and the aged 3 hrs at 500°C condition, but only the previously identified H-phase precipitate was observed after aging at temperatures of 600°C and 700°C for 3 hrs. Finally, dislocation analysis indicated that plastic deformation of the austenite phase occurred by type slip, similar to that observed in binary NiTi.« less

  17. Time-dependent water dynamics in hydrated uranyl fluoride

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Miskowiec, Andrew J.; Anderson, Brian B.; Herwig, Kenneth W.; Huq, Ashfia; Mamontov, Eugene; Rondinone, Adam; Trowbridge, Lee D.

    2015-09-15

    In this study, uranyl fluoride is a three-layer, hexagonal structure with significant stacking disorder in the c-direction. It supports a range of unsolved ‘thermodynamic’ hydrates with 0–2.5 water molecules per uranium atom, and perhaps more. However, the relationship between water, hydrate crystal structures, and thermodynamic results, collectively representing the chemical pathway through these hydrate structures, has not been sufficiently elucidated. We used high-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering to study the dynamics of water in partially hydrated uranyl fluoride powder over the course of 4 weeks under closed conditions. The spectra are composed of two quasielastic components: one is associated with translationalmore »diffusive motion of water that is approximately five to six times slower than bulk water, and the other is a slow (on the order of 2–300 ps), spatially bounded water motion. The translational component represents water diffusing between the weakly bonded layers in the crystal, while the bounded component may represent water trapped in subnanometre ‘pockets’ formed by the space between uranium-centred polymerisation units. Complementary neutron diffraction measurements do not show any significant structural changes, suggesting that a chemical conversion of the material does not occur in the thermodynamically isolated system on this timescale.« less

  18. The Walnut Street Model of Ionospheric HF Radio Propagation Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    1 The Walnut Street Model of Ionospheric HF Radio Propagation Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State on radio frequency, latitude, time of day, season, the solar weather, and so on. Signals reach the receiver

  19. LuHf isotope systematics of fossil biogenic apatite and their effects on geochronology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schöne, Bernd R.

    ) and argillaceous matrices with low permeability (oil shale of Messel, Germany; Posidonienschiefer of Holzmaden the Eifel, Germany. Low 176 Lu/177 Hf ratios in all materials from the Middle Eocene Messel oil shale (e

  20. HF beam parameters in ELF/VLF wave generation via modulated heating of the ionosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of spreading the HF power over a wider area, and we find that a larger beam area yields larger generated et al., 1982], and the observa- tory at Jicamarca, Peru [Lunnen et al., 1984], were both used

  1. The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6-based organic carbonate electrolytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lux, Simon

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6-based organicliterature data, a simplified mechanism for the formation of3 . In this proposed mechanism, the blue lines represent the

  2. THIRD-GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR HF RADIO NETWORKING Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    THIRD-GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR HF RADIO NETWORKING Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State University for Internet protocols and applications This new generation of open standards is the result of ideas

  3. STUDY OF THE REACTION DYNAMICS OF Li + HF, HC1 BY THE CROSSED MOLECULAR BEAMS METHOD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    the angular and velocity distributions of reaction products~of~flight velocity measurements of the reaction product atLi + HF reaction at EC 2.2 kcal/mole. Velocity distributions

  4. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); DeLoach, Laura D. (Manteca, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Keszler, Douglas A. (Corvallis, OK)

    1997-01-01

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM'(BO.sub.3)F, where M, M' are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO.sub.3 F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator.

  5. Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schaffers, K.I.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.; Keszler, D.A.

    1997-10-14

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM{prime}(BO{sub 3})F, where M, M{prime} are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO{sub 3}F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator. 6 figs.

  6. Uranium hexafluoride liquid thermal expansion, elusive eutectic with hydrogen fluoride, and very first production using chlorine trifluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutledge, G.P. [Central Environmental, Inc., Anchorage, AK (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Three unusual incidents and case histories involving uranium hexafluoride in the enrichment facilities of the USA in the late 1940`s and early 1950`s are presented. The history of the measurements of the thermal expansion of liquids containing fluorine atoms within the molecule is reviewed with special emphasis upon uranium hexafluoride. A comparison is made between fluorinated esters, fluorocarbons, and uranium hexafluoride. The quantitative relationship between the thermal expansion coefficient, a, of liquids and the critical temperature, T{sub c} is presented. Uranium hexafluoride has an a that is very high in a temperature range that is used by laboratory and production workers - much higher than any other liquid measured. This physical property of UF{sub 6} has resulted in accidents involving filling the UF{sub 6} containers too full and then heating with a resulting rupture of the container. Such an incident at a uranium gaseous diffusion plant is presented. Production workers seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} uranium hexafluoride. The movement of UF{sub 6} from one container to another is usually trailed by weight, not sight. Even laboratory scientists seldom {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} solid or liquid UF{sub 6} and this can be a problem at times. This inability to {open_quotes}see{close_quotes} the UF{sub 6}-HF mixtures in the 61.2{degrees}C to 101{degrees}C temperature range caused a delay in the understanding of the phase diagram of UF{sub 6}-HF which has a liquid - liquid immiscible region that made the eutectic composition somewhat elusive. Transparent fluorothene tubes solved the problem both for the UF{sub 6}-HF phase diagram as well as the UF{sub 6}-HF-CIF{sub 3} phase diagram with a miscibility gap starting at 53{degrees}C. The historical background leading to the first use of CIF{sub 3} to produce UF{sub 6} in both the laboratory and plant at K-25 is presented.

  7. Nanoscale characterization of solution-cast poly(vinylidene fluoride) thinfilms using atomic force microscopy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jee, Tae Kwon

    2007-04-25

    This thesis research focuses on the characterization of thinfilms made of poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) using an atomic force microscope. Thinfilms of PVDF were fabricated by a spin coating method with different conditions and characterized using...

  8. Giantically blue-shifted visible light in femtosecond mid-IR filament in fluorides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dormidonov, A E; Chekalin, S V; Kandidov, V P

    2015-01-01

    A giant blue shift of an isolated visible band of supercontinuum was discovered and studied in the single filament regime of Mid-IR femtosecond laser pulse at powers slightly exceeding critical power for self-focusing in fluorides.

  9. Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, A.M.

    1999-02-10

    This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

  10. Surface characterization of polyvinylidene fluoride (pvdf) in its application as an actuator 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mani, Saikumar

    2009-05-15

    Polyvinylidene Fluoride (PVDF) is a common piezoelectric polymer. It is widely utilized because of its advantageous mechanical, chemical, and electromechanical properties. An interesting application for its properties lies in using it as an actuator...

  11. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    FitzPatrick, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Dunn, Jerry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1987-01-01

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF.sub.4 is not further oxidized to AmF.sub.6 by the application of O.sub.2 F at room temperature, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF.sub.6, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride.

  12. Physical approaches to controlling the fluoride content of fish protein concentrate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Muhammad Asadur

    1968-01-01

    PHYSICAL APPROACHES TO CONTROLLING THE FLUORIDE CONTENT OF FISH PROTEIN CONCENTRATE A Thesis By Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May... 1968 Major Subject: Wildlife Science PHYSICAL APPROACHES TO CONTROLLING THE FLUORIDE CONTENT OF FISH PROTEIN CONCENTRATE A Thesis By Approved as to style and cont t by: airman of Committee Co-c n of Committee Member ead apartment Mem r May...

  13. Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    FitzPatrick, J.R.; Dunn, J.G.; Avens, L.R.

    1987-02-13

    Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF/sub 4/ is not further oxidized to AmF/sub 6/ by the application of O/sub 2/F at room temperature thereto, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF/sub 6/, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride thereof.

  14. Excitation functions of the natTa(p,x)178m2Hf and natW(p,x)178m2Hf reactions at energies up to 2600 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titarenko, Yu. E.; Batyaev, V. F.; Pavlov, K. V.; Titarenko, A. Yu.; Zhivun, V. M.; Chauzova, M. V.; Ignatyuk, A. V.; Mashnik, Stepan Georgievich; Leray, S.; Boudard, A.; David, J. -C.; Mancusi, D.; Cugnon, J.; Yariv, Y.; Nishihara, K.; Matsuda, N.; Kumawat, H.; Stankovskiy, A. Yu.

    2015-04-29

    Due to potential level of energy intensity 178m2Hf is an extremely interesting isomer. One possible way to produce this isomer is irradiation of natTa or natW samples with high energy protons. Irradiation of natTa or natW samples performed for other purposes provides an opportunity to study the corresponding reactions. This paper presents the 178m2Hf independent production cross sections for both targets measured by the gamma-ray spectrometry method. The reaction excitation functions have been obtained for the proton energies from 40 up to 2600 MeV. The experimental results were compared with calculations by various versions of the intranuclear cascade model in the well-known codes: ISABEL, Bertini, INCL4.5+ABLA07, PHITS, CASCADE07 and CEM03.02. The isomer ratio for the natTa(p,x) 178m2Hf reaction is evaluated on the basis of the available data.

  15. Thermally-driven H interaction with HfO{sub 2} films deposited on Ge(100) and Si(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soares, G. V. Feijó, T. O.; Baumvol, I. J. R.; Aguzzoli, C.; Krug, C.; Radtke, C.

    2014-01-27

    In the present work, we investigated the thermally-driven H incorporation in HfO{sub 2} films deposited on Si and Ge substrates. Two regimes for deuterium (D) uptake were identified, attributed to D bonded near the HfO{sub 2}/substrate interface region (at 300?°C) and through the whole HfO{sub 2} layer (400–600?°C). Films deposited on Si presented higher D amounts for all investigated temperatures, as well as, a higher resistance for D desorption. Moreover, HfO{sub 2} films underwent structural changes during annealings, influencing D incorporation. The semiconductor substrate plays a key role in this process.

  16. On stability of self-sustained volume discharge in working mixtures of non-chain electrochemical HF laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belevtsev, A A; Kazantsev, S Yu; Konov, I G; Lebedev, A A; Podlesnykh, S V; Firsov, K N

    2011-08-31

    Burning voltage of a self-sustained volume discharge (SSVD) is studied as a function of the specific energy deposition in SF{sub 5} with C{sub 2}-H{sub 6} and H{sub 2} mixtures, which are working media of a non-chain electrochemical HF laser. It is established that the voltage rises linearly with increasing the specific energy deposition, the relative voltage rise in the SF{sub 6}-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} mixtures being noticeably higher than in pure SF{sub 6} and SF{sub 6}-H{sub 2} mixtures. An assumption is suggested and substantiated on determining the role of molecule dissociation by the electron impact leading to the observed voltage rise. From experimental data we have found approximate energy expenditures of producing dissociation fragments including atomic fluorine in a discharge in pure SF{sub 6}: E-tilde {sub d}(F)= 5{+-}1 eV. The values of E{sub d} well agree with literature data obtained by other experimental methods. A conclusion is drawn that the dissociation process is the main mechanism limiting the current density, which implies SSVD realisation without preliminary gas ionisation in working mixtures of a non-chain HF laser and determines a higher stability of the volume discharge in mixtures of SF{sub 6} with hydrocarbons (deuterocarbons) as compared to mixtures with hydrogen (deuterium). A method is suggested and substantiated for numerical estimation of the limitation effect of the current density and its influence on the SSVD stability. (control of radiation parameters)

  17. Fluoride-elicited developmental testicular toxicity in rats: Roles of endoplasmic reticulum stress and inflammatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Shun; Jiang, Chunyang; Liu, Hongliang; Guan, Zhizhong; Zeng, Qiang; Zhang, Cheng; Lei, Rongrong; Xia, Tao; Gao, Hui; Yang, Lu; Chen, Yihu; Wu, Xue; Zhang, Xiaofei; Cui, Yushan; Yu, Linyu; Wang, Zhenglun; Wang, Aiguo

    2013-09-01

    Long-term excessive fluoride intake is known to be toxic and can damage a variety of organs and tissues in the human body. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying fluoride-induced male reproductive toxicity are not well understood. In this study, we used a rat model to simulate the situations of human exposure and aimed to evaluate the roles of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammatory response in fluoride-induced testicular injury. Sprague–Dawley rats were administered with sodium fluoride (NaF) at 25, 50 and 100 mg/L via drinking water from pre-pregnancy to gestation, birth and finally to post-puberty. And then the testes of male offspring were studied at 8 weeks of age. Our results demonstrated that fluoride treatment increased MDA accumulation, decreased SOD activity, and enhanced germ cell apoptosis. In addition, fluoride elevated mRNA and protein levels of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), inositol requiring ER-to-nucleus signal kinase 1 (IRE1), and C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), indicating activation of ER stress signaling. Furthermore, fluoride also induced testicular inflammation, as manifested by gene up-regulation of tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?), interleukin-1? (IL-1?), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), in a nuclear factor-?B (NF-?B)-dependent manner. These were associated with marked histopathological lesions including injury of spermatogonia, decrease of spermatocytes and absence of elongated spermatids, as well as severe ultrastructural abnormalities in testes. Taken together, our results provide compelling evidence that ER stress and inflammation would be novel and significant mechanisms responsible for fluoride-induced disturbance of spermatogenesis and germ cell loss in addition to oxidative stress. - Highlights: • We used a rat model to simulate the situations of human fluoride (F) exposure. • Developmental F exposure induces testicular damage related with oxidative stress. • Endoplasmic reticulum stress is involved in testis disorder and germ cell apoptosis. • Inflammatory response is implicated in impaired spermatogenesis and germ cell loss.

  18. Triaxial strongly deformed bands in {sup 164}Hf and the effect of elevated yrast line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Wenchao

    2012-10-20

    Two exotic rotational bands have been identified in {sup 164}Hf and linked to known states. They are interpreted as being associated with the calculated triaxial strongly deformed (TSD) potential energy minimum. The bands are substantially stronger and are located at much lower spins than the previously discovered TSD bands in {sup 168}Hf. In addition to the proton and neutron shell gaps at large trixiality, it was proposed that the relative excitation energy of TSD bands above the yrast line plays an important role in the population of TSD bands.

  19. Hydrocarbon reaction with HF-cleaned Si(lOQ) and effects on metal-oxide-semiconductor device quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubloff, Gary W.

    Hydrocarbon reaction with HF-cleaned Si(lOQ) and effects on metal-oxide-semiconductor device-cleaned Si( 100) towards hydrocarbon adsorption is examined by surface analysis; most hydrocarbons adsorb oxidation after HF treatment.4'5 In this letter, passivation against hydrocarbon contamination is studied

  20. Chromosome aberrations and mutations in sorghum induced by dimethyl-sulfoxide, ethylmethane-sulfonate, sodium fluoride and colchicine 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Seudy

    1968-01-01

    sorghum nith diamthyl?sulfonide, ethylmsthanamulfocate, colchicine, sodium fluoride acd their combinstione at various concentrations. different methods of txeatment sere also studied. 'lhe reduction of plant grouch and emergence was related... in ~ ~ following with ethyhmethsne-sulfonate ljeiosis in ~ ~ following tresteent with ethylesthsne-sulfonate (1 to 4) or dieethyl- sulfoxide (g snd 6) . . . . . . . . . . . . . gy Ssiosis in ~ ~ fol4wing txesteent with eekiwe fluoride...

  1. Effect of temperature on the complexation of Uranium(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Guoxin; Rao, Linfeng

    2009-05-18

    Complexation of U(VI) with fluoride at elevated temperatures in aqueous solutions was studied by spectrophotometry. Four successive complexes, UO{sub 2}F{sup +}, UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}(aq), UO{sub 2}F{sub 3}{sup -}, and UO{sub 2}F{sub 4}{sup 2-}, were identified, and the stability constants at 25, 40, 55, and 70 C were calculated. The stability of the complexes increased as the temperature was elevated. The enthalpies of complexation at 25 C were determined by microcalorimetry. Thermodynamic parameters indicate that the complexation of U(VI) with fluoride in aqueous solutions at 25 to 70 C is slightly endothermic and entropy-driven. The Specific Ion Interaction (SIT) approach was used to obtain the thermodynamic parameters of complexation at infinite dilution. Structural information on the U(VI)/fluoride complexes was obtained by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  3. Automatic Calibrations for Improved Quality Assurance of Coastal HF Radar Currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    to the public via the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (USIOOS): http://www.ioos.gov/hfradar/. These real Monitoring, Monitoring Harmful Algal Blooms, Fisheries Management, Modeling, Marine Navigation, Ocean Energy. INTRODUCTION Currently, over 130 HF radar units are providing coastal surface current maps to the public via

  4. Zr-Hf separation based on a molten salt/metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Zr-Hf separation based on a molten salt/metal equilibrium )URP ROGIDVKLRQHG Ã?DVKEXOEV to newfangled. These involve complicated multistep batch processes. This new purification method is based on molten salt to raw zirconium and hafnium metal, so a molten metal stream can be achieved and tin chloride salts

  5. HF Multiresonant Electronic Ballast for Fluorescent Lamps with Constant Filament Preheat Voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    HF Multiresonant Electronic Ballast for Fluorescent Lamps with Constant Filament Preheat Voltage resonance arrangement that acts as a current source. During warm up the filaments are driven by a secondary the filament and shorts out the voltage across the lamp. Simulation and experimental results suggest

  6. Adsorbate shape selectivity: Separation of the HF/134a azeotrope over carbogenic molecular sieve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong, A.; Mariwala, R.K.; Kane, M.S.; Foley, H.C. [Univ. of Delaware, Nework, DE (United States)

    1995-03-01

    Experimental evidence is provided for adsorptive shape selectivity in the separation of the azeotrope between HF and 1,1,1,2-tetrafluoroethane (134a) over pyrolyzed poly(furfuryl alcohol)-derived carbogenic molecular sieve (PPFA-CMS). The separation can be accomplished over coconut charcoal or Carbosieve G on the basis of the differences in the extent of equilibrium adsorption of HF and 134a. On these adsorbents 134a is more strongly bound than HF, thus it elutes much more slowly from the bed. The heat of adsorption for 134a in the vicinity of 200 C on Carbosieve G is {approximately}8.8 kcal/mol. In contrast, when the same azeotropic mixture is separated over PPFA-CMS prepared at 500 C, 134a is not adsorbed. As a result 134a elutes from the bed first, followed by HF. The reversal is brought about by the narrower pore size and pore size distribution of the PPFA-CMS versus that for Carbosieve G. Thus the separation over PPFA-CMS is an example of adsorbate shape selectivity and represents a limiting case of kinetic separation.

  7. INTEROPERABILITY AND PERFORMANCE ISSUES IN HF E-MAIL Eric E. Johnson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    INTEROPERABILITY AND PERFORMANCE ISSUES IN HF E-MAIL Eric E. Johnson New Mexico State University exceed those experi- enced in the wired Internet. Beyond the delays imposed by low data bandwidths network.) · The Simple Mail Transfer Protocol SMTP [RFC-821] is the standard within the Internet. Its

  8. Numerical investigation of mid-infrared Raman soliton source generation in endless single mode fluoride fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lai; Qin, Guan-Shi, E-mail: qings@jlu.edu.cn; Tian, Qi-jun; Zhao, Dan; Qin, Wei-Ping, E-mail: wpqin@jlu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-04-28

    We numerically investigate Raman soliton generation in a fluoride photonic crystal fiber (PCF) pumped by 1.93 ?m femtosecond fiber lasers in order to get widely tunable laser source in the mid-infrared region. The simulated results show that a continuously tunable range (1.93???3.95??m) over 2000?nm is achieved in 1-m-long fluoride PCF pumped by a 1.93??m femtosecond fiber laser with a pulse width of 200 fs. The power conversion efficiency is also calculated and the maximum efficiency can be up to 84.27%.

  9. Effect of glycine on chromosomal aberrations of Allium cepa L. root tips caused by sodium fluoride 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abid, Adeeba Al-Shahwani

    1967-01-01

    EFFECT OF GLYCINE ON CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS OF ALLIUM CEPA L ~ ROOT TIPS CAUSED BY SODIUM FLUORIDE A Thesis By Adeeba Al-Shahvani Abid Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject Genetics EFFECT OF GLYCINE ON CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS OF ALLIUM CEPA L, ROOT TIPS CAUSED BY SODIUM FLUORIDE A Thesis By Adeeba Al-Shahwani Abid Approved as to style and content by: ( airman...

  10. The structure of oxygen difluoride and an attempted preparation of cyanogen fluoride 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hilton, Albert Ray

    1959-01-01

    was observed in the first reaction, while CF^ was found in the product of the second. D. FCIO^ + ICN 220?C no reaction FCIO^ + KCN 220?C no reaction FCIO^ + BrCN 220?C > no reaction Attempts were made to react perchloryl fluoride with ICN, KCN, and Br...THE STRUCTURE OF OXYGEN DIFLUORIDE AND AN ATTEMPTED PREPARATION OF CYANOGEN FLUORIDE A DISSERTATION BY A. RAY HILTON Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas partial fulfillment of the requirements...

  11. Transitions of bandgap and built-in stress for sputtered HfZnO thin films after thermal treatments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Chih-Hung; Chen, Jian-Zhang [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Institute of Applied Mechanics, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China); Cheng, I-Chun [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China)] [Graduate Institute of Photonics and Optoelectronics and Department of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei City 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2013-08-28

    HfZnO thin films with various Hf contents are sputter-deposited on glass substrates from Hf{sub x}Zn{sub 1?x}O (x = 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5, and 10 at. %) targets at room temperature. The incorporation of Hf in the ZnO film leads to the amorphorization of the materials. The amorphous structures of high-Hf-content films remain after annealing at 600 °C for 30 min. The built-in stresses of as-deposited films are compressive. As the annealing temperature increases, the stresses are relaxed and even become tensile. The films exhibit a high transmission of 80% in the visible region. The optical bandgap increases with the Hf content, but it decreases with the annealing temperature. This can be attributed to the alteration of strain (stress) status in the films and atomic substitution. The reduction of bandgap partly results from the grain growth, which is due to the quantum confinement effect of the small grains. Hf doping increases the resistivity of ZnO owing to the disorder of the material structure and the higher bandgap, which result in more carrier traps and less thermally excited carriers in the conduction bands.

  12. Low-temperature specific heat measurement of a ferroelectric copolymer film of vinylidene fluoride and trifluoroethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei, Eva Y.

    Low-temperature specific heat measurement of a ferroelectric copolymer film of vinylidene fluoride; published 13 February 2004 The specific heat of a highly crystallized ferroelectric copolymer film to the pyroelectric coefficient in this temperature range. The specific heat data also show a rapid transition from

  13. W deposition and titanium fluoride formation during WF6 reduction by Ti: Reaction path and mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Leslie H.

    W deposition and titanium fluoride formation during WF6 reduction by Ti: Reaction path, Materials Research Laboratory, and Department of Materials Science, University of Illinois, 1304 West Green Street, Urbana, Illinois 61801 V. C. Hornback and D. J. Allman Symbios Logic Incorporated, 1635 Aeroplaza

  14. Radiolytic Effects on Fluoride Impurities in a U{sub 3}O{sub 8} Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Icenhour, A.S.

    2000-05-01

    The safe handling and storage of radioactive materials require an understanding of the effects of radiolysis on those materials. Radiolysis may result in the production of gases (e.g., corrosives) or pressures that are deleterious to storage containers. A study has been performed to address these concerns as they relate to the radiolysis of residual fluoride compounds in uranium oxides.

  15. PILOT-SCALE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS USING VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R. A.; Pak, D. J.

    2012-09-11

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. In 2011, SRNL adapted the technology for the removal of fluoride from fluoride-bearing salts. The method involved an in situ reaction between potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the fluoride salt to yield potassium fluoride (KF) and the corresponding oxide. The KF and excess KOH can be distilled below 1000{deg}C using vacuum salt distillation (VSD). The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated by a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attaned, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile material in the feed boat. Studies discussed in this report were performed involving the use of non-radioactive simulants in small-scale and pilot-scale systems as well as radioactive testing of a small-scale system with plutonium-bearing materials. Aspects of interest include removable liner design considerations, boat materials, in-line moisture absorption, and salt deposition.

  16. Fluoride removal in the presence of organophosphates: application to chemical warfare agent destruction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenaas, Christopher Eric

    1996-01-01

    affinity for alumina, even at high pH, and in the presence of IMPA and MPA. A design using multiple columns containing fluidized beds of alumina placed prior to biological treatment was chosen as a likely reactor configuration. By placing the fluoride...

  17. The system ammonium fluoride - cupric fluoride - water at zero degrees centigrade: A program for calculating the rotational spectrum of an asymmetric-top molecule in the microwave region on the IBM 650 digital computer. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beal, James Burton

    1959-01-01

    TSE 8TSTBN ANNCEIUN FLUORIDE - CUPRIC FLUORIDE WATER AT ZERO UBCRR88 CRETIORADB A PROORAN FOR CALCULATINO T88 ROTATIONAL SPBCTRUN OP AN ASXNNETRIC TOP NOLECULE IE TKH NXCRCWAVE REOXQE OE THE IEN 650 QIQITAL CONPUTER A THESI8 Jaaes Burton Baal...YOSIUN PIIIORIDE CUPRIC FLUORIDE MATER AT EBRO DESRSES CESTIORADR A PROSRAN POR CALCULATI?G THE ROTATIOSAL SPECTRUN OP AI ASINNRTRZO TOP NOLRCULB IS THE NICROMAVE REOIGS ~ OW THE IRK 650 DIOITAL CONPSTRR A THSSZS Janee Rurton Seal, Jr, Approved ae to etre...

  18. High resolution gas phase infrared spectroscopy of the hydrogen bonded complex HCN---HF and its deuterated isotopic species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Marc William

    1987-01-01

    Scan Over a Portion of the u6 Band 1 System of HCiV---HF 59 The Central Portion of the u6 Band of HCN- ? -HF 1 Showing the 3 Assignment of the Q-branch and a Portion of the P-branch 1 A Portion of the R-branch of the u6 Band of HCN---HF 60 10 A... region. Reported herein is the analysis of the rovibrational substructure of the ul(D-F), u2(C-D) and w3 (C=N) predissociating stretching vibrations of DCiV---DF. Numerous molecular constants were determined for these fundamentals along with a total...

  19. An Experimental Test Facility to Support Development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L; Aaron, Adam M; Cunningham, Richard Burns; Fugate, David L; Holcomb, David Eugene; Kisner, Roger A; Peretz, Fred J; Robb, Kevin R; Wilgen, John B; Wilson, Dane F

    2014-01-01

    The need for high-temperature (greater than 600 C) energy exchange and delivery systems is significantly increasing as the world strives to improve energy efficiency and develop alternatives to petroleum-based fuels. Liquid fluoride salts are one of the few energy transport fluids that have the capability of operating at high temperatures in combination with low system pressures. The Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor design uses fluoride salt to remove core heat and interface with a power conversion system. Although a significant amount of experimentation has been performed with these salts, specific aspects of this reactor concept will require experimental confirmation during the development process. The experimental facility described here has been constructed to support the development of the Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor concept. The facility is capable of operating at up to 700 C and incorporates a centrifugal pump to circulate FLiNaK salt through a removable test section. A unique inductive heating technique is used to apply heat to the test section, allowing heat transfer testing to be performed. An air-cooled heat exchanger removes added heat. Supporting loop infrastructure includes a pressure control system; trace heating system; and a complement of instrumentation to measure salt flow, temperatures, and pressures around the loop. The initial experiment is aimed at measuring fluoride salt heat transfer inside a heated pebble bed similar to that used for the core of the pebble bed advanced high-temperature reactor. This document describes the details of the loop design, auxiliary systems used to support the facility, the inductive heating system, and facility capabilities.

  20. Method for producing nanostructured metal-oxides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tillotson, Thomas M.; Simpson, Randall L.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Gash, Alexander

    2006-01-17

    A synthetic route for producing nanostructure metal-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing. This procedure employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-metal inorganic salts and environmentally friendly solvents such as water and ethanol. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by the addition of a proton scavenger, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively. Using this method synthesis of metal-oxide nanostructured materials have been carried out using inorganic salts, such as of Fe.sup.3+, Cr.sup.3+, Al.sup.3+, Ga.sup.3+, In.sup.3+, Hf.sup.4+, Sn.sup.4+, Zr.sup.4+, Nb.sup.5+, W.sup.6+, Pr.sup.3+, Er.sup.3+, Nd.sup.3+, Ce.sup.3+, U.sup.3+ and Y.sup.3+. The process is general and nanostructured metal-oxides from the following elements of the periodic table can be made: Groups 2 through 13, part of Group 14 (germanium, tin, lead), part of Group 15 (antimony, bismuth), part of Group 16 (polonium), and the lanthanides and actinides. The sol-gel processing allows for the addition of insoluble materials (e.g., metals or polymers) to the viscous sol, just before gelation, to produce a uniformly distributed nanocomposites upon gelation. As an example, energetic nanocomposites of Fe.sub.xO.sub.y gel with distributed Al metal are readily made. The compositions are stable, safe, and can be readily ignited to thermitic reaction.

  1. GEO 600 and the GEO-HF upgrade program: successes and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, K L; Adams, T; Affeldt, C; Bisht, A; Bogan, C; Degallaix, J; Gräf, C; Hild, S; Hough, J; Khalaidovski, A; Lastzka, N; Lough, J; Lück, H; Macleod, D; Nuttall, L; Prijatelj, M; Schnabel, R; Schreiber, E; Slutsky, J; Sorazu, B; Strain, K A; Vahlbruch, H; Was, M; Willke, B; Wittel, H; Danzmann, K; Grote, H

    2015-01-01

    The German-British laser-interferometric gravitational wave detector GEO 600 is in its 14th year of operation since its first lock in 2001. After GEO 600 participated in science runs with other first-generation detectors, a program known as GEO-HF began in 2009. The goal was to improve the detector sensitivity at high frequencies with technologically advanced yet minimally invasive upgrades. Simultaneously, the detector would record science quality data in between commissioning activities. As of early 2014, all of the planned upgrades have been carried out and sensitivity improvements of up to a factor of four at the high-frequency end of the observation band have been achieved. Besides science data collection, an experimental program is ongoing with the goal to further improve the sensitivity and evaluate future detector technologies. We summarize the results of the GEO-HF program to date and discuss its successes and challenges.

  2. Shape memory response and microstructural evolution of a severe plastically deformed high temperature shape memory alloy (NiTiHf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Anish Abraham

    2006-04-12

    NiTiHf alloys have attracted considerable attention as potential high temperature Shape Memory Alloy (SMA) but the instability in transformation temperatures and significant irrecoverable strain during thermal cycling under constant stress remains a...

