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1

First principles simulation of a superionic phase of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at high pressures and temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have conducted Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of hydrogen fluoride (HF) at pressures of 5-66 GPa along the 900 K isotherm. They predict a superionic phase at 33 GPa, where the fluorine atoms are fixed in a bcc lattice while the hydrogen atoms diffuse rapidly with a diffusion constant of between 2 x 10{sup -5} and 5 x 10{sup -5} cm{sup 2}/s. They find that a transformation from asymmetric to symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs in HF at 66 GPa and 900 K. With superionic HF they have discovered a model system where symmetric hydrogen bonding occurs at experimentally achievable conditions. Given previous results on superionic H{sub 2}O[1,2,3] and NH{sub 3}[1], they conclude that high P,T superionic phases of electronegative element hydrides could be common.

Goldman, N; Fried, L E

2006-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

2

Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride  

SciTech Connect

This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}. This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods.

Manuta, D.M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

4

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Appendix E: Impacts Associated with HF and CaF2 Conversion Product Sale and Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Paducah DUF Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-2 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS HF and CaF 2 Conversion Products E-3 Paducah DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS APPENDIX E: IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH HF AND CaF 2 CONVERSION PRODUCT SALE AND USE E.1 INTRODUCTION During the conversion of the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF 6 ) inventory to depleted uranium oxide, products having some potential for sale to commercial users would be produced. These products would include aqueous hydrogen fluoride (HF) and calcium fluoride (CaF 2 , commonly referred to as fluorspar). These products are routinely used as commercial materials, and an investigation into their potential reuse was done; results are included as part of

5

Fluoride nanoscintillators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary investigation of the scintillation response of rare earth-doped fluoride nanoparticles is reported. Nanoparticles of CaF2 : Eu, BaF2 : Ce, and LaF3 : Eu were produced by precipitation methods using ammonium ...

Luiz G. Jacobsohn; Kevin B. Sprinkle; Steven A. Roberts; Courtney J. Kucera; Tiffany L. James; Eduardo G. Yukihara; Timothy A. DeVol; John Ballato

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Process for converting magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a process for the conversion of magnesium fluoride to calcium fluoride whereby magnesium fluoride is decomposed by heating in the presence of calcium carbonate, calcium oxide or calcium hydroxide. Magnesium fluoride is a by-product of the reduction of uranium tetrafluoride to form uranium metal and has no known commercial use, thus its production creates a significant storage problem. The advantage of this invention is that the quality of calcium fluoride produced is sufficient to be used in the industrial manufacture of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride, steel mill flux or ceramic applications.

Kreuzmann, A.B.; Palmer, D.A.

1984-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

7

Method of making porous ceramic fluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for making a porous ceramic composite where fumed silica particles are coated with a nitrate, preferably aluminum nitrate. Next the nitrate is converted to an oxide and formed into a desired configuration. This configuration is heated to convert the oxide to an oxide silicate which is then react with HF, resulting in the fluoride ceramic, preferably aluminum fluoride.

Reiner, Robert H. (Knoxville, TN); Holcombe, Cressie E. (Farragut, TN)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

PRODUCTION OF THORIUM FLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for producing anhydrous thorium fluoride comprising the step of contacting a saturated aqueous solution of thorium nitrate with an aqueous solution of hydrofluoric acid having a concentration of about 45 to 50% by weight at a temperature above 70 deg C whereby anhydrous thorium fluoride precipitates.

Zachariasen, W.H.

1959-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

9

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separting the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF.sub.2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium, without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, Howard (West Paducah, KY); Seltzer, Steven F. (Paducah, KY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Removal of uranium from aqueous HF solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This invention is a simple and effective method for removing uranium from aqueous HF solutions containing trace quantities of the same. The method comprises contacting the solution with particulate calcium fluoride to form uranium-bearing particulates, permitting the particulates to settle, and separating the solution from the settled particulates. The CaF2 is selected to have a nitrogen surface area in a selected range and is employed in an amount providing a calcium fluoride/uranium weight ratio in a selected range. As applied to dilute HF solutions containing 120 ppm uranium, the method removes at least 92% of the uranium without introducing contaminants to the product solution.

Pulley, H.; Seltzer, S.F.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

11

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride. I = 2.2 mol·p.w. – present work. Reaction Pu 4+ + HF PuF 3+ + H + t oI = 0) Ref. p.w. p.w. p.w. Pu 4+ + 2HF 2H + PuF 22+ + dis

Moore, Dean A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

Anderson, David F. (630 Sylvan Pl., Batavia, IL 60510); Sparrow, Robert W. (28 Woodlawn Dr., Sturbridge, MA 01566)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography.

Anderson, D.F.; Sparrow, R.W.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Fabrication of nanoscale patterns in lithium fluoride crystal using a 13.5 nm Schwarzschild objective and a laser produced plasma source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lithium fluoride (LiF) crystal is a radiation sensitive material widely used as EUV and soft x-ray detector. The LiF-based detector has high resolution, in principle limited by the point defect size, large field of view, and wide dynamic range. Using LiF crystal as an imaging detector, a resolution of 900 nm was achieved by a projection imaging of test meshes with a Schwarzschild objective operating at 13.5 nm. In addition, by imaging of a pinhole illuminated by the plasma, an EUV spot of 1.5 {mu}m diameter in the image plane of the objective was generated, which accomplished direct writing of color centers with resolution of 800 nm. In order to avoid sample damage and contamination due to the influence of huge debris flux produced by the plasma source, a spherical normal-incidence condenser was used to collect EUV radiation. Together with a description of experimental results, the development of the Schwarzschild objective, the influence of condenser on energy density and the alignment of the imaging system are also reported.

Wang Xin [Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-structured Materials, MOE, Department of Physics, Institute of Precision Optical Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); Mu Baozhong; Jiang Li; Zhu Jingtao; Yi Shengzhen; Wang Zhanshan [Key Laboratory of Advanced Micro-structured Materials, MOE, Department of Physics, Institute of Precision Optical Engineering, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); He Pengfei [School of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Magnesium fluoride recovery method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of obtaining magnesium fluoride substantially free from radioactive uranium from a slag containing the same and having a radioactivity level of at least about 7000 pCi/gm. The slag is ground to a particle size of about 200 microns or less. The ground slag is contacted with an acid under certain prescribed conditions to produce a liquid product and a particulate solid product. The particulate solid product is separated from the liquid and treated at least two more times with acid to produce a solid residue consisting essentially of magnesium fluoride substantially free of uranium and having a residual radioactivity level of less than about 1000 pCi/gm. In accordance with a particularly preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst and an oxidizing agent are used during the acid treatment and preferably the acid is sulfuric acid having a strength of about 1.0 Normal.

Gay, Richard L. (Canoga Park, CA); McKenzie, Donald E. (Woodland Hills, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

MEASUREMENT OF CARBONYL FLUORIDE, HYDROGEN ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. MEASUREMENT OF CARBONYL FLUORIDE, HYDROGEN FLUORIDE, AND OTHER COMBUSTION BYPRODUCTS DURING FIRE ...

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Potassium Fluoride (KF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (l). ... PREVIOUS: December 1963, CURRENT: June 1969. Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (l). ...

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

18

Potassium Fluoride (KF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (cr,l). Enthalpy ... PREVIOUS: CURRENT: June 1969. Potassium Fluoride (KF), F 1 K 1 (cr,l). Download ...

2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

19

HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN HIGH-MASS STAR-FORMING REGIONS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen fluoride (HF) has been established to be an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen in diffuse clouds. In denser environments, however, the HF abundance has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude lower. We present Herschel/HIFI observations of HF J = 1-0 toward two high-mass star formation sites, NGC 6334 I and AFGL 2591. In NGC 6334 I the HF line is seen in absorption in foreground clouds and the source itself, while in AFGL 2591 HF is partially in emission. We find an HF abundance with respect to H{sub 2} of 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8} in the diffuse foreground clouds, whereas in the denser parts of NGC 6334 I we derive a lower limit on the HF abundance of 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10}. Lower HF abundances in dense clouds are most likely caused by freezeout of HF molecules onto dust grains in high-density gas. In AFGL 2591, the view of the hot core is obstructed by absorption in the massive outflow, in which HF is also very abundant (3.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -8}) due to the desorption by sputtering. These observations provide further evidence that the chemistry of interstellar fluorine is controlled by freezeout onto gas grains.

Emprechtinger, M.; Monje, R. R.; Lis, D. C.; Phillips, T. G. [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics 301-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Van der Tak, F. F. S.; Van der Wiel, M. H. D. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, NL-9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands); Neufeld, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ceccarelli, C., E-mail: emprecht@caltech.edu [UJF-Grenoble 1/CNRS-INSU, Institut de Planetologie et d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (IPAG) UMR 5274, F-38041 Grenoble (France)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hf-Ir (Hafnium - Iridium)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hf-Ir crystallographic data...Hf-Ir crystallographic data Phase Composition, wt% Ir Pearson symbol Space group (βHf) 0 to ~10.5 cI 2 Im m (αHf) 0 to ~1.5 hP 2 P 6 3 / mmc Hf 2 Ir ~28 to 35.0 cF 96 Fd m Hf 5 Ir 3 39.3 hP 16 P 6 3 / mcm HfIr 51.9 to 59 o ** � HfIr 3 76 to 82 cP 4 Pm m (Ir) ~91 to 100 cF 4 Fm m...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

DECONTAMINATION OF PLUTONIUM FOR FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE DURING OXALATE PRECIPITATION, FILTRATION AND CALCINATION PROCESSES  

SciTech Connect

Due to analytical limitations for the determination of fluoride (F) and chloride (Cl) in a previous anion exchange study, an additional study of the decontamination of Pu from F and Cl by oxalate precipitation, filtration and calcination was performed. Anion product solution from the previous impurity study was precipitated as an oxalate, filtered, and calcined to produce an oxide for analysis by pyrohydrolysis for total Cl and F. Analysis of samples from this experiment achieved the purity specification for Cl and F for the proposed AFS-2 process. Decontamination factors (DF's) for the overall process (including anion exchange) achieved a DF of {approx}5000 for F and a DF of {approx}100 for Cl. Similar experiments where both HF and HCl were spiked into the anion product solution to a {approx}5000 {micro}g /g Pu concentration showed a DF of 5 for F and a DF of 35 for Cl across the combined precipitation-filtration-calcination process steps.