  3. HF Radar Performance in a Low-Energy Environment: CODAR SeaSonde Experience on the West Florida Shelf*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    both tidal and subtidal frequency bands. By examining the HF radar radial velocities at low wave energy have evolved along with coastal ocean circulation-observing technologies. Early inferences on surface

  4. Electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface: Band offsets and oxygen dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KC, Santosh; Dong, Hong; Longo, Roberto C.; Xiong, Ka [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Wang, Weichao [Department of Electronics and Microelectronics and Tianjin Key Laboratory of Photo-Electronic Thin Film Device and Technology, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Wallace, Robert M.; Cho, Kyeongjae, E-mail: kjcho@utdallas.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2014-01-14

    Using ab-initio methods, atomic structures and electronic properties of InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are studied within the framework of density functional theory. We examine the InP/HfO{sub 2} model interface electronic structures under varying oxidation conditions. The effects of indium and phosphorous concentrations on interfacial bonding, defect states, band offsets, and the thermodynamic stability at the interface are also investigated. The origin of interfacial gap states in InP (001)/HfO{sub 2} (001) interface are proposed, mainly from the P-rich oxides, which is validated by our experimental work. This highlights the importance of surface passivation prior to high-? deposition based on the in situ spectroscopic results of atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP.

  5. Coexistence of different charge states in Ta-doped monoclinic HfO2: Theoretical and experimental approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svane, Axel Torstein

    and with the addition of small amounts of impurities, it has applications ranging from solid oxide fuel cell attention due to its potential technological applications. HfO2 is a wide-band- gap semiconductor

  6. Mode specificity in the HF + OH ? F + H{sub 2}O reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hongwei; Li, Jun; Guo, Hua

    2014-10-28

    Full-dimensional quantum dynamics and quasi-classical trajectory calculations are reported for the title reaction on a recently constructed ab initio based global potential energy surface. Strong mode specificity was found, consistent with the prediction of the sudden vector projection model. Specifically, the HF vibration strongly promotes the reaction while the OH vibration has little effect. Rotational excitations of both reactants slightly enhance the reaction.

  7. Method of producing hydrogen

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Wilding, Bruce M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-12-26

    A method of producing hydrogen is disclosed and which includes providing a first composition; providing a second composition; reacting the first and second compositions together to produce a chemical hydride; providing a liquid and reacting the chemical hydride with the liquid in a manner to produce a high pressure hydrogen gas and a byproduct which includes the first composition; and reusing the first composition formed as a byproduct in a subsequent chemical reaction to form additional chemical hydride.

  8. {sup 252}Cf-source-correlated transmission measurements for uranyl fluoride deposit in a 24-in.-OD process pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E.; Mullens, J.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Instrumentation and Controls Div.; Wyatt, M.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Hannon, T.F. [Central Engineering Services, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-06-01

    Characterization of a hydrated uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{center_dot}nH{sub 2}O) deposit in a 17-ft-long, 24-in.-OD process pipe at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant was successfully performed by using {sup 252}Cf-source-correlated time-of-flight (TOF) transmission measurements. These measurements of neutrons and gamma rays through the pipe from an external {sup 2521}Cf fission source were used to measure the deposit profile and its distribution along the pipe, the hydration (or H/U), and the total uranium mass. The measurements were performed with a source in an ionization chamber on one side of the pipe and detectors on the other. Scanning the pipe vertically and horizontally produced a spatial and time-dependent radiograph of the deposit in which transmitted gamma rays and neutrons were separated in time. The cross-correlation function between the source and the detector was measured with the Nuclear Weapons Identification System. After correcting for pipe effects, the deposit thickness was determined from the transmitted neutrons and H/U from the gamma rays. Results were consistent with a later intrusive observation of the shape and the color of the deposit; i.e., the deposit was annular and was on the top of the pipe at some locations, demonstrating the usefulness of this method for deposit characterization.

  9. Enantioselective Nucleophile-Catalyzed Synthesis of Tertiary Alkyl Fluorides via the ?-Fluorination of Ketenes: Synthetic and Mechanistic Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sarah Yunmi

    The catalytic asymmetric synthesis of alkyl fluorides, particularly ?-fluorocarbonyl compounds, has been the focus of substantial effort in recent years. While significant progress has been described in the formation of ...

  10. Impact of pH on the removal of fluoride, nitrate and boron by nanofiltration/reverse osmosis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Laura A.; Vuachère, Marion; Schäfer, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact of pH on boron, fluoride, and nitrate retention by comparing modelled speciation predictions with retention using six different nanofiltration (NF) and reverse osmosis ...

  11. Preventing fuel failure for a beyond design basis accident in a fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minck, Matthew J. (Matthew Joseph)

    2013-01-01

    The fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR) combines high-temperature coated-particle fuel with a high-temperature salt coolant for a reactor with unique market and safety characteristics. This combination can ...

  12. Investigation and design of a secure, transportable fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (TFHR) for isolated locations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ruaridh (Ruaridh R.)

    2014-01-01

    In this work we describe a preliminary design for a transportable fluoride salt cooled high temperature reactor (TFHR) intended for use as a variable output heat and electricity source for off-grid locations. The goals of ...

  13. Tritium production analysis and management strategies for a Fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature test reactor (FHTR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, Judy N

    2013-01-01

    The Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) is a test reactor concept that aims to demonstrate the neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, materials, tritium management, and to address other reactor operational ...

  14. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

    2011-08-10

    Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current activities are concerned with the removal of the halide ions associated with plutonium trifluoride (PuF{sub 3}), plutonium tetrafluoride (PuF{sub 4}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). This report discusses non-radioactive testing of small-scale and pilot-scale systems and radioactive testing of a small-scale system. Experiments focused on demonstrating the chemistry for halide removal and addressing the primary engineering questions associated with a change in the process chemistry.

  15. Variable dimensionality in the uranium fluoride/2-methyl-piperazine system: Synthesis and structures of UFO-5, -6, and -7; Zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials with unprecedented topologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, R.J.; Halasyamani, P.S.; Bee, J.S.; O'Hare, D.

    1999-02-24

    Recently, low temperature (T < 300 C) hydrothermal reactions of inorganic precursors in the presence of organic cations have proven highly productive for the synthesis of novel solid-state materials. Interest in these materials is driven by the astonishingly diverse range of structures produced, as well as by their many potential materials chemistry applications. This report describes the high yield, phase pure hydrothermal syntheses of three new uranium fluoride phases with unprecedented structure types. Through the systematic control of the synthesis conditions the authors have successfully controlled the architecture and dimensionality of the phase formed and selectively synthesized novel zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials.

  16. Nuclear quantum effects in water exchange around lithium and fluoride ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkins, David M; Dang, Liem X

    2015-01-01

    We employ classical and ring polymer molecular dynamics simulations to study the effect of nuclear quantum fluctuations on the structure and the water exchange dynamics of aqueous solutions of lithium and fluoride ions. While we obtain reasonably good agreement with experimental data for solutions of lithium by augmenting the Coulombic interactions between the ion and the water molecules with a standard Lennard-Jones ion-oxygen potential, the same is not true for solutions of fluoride, for which we find that a potential with a softer repulsive wall gives much better agreement. A small degree of destabilization of the first hydration shell is found in quantum simulations of both ions when compared with classical simulations, with the shell becoming less sharply defined and the mean residence time of the water molecules in the shell decreasing. In line with these modest differences, we find that the mechanisms of the exchange processes are unaffected by quantization, so a classical description of these reaction...

  17. Determination of shower central position in laterally segmented lead-fluoride electromagnetic calorimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Mazouz; L. Ghedira; E. Voutier

    2015-10-02

    The spatial resolution of laterally segmented electromagnetic calorimeters is studied on the basis of Monte-Carlo simulations worked-out for lead fluoride material. Parametrization of the relative resolution is proposed and optimized in terms of the energy of incoming particles and the elementary size of the calorimeter blocks. A new fit algorithm method is proposed that improves spatial resolution at high energies, and provides guidance for the design optimization of electromagnetic calorimeters.

  18. PEG/Ion -Scoring Sheet 1. 0.2 M Sodium Fluoride, 20% PEG 3350

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Chris

    3350 23. 0.2 M Ammonium Formate, 20% PEG 3350 24. 0.2 M Lithium Acetate, 20% PEG 3350 25. 0.2 M Acetate, 20% PEG 3350 31. 0.2 M Lithium Sulfate, 20% PEG 3350 32. 0.2 M Magnesium Sulfate, 20% PEG 3350 33 3350 3. 0.2 M Ammonium Fluoride, 20% PEG 3350 4. 0.2 M Lithium Chloride, 20% PEG 3350 5. 0.2 M

  19. pH effect on the separation of uranium fluoride effluents by the reverse osmosis process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun Chen ); Min-Lin Chu; Mu-Chang Shieh , Lung-tan, )

    1992-04-01

    Ammonium fluoride solutions and uranium fluoride effluents (UFE) with solute concentrations from 0.101 to 7,920 kg/m{sup 3}, at pH 2.80 to 9.60, have been treated with a continuous feedback reverse osmosis (RO) process. The solute rejections of NH{sub 4}{sup +}, F{sup {minus}}, and U{sup 6+} depend heavily on the feed pH value. For ammonium fluoride solutions, the rejection ratio of NH{sub 4}{sup +} decreases sharply from ca. 90 to 44.2% with the feed pH increased from 3.30 to 9.60, while that of F{sup {minus}} increases abruptly from 44.8 to 99.9% at the same pH change. For UFE solutions, the rejection ratio of U{sup 6+} remains greater than 90% at pH 2.80-7.13, while that of F{sup {minus}} decreases steadily from 96.4 to 18.8% with decreasing feed pH. Accordingly, the fluoride ions can be separated from UFE solutions under acidic conditions. The changes of solute rejection with feed pH can be explained by the different solubilities of the solutes in the membrane at different pH values. The UFE solutions with {alpha} and {beta} activities at 20.4-53.7 and 8.99-21.3 ({times} 10{sup 5} Baq/m{sup 3}) can be reduced to a level lower than 2.41 and 3.37 ({times}10{sup 5} Baq/m{sup 3}), respectively, by the current RO process.

  20. Determination of shower central position in laterally segmented lead-fluoride electromagnetic calorimeters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazouz, M; Voutier, E

    2015-01-01

    The spatial resolution of laterally segmented electromagnetic calorimeters is studied on the basis of Monte-Carlo simulations worked-out for lead fluoride material. Parametrization of the relative resolution is proposed and optimized in terms of the energy of incoming particles and the elementary size of the calorimeter blocks. A new fit algorithm method is proposed that improves spatial resolution at high energies, and provides guidance for the design optimization of electromagnetic calorimeters.

  1. Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

  2. Performance enhancement of GaN metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet photodetectors by insertion of ultrathin interfacial HfO{sub 2} layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Manoj E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr; Tekcan, Burak; Okyay, Ali Kemal E-mail: aokyay@ee.bilkent.edu.tr

    2015-03-15

    The authors demonstrate improved device performance of GaN metal–semiconductor–metal ultraviolet (UV) photodetectors (PDs) by ultrathin HfO{sub 2} (UT-HfO{sub 2}) layer on GaN. The UT-HfO{sub 2} interfacial layer is grown by atomic layer deposition. The dark current of the PDs with UT-HfO{sub 2} is significantly reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to those without HfO{sub 2} insertion. The photoresponsivity at 360?nm is as high as 1.42 A/W biased at 5 V. An excellent improvement in the performance of the devices is ascribed to allowed electron injection through UT-HfO{sub 2} on GaN interface under UV illumination, resulting in the photocurrent gain with fast response time.

  3. Beyond Conventional Cathode Materials for Li-ion Batteries and Na-ion Batteries Nickel fluoride conversion materials and P2 type Na-ion intercalation cathodes /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dae Hoe

    2013-01-01

    Electrode for Sodium Ion Batteries. Chemistry of Materialsnickel fluoride in Li ion batteries. Electrochimica Actafor advanced lithium ion batteries. Materials Science and

  4. Beyond Conventional Cathode Materials for Li-ion Batteries and Na-ion Batteries Nickel fluoride conversion materials and P2 type Na-ion intercalation cathodes /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Dae Hoe

    2013-01-01

    lithium batteries. Electrochemistry Communications 9, 262 (Amatucci, Structure and Electrochemistry of Copper FluorideLi-ion battery, Fe2OF4. Electrochemistry Communications 11,

  5. HF-based etching processes for improving laser damage resistance of fused silica optical surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suratwala, T I; Miller, P E; Bude, J D; Steele, R A; Shen, N; Monticelli, M V; Feit, M D; Laurence, T A; Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Wong, L L

    2010-02-23

    The effect of various HF-based etching processes on the laser damage resistance of scratched fused silica surfaces has been investigated. Conventionally polished and subsequently scratched fused silica plates were treated by submerging in various HF-based etchants (HF or NH{sub 4}F:HF at various ratios and concentrations) under different process conditions (e.g., agitation frequencies, etch times, rinse conditions, and environmental cleanliness). Subsequently, the laser damage resistance (at 351 or 355 nm) of the treated surface was measured. The laser damage resistance was found to be strongly process dependent and scaled inversely with scratch width. The etching process was optimized to remove or prevent the presence of identified precursors (chemical impurities, fracture surfaces, and silica-based redeposit) known to lead to laser damage initiation. The redeposit precursor was reduced (and hence the damage threshold was increased) by: (1) increasing the SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-} solubility through reduction in the NH4F concentration and impurity cation impurities, and (2) improving the mass transport of reaction product (SiF{sub 6}{sup 2-}) (using high frequency ultrasonic agitation and excessive spray rinsing) away from the etched surface. A 2D finite element crack-etching and rinsing mass transport model (incorporating diffusion and advection) was used to predict reaction product concentration. The predictions are consistent with the experimentally observed process trends. The laser damage thresholds also increased with etched amount (up to {approx}30 {micro}m), which has been attributed to: (1) etching through lateral cracks where there is poor acid penetration, and (2) increasing the crack opening resulting in increased mass transport rates. With the optimized etch process, laser damage resistance increased dramatically; the average threshold fluence for damage initiation for 30 {micro}m wide scratches increased from 7 to 41 J/cm{sup 2}, and the statistical probability of damage initiation at 12 J/cm{sup 2} of an ensemble of scratches decreased from {approx}100 mm{sup -1} of scratch length to {approx}0.001 mm{sup -1}.

  6. Effects of ZrO{sub 2} doping on HfO{sub 2} resistive switching memory characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryu, Seung Wook; Kwac, Jungsuk; Nishi, Yoshio [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Cho, Seongjae, E-mail: felixcho@gachon.ac.kr [Department of Electronic Engineering and New Technology Component and Material Research Center (NCMRC), Gachon University, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi-do 461-741 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joonsuk [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Kim, Hyeong Joon [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Inter-university Semiconductor Research Center (ISRC), Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-18

    A resistive switching (RS) random access memory device with ZrO{sub 2}-doped HfO{sub 2} exhibits better RS performance than that with pure HfO{sub 2}. In particular, I{sub res}, V{sub res}, and V{sub set} are reduced by approximately 58%, 38%, and 39%, respectively, when HfO{sub 2} is doped with ZrO{sub 2} (9 at.?%). In addition, the ZrO{sub 2} doping in HfO{sub 2} makes the distribution of most parameters steeper. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis reveals that the deposited zirconium-doped hafnium oxide (HZO) (9 at.?%) is polycrystalline. Elemental mapping results by scanning TEM–energy dispersive spectroscopy also prove that ZrO{sub 2} is uniformly distributed in the HZO (9 at.?%) film. The possible mechanism for the improvement in the RS characteristics is also suggested on the basis of the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy results and filamentary RS mechanism. These results suggest that the ZrO{sub 2} doping into HfO{sub 2} likely not only will reduce power consumption but also will improve cyclic endurance by controlling the nonstoichiometric phase.

  7. Current-induced spin-orbit torque switching of perpendicularly magnetized Hf|CoFeB|MgO and Hf|CoFeB|TaO{sub x} structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyol, Mustafa; Yu, Guoqiang; Alzate, Juan G.; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Li, Xiang; Wong, Kin L.; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Wang, Kang L.; Ekicibil, Ahmet

    2015-04-20

    We study the effect of the oxide layer on current-induced perpendicular magnetization switching properties in Hf|CoFeB|MgO and Hf|CoFeB|TaO{sub x} tri-layers. The studied structures exhibit broken in-plane inversion symmetry due to a wedged CoFeB layer, resulting in a field-like spin-orbit torque (SOT), which can be quantified by a perpendicular (out-of-plane) effective magnetic field. A clear difference in the magnitude of this effective magnetic field (H{sub z}{sup FL}) was observed between these two structures. In particular, while the current-driven deterministic perpendicular magnetic switching was observed at zero magnetic bias field in Hf|CoFeB|MgO, an external magnetic field is necessary to switch the CoFeB layer deterministically in Hf|CoFeB|TaO{sub x}. Based on the experimental results, the SOT magnitude (H{sub z}{sup FL} per current density) in Hf|CoFeB|MgO (?14.12?Oe/10{sup 7} A cm{sup ?2}) was found to be almost 13× larger than that in Hf|CoFeB|TaO{sub x} (?1.05?Oe/10{sup 7} A cm{sup ?2}). The CoFeB thickness dependence of the magnetic switching behavior, and the resulting ?H{sub z}{sup FL} generated by in-plane currents are also investigated in this work.

  8. Accident prevention and Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 with particular reference to anhydrous hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, G.D. (Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States))

    1993-07-01

    The sections of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990 that refer to accident prevention are to be found in Title III. Two significant requirements of the CAAA in this respect relate to the responsibilities of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), which has promulgated a new Process Safety Management (PSM) standard and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), which at the time of writing, is developing Risk Management Program (RMP) regulations. The focus of this paper is on how the requirements of the CAAA may affect the reasons for performing a Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) or may affect the results of QRA. In order to limit the discussion, this paper focuses on HF. First, the CAAA requires that the EPA assess the hazards associated with HF; the EPA's current draft report is discussed. Second, a generic assessment of the risks associated with the use of HF is given, with emphasis on alkylation units in refineries. The principal contributors to risk are listed. Finally, an assessment of OSHA's PSM standard 29 CFR 1910.119, the related requirements of state laws such as California's Risk Management and Prevention Program and the potential requirement of EPA's Risk Management Program are given, including an assessment of how these requirements may influence quantitative estimates of risk. 13 refs., 1 fig.

  9. Process for producing silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, Jerry M. (Lakewood, CO); Carleton, Karen L. (Boulder, CO)

    1984-01-01

    A process for producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  10. Method of producing imines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sithambaram, Shanthakumar (Storrs, CT); Son, Young-Chan (Storrs, CT); Suib, Steven L. (Storrs, CT)

    2008-04-08

    A method for forming an imine comprises reacting a first reactant comprising a hydroxyl functionality, a carbonyl functionality, or both a hydroxyl functionality and a carbonyl functionality with a second reactant having an amine functionality in the presence of ordered porous manganese-based octahedral molecular sieves and an oxygen containing gas at a temperature and for a time sufficient for the imine to be produced.

  11. Process for producing silicon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Olson, J.M.; Carleton, K.L.

    1982-06-10

    A process of producing silicon includes forming an alloy of copper and silicon and positioning the alloy in a dried, molten salt electrolyte to form a solid anode structure therein. An electrically conductive cathode is placed in the electrolyte for plating silicon thereon. The electrolyte is then purified to remove dissolved oxides. Finally, an electrical potential is applied between the anode and cathode in an amount sufficient to form substantially pure silicon on the cathode in the form of substantially dense, coherent deposits.

  12. Reactions of aluminum with uranium fluorides and oxyfluorides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leitnaker, J.M.; Nichols, R.W.; Lankford, B.S. [Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1991-12-31

    Every 30 to 40 million operating hours a destructive reaction is observed in one of the {approximately}4000 large compressors that move UF{sub 6} through the gaseous diffusion plants. Despite its infrequency, such a reaction can be costly in terms of equipment and time. Laboratory experiments reveal that the presence of moderate pressures of UF{sub 6} actually cools heated aluminum, although thermodynamic calculations indicate the potential for a 3000-4000{degrees}C temperature rise. Within a narrow and rather low (<100 torr; 1 torr = 133.322 Pa) pressure range, however, the aluminum is seen to react with sufficient heat release to soften an alumina boat. Three things must occur in order for aluminum to react vigorously with either UF{sub 6} or UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}. 1. An initiating source of heat must be provided. In the compressors, this source can be friction, permitted by disruption of the balance of the large rotating part or by creep of the aluminum during a high-temperature treatment. In the absence of this heat source, compressors have operated for 40 years in UF{sub 6} without significant reaction. 2. The film protecting the aluminum must be breached. Melting (of UF{sub 5} at 620 K or aluminum at 930 K) can cause such a breach in laboratory experiments. In contrast, holding Al samples in UF{sub 6} at 870 K for several hours produces only moderate reaction. Rubbing in the cascade can undoubtedly breach the protective film. 3. Reaction products must not build up and smother the reaction. While uranium products tend to dissolve or dissipate in molten aluminum, AIF{sub 3} shows a remarkable tendency to surround and hence protect even molten aluminum. Hence the initial temperature rise must be rapid and sufficient to move reactants into a temperature region in which products are removed from the reaction site.

  13. Fluoride adsorption on goethite in relation to different types of surface sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiemstra, T.; Van Riemsdijk, W.H.

    2000-05-01

    Metal (hydr)oxides have different types of surface groups. Fluoride ions have been used as a probe to assess the number of surface sites. The authors have studied the F{sup {minus}} adsorption on goethite by measuring the F{sup {minus}} and H{sup +} interaction and F{sup {minus}} adsorption isotherms. Fluoride ions exchange against singly coordinated surface hydroxyls at low F{sup {minus}} concentrations. At higher concentrations also the doubly coordinated OH groups are involved. The replacement of a surface OH{sup {minus}} by F{sup {minus}} suggests that all F charge ({minus}1) is located at the surface in contrast to oxyanions which have a charge distribution in the interface due to the binding structure in which the anion only partially coordinates with the surface. Analysis of their F{sup {minus}} data with the CD-MUSIC approach shows that the formation of the fluoride surface complex is accompanied by a redistribution of charge. This is supposed to be due to a net switch in the H bonding as a result of the change of the type of surface complex from donating (FeOH, FeOH{sub 2}) to proton accepting (FeF). The modeled redistribution of charge is approximately equivalent with the change of a donating H bond into an accepting H bond. At high F{sup {minus}} concentrations precipitation of F{sup {minus}}, as for instance FeF{sub 3}(s), may occur. The rate of formation is catalyzed by the presence of high electrolyte concentrations.

  14. DANCE : a 4[pi] barium fluoride detector for measuring neutron capture on unstable nuclei /.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullmann, J. L. (John L.); Haight, Robert C.; Hunt, L. F. (Lloyd F.); Reifarth, R. (Rene); Rundberg, R. S. (Robert S.); Bredeweg, T. A. (Todd A); Fowler, Malcolm M.; Miller, G. G. (Geoffrey G.); Heil, M.; Käppeler, F. (Franz); Chamberlin, E. P. (Edwin P.)

    2002-01-01

    Measurements of neutron capture on unstable nuclei are important for studies of s-process nucleosynthesis, nuclear waste transmutation, and stewardship science. A 160-element, 4{pi} barium fluoride detector array, and associated neutron flight path, is being constructed to make capture measurements at the moderated neutron spallation source at LANSCE. Measurements can be made on as little as 1 mg of sample material over energies from near thermal to near 100 keV. The design of the DANCE array is described and neutron flux measurements from flight path commissioning are shown. The array is expected to be complete by the end of 2002.

  15. Methods of using ionic liquids having a fluoride anion as solvents

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pagoria, Philip (Livermore, CA); Maiti, Amitesh (San Ramon, CA); Gash, Alexander (Brentwood, CA); Han, Thomas Yong (Pleasanton, CA); Orme, Christine (Oakland, CA); Fried, Laurence (Livermore, CA)

    2011-12-06

    A method in one embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having a fluoride anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of about 90.degree. C. or less during the contacting. A method in another embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having an acetate or formate anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of less than about 90.degree. C. during the contacting.

  16. Investigation of the use of an Er:YAG laser and a fluoride glass fiber for laser angioplasty 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwark, Bongsin

    1989-01-01

    INVESTIGATION OF THE USE OF AN ER:YAG LASER AND A FLUORIDE ClLASS FIBER FOR LASER ANGIOPLASTY A Thes&s BONC'SIN KA'ARK Submitted to the Office of Clraduate Sturlies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of 'tIASTER OF SGIEVCE December Iqg9 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering INVESTIGATION OF THE IJSE OF AN ER:YAG LASER. AND A FLUORIDE GLASS FIBER FOR LASER ANGIOPLASTY A Thesis bi BONGSIN I~AVARI~ Approved as to style and content by: ry...

  17. An analysis of crystal structure of selected rare earth fluorides by means of electron diffraction and transmission 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Dennis Brannon

    1967-01-01

    AN ANALYSIS OF CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF SELECTED RARE EARTH FLUORIDES BY MEANS OF ELECTRON DIFFRACTION AND TRANSMISSION A Thesis by DENNIS BRANNON BARR Submitted to the Graduate College of the T e~a s All M Univ e r s ity in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1967 Major Subject: Physics AN ANALYSIS OF CRYSTAL STRUCTURE OF SELECTED RARE EARTH FLUORIDES BY MEANS OF ELECTRON DIFFRACTION AND TRANSMISSION A Thesis by DENNIS BRANNON BARR Approved...

  18. The Long Wavelength Array (LWA): A Large HF/VHF Array for Solar Physics, Ionospheric Science, and Solar Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    be an excellent receiver for solar radar, potentially demonstrating accurate geomagnetic storm prediction fromThe Long Wavelength Array (LWA): A Large HF/VHF Array for Solar Physics, Ionospheric Science, and Solar Radar A Ground-Based Instrument Paper for the 2010 NRC Decadal Survey of Solar and Space

  19. The Long Wavelength Array (LWA): A Large HF/VHF Array for Solar Physics, Ionospheric Science, and Solar Radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellingson, Steven W.

    construction in New Mexico, and discuss the scientific goals of the project in the areas of solar, ionosphericThe Long Wavelength Array (LWA): A Large HF/VHF Array for Solar Physics, Ionospheric Science, and Solar Radar Namir E. Kassim Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 Stephen M. White AFRL

  20. PHYSICAL REVIEW C 83, 067303 (2011) Deformation and its influence on K isomerism in neutron-rich Hf nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    2011-01-01

    around N = 116, using configuration-constrained calculations of potential-energy surfaces. Despite having energy (2.4 MeV) in the isomer has been associated with proposals for a clean reservoir of nuclear energy reduced shape elongation, the multiquasiparticle states in 186,188 Hf remain moderately robust against

  1. Role of hydrogen in Ge/HfO2/Al gate stacks subjected to negative bias temperature instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Misra, Durgamadhab "Durga"

    Role of hydrogen in Ge/HfO2/Al gate stacks subjected to negative bias temperature instability N 2007; published online 17 January 2008 This work investigates the role of hydrogen and nitrogen in a Ge. Virtually unchanged interface state density as a function of NBTI indicates no atomic hydrogen release from

  2. Computational investigation of the phase stability and the electronic properties for Gd-doped HfO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L. G. [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States); Xiong, Y.; Xiao, W.; Cheng, L.; Du, J.; Tu, H. [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Walle, A. van de [Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2014-05-19

    Rare earth doping is an important approach to improve the desired properties of high-k gate dielectric oxides. We have carried out a comprehensive theoretical investigation on the phase stability, band gap, formation of oxygen vacancies, and dielectric properties for the Gd-doped HfO{sub 2}. Our calculated results indicate that the tetragonal phase is more stable than the monoclinic phase when the Gd doping concentration is greater than 15.5%, which is in a good agreement with the experimental observations. The dopant's geometric effect is mainly responsible for the phase stability. The Gd doping enlarges the band gap of the material. The dielectric constant for the Gd-doped HfO{sub 2} is in the range of 20–30 that is suitable for high-k dielectric applications. The neutral oxygen vacancy formation energy is 3.2?eV lower in the doped material than in pure HfO{sub 2}. We explain the experimental observation on the decrease of photoluminescence intensities in the Gd-doped HfO{sub 2} according to forming the dopant-oxygen vacancy complexes.

  3. Analytical Potential Energy Surface for the Na + HF NaF + H reaction: Application of Conventional Transition-State Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analytical Potential Energy Surface for the Na + HF NaF + H reaction: Application of Conventional Transition-State Theory Alessandra F. A. Vilela, Ricardo Gargano a Patr´icia R.P. Barreto b a Instituto de from calculation of the rate constant using con- ventional Transition State Theory (TST

  4. Numerical prediction of the thermodynamic properties of ternary Al-Ni-Hf alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanowska, Jolanta; Kotowski, S?awomir; Zagula-Yavorska, Maryana

    2014-10-06

    Thermodynamic properties of ternary Al-Hf-Ni system, such as {sup ex}G, ?{sub Al}, ?{sub Ni} and ?{sub Zr} at 1373K were predicted on the basis of thermodynamic properties of binary systems included in the investigated ternary system. The idea of predicting {sup ex}G values was regarded as the calculation of excess Gibbs energy values inside a certain area (a Gibbs triangle) unless all boundary conditions, that is values of {sup ex}G on all legs of the triangle are known. {sup ex}G and L{sub ijk} ternary interaction parameters in the Muggianu extension of the Redlich-Kister formalism are calculated numerically using Wolfram Mathematica 9 software.

  5. Produce diesel from gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singleton, A.H.; Regier, S.

    1983-05-01

    The Gulf Badger process converts natural gas directly to hydrocarbon liquids by a catalytic chemical route. Fischer-Tropsch process--which is a carbon monoxide polymerization/ hydrogenation process--is used. Because the process is exothermal, heat removal by either tubular fixed bed, fluidized bed, or slurry are considered. A wax build up of high molecular weight material is removed by hydro-stripping two-bed system. The demonstration plant flow diagram shows the process to be: natural gas is compressed, recycled with CO/sub 2/, sulfur is removed in a zinc oxide drum, CO is removed in amine scrubbers, H/sub 2//CO ratio is adjusted to produce a hydrogen rich stream, and stabilization and distribution follow. A monitoring system using computers is part of the demonstration unit.

  6. System for treating produced water

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

    2010-08-03

    A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

  7. Effect of Phosphate, Fluoride, and Nitrate on Gibbsite Dissolution Rate and Solubility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herting, Daniel L.

    2014-01-29

    Laboratory tests have been completed with simulated tank waste samples to investigate the effects of phosphate, fluoride, and nitrate on the dissolution rate and equilibrium solubility of gibbsite in sodium hydroxide solution at 22 and 40{degrees}C. Results are compared to relevant literature data and to computer model predictions. The presence of sodium nitrate (3 M) caused a reduction in the rate of gibbsite dissolution in NaOH, but a modest increase in the equilibrium solubility of aluminum. The increase in solubility was not as large, though, as the increase predicted by the computer model. The presence of phosphate, either as sodium phosphate or sodium fluoride phosphate, had a negligible effect on the rate of gibbsite dissolution, but caused a slight increase in aluminum solubility. The magnitude of the increased solubility, relative to the increase caused by sodium nitrate, suggests that the increase is due to ionic strength (or water activity) effects, rather than being associated with the specific ion involved. The computer model predicted that phosphate would cause a slight decrease in aluminum solubility, suggesting some Al-PO4 interaction. No evidence was found of such an interaction.

  8. A literature review on the chemical and physical properties of uranyl fluoride (UO sub 2 F sub 2 )

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, W.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1990-08-01

    This report reviews the preparation and properties of uranyl fluoride. Data are given on the crystal structure, solubility in water, specific gravity, density, specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, acidity, corrosion properties, and refractive indices. Empirical formulas are given to calculate specific gravity, density of aqueous solutions, molal volume, and refractive indices. 13 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

  9. A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nielsen, Steven O.

    A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

  10. Methods for producing complex films, and films produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duty, Chad E.; Bennett, Charlee J. C.; Moon, Ji -Won; Phelps, Tommy J.; Blue, Craig A.; Dai, Quanqin; Hu, Michael Z.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jellison, Jr., Gerald E.; Love, Lonnie J.; Ott, Ronald D.; Parish, Chad M.; Walker, Steven

    2015-11-24

    A method for producing a film, the method comprising melting a layer of precursor particles on a substrate until at least a portion of the melted particles are planarized and merged to produce the film. The invention is also directed to a method for producing a photovoltaic film, the method comprising depositing particles having a photovoltaic or other property onto a substrate, and affixing the particles to the substrate, wherein the particles may or may not be subsequently melted. Also described herein are films produced by these methods, methods for producing a patterned film on a substrate, and methods for producing a multilayer structure.

  11. Total ionizing dose effect of ?-ray radiation on the switching characteristics and filament stability of HfOx resistive random access memory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Runchen; Yu, Shimeng; Gonzalez Velo, Yago; Chen, Wenhao; Holbert, Keith E.; Kozicki, Michael N.; Barnaby, Hugh

    2014-05-05

    The total ionizing dose (TID) effect of gamma-ray (?-ray) irradiation on HfOx based resistive random access memory was investigated by electrical and material characterizations. The memory states can sustain TID level ?5.2 Mrad (HfO{sub 2}) without significant change in the functionality or the switching characteristics under pulse cycling. However, the stability of the filament is weakened after irradiation as memory states are more vulnerable to flipping under the electrical stress. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was performed to ascertain the physical mechanism of the stability degradation, which is attributed to the Hf-O bond breaking by the high-energy ?-ray exposure.

  12. Detailed optical characterization of a near diffraction limited xenon fluoride laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Londono, C. ); Smith, M.J.; Trainor, D.W.; Itzkan, I. ); Berggren, R. ); Fulghum, S.F. )

    1988-12-01

    A 1 m gain length, electron beam pumped xenon fluoride laser (lambda = 353, 351 nm) utilizing two laser mixtures of lean and rich NF/sub 3/, with Xe and balance Ne, was operated with a confocal unstable resonator with magnification of 2.24. The resultant beam quality was diagnosed with both shearing interferometry to measure near-field phase and far-field focal spot evaluation techniques. These measurements resulted in a beam quality of <1.15 times the diffraction limit with no evidence of the wide angle energy loss. This laser device was fully characterized with regard to electron beam deposition uniformity, transient refractive index effects, and optical quality of the resonator and diagnostic components.

  13. Temperature requirements and corrosion rates in combustion driven hydrogen fluoride supersonic diffusion lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nordine, P.C.

    1983-08-01

    A maximum F-atom yield from F2 occurs in a combustion driven hydrogen fluoride supersonic diffusion laser (HFSDL) because the amount of fluorine reacted with hydrogen (or deuterium) continues to increase with temperature after most of the unreacted fluorine has been thermally dissociated. A small decease from the maximum combustor F-atom yield allows a significant decease in the required temperature and in the corrosion rates that uncooled laser nozzles would display. The temperatures that give F-atom yields equal to 95 percent of the maximum values were calculated for typical HFSDL combustor pressures and F-atom mole fractions and the corrosion rates of uncooled nozzles were evaluated at these temperatures. The corrosion rates of materials resistant to fluorine attack at the highest temperatures would allow HFSDL applications or test experiments up to several hours duration.

  14. Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcomb, David Eugene; Flanagan, George F; Mays, Gary T; Pointer, William David; Robb, Kevin R; Yoder Jr, Graydon L

    2013-11-01

    Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

  15. Effect of the oxide layer on current-induced spin-orbit torques in Hf|CoFeB|MgO and Hf|CoFeB|TaO{sub x} structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akyol, Mustafa; Alzate, Juan G.; Yu, Guoqiang; Upadhyaya, Pramey; Wong, Kin L.; Khalili Amiri, Pedram; Wang, Kang L.; Ekicibil, Ahmet

    2015-01-19

    We study the effect of the oxide layer on the current-induced spin-orbit torques (SOTs) in perpendicularly magnetized Hf|CoFeB|MgO (MgO-capped) or Hf|CoFeB|TaO{sub x} (TaO{sub x}-capped) structures. The effective fields corresponding to both the field-like and damping-like current-induced SOTs are characterized using electric transport measurements. Both torques are found to be significantly stronger in MgO-capped structures than those in TaO{sub x}-capped structures. The difference in field-like and damping-like SOTs in the different structures may be attributed to the different Rashba-like Hamiltonian, arising from the difference in the electric potential profiles across the oxide|ferromagnet interfaces in the two cases, as well as possible structural and oxidation differences in the underlying CoFeB and Hf layers. Our results show that the oxide layer in heavy-metal|ferromagnet|oxide trilayer structures has a very significant effect on the generated SOTs for manipulation of ferromagnetic layers. These findings could potentially be used to engineer SOT devices with enhanced current-induced switching efficiency.

  16. Morphology and chemical termination of HF-etched Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Li-Hong; Debenedetti, William J. I.; Peixoto, Tatiana; Gokalp, Sumeyra; Shafiq, Natis; Veyan, Jean-François; Chabal, Yves J.; Michalak, David J.; Hourani, Rami

    2014-12-29

    Several reports on the chemical termination of silicon nitride films after HF etching, an important process in the microelectronics industry, are inconsistent claiming N-H{sub x}, Si-H, or fluorine termination. An investigation combining infrared and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopies with atomic force and scanning electron microscopy imaging reveals that under some processing conditions, salt microcrystals are formed and stabilized on the surface, resulting from products of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} etching. Rinsing in deionized water immediately after HF etching for at least 30?s avoids such deposition and yields a smooth surface without evidence of Si-H termination. Instead, fluorine and oxygen are found to terminate a sizeable fraction of the surface in the form of Si-F and possibly Si-OH bonds. The relatively unique fluorine termination is remarkably stable in both air and water and could lead to further chemical functionalization pathways.

  17. Calculations of the cross sections for the neutron acceleration, slowing down, and capture by the isomer "OmHf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlyakhter, Ilya

    Calculations of the cross sections for the neutron acceleration, slowing down, and capture for the isomer lsomHf in the energy range of the incoming neutron from 1keV to 5 MeV. Below 0.7 MeV the energy transferred to the neutron in the collision is positive on the average, i.e., the isomer is acting

  18. Report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alain Blondel; Alex Chao; Weiren Chou; Jie Gao; Daniel Schulte; Kaoru Yokoya

    2013-02-15

    This paper is a summary report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012). It discusses four types of accelerators as possible candidates for a Higgs factory: linear e+e- colliders, circular e+e- colliders, muon collider and photon colliders. The comparison includes: physics reach, performance (energy and luminosity), upgrade potential, technology maturity and readiness, and technical challenges requiring further R&D.

  19. N-body simulations of oligarchic growth of Mars: Implications for Hf-W chronology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morishima, Ryuji; Samuel, Henri

    2013-01-01

    Dauphas and Pourmand (2011) [Nature 473, 489--492] estimated the accretion timescale of Mars to be 1.8 $^{+0.9}_{-1.0}$ Myr from the W isotopes of martian meteorites. This timescale was derived assuming perfect metal-silicate equilibration between the impactor and the target's mantle. However, in the case of a small impactor most likely only a fraction of the target's mantle is involved in the equilibration, while only a small part of the impactor's core equilibrates in the case of a giant impact. We examined the effects of imperfect equilibration using results of high-resolution $N$-body simulations for the oligarchic growth stage. These effects were found to be small as long as a planetary embryo has a deep liquid magma ocean during its accretion. The effect due to partial involvement of the target's mantle in equilibration is small due to the low metal-silicate partition coefficient for W suggested from the low Hf/W ratio of the martian mantle. The effect due to partial involvement of the impactor's core i...

  20. Temperature dependent structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of sputtered deposited HfO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dave, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Roorkee (India); Institute Instrumentation Centre, IIT Roorkee (India); Dubey, P.; Chandra, R. [Institute Instrumentation Centre, IIT Roorkee (India); Gupta, H. O. [Department of Electrical Engineering, IIT Roorkee (India)

    2014-01-28

    Hafnium oxide being high-k dielectric has been successfully utilized in electronic and optical applications. Being thermodynamically stable and having good mechanical strength, it can be used as a protective coating for outdoor HV insulators which are suffering from surface flashover problem due to contamination. In this paper, we are investigating the effect of substrate temperature on structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of hafnium oxide coating deposited over glass insulators by DC magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction is applied to determine the crystalline phase and crystallite size of the film. The morphology of the samples is examined using atomic force microscopy. The optical properties are studied using UV-vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The wettability of the film is investigated using contact angle meter. The thickness is measured using surface profilometer and verified through optical data. The relationship between substrate temperature with grain size, roughness, refractive index, and hydrophobicity is manifested. The maximum contact angle for HfO{sub 2} film was found to be 106° at 400°C.

  1. Experiments and theory on parametric instabilities excited in HF heating experiments at HAARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Spencer; Snyder, Arnold; Lee, M. C.

    2014-06-15

    Parametric instabilities excited by O-mode HF heater and the induced ionospheric modification were explored via HAARP digisonde operated in a fast mode. The impact of excited Langmuir waves and upper hybrid waves on the ionosphere are manifested by bumps in the virtual spread, which expand the ionogram echoes upward as much as 140?km and the downward range spread of the sounding echoes, which exceeds 50?km over a significant frequency range. The theory of parametric instabilities is presented. The theory identifies the ionogram bump located between the 3.2?MHz heater frequency and the upper hybrid resonance frequency and the bump below the upper hybrid resonance frequency to be associated with the Langmuir and upper hybrid instabilities, respectively. The Langmuir bump is located close to the upper hybrid resonance frequency, rather than to the heater frequency, consistent with the theory. Each bump in the virtual height spread of the ionogram is similar to the cusp occurring in daytime ionograms at the E-F2 layer transition, indicating that there is a small ledge in the density profile similar to E-F2 layer transitions. The experimental results also show that the strong impact of the upper hybrid instability on the ionosphere can suppress the Langmuir instability.

  2. Assessment of the Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride for Purifying Coolant and Heat Transfer Salts in the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.

    2010-09-28

    This report provides an assessment of the use of nitrogen trifluoride for removing oxide and water-caused contaminants in the fluoride salts that will be used as coolants in a molten salt cooled reactor.

  3. Features of the band structure and conduction mechanisms in the n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with Ru

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaka, V. A.; Rogl, P.; Romaka, V. V.; Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Korzh, R. O.; Krayovskyy, V. Ya.; Horyn, A. M.

    2014-12-15

    The crystal and electronic structure and energy and kinetic properties of the n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with a Ru acceptor impurity are investigated in the temperature and Ru concentration ranges T = 80–400 K and N{sub A}{sup Ru} ? 9.5 × 10{sup 19}?5.7 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup ?3} (x = 0–0.03), respectively. The mechanism of structural-defect generation is established, which changes the band gap and degree of compensation of the semiconductor and consists in the simultaneous concentration reduction and elimination of donor structural defects by means of the displacement of ?1% of Ni atoms from the Hf (4a) positions, the generation of acceptor structural defects upon the substitution of Ru atoms for Ni atoms in the 4c positions, and the generation of donor defects in the form of vacancies in the Sn (4b) positions. The calculated electronic structure of HfNi{sub 1?x}Ru{sub x}Sn is consistent with the experiment. The results obtained are discussed within the Shklovsky-Efros model for a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  4. The rate constant for radiative association of HF: Comparing quantum and classical dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustafsson, Magnus, E-mail: magngu@chem.gu.se; Monge-Palacios, M.; Nyman, Gunnar [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)] [Department of Chemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Gothenburg, 41296 Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2014-05-14

    Radiative association for the formation of hydrogen fluoride through the A{sup 1}? ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} and X{sup 1}?{sup +} ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} transitions is studied using quantum and classical dynamics. The total thermal rate constant is obtained for temperatures from 10 K to 20 000 K. Agreement between semiclassical and quantum approaches is observed for the A{sup 1}? ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} rate constant above 2000 K. The agreement is explained by the fact that the corresponding cross section is free of resonances for this system. At temperatures below 2000 K we improve the agreement by implementing a simplified semiclassical expression for the rate constant, which includes a quantum corrected pair distribution. The rate coefficient for the X{sup 1}?{sup +} ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} transition is calculated using Breit–Wigner theory and a classical formula for the resonance and direct contributions, respectively. In comparison with quantum calculations the classical formula appears to overestimate the direct contribution to the rate constant by about 12% for this transition. Below about 450 K the resonance contribution is larger than the direct, and above that temperature the opposite holds. The biggest contribution from resonances is at the lowest temperature in the study, 10 K, where it is more than four times larger than the direct. Below 1800 K the radiative association rate constant due to X{sup 1}?{sup +} ? X{sup 1}?{sup +} transitions dominates over A{sup 1}? ? X{sup 1}?{sup +}, while above that temperature the situation is the opposite.

  5. Displacement of the proton in hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride by beryllium and magnesium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDowell, Sean A. C. [Department of Biological and Chemical Sciences, University of the West Indies, Cave Hill Campus (Barbados)

    2009-05-14

    The displacement of the proton by a beryllium ion and by a magnesium ion from hydrogen-bonded complexes of hydrogen fluoride, of varying hydrogen bond strengths, was investigated theoretically using ab initio methods. Stable metal-containing species were obtained from all of the hydrogen-bonded complexes regardless of the strength of the hydrogen bond. It was found that the beryllium ion was energetically very effective in displacing the proton from hydrogen bonds, whereas the magnesium ion was unable to do so. The high stability of the beryllium-containing complexes is mainly due to the strong electrostatic bonding between the beryllium and fluoride atoms. This work supports the recent finding from a multidisciplinary bioinorganic study that beryllium displaces the proton in many strong hydrogen bonds.

  6. Carbide Coatings for Nickel Alloys, Graphite and Carbon/Carbon Composites to be used in Fluoride Salt Valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagle, Denis; Zhang, Dajie

    2015-10-22

    The focus of this research was concerned with developing materials technology that supports the evolution of Generation IV Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) concepts. Specifically, we investigate refractory carbide coatings for 1) nickel alloys, and 2) commercial carbon-carbon composites (CCCs). Numerous compelling reasons have driven us to focus on carbon and carbide materials. First, unlike metals, the strength and modulus of CCCs increase with rising temperature. Secondly, graphite and carbon composites have been proven effective for resisting highly corrosive fluoride melts such as molten cryolite [Na3AlF6] at ~1000oC in aluminum reduction cells. Thirdly, graphite and carbide materials exhibit extraordinary radiation damage tolerance and stability up to 2000°C. Finally, carbides are thermodynamically more stable in liquid fluoride salt than the corresponding metals (i.e. Cr and Zr) found in nickel based alloys.

  7. Method of producing submicron size particles and product produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourne, R.S.; Eichman, C.C.; Welbon, W.W.

    1988-05-11

    Submicron size particles are produced by using a sputtering process to deposit particles into a liquid. The liquid is processed to recover the particles therefrom, and the particles have sizes in the range of twenty to two hundred Angstroms. Either metallic or non-metallic particles can be produced, and the metallic particles can be used in ''metallic inks.'' 4 figs.

  8. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, W., E-mail: guowei1982cry@163.com [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ma, H.A.; Jia, X. [National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  9. APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

    2011-11-01

    Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

  10. Method for producing a borohydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2008-09-02

    A method for producing a borohydride is described and which includes the steps of providing a source of borate; providing a material which chemically reduces the source of the borate to produce a borohydride; and reacting the source of borate and the material by supplying heat at a temperature which substantially effects the production of the borohydride.

  11. Method for producing a borohydride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C.

    2010-06-22

    A method for producing a borohydride is described that includes the steps of providing a source of borate; providing a material that chemically reduces the source of the borate to produce a borohydride; and reacting the source of the borate and the material by supplying heat at a temperature that substantially effects the production of the borohydride.

  12. Method of producing molybdenum-99

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2013-05-28

    Method of producing molybdenum-99, comprising accelerating ions by means of an accelerator; directing the ions onto a metal target so as to generate neutrons having an energy of greater than 10 MeV; directing the neutrons through a converter material comprising techentium-99 to produce a mixture comprising molybdenum-99; and, chemically extracting the molybdenum-99 from the mixture.

  13. Energy-Efficient, High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride and Fluoride Phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur, A.; Radkov, E; Henderson, C; Her, J; Srivastava, A; Karkada, N; Kishore, M; Kumar, N; Aesram, D; et al.

    2010-01-01

    LED lamps using phosphor downconversion can be designed to replace incandescent or halogen sources with a 'warm-white' correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2700-3200 K and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90. However, these lamps have efficacies of {approx}70% of standard 'cool-white' LED packages (CCT = 4500-6000 K; CRI = 75-80). In this report, we describe structural and luminescence properties of fluoride and oxyfluoride phosphors, specifically a (Sr,Ca){sub 3}(Al,Si)O{sub 4}(F,O):Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green phosphor and a K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} red phosphor, that can reduce this gap and therefore meet the spectral and efficiency requirements for high-efficacy LED lighting. LED lamps with a warm-white color temperature (3088 K), high CRI (90), and an efficacy of {approx}82 lm/W are demonstrated using these phosphors. This efficacy is {approx}85% of comparable cool-white lamps using typical Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}-based phosphors, significantly reducing the efficacy gap between warm-white and cool-white LED lamps that use phosphor downconversion.

  14. Pulsed power considerations for electron beam pumped krypton fluoride lasers for inertial confinement fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, E.A.; McDonald, T.E.; Rosocha, L.A.; Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Smith, I.D. (Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program is developing the krypton-fluoride excimer laser for use as an ICF driver. The KrF laser has a number of inherent characteristics that make it a promising driver candidate, such as short wavelength (0.25 {mu}m), broad bandwidth to target (>100 cm{sup {minus}1}), pulse-shaping with high dynamic range, and the potential for high overall efficiency (>5%) and repetitive operation. The large KrF laser amplifiers needed for ICF drivers are electron-beam pumped. A key issue for all laser ICF drivers is cost, and a leading cost component of a KrF laser driver is associated with the pulsed power and electron diode. Therefore, the efficient generation of electron beams is a high priority. The Los Alamos ICF program is investigating pulsed-power and diode designs and technologies to further the development of affordable KrF laser ICF drivers. 12 refs., 8 figs.

  15. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H.C.

    1997-12-30

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  16. Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

    1997-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  17. Methods of producing cesium-131

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meikrantz, David H; Snyder, John R

    2012-09-18

    Methods of producing cesium-131. The method comprises dissolving at least one non-irradiated barium source in water or a nitric acid solution to produce a barium target solution. The barium target solution is irradiated with neutron radiation to produce cesium-131, which is removed from the barium target solution. The cesium-131 is complexed with a calixarene compound to separate the cesium-131 from the barium target solution. A liquid:liquid extraction device or extraction column is used to separate the cesium-131 from the barium target solution.

  18. Microorganisms for producing organic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-09-30

    Organic acid-producing microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-producing microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, acrylic acid, propionic acid, lactic acid, and others. Further modifications to the microorganisms increase production of such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others. Methods of producing such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid, lactate, and others with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers are also provided.

  19. Thickness independent reduced forming voltage in oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2} based resistive switching memories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharath, S. U. Kurian, J.; Komissinskiy, P.; Hildebrandt, E.; Alff, L.; Bertaud, T.; Walczyk, C.; Calka, P.; Schroeder, T.

    2014-08-18

    The conducting filament forming voltage of stoichiometric hafnium oxide based resistive switching layers increases linearly with layer thickness. Using strongly reduced oxygen deficient hafnium oxide thin films grown on polycrystalline TiN/Si(001) substrates, the thickness dependence of the forming voltage is strongly suppressed. Instead, an almost constant forming voltage of about 3?V is observed up to 200?nm layer thickness. This effect suggests that filament formation and switching occurs for all samples in an oxidized HfO{sub 2} surface layer of a few nanometer thickness while the highly oxygen deficient thin film itself merely serves as a oxygen vacancy reservoir.

  20. Controlled oxygen vacancy induced p-type conductivity in HfO{sub 2-x} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrandt, Erwin; Kurian, Jose; Mueller, Mathis M.; Kleebe, Hans-Joachim; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Schroeder, Thomas [IHP, 15236 Frankfurt/Oder (Germany)

    2011-09-12

    We have synthesized highly oxygen deficient HfO{sub 2-x} thin films by controlled oxygen engineering using reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Above a threshold value of oxygen vacancies, p-type conductivity sets in with up to 6 times 10{sup 21} charge carriers per cm{sup 3}. At the same time, the band-gap is reduced continuously by more than 1 eV. We suggest an oxygen vacancy induced p-type defect band as origin of the observed behavior.

  1. Physical properties and band structure of reactive molecular beam epitaxy grown oxygen engineered HfO{sub 2{+-}x}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hildebrandt, Erwin; Kurian, Jose; Alff, Lambert [Institute of Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2012-12-01

    We have conducted a detailed thin film growth structure of oxygen engineered monoclinic HfO{sub 2{+-}x} grown by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. The oxidation conditions induce a switching between (111) and (002) texture of hafnium oxide. The band gap of oxygen deficient hafnia decreases with increasing amount of oxygen vacancies by more than 1 eV. For high oxygen vacancy concentrations, defect bands form inside the band gap that induce optical transitions and p-type conductivity. The resistivity changes by several orders of magnitude as a function of oxidation conditions. Oxygen vacancies do not give rise to ferromagnetic behavior.

  2. Room temperature strain rate sensitivity in precursor derived HfO{sub 2}/Si-C-N(O) ceramic nanocomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sujith, Ravindran; Kumar, Ravi

    2014-01-15

    Investigation on the room temperature strain rate sensitivity using depth sensing nanoindentation is carried out on precursor derived HfO{sub 2}/Si-C-N(O) ceramic nanocomposite sintered using pulsed electric current sintering. Using constant load method the strain rate sensitivity values are estimated. Lower strain rate sensitivity of ? 3.7 × 10{sup ?3} is observed and the limited strain rate sensitivity of these ceramic nanocomposites is explained in terms of cluster model. It is concluded that presence of amorphous Si-C-N(O) clusters are responsible for the limited flowability in these ceramics.

  3. : 8GM-I=8=!"pJsCj=P!"%3!%Q%9Hf3S Analysis on Difficulty Indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : 8GM-I=8=!"¿pJsCj=P!"%3!¡%Q%9Hf3S Analysis on Difficulty Indices for Japanese Named Entity comparison 1 $O$8$a$K K"8&5f$NL"E*$O!"¿pJsCj=P$N%5%V%?%9%/$G$"$k8GM-I=8=Cj=(Named Entity Task) $NFq0WEY $N$N%o!¡%/%7%g%C%WMessage Understanding Conference (MUC) $G%?%9%/$NDj5A!&I¿2A$,9T$o$l$F$-$?!#8GM-I=8=(Named

  4. Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on epitaxial (110)Ge grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, M. K.; Zhu, Y. [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Maurya, D.; Priya, S. [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)] [Center for Energy Harvesting Materials and Systems (CEHMS), Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-04

    The band alignment properties of atomic layer HfO{sub 2} film deposited on epitaxial (110)Ge, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, was investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy exhibited a sharp interface between the (110)Ge epilayer and the HfO{sub 2} film. The measured valence band offset value of HfO{sub 2} relative to (110)Ge was 2.28 {+-} 0.05 eV. The extracted conduction band offset value was 2.66 {+-} 0.1 eV using the bandgaps of HfO{sub 2} of 5.61 eV and Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters and the interface chemical properties of HfO{sub 2}/(110)Ge system are of tremendous importance for the design of future high hole mobility and low-power Ge-based metal-oxide transistor devices.

  5. Photo-induced tunneling currents in MOS structures with various HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} stacking dielectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pang, Chin-Sheng; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2014-04-15

    In this study, the current conduction mechanisms of structures with tandem high-k dielectric in illumination are discussed. Samples of Al/SiO{sub 2}/Si (S), Al/HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si (H), and Al/3HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si (3H) were examined. The significant observation of electron traps of sample H compares to sample S is found under the double bias capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements in illumination. Moreover, the photo absorption sensitivity of sample H is higher than S due to the formation of HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer, which leads to larger numbers of carriers crowded through the sweep of V{sub G} before the domination of tunneling current. Additionally, the HfO{sub 2} dielectric layer would block the electrons passing through oxide from valance band, which would result in less electron-hole (e{sup ?}-h{sup +}) pairs recombination effect. Also, it was found that both of the samples S and H show perimeter dependency of positive bias currents due to strong fringing field effect in dark and illumination; while sample 3H shows area dependency of positive bias currents in strong illumination. The non-uniform tunneling current through thin dielectric and through HfO{sub 2} stacking layers are importance to MOS(p) tunneling photo diodes.

  6. Characterizing HfXZr1-XO2 by EXAFS: Relationship Between Bulk and Surface Composition, and Impact on Catalytic Selectivity for Alcohol Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, G.; Milling, M; Ji, Y; Patterson, P; Sparks, D; Davis, B

    2009-01-01

    A series of mixed Hf{sub X}Zr{sub 1-X}O{sub 2} oxide catalysts was prepared according to a recipe that yields the monoclinic structure. The samples were examined by EXAFS spectroscopy at the Zr K and Hf L{sub III} edges. A fitting model was used that simultaneously fits data from both edges, and makes use of an interdependent mixing parameter X mix to take into account substitution of the complementary atom in the nearest metal-metal shell. For XPS analysis, Scofield factors were applied to estimate the relative atomic surface concentrations of Zr and Hf. EXAFS results suggested that a solid bulk solution was formed over a wide range of X for Hf{sub X}Zr{sub 1-X}O{sub 2} binary oxides, and that the relative ratio was retained in the surface shell (i.e., including some subsurface layers by XPS) and the surface (e.g., by ISS). The increase in selectivity for the 1-alkene from dehydration of alcohols at high Zr content does not correlate smoothly with the tuned relative atomic concentration of Hf to Zr. The step change at high Zr content appears to be due to other indirect factors (e.g., surface defects, oxygen vacancies).

  7. Methods of producing transportation fuel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

    2011-12-27

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

  8. EIS-0360: Depleted Uranium Oxide Conversion Product at the Portsmouth, Ohio Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This site-specific EIS analyzes the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three alternative locations within the Paducah site; transportation of all cylinders (DUF6, enriched, and empty) currently stored at the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) near Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to Portsmouth; construction of a new cylinder storage yard at Portsmouth (if required) for ETTP cylinders; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion coproduct; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold.

  9. Demonstrating 1 nm-oxide-equivalent-thickness HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure with unpinning Fermi level and low gate leakage current density

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trinh, Hai-Dang [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Lin, Yueh-Chin; Nguyen, Hong-Quan; Luc, Quang-Ho [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Nguyen, Minh-Thuy; Duong, Quoc-Van; Nguyen, Manh-Nghia [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)] [Department of Physics, Hanoi National University of Education, 136 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Wang, Shin-Yuan [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yi Chang, Edward [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, 1001 University Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Department of Electronic Engineering, National Chiao Tung University 1001, University Rd., Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2013-09-30

    In this work, the band alignment, interface, and electrical characteristics of HfO{sub 2}/InSb metal-oxide-semiconductor structure have been investigated. By using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis, the conduction band offset of 1.78 ± 0.1 eV and valence band offset of 3.35 ± 0.1 eV have been extracted. The transmission electron microscopy analysis has shown that HfO{sub 2} layer would be a good diffusion barrier for InSb. As a result, 1 nm equivalent-oxide-thickness in the 4 nm HfO{sub 2}/InSb structure has been demonstrated with unpinning Fermi level and low leakage current of 10{sup ?4} A/cm{sup ?2}. The D{sub it} value of smaller than 10{sup 12} eV{sup ?1}cm{sup ?2} has been obtained using conduction method.

  10. Synthesis of bulk FeHfBO soft magnetic materials and its loss characterization at megahertz frequency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou Yang; Kou Xiaoming; Warsi Muhammad, Asif; Lin Shuo; Harris, Brendan S.; Parsons, Paul E.; Xiao, John Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Mu Mingkai; Lee, Fred C. [Center for Power Electronics System, Virginia Polytechnic and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States); Zhu Hao [Spectrum Magnetics LLC, Wilmington, Delaware 19804 (United States)

    2013-05-07

    Magnetic core materials with low loss, high saturation magnetization, large permeability, and operating frequency above 1 MHz are in high demands for the next generation of miniaturized power electronics. Amorphous FeHfB ribbons with thickness around 20 {mu}m have been fabricated through melt-spinning. Different heat treatments were performed on the FeHfB ribbons, and the relations among heat treatments, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been explored. Properties such as coercivity (H{sub c}) of 2.0 Oe and saturation magnetic flux density (B{sub S}) of 1.2 T have been achieved in samples with exchange coupling. The losses can be minimized by balancing the hysteretic and eddy current losses and can be further reduced with additional magnetic field annealing. At 5 MHz with peak magnetic flux density of 20 mT, the materials show core losses comparable to the best ferrites, but with higher permeability value of about 200 and superior saturation induction of more than 1 T.

  11. Features of conduction mechanisms in n-HfNiSn semiconductor heavily doped with a Rh acceptor impurity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romaka, V. A.; Rogl, P.; Stadnyk, Yu. V.; Romaka, V. V.; Hlil, E. K.; Krajovskii, V. Ya.; Horyn, A. M.