Kyser, E.

2012-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Synthesis and structural investigation of the compounds containing HF{sub 2}{sup -} anions: Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6})  

SciTech Connect

Three new compounds Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) were obtained in the system metal(II) fluoride and anhydrous HF (aHF) acidified with excessive PF{sub 5}. The obtained polymeric solids are slightly soluble in aHF and they crystallize out of their aHF solutions. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} was prepared by simply dissolving CaF{sub 2} in a neutral aHF. It represents the second known compound with homoleptic HF environment of the central atom besides Ba(H{sub 3}F{sub 4}){sub 2}. The compounds Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) represent two additional examples of the formation of a polymeric zigzag ladder or ribbon composed of metal cation and fluoride anion (MF{sup +}){sub n} besides PbF(AsF{sub 6}), the first isolated compound with such zigzag ladder. The obtained new compounds were characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction method and partly by Raman spectroscopy. Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} crystallizes in a triclinic space group P1-bar with a=4.5870(2) A, b=8.8327(3) A, c=11.2489(3) A, {alpha}=67.758(9){sup o}, {beta}=84.722(12), {gamma}=78.283(12){sup o}, V=413.00(3) A{sup 3} at 200 K, Z=1 and R=0.0588. Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) at 200 K: space group P1-bar , a=4.5722(19) A, b=4.763(2) A, c=8.818(4) A, {alpha}=86.967(10){sup o}, {beta}=76.774(10){sup o}, {gamma}=83.230(12){sup o}, V=185.55(14) A{sup 3}, Z=1 and R=0.0937. Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) at 293 K: space group P1-bar, a=4.586(2) A, b=4.781(3) A, c=8.831(5) A, {alpha}=87.106(13){sup o}, {beta}=76.830(13){sup o}, {gamma}=83.531(11){sup o}, V=187.27(18) A{sup 3}, Z=1 and R=0.072. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} crystallizes in an orthorhombic Fddd space group with a=5.5709(6) A, b=10.1111(9) A, c=10.5945(10) A, V=596.77(10) A{sup 3} at 200 K, Z=8 and R=0.028. - Graphical abstract: Three new compounds Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2}, Ba{sub 4}F{sub 4}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}){sub 3} and Pb{sub 2}F{sub 2}(HF{sub 2})(PF{sub 6}) were obtained in the system metal(II) fluoride and anhydrous HF acidified with excessive PF{sub 5} and characterized by X-ray single crystal diffraction method and partly by Raman spectroscopy. Ca(HF{sub 2}){sub 2} represents the second known compound with homoleptic HF{sub 2}{sup -} environment of the central atom. Display Omitted.

Bunic, Tina; Tramsek, Melita [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Goreshnik, Evgeny [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: evgeny.goreshnik@ijs.si; Zemva, Boris [Department of Inorganic Chemistry and Technology, Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)], E-mail: boris.zemva@ijs.si

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Calcium fluoride window mounting  

SciTech Connect

A technique has been developed for joining a large calcium fluoride crystal to a stainless-steel flange by means of a silver transition ring. The process involves both vacuum brazing using a copper-silver alloy and air brazing using silver chloride. This paper describes the procedure used in fabricating a high-vacuum leak-tight calcium fluoride window assembly.

Berger, D.D.

1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Methods of controlling hydrogen fluoride pressure during chemical fabrication processes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method for producing a crystalline end-product. The method comprising exposing a fluoride-containing precursor to a hydrogen fluoride absorber under conditions suitable for the conversion of the precursor into the crystalline end-product.

Solovyov, Vyacheslav (Rocky Point, NY); Wiesmann, Harold (Stony Brook, NY)

2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

25

CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS FOR THE HYDROFLUORINATOR OF THE FLUORIDE-VOLATILITY PROCESS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel elements clad with Zr or containing Zr as a diluent can be recovered by a fluoride-volatility process. The first step consists of hydrofluorination of the elements in a bath of molten fluoride salts using an HF sparge. In this case the two salt systems considered were NaF-ZrF/sub 4/ and NaF- LiF. Materials evaluated at Battelle for possible use in the construction of this hydrofluorinator include Inconel, A'' Nickel, copper, silver, Monel, Hastelloy B, Hastelloy W, INOR-1, and INOR-8. The metals were exposed to molten fluoride salts through which HF was bubbled continuously. The data indicate that the NaF-LiF systems are much more corrosive than the NaF-ZrF/sub 4/ system. The systems are most corrosive when the alkali fluoride component is high. An elevation in temperature increases the corrosion significantly as does an increase in the HF flow rate. Hydrogen in the HF flow stream retards the corrosion of the sodiumzirconium salts significantly, but appears to have less effect on the sodium -lithium systems. The areas at the interface of the liquid and vapor phases were most seriously damaged under the exposure conditions usually used. However, appreciable reduction in attack was experienced when zirconium was actually hydrofluorinated. INOR-8 was the most promising of the materials evaluated. (auth)

Miller, P.D.; Peterson, C.L.; Stewart, O.M.; Stephan, E.F.; Fink, F.W.

1959-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Growth of purified calcium fluoride and magnesium fluoride and degradation of optical properties by defects  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the purification and crystal growth portion of the research undertaken in this program. Several new devices for conducting chemical operations in isolated environments were perfected. The precipitator/decanter system was the most important of these. Without it the very large number of precipitate washing cycles required would have been prohibitive due to the time required using the older design. The purification process improved the purity of both fluorides. Precipitation of the alkaline earth carbonates from an alkaline solution was extremely effective in removing alkali ions. The second stage of the process used ion-exchange to remove transition metal ions and to reduce the concentration of other alkaline earths. The third stage of the process was the precipitation and washing of the product fluoride which proved to be difficult because these fluorides form gels or sols when pure. At an ammonium fluoride concentration near 8M a satisfactory precipitate was obtained. Only after a long resting period could the precipitate be washed without converting to a gel or sol. Magnesium fluoride had a much greater tendency to form gels than the calcium salt. Crystal growth was attempted by a Stockbarger method using HF as the reactive gas. The remainder of this report describes the research on the effect of defects on the optical properties of optical materials. The Landau-Placzek ratio and the method for calculating its theoretical value is described. This establishes a comparison standard for studies of doped crystals discussed in the remaining chapters of this report. As part of the preparation of the crystals for optical studies the distribution coefficients for cadmium, calcium and lead were measured and are reported. 121 refs., 30 figs., 22 tabs.

Fredericks, W.J.; Collins, P.R.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Fluorination of amorphous thin-film materials with xenon fluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for producing fluorine-containing amorphous semiconductor material, preferably comprising amorphous silicon. The method includes depositing amorphous thin-film material onto a substrate while introducing xenon fluoride during the film deposition process.

Weil, Raoul B. (Haifa, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Nitrogen Trifluoride-Based Fluoride- Volatility Separations Process: Initial Studies  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the results of our investigations on the potential use of nitrogen trifluoride as the fluorinating and oxidizing agent in fluoride volatility-based used nuclear fuel reprocessing. The conceptual process uses differences in reaction temperatures between nitrogen trifluoride and fuel constituents that produce volatile fluorides to achieve separations and recover valuable constituents. We provide results from our thermodynamic evaluations, thermo-analytical experiments, kinetic models, and provide a preliminary process flowsheet. The evaluations found that nitrogen trifluoride can effectively produce volatile fluorides at different temperatures dependent on the fuel constituent.

McNamara, Bruce K.; Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.; Kozelisky, Anne E.

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

Aluminum Fluoride – A Users Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2010 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Aluminum Reduction Technology. Presentation Title, Aluminum Fluoride – A ...

30

MOLTEN FLUORIDE NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molten-salt reactor fuel compositions consisting of mixtures of fluoride salts are reported. In its broadest form, the composition contains an alkali fluoride such as sodium fluoride, zirconium tetrafluoride, and a uranium fluoride, the latter being the tetrafluoride or trifluoride or a mixture of the two. An outstanding property of these fuel compositions is a high coeffieient of thermal expansion which provides a negative temperature coefficient of reactivity in reactors in which they are used.

Barton, C.J.; Grimes, W.R.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thermodynamics of the conversion of calcium and magnesium fluorides to the parent metal oxides and hydrogen fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have used thermodynamic modeling to examine the reaction of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and magnesium fluoride (MgF{sub 2}) with water (H{sub 2}O) at elevated temperatures. The calculated, equilibrium composition corresponds to the global free-energy minimum for the system. Optimum, predicted reaction temperatures and reactant mole ratios are reported for the recovery of hydrogen fluoride (HF), a valuable industrial feedstock. Complete conversion of MgF{sub 2} is found at 1,000 C and a ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of MgF{sub 2}. For CaF{sub 2}, temperatures as high as 1,400 C are required for complete conversion at a corresponding mole ratio of 40 moles of H{sub 2}O per 1 mole of CaF{sub 2}. The authors discuss the presence of minor chemical constituents as well as the stability of various potential container materials for the pyrohydrolysis reactions at elevated temperatures. CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2} slags are available as wastes at former uranium production facilities within the Department of Energy Complex and other facilities regulated by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Recovery of HF from these wastes is an example of environmental remediation at such facilities.