    2013-09-15

    The crystal structure and electron-density distribution, as well as the energy, kinetic, and magnetic characteristics of n-HfNiSn intermetallic semiconductor heavily doped with a Rh acceptor impurity in the temperature range T = 80-400 K, in the acceptor-concentration range N{sub A}{sup Rh} Almost-Equal-To 9.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19}-1.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3} (x = 0.005-0.10), and in magnetic fields H {<=} 10 kG are investigated. It is established that doping is accompanied by a simultaneous decrease in concentration, the elimination of donor-type structural defects (to x Almost-Equal-To 0.02), and an increase in the concentration of acceptor-type structural defects (0 < x {<=} 0.10). The dependence of the degree of semiconductor compensation on temperature is revealed. A model of the spatial arrangement of atoms in HfNi{sub 1-x}Rh{sub x}Sn is proposed, and the results of calculating the electron structure based on this model agree with the results of investigations of the kinetic and magnetic characteristics of the semiconductor. The results are discussed within the context of the Shklovskii-Efros model for a heavily doped and compensated semiconductor.

  12. Electron-stimulated desorption from polished and vacuum fired 316LN stainless steel coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malyshev, Oleg B. Valizadeh, Reza; Hogan, Benjamin T.; Hannah, Adrian N.

    2014-11-01

    In this study, two identical 316LN stainless steel tubular samples, which had previously been polished and vacuum-fired and then used for the electron-stimulated desorption (ESD) experiments, were coated with Ti-Zr-Hf-V with different morphologies: columnar and dense. ESD measurement results after nonevaporable getter (NEG) activation to 150, 180, 250, and 350?°C indicated that the values for the ESD yields are significantly (2–20 times) lower than the data from our previous study with similar coatings on nonvacuum-fired samples. Based on these results, the lowest pressure and best long-term performance in particle accelerators will be achieved with a vacuum-fired vacuum chamber coated with dense Ti-Zr-Hf-V coating activated at 180?°C. This is likely due to the following facts: after NEG activation, the hydrogen concentration inside the NEG was lower than in the bulk stainless steel substrate; the NEG coating created a barrier for gas diffusion from the sample bulk to vacuum; the dense NEG coating performed better as a barrier than the columnar NEG coating.

  13. Estimating Entropy of Liquids from Atom-Atom Radial Distribution Functions: Silica, Beryllium Fluoride and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruchi Sharma; Manish Agarwal; Charusita Chakravarty

    2008-09-24

    Molecular dynamics simulations of water, liquid beryllium fluoride and silica melt are used to study the accuracy with which the entropy of ionic and molecular liquids can be estimated from atom-atom radial distribution function data. All three systems are known to display similar liquid-state thermodynamic and kinetic anomalies due to a region of anomalous excess entropy behaviour where entropy rises on isothermal compression. The pair correlation entropy is demonstrated to be sufficiently accurate that the density-temperature regime of anomalous behaviour as well as the strength of the entropy anomaly can be predicted reliably for both ionic melts as well as different rigid-body pair potentials for water. Errors in the total thermodynamic entropy for ionic melts due to the pair correlation approximation are of the order of 10% or less for most state points but can be significantly larger in the anomalous regime at very low temperatures. In the case of water, as expected given the rigid-body constraints for a molecular liquids, the pair correlation approximation causes significantly larger errors, between 20 and 30%, for most state points. Comparison of the excess entropy, Se, of ionic melts with the pair correlation entropy, S2, shows that the temperature dependence of Se is well described by T ??2=5 scaling across both the normal and anomalous regimes, unlike in the case of S2. As a function of density, the Se(rho) curves shows only a single maximum while the S2(rho) curves show both a maximum and a minimum. These differences in the behaviour of S2 and Se are due to the fact that the residual multiparticle entropy, delta(S) = Se - S2, shows a strong negative correlation with tetrahedral order in the anomalous regime.

  14. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leininger, Thomas F. (Chino Hills, CA); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA); Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Suggitt, Robert M. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

    1995-01-01

    A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

  15. Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

    1995-03-28

    A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

  16. Producing and Detecting Correlated atoms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christoph I. Westbrook; Martijn Schellekens; Aurélien Perrin; Valentina Krachmalnicoff; Jose Carlos Viana Gomes; Jean-Baptiste Trebbia; Jérôme Estève; Hong Chang; Isabelle Bouchoule; Denis Boiron; Alain Aspect; Tom Jeltes; John McNamara; Wim Hogervorst; Wim Vassen

    2006-09-04

    We discuss experiments to produce and detect atom correlations in a degenerate or nearly degenerate gas of neutral atoms. First we treat the atomic analog of the celebrated Hanbury Brown Twiss experiment, in which atom correlations result simply from interference effects without any atom interactions.We have performed this experiment for both bosons and fermions. Next we show how atom interactions produce correlated atoms using the atomic analog of spontaneous four-wavemixing. Finally, we briefly mention experiments on a one dimensional gas on an atom chip in which correlation effects due to both interference and interactions have been observed.

  17. IUPAC-NIST Solubility Data Series. 100. Rare Earth Metal Fluorides in Water and Aqueous Systems. Part 1. Scandium Group (Sc, Y, La)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mioduski, Tomasz [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, 03195 Warsaw (Poland); Gumi?ski, Cezary, E-mail: cegie@chem.uw.edu.pl [Department of Chemistry, University of Warsaw, 02093 Warsaw (Poland); Zeng, Dewen, E-mail: dewen-zeng@hotmail.com [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, 410083 Changsha (China)

    2014-03-15

    This work presents an assessment of solubility data for rare earth metal fluorides (generally of trivalent metals and of CeF{sub 4}) in water and in aqueous ternary systems. Compilations of all available experimental data are introduced for each rare earth metal fluoride with a corresponding critical evaluation. Every such evaluation contains a collection of all solubility results in water, a selection of suggested solubility data, and a brief discussion of the multicomponent systems. Because the ternary systems were seldom studied more than once, no critical evaluations of such data were possible. Only simple fluorides (no complexes or binary salts) are treated as the input substances in this report. The literature has been covered through the end of 2013.

  18. Method for fluorination of actinide fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof using O.sub.2 F.sub.2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eller, Phillip G. (Los Alamos, NM); Malm, John G. (Naperville, IL); Penneman, Robert A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1988-01-01

    Method for fluorination of actinides and fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof using O.sub.2 F.sub.2 which generates actinide hexafluorides, and for removal of actinides and compounds thereof from surfaces upon which they appear as unwanted deposits. The fluorinating agent, O.sub.2 F.sub.2, has been observed to readily perform the above-described tasks at sufficiently low temperatures that there is virtually no damage to the containment vessels. Moreover, the resulting actinide hexafluorides are thereby not destroyed by high temperature reactions with the walls of the reaction vessel. Dioxygen difluoride is easily prepared, stored and transferred to the desired place of reaction.

  19. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ding, Yu-Shin (Central Islip, NY); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  20. No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

    1993-10-19

    A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

  1. Method for fluorination of actinide fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof using O[sub 2]F[sub 2

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eller, P.G.; Malm, J.G.; Penneman, R.A.

    1988-11-08

    Method is described for fluorination of actinides and fluorides and oxyfluorides thereof using O[sub 2]F[sub 2] which generates actinide hexafluorides, and for removal of actinides and compounds thereof from surfaces upon which they appear as unwanted deposits. The fluorinating agent, O[sub 2]F[sub 2], has been observed to readily perform the above-described tasks at sufficiently low temperatures that there is virtually no damage to the containment vessels. Moreover, the resulting actinide hexafluorides are thereby not destroyed by high temperature reactions with the walls of the reaction vessel. Dioxygen difluoride is easily prepared, stored and transferred to the desired place of reaction.

  2. Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

    1985-04-30

    A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

  3. Additive manufacturing method of producing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Painter, Kevin

    Additive manufacturing method of producing silver or copper tracks on polyimide film Problem/stripping) using an additive process support by a novel bio- degradable photo-initiator package. technology. Building on previous work by Hoyd- Gigg Ng et al. [1,2], Heriot-Watt has developed an additive film

  4. Ge MOS Characteristics with CVD HfO2 Gate Dielectrics and TaN Gate Electrode W. P. Bai*, N. Lu*, J. Liu*, A. Ramirez**, D. L. Kwong*, D. Wristers**, A. Ritenour#

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge MOS Characteristics with CVD HfO2 Gate Dielectrics and TaN Gate Electrode W. P. Bai*, N. Lu*, J, we report for the first time Ge MOS characteristics with ultra thin rapid thermal CVD HfO2 gate dielectrics and TaN gate electrode. Using the newly developed pre- gate cleaning and NH3-based Ge surface

  5. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Perry, William L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  6. Process for producing advanced ceramics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwong, Kyei-Sing (Tuscaloosa, AL)

    1996-01-01

    A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

  7. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  8. Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Coronado, P.R.

    1999-12-21

    A method is described for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

  9. Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2012-02-01

    Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental results show similar trends as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results presented in this report; however, some differences exist that will need to be assessed in future studies. The results of this testing will be used to improve the diode design to be tested in the liquid salt loop system.

  10. Voltammetry and Impedance Studies of Ta in Aqueous HF Sanjeev Sapra, Hongqi Li, Zuocheng Wang, and Ian Ivar Suni*,z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suni, Ian Ivar

    , and Ian Ivar Suni*,z a Department of Chemical Engineering, Center for Advanced Materials Processing hydrogen evolution current and the much lower charge-transfer resistance for the high-frequency impedance both Ti/TiN7-9 and Ta/TaN10-17 diffusion barriers. Fluoroborate solutions, in which HF can form

  11. Manipulation of electronic and magnetic properties of M{sub 2}C (M = Hf, Nb, Sc, Ta, Ti, V, Zr) monolayer by applying mechanical strains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Shijun; Kang, Wei; Xue, Jianming

    2014-03-31

    Tuning the electronic and magnetic properties of a material through strain engineering is an effective strategy to enhance the performance of electronic and spintronic devices. In this paper, first-principles calculations based on density functional theory are carried out to investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of M{sub 2}C(M?=?Hf, Nb, Sc, Ta, Ti, V, Zr, known as MXenes) subjected to biaxial symmetric mechanical strains. At the strain-free state, all these MXenes exhibit no spontaneous magnetism except for Ti{sub 2}C and Zr{sub 2}C which show a magnetic moment of 1.92 and 1.25??{sub B}/unit, respectively. As the tensile strain increases, the magnetic moments of MXenes are greatly enhanced and a transition from nonmagnetism to ferromagnetism is observed for those nonmagnetic MXenes at zero strains. The most distinct transition is found in Hf{sub 2}C, in which the magnetic moment is elevated to 1.5??{sub B}/unit at a strain of 1.80%. We further show that the magnetic properties of Hf{sub 2}C are attributed to the band shift mainly composed of Hf(5d) states.

  12. Structural and electronic properties of cubic HfO2 surfaces G.H. Chen, Z.F. Hou, X.G. Gong *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    Structural and electronic properties of cubic HfO2 surfaces G.H. Chen, Z.F. Hou, X.G. Gong@fudan.edu.cn (X.G. Gong). www.elsevier.com/locate/commatsci Available online at www

  13. Density functional theory study of first-layer adsorption of ZrO2 and HfO2 on Ge(100)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    in this manuscript), usually grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD). These oxides, under normal Ge process- ingDensity functional theory study of first-layer adsorption of ZrO2 and HfO2 on Ge(100) T.J. Grassman

  14. Field emission from single-crystalline HfC nanowires Jinshi Yuan, Han Zhang, Jie Tang, Norio Shinya, Kiyomi Nakajima et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Lu-Chang

    based on nickel inverse opal slabs J. Appl. Phys. 111, 07A948 (2012) Interfacial stabilization molecules and ion bombardment.4 Single-crystalline nanowires as well as carbon nanotubes possess a unique nanotubes in our previous work.5­12 Therefore, an HfC nanowire emitter can poten- tially provide a more

  15. 13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakhmouradian, Anton

    13.21 Geochemistry of the Rare-Earth Element, Nb, Ta, Hf, and Zr Deposits RL Linnen, University of rare metals in natural fluids 551 13.21.2.2.2 Aqueous complexation and mineral solubility 552 13 Acknowledgments 564 References 564 13.21.1 Introduction Rare-element mineral deposits, also called rare-metal

  16. Microstructural Characterization and Shape Memory Response of Ni-Rich NiTiHf and NiTiZr High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evirgen, Alper

    2014-08-14

    NiTiHf and NiTiZr high temperature shape memory alloys (HTSMAs) have drawn a great deal of attention as cheaper alternatives to Pt, Pd and Au alloyed NiTi-based HTSMAs while NiTiZr alloys also providing at least 20% weight reduction then its Ni...

  17. Coupled LuHf and SmNd geochronology constrains prograde and exhumation histories of high-and ultrahigh-pressure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacker, Bradley R.

    Coupled Lu­Hf and Sm­Nd geochronology constrains prograde and exhumation histories of high; Geochronology; Norway 1. Introduction The Western Gneiss Region (WGR) of Norway exposes high-pressure (HP and the mantle, and generation of continental crust. Despite abundant structural, geochronologic and pressure

  18. In-Line-Test of Variability and Bit-Error-Rate of HfOx-Based Resistive Memory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ji, B L; Ye, Q; Gausepohl, S; Deora, S; Veksler, D; Vivekanand, S; Chong, H; Stamper, H; Burroughs, T; Johnson, C; Smalley, M; Bennett, S; Kaushik, V; Piccirillo, J; Rodgers, M; Passaro, M; Liehr, M

    2015-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of HfOx-based resistive random access memory (RRAM) are investigated for manufacturing and product designs. Manufacturing variability is characterized at different levels including lots, wafers, and chips. Bit-error-rate (BER) is proposed as a holistic parameter for the write cycle resistance statistics. Using the electrical in-line-test cycle data, a method is developed to derive BERs as functions of the design margin, to provide guidance for technology evaluation and product design. The proposed BER calculation can also be used in the off-line bench test and build-in-self-test (BIST) for adaptive error correction and for the other types of random access memories.

  19. Electron band theory predictions and the construction of phase diagrams. [HfPt; TaIr; WOs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, R.E.; Bennett, L.H.; Davenport, J.W.; Weinert, M.

    1985-01-01

    The a priori theory of metals is yielding energy results which are relevant to the construction of phase diagrams - to the solution phases as well as to line compounds. There is a wide range in the rigor of the calculations currently being done and this is discussed. Calculations for the structural stabilities (fcc vs bcc vs hcp) of the elemental metals, quantities which are employed in the constructs of the terminal phases, are reviewed and shown to be inconsistent with the values currently employed in such constructs (also see Miodownik elsewhere in this volume). Finally, as an example, the calculated heats of formation are compared with experiment for PtHf, IrTa and OsW, three compounds with the same electron to atom ratio but different bonding properties.

  20. In situ study of HfO{sub 2} atomic layer deposition on InP(100)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J.; Hinkle, C. L.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-29

    The interfacial chemistry of the native oxide and chemically treated InP samples during atomic layer deposition (ALD) HfO{sub 2} growth at 250 Degree-Sign C has been studied by in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The In-oxide concentration is seen to gradually decrease on the native oxide and acid etched samples. No significant changes of the P-oxide concentrations are detected, while the P-oxides chemical states are seen to change gradually during the initial cycles of ALD on the native oxide and the chemically treated samples. (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S treatment strongly decreases In-oxide and P-oxide concentrations prior to ALD and maintains low concentrations during the ALD process.

  1. Hole Trapping at Surfaces of m?ZrO2 and m?HfO2 Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, Matthew J.; Mckenna, Keith P.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2012-12-03

    We investigate hole trapping at the most prevalent facets of monoclinic zirconia (m-ZrO2) and hafnia (m-HfO2) nanocrystals using first-principles methods. The localization of holes at surface oxygen ions is more favorable than in the bulk crystal by up to ?1 eV. This is caused mainly by the reduction of the absolute value of the electrostatic potential at the surface ions with respect to the bulk and by the significant surface distortion caused by the hole localization. The mobility of holes at surfaces is much lower than that found in the bulk and is fairly isotropic. Unlike in cubic oxides, such as MgO and CaO, we do not find a significant driving force for preferential trapping of holes at steps on the m-ZrO2 surface. These fundamental results are relevant to mechanisms of water oxidation, photocatalysis, contact charging, and photodesorption.

  2. Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-04-16

    The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

  3. Fatty acid-producing hosts

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfleger, Brian F; Lennen, Rebecca M

    2013-12-31

    Described are hosts for overproducing a fatty acid product such as a fatty acid. The hosts include an exogenous nucleic acid encoding a thioesterase and, optionally, an exogenous nucleic acid encoding an acetyl-CoA carboxylase, wherein an acyl-CoA synthetase in the hosts are functionally delected. The hosts prefereably include the nucleic acid encoding the thioesterase at an intermediate copy number. The hosts are preferably recominantly stable and growth-competent at 37.degree. C. Methods of producing a fatty acid product comprising culturing such hosts at 37.degree. C. are also described.

  4. Method for producing viscous hydrocarbons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poston, Robert S. (Winter Park, FL)

    1982-01-01

    A method for recovering viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels from a subterranean formation by drilling a well bore through the formation and completing the well by cementing a casing means in the upper part of the pay zone. The well is completed as an open hole completion and a superheated thermal vapor stream comprised of steam and combustion gases is injected into the lower part of the pay zone. The combustion gases migrate to the top of the pay zone and form a gas cap which provides formation pressure to produce the viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels.

  5. Number of Producing Gas Wells

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets16 (next20, 20082008707 1 NovemberProducing

  6. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin; Vazdar, Mario; Cwiklik, Lukasz; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H{sub 2}O with D{sub 2}O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl{sup ?} and F{sup ?}.

  7. ELECTRONIC SOLUTION SPECTRA FOR URANIUM AND NEPTUNIUM IN OXIDATION STATES (III) TO (VI) IN ANHYDROUS HYDROGEN FLUORIDE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baluka, M.; Edelstein, N.; O'Donnell, T. A.

    1980-10-01

    Spectra have been recorded for solutions in anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) of uranium and neptunium in oxidation states (III) to (VI). The spectra for U(III), Np(III) and Np(IV) in AHF are very similar to those in acidified aqueous solution, but that for U(IV) suggests that the cationic species is UF{sub 2}{sup 2+}. The AHF spectra for the elements in oxidation states (V) and (VI) are not comparable with those of the formally analogous aqueous solutions, where the elements exist as well-defined dioxo-cations. However, the AHF spectra can be related to spectra in the gas phase, in the solid state or in non-aqueous solvents for each element in its appropriate oxidation state.

  8. Optical properties of chromium and neodymium in zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass. Final report, October 1987-September 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanson, F.E.; Caspers, H.H.

    1993-08-01

    The optical properties are reported of chromium and neodymium doped in zirconium-barium-lanthanum-aluminum fluoride glass (ZBLA). The fluorescence of Cr(3+) and of co-doped Cr(3+), Nd(3+) glasses is investigated. Fluorescence decay rates of Cr(3+) and Nd(3+) are measured at various temperatures, and the excitation transfer efficiency between Cr(3+) and Nd(3+) is determined. The absorption spectrum of Nd(3+):ZBLA is characterized in terms of the Judd-Ofelt model of crystal field-induced electric-dipole transitions. The three phenomenological intensity parameters for Nd(3+) in ZBLA glass Omega sub 2,4,6, are compared to those obtained for Nd(3+) in Y3Al5Ol2, Gd3S2Al3Ol2, and LHG-8 glass.

  9. Sorbent selection and design considerations for uranium trapping. [H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, F-1 alumina, sodium fluoride

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, R.M.; Hobbs, W.E.; Norton, J.L.; Stephenson, M.J.

    1981-07-01

    The efficient removal of UF/sub 6/ from effluent streams can be accomplished through the selection of the best solid sorbent and the implementation of good design principles. Pressure losses, sorbent capacity, reaction kinetics, sorbent regeneration/uranium recovery requirements and the effects of other system components are the performance factors which are summarized. The commonly used uranium trapping materials highlighted are sodium fluoride, H-151 alumina, XF-100 alumina, and F-1 alumina. Sorbent selection and trap design have to be made on a case-by-case basis but the theoretical modeling studies and the evaluation of the performance factors presented can be used as a guide for other chemical trap applications.

  10. Engineering microbes to produce biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wackett, LP

    2011-06-01

    The current biofuels landscape is chaotic. It is controlled by the rules imposed by economic forces and driven by the necessity of finding new sources of energy, particularly motor fuels. The need is bringing forth great creativity in uncovering new candidate fuel molecules that can be made via metabolic engineering. These next generation fuels include long-chain alcohols, terpenoid hydrocarbons, and diesel-length alkanes. Renewable fuels contain carbon derived from carbon dioxide. The carbon dioxide is derived directly by a photosynthetic fuel-producing organism(s) or via intermediary biomass polymers that were previously derived from carbon dioxide. To use the latter economically, biomass depolymerization processes must improve and this is a very active area of research. There are competitive approaches with some groups using enzyme based methods and others using chemical catalysts. With the former, feedstock and end-product toxicity loom as major problems. Advances chiefly rest on the ability to manipulate biological systems. Computational and modular construction approaches are key. For example, novel metabolic networks have been constructed to make long-chain alcohols and hydrocarbons that have superior fuel properties over ethanol. A particularly exciting approach is to implement a direct utilization of solar energy to make a usable fuel. A number of approaches use the components of current biological systems, but re-engineer them for more direct, efficient production of fuels.

  11. In situ study of the role of substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} on InP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, H.; Santosh, K.C.; Qin, X.; Brennan, B.; McDonnell, S.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Zhernokletov, D. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Hinkle, C. L.; Cho, K.; Wallace, R. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-10-21

    The dependence of the “self cleaning” effect of the substrate oxides on substrate temperature during atomic layer deposition (ALD) of HfO{sub 2} on various chemically treated and native oxide InP (100) substrates is investigated using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The removal of In-oxide is found to be more efficient at higher ALD temperatures. The P oxidation states on native oxide and acid etched samples are seen to change, with the total P-oxide concentration remaining constant, after 10 cycles of ALD HfO{sub 2} at different temperatures. An (NH{sub 4}){sub 2} S treatment is seen to effectively remove native oxides and passivate the InP surfaces independent of substrate temperature studied (200 °C, 250 °C and 300 °C) before and after the ALD process. Density functional theory modeling provides insight into the mechanism of the changes in the P-oxide chemical states.

  12. Phase transition behavior and high piezoelectric properties in lead-free BaTiO3CaTiO3BaHfO3 ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Wenwu

    ceramics Dali Wang · Zhaohua Jiang · Bin Yang · Shantao Zhang · Mingfu Zhang · Feifei Guo · Wenwu Cao of lead-free (1-x)Ba(Hf0.16Ti0.84)O3­x (Ba0.70Ca0.30)TiO3 (BCHT) ceramics fabricated by the conventional been proposed based on their dielectric behavior. It is found that BHCT ceramics undergo a complicated

  13. Energy band alignment of atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} oxide film on epitaxial (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hudait, Mantu K.; Zhu Yan [Advanced Devices and Sustainable Energy Laboratory (ADSEL), Bradley Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States)

    2013-03-21

    Crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge layers were grown on (100), (110), and (111)A GaAs substrates by in situ growth process using two separate molecular beam epitaxy chambers. The band alignment properties of atomic layer hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) film deposited on crystallographically oriented epitaxial Ge were investigated using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub v} values of HfO{sub 2} relative to (100)Ge, (110)Ge, and (111)Ge orientations were 2.8 eV, 2.28 eV, and 2.5 eV, respectively. Using XPS data, variation in valence band offset, {Delta}E{sub V}(100)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub V}(110)Ge, was obtained related to Ge orientation. Also, the conduction band offset, {Delta}E{sub c} relation, {Delta}E{sub c}(110)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(111)Ge>{Delta}E{sub c}(100)Ge related to Ge orientations was obtained using the measured bandgap of HfO{sub 2} on each orientation and with the Ge bandgap of 0.67 eV. These band offset parameters for carrier confinement would offer an important guidance to design Ge-based p- and n-channel metal-oxide field-effect transistor for low-power application.

  14. Effect of Si substrate on interfacial SiO{sub 2} scavenging in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si stacks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Xiuyan, E-mail: xiuyan@adam.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Yajima, Takeaki; Nishimura, Tomonori; Nagashio, Kosuke; Toriumi, Akira [Department of Materials Engineering, The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

    2014-11-03

    The scavenging kinetics of an ultra-thin SiO{sub 2} interface layer (SiO{sub 2}-IL) in an HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si stack is discussed by focusing on the substrate effect in addition to oxygen diffusion. {sup 18}O tracing experiments demonstrate that the O-atom moves from the SiO{sub 2}-IL to the HfO{sub 2} layer during scavenging. SiO{sub 2}-IL scavenging with various substrates (Si, SiC, and sapphire) has been found to be significantly different, which suggests that the Si in the substrate is also necessary to continuously cause the scavenging. Based on these findings and thermodynamic considerations, a kinetic model where oxygen vacancy (V{sub O}) transferred from the HfO{sub 2} reacts with the SiO{sub 2}, which is in contact with the Si-substrate, is proposed for the SiO{sub 2}-IL scavenging.

  15. Formation of the dopant-oxygen vacancy complexes and its influence on the photoluminescence emissions in Gd-doped HfO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, L. G.; Tu, H. L.; Xiong, Y. H.; Du, J.; Wang, J. W.; Huang, G. J. [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); Xiao, W. [General Research Institute for Nonferrous Metals, Beijing 100088 (China); University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-09-28

    Rare earth doping is widely used to improve the desired properties of high-k dielectric oxides. However, whether rare earth doping can suppress the formation of oxygen vacancies is still debated. By using the first-principles calculations with the generalized gradient approximation and more advanced hybrid functional, we have investigated the structural and electronic properties of the dopant-oxygen vacancy complexes in Gd-doped HfO{sub 2}. Our calculations indicate that the Gd dopants interacting with oxygen vacancies can substantially shift up the V{sub O} energy states towards the conduction band edge. This together with other effects, such as capturing the localized electrons at the oxygen vacancy by Gd dopants and suppressing the randomicity of oxygen vacancy formation, improves the reliability of the devices made from Gd-doped HfO{sub 2}. Based on our calculated results, we have presented an explanation for the experimentally observed decrease of the V{sub O}-related photoluminescence intensities upon Gd doping in HfO{sub 2}.

  16. Small cell experiments for electrolytic reduction of uranium oxides to uranium metal using fluoride salts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, P.A.; Adcock, P.W.; Coroneos, A.C.; Hendrix, D.E. )

    1994-08-01

    Electrolytic reduction of uranium oxide was proposed for the preparation of uranium metal feed for the atomic vapor laser isotope separation (AVLIS) process. A laboratory cell of 25-cm ID was operated to obtain additional information in areas important to design and operation of a pilot plant cell. Reproducible test results and useful operating and control procedures were demonstrated. About 20 kg of uranium metal of acceptable purity were prepared. A good supply of dissolved UO[sub 2] feed at the anode is the most important controlling requirement for efficient cell operation. A large fraction of the cell current is nonproductive in that it does not produce a metal product nor consume carbon anodes. All useful test conditions gave some reduction of UF[sub 4] to produce CF[sub 4] in addition to the reduction of UO[sub 2], but the fraction of metal from the reduction of UF[sub 4] can be decreased by increasing the concentration of dissolved UO[sub 2]. Operation of large continuous cells would probably be limited to current efficiencies of less than 60 pct, and more than 20 pct of the metal would result from the reduction of UF[sub 4].

  17. Process for producing ethanol from syngas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

    2013-05-14

    The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

  18. Producing Transportation Fuels via Photosynthetically-derived...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    technology using cyanobacteria. This technology has potential to produce biofuels and green chemicals (1) at cost that is competitive with conventional ethylene and derivatives...

  19. Table of Contents Producing Hydrogen................1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Biomass Gasification.......................10 Thermochemical Production ........................11 Water in its molecular form. It must be produced from other sources or "feedstocks" such as water, biomass

  20. Looking for footprint of bulk metallic glass in electronic and phonon heat capacities of Cu{sub 55}Hf{sub 45?x}Ti{sub x} alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remenyi, G.; Biljakovi?, K.; Starešini?, D.; Dominko, D.; Risti?, R.; Babi?, E.; Figueroa, I. A.; Davies, H. A.

    2014-04-28

    We report on the heat capacity investigation of Cu{sub 55}Hf{sub 45?x}Ti{sub x} metallic glasses. The most appropriate procedure to estimate low temperature electronic and phonon contributions has been determined. Both contributions exhibit monotonous Ti concentration dependence, demonstrating that there is no relation of either the electron density of states at the Fermi level or the Debye temperature to the increased glass forming ability in the Ti concentration range x?=?15–30. The thermodynamic parameters (e.g., reduced glass temperature) remain better indicators in assessing the best composition for bulk metallic glass formation.

  1. Hf-irJ

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouthReport for the t-) S/,,5 'a C O M P R E H E N SGwen Nu+'.nop-s'

  2. LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF BIOFUEL SUGARCANE PRODUCED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF BIOFUEL SUGARCANE PRODUCED IN MINERAL SOILS IN FLORIDA 1/11/2013 Technical Report Prepared by: Jose-Luis Izursa #12;LIFE CYCLE ASSESSMENT OF BIOFUEL SUGARCANE PRODUCED IN MINERAL.............................................................................................. 10 3.3. Life Cycle Impact Assessment Methodology and Impact Categories

  3. September 2011 Dear FL Beef Cattle Producers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    September 2011 Dear FL Beef Cattle Producers, I am the veterinary entomologist for UF-IFAS and am beef cattle producers who have extensively used the Avenger insecticide ear tag on their cattle on beef cattle. However, the horn fly is expected to develop resistance to this chemical as it has most

  4. High quality HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb(001) metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with 0.8?nm equivalent oxide thickness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barth, Michael; Datta, Suman; Bruce Rayner, G.; McDonnell, Stephen; Wallace, Robert M.; Bennett, Brian R.; Engel-Herbert, Roman

    2014-12-01

    We investigate in-situ cleaning of GaSb surfaces and its effect on the electrical performance of p-type GaSb metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitor (MOSCAP) using a remote hydrogen plasma. Ultrathin HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition were used as a high permittivity gate dielectric. Compared to conventional ex-situ chemical cleaning methods, the in-situ GaSb surface treatment resulted in a drastic improvement in the impedance characteristics of the MOSCAPs, directly evidencing a much lower interface trap density and enhanced Fermi level movement efficiency. We demonstrate that by using a combination of ex-situ and in-situ surface cleaning steps, aggressively scaled HfO{sub 2}/p-GaSb MOSCAP structures with a low equivalent oxide thickness of 0.8?nm and efficient gate modulation of the surface potential are achieved, allowing to push the Fermi level far away from the valence band edge high up into the band gap of GaSb.

  5. Quantifying the parameters of successful agricultural producers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaase, Gregory Herman

    2006-08-16

    The primary purpose of the study was to quantify the parameters of successful agricultural producers. Through the use of the Financial and Risk Management (FARM) Assistance database, this study evaluated economic measures ...

  6. Producing a computer generated explosive effect 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Wei

    1999-01-01

    is conducted in order to produce a convincing explosive effect with a computer. A description of the current state of the art provides current achievements by industry and individual artists. A tutorial focusing on modeling, lighting, and setting up animation...

  7. Producing X-rays at the APS

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-04-19

    An introduction and overview of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, the technology that produces the brightest X-ray beams in the Western Hemisphere, and the research carried out by scientists using those X-rays.

  8. Clean Energy Producing and Exporting Countries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atighetchi, K.

    2007-01-01

    fitting structure are being investigated. The model developed will be presented to various Natural Gas producing countries such as Iran, Iraq, Russia, and Saudi to name a few and will ultimately be set up the same way that OPEC was....

  9. Methods of producing compounds from plant materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werpy, Todd A. (West Richland, WA); Schmidt, Andrew J. (Richland, WA); Frye, Jr., John G. (Richland, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA), Franz; James A. (Kennewick, WA), Alnajjar; Mikhail S. (Richland, WA), Neuenschwander; Gary G. (Burbank, WA), Alderson; Eric V. (Kennewick, WA), Orth; Rick J. (Kennewick, WA), Abbas; Charles A. (Champaign, IL), Beery; Kyle E. (Decatur, IL), Rammelsberg; Anne M. (Decatur, IL), Kim; Catherine J. (Decatur, IL)

    2010-01-26

    The invention includes methods of processing plant material by adding water to form a mixture, heating the mixture, and separating a liquid component from a solid-comprising component. At least one of the liquid component and the solid-comprising component undergoes additional processing. Processing of the solid-comprising component produces oils, and processing of the liquid component produces one or more of glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol. The invention includes a process of forming glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol from plant matter by adding water, heating and filtering the plant matter. The filtrate containing starch, starch fragments, hemicellulose and fragments of hemicellulose is treated to form linear poly-alcohols which are then cleaved to produce one or more of glycerol, ethylene glycol, lactic acid and propylene glycol. The invention also includes a method of producing free and/or complexed sterols and stanols from plant material.

  10. Methods and systems for producing syngas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hawkes, Grant L; O'Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

    2013-02-05

    Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

  11. Produced Water Management and Beneficial Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terry Brown; Carol Frost; Thomas Hayes; Leo Heath; Drew Johnson; David Lopez; Demian Saffer; Michael Urynowicz; John Wheaton; Mark Zoback

    2007-10-31

    Large quantities of water are associated with the production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. The chemistry of co-produced water often makes it unsuitable for subsequent uses such as irrigated agriculture. However, co-produced waters have substantial potential for a variety of beneficial uses. Achieving this potential requires the development of appropriate water management strategies. There are several unique characteristics of co-produced water that make development of such management strategies a challenge. The production of CBM water follows an inverse pattern compared to traditional wells. CBM wells need to maintain low reservoir pressures to promote gas production. This need renders the reinjection of co-produced waters counterproductive. The unique water chemistry of co-produced water can reduce soil permeability, making surface disposal difficult. Unlike traditional petroleum operations where co-produced water is an undesirable by-product, co-produced water in the PRB often is potable, making it a highly valued resource in arid western states. This research project developed and evaluated a number of water management options potentially available to CBM operators. These options, which focus on cost-effective and environmentally-sound practices, fall into five topic areas: Minimization of Produced Water, Surface Disposal, Beneficial Use, Disposal by Injection and Water Treatment. The research project was managed by the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and involved personnel located at CERI, CSM, Stanford University, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Wyoming, the Argonne National Laboratory, the Gas Technology Institute, the Montana Bureau of Mining and Geology and PVES Inc., a private firm.

  12. Effects of Introduced Materials in the Drift Scale Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLoach, L; Jones, RL

    2002-01-11

    Water samples previously acquired from superheated (>140 C) zones within hydrological test boreholes of the Drift Scale Test (DST) show relatively high fluoride concentrations (5-66 ppm) and low pH (3.1-3.5) values. In these high temperature regions of the rock, water is present superheated vapor only--liquid water for sampling purposes is obtained during the sampling process by cooling. Based on data collected to date, it is evident that the source of the fluoride and low pH is from introduced man-made materials (Teflon{trademark} and/or Viton{trademark} fluoroelastomer) used in the test. The test materials may contribute fluoride either by degassing hydrogen fluoride (HF) directly to produce trace concentrations of HF gas ({approx}0.1 ppm) in the high temperature steam, or by leaching fluoride in the sampling tubes after condensation of the superheated steam. HF gas is known to be released from Viton{trademark} at high temperatures (Dupont Dow Elastomers L.L.C., Elkton, MD, personal communication) and the sample water compositions indicate near stoichiometric balance of hydrogen ion and fluoride ion, indicating dissolution of HF gas into the aqueous phase. These conclusions are based on a series of water samples collected to determine if the source of the fluoride is from the degradation of materials originally installed to facilitate measurements. Analyses of these water samples show that the source of the fluoride is the introduced materials, that is the Viton{trademark} packers used to isolate test zones and/or Teflon{trademark} tubing used to draw water and steam from the test zones. In particular, water samples collected from borehole (BH) 72 high temperatures ({approx} 170 C) prior to introduction of any Viton{trademark} or Teflon{trademark} show pH Values (4.8 to 5.5) and fluoride concentrations well below 1 ppm over a period of six months. These characteristics are typical of condensing DST steam that contains only some dissolved carbon dioxide generated by water-mineral-gas reactions in the rock. With the introduction of the Viton{trademark} packer materials and Teflon{trademark} sampling tube in BH72, the water samples show pH values drop to 3.8, while fluoride rises to 2.4 ppm within three days. After nine days, the pH values reach as low as 3.4 and fluoride concentrations rise as high as 7.5 ppm in the collected samples. The background information describing the fluoride issue and a summary of the water collection activities along with the analytical results are provided below. The results of the field test confirm the hypothesis that the source of the fluoride in specific samples from the DST is the introduced test materials (i.e. Viton{trademark} and/or Teflon{trademark}). This is positive from the perspective of repository performance, particularly waste package and drip shield degradation behavior, as deleterious introduced materials would be avoided in an operating repository. Ongoing laboratory testing to be Completed in January 2002, and additional testing in BH72 and BH55 will address further details, such as the specific material introducing the fluorine and the material breakdown process.

  13. Collapse of ferromagnetism in itinerant-electron system: A magnetic, transport properties, and high pressure study of (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diop, L. V. B. Isnard, O.; Kastil, J.; Arnold, Z.; Kamarad, J.

    2014-10-28

    The magnetism and transport properties were studied for Laves (Hf,Ta)Fe{sub 2} itinerant-electron compounds, which exhibit a temperature-induced first-order transition from the ferromagnetic (FM) to the antiferromagnetic (AFM) state upon heating. At finite temperatures, the field-induced metamagnetic phase transition between the AFM and FM has considerable effects on the transport properties of these model metamagnetic compounds. A large negative magnetoresistance of about 14% is observed in accordance with the metamagnetic transition. The magnetic phase diagram is determined for the Laves Hf{sub 1?x}Ta{sub x}Fe{sub 2} series and its Ta concentration dependence discussed. An unusual behavior is revealed in the paramagnetic state of intermediate compositions, it gives rise to the rapid increase and saturation of the local spin fluctuations of the 3d electrons. This new result is analysed in the frame of the theory of Moriya. For a chosen composition Hf{sub 0.825}Ta{sub 0.175}Fe{sub 2}, exhibiting such remarkable features, a detailed investigation is carried out under hydrostatic pressure up to 1?GPa in order to investigate the volume effect on the magnetic properties. With increasing pressure, the magnetic transition temperature T{sub FM-AFM} from ferromagnetic to antiferromagnetic order decreases strongly non-linearly and disappears at a critical pressure of 0.75?GPa. In the pressure-induced AFM state, the field-induced first-order AFM-FM transition appears and the complex temperature dependence of the AFM-FM transition field is explained by the contribution from both the magnetic and elastic energies caused by the significant temperature variation of the amplitude of the local Fe magnetic moment. The application of an external pressure leads also to the progressive decrease of the Néel temperature T{sub N}. In addition, a large pressure effect on the spontaneous magnetization M{sub S} for pressures below 0.45?GPa, dln(M{sub s})/dP?=??6.3?×?10{sup ?2?}GPa{sup ?1} was discovered. The presented results are consistent with Moriya's theoretical predictions and can significantly help to better understand the underlying physics of itinerant electron magnetic systems nowadays widely investigated for both fundamental and applications purposes.

  14. Producers. US independents: exploring for clout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-05-25

    Are US independent oil producers an emerging voice that will catapult the country towards a new, comprehensive energy policy. Or, are they voices in a quiet wilderness of traditional oil supply at prices posted by the majors. Certainly the independents drill 85% of all new wells and produce 41% of the country's oil. But contemporary pricing practices, accompanied by growing energy interdependencies on a global scale, are realities many independents see at a foggy distance. Will they adopt the New Think of product-price values, as the OPEC countries did many years ago. This issue also presents the following data in tabular form: (1) changes in the number of US producing wells and new wells completed by state, 1985-1987; (2) ED refining netback data for the US Gulf and West Coasts, Rotterdam, and Singapore for late May 1988; and (3) ED fuel price/tax series for countries of the Eastern Hemisphere, May 1988 edition. 5 figures, 6 tables.

  15. Method of producing a high pressure gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Zollinger, William T.

    2006-07-18

    A method of producing a high pressure gas is disclosed and which includes providing a container; supplying the container with a liquid such as water; increasing the pressure of the liquid within the container; supplying a reactant composition such as a chemical hydride to the liquid under pressure in the container and which chemically reacts with the liquid to produce a resulting high pressure gas such as hydrogen at a pressure of greater than about 100 pounds per square inch of pressure; and drawing the resulting high pressure gas from the container.

  16. Solid fuel volatilization to produce synthesis gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Lanny D.; Dauenhauer, Paul J.; Degenstein, Nick J.; Dreyer, Brandon J.; Colby, Joshua L.

    2014-07-29

    A method comprising contacting a carbon and hydrogen-containing solid fuel and a metal-based catalyst in the presence of oxygen to produce hydrogen gas and carbon monoxide gas, wherein the contacting occurs at a temperature sufficiently high to prevent char formation in an amount capable of stopping production of the hydrogen gas and the carbon monoxide gas is provided. In one embodiment, the metal-based catalyst comprises a rhodium-cerium catalyst. Embodiments further include a system for producing syngas. The systems and methods described herein provide shorter residence time and high selectivity for hydrogen and carbon monoxide.

  17. Comparison of the vacuum-ultraviolet radiation response of HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/Si dielectric stacks with SiO{sub 2}/Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Upadhyaya, G. S.; Shohet, J. L.

    2007-02-12

    Vacuum ultraviolet (vuv) emitted during plasma processing degrades dielectrics by generating electron-hole pairs. VUV-induced charging of SiO{sub 2}/p-Si and HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si dielectric stacks are compared. For SiO{sub 2}/p-Si, charging is observed for photon energies >15 eV by ionization of dielectric atoms from photoinjected electrons. In HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2}/p-Si, charging is observed for photon >10 eV and is due to ionization by photoinjected electrons and by H{sup +} trapping in the HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} bulk. Hydrogen appears during annealing at the Si-SiO{sub 2} interface forming Si-H, which, during irradiation, is depassivated by photoinjected electrons. The authors conclude that dielectric charging in thin oxides (<10 nm) occurs more easily in HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} than in SiO{sub 2}.

  18. In-operando hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study on the impact of current compliance and switching cycles on oxygen and carbon defects in resistive switching Ti/HfO{sub 2}/TiN cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowinska, Malgorzata Bertaud, Thomas; Walczyk, Damian; Calka, Pauline; Walczyk, Christian; Thiess, Sebastian; Alff, Lambert; Schroeder, Thomas

    2014-05-28

    In this study, direct experimental materials science evidence of the important theoretical prediction for resistive random access memory (RRAM) technologies that a critical amount of oxygen vacancies is needed to establish stable resistive switching in metal-oxide-metal samples is presented. In detail, a novel in-operando hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy technique is applied to non-destructively investigates the influence of the current compliance and direct current voltage sweep cycles on the Ti/HfO{sub 2} interface chemistry and physics of resistive switching Ti/HfO{sub 2}/TiN cells. These studies indeed confirm that current compliance is a critical parameter to control the amount of oxygen vacancies in the conducting filaments in the oxide layer during the RRAM cell operation to achieve stable switching. Furthermore, clear carbon segregation towards the Ti/HfO{sub 2} interface under electrical stress is visible. Since carbon impurities impact the oxygen vacancy defect population under resistive switching, this dynamic carbon segregation to the Ti/HfO{sub 2} interface is suspected to negatively influence RRAM device endurance. Therefore, these results indicate that the RRAM materials engineering needs to include all impurities in the dielectric layer in order to achieve reliable device performance.

  19. Surface and interfacial reaction study of half cycle atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} on chemically treated GaSb surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhernokletov, D. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Dong, H.; Brennan, B.; Kim, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Yakimov, M.; Tokranov, V.; Oktyabrsky, S. [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States)] [College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, University at Albany - SUNY, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Wallace, R. M. [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States)

    2013-04-01

    An in situ half-cycle atomic layer deposition/X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study was conducted in order to investigate the evolution of the HfO{sub 2} dielectric interface with GaSb(100) surfaces after sulfur passivation and HCl etching, designed to remove the native oxides. With the first pulses of tetrakis(dimethylamido)hafnium(IV) and water, a decrease in the concentration of antimony oxide states present on the HCl-etched surface is observed, while antimony sulfur states diminished below the XPS detection limit on sulfur passivated surface. An increase in the amount of gallium oxide/sulfide is seen, suggesting oxygen or sulfur transfers from antimony to gallium during antimony oxides/sulfides decomposition.

  20. 3. Have the products been legally produced?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ecosystems, been protected? Climate change Have climate issues been addressed? Environmental protection Have a complex set of legal, political, social, and economic issues. Poverty, lack of education, financial issues3. Have the products been legally produced? 3.Legality Environmental aspects Social aspects

  1. Producing dicarboxylic acids using polyketide synthases

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2013-10-29

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a dicarboxylic acid (diacid). Such diacids include diketide-diacids and triketide-diacids. The invention includes recombinant nucleic acid encoding the PKS, and host cells comprising the PKS. The invention also includes methods for producing the diacids.

  2. Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    The information and analyses in Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers is intended to provide a critical review, and promote an understanding, of the possible motivations and apparent consequences of investment decisions made by some of the largest corporations in the energy industry.

  3. Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dill, Lawrence M.

    Pacific and Atlantic herring produce burst pulse sounds Ben Wilson1,2* , Robert S. Batty3 wild-caught herring. Pacific herring pro- duce distinctive bursts of pulses, termed Fast Repetitive Tick (FRT) sounds. These trains of broadband pulses (1.7­22 kHz) lasted between 0.6 s and 7.6 s. Most

  4. Cooperative Extension System Cattle Producer's Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    1150-1 Cooperative Extension System Cattle Producer's Library Cow-Calf Section CL1150 efficiency be used when balancing rations for beef cattle. One other ben- efit of the ammoniation process of wintering beef cattle. Those who have wheat or barley straw may find that ammoniation could solve

  5. Cooperative Extension System Cattle Producer's Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    1120-1 Cooperative Extension System Cattle Producer's Library Cow-Calf Section CL1120 Drought conditions greatly reduce the available for- age for wintering cattle. During drought periods, both Cows Roger Brownson, Beef Cattle Specialist Montana State University Proposed rations are based

  6. Cooperative Extension System Cattle Producer's Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Laughlin, Jay

    Cooperative Extension System Cattle Producer's Library Cow-Calf Section CL1100 Cattlemen have to vitamin A for calves or cows, may occur during drought. Even though cattle can store vitamin or the nursing-only calves during a trial period of 107 days. Roger Brownson, Beef Cattle Specialist Montana

  7. Method for producing gasoline-alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Black, C.

    1983-05-10

    A process for producing gasoline-ethanol blends comprises purifying dilute ethanol by extractive distillation and concentrating the ethanol by distillation followed by one or both of the following steps: (A) liquid extraction of ethanol into heated gasoline or (B) azeotropic distillation of ethanol with an entrainer followed by blending with gasoline.

  8. Biotech Breakthrough Produces Ethanol from Waste Glycerin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    , it actually assists with waste processing, vitamin K production and food absorption. The same principleBiotech Breakthrough Produces Ethanol from Waste Glycerin Doing something about global warming that this process creates large quantities of waste glycerin, that was so far impossible to put to good use

  9. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  10. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2006-07-31

    This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

  11. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Biochemical composition of microalgae from the green algalof Selected Photosynthetic Microalgae Producing Biofuelsof Selected Photosyn- thetic Microalgae Producing Biofuels”,

  12. Method for producing catalysis from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

    1998-01-01

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

  13. Method for producing catalysts from coal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Farcasiu, M.; Derbyshire, F.; Kaufman, P.B.; Jagtoyen, M.

    1998-02-24

    A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere. 1 fig.

  14. Method of producing .sup.67 Cu

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O'Brien, Jr., Harold A. (Los Alamos, NM); Barnes, John W. (Los Alamos, NM); Taylor, Wayne A. (Los Alamos, NM); Thomas, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM); Bentley, Glenn E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A method of producing carrier-free .sup.67 Cu by proton spallation combined with subsequent chemical separation and purification is disclosed. A target consisting essentially of pressed zinc oxide is irradiated with a high energy, high current proton beam to produce a variety of spallogenic nuclides, including .sup.67 Cu and other copper isotopes. The irradiated target is dissolved in a concentrated acid solution to which a palladium salt is added. In accordance with the preferred method, the spallogenic copper is twice coprecipitated with palladium, once with metallic zinc as the precipitating agent and once with hydrogen sulfide as the precipitating agent. The palladium/copper precipitate is then dissolved in an acid solution and the copper is separated from the palladium by liquid chromatography on an anion exchange resin.

  15. Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, James T. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, John R. (Penfield, NY)

    1984-01-01

    An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers.

  16. Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Murphy, J.T.; Miller, J.R.

    1984-08-07

    An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers. 6 figs.

  17. Method of producing microchannel and nanochannel articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Urso, Brian R.

    2010-05-04

    A method of making an article having channels therethrough includes the steps of: providing a ductile structure defining at least one macro-channel, the macro-channel containing a salt; drawing the ductile structure in the axial direction of the at least one macro-channel to reduce diameter of the macro-channel; and contacting the salt with a solvent to dissolve the salt to produce an article having at least one microchannel.

  18. Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diebold, J.P.; Evans, R.J.

    1987-04-06

    A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof as disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

  19. Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert A. Liske

    2003-09-26

    This report summarizes the work performed from 1 April 2003 to 30 September 2003 and recommends the tasks to be performed during Phase II (Pilot Evaluation). During this period discussions were held with various water agencies regarding use of the treated produced water either directly or indirectly through a water trading arrangement. In particular, several discussions were held with Monterey County Water Resources Agency, that has been charged with the long-term management and preservation of water resources in Monterey County. The Agency is very supportive of the program. However, they would like to see water quality/cost estimate data for the treated produced water from the pilot study prior to evaluating water use/water trade options. The agency sent a letter encouraging the project team to perform the pilot study to evaluate feasibility of the project. In addition, the regulations related to use of the treated water for various applications were updated during this period. Finally, the work plan, health and safety plan and sample analyses plan for performing pilot study to treat the oilfield produced water were developed during this period.

  20. ADVANCED STRIPPER GAS PRODUCED WATER REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harry Bonner; Roger Malmquist

    2003-11-01

    Natural gas and oil production from stripper wells also produces water contaminated with hydrocarbons, and in most locations, salts and trace elements. The hydrocarbons are not generally present in concentrations that allow the operator to economically recover these liquids. Produced liquids, (Stripper Gas Water) which are predominantly water, present the operator with two options; purify the water to acceptable levels of contaminates, or pay for the disposal of the water. The project scope involves testing SynCoal as a sorbent to reduce the levels of contamination in stripper gas well produced water to a level that the water can be put to a productive use. Produced water is to be filtered with SynCoal, a processed sub-bituminous coal. It is expected that the surface area of and in the SynCoal would sorb the hydrocarbons and other contaminates and the effluent would be usable for agricultural purposes. Test plan anticipates using two well locations described as being disparate in the level and type of contaminates present. The loading capacity and the rate of loading for the sorbent should be quantified in field testing situations which include unregulated and widely varying liquid flow rates. This will require significant flexibility in the initial stages of the investigation. The scope of work outlined below serves as the guidelines for the testing of SynCoal carbon product as a sorbent to remove hydrocarbons and other contaminants from the produced waters of natural gas wells. A maximum ratio of 1 lb carbon to 100 lbs water treated is the initial basis for economic design. While the levels of contaminants directly impact this ratio, the ultimate economics will be dictated by the filter servicing requirements. This experimental program was intended to identify those treatment parameters that yield the best technological practice for a given set of operating conditions. The goal of this research was to determine appropriate guidelines for field trials by accurately characterizing the performance of SynCoal over a full range of operating conditions.

  1. Oriented polyvinylidene fluoride–trifluoroethylene (P(VDF–TrFE)) films by Langmuir–Blodgett deposition: A synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lindemann, W. R.; Philiph, R. L.; Chan, D. W. W.; Ayers, C. T.; Perez, E. M.; Beckman, S. P.; Strzalka, J.; Chaudhary, S.; Vaknin, D.

    2015-10-07

    Langmuir–Blodgett films of polyvinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene – P(VDF–TrFE)-copolymers possess substantially improved electrocaloric and pyroelectric properties, when compared with conventionally spin-cast films. In order to rationalize this, we prepared single-layered films of P(VDF–TrFE) (70:30) using both deposition techniques. Grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS), reveals that Langmuir–Blodgett deposited films have a higher concentration of the ferroelectric ?-phase crystals, and that these films are highly oriented with respect to the substrate. Based on these observations, we suggest alternative means of deposition, which may substantially enhance the electrocaloric effect in P(VDF–TrFE) films. As a result, this development has significant implications for the potentialmore »use of P(VDF–TrFE) in solid-state refrigeration.« less

  2. Electrical characterization and modeling of the Au/CaF{sub 2}/nSi(111) structures with high-quality tunnel-thin fluoride layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vexler, M. I. [Institut fuer Elektronische Bauelemente und Schaltungstechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sokolov, N. S.; Suturin, S. M.; Banshchikov, A. G. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tyaginov, S. E. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Christian-Dopper-Laboratory and Institut fuer Mikroelektronik, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 25-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Grasser, T. [Christian-Dopper-Laboratory and Institut fuer Mikroelektronik, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 25-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-04-15

    Au/CaF{sub 2}/nSi(111) structures with 4-5 monolayers of epitaxial fluoride are fabricated and electrically tested. The leakage current in these structures was substantially smaller than in similar samples reported previously. Simulations adopting a Franz-type dispersion relation with Franz mass of m{sub F}approx1.2m{sub 0} for carriers in the forbidden band of CaF{sub 2} reproduced the measured current-voltage curves quite satisfactorily. Roughly, these curves could also be reproduced using the parabolic dispersion law with the electron mass of m{sub e}=1.0m{sub 0}, which is a material constant rather than a fitting parameter. Experimental facts and their comparison to modeling results allow qualification of the crystalline quality of fabricated structures as sufficient for device applications.

  3. Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H.C.

    1998-05-26

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques. 5 figs.

  4. Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

    1998-01-01

    Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

  5. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-23

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1989 is the thirteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 23 major energy companies (the FRS companies'') required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. It also traces key developments affecting the financial performance of major energy companies in 1989, as well as review of important trends.

  6. Method of producing .beta.-spodumene bodies

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chyung, Kenneth (Painted Post, NY); Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY); Holleran, Louis M. (Big Flats, NY); Olszewski, Anthony R. (Bath, NY)

    1999-01-01

    Beta-spodumene bodies and method of preparing the bodies that involves providing a uniform plastic batch of inorganic raw materials, organic binder, and vehicle, wherein the inorganic raw materials are composed of, in percent by weight, about 75% to 95% minerals, and about 5% to 25% glass. The batch is formed into a green body that is fired to produce a body composed substantially of beta-spodumene, and having a thermal expansion coefficient of <10.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C.(0-800.degree. C.), and a strength of .gtoreq.4 Ksi.

  7. Tensor mesons produced in tau lepton decays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez Castro, G.; Munoz, J. H.

    2011-05-01

    Light tensor mesons (T=a{sub 2}, f{sub 2} and K{sub 2}*) can be produced in decays of {tau} leptons. In this paper we compute the branching ratios of {tau}{yields}T{pi}{nu} decays by assuming the dominance of intermediate virtual states to model the form factors involved in the relevant hadronic matrix elements. The exclusive f{sub 2}(1270){pi}{sup -} decay mode turns out to have the largest branching ratio, of O(10{sup -4}). Our results indicate that the contribution of tensor meson intermediate states to the three-pseudoscalar channels of {tau} decays are rather small.

  8. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agblevor, F.A.

    1998-09-15

    A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

  9. Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agblevor, Foster A. (Lakewood, CO)

    1998-01-01

    A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

  10. Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Mendoza, Daniel (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-15

    Method for producing metal oxide nanoparticles. The method includes generating an aerosol of solid metallic microparticles, generating plasma with a plasma hot zone at a temperature sufficiently high to vaporize the microparticles into metal vapor, and directing the aerosol into the hot zone of the plasma. The microparticles vaporize in the hot zone into metal vapor. The metal vapor is directed away from the hot zone and into the cooler plasma afterglow where it oxidizes, cools and condenses to form solid metal oxide nanoparticles.

  11. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Carriera, Laura H. (Athens, GA)

    1983-01-01

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  12. High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

    1983-05-24

    Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

  13. Cathode for aluminum producing electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Craig W.

    2004-04-13

    A method of producing aluminum in an electrolytic cell comprising the steps of providing an anode in a cell, preferably a non-reactive anode, and also providing a cathode in the cell, the cathode comprised of a base material having low electrical conductivity reactive with molten aluminum to provide a highly electrically conductive layer on the base material. Electric current is passed from the anode to the cathode and alumina is reduced and aluminum is deposited at the cathode. The cathode base material is selected from boron carbide, and zirconium oxide.

  14. Apparatus for producing voltage and current pulses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirbie, Hugh (Los Alamos, NM); Dale, Gregory E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-12-21

    An apparatus having one or more modular stages for producing voltage and current pulses. Each module includes a diode charging means to charge a capacitive means that stores energy. One or more charging impedance means are connected to the diode charging means to provide a return current pathway. A solid-state switch discharge means, with current interruption capability, is connected to the capacitive means to discharge stored energy. Finally, a control means is provided to command the switching action of the solid-state switch discharge means.

  15. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 is the eighteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 24 major U.S. energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the United States and abroad.

  16. Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composites produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

    2013-12-24

    A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intensity acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaction products comprise a solid particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particle-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

  17. Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composties produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

    2013-12-24

    A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intenisty acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaciton products comprise a solide particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particles-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

  18. Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composites produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

    2015-12-29

    A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intensity acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaction products comprise a solid particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particle-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

  19. Very Big Accelerators as Energy Producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, R R

    2010-01-01

    One consequence of the application of superconductivity to accelerator construction is that the power consumption of accelerators will become much smaller. This raises the old possibility of using high energy protons to make neutrons which are then absorbed by fertile uranium or thorium to make a fissionable material like plutonium that can be burned in a nuclear reactor. The Energy Doubler/Saver being constructed at Fermilab is to be a superconducting accelerator that will produce 1000 GeV protons. The expected intensity of about $10^{12}$ protons per second corresponds to a beam power of about 0.2 MW. The total power requirements of the Doubler will be about 20 MW of which the injector complex will use approximately 13 MW, and the refrigeration of the superconducting magnets will use about 7 MW. Thus the beam power as projected is only a few orders of magnitude less than the accelerator power. But each 1000 GeV proton will produce about 60,000 neutrons in each nuclear cascade shower that is releaseq in a bl...

  20. Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Enid J.

    2012-05-25

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

  1. Intense ultraviolet perturbations on aquatic primary producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guimarais, Mayrene; Horvath, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, the hypothesis that one or more biodiversity drops in the Phanerozoic eon, evident in the geological record, might have been caused by the most powerful kind of stellar explosion so far known (Gamma Ray Bursts) has been discussed in several works. These stellar explosions could have left an imprint in the biological evolution on Earth and in other habitable planets. In this work we calculate the short-term lethality that a GRB would produce in the aquatic primary producers on Earth. This effect on life appears as a result of ultraviolet (UV) re-transmission in the atmosphere of a fraction of the gamma energy, resulting in an intense UV flash capable of penetrating ~ tens of meters in the water column in the ocean. We focus on the action of the UV flash on phytoplankton, as they are the main contributors to global aquatic primary productivity. Our results suggest that the UV flash could cause an hemispheric reduction of phytoplankton biomass in the upper mixed layer of the World Ocean o...

  2. Low temperature fluorination of Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} with polyvinylidine fluoride: An X-ray powder diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hancock, Cathryn A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Herranz, Tirma; Marco, Jose F. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Seranno 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Berry, Frank J. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Slater, Peter R., E-mail: p.r.slater@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Fluorination of the Ruddlesden Popper phase, Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} by heat treatment with polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) gives a range of novel oxide fluoride compounds. Fluorination with 1 mol equivalent PVDF leads to a filling of the normal Ruddlesden Popper structure anion sites and a material of composition Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5+x}F{sub 2-x} (x Almost-Equal-To 0.28(4)) which contains both Fe{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+}. Increasing the amount of PVDF to 2 mol equivalent leads to an increase in anion content due to filling of half the interstitial sites within the structure, with iron being completely reduced to Fe{sup 3+} leading to a composition Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 4}. An increase in the amount of PVDF to Almost-Equal-To 3 mol equivalent leads to a further increase in unit cell volume, attributed to complete filling of the interstitial sites and a composition Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}F{sub 6}. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra in the temperature range 10-300 K demonstrated the complexity of the magnetic interactions in each of the three phases which reflect different local compositions of oxygen and fluorine around the iron ions thus influencing the superexchange pathways. - Graphical abstract: Low temperature (375 Degree-Sign C) fluorination of Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} with poly(vinylidene fluoride) leads to the production of three new Ruddlesden Popper oxide fluorides with progressive filling of the anion sites within the structure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorination of Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} using PVDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the fluorine content with amount of PVDF used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis of three new Fe based oxide fluorides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The identification of the structures of these oxide fluorides.