West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

DISCOVERY OF HYDROGEN FLUORIDE IN THE CLOVERLEAF QUASAR AT z = 2.56  

SciTech Connect

We report the first detection of hydrogen fluoride (HF) toward a high-redshift quasar. Using the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, we detect the HF J = 1-0 transition in absorption toward the Cloverleaf, a broad absorption line quasi-stellar object at z = 2.56. The detection is statistically significant at the {approx}6{sigma} level. We estimate a lower limit of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2} for the HF column density and using a previous estimate of the hydrogen column density, we obtain a lower limit of 1.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -9} for the HF abundance. This value suggests that, assuming a Galactic N(HF)/N{sub H} ratio, HF accounts for at least {approx}10% of the fluorine in the gas phase along the line of sight to the Cloverleaf quasar. This observation corroborates the prediction that HF should be a good probe of the molecular gas at high redshift. Measurements of the HF abundance as a function of redshift are urgently needed to better constrain the fluorine nucleosynthesis mechanism(s).

Monje, R. R.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Emprechtinger, M. [California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., Pasadena, CA 91125-4700 (United States); Peng, R. [Caltech Submillimeter Observatory, 111 Nowelo Street, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Neufeld, D. A., E-mail: raquel@caltech.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

33

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Cover Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co- product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not...

34

Paducah DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Cover Page  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride (CaF 2 ) and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not...

35

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion coproduct; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold....

36

Record of Decision for Construction and Operation of a Depleted...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of aqueous HF to calcium fluoride (CAF 2 ) and its sale or disposal in the event that the aqueous HF...

37

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold....

38

REDUCING HYDROGEN FLUORIDE AND OTHER ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... with Halons 1301 and 121 I), as well as carbonyl fluoride (COFz) are ... Figures 6 and 7 show typical test results for calcium carbonate and potassium ...

2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

39

Method for the recovery of fluorides from spent aluminum potlining and the production of an environmentally safe waste residue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for recovery of fluoride values from spent potlining and fluoride containing insulating materials associated with the potlining is disclosed. Spent potlining and the insulating matericals are reduced to a fine particle size and incinerated. The ash residue is leached with a dilute caustic and the leachate is treated with a calcium compound to precipitate calcium fluoride. The calcium fluoride is dried to a moisture content of less than 0.1 percent and is treated with about 93 to 99 percent concentration of sulfuric acid to produce hydrogen fluoride gas and a metal sulfate. The hydrogen fluoride gas is fed into an alumina dry scrubber to produce alumina with absorbed fluorides to be used as feed material to reduction cells used in the manufacture of aluminum by electrolytic reduction. The metal sulfate residue is treated with lime and constitutes an environmentally safe product which can be disposed of as landfill material.

Snodgrass, J.B.; Cambridge, E.L.

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

WET FLUORIDE SEPARATION METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of U/sup 233/ from thorium, protactinium, and fission products present in neutron-irradiated thorium is accomplished by dissolving the irradiated materials in aqueous nitric acid, adding either a soluble fluoride, iodate, phosphate, or oxalate to precipltate the thorium, separating the precipltate from the solution, and then precipitating uranlum and protactinium by alkalizing the solution. The uranium and protactinium precipitate is removcd from the solution and dissolved in nitric acid. The uranyl nitrate may then be extracted from the acid solution by means of ether, and the protactinium recovered from the aqueous phase.

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1958-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Soft lithographic production of electroactive polyvinylidene fluoride microstructures for BioMEMS technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a method for the fabrication of electroactive polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) microstructures via soft lithography for BioMEMS applications. Previously patterned PDMS stamps were used to produce arrays of PVDF microstructures with different ... Keywords: BioMEMS, piezoelectric, polyvinylidene fluoride, soft lithography

Daniel Gallego; Nicholas Ferrell; Natalia Higuita; Derek J. Hansford

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Determination of Stability Constants of Hydrogen and Aluminum Fluorides with a Fluoride-Selective Electrode  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability to directly determine free fluoride ion concentration (or mean activity) simplifies gathering and interpretation of experimental data for studies of metal complexes. In this work, the new lanthanum fluoride electrode was used to measure free fluoride ion in an investigation of the hydrogen-fluoride and aluminum-fluoride systems in NH4NO3.

Baumann, E.W.

2003-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fluorination utilizing thermodynamically unstable fluorides and fluoride salts thereof  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for fluorinating a carbon compound or cationic carbon compound utilizes a fluorination agent selected from thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides and salts thereof in liquid anhydrous hydrogen fluoride. The desired carbon compound or cationic organic compound to undergo fluorination is selected and reacted with the fluorination agent by contacting the selected organic or cationic organic compound and the chosen fluorination agent in a reaction vessel for a desired reaction time period at room temperature or less.

Bartlett, Neil (Orinda, CA); Whalen, J. Marc (Corning, NY); Chacon, Lisa (Corning, NY)

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

44

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium...

45

Phytic acid plus calcium, but not phytic acid alone, decreases fluoride bioavailability in the rat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results of in vitro studies have suggested that fluoride becomes insoluble when some soy-based infant formulas are diluted with fluoridated water because of the presence of phytate, added calcium or a combination of these factors. The present study was designed to test this hypothesis in vivo. Male albino rats were fed a purified diet containing phytic acid, calcium and fluoride for 4 weeks in a factorial design of treatments. Phytic acid was added to the diet by chemically reacting a phytic acid concentrate with casein prior to diet preparation to mimic a soy-protein. Food intake, weight gain and femur P were unaffected by dietary treatments. Both phytic acid and supplemental calcium alone had little or no effect upon fluoride uptake into either bone or teeth. The combination of phytic acid plus supplemental calcium, however, significantly increased % of fluoride intake found in the feces which was reflected in a significant decrease in fluoride concentration of femur, 2nd molar teeth and vertebrate bone. These results provide evidence that insoluble complex formation produced by a calcium and phytate interaction can explain reduced fluoride solubility in some soy-based infant formulas as well as decreased fluoride absorbability in vivo.

Cerklewski, F.L. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Fluoride Emissions Management Guide (FEMG) for Aluminium ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Aluminum Reduction Technology. Presentation Title, Fluoride Emissions ...

47

Anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte battery. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

It is an object of the invention to provide a primary cell or battery using ammonium fluoride--anhydrous hydrogen fluoride electrolyte having improved current and power production capabilities at low temperatures. It is operable at temperatures substantially above the boiling point of hydrogen fluoride. (GRA)

Not Available

1972-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

48

The synthesis, characterization and reactivity of high oxidation state nickel fluorides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research described in this thesis has mainly addressed the challenge of the synthesis of thermodynamically unstable nickel fluorides, which cannot be made by traditional thermal methods. A low-temperature approach towards the synthesis of such transition metal fluorides exploits the greater thermodynamic stability of high oxidation states in anions and involves the use of anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (aHF) as a solvent. The general method consists of combining an aHF soluble starting material (e.g., K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6}) with a Lewis fluoroacid (e.g., BF{sub 3}), which precipitates a neutral polymeric solid state fluoride: 2 K{sup +} + NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} + BF{sub 3} {r_arrow} NiF{sub 4} + 2 BF{sub 4}{sup {minus}} + 2 K{sup +}. At room temperature, this reaction yields a different structural phase, with composition K{sub x}NiF{sub 3} (x {approx} 0.18). This material has a pseudo-hexagonal tungsten bronze structure (H{sub 0}-K{sub x}NiF{sub 3}), and is an ionic conductor, probably due to K{sup +} ions hosted in the lattice channels. R-NiF{sub 3} is capable of fluorinating a wide range of inorganic and organic substrates. These reactions have probably shed light on the mechanism of the Simons Electrochemical Fluorination (ECF) Process, an important industrial method of fluorinating organic compounds. It has long been speculated that NiF{sub 3} plays a role in the ECF process, which uses nickel electrodes in aHF solvent. K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} also fluorinates organic compounds in aHF, but interestingly, yields different fluorinated products. The reduction of R-NiF{sub 3} and K{sub 2}NiF{sub 6} during fluorination reactions yields NiF{sub 2}. A method has been developed to regenerate NiF{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}} from NiF{sub 2}.

Chacon, L.C. [Univ. of Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Div.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Separation of High Order Harmonics with Fluoride Windows  

SciTech Connect

The lower orders produced in high order harmonic generation can be effciently temporally separated into monochromatic pulses by propagation in a Fluoride window while still preserving their femtosecond pulse duration. We present calculations for MgF2, CaF2, and LiF windows for the third, fifth, and seventh harmonics of 800 nm. We demonstrate the use of this simple and inexpensive technique in a femtosecond pump/probe experiment using the fifth harmonic.

Allison, Tom; van Tilborg, Jeroen; Wright, Travis; Hertlein, Marcus; Falcone, Roger; Belkacem, Ali

2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

50

DISSOLUTION OF LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plutonium separatory ore concentration procedure involving the use of a fluoride type of carrier is presented. An improvement is given in the derivation step in the process for plutonium recovery by carrier precipitation of plutonium values from solution with a lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitate and subsequent derivation from the resulting plutonium bearing carrier precipitate of an aqueous acidic plutonium-containing solution. The carrier precipitate is contacted with a concentrated aqueous solution of potassium carbonate to effect dissolution therein of at least a part of the precipitate, including the plutonium values. Any remaining precipitate is separated from the resulting solution and dissolves in an aqueous solution containing at least 20% by weight of potassium carbonate. The reacting solutions are combined, and an alkali metal hydroxide added to a concentration of at least 2N to precipitate lanthanum hydroxide concomitantly carrying plutonium values.