  3. Methods for producing nanoparticles using palladium salt and uses thereof

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Siu-Wai; Liang, Hongying

    2015-12-01

    The disclosed subject matter is directed to a method for producing nanoparticles, as well as the nanoparticles produced by this method. In one embodiment, the nanoparticles produced by the disclosed method have a high defect density.

  4. From Investor-owned Utility to Independent Power Producer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Jun

    2003-01-01

    Utility To Independent Power Producer Jun Ishii NovemberU t i l i t y to Independent Power Producer J u n Ishiii o n decision of independent power producers (IPPs) i n the

  5. Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

  6. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-13

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 is the sixteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments, with particular reference to the 25 major energy companies (the FRS companies) required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, and other energy operations. Domestic and international operations are examined separately in this report. The data are presented in the context of key energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing strategies of corporate development and measuring the apparent success of current ongoing operations.

  7. Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Richland, WA); Hirth, John P. (Viola, ID)

    1995-01-01

    This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

  8. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L; Englund, David J; Iwasaki, Iwao; Fosnacht, Donald R; Brandon, Mark M; True, Bradford G

    2013-09-17

    A hearth furnace for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing having a drying/preheat zone, a conversion zone, a fusion zone, and optionally a cooling zone, the conversion zone is between the drying/preheat zone and the fusion zone. A moving hearth is positioned within the furnace housing. A hood or separation barrier within at least a portion of the conversion zone, fusion zone or both separates the fusion zone into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  9. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-01-01

    Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

  10. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major US e energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area. In 1996, 24 companies filed Form EIA-28. The analysis and data presented in this report represents the operations of the Financial Reporting System companies in the context of their worldwide operations and in the context of the major energy markets which they serve. Both energy and nonenergy developments of these companies are analyzed. Although the focus is on developments in 1996, important trends prior to that time are also featured. Sections address energy markets in 1996; key financial developments; oil and gas exploration, development, and production; downstream petroleum in 1996; coal and alternative energy; and foreign direct investment in US energy. 30 figs., 104 tabs.

  11. Producing usable fuel from municipal solid waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohlsson, O.O.

    1995-03-01

    Refuse disposal is a matter of increasing concern for municipalities and state governments. As existing land-fills become filled to capacity, and new landfills become more costly to site, it has become critical to develop alternative disposal methods. Some of the refuse that is presently being landfilled has the potential to provide considerable quantities of energy and thereby replace conventional fossil fuels. Another environmental concern is the problem of the emissions associated with combustion of traditional fossil fuels. The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 significantly restrict the level of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions permissible as effluent from combustion facilities. To address both of these concerns, Argonne National Laboratory, under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has developed a means of producing fuel from municipal solid waste that can be co-fired with coal to supplement coal supplies and reduce problematic emissions.

  12. Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, N.L.

    1983-11-10

    Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

  13. System and method for producing metallic iron

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bleifuss, Rodney L. (Grand Rapids, MN); Englund, David J. (Bovey, MN); Iwasaki, Iwao (Grand Rapids, MN); Fosnacht, Donald R. (Hermantown, MN); Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

    2012-01-17

    A hearth furnace 10 for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing 11 having a drying/preheat zone 12, a conversion zone 13, a fusion zone 14, and optionally a cooling zone 15, the conversion zone 13 is between the drying/preheat zone 12 and the fusion zone 14. A moving hearth 20 is positioned within the furnace housing 11. A hood or separation barrier 30 within at least a portion of the conversion zone 13, fusion zone 14 or both separates the fusion zone 14 into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth 20 and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth 20. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth 20. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

  14. Broadband microwave burst produced by electron beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. T. Altyntsev; G. D. Fleishman; G. -L. Huang; V. F. Melnikov

    2007-12-16

    Theoretical and experimental study of fast electron beams attracts a lot of attention in the astrophysics and laboratory. In the case of solar flares the problem of reliable beam detection and diagnostics is of exceptional importance. This paper explores the fact that the electron beams moving oblique to the magnetic field or along the field with some angular scatter around the beam propagation direction can generate microwave continuum bursts via gyrosynchrotron mechanism. The characteristics of the microwave bursts produced by beams differ from those in case of isotropic or loss-cone distributions, which suggests a new tool for quantitative diagnostics of the beams in the solar corona. To demonstrate the potentiality of this tool, we analyze here a radio burst occurred during an impulsive flare 1B/M6.7 on 10 March 2001 (AR 9368, N27W42). Based on detailed analysis of the spectral, temporal, and spatial relationships, we obtained firm evidence that the microwave continuum burst is produced by electron beams. For the first time we developed and applied a new forward fitting algorithm based on exact gyrosynchrotron formulae and employing both the total power and polarization measurements to solve the inverse problem of the beam diagnostics. We found that the burst is generated by a oblique beam in a region of reasonably strong magnetic field ($\\sim 200-300$ G) and the burst is observed at a quasi-transverse viewing angle. We found that the life time of the emitting electrons in the radio source is relatively short, $\\tau_l \\approx 0.5$ s, consistent with a single reflection of the electrons from a magnetic mirror at the foot point with the stronger magnetic field. We discuss the implications of these findings for the electron acceleration in flares and for beam diagnostics.

  15. City in Colorado Fueling Vehicles with Gas Produced from Wastewater...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    City in Colorado Fueling Vehicles with Gas Produced from Wastewater Treatment Facility City in Colorado Fueling Vehicles with Gas Produced from Wastewater Treatment Facility April...

  16. Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    Microalgae Producing Biofuels Euntaek Lee, Ri-Liang Heng,Microalgae Producing Biofuels”, Journal of Quantitativeconverted into liquid biofuels [50–53]. On the other hand,

  17. Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact Sheet, April 2014 Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas - Fact Sheet, April...

  18. Particulate Produced from Advanced Combustion Operation in a...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Produced from Advanced Combustion Operation in a Compression Ignition Engine Particulate Produced from Advanced Combustion Operation in a Compression Ignition Engine Determine...

  19. Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

  20. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces Upgrades in Record Time,...

  1. Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods Methods for Post Irradiation Examination of Tritium Producing Burnable Absorber Rods...

  2. Methods for producing and using densified biomass products containing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    producing and using densified biomass products containing pretreated biomass fibers Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Methods for producing and using densified biomass...

  3. Current Challenges in Commercially Producing Biofuels from Lignocellul...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Current Challenges in Commercially Producing Biofuels from Lignocellulosic Biomass Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Current Challenges in Commercially Producing Biofuels...

  4. Crystal structure and antiferromagnetic ordering of quasi-2D [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]TaF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.; LANL

    2010-04-01

    The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains Taf{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

  5. Study on the Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x}/HfO{sub 2} interface and its impacts on Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} tunneling transistor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Yingxin; Wang, Runsheng, E-mail: ruhuang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: r.wang@pku.edu.cn; Huang, Qianqian; Huang, Ru, E-mail: ruhuang@pku.edu.cn, E-mail: r.wang@pku.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Microelectronic Devices and Circuits, Institute of Microelectronics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-06-21

    In this paper, we employ first-principle calculation to investigate the Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x}/HfO{sub 2} interface, and then evaluate its impacts on Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} tunneling field-effect transistor (TFET). First-principle calculations of Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x}/HfO{sub 2} interfaces in the oxygen-rich process atmosphere indicate that the interface states originate from the Ge and Sn dangling bond, rather than Hf-bond. The total density of state shows that there are more interface states in the semiconductor bandgap with increasing Sn fraction. By further incorporating the material and interface parameters from density functional theory calculation into advanced device simulation, the electrical characteristics of Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} TFET are investigated. Removing the Sn atom from the first atom layer of Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} in device processes is found to be beneficial to reduce the degradations. For the degradation mechanisms, the trap-assisted-tunneling is the dominant mechanism at the low Sn fraction, and enhanced Shockley-Read-Hall recombination induced by traps becomes the dominant mechanism with increasing Sn fraction. The results are helpful for the interface optimization of Ge{sub 1?x}Sn{sub x} TFET.

  6. Effect of current compliance and voltage sweep rate on the resistive switching of HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar structure as measured by conductive atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, You-Lin Liao, Chun-Wei; Ling, Jing-Jenn

    2014-06-16

    The electrical characterization of HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar resistive switching memory structure was studied using conductive atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a semiconductor parameter analyzer, Agilent 4156C. The metal alloy Invar was used as the metal substrate to ensure good ohmic contact with the substrate holder of the AFM. A conductive Pt/Ir AFM tip was placed in direct contact with the HfO{sub 2} surface, such that it acted as the top electrode. Nanoscale current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of the HfO{sub 2}/ITO/Invar structure were measured by applying a ramp voltage through the conductive AFM tip at various current compliances and ramp voltage sweep rates. It was found that the resistance of the low resistance state (RLRS) decreased with increasing current compliance value, but resistance of high resistance state (RHRS) barely changed. However, both the RHRS and RLRS decreased as the voltage sweep rate increased. The reasons for this dependency on current compliance and voltage sweep rate are discussed.

  7. Density functional theory simulations of amorphous high-oxides on a compound semiconductor alloy: a-Al2O3/InGaAs(100)-(42), a-HfO2/InGaAs(100)-(42), and a-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kummel, Andrew C.

    atomic layer deposition Appl. Phys. Lett. 104, 042904 (2014); 10.1063/1.4863440 Si passivation effects x 0.53 ) and atomic-layer deposited Al 2 O 3 and HfO 2 Appl. Phys. Lett. 94, 202110 (2009); 10.1063/1.3137187 Energy-band parameters of atomic layer deposited Al 2 O 3 and HfO 2 on In x Ga 1 - x As Appl. Phys. Lett

  8. FLUORINE IN THE SOLAR NEIGHBORHOOD: IS IT ALL PRODUCED IN ASYMPTOTIC GIANT BRANCH STARS?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jönsson, H.; Ryde, N. [Lund Observatory, Department of Astronomy and Theoretical Physics, Lund University, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Harper, G. M. [School of Physics, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Richter, M. J. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Hinkle, K. H., E-mail: henrikj@astro.lu.se [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, P.O. Box 26732, Tucson, AZ 85726 (United States)

    2014-07-10

    The origin of ''cosmic'' fluorine is uncertain, but there are three proposed production sites/mechanisms for the origin: asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, ? nucleosynthesis in Type II supernovae, and/or the winds of Wolf-Rayet stars. The relative importance of these production sites has not been established even for the solar neighborhood, leading to uncertainties in stellar evolution models of these stars as well as uncertainties in the chemical evolution models of stellar populations. We determine the fluorine and oxygen abundances in seven bright, nearby giants with well determined stellar parameters. We use the 2.3 ?m vibrational-rotational HF line and explore a pure rotational HF line at 12.2 ?m. The latter has never been used before for an abundance analysis. To be able to do this, we have calculated a line list for pure rotational HF lines. We find that the abundances derived from the two diagnostics agree. Our derived abundances are well reproduced by chemical evolution models including only fluorine production in AGB stars and, therefore, we draw the conclusion that this might be the main production site of fluorine in the solar neighborhood. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of using the 12 ?m HF lines to determine the possible contribution of the ? process to the fluorine budget at low metallicities where the difference between models including and excluding this process is dramatic.

  9. Alloy and method of producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hufnagel, Todd C.; Ott, Ryan T.; Fan, Cang; Kecskes, Laszlo

    2005-07-19

    In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, an alloy or other composite material is provided formed of a bulk metallic glass matrix with a microstructure of crystalline metal particles. The alloy preferably has a composition of (X.sub.a Ni.sub.b Cu.sub.c).sub.100-d-c Y.sub.d Al.sub.c, wherein the sum of a, b and c equals 100, wherein 40.ltoreq.a.ltoreq.80, 0.ltoreq.b.ltoreq.35, 0.ltoreq.c.ltoreq.40, 4.ltoreq.d.ltoreq.30, and 0.ltoreq.e.ltoreq.20, and wherein preferably X is composed of an early transition metal and preferably Y is composed of a refractory body-centered cubic early transition metal. A preferred embodiment of the invention also provides a method of producing an alloy composed of two or more phases at ambient temperature. The method includes the steps of providing a metastable crystalline phase composed of at least two elements, heating the metastable crystalline phase together with at least one additional element to form a liquid, casting the liquid, and cooling the liquid to form the alloy. In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, the composition and cooling rate of the liquid can be controlled to determine the volume fraction of the crystalline phase and determine the size of the crystalline particles, respectively.

  10. Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The energy industry generally and petroleum and natural gas operations in particular are frequently reacting to a variety of unsettling forces. Falling oil prices, economic upswings, currency devaluations, increasingly rigorous environmental quality standards, deregulation of electricity markets, and continued advances in exploration and production technology were among the challenges and opportunities to the industry in 1997. To analyze the extent to which these and other developments have affected energy industry financial and operating performance, strategies, and industry structure, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains the Financial Reporting Systems (FRS). Through Form EIA-28, major US energy companies annually report to the FRS. Financial and operating information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production (upstream), petroleum refining and marketing (downstream), other energy operations, and nonenergy business. Performance Profiles of Major Producers 1997 examines the interplays of energy markets, companies` strategies, and government policies (in 1997 and in historical context) that gave rise to the results given here. The report also analyzes other key aspects of energy company financial performance as seen through the multifaceted lens provided by the FRS data and complementary data for industry overall. 41 figs., 77 tabs.

  11. Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hasoon, F.S.; Nelson, A.J.

    1996-01-16

    A process is described for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10{sup {minus}6} torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m.

  12. Management of produced water in oil and gas operations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Chirag V.

    2005-02-17

    Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment of the producing well. The development of effective produced water management strategies poses a big challenge...

  13. NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

    2003-09-24

    The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

  14. Methods for producing partially digested restriction DNA fragments and for producing a partially modified PCR product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method of making a partially modified PCR product from a DNA fragment with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In a standard PCR process, the DNA fragment is combined with starting deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a primer, a buffer and a DNA polymerase in a PCR mixture. The PCR mixture is then reacted in the PCR producing copies of the DNA fragment. The improvement of the present invention is adding an amount of a modifier at any step prior to completion of the PCR process thereby randomly and partially modifying the copies of the DNA fragment as a partially modified PCR product. The partially modified PCR product may then be digested with an enzyme that cuts the partially modified PCR product at unmodified sites thereby producing an array of DNA restriction fragments.

  15. Proposed replacement and operation of the anhydrous hydrogen fluoride supply and fluidized-bed chemical processing systems at Building 9212, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to replace the existing anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (AHF) supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems for the Weapons Grade Highly Enriched Uranium Chemical Recovery and Recycle Facility, Building 9212, which is located within the Y-12 Plant on DOE`s Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. The proposed replacement system would be based upon modern design criteria and safety analyses. The replacement AHF supply and distribution system equipment would be located on the existing Dock 8/8A at Building 9212. Utilities would be extended to the dock to service the process equipment. The following process equipment modules would be prefabricated for installation at the modified dock: an AHF cylinder enclosure, an AHF supply manifold and vaporizer module, an AHF sump tank and transfer skid, and an AHF supply off-gas scrubber assembly module. The fluidized-bed reactor system would be constructed in an area adjacent to the existing system in Building 9212. The replacement equipment would consist of a new reduction fluidized-bed reactor, a hydrofluorination fluidized-bed reactor, and associated air emission control equipment. The no-action alternative, which is the continued operation of the existing AHF supply and fluidized-bed reactor systems, was also evaluated.

  16. Measurement of the relative fraction of ttbar events produced...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    produced via gluon fusion in ppbar collision at s**(12) 1.96 TeV at CDF In this thesis we present a measurement of the relative fraction of tbar t events produced via...

  17. Energy Department Selects Five Projects in First Step to Produce...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Selects Five Projects in First Step to Produce Fresh Water from CO2 Storage Sites Energy Department Selects Five Projects in First Step to Produce Fresh Water from CO2 Storage...

  18. Influences of climate on aflatoxin producing fungi and aflatoxin contamination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cotty, Peter J.

    Influences of climate on aflatoxin producing fungi and aflatoxin contamination Peter J. Cotty a human exposure, crop contamination with aflatoxins causes significant economic loss for producers, marketers, and processors of diverse susceptible crops. Aflatoxin contamination occurs when specific fungi

  19. Physical and Hydrodynamic Properties of Flocs Produced During Biological

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical and Hydrodynamic Properties of Flocs Produced During Biological Hydrogen Production Jian in continuous culture bioreactors used for hydrogen production, but the fractal and hydrodynamic properties imperme- able flocs are produced in biohydrogen reactors that have settling properties in reasonable

  20. Factors Affecting Cotton Producers' Choice of Marketing Outlet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Jason 1979-

    2012-08-16

    In recent years, changes in government policies, supply and demand fundamentals and price patterns in the cotton market have led to several shifts in how producers market their cotton. This thesis examined producer cash marketing choices, including...

  1. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen: A Study...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Produce Hydrogen: A Study of Issues Related to the Use of Aluminum for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage. Version 2, 2010. Reaction of Aluminum with Water to Produce Hydrogen: A...

  2. ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart.........................................................................................8 Coal and Metabolite Enrichment Studies ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16

  3. Multi-echelon inventory optimization for fresh produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limvorasak, Saran

    2013-01-01

    For fresh produce, the product freshness is a key value to end consumers. Retailers try to maximize product freshness at retail stores while maintaining high product availability. Fresh produce that is close to the end of ...

  4. Ion emission and expansion in laser-produced tin plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burdt, Russell Allen

    2011-01-01

    energy, in which the ablation pressure generated in the laser produced plasma is used to compress fusion reactants to thermonuclear

  5. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  6. Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

  7. Lift producing device exhibiting low drag and reduced ventilation potential and method for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Richard A. (115 Wimico Dr., Indian Harbour Beach, FL 32937)

    1991-01-01

    A lift producing device is disclosed which is adapted to be connected to a vehicle to provide lift to the vehicle when the vehicle is moved relative to a first fluid medium having a first density and viscosity and being in contact with a second fluid medium adjacent the vehicle. The second fluid medium has a second fluid density which is different from the first fluid density. The lift producing device comprises opposed first and second major surfaces joined at a longitudinally extending leading edge and at a longitudinally extending trailing edge, with at least a portion of the longitudinally extending leading edge being spaced from the longitudinally extending trailing edge by a predetermined mean chord length. When the vehicle is moved relative to the first fluid medium at a velocity within a range of predetermined velocities, with each of the velocities having a direction inclined from a plane extending through the leading edge and the trailing edge within a predetermined angular range, a region of high pressure is generated in the first fluid medium adjacent the first major surface and a region of low pressure is generated in the first fluid medium adjacent the second major surface. The lift producing device has a cross-sectional shape which will generate a pressure distribution around the device when the vehicle is moved relative to the first fluid medium at a velocity within the range of predetermined velocities such that the first fluid medium exhibits attached laminar flow along the device for a portion of the predetermined mean chord length from the leading edge to the trailing edge and will neither form a laminar separation bubble adjacent the second major surface of the device, nor exhibit turbulent separation adjacent the second major surface for substantially all of the predetermined mean chord length from the leading edge to the trailing edge. The portion along which attached laminar flow is maintained is the longest portion which will still fulfill the flow separation requirements. A method for producing the foil is also disclosed.

  8. Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-08-04

    A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

  9. Thermochemical method for producing hydrogen from hydrogen sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrington, D.R.

    1984-02-21

    Hydrogen is produced from hydrogen sulfide by a 3-step, thermochemical process comprising: (a) contacting hydrogen sulfide with carbon dioxide to form carbonyl sulfide and water, (b) contacting the carbonyl sulfide produced in (a) with oxygen to form carbon monoxide and sulfur dioxide, and (c) contacting the carbon monoxide produced in (b) with water to form carbon dioxide and hydrogen.

  10. Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taskaev, Sergey Yur'evich

    247 Neutron producing target for accelerator based neutron source for NCT V. Belov1 , S. Fadeev1, Russia Summary Neutron producing targets for novel accelerator based neutron source [1, 2] are presented Neutron producing target is one of the main elements of proposed accelerator based facility for neutron

  11. Modified Fresnel zone plates that produce sharp Gaussian focal spots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahns, Jürgen

    Modified Fresnel zone plates that produce sharp Gaussian focal spots Qing Cao and Ju¨rgen Jahns Fresnel zone plate that can produce an approximate Gaussian focal spot is proposed for the focusing of 7.7 nm can be produced by a modified Fresnel zone plate with a minimum structure size of 30 nm

  12. Method of producing Pb-stabilized superconductor precursors and method of producing superconductor articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, Donald M. (Knoxville, TN); Hsu, Huey S. (Knoxville, TN); Brynestad, Jorulf (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01

    Metal oxide superconductor powder precursors are prepared in an aerosol pyrolysis process. A solution of the metal cations is introduced into a furnace at 600.degree.-1000.degree. C. for 0.1 to 60 seconds. The process produces micron to submicron size powders without the usual loss of the lead stabilizer. The resulting powders have a narrow particle size distribution, a small grain size, and are readily converted to a superconducting composition upon subsequent heat treatment. The precursors are placed in a metal body deformed to form a wire or tape and heated to form a superconducting article. The fine powders permit a substantial reduction in heat treatment time, thus enabling a continuous processing of the powders into superconducting wire, tape or multifilamentary articles by the powder-in-tube process.

  13. Method of producing Pb-stabilized superconductor precursors and method of producing superconductor articles therefrom

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kroeger, D.M.; Hsu, H.S.; Brynestad, J.

    1995-03-07

    Metal oxide superconductor powder precursors are prepared in an aerosol pyrolysis process. A solution of the metal cations is introduced into a furnace at 600--1,000 C for 0.1 to 60 seconds. The process produces micron to submicron size powders without the usual loss of the lead stabilizer. The resulting powders have a narrow particle size distribution, a small grain size, and are readily converted to a superconducting composition upon subsequent heat treatment. The precursors are placed in a metal body deformed to form a wire or tape and heated to form a superconducting article. The fine powders permit a substantial reduction in heat treatment time, thus enabling a continuous processing of the powders into superconducting wire, tape or multifilamentary articles by the powder-in-tube process. 3 figs.

  14. Evaluation of DUF{sub 6}-G-Q-STU-001 (ALARA analysis supporting approval of authorized limits).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ranek, N. L.; Croff, A. G.; Cheng, J.-J.; Gillette, J. L.; Avci, H. I.

    2004-06-29

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected Uranium Disposition Services, LLC (UDS) to proceed with disposition of the inventory of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF{sub 6}) for which DOE has management responsibility. To accomplish this task, UDS will construct and operate facilities at two DOE-owned sites, one near Paducah, Kentucky, and another near Portsmouth, Ohio, to convert DUF{sub 6} to uranium oxide (principally U{sub 3}O{sub 8}). The off-gas treatment system for the conversion process will produce aqueous hydrogen fluoride (AqHF), also known as hydrofluoric acid, and a relatively small amount of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), each containing some residual radioactive material. As part of its contractual charge, UDS must identify and implement a disposition for all three products generated by the DUF{sub 6} conversion facilities: uranium oxide, AqHF, and CaF{sub 2}. The UDS DUF{sub 6} Conversion Product Management Plan (DUF{sub 6}-UDS-PLN-004, September 2003) concludes that a viable commercial market exists for AqHF, which, if not sold, would have to be neutralized, producing a relatively large quantity of additional CaF{sub 2}. Although CaF{sub 2} has very limited market potential, there is some possibility that it also could be sold. If these potential markets could be developed, DOE would save the costs of neutralizing AqHF and/or disposing of the CaF{sub 2} neutralization product. Accordingly, UDS has decided to seek approval from DOE for unrestricted release of both AqHF and CaF{sub 2} that would be generated if AqHF could not be sold or if sales were interrupted. If AqHF were sold, the relatively small quantity of CaF{sub 2} still being generated by the DUF{sub 6} conversion process off-gas treatment system would most likely be disposed of as waste. The main product of conversion, depleted uranium oxide, will be reused to the extent possible or disposed of as waste, if no practical reuse option is found.

  15. Micro helical polymeric structures produced by variable voltage direct electrospinning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. P. Shariatpanahi; A. Iraji zad; I. Abdollahzadeh; R. Shirsavar; D. Bonn; R. Ejtehadi

    2011-09-12

    Direct near field electrospinning is used to produce very long helical polystyrene microfibers in water. The pitch length of helices can be controlled by changing the applied voltage, allowing to produce both micro springs and microchannels. Using a novel high frequency variable voltage electrospinning method we found the helix formation speed and compared the experimental buckling frequency to theoretical expressions for viscous and elastic buckling. Finally we showed that the newmethod can be used to produce new periodic micro and nano structures.

  16. Low-Temperature and Co-Produced Resources Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geothermal Technologies Office, U.S. Department of Energy

    2013-02-01

    This two-page Geothermal Technologies Office fact sheet provides an overview of low-temperature and co-produced resources. It includes technology benefits and project highlights.

  17. Treating and Reusing Produced Water | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    center, the Oil & Gas Technology Center in Oklahoma City, are working to develop new cost-effective and sustainable methods for treating and reusing produced water. This...

  18. ITP Steel: Theoretical Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Minimum Energies to Produce Steel for Selected Conditions, March 2000 theoreticalminimumenergies.pdf More Documents & Publications Ironmaking Process Alternatives Screening Study...

  19. Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in Laser-Produced Underdense Plasma for Efficient X-Ray Generation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Supersonic Heat Wave Propagation in...

  20. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria; Nair, Vijay; Munsterman, Erwin Hunh; Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus; Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius

    2013-05-28

    Methods for treating a subsurface formation and compositions produced therefrom are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  1. Scientists propose a solution to a critical barrier to producing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will need to produce self-sustaining fusion reactions, or "burning plasmas," to generate electric power. Such machines include proposed successors to ITER, a 20 billion...

  2. Energy Department Announces $12 Million for Technologies to Produce...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    residues and woody biomass. Carbon fiber derived from biomass may be less costly to manufacture and offer greater environmental benefits than traditional carbon fiber produced...

  3. From Producer Innovation to User and Open Collaborative Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baldwin, Carliss

    In this paper we assess the economic viability of innovation by producers relative to two increasingly important alternative models: innovations by single user individuals or firms, and

  4. Effect of sewage sludge content on gas quality and solid residues produced by cogasification in an updraft gasifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seggiani, Maurizia, E-mail: m.seggiani@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Puccini, Monica, E-mail: m.puccini@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy); Raggio, Giovanni, E-mail: g.raggio@tiscali.it [Italprogetti Engineering SPA, Lungarno Pacinotti, 59/A, 56020 San Romano (Pisa) (Italy); Vitolo, Sandra, E-mail: s.vitolo@diccism.unipi.it [Department of Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry and Material Science, University of Pisa, Largo Lucio Lazzarino 1, 56126 Pisa (Italy)

    2012-10-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cogasification of sewage sludge with wood pellets in updraft gasifier was analysed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of sewage sludge content on the gasification process were examined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sewage sludge addition up to 30 wt.% reduces moderately the process performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer At high sewage sludge content slagging and clinker formation occurred. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Solid residues produced resulted acceptable at landfills for non-hazardous waste. - Abstract: In the present work, the gasification with air of dehydrated sewage sludge (SS) with 20 wt.% moisture mixed with conventional woody biomass was investigated using a pilot fixed-bed updraft gasifier. Attention was focused on the effect of the SS content on the gasification performance and on the environmental impact of the process. The results showed that it is possible to co-gasify SS with wood pellets (WPs) in updraft fixed-bed gasification installations. However, at high content of sewage sludge the gasification process can become instable because of the very high ash content and low ash fusion temperatures of SS. At an equivalent ratio of 0.25, compared with wood pellets gasification, the addition of sewage sludge led to a reduction of gas yield in favor of an increase of condensate production with consequent cold gas efficiency decrease. Low concentrations of dioxins/furans and PAHs were measured in the gas produced by SS gasification, well below the limiting values for the exhaust gaseous emissions. NH{sub 3}, HCl and HF contents were very low because most of these compounds were retained in the wet scrubber systems. On the other hand, high H{sub 2}S levels were measured due to high sulfur content of SS. Heavy metals supplied with the feedstocks were mostly retained in gasification solid residues. The leachability tests performed according to European regulations showed that metals leachability was within the limits for landfilling inert residues. On the other hand, sulfate and chloride releases were found to comply with the limits for non-hazardous residues.

  5. Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus niger ATCC 1015 versus enzyme-producing CBS 513.88

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriev, Igor V.

    2011-01-01

    expression  profiles.   Mol.   Genet.   Genomics  279: Comparative genomics of citric-acid producing Aspergillus2006.  Aspergillus niger genomics: past, present and into 

  6. The Key Coal Producers ONLINE SUPPORTING MATERIALS to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    The Key Coal Producers ONLINE SUPPORTING MATERIALS to A Global Coal Production Forecast with Multi's most important coal-producing area is North-Central China. The provinces of Inner Mongolia, Ningxia, Shaanxi and Shanxi together accounted for 83 percent of China's proven coal reserves in 2000, and Shanxi

  7. Rotating superconductor magnet for producing rotating lobed magnetic field lines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hilal, Sadek K. (Englewood Cliffs, NJ); Sampson, William B. (Bellport, NY); Leonard, Edward F. (Leonia, NJ)

    1978-01-01

    This invention provides a rotating superconductor magnet for producing a rotating lobed magnetic field, comprising a cryostat; a superconducting magnet in the cryostat having a collar for producing a lobed magnetic field having oppositely directed adjacent field lines; rotatable support means for selectively rotating the superconductor magnet; and means for energizing the superconductor magnet.