Fries, B.A.

1959-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nonstoichiometry in inorganic fluorides: I. Nonstoichiometry in MF{sub m}-RF{sub n} (m < n {<=} 4) systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manifestation of gross nonstoichiometry in MF{sub m}-RF{sub n} systems (m Fluorides of 34 elements, in the systems of which phases of practical interest are formed, are chosen. To search for new phases of complex composition, a program for studying the phase diagrams of the condensed state ({approx}200 systems) has been carried out at the Institute of Crystallography, Russian Academy of Sciences. The main products of high-temperature interactions of the fluorides of elements with different valences (m {ne} n) are grossly nonstoichiometric phases of two structural types: fluorite (CaF{sub 2}) and tysonite (LaF{sub 3}). Systems of fluorides of 27 elements (M{sup 1+} = Na, K; M{sup 2+} = Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, Pb; R{sup 3+} = Sc, Y, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu; R{sup 4+} = Zr, Hf, Th, U) are selected; nonstoichiometric M{sub 1-x}R{sub x}F{sub m(1-x)+nx} phases, which are of greatest practical interest, are formed in these systems. The gross nonstoichiometry in inorganic fluorides is most pronounced in 80 MF{sub 2} - RF{sub 3} systems (M = Ca, Sr, Ba, Cd, Pb; R are rare earth elements). The problems related to the growth of single crystals of nonstoichiometric phases and basic fields of their application as new fluoride multicomponent materials, the properties of which are controlled by the defect structure, are considered.

Sobolev, B. P., E-mail: sobolevb@yandex.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

52

PREPARATION OF ANHYDROUS F-18 FLUORIDE, T. Tewson. Journal of Labelled Compounds and Radiopharmaceuticals S165; 52, Supplement 1 2009  

SciTech Connect

The original specific aims of the grant where cut back considerably as the study section reduced both the time and the budget for the project. The objective of the grant was to show that fluorine-18 fluoride could be prepared completely anhydrous and thus substantially more reactive than conventionally dried fluoride using the method of Sun and DiMagno. This method involved using conventionally dried fluoride to prepare an aromatic fluoride in which the aromatic ring is substituted with electron withdrawing groups. The aryl fluoride is then dried and purified and the fluoride is displaced with an anhydrous nucleophile. Using fluorine-19 and macroscopic scale reactions the reactions work well and give anhydrous fluoride salts that are both more reactive and more selective in their reactions than conventionally dried fluoride. The original substrate chosen for the reaction was bromopentacyanobenzene (1). This compound proved to be easy to make but very hard to purify. As an alternative hexabromobenzene, which is commercially available in high purity, was tried. This reacted cleanly with conventionally dried F-18 fluoride in acetonitrile to give [{sup 18}F]-fluoropentabromobenzene (2), which could be dried by passage of the solution over alumina, which also removed any unreacted fluoride. The fluorine-18 fluoride could be liberated from (2) by displacement with an anhydrous nucleophilic tetra-alkylammonium salt but the anion had to be chosen with considerable care. The reaction is potentially reversible especially as, on the no carrier added scale, there is inevitably an excess of hexabromobenzene and so the displacing nucleophile is chosen to deactivate the aromatic compound to further nucleophilic displacement reactions. To this end tetrabutylammonium azide and tetrabutylammonium phenolate have been tried. Both work but the phenolate is probably the better choice. The F-18 fluoride produced by this process is substantially more reactive than conventionally dried fluoride. A solution of the 3'-anhydrothymidine-5-benzoate (3) was added to the fluoride solution and 30% of the fluoride was incorporated in less than 3 minutes at room temperature were as conventionally dried fluoride requires 10 minutes at 160 C and gives {approx}10% incorporation. These results are encouraging in that they show that the objective of truly anhydrous fluoride is worth pursuing but the problem is that you end up with too much 'stuff' in the solution. Four to five milligrams of hexabromobenzene are used for the initial fluorination reaction and enough of the tetra-alkylammonium salt has to be added to react with a substantial number of those bromides. No attempt has been made to optimize these amounts but there is clearly a lot of material in the solution before the final substrate is added. To avoid these difficulties experiments involving a different, low boiling carrier of the fluoride which can be distilled from the initial fluorination mixture have been tried. Phenyltrifluoromethane sulfonate reacts with fluoride to give trifluoromethane sulfonyl fluoride which boils at -20 C as shown. This reaction works with conventionally dried fluorine-18 fluoride and the no carrier added trifluoromethane sulphonyl fluoride distills out of the reaction as it forms. The choice of nucleophile to react it with to liberate the fluoride is limited and the obvious choice is tetrabutylammonium azide as the resulting trifluoromethane sulfonyl azide is unreactive. We have shown that this works in principle but the experimental details have not been explored.

Tewson, T.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Skin Effect of Hf-Rich Melts and Some Aspects in its Usage for Hf ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

USAGE FOR Hf-CONTAINING. CAST NICKEL- ... of advanced gas turbines. ... were polished by metallo- graphy and then melted by tungsten inert gas(TIG).

54

PRECIPITATION OF URANIUM PEROXIDE OF LOW FLUORIDE CONTENT FROM SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FLUORIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>A method is described for the preparation of fluoride free uraniunn peroxide precipitates, even though the solution from which the precipitation is made is contaminated with fluorides. This is accomplished by add ing aluminum ions to the solution, where they complex any fluoride present and prevent its precipitation with the uramum peroxide.

King, E.J.; Clark, H.M.

1958-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

55

Hydrogeochemical genesis of groundwaters with abnormal fluoride ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

fluoride concentrations from Zhongxiang City, Hubei Province, central China. Qinghai ..... gypsum source calcium can be calculated by subtracting the amount of ...

56

Fluoride concentrations in a crystalline bedrock aquifer Marathon ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 14, 2006 ... Introduction. The effects of fluoride on human health are well-studied. Although trace amounts of fluoride in the diet are important to the ...

57

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Neptunium and Plutonium. Edited by OECD Nuclear EnergyComplexation of Plutonium(IV) with Fluoride at Variablehigher temperatures. Key Words: Plutonium (IV) / Fluoride /

Moore, Dean A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

PROCESS OF PREPARING A FLUORIDE OF TETRAVLENT URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for producing a fluoride salt pf tetravalent uranium suitable for bomb reduction to metallic uranium. An aqueous solution of uranyl nitrate is treated with acetic acid and a nitrite-suppressor and then contacted with metallic lead whereby uranium is reduced from the hexavalent to the tetravalent state and soluble lead acetate is formed. Sulfate ions are then added to the solution to precipitate and remove the lead values. Hydrofluoric acid and alkali metal ions are then added causing the formation of an alkali metal uranium double-fluoride in which the uranium is in the tetravalent state. After recovery, this precipitate is suitable for using in the limited production of metallic uranium.

Wheelwright, E.J.

1959-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

59

Parametric Study of Hydrogen Fluoride Formation in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... flames for three fuels, methane, propane, and heptane, CH4 ... can overestimate the steady-state HF production ... Corp., New York NY, 1955,647-651. ...

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

60

Growth of hollow nickel fluoride whiskers  

SciTech Connect

Hollow nickel fluoride whiskers have been obtained by condensation from the vapor phase onto a platinum substrate in a flow of hydrogen fluoride. Crystals up to 5 mm in length have a square cross section with a 300 {+-} 30-{mu}m side. The wall thickness is 85 {+-} 20 {mu}m.

Petrov, S. V.; Orekhov, Yu. F. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Kapitsa Institute for Physical Problems (Russian Federation); Fedorov, P. P., E-mail: ppf@lst.gpi.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Prokhorov General Physics Institute (Russian Federation)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

PROCESS FOR TREATING VOLATILE METAL FLUORIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to the purification of uranium hexafluoride, made by reacting the metal or its tetrafluoride with fluorine, from the frequently contained traces of hydrofluoric acid. According to the present process, UF/sub 6/ containing as an impurity a small amount of hydrofluoric acid, is treated to remove such impurity by contact with an anhydrous alkali metal fluoride such as sodium fluoride. In this way a non-volatile complex containing hydrofluoric acid and the alkali metal fluoride is formed, and the volatile UF /sub 6/ may then be removed by distillation.

Rudge, A.J.; Lowe, A.J.

1957-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

REDUCTION OF FLUORIDE TO METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for making yttrium metal by reducing yttrium fluoride with calcium plus magnesium. Calcium is added in an excess of from 10 to 20% and magnesium in a quantity to yield a magnesium--yttrium alloy containing from 12 to 25% magnesium when the reaction mass is heated in an inert atmosphere at from 900 to 1106 deg C, but preferably above the melting point of the alloy. Calcium chloride may be added so as to obtain a less viscous slag containing from 30 to 60% calcium chloride. After removal of the slag the alloy is vacuum-heated at about 1100 deg C for volatilization of the magnesium and calcium.

Carlson, O.N.; Schmidt, F.A.; Spedding, F.H.

1960-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Sulfuryl fluoride in the global atmosphere  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first calibrated high-frequency, high-precision, in situ atmospheric and archived air measurements of the fumigant sulfuryl fluoride (SO[subscript 2]F[subscript 2]) have been made as part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric ...

Muhle, J.

64

Development of fluorides for high power laser optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The laser-assisted thermonuclear fusion program has significant needs for improved optical materials with high transmission in the ultraviolet, and with low values of nonlinear index of refraction. Lithium fluoride (LiF) possesses a combination of optical properties which are of potential use. Single-crystalline LiF is limited by low mechanical strength. In this program, we investigated the technique of press-forging to increase the mechanical strength. LiF single crystals were press-forged over the temperature range 300 to 600/sup 0/C to produce fine-grained polycrystalline material.

Ready, J.F.; Vora, H.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Physical vapor deposition and patterning of calcium fluoride films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physical vapor deposition of calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) thin films was performed via electron beam evaporation, resistive/thermal evaporation, and nonreactive radio frequency sputtering. Patterning of the resultant ''usable'' thin films was then also attempted in several ways, including by shadow mask deposition, liftoff, and direct chemical etching. Resistive evaporation produced the most stable films, having polycrystalline morphology with a moderately strong preference to the 331 orientation. The cleanest patterning results were obtained via a polymer/metal liftoff. The results and implications of each of the various deposition and patterning techniques are discussed.

Pinol, L.; Rebello, K.; Caruso, K.; Francomacaro, A. S.; Coles, G. L. [Applied Physics Laboratory, Johns Hopkins University, Laurel, Maryland 20723 (United States)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

PROCESS OF PRODUCING SHAPED PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for producing and casting high purity plutonium metal in one step from plutonium tetrafluoride. The process comprises heating a mixture of the plutonium tetrafluoride with calcium while the mixture is in contact with and defined as to shape by a material obtained by firing a mixture consisting of calcium oxide and from 2 to 10% by its weight of calcium fluoride at from 1260 to 1370 deg C.

Anicetti, R.J.

1959-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Reduction in HF Emission Through Improvement in Operational ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Effect of Calcium Fluoride on Alumina Solubility in Low Temperature Cryolite Melts · The First Results of the Industrial Application of the EcoSoderberg ...

68

Rare earth/iron fluoride and methods for making and using same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A particulate mixture of Fe.sub.2 O.sub.3 and RE.sub.2 O.sub.3, where RE is a rare earth element, is reacted with an excess of HF acid to form an insoluble fluoride compound (salt) comprising REF.sub.3 and FeF.sub.3 present in solid solution in the REF.sub.3 crystal lattice. The REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound is dried to render it usable as a reactant in the thermite reduction process as well as other processes which require an REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 mixture. The dried REF.sub.3 /FeF.sub.3 compound comprises about 5 weight % to about 40 weight % of FeF.sub.3 and the balance REF.sub.3 to this end.

Schmidt, Frederick A. (Ames, IA); Wheelock, John T. (Neveda, IA); Peterson, David T. (Ames, IA)

1991-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

69

METATHESIS OF PLUTONIUM CARRIER LANTHANUM FLUORIDE PRECIPITATE WITH AN ALKALI  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plutonium fluoride precipitate is converted to plutonium hydroxide by digesting the precipitate with an aqueous alkali metal hydroxide solution.

Duffield, R.B.

1960-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

The Control of Fluoride Concentration in ET? Alüminyum Bayer ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2013 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Alumina and Bauxite. Presentation Title, The Control of Fluoride ...

71

Method for removing fluoride contamination from nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluoride ions are removed from nitric acid solution by contacting the vaporized solution with alumina or zirconium.

Pruett, David J. (Knoxville, TN); Howerton, William B. (Kingston, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

METHOD FOR DISSOLVING LANTHANUM FLUORIDE CARRIER FOR PLUTONIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for dissolving lanthanum fluoride precipitates which is applicable to lanthanum fluoride carrier precipitation processes for recovery of plutonium values from aqueous solutions. The lanthanum fluoride precipitate is contacted with an aqueous acidic solution containing dissolved zirconium in the tetravalent oxidation state. The presence of the zirconium increases the lanthanum fluoride dissolved and makes any tetravalent plutonium present more readily oxidizable to the hexavalent state. (AEC)

Koshland, D.E. Jr.; Willard, J.E.

1961-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Monitoring Air Fluoride (F-) Concentration around ALUAR Smelter in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, 2011 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium , Aluminum Reduction Technology. Presentation Title, Monitoring Air Fluoride ...

74

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride: Ceramic Nano-particles via a ...  

Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride: Ceramic Nano-particles via a Hydrothermal Method. Battelle Number(s): 12234. ... Potential Industry Applications. ...

75

Selective Adsorption of Sodium Aluminum Fluoride Salts from Molten Aluminum  

SciTech Connect

Aluminum is produced in electrolytic reduction cells where alumina feedstock is dissolved in molten cryolite (sodium aluminum fluoride) along with aluminum and calcium fluorides. The dissolved alumina is then reduced by electrolysis and the molten aluminum separates to the bottom of the cell. The reduction cell is periodically tapped to remove the molten aluminum. During the tapping process, some of the molten electrolyte (commonly referred as “bath” in the aluminum industry) is carried over with the molten aluminum and into the transfer crucible. The carryover of molten bath into the holding furnace can create significant operational problems in aluminum cast houses. Bath carryover can result in several problems. The most troublesome problem is sodium and calcium pickup in magnesium-bearing alloys. Magnesium alloying additions can result in Mg-Na and Mg-Ca exchange reactions with the molten bath, which results in the undesirable pickup of elemental sodium and calcium. This final report presents the findings of a project to evaluate removal of molten bath using a new and novel micro-porous filter media. The theory of selective adsorption or removal is based on interfacial surface energy differences of molten aluminum and bath on the micro-porous filter structure. This report describes the theory of the selective adsorption-filtration process, the development of suitable micro-porous filter media, and the operational results obtained with a micro-porous bed filtration system. The micro-porous filter media was found to very effectively remove molten sodium aluminum fluoride bath by the selective adsorption-filtration mechanism.

Leonard S. Aubrey; Christine A. Boyle; Eddie M. Williams; David H. DeYoung; Dawid D. Smith; Feng Chi

2007-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

76

COMPLEX FLUORIDES OF PLUTONIUM AND AN ALKALI METAL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for precipitating alkali metal plutonium fluorides. such as KPuF/sub 5/, KPu/sub 2/F/sub 9/, NaPuF/sub 5/, and RbPuF/sub 5/, from an aqueous plutonium(IV) solution by adding hydrogen fluoride and alkali-metal- fluoride.

Seaborg, G.T.

1960-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New Heat Exchanger. Author(s), Anders Kenneth Sorhuus, Geir Wedde, Ketil A.

78

On the dynamic NBTI of the HfO2 and HfSiON P-MOSFET  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under typical dynamic NBTI conditions (~7MV/cm, 100^oC), a progressive decrease in the recoverable component (R) of the HfO"2 p-MOSFET is observed but those of the HfSiON and SiON p-MOSFETs are found to remain constant. The decrease in the R of the HfO"2 ... Keywords: Bias-temperature instability, Hole trapping, Interface traps, Permanent degradation, Recovery

Y. Gao; D. S. Ang; A. A. Boo; Z. Q. Teo

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

DIODE LASER-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF FUELS ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Recent work [3] has shown that hydrogen fluoride gas (HF) is the principal toxic gas produced during fire suppression by Halon 1301 and by ...

2012-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

80

PROCESS FOR THE PRODUCTION OF AMMONIUM URANIUM FLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to the preparation of ammonium uranium fluoride. The process comprises adding a water soluble fluoride to an aqueous solution of a uranous compound containing an ammonium salt, and isolating the resulting precipitate. This patent relates to the manufacture of uranium tetnafluoride from ammonium uranium fluoride, NH/sub 4/UF/sub 5/. Uranium tetrafluoride is prepared by heating the ammonium uranium fluoride to a temperature at which dissociation occurs with liberation of ammonium fluoride. Preferably the process is carried out under reduced pressure, or in a current of an inert gas.

Ellis, A.S.; Mooney, R.B.

1953-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Interfacial transition regions at germanium/Hf oxide based dielectric interfaces: Qualitative differences between non-crystalline Hf Si oxynitride and nanocrystalline HfO2 gate stacks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The contribution from a relatively low-K SiON (K~6) interfacial transition region (ITR) between Si and transition metal high-K gate dielectrics such as nanocrystalline HfO"2 (K~20), and non-crystalline Hf Si oxynitride (K~10-12) places a significant ... Keywords: Di-vacancy defects, Ge substrates, High-K gate dielectrics, Interfacial transition regions, MOS devices, Native Ge dielectrics, Spectroscopic ellipsometry, X-ray absorption spectroscopy

G. Lucovsky; S. Lee; J. P. Long; H. Seo; J. Lüning

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Fluoride ion encapsulation by Mg[superscript 2+] ions and phosphates in a fluoride riboswitch  

SciTech Connect

Significant advances in our understanding of RNA architecture, folding and recognition have emerged from structure-function studies on riboswitches, non-coding RNAs whose sensing domains bind small ligands and whose adjacent expression platforms contain RNA elements involved in the control of gene regulation. We now report on the ligand-bound structure of the Thermotoga petrophila fluoride riboswitch, which adopts a higher-order RNA architecture stabilized by pseudoknot and long-range reversed Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen A {sm_bullet} U pair formation. The bound fluoride ion is encapsulated within the junctional architecture, anchored in place through direct coordination to three Mg{sup 2+} ions, which in turn are octahedrally coordinated to water molecules and five inwardly pointing backbone phosphates. Our structure of the fluoride riboswitch in the bound state shows how RNA can form a binding pocket selective for fluoride, while discriminating against larger halide ions. The T. petrophila fluoride riboswitch probably functions in gene regulation through a transcription termination mechanism.