  8. Pop Up Radio Archive: A Solution for Independent Producers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Militzer, Burkhard

    Pop Up Radio Archive: A Solution for Independent Producers Anne Wootton, Bailey Smith, and Christen Penny UC Berkeley School of Information May 4, 2012 #12;Pop Up Radio Archive 2 Abstract Independent* solutions do not adequately serve independent radio producers, who "have all these hard drives at home

  9. Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balzs Arat1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Magnetic minerals produced by magnetotactic bacteria Balázs Arató1 , Mihály Pósfai1 and Rafal E-controlled mineralization Abstract. Magnetotactic bacteria produce intracellular magnetic minerals that have distinct for studying the biological membrane around the mineral grains. Our goals were to deduce the possible growth

  10. Fitness Biasing Produce Adaptive Gaits for Hexapod Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    Fitness Biasing Produce Adaptive Gaits for Hexapod Robots Gary Parker Computer Science Connecticut in an earlier work an effective learning cycles a hexapod robot. learning system capable of adapting to changes produce gaits hexapod robots difficult problem. particularly challenging if wants programs altered adapt

  11. A new method for producing molybdenum-99 without the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    -life Molybdenum-99 decays into technetium-99. It is this that is used as the actual tracer in medical imaging for molybdenum-99 to be produced in other nuclear reactors than those using uranium fission, improving worldwideA new method for producing molybdenum-99 without the need for enriched uranium can bring an end

  12. Method of producing adherent metal oxide coatings on metallic surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lane, Michael H. (Clifton Park, NY); Varrin, Jr., Robert D. (McLean, VA)

    2001-01-01

    Provided is a process of producing an adherent synthetic corrosion product (sludge) coating on metallic surfaces. The method involves a chemical reaction between a dry solid powder mixture of at least one reactive metal oxide with orthophosphoric acid to produce a coating in which the particles are bound together and the matrix is adherent to the metallic surface.

  13. Methods and apparatus for producing and storing positrons and protons

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Akers, Douglas W. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-07-06

    Apparatus for producing and storing positrons may include a trap that defines an interior chamber therein and that contains an electric field and a magnetic field. The trap may further include a source material that includes atoms that, when activated by photon bombardment, become positron emitters to produce positrons. The trap may also include a moderator positioned adjacent the source material. A photon source is positioned adjacent the trap so that photons produced by the photon source bombard the source material to produce the positron emitters. Positrons from the positron emitters and moderated positrons from the moderator are confined within the interior chamber of the trap by the electric and magnetic fields. Apparatus for producing and storing protons are also disclosed.

  14. Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R. [Campbell Applied Physics

    2011-05-20

    ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

  15. Micro-PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) study of the effects of fluoride on mineral distribution patterns in enamel and dentin in the developing hamster tooth germ

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyaruu, D.M.; Tros, G.H.; Bronckers, A.L.; Woeltgens, J.H. (ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherland))

    1990-06-01

    Micro-PIXE (proton-induced X-ray emission) analysis was performed on unfixed and anhydrously prepared sections from developing enamel and dentin from hamsters injected with a single dose of 20 mg NaF/kg body weight. Fluoride, apart from inducing the formation of the characteristic paired response in the enamel (i.e., a hyper- followed by a hypomineralized band in the secretory enamel), also induces the formation of sub-ameloblastic cystic lesions under the transitional and early secretory enamel accompanied by relatively intense hypermineralization of the underlying cystic enamel surface. These cystic lesions, however, were only found to be associated with certain isolated populations of these cells. In addition, these lesions were restricted to the smooth surfaces of the tooth germ only. Cystic lesions such as those seen under the transitional and early secretory ameloblasts were not observed under the fully secretory or maturation stage ameloblasts. Why fluoride induces the formation of cystic lesions in some ameloblast populations while other cells in the same stage of development apparently remain unaffected, is a matter which needs further investigation.

  16. Produced water volumes and management practices in the United States.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C. E.; Veil, J. A.

    2009-09-01

    Produced water volume generation and management in the United States are not well characterized at a national level. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Argonne National Laboratory to compile data on produced water associated with oil and gas production to better understand the production volumes and management of this water. The purpose of this report is to improve understanding of produced water by providing detailed information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the ways in which produced water is disposed or reused. As the demand for fresh water resources increases, with no concomitant increase in surface or ground water supplies, alternate water sources, like produced water, may play an important role. Produced water is water from underground formations that is brought to the surface during oil or gas production. Because the water has been in contact with hydrocarbon-bearing formations, it contains some of the chemical characteristics of the formations and the hydrocarbons. It may include water from the reservoir, water previously injected into the formation, and any chemicals added during the production processes. The physical and chemical properties of produced water vary considerably depending on the geographic location of the field, the geologic formation, and the type of hydrocarbon product being produced. Produced water properties and volume also vary throughout the lifetime of a reservoir. Produced water is the largest volume by-product or waste stream associated with oil and gas exploration and production. Previous national produced water volume estimates are in the range of 15 to 20 billion barrels (bbl; 1 bbl = 42 U.S. gallons) generated each year in the United States (API 1988, 2000; Veil et al. 2004). However, the details on generation and management of produced water are not well understood on a national scale. Argonne National Laboratory developed detailed national-level information on the volume of produced water generated in the United States and the manner in which produced water is managed. This report presents an overview of produced water, summarizes the study, and presents results from the study at both the national level and the state level. Chapter 2 presents background information on produced water, describing its chemical and physical characteristics, where it is produced, and the potential impacts of produced water to the environment and to oil and gas operations. A review of relevant literature is also included. Chapter 3 describes the methods used to collect information, including outreach efforts to state oil and gas agencies and related federal programs. Because of the inconsistency in the level of detail provided by various state agencies, the approaches and assumptions used to extrapolate data values are also discussed. In Chapter 4, the data are presented, and national trends and observations are discussed. Chapter 5 presents detailed results for each state, while Chapter 6 presents results from federal sources for oil and gas production (i.e., offshore, onshore, and tribal lands). Chapter 7 summarizes the study and presents conclusions.

  17. When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel, Howard E.

    ABSTRACT When fish die, bacteria or the enzymes they produce invade the flesh of fish. This process produces toxic compounds in the fish and the fish becomes spoiled. Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy neural network (ANN) for the development of an ANN based FT-IR Screening System for fish

  18. Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

    2014-10-07

    The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

  19. Compositions produced using an in situ heat treatment process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Munsterman, Erwin Henh (Amsterdam, NL); Van Bergen, Petrus Franciscus (Amsterdam, NL); Van Den Berg, Franciscus Gondulfus Antonius (Amsterdam, NL)

    2009-10-20

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing hydrocarbons from a subsurface formation includes providing heat to the subsurface formation using an in situ heat treatment process. One or more formation particles may be formed during heating of the subsurface formation. Fluid that includes hydrocarbons and the formation particles may be produced from the subsurface formation. The formation particles in the produced fluid may include cenospheres and have an average particle size of at least 0.5 micrometers.

  20. Micro-mechanical logic for field produceable gate arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Manu

    2005-01-01

    A paradigm of micro-mechanical gates for field produceable logic is explored. A desktop manufacturing system is sought after which is capable of printing functional logic devices in the field. A logic scheme which induces ...

  1. Effects of the Biologically Produced Polymer Alginic Acid on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Effects of the Biologically Produced Polymer Alginic Acid on Macroscopic and Microscopic Calcite of carbonate minerals has significant envi- ronmental effects. Microorganisms affect carbonate dissolution, and hydrogeological systems. Calcite is an important reservoir of carbon, and accelerated dissolution of calcite

  2. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method Title: Search for a standard model...

  3. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method Khachatryan, V. Yerevan Physics Inst. (YerPhI)...

  4. Performance profiles of major energy producers 1995, January 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    This publication examines developments in the operations of the major U.S. energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area.

  5. Time-to-Produce, Inventory, and Asset Prices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhanhui

    2012-10-19

    In a production-based general equilibrium model, I study the impact of time-to-build and time-to-produce technology constraints and inventory on asset prices and macroeconomic quantity dynamics. A time-to-build constraint ...

  6. Fact #600: December 7, 2009 China Produced More Vehicles than...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    produced in China and the U.S. for various years starting in 1980. In the year 2008 Chinese production surpassed the U.S by 0.8 million vehicles. For more detailed information,...

  7. Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    564 Upgrades in Record Time Spotlight on Austin, Texas: Best Offer Ever Produces 564 Upgrades in Record Time This Better Buildings case study from April 2011 focuses on grantee...

  8. Reactive binders for metal parts produced by Three Dimensional Printing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Helen Jean

    1997-01-01

    Three Dimensional Printing (3DP) is a solid free form fabrication process which enables the construction of parts directly from computer-aided design (CAD) models. In the current process, metal parts are produced by printing ...

  9. SaskPower Small Power Producers Program (Saskatchewan, Canada)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Power Producers Program accommodates customers who wish to generate up to 100 kilowatts (kW) of electricity for the purpose of offsetting power that would otherwise be purchased from...

  10. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, Elias (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1984-01-01

    Efficiency of process for producing H.sub.2 by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  11. Method for producing hydrogen and oxygen by use of algae

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Greenbaum, E.

    1982-06-16

    Efficiency of process for producing H/sub 2/ by subjecting algae in an aqueous phase to light irradiation is increased by culturing algae which has been bleached during a first period of irradiation in a culture medium in an aerobic atmosphere until it has regained color and then subjecting this algae to a second period of irradiation wherein hydrogen is produced at an enhanced rate.

  12. Process for producing peracids from aliphatic hydroxy carboxylic acids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chum, H.L.; Palasz, P.D.; Ratcliff, M.A.

    1984-12-20

    A process is described for producing peracids from lactic acid-containing solutions derived from biomass processing systems. It consists of adjusting the pH of the solution to about 8 to 9 and removing alkaline residue fractions therefrom to form a solution comprised substantially of lower aliphatic hydroxy acids. The solution is oxidized to produce volatile lower aliphatic aldehydes. The aldehydes are removed as they are generated and converted to peracids.

  13. Characterizing the noise produced by hard disk drives 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherniak, Bruce Marshall

    1991-01-01

    CHARACTERIZING THE NOISE PRODUCED BY HARD DISK DRIVES A Thesis by BRUCE MARSHALL CHERNIAK Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1991 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering CHARACTERIZING THE NOISE PRODUCED BY HARD DISK DRIVES A Thesis by BRUCE MARSHALL CHERNIAK Approved as to style and content by: Karan L. Watson (Chair of Committee) Hosame Abu-Amara (Member...

  14. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strongin, Myron (Center Moriches, NY); Ruckman, Mark (Middle Island, NY); Strongin, Daniel (Port Jefferson, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate.

  15. Method for producing high quality thin layer films on substrates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Strongin, M.; Ruckman, M.; Strongin, D.

    1994-04-26

    A method for producing high quality, thin layer films of inorganic compounds upon the surface of a substrate is disclosed. The method involves condensing a mixture of preselected molecular precursors on the surface of a substrate and subsequently inducing the formation of reactive species using high energy photon or charged particle irradiation. The reactive species react with one another to produce a film of the desired compound upon the surface of the substrate. 4 figures.

  16. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called ``produced water.`` Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  17. Produced water radionuclide hazard/risk assessment, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, L.D.; Meinhold, A.F.; Nagy, J.

    1991-06-01

    Petroleum production may be accompanied by the production of saline water, called produced water.'' Produced water discharged into freshwater streams, estuaries, coastal and outer continental shelf waters can contained enhanced levels of radium isotopes. This document reports on the first phase of a study to estimate the risk to human health and the environment from radium discharged in produced water. The study involved five major steps: (1) evaluate the usefulness of available produced water outfall data for developing estimates of radium environmental concentrations; (2) review the literature on the bioaccumulation of radium by aquatic organism; (3) review the literature on the effects of radiation on aquatic organisms; (4) review the information available concerning the human health risks associated with exposure to Ra-226 and Ra-228 and (5) perform a conservative, screening-level assessment of the health and environmental risks posed by Ra-226 and Ra-228 discharged in produced waters. A screening-level analysis was performed to determine whether radium discharged to coastal Louisiana in produced waters presents potential health or environmental risks requiring further study. This conservative assessment suggested that no detectable impact on populations of fish, molluscs or crustaceans from radium discharged in produced waters is likely. The analysis also suggested that there is a potential for risk were an individual to ingest a large amount of seafood harvested near a produced water discharge point over a lifetime. The number of excess cancers predicted per year under a conservative scenario is comparable to those expected to result from background concentrations of radium.

  18. Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Spectroscopic Study of Band Offsets and Interface Self-cleaning by Atomic Layer Deposited HfO2 on In0.53Ga0.47As and In0.52Al0.48As

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kobayashi, Masaharu; /SLAC, SSRL; Chen, P.T.; Sun, Y.; Goel, N.; Majhi, P.; Garner, M; Tsai, W.; Pianetta, P.; Nishi, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2008-10-31

    The Synchrotron Radiation Photoemission Spectroscopic (SRPES) study was conducted to (a) investigate the surface chemistry of In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As post chemical and thermal treatments, (b) construct band diagram and (c) investigate the interface property of HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.48}As. Dilute HCl and HF etch remove native oxides on In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.47}As, whereas in-situ vacuum annealing removes surface arsenic pile-up. After the atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2}, native oxides were considerably reduced compared to that in as-received epi-layers, strongly suggesting the self-clean mechanism. Valence and conduction band offsets are measured to be 3.37 {+-} 0.1eV, 1.80 {+-} 0.3eV for In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As and 3.00 {+-} 0.1eV, 1.47 {+-} 0.3eV for In{sub 0.52}Al{sub 0.47}As, respectively.

  19. First-principles studies of structural stabilities and enthalpies of formation of refractory intermetallics: TM and TM3 (T = Ti, Zr, Hf; M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xing, Weiwei; Chen, X.; Li, Dianzhong; Li, Y. Y.; Fu, Chong Long; Meschel, S.

    2012-01-01

    Using first-principles local density functional approach, we have calculated the ground-state structural phase stabilities and enthalpies of formation of thirty-six binary transition-metal refractory TM and TM3 compounds formed by Group IV elements T (T = Ti, Zr, Hf) and platinum group elements M (M = Ru, Rh, Pd, Os, Ir, Pt) . We compared our results with the available experimental data and found good agreement between theory and experiment in both the trends of structural stabilities and the magnitudes of formation enthalpies. Moreover, based on our calculated results, an empirical relationship between cohesive energies ( E) and melting temperatures (Tm) was derived as Tm = 0.0292 E/kB (where kB is the Boltzmann constant) for both TM and TM3 compounds.

  20. Sub-250?nm low-threshold deep-ultraviolet AlGaN-based heterostructure laser employing HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} dielectric mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, Tsung-Ting; Liu, Yuh-Shiuan; Mahbub Satter, Md.; Li, Xiao-Hang; Lochner, Zachary; Douglas Yoder, P.; Detchprohm, Theeradetch; Dupuis, Russell D.; Shen, Shyh-Chiang Ryou, Jae-Hyun; Fischer, Alec M.; Wei, Yong; Xie, Hongen; Ponce, Fernando A.

    2013-11-18

    We report a sub-250-nm, optically pumped, deep-ultraviolet laser using an Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}N-based multi-quantum-well structure grown on a bulk Al-polar c-plane AlN substrate. TE-polarization-dominant lasing action was observed at room temperature with a threshold pumping power density of 250?kW/cm{sup 2}. After employing high-reflectivity SiO{sub 2}/HfO{sub 2} dielectric mirrors on both facets, the threshold pumping power density was further reduced to 180?kW/cm{sup 2}. The internal loss and threshold modal gain can be calculated as 2?cm{sup ?1} and 10.9?cm{sup ?1}, respectively.

  1. Enhancement in the transport critical current density J{sub c} in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} added with an insulating nano crystalline YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} perovskite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rejith, P. P.; Vidya, S.; Thomas, J. K. [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Department of Physics, Mar Ivanios College, Thiruvananthapuram- 695 015, Kerala (India); Solomon, Sam [Department of Physics, St. John's College, Anchal-691306, Kerala (India)

    2014-01-28

    When a magnetic field is applied to type II superconductors, such as YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}0{sub 7??} (YBCO), the flux quanta penetrate the material as a regular array of vortices. However when transport currents are applied, they act to move these vortices, thus lowers the critical current density (J{sub c}) as well as destroying superconductivity. The development of microstructures made of YBCO materials has enabled engineers to increase the critical current density, within Type II materials by introducing flux pinning centres into the material. The microstructure and flux pinning properties of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} system with varying levels (0-5 wt. %) of a nano perovskite ceramic insulator; YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} addition was studied in detail. Orthorhombic YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} powder was prepared through conventional solid state route and a modified combustion method was used for synthesizing nanocrystalline YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5}. The structure and microstructure of the samples examined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy showed that YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} and YBCO remained unreacted even at higher processing temperature without deteriorating the superconducting properties. The scanning electron microscope image shows that YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} forms an electrical-network between grains. These observations suggest that the YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} addition to the Y-123-compounds improve the electrical connection between superconducting grains and substantial improvements in the relative electrical transport properties of the composites. The variation of sintering temperature, density, critical transition temperature (T{sub c}) and magnetic field dependence of critical current density (J{sub c}) of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} having different proportions of YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} in the matrix were also studied in detail. It is found that the addition of these elements considerably enhances the flux pinning strength of the system, and there is also an increase of critical temperature (T{sub c}) and critical current density (J{sub c}) up to an optimum value of 8.76 × 10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} for a concentration of 2 wt % addition of nano YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5}. The enhancement of the critical current density in the YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} - YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} samples is attributed to the sustained formation of the insulating and non-reacting YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} phase acting as pinning center. The addition of YBa{sub 2}HfO{sub 5.5} in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7??} bulk superconductor also enhances the pinning force density from 3 ×10{sup 6} N/m{sup 3} to 69.6 × 10{sup 6}N/m{sup 3} at 77 K.

  2. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, W.W.

    1991-05-14

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF[sub 3] and CeF[sub 3] as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF[sub 3] and the remainder CeF[sub 3] have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography. 2 figures.

  3. Scintillator materials containing lanthanum fluorides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moses, William W. (Berkeley, CA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved radiation detector containing a crystalline mixture of LaF.sub.3 and CeF.sub.3 as the scintillator element is disclosed. Scintillators made with from 25% to 99.5% LaF.sub.3 and the remainder CeF.sub.3 have been found to provide a balance of good stopping power, high light yield and short decay constant that is equal to or superior to other known scintillator materials, and which may be processed from natural starting materials containing both rare earth elements. The radiation detectors disclosed are favorably suited for use in general purpose detection and in positron emission tomography.

  4. Recycling produced water for algal cultivation for biofuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neal, Justin N.; Sullivan, Enid J.; Dean, Cynthia A.; Steichen, Seth A.

    2012-08-09

    Algal growth demands a continuous source of water of appropriate salinity and nutritional content. Fresh water sources are scarce in the deserts of the Southwestern United States, hence, salt water algae species are being investigated as a renewable biofuel source. The use of produced water from oil wells (PW) could offset the demand for fresh water in cultivation. Produced water can contain various concentrations of dissolved solids, metals and organic contaminants and often requires treatment beyond oil/water separation to make it suitable for algae cultivation. The produced water used in this study was taken from an oil well in Jal, New Mexico. An F/2-Si (minus silica) growth media commonly used to cultivate Nannochloropsis salina 1776 (NS 1776) was prepared using the produced water (F/2-Si PW) taking into account the metals and salts already present in the water. NS 1776 was seeded into a bioreactor containing 5L of the (F/2-Si PW) media. After eleven days the optical density at 750 nm (an indicator of algal growth) increased from 0 to 2.52. These results indicate algae are able to grow, though inhibited when compared with non-PW media, in the complex chemical conditions found in produced water. Savings from using nutrients present in the PW, such as P, K, and HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, results in a 44.38% cost savings over fresh water to mix the F/2-Si media.

  5. Method and system for producing complex-shape objects

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jeantette, Francisco P. (Albuquerque, NM); Keicher, David M. (Albuquerque, NM); Romero, Joseph A. (Albuquerque, NM); Schanwald, Lee P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01

    A method and system are provided for producing complex, three-dimensional, net shape objects from a variety of powdered materials. The system includes unique components to ensure a uniform and continuous flow of powdered materials as well as to focus and locate the flow of powdered materials with respect to a laser beam which results in the melting of the powdered material. The system also includes a controller so that the flow of molten powdered materials can map out and form complex, three-dimensional, net-shape objects by layering the molten powdered material. Advantageously, such complex, three-dimensional net-shape objects can be produced having material densities varying from 90% of theoretical to fully dense, as well as a variety of controlled physical properties. Additionally, such complex, three-dimensional objects can be produced from two or more different materials so that the composition of the object can be transitioned from one material to another.

  6. Method for producing high surface area chromia materials for catalysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gash, Alexander E. (Brentwood, CA); Satcher, Joe (Patterson, CA); Tillotson, Thomas (Tracy, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence (Pleasanton, CA); Simpson, Randall (Livermore, CA)

    2007-05-01

    Nanostructured chromium(III)-oxide-based materials using sol-gel processing and a synthetic route for producing such materials are disclosed herein. Monolithic aerogels and xerogels having surface areas between 150 m.sup.2/g and 520 m.sup.2/g have been produced. The synthetic method employs the use of stable and inexpensive hydrated-chromium(III) inorganic salts and common solvents such as water, ethanol, methanol, 1-propanol, t-butanol, 2-ethoxy ethanol, and ethylene glycol, DMSO, and dimethyl formamide. The synthesis involves the dissolution of the metal salt in a solvent followed by an addition of a proton scavenger, such as an epoxide, which induces gel formation in a timely manner. Both critical point (supercritical extraction) and atmospheric (low temperature evaporation) drying may be employed to produce monolithic aerogels and xerogels, respectively.

  7. The Wigner Function of Produced Particles in String Fragmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheuk-Yin Wong

    2009-11-05

    We show that QCD4 with transverse confinement can be approximately compactified into QCD2 with a transverse quark mass $m_{{}_T}$ that is obtained by solving a set of coupled transverse eigenvalue equations. In the limits of a strong coupling and a large number of flavors, QCD2 further admits Schwinger QED2-type bosonized solutions. We therefore examine phenomenologically the space-time dynamics of produced particles in string fragmentation by studying the Wigner function of produced bosons in Schwinger QED2, which mimics many features of string fragmentation in quantum chromodynamics. We find that particles with momenta in different regions of the rapidity plateau are produced at the initial moment of string fragmentation as a quark pulls away from an antiquark at high energies, in contrast to classical pictures of string fragmentation with longitudinal space-momentum-time ordering.

  8. Electrochemical method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Joan; Jang, Bor Z.

    2013-09-03

    A method of producing nano-scaled graphene platelets with an average thickness smaller than 30 nm from a layered graphite material. The method comprises (a) forming a carboxylic acid-intercalated graphite compound by an electrochemical reaction; (b) exposing the intercalated graphite compound to a thermal shock to produce exfoliated graphite; and (c) subjecting the exfoliated graphite to a mechanical shearing treatment to produce the nano-scaled graphene platelets. Preferred carboxylic acids are formic acid and acetic acid. The exfoliation step in the instant invention does not involve the evolution of undesirable species, such as NO.sub.x and SO.sub.x, which are common by-products of exfoliating conventional sulfuric or nitric acid-intercalated graphite compounds. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites. Nano-scaled graphene platelets are much lower-cost alternatives to carbon nano-tubes or carbon nano-fibers.

  9. Engineered microorganisms capable of producing target compounds under anaerobic conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buelter, Thomas (Denver, CO); Meinhold, Peter (Denver, CO); Feldman, Reid M. Renny (San Francisco, CA); Hawkins, Andrew C. (Parker, CO); Urano, Jun (Irvine, CA); Bastian, Sabine (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Frances (La Canada, CA)

    2012-01-17

    The present invention is generally provides recombinant microorganisms comprising engineered metabolic pathways capable of producing C3-C5 alcohols under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. The invention further provides ketol-acid reductoisomerase enzymes which have been mutated or modified to increase their NADH-dependent activity or to switch the cofactor preference from NADPH to NADH and are expressed in the modified microorganisms. In addition, the invention provides isobutyraldehyde dehydrogenase enzymes expressed in modified microorganisms. Also provided are methods of producing beneficial metabolites under aerobic and anaerobic conditions by contacting a suitable substrate with the modified microorganisms of the present invention.

  10. Method to produce succinic acid from raw hydrolysates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donnelly, Mark I.; Sanville-Millard, Cynthia Y.; Nghiem, Nhuan Phu

    2004-06-01

    A method for producing succinic acid from industrial-grade hydrolysates is provided, comprising supplying an organism that contains mutations for the genes ptsG, pflB, and ldhA, allowing said organism to accumulate biomass, and allowing said organism to metabolize the hydrolysate. Also provided is a bacteria mutant characterized in that it produces succinic acid from substrate contained in industrial-grade hydrolysate in a ratio of between 0.6:1 and 1.3:1 succinic acid to substrate.

  11. Methods of producing adsorption media including a metal oxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mann, Nicholas R; Tranter, Troy J

    2014-03-04

    Methods of producing a metal oxide are disclosed. The method comprises dissolving a metal salt in a reaction solvent to form a metal salt/reaction solvent solution. The metal salt is converted to a metal oxide and a caustic solution is added to the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to adjust the pH of the metal oxide/reaction solvent solution to less than approximately 7.0. The metal oxide is precipitated and recovered. A method of producing adsorption media including the metal oxide is also disclosed, as is a precursor of an active component including particles of a metal oxide.

  12. Low-cost method for producing extreme ultraviolet lithography optics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA); Montcalm, Claude (Fort Collins, CO); Taylor, John S. (Livermore, CA); Spiller, Eberhard A. (Mt. Kisco, NY)

    2003-11-21

    Spherical and non-spherical optical elements produced by standard optical figuring and polishing techniques are extremely expensive. Such surfaces can be cheaply produced by diamond turning; however, the roughness in the diamond turned surface prevent their use for EUV lithography. These ripples are smoothed with a coating of polyimide before applying a 60 period Mo/Si multilayer to reflect a wavelength of 134 .ANG. and have obtained peak reflectivities close to 63%. The savings in cost are about a factor of 100.

  13. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S.; Alman, David E.

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800 C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800 C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700 C. at a low cost

  14. Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, Donald J. (Albuquerque, NM); Armstrong, Pamela S. (Abingdon, MD); Panitz, Janda Kirk G. (Edgewood, NM)

    1998-01-01

    A solid electrolytic capacitor having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects.

  15. Autogenous electrolyte, non-pyrolytically produced solid capacitor structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sharp, D.J.; Armstrong, P.S.; Panitz, J.K.G.

    1998-03-17

    A solid electrolytic capacitor is described having a solid electrolyte comprising manganese dioxide dispersed in an aromatic polyamide capable of further cure to form polyimide linkages, the solid electrolyte being disposed between a first electrode made of valve metal covered by an anodic oxide film and a second electrode opposite the first electrode. The electrolyte autogenously produces water, oxygen, and hydroxyl groups which act as healing substances and is not itself produced pyrolytically. Reduction of the manganese dioxide and the water molecules released by formation of imide linkages result in substantially improved self-healing of anodic dielectric layer defects. 2 figs.

  16. Gamma-ray Bursts Produced by Mirror Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Blinnikov

    1999-02-21

    I argue that cosmic Gamma-ray Bursts (GRB) may be produced by collapses or mergers of stars made of `mirror' matter. The mirror neutrinos (which are sterile for our matter) produced at these events can oscillate into ordinary neutrinos. The annihilations or decays of the latter create an electron-positron plasma and subsequent relativistic fireball with a very low baryon load needed for GRBs. The concept of mirror matter is able to explain several key problems of modern astrophysics: neutrino anomalies, the missing mass, MACHO microlensing events and GRBs. Thus this concept becomes very appealing and should be considered quite seriously and attentively.

  17. Oxidation resistant alloys, method for producing oxidation resistant alloys

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John S. (Corvallis, OR); Alman, David E. (Salem, OR)

    2002-11-05

    A method for producing oxidation-resistant austenitic alloys for use at temperatures below 800.degree. C. comprising of: providing an alloy comprising, by weight %: 14-18% chromium, 15-18% nickel, 1-3% manganese, 1-2% molybdenum, 2-4% silicon, 0% aluminum and the balance being iron; heating the alloy to 800.degree. C. for between 175-250 hours prior to use in order to form a continuous silicon oxide film and another oxide film. The method provides a means of producing stainless steels with superior oxidation resistance at temperatures above 700.degree. C. at a low cost

  18. Method of producing nano-scaled inorganic platelets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhamu, Aruna; Jang, Bor Z.

    2012-11-13

    The present invention provides a method of exfoliating a layered material (e.g., transition metal dichalcogenide) to produce nano-scaled platelets having a thickness smaller than 100 nm, typically smaller than 10 nm. The method comprises (a) dispersing particles of a non-graphite laminar compound in a liquid medium containing therein a surfactant or dispersing agent to obtain a stable suspension or slurry; and (b) exposing the suspension or slurry to ultrasonic waves at an energy level for a sufficient length of time to produce separated nano-scaled platelets. The nano-scaled platelets are candidate reinforcement fillers for polymer nanocomposites.

  19. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, James L. (Fayetteville, AR); Clausen, Edgar C. (Fayetteville, AR)

    1992-01-01

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate.

  20. Clostridiumm ljungdahlii, an anaerobic ethanol and acetate producing microorganism

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaddy, J.L.; Clausen, E.C.

    1992-12-22

    A newly discovered microorganism was isolated in a biologically pure culture and designated Clostridium ljungdahlii, having the identifying characteristics of ATCC No. 49587. Cultured in an aqueous nutrient medium under anaerobic conditions, this microorganism is capable of producing ethanol and acetate from CO and H[sub 2]O and/or CO[sub 2] and H[sub 2] in synthesis gas. Under optimal growth conditions, the microorganism produces acetate in preference to ethanol. Conversely, under non-growth conditions, ethanol production is favored over acetate. 3 figs.

  1. Marketing Practices and Costs of Texas Egg Producer-Wholesalers. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shafer, Carl E.

    1964-01-01

    -wholesalers. It was not cafes and but they not be to a random sample of the producer-who~esaler compete for the large retailer outlets. The small population, of Texas. producers generally have higher costs per cue and insufficient volume to adequately service Labor... efficiency. Size Number Tt: Whole- On group SalerS consumer stores At cafes other1 Labor Efficiency and Costs routes farm Differences in costs per case for egg cle- - - - - - Number - - - - livery were mainly associated with variatiolli 1 A 1s 4 9 3...

  2. Methods for producing monodispersed particles of barium titanate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hu, Zhong-Cheng (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention is a low-temperature controlled method for producing high-quality, ultrafine monodispersed nanocrystalline microsphere powders of barium titanate and other pure or composite oxide materials having particles ranging from nanosized to micronsized particles. The method of the subject invention comprises a two-stage process. The first stage produces high quality monodispersed hydrous titania microsphere particles prepared by homogeneous precipitation via dielectric tuning in alcohol-water mixed solutions of inorganic salts. Titanium tetrachloride is used as an inorganic salt precursor material. The second stage converts the pure hydrous titania microsphere particles into crystalline barium titanate microsphere powders via low-temperature, hydrothermal reactions.