Ren, Aiming; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Patel, Dinshaw J. (Cornell); (MSKCC)

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

Method for decontamination of nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a process for decontaminating particulate nickel contaminated with actinide-metal fluorides. In one aspect, the invention comprises contacting nickel-fluoride-coated nickel with gaseous ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation thereof and effecting hydrogen-reduction of the nickel fluoride. The resulting nickel is heated to form a melt and a slag and to effect transfer of actinide metals from the melt into the slag. The melt and slag are then separated. In another aspect, nickel containing nickel oxide and actinide metals is contacted with ammonia at a temperature effecting nickel-catalyzed dissociation to effect conversion of the nickel oxide to the metal. The resulting nickel is then melted and separated as described. In another aspect nickel-fluoride-coated nickel containing actinide-metal fluorides is contacted with both steam and ammonia. The resulting nickel then is melted and separated as described. The invention is characterized by higher nickel recovery, efficient use of ammonia, a substantial decrease in slag formation and fuming, and a valuable increase in the service life of the furnace liners used for melting.

Windt, Norman F. (Paducah, KY); Williams, Joe L. (Paducah, KY)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Calcium accumulation in relation to fluoride pollution in plants  

SciTech Connect

By use of radioactive Ca/sup 45/ it has been established that the presence of fluoride on leaves leads to accumulation of calcium at the same point and that this calcium migrates by itself towards the sites of fluoride accumulation. It was demonstrated also that the calcium concentration in tissues plays an important role in the development of necrosis. If leaves have been subjected to pretreatment with calcium, fluoride applied to leaves does not induce necrotic lesions.

Garree, J.P.; Chopin, S.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Distribution and Geochemical Evolution of Fluoride in Groundwater of Taiyuan Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogeochemistry data were utilized to understand origin, distribution, and geochemical evolution of the high-fluoride groundwater in Taiyuan basin, China. In the study area, the spatial distribution of the high fluoride groundwater are strictly controlled ... Keywords: fluoride, geochemical mechanism

Xiangquan Li; Xinwei Hou; Zhichao Zhou; Lingxia Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

First Principle Study of the Anti--- and Syn---Conformers of Thiophene---2---Carbonyl Fluoride and Selenophene---2---Carbonyl Fluoride in the Gas and Solution Phases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The anti- and syn-conformers of thiophene-2-carbonyl fluoride (A) and selenophene-2-carbonyl fluoride (B) have been studied in the gas phase. The transition states have also been obtained for the interconversion of the anti- and syn-conformers. ... Keywords: DFT/B3LYP, MP2, Selenophene-2-carbonyl fluoride, Thiophene-2-carbonyl fluoride, energy difference, rotational barrier, solvent effect

Hassan H. Abdallah; Ponnadurai Ramasami

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Analytical determination of fluorides in South African chemical gypsum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Fluoride ion is an accompanying impurity in a wide variety of chemical gypsum throughout the world. In this study, the Ion Selective Electrode (ISE) method,… (more)

Motalane, Mpempe Paulus

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Methods of Controlling Hydrogen Fluoride Pressure During Chemical ...  

Graphical representation of the removal of hydrogen fluoride gas by the absorber during growth of YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 (YBCO).

89

NIST: X-Ray Mass Attenuation Coefficients - Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents Back to table 4 Calcium Fluoride HTML table format. Energy, ?/?, ? en /?. (MeV), (cm 2 /g), (cm 2 /g). 1.00000 ...

90

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Wensheng He, David Mountz, Tao Zhang, Chris Roger July 17, 2012 2 Outline Background on Arkema's...

91

Process for producing a clean hydrocarbon fuel from high calcium coal  

SciTech Connect

A method is described for substantially reducing the amount of at least one insoluble fluoride-forming species selected from the group consisting of Group IA species and Group IIA species. The species is present in a coal feed material comprising: forming a slurry of a coal feed; a fluoride acid in an amount to produce a first molar concentration of free-fluoride-ions; at least one fluoride-complexing species, the total of all fluoride-complexing species in the slurry being present in an amount to produce a second molar concentration, the second molar concentration being at least equal to that amount such that the ratio of the first molar concentration to the second molar concentration is substantially equal to the stoichiometric ratio of fluoride in at least one tightly-bound complexion so as to from tightly-bound complexions with substantially all free-fluoride ions in the slurry to produce a leached coal product and a spent leach liquor; and separating the leached coal product from the spent leach liquor.

Kindig, J.K.

1988-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Non-molecular Phases of H2O and HF Under Detonation-like Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energetic materials are known to produce simple molecular species, such as HF and H{sub 2}O, during detonation. The behavior of such species under conditions of simultaneous high pressure and temperature are unknown. The predicted high pressure superionic phases of water and HF are investigated via ab initio molecular dynamics. We study water at densities of 2.0-3.0 g/cc (34 -115 GPa) along the 2000 K isotherm. We find that extremely rapid (superionic) diffusion of protons occurs in a fluid phase at pressures between 34 and 58 GPa. A transition to a stable body-centered cubic (bcc) O lattice with superionic proton conductivity is observed between 70 and 75 GPa. We find that all molecular species at pressures greater than 75 GPa are too short lived to be classified as bound states. Up to 95 GPa, we find a solid superionic phase characterized by covalent O-H bonding. Above 95 GPa, a transient network phase is found characterized by symmetric O-OH hydrogen bonding with nearly 50% covalent character. Ab initio molecular dynamics H simulations of HF were conducted at densities of 1.8-4.0 g/cc along the 900 K isotherm. According to our simulations, a unique form of (symmetric) hydrogen bonding could play a significant role in superionic conduction. Our work shows that the Chapman-Jouget and Zeldovich-von Neumann Doring (ZND) states of some energetic materials are close to the molecular to non-molecular transition.

Fried, L E; Goldman, N; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C J

2006-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Spatial Averaging of HF Radar Data for Wave Measurement Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HF radar data are often collected for time periods that are optimised for current measurement applications where, in many cases, very high temporal resolution is needed. Previous work has demonstrated that this does not provide sufficient ...

Lucy R. Wyatt; Jasmine B. D. Jaffrés; Mal L. Heron

94

Factors Affecting the Accuracy of SHOWEX HF Radar Wave Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean Surface Current Radar (OSCR) HF radar measurements of ocean waves and currents were made during the Shoaling Waves Experiment (SHOWEX) in the fall of 1999. During some periods, at some locations, good quality wave measurements were ...

Lucy R. Wyatt; Guennadi Liakhovetski; Hans C. Graber; Brian K. Haus

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Theoretical Assessment of 178m2Hf De-Excitation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains a comprehensive literature review in support of the theoretical assessment of the {sup 178m2}Hf de-excitation, as well as a rigorous description of controlled energy release from an isomeric nuclear state.

Hartouni, E P; Chen, M; Descalle, M A; Escher, J E; Loshak, A; Navratil, P; Ormand, W E; Pruet, J; Thompson, I J; Wang, T F

2008-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

96

Effects of fluoride varnishes and adhesives on bond strength and preventing enamel decalcification around orthodontic appliances.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this study was to determine whether the fluoride released from the APC-Plus adhesive or application of a fluoride varnish, Duraflor, had any… (more)

Boyles, Glenn A., 1964-

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

EE3, Molecular Beam Epitaxy of Very Thin Fluoride Films on Ge(111)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RTDs were fabricated on Ge substrates by using the initial fluoride layer grown under the optimized condition. The various fluoride layers grown by the single ...

98

Vacuum-evaporated ferroelectric films and heterostructures of vinylidene fluoride/trifluoroethylene copolymer  

SciTech Connect

The potential of the vacuum method for preparing ferroelectric films and photonic heterostructures from organic materials is studied. Vacuum-evaporated films of fluoropolymers and heterostructures on their basis are obtained and their ferroelectric and spectral properties are studied. In particular, homogeneous films of the well-known piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene fluoride and ferroelectric material vinylidene fluoride/trifluoroethylene copolymer (P(VDF/TFE)) are produced. Experimental studies of vacuum-evaporated P(VDF/TFE) films confirmed their ferroelectric properties. The heterostructures composed of alternating layers of P(VDF/TFE) copolymer molecules and azodye molecules are fabricated by vacuum evaporation. Owing to the controlled layer thickness and a significant difference in the refractive indices of the P(VDF/TFE) copolymer and azodyes, these heterostructures exhibit properties of photonic crystals. This finding is confirmed by the occurrence of a photonic band in the absorption spectra of the heterostructures.

Draginda, Yu. A., E-mail: lbf@ns.crys.ras.ru; Yudin, S. G.; Lazarev, V. V.; Yablonskii, S. V.; Palto, S. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

99

Defect aggregation kinetics in calcium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defects in solid materials are responsible for many of their most interesting and critical properties. The authors have developed a site-selective laser technique that allows us to monitor the aggregation of rare earth ion defects in solids on the microscopic scale. This excitation absorption laser method enables us to derive kinetic rate information and thermodynamic parameters for the distribution of defects in solids. For doped materials, various types of defects arise when the dopant ions have ionic charges that differ from the charges of host crystal ions. In model systems such as alkaline earth fluorides doped with trivalent rare earth ions, some defect sites consist of a single dopant ion, while others consist of clusters of dopant cations and interstitial anions. Heat treatment of doped samples leads to a distribution of the various types of defect sites that is characteristic of the temperature and length of heat treatment and the total dopant ion concentration. The results from a study of the formation of trivalent europium ion defect aggregates in calcium fluoride indicate that our method successfully monitors changes in individual site concentrations resulting from heat treatment. The results of this study are consistent with the formation of negatively charged dimer and trimer defects in Eu{sup 3+}:CaF{sub 2} crystals from isolated europium ion and (Eu:F{sub i}) single pair defects. In addition, he presents evidence for rapid equilibrium between the isolated ion and the single pair. Other work presented in this thesis includes the development of a high-temperature fluorine oxidation apparatus that was used to convert divalent europium ions to the trivalent state in calcium fluoride single crystals. This apparatus was also used to increase the superconducting {Tc}'s of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} through modification of copper-oxygen oxidation states.

Cirillo, K.M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Scintillation of rare earth doped fluoride nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

The scintillation response of rare earth (RE) doped core/undoped (multi-)shell fluoride nanoparticles was investigated under x-ray and alpha particle irradiation. A significant enhancement of the scintillation response was observed with increasing shells due: (i) to the passivation of surface quenching defects together with the activation of the REs on the surface of the core nanoparticle after the growth of a shell, and (ii) to the increase of the volume of the nanoparticles. These results are expected to reflect a general aspect of the scintillation process in nanoparticles, and to impact radiation sensing technologies that make use of nanoparticles.

Jacobsohn, L. G.; McPherson, C. L.; Sprinkle, K. B.; Ballato, J. [Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), and School of Materials Science and Engineering, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Yukihara, E. G. [Physics Department, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma 74078-3072 (United States); DeVol, T. A. [Department of Environmental Engineering and Earth Sciences, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634-0905 (United States)

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Continuous production of granular or powder Ti, Zr and Hf or their alloy products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A continuous process for producing a granular metal selected from the group consisting of Ti, Zr or Hf under conditions that provide orderly growth of the metal free of halide inclusions comprising: a) dissolving a reducing metal selected from the group consisting of Na, Mg, Li or K in their respective halide salts to produce a reducing molten salt stream; b) preparing a second molten salt stream containing the halide salt of Ti, Zr or Hf; c) mixing and reacting the two molten streams of steps a) and b) in a continuous stirred tank reactor; d) wherein steps a) through c) are conducted at a temperature range of from about 800.degree. C. to about 1100.degree. C. so that a weight percent of equilibrium solubility of the reducing metal in its respective halide salt varies from about 1.6 weight percent at about 900.degree. C. to about 14.4 weight percent at about 1062.degree. C.; and wherein a range of concentration of the halide salt of Ti, Zn or Hf in molten halides of Na, Mg, Li or K is from about 1 to about 5 times the concentration of Na, Mg, Li or K; e) placing the reacted molten stream from step c) in a solid-liquid separator to recover an impure granular metal product by decantation, centrifugation, or filtration; and f) removing residual halide salt impurity by vacuum evaporator or inert gas sweep at temperatures from about 850.degree. C. to 1000.degree. C. or cooling the impure granular metal product to ambient temperature and water leaching off the residual metal halide salt.

White, Jack C. (Albany, OR); Oden, Laurance L. (Albany, OR)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Status of the ADMX and ADMX-HF experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX) is in the midst of an upgrade to reduce its system noise temperature. ADMX-HF (High Frequency) is a second platform specifically designed for higher mass axions and will serve as an innovation test-bed. Both will be commissioning in 2013 and taking data shortly thereafter. The principle of the experiment, current experimental limits and the status of the ADMX/ADMX-HF program will be described. R&D on hybrid superconducting cavities will be discussed as one example of an innovation to greatly enhance sensitivity.

Karl van Bibber; Gianpaolo Carosi

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

VFL-HF heating of the lower ionosphere and ELF wave generation  

SciTech Connect

For incident wave power densities of 10{sup {minus}6} {minus} 10{sup {minus}2} W/m{sup 2} (at 30 km altitude), VLF heating of the D-region (< 90 km) is found to be 2-10 times more effective (depending on power) than HF heating, resulting in comparable perturbations of subionospheric VLF probe waves in spite of up to 10{sup 3} times larger power density utilized in HF heating and at least as efficient in ELF wave generation. In view of generally larger (100 {times} 100 km) area of the ionosphere illuminated by VLF transmitters, ELF wave generation by modulated VLF heating is estimated to produce ELF power levels of {approximately}100 mW, comparable with or larger than those produced in typical midlatitude ambient ionosphere occurs primarily via the modulation of Pedersen current whereas in a typical auroral ionosphere Hall current is dominant for pump wave frequencies up to {approximately}6 MHz. For 10-30 MHz and power densities > 10{sup {minus}4} W/m{sup 2}, Pedersen current modulation is again dominant, potentially providing up to 2-15 times higher ELF dipole moment than those found in recent experiments using 3-5 MHz heaters.

Taranenko, Y.N.; Inan, U.S.; Bell, T.F. (Stanford Univ., CA (United States))

1992-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

104

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM HALIDES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process amd associated apparatus for producing UF/sub 4/ from U/sub 3/ O/sub 8/ by a fluidized'' technique are reported. The U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is first reduced to UO/sub 2/ by reaction with hydrogen, and the lower oxide of uranium is then reacted with gaseous HF to produce UF/sub 4/. In each case the reactant gas is used, alone or in combination with inert gases, to fluidize'' the finely divided reactant solid. The complete setup of the plant equipment including bins, reactor and the associated piping and valving, is described. An auxiliary fluorination reactor allows for the direct production of UF/sub 6/ from UF/sub 4/ and fluorine gas, or if desired, UF/sub 4/ may be collected as the product.

Murphree, E.V.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

The complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride at elevated temperatures was studied by solvent extraction technique. A solution of NaBrO3 was used as holding oxidant to maintain the oxidation state of plutonium throughout the experiments. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases was found to decrease as the concentrations of fluoride were increased. Stability constants of the 1:1 and 1:2 Pu(IV)-F- complexes, dominant in the aqueous phase under the experimental conditions, were calculated from the effect of fluoride ions on the distribution ratio. The thermodynamic parameters, including enthalpy and entropy of complexation between Pu(IV) and fluoride at 25 degrees C - 55 degrees C were calculated from the stability constants at different temperatures by using the Van’t Hoff equation.

Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Bachelor, Paula P.

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

THE OXIDIZING BEHAVIOR OF SOME PLATINUM METAL FLUORIDES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

iii- IV. The Interaction of Chlorine with the Third-SeriesIV. THE INTERACTION OF CHLORINE WITH THE THIRD-SERIESobserved for solutions of chlorine fluorides in SbF 5 , HS0

Graham, Lionell

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Separation of High Order Harmonics with Fluoride Windows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Harmonics with Fluoride Windows T. K. Allison, 1,2? J. vanpropagation in a ?uoride window while still preserving theirfor MgF 2 , CaF 2 , and LiF windows for the third, ?fth, and

Allison, Tom

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hf-Doped Ni-Al2O3 Interfaces at Equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

In this study, a series of dewetting experiments of pure and Hf-doped Ni films on sapphire and HfO2 substrates were conducted in order to measure the change in interface energy of the Ni-Al2O3 interface in the presence of Hf, and to study Hf interfacial segregation. It was found that Hf oxidizes under the conditions of the experiment (P(O2)=10-20atm.), and that the presence of HfO2 at the Ni-Al2O3 interface increases the interface energy from 2.16 0.2 to 2.7 0.4 [J/m2]. This result contradicts several theoretical studies that predict that Hf segregates to the interface to stabilize it thermodynamically. The solubility of Hf in bulk Ni was found to be significantly lower than the value reported in the equilibrium phase diagram.

Meltzman, Hila [Technion, Israel Institute of Technology; Besmann, Theodore M [ORNL; Kaplan, Prof. Wayne D. [Technion, Israel Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or tission products by formation of the higher fluorides of uranium and/or plutonium is discussed. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first convcrted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treatced with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sup 6/ leaving plutonium behind. The plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 500 deg C and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

VOLATILE FLUORIDE PROCESS FOR SEPARATING PLUTONIUM FROM OTHER MATERIALS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of plutonium from uranium and/or fission products by formation of the higher fluorides off uranium and/or plutonium is described. Neutronirradiated uranium metal is first converted to the hydride. This hydrided product is then treated with fluorine at about 315 deg C to form and volatilize UF/sub 6/ leaving plutonium behind. Thc plutonium may then be separated by reacting the residue with fluorine at about 5004DEC and collecting the volatile plutonium fluoride thus formed.

Spedding, F.H.; Newton, A.S.

1959-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

111

An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Technology  

SciTech Connect

Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize salt corrosion as well as providing a general discussion of heat transfer loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and freeze-up vulnerability.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Effect of Al addition on the microstructure and electronic structure of HfO2 film  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effect of Al addition on the microstructure and electronic structure of HfO2 film X. F. Wang investigated the microstructures and electronic structures of a series of hafnium aluminate HfAlO films with Al concentration ranging from 0% to 100%. When the films evolve from pure HfO2 to pure Al2O3 by increasing

Gong, Xingao

113

PRODUCTION OF PLUTONIUM FLUORIDE FROM BISMUTH PHOSPHATE PRECIPITATE CONTAINING PLUTONIUM VALUES  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for separating plutonium from fission products present on a bismuth phosphate carrier. The dried carrier is first treated with hydrogen fluoride at between 500 and 600 deg C whereby some fission product fluorides volatilize away from plutonium tetrafluoride, and nonvolatile fission product fluorides are formed then with anhydrous fluorine at between 400 and 500 deg C. Bismuth and plutonium distill in the form of volatile fluorides away from the nonvolatile fission product fluorides. The bismuth and plutonium fluorides are condensed at below 290 deg C.