  3. Superconducting articles of manufacture and method of producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Newkirk, Lawrence R. (Los Alamos, NM); Valencia, Flavio A. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1980-01-01

    Bulk coatings of Nb.sub.3 Ge with high superconducting transition temperatures bonded to metallic substrates and a chemical vapor deposition method for producing such coatings on metallic substrates are disclosed. In accordance with the method, a Nb.sub.3 Ge coating having a transition temperature in excess of 21.5 K may be tightly bonded to a copper substrate.

  4. Electroplating method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ruddy, Francis H. (Monroeville, PA)

    1989-01-01

    A method for producing ultralow-mass fissionable deposits for nuclear reactor dosimetry is described, including the steps of holding a radioactive parent until the radioactive parent reaches secular equilibrium with a daughter isotope, chemically separating the daughter from the parent, electroplating the daughter on a suitable substrate, and holding the electroplated daughter until the daughter decays to the fissionable deposit.

  5. This Quick Guide was produced by the Colorado

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    This Quick Guide was produced by the Colorado State Forest Service to promote knowledge transfer. Juniper tends to grow in more arid areas; its scaled foliage allows it to conserve water more effectively. Treatment Methods for Thinning Piñon-Juniper Forests A variety of techniques may be used to manage piñon

  6. Inducing currents A current can produce a B field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    current (and an induced emf) can be generated in a loop of wire by: Moving a permanent magnet in or out#12;Inducing currents A current can produce a B field Can a B field generate a current? Move a bar magnet in and out of loop of wire Moving magnet towards loop causes current in loop Current disappears

  7. Producer Nutritional Quality Controls Ecosystem Trophic Just Cebrian1.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    , fast energy recycling, and reduced carbon accumulation. Anthropogenic changes in producer nutritional the original author and source are credited. Funding: This work was supported by funding provided. Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist. * E-mail: jcebrian

  8. Optimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garulli, Andrea

    profiles, raise major challenges to wind power integration into the electricity grid. In this work we studyOptimal Bidding Strategies for Wind Power Producers with Meteorological Forecasts Antonio that the inherent variability in wind power generation and the related difficulty in predicting future generation

  9. Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liska, Richard

    Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

  10. On the Testing Maturity of Software Producing Organizations Mats Grindal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    On the Testing Maturity of Software Producing Organizations Mats Grindal Humanities and Informatics of practice of software testing. Test managers from twelve different software organizations were interviewed]. The high cost of testing and the trend toward increased focus on the quality of software should be strong

  11. Transverse Diffusion of Laminar Flow Profiles To Produce Capillary Nanoreactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Sergey

    Transverse Diffusion of Laminar Flow Profiles To Produce Capillary Nanoreactors Victor Okhonin, Xin We introduce transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles (TDLFP), the first generic method the capillary by pressure as a series of consecutive plugs. Due to the laminar nature of flow inside

  12. Producing Network Applications Using ObjectOriented Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakos, Charles

    Producing Network Applications Using Object­Oriented Petri Nets by Glenn Anthony Lewis Thesis of such systems. The Petri net formalism [Petri 1962] can be used for the design, specification, simulation, verification, validation and implementation of concurrent systems. Object Petri Nets (OPNs) [Lakos 1994

  13. Market Entry Costs, Producer Heterogeneity, and Export Dynamics Sanghamitra Das

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    As the exchange rate, foreign demand, production costs and export promotion policies evolve, manufacturing firms-exporting. Thus, while history and expectations matter for a few marginal producers, most of the aggregate export response to a change in the exchange rate regime comes from volume adjustments among large incumbents

  14. Certification of a weld produced by friction stir welding

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Obaditch, Chris; Grant, Glenn J

    2013-10-01

    Methods, devices, and systems for providing certification of friction stir welds are disclosed. A sensor is used to collect information related to a friction stir weld. Data from the sensor is compared to threshold values provided by an extrinsic standard setting organizations using a certification engine. The certification engine subsequently produces a report on the certification status of the weld.

  15. animals --produce characteristic, heritable incubation times and patterns of brain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hays, Graeme

    animals -- produce characteristic, heritable incubation times and patterns of brain damage, the animalslivedalong,TSE-freelife,andmostly did not accumulate PrPSc in their brains (B. Chesebro, Rocky Mountain Labs, Hamilton, Montana). The injection of PrPSc -negative brain extracts from these mice into further

  16. Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neiman, Maurine

    Water produced at the University of Iowa Water treatment plant meets or surpasses all federal and state drinking-water standards at this time. For information about the University of Iowa water supply, call us at 319-335-5168 Water Source The University of Iowa Water Plants' primary source of water

  17. Horizontal natural gas storage caverns and methods for producing same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Russo, Anthony (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01

    The invention provides caverns and methods for producing caverns in bedded salt deposits for the storage of materials that are not solvents for salt. The contemplated salt deposits are of the bedded, non-domed variety, more particularly salt found in layered formations that are sufficiently thick to enable the production of commercially usefully sized caverns completely encompassed by walls of salt of the formation. In a preferred method, a first bore hole is drilled into the salt formation and a cavity for receiving insolubles is leached from the salt formation. Thereafter, at a predetermined distance away from the first bore hole, a second bore hole is drilled towards the salt formation. As this drill approaches the salt, the drill assumes a slant approach and enters the salt and drills through it in a horizontal direction until it intersects the cavity for receiving insolubles. This produces a substantially horizontal conduit from which solvent is controlledly supplied to the surrounding salt formation, leaching the salt and producing a concentrated brine which is removed through the first bore hole. Insolubles are collected in the cavity for receiving insolubles. By controlledly supplying solvent, a horizontal cavern is produced with two bore holes extending therefrom.

  18. OPTICAL EMISSION DIAGNOSTICS OF LASER PRODUCED PLASMA FROM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    OPTICAL EMISSION DIAGNOSTICS OF LASER PRODUCED PLASMA FROM GRAPHITE AND YBa2Cu30 7 HARILAL. s irradiances, ionization occurs which leads to the plasma formation. Spectroscopic studies of optical emission and the resulting plasma. Optical emission spectroscopy is a technique which analyzes the light emitted from

  19. Coevolution Produces an Arms Race Among Virtual Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebner, Marc

    Coevolution Produces an Arms Race Among Virtual Plants Marc Ebner, Adrian Grigore, Alexander He#11 create plants for a virtual environment. The plants are represented as context-free Lin- denmayer systems. OpenGL is used to visualize and evaluate the plants. Our plants have to collect virtual sunlight

  20. Legacy sediment: Definitions and processes of episodically produced anthropogenic sediment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James, L. Allan

    Legacy sediment: Definitions and processes of episodically produced anthropogenic sediment L. Allan. Introduction Anthropogenic sediment is an extremely important element of change during the Anthropocene of sediment and the character of land use before and after contact. Rivers are often dominated by cultural

  1. Current Challenges in Commercially Producing Biofuels from Lignocellulosic Biomass

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Balan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Biofuels that are produced from biobased materials are a good alternative to petroleum based fuels. They offer several benefits to society and the environment. Producing second generation biofuels is even more challenging than producing first generation biofuels due the complexity of the biomass and issues related to producing, harvesting, and transporting less dense biomass to centralized biorefineries. In addition to this logistic challenge, other challenges with respect to processing steps in converting biomass to liquid transportation fuel like pretreatment, hydrolysis, microbial fermentation, and fuel separation still exist and are discussed in this review. The possible coproducts that could be producedmore »in the biorefinery and their importance to reduce the processing cost of biofuel are discussed. About $1 billion was spent in the year 2012 by the government agencies in US to meet the mandate to replace 30% existing liquid transportation fuels by 2022 which is 36?billion gallons/year. Other countries in the world have set their own targets to replace petroleum fuel by biofuels. Because of the challenges listed in this review and lack of government policies to create the demand for biofuels, it may take more time for the lignocellulosic biofuels to hit the market place than previously projected.« less

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Characterization of the cellulolytic and hydrogen-producing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the global concerns of energy-related environ- mental pollution, hydrogen has been proposed as a cleanORIGINAL ARTICLE Characterization of the cellulolytic and hydrogen-producing activities of six and Environmental Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA, USA 2 Penn State Hydrogen

  3. Supplementary Material1 Characterization of Organic Aerosol Produced during2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meskhidze, Nicholas

    mass spectra of a dominant type (coal) of ambient aerosol in Shanghai using2 ATOFMS (m/z from 1501 Supplementary Material1 Characterization of Organic Aerosol Produced during2 Pulverized Coal diagram of combustion process of a single coal particle5 6 #12;3 10 100 10 3 10 4 10 5 Oxygen/coal ratio

  4. Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks Application to Fresh Produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks with Application to Fresh Produce Min Yu1 Anna Nagurney 2 1 Annual Meeting, Minneapolis, MN October 6-9, 2013 Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 1 / 41 #12 Program. Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 2 / 41 #12;This talk is based on the paper: Yu, M

  5. Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks Application to Fresh Produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks with Application to Fresh Produce Min Yu Department Research 224(2) (2013) pp 273-282. Abstract: In this paper, we develop a network-based food supply chain- corporates food deterioration through the introduction of arc multipliers, with the inclusion

  6. Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks Application to Fresh Produce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Competitive Food Supply Chain Networks with Application to Fresh Produce Min Yu1 Anna Nagurney 2 1 Annual Conference, Atlanta, GA May 9-12, 2014 Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 1 / 43 #12 Program. Yu and Nagurney Food Supply Chain Networks 2 / 43 #12;This talk is based on the paper: Yu, M

  7. A microbial fuel cell built by the researchers produces electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A microbial fuel cell built by the researchers produces electricity from biomass using bacteria of Energy revealed potential hydrogen and fuel cell funding opportunities for 2007. Dr. Chao-Yang Wang discussed Penn State's progress with direct methanol fuel cells for portable applications and fuel cell cold

  8. Producing hydrogen using solar panels is expensive. Scientists at TU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Producing hydrogen using solar panels is expensive. Scientists at TU Delft have come up with a new membranes with integrated electrodes. Solar panels are becoming increasingly efficient. However, storing the electricity they generate is a problem. This can be prevented by converting the solar energy into a fuel

  9. Process for producing ceramic nitrides anc carbonitrides and their precursors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, G.M.; Maya, L.

    1987-02-25

    A process for preparing ceramic nitrides and carbon nitrides in the form of very pure, fine particulate powder. Appropriate precursors is prepared by reaching a transition metal alkylamide with ammonia to produce a mixture of metal amide and metal imide in the form of an easily pyrolyzable precipitate.

  10. Producer Individual License Application Java Desktop App Entered demographic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demurjian, Steven A.

    TESTING Producer ­ Individual License Application ­ Java Desktop App 7/21/2004 Entered demographic... On `Next', license attachment screen, added a cert letter: Still need to accommodate multiple authorities;On "Submit/Next" ­ Pulled up license with Inquiry tool. Some fields need widening. Didn't pick up

  11. Method for producing sintered ceramic, layered, circular fuel pellets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harlow, John L. (East Berne, NY)

    1983-01-01

    A compacting die wherein the improvement comprises providing a screen in the die cavity, the screen being positioned parallel to the side walls of said die and dividing the die cavity into center and annular compartments. In addition, the use of this die in a method for producing an annular clad ceramic fuel material is disclosed.

  12. Tearing Graphene Sheets From Adhesive Substrates Produces Tapered Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reis, Pedro Miguel

    Thin films Tearing Graphene Sheets From Adhesive Substrates Produces Tapered Nanoribbons Dipanjan from adhesive substrates is reported, including the discovery of the formation of tapered graphene that the resulting nanoribbon geometry is controlled by both the graphene­substrate adhesion energy and by the number

  13. Waste Management of Cuttings, Drilling Fluids, Flowback and Produced Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Waste Management of Cuttings, Drilling Fluids, Flowback and Produced Water the drill bit as it cuts deeper into the earth. This fluid, which is used only of the shale. Drilling muds are made up of a base fluid (water, mineral oil

  14. EVOLVING LEG CYCLES TO PRODUCE HEXAPOD GAITS GARY B. PARKER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    EVOLVING LEG CYCLES TO PRODUCE HEXAPOD GAITS GARY B. PARKER Computer Science, Connecticut College, New London, CT 06320 parker@conncoll.edu ABSTRACT Gait generation for hexapod robots is accomplished for a simulated hexapod robot. KEYWORDS: genetic, learning, robot, hexapod, gait, control, cyclic INTRODUCTION

  15. Fitness Biasing to Produce Adaptive Gaits for Hexapod Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Gary B.

    Fitness Biasing to Produce Adaptive Gaits for Hexapod Robots Gary B. Parker Computer Science was shown in an earlier work to be an effective tool for learning leg cycles for a hexapod robot for hexapod robots is a difficult problem. It is particularly challenging if one wants these programs

  16. C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors Generation and Characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    14 C Produced by Nuclear Power Reactors ­ Generation and Characterization of Gaseous, Liquid in the terrestrial environment in the vicinity of two European nuclear power plants. Radiocarbon 46(2)863­868. III levels in the vicinity of the Lithuanian nuclear power plant Ignalina. Nuclear Instruments and Methods

  17. Process for producing astatine-211 for radiopharmaceutical use

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mirzadeh, S.; Lambrecht, R.M.

    1984-04-10

    A process is described for reliably and consistently producing astatine-211 in small controlled volumes of a solution, which is selected from a choice of solvents that are useful in selected radiopharmaceutical procedures in which the At-211 activities are to be applied. 4 figures, 1 table.

  18. Power systems utilizing the heat of produced formation fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lambirth, Gene Richard (Houston, TX)

    2011-01-11

    Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method includes treating a hydrocarbon containing formation. The method may include providing heat to the formation; producing heated fluid from the formation; and generating electricity from at least a portion of the heated fluid using a Kalina cycle.

  19. THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THE POSSIBILITY OF PRODUCING THERMONUCLEAR REACTIONS IN A GASEOUS DISCHARGE* I.V. Kurchatov of the energy of thermonuclear reactions. Physicists the world over are attracted by the extraordinarily interest- ing and very difficult task of controlling thermonuclear reactiom. Investigations in this field

  20. August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 6, 2009 Wastewater Produces Electricity and Desalinates Water University Park, Pa in the future will be even more problematic. Many locations already desalinate water using either a reverse a membrane. Both methods require large amounts of energy. "Water desalination can be accomplished without

  1. Method of producing hydrogen, and rendering a contaminated biomass inert

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-02-23

    A method for rendering a contaminated biomass inert includes providing a first composition, providing a second composition, reacting the first and second compositions together to form an alkaline hydroxide, providing a contaminated biomass feedstock and reacting the alkaline hydroxide with the contaminated biomass feedstock to render the contaminated biomass feedstock inert and further producing hydrogen gas, and a byproduct that includes the first composition.

  2. Determining Relative f and d Orbital Contributions to M?Cl Covalency in MCl62– (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and UOCl5 Using Cl K-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minasian, Stefan G.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; Martin, Richard L.; Schwarz, Daniel E.; Shuh, David K.; Wagner, Gregory L.; Wilkerson, Marianne P.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Yang, Ping

    2012-03-09

    Chlorine K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and ground-state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT) were used to probe electronic structure for O{sub h}-MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}(M = Ti, Zr, Hf, U) and C{sub 4v}-UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, and to determine the relative contributions of valence 3d, 4d, 5d, 6d, and 5f orbitals in M-Cl bonding. Spectral interpretations were guided by time-dependent DFT calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths, which agree well with the experimental XAS spectra. The data provide new spectroscopic evidence for the involvement of both 5f and 6d orbitals in actinide-ligand bonding in UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}. For the MCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, where transitions into d orbitals of t{sub 2g} symmetry are spectroscopically resolved for all four complexes, the experimentally determined Cl 3p character per M-Cl bond increases from 8.3(4)% (TiCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}) to 10.3(5)% (ZrCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), 12(1)% (HfCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}), and 26 18(1)% (UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}). Chlorine K-edge XAS spectra of UOCl{sub 5}{sup -} provide additional insights into the transition assignments by 27 lowering the symmetry to C{sub 4v}, where five pre-edge transitions into both 5f and 6d orbitals are observed. For UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}, the XAS data 28 suggest that orbital mixing associated with the U 5f orbitals is considerably lower than that of the U 6d orbitals. For both UCl{sub 6}{sup 2-}29 and UOCl{sub 5}{sup -}, the ground-state DFT calculations predict a larger 5f contribution to bonding than is determined experimentally. 30 These findings are discussed in the context of conventional theories of covalent bonding for d- and f-block metal complexes.

  3. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Herbst, R. Scott (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Blackfoot, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID)

    2008-05-06

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  4. Oil shale retorting with steam and produced gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, L.S. Jr.; Wheaton, L.D.

    1991-08-20

    This patent describes a process for retorting oil shale in a vertical retort. It comprises introducing particles of oil shale into the retort, the particles of oil shale having a minimum size such that the particles are retained on a screen having openings 1/4 inch in size; contacting the particles of oil shale with hot gas to heat the particles of oil shale to a state of pyrolysis, thereby producing retort off-gas; removing the off-gas from the retort; cooling the off-gas; removing oil from the cooled off-gas; separating recycle gas from the off-gas, the recycle gas comprising steam and produced gas, the steam being present in amount, by volume, of at least 50% of the recycle gas so as to increase the yield of sand oil; and heating the recycle gas to form the hot gas.

  5. Method to produce large, uniform hollow spherical shells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1983-09-26

    The invention is a method to produce large uniform hollow spherical shells by (1) forming uniform size drops of heat decomposable or vaporizable material, (2) evaporating the drops to form dried particles, (3) coating the dried particles with a layer of shell forming material and (4) heating the composite particles to melt the outer layer and to decompose or vaporize the inner particle to form an expanding inner gas bubble. The expanding gas bubble forms the molten outer layer into a shell of relatively large diameter. By cycling the temperature and pressure on the molten shell, nonuniformities in wall thickness can be reduced. The method of the invention is utilized to produce large uniform spherical shells, in the millimeter to centimeter diameter size range, from a variety of materials and of high quality, including sphericity, concentricity and surface smoothness, for use as laser fusion or other inertial confinement fusion targets as well as other applications.

  6. Emittance of positron beams produced in intense laser plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Hui; Hazi, A.; Link, A.; Anderson, S.; Gronberg, J.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Wilks, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Sheppard, J. C. [SLAC, Standford University, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Baldis, H. A.; Marley, E.; Park, J.; Williams, G. J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Fedosejev, R.; Kerr, S. [Department of Applied Science, University of Alberta, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2013-01-15

    The first measurement of the emittance of intense laser-produced positron beams has been made. The emittance values were derived through measurements of positron beam divergence and source size for different peak positron energies under various laser conditions. For one of these laser conditions, we used a one dimensional pepper-pot technique to refine the emittance value. The laser-produced positrons have a geometric emittance between 100 and 500 mm{center_dot}mrad, comparable to the positron sources used at existing accelerators. With 10{sup 10}-10{sup 12} positrons per bunch, this low emittance beam, which is quasi-monoenergetic in the energy range of 5-20 MeV, may be useful as an alternative positron source for future accelerators.

  7. Diffusive radiation in Langmuir turbulence produced by jet shocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleishman, Gregory D

    2007-01-01

    Anisotropic distributions of charged particles including two-stream distributions give rise to generation of either stochastic electric fields (in the form of Langmuir waves, Buneman instability) or random quasi-static magnetic fields (Weibel and filamentation instabilities) or both. These two-stream instabilities are known to play a key role in collisionless shock formation, shock-shock interactions, and shock-induced electromagnetic emission. This paper applies the general non-perturbative stochastic theory of radiation to study electromagnetic emission produced by relativistic particles, which random walk in the stochastic electric fields of the Langmuir waves. This analysis takes into account the cumulative effect of uncorrelated Langmuir waves on the radiating particle trajectory giving rise to angular diffusion of the particle, which eventually modifies the corresponding radiation spectra. We demonstrate that the radiative process considered is probably relevant for emission produced in various kinds of...

  8. Long-laser-pulse method of producing thin films

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Olander, Donald K. (Berkeley, CA); Russo, Richard E. (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A method of depositing thin films by means of laser vaporization employs a long-pulse laser (Nd-glass of about one millisecond duration) with a peak power density typically in the range 10.sup.5 -10.sup.6 W/cm.sup.2. The method may be used to produce high T.sub.c superconducting films of perovskite material. In one embodiment, a few hundred nanometers thick film of YBa.sub.2 Cu.sub.3 O.sub.7-x is produced on a SrTiO.sub.3 crystal substrate in one or two pulses. In situ-recrystallization and post-annealing, both at elevated temperature and in the presence of an oxidizing agen The invention described herein arose in the course of, or under, Contract No. DE-C03-76SF0098 between the United States Department of Energy and the University of California.

  9. High capacity adsorption media and method of producing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tranter, Troy J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mann, Nicholas R. (Blackfoot, ID); Todd, Terry A. (Aberdeen, ID); Herbst, Ronald S. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-10-05

    A method of producing an adsorption medium to remove at least one constituent from a feed stream. The method comprises dissolving and/or suspending at least one metal compound in a solvent to form a metal solution, dissolving polyacrylonitrile into the metal solution to form a PAN-metal solution, and depositing the PAN-metal solution into a quenching bath to produce the adsorption medium. The at least one constituent, such as arsenic, selenium, or antimony, is removed from the feed stream by passing the feed stream through the adsorption medium. An adsorption medium having an increased metal loading and increased capacity for arresting the at least one constituent to be removed is also disclosed. The adsorption medium includes a polyacrylonitrile matrix and at least one metal hydroxide incorporated into the polyacrylonitrile matrix.

  10. Titania may produce abiotic oxygen atmospheres on habitable exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narita, Norio; Masaoka, Shigeyuki; Kusakabe, Nobuhiko

    2015-01-01

    The search for habitable exoplanets in the Universe is actively ongoing in the field of astronomy. The biggest future milestone is to determine whether life exists on such habitable exoplanets. In that context, oxygen in the atmosphere has been considered strong evidence for the presence of photosynthetic organisms. In this paper, we show that a previously unconsidered photochemical mechanism by titanium(IV) oxide (titania) can produce abiotic oxygen from liquid water under near ultraviolet (NUV) lights on the surface of exoplanets. Titania works as a photocatalyst to dissociate liquid water in this process. This mechanism offers a different source of a possibility of abiotic oxygen in atmospheres of exoplanets from previously considered photodissociation of water vapor in upper atmospheres by extreme ultraviolet (XUV) light. Our order-of-magnitude estimation shows that possible amounts of oxygen produced by this abiotic mechanism can be comparable with or even more than that in the atmosphere of the current ...

  11. Membrane Technology for Produced Water in Lea County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cecilia Nelson; Ashok Ghosh

    2011-06-30

    Southeastern New Mexico (SENM) is rich in mineral resources, including oil and gas. Produced water is a byproduct from oil and gas recovery operations. SENM generates approximately 400 million barrels per year of produced water with total dissolved solids (TDS) as high as ~ 200,000 ppm. Typically, produced water is disposed of by transporting it to injection wells or disposal ponds, costing around $1.2 billion per year with an estimated use of 0.3 million barrels of transportation fuel. New Mexico ranks first among U.S. states in potash production. Nationally, more than 85% of all potash produced comes from the Carlsbad potash district in SENM. Potash manufacturing processes use large quantities of water, including fresh water, for solution mining. If the produced water from oilfield operations can be treated and used economically in the potash industry, it will provide a beneficial use for the produced water as well as preserve valuable water resources in an area where fresh water is scarce. The goal of this current research was to develop a prototype desalination system that economically treats produced water from oil and/or natural gas operations for the beneficial use of industries located in southeastern New Mexico. Up until now, most water cleaning technologies have been developed for treating water with much lower quantities of TDS. Seawater with TDS of around 30,000 ppm is the highest concentration that has been seriously studied by researchers. Reverse osmosis (RO) technology is widely used; however the cost remains high due to high-energy consumption. Higher water fluxes and recoveries are possible with a properly designed Forward Osmosis (FO) process as large driving forces can be induced with properly chosen membranes and draw solution. Membrane fouling and breakdown is a frequent and costly problem that drives the cost of desalination very high. The technology developed by New Mexico Tech (NMT) researchers not only protects the membrane, but has also proven to generate higher water flux, based on the series of experiments conducted. Laboratory tests at NMT demonstrated that an unprecedented water flux of 1300 l/m2/hr (where typical flux is on the order of 0-3 l/m{sup 2}/hr) can be achieved from a properly designed membrane module. The patent pending NMT system, which was designed and developed at NMT was successful in reducing the possibility for concentration polarization and thereby increasing the permeate water flux, while still maintaining a high salt rejection rate of 96% or greater. For feed solutions having a dissolved contaminant concentration greater than 10,000 ppm, preliminary economic analysis demonstrates that a well-designed FO process will outperform an RO process. Most produced water generated in SENM has TDS higher than 10,000 ppm. Therefore, it is logical to use FO to desalinate the water. Since the issues associated with concentration polarization has only recently been solved by our mechanically enhanced membrane module, the level of system maturity is not at the same level as that for RO. Our efforts going forward will be directed at taking the technology to a higher level of system maturity. With the superior cost effectiveness for FO, it is imperative that this technology reach a point that is competitive with RO in order to meet the expanding need for water for industries in SENM. NMT seeks to demonstrate the greater cost effectiveness by proving the process through a scaled up model. To ensure success, NMT feels it is important to demonstrate this technology in a larger system, (~ 100,000 GPD), before venturing to the commercial scale. This will build confidence in the process with the commercial sector. In addition, it will be possible to develop some of the operational processes around renewable energy sources for the scaled up model. This will further lower the operating costs and enhance the environmentally clean aspect of the process.

  12. Method of producing novel silicon carbide articles. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Milewski, J.V.

    1982-06-18

    A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

  13. Method of producing gaseous products using a downflow reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cortright, Randy D; Rozmiarek, Robert T; Hornemann, Charles C

    2014-09-16

    Reactor systems and methods are provided for the catalytic conversion of liquid feedstocks to synthesis gases and other noncondensable gaseous products. The reactor systems include a heat exchange reactor configured to allow the liquid feedstock and gas product to flow concurrently in a downflow direction. The reactor systems and methods are particularly useful for producing hydrogen and light hydrocarbons from biomass-derived oxygenated hydrocarbons using aqueous phase reforming. The generated gases may find used as a fuel source for energy generation via PEM fuel cells, solid-oxide fuel cells, internal combustion engines, or gas turbine gensets, or used in other chemical processes to produce additional products. The gaseous products may also be collected for later use or distribution.

  14. Methods and apparatus for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, John R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A new technique for producing uniform layers of solid DT on microballoon surfaces. Local heating of the target, typically by means of a focused laser, within an isothermal freezing cell containing a low pressure cryogenic exchange gas such as helium, vaporizes the DT fuel. Removal of the laser heating source causes the DT gas to rapidly condense and freeze in a layer which exhibits a good degree of uniformity.

  15. Apparatus for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, John R. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1981-01-01

    A new technique for producing uniform layers of solid DT on microballoon surfaces. Local heating of the target, typically by means of a focused laser, within an isothermal freezing cell containing a low pressure cryogenic exchange gas such as helium, vaporizes the DT fuel contained within the microballoon. Removal of the laser heating source causes the DT gas to rapidly condense and freeze in a layer which exhibits a good degree of uniformity.

  16. Water management practices used by Fayetteville shale gas producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.

    2011-06-03

    Water issues continue to play an important role in producing natural gas from shale formations. This report examines water issues relating to shale gas production in the Fayetteville Shale. In particular, the report focuses on how gas producers obtain water supplies used for drilling and hydraulically fracturing wells, how that water is transported to the well sites and stored, and how the wastewater from the wells (flowback and produced water) is managed. Last year, Argonne National Laboratory made a similar evaluation of water issues in the Marcellus Shale (Veil 2010). Gas production in the Marcellus Shale involves at least three states, many oil and gas operators, and multiple wastewater management options. Consequently, Veil (2010) provided extensive information on water. This current study is less complicated for several reasons: (1) gas production in the Fayetteville Shale is somewhat more mature and stable than production in the Marcellus Shale; (2) the Fayetteville Shale underlies a single state (Arkansas); (3) there are only a few gas producers that operate the large majority of the wells in the Fayetteville Shale; (4) much of the water management information relating to the Marcellus Shale also applies to the Fayetteville Shale, therefore, it can be referenced from Veil (2010) rather than being recreated here; and (5) the author has previously published a report on the Fayetteville Shale (Veil 2007) and has helped to develop an informational website on the Fayetteville Shale (Argonne and University of Arkansas 2008), both of these sources, which are relevant to the subject of this report, are cited as references.

  17. Water management technologies used by Marcellus Shale Gas Producers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division

    2010-07-30

    Natural gas represents an important energy source for the United States. According to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA), about 22% of the country's energy needs are provided by natural gas. Historically, natural gas was produced from conventional vertical wells drilled into porous hydrocarbon-containing formations. During the past decade, operators have increasingly looked to other unconventional sources of natural gas, such as coal bed methane, tight gas sands, and gas shales.

  18. Can Population III Stars at High Redshifts produce GRB's?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun

    2010-08-24

    Gamma ray bursts are the most luminous physical phenomena in the universe, consisting of flashes of gamma rays that last from seconds to hours. There have been attempts to observe gamma ray bursts, for example, from population III stars of about 500 solar mass at high redshifts. Here we argue that collapse of such high mass stars does not lead to gamma ray burst as their core collapse temperatures are not sufficient to produce gamma rays, leading to GRBs.

  19. Deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, George C. (La Crescenta, CA); Rohatgi, Naresh K. (W. Corine, CA)

    1987-01-01

    An improved deposition method for producing silicon carbide high-temperature semiconductor material comprising placing a semiconductor substrate composed of silicon carbide in a fluidized bed silicon carbide deposition reactor, fluidizing the bed particles by hydrogen gas in a mildly bubbling mode through a gas distributor and heating the substrate at temperatures around 1200.degree.-1500.degree. C. thereby depositing a layer of silicon carbide on the semiconductor substrate.

  20. Hybrid materials and methods for producing the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luzzi, David E. (Wallingford, PA); Smith, Brian W. (Philadelphia, PA)

    2008-02-19

    A hybrid material is provided which comprises a first single-walled nanotube having a lumen, and a fill molecule contained within the lumen of the single-walled nanotube. A method for producing the hybrid material is also provided wherein a single-walled nanotube is contacted with a fill molecule to cause the fill molecule to enter the lumen of the single-walled nanotube.