Brown, H.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

METHOD OF PRODUCING PLUTONIUM TETRAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is presented for preparing plutonium tetrafluoride from plutonium(IV) oxalate. The oxalate is dried and decomposed at about 300 deg C to the dioxide, mixed with ammonium bifluoride, and the mixture is heated to between 50 and 150 deg C whereby ammonium plutonium fluoride is formed. The ammonium plutonium fluoride is then heated to about 300 deg C for volatilization of ammonium fluoride. Both heating steps are preferably carried out in an inert atmosphere.

Tolley, W.B.; Smith, R.C.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

115

An Overview of Liquid Fluoride Salt Heat Transport Systems  

SciTech Connect

Heat transport is central to all thermal-based forms of electricity generation. The ever increasing demand for higher thermal efficiency necessitates power generation cycles transitioning to progressively higher temperatures. Similarly, the desire to provide direct thermal coupling between heat sources and higher temperature chemical processes provides the underlying incentive to move toward higher temperature heat transfer loops. As the system temperature rises, the available materials and technology choices become progressively more limited. Superficially, fluoride salts at {approx}700 C resemble water at room temperature being optically transparent and having similar heat capacity, roughly three times the viscosity, and about twice the density. Fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat-transport material at high temperatures. Fluoride salts have been extensively used in specialized industrial processes for decades, yet they have not entered widespread deployment for general heat transport purposes. This report does not provide an exhaustive screening of potential heat transfer media and other high temperature liquids such as alkali metal carbonate eutectics or chloride salts may have economic or technological advantages. A particular advantage of fluoride salts is that the technology for their use is relatively mature as they were extensively studied during the 1940s-1970s as part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's program to develop molten salt reactors (MSRs). However, the instrumentation, components, and practices for use of fluoride salts are not yet developed sufficiently for commercial implementation. This report provides an overview of the current understanding of the technologies involved in liquid salt heat transport (LSHT) along with providing references to the more detailed primary information resources. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier MSR program. However, technology has evolved over the intervening years, and this report also describes more recently developed technologies such as dry gas seals. This report also provides a high-level, parametric evaluation of LSHT loop performance to allow general intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as provide an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. A compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful fluoride salts is also included for salt heat transport systems. Fluoride salts can be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report includes an overview of the state-of-the-art in reduction-oxidation chemistry control methodologies employed to minimize corrosion issues. Salt chemistry control technology, however, remains at too low a level of understanding for widespread industrial usage. Loop operational issues such as start-up procedures and system freeze-up vulnerability are also discussed. Liquid fluoride salts are a leading candidate heat transport medium for high-temperature applications. This report provides an overview of the current status of liquid salt heat transport technology. The report includes a high-level, parametric evaluation of liquid fluoride salt heat transport loop performance to allow intercomparisons between heat-transport fluid options as well as providing an overview of the properties and requirements for a representative loop. Much of the information presented here derives from the earlier molten salt reactor program and a significant advantage of fluoride salts, as high temperature heat transport media is their consequent relative technological maturity. The report also includes a compilation of relevant thermophysical properties of useful heat transport fluoride salts. Fluoride salts are both thermally stable and with proper chemistry control can be relatively chemically inert. Fluoride salts can, however, be highly corrosive depending on the container materials selected, the salt chemistry, and the operating procedures used. The report also provides an over

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Growth, microstructure and electrical properties of sputter-deposited hafnium oxide (HfO2) thin films grown using HfO2 ceramic target  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hafnium oxide (HfO?) thin films have been made by radio-frequency (rf) magnetron-sputtering onto Si(100) substrates under varying growth temperature (Ts). HfO? ceramic target has been employed for sputtering while varying the Ts from room temperature to 500?C during deposition. The effect of Ts on the growth and microstructure of deposited HfO? films has been studied using grazing incidence x-ray diffraction (GIXRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy (HR-SEM) coupled with energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS). The results indicate that the effect of Ts is significant on the growth, surface and interface structure, morphology and chemical composition of the HfO? films. Structural characterization indicates that the HfO? films grown at Ts200 ?C are nanocrystalline. An amorphous-to-crystalline transition occurs at Ts=200 ?C. Nanocrystalline HfO? films crystallized in a monoclinic structure with a (-111) orientation. XPS measurements indicated the high surface-chemical quality and stoichiometric nature of the grown HfO? films. An interface layer (IL) formation occurs due to reaction at the HfO?-Si interface for HfO? films deposited at Ts>200 ?C. The thickness of IL increases with increasing Ts. XPS and EDS at the HfO?-Si cross-section indicate the IL is a (Hf, Si)-O compound. The electrical characterization using capacitance-voltage measurements indicate that the dielectric constant decreases from 25 to 16 with increasing Ts.

Aguirre, B.; Vemuri, R. S.; Zubia, David; Engelhard, Mark H.; Shutthanandan, V.; Kamala Bharathi, K.; Ramana, Chintalapalle V.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Effects of fluoride residue on Cu agglomeration in Cu/low-k interconnects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated the effects of fluoride residue on the thermal stability of a Cu/barrier metal (BM)/porous low-k film (kKeywords: Barrier metal, Cu agglomeration, Fluoride residue, Low-k, Oxidation, Penetration, Porous

Y. Kobayashi; S. Ozaki; Y. Iba; Y. Nakata; T. Nakamura

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Studies on the tolerance limit of fluoride in food in China  

SciTech Connect

To estimate the appropriate tolerance limit of fluoride in food in China, fluoride-related endemic diseases, background levels of fluoride in foods, and daily total intake of fluoride per capita were studied in addition to the subchronic toxicity test of fluoride in rats. In the general population, the daily total intake of fluoride from food, water, and air is 1.45-3.15 mg per capita. On the basis of these results and other information, it is suggested that the ADI of fluoride in the Chinese population should be 3.5 mg per capita, or 0.058 mg/kg body wt, and the tolerance limit of fluoride should be 1.0 ppm in rice, wheat flour, vegetables, and freshwater fish.

Chen, S.L.; Gong, Y.J.; Fu, Y.G. (Zhejiang Academy of Medicine (China))

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thermodynamic modeling of hydrogen fluoride production relevant to actinide residue treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report addresses issues specific to generation of hydrogen fluoride via reaction of calcium fluoride with sulfuric acid. This process has been established on a commercial scale and is under consideration for treatment of calcium fluoride residues from uranium processing. Magnesium fluoride slags are also available as a product of uranium processing. The technique of using sulfuric acid for the production of hydrogen fluoride from magnesium fluoride is also under consideration as a residue processing scheme. In the current study, thermodynamic modeling was used to investigate these chemical processing systems. Results presented herein reveal information relevant to selection of processing temperatures and conditions. Details include predicted effects in system composition based on operating temperatures for both the calcium fluoride and the magnesium fluoride systems.

West, M.H.; Axler, K.M.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Fluoride at Elevated Temperatures  

SciTech Connect

Complexation of neptunium(V) with fluoride at elevated temperatures was studied by spectrophotometry and microcalorimetry. Two successive complexes, NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{sup -}, were identified by spectrophotometry in the temperature range of 10-70 C. Thermodynamic parameters, including the equilibrium constants and enthalpy of complexation between Np(V) and fluoride at 10-70 C were determined. Results show that the complexation of Np(V) with fluoride is endothermic and that the complexation is enhanced by the increase in temperature - a two-fold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F(aq) and more than five-fold increase in the stability constants of NpO{sub 2}F{sub 2}{sup -} as the temperature is increased from 10 to 70 C.

Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

2008-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Recovery of protactinium from molten fluoride nuclear fuel compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for separating protactinium from a molten fluonlde salt composition consisting essentially of at least one alkali and alkaline earth metal fluoride and at least one soluble fluoride of uranium or thorium which comprises oxidizing the protactinium in said composition to the + 5 oxidation state and contacting said composition with an oxide selected from the group consisting of an alkali metal oxide, an alkaline earth oxide, thorium oxide, and uranium oxide, and thereafter isolating the resultant insoluble protactinium oxide product from said composition. (Official Gazette)

Baes, C.F. Jr.; Bamberger, C.; Ross, R.G.

1973-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Kinetics of the reactions of hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the kinetics of interaction of gaseous hydrogen fluoride with calcium oxide at temperatures 300-700 degrees. The experiments were conducted in a laboratory adsorption apparatus modified and adapted for work with corrosive hydrogen fluoride. Calcium oxide samples in granulated form and deposited on gamma-alumina were used in the experiments. Kinetic curves representing variations of the degree of conversion of the solid samples with time are shown. The influence of retardation dure to diffusion was observed in the experiments. The influence of diffusion control on the reaction rate was also observed in a study of the reaction kinetics on supported layers of calcium oxide.

Kossaya, A.M.; Belyakov, B.P.; Kuchma, Z.V.; Sandrozd, M.K.; Vasil'eva, V.G.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

On the assessment of hydroxyapatite fluoridation by means of Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

Hydroxyapatite is the main mineral component of bones and teeth. Fluorapatite, a bioceramic that can be obtained from hydroxyapatite by chemical substitution of the hydroxide ions with fluoride, exhibits lower mineral solubility and larger mechanical strength. Despite the widespread use of fluoride against caries, a reliable technique for unambiguous assessment of fluoridation in in vitro tests is still lacking. Here we present a method to probe fluorapatite formation in fluoridated hydroxyapatite by combining Raman scattering with thermal annealing. In synthetic minerals, we found that effectively fluoride substituted hydroxyapatite transforms into fluorapatite only after heat treatment, due to the high activation energy for this first order phase transition.

Campillo, M.; Valiente, M. [Centre Grup de Tecniques de Separacio en Quimica, Edifici CN, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona (Spain); Lacharmoise, P. D.; Reparaz, J. S.; Goni, A. R. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Esfera UAB, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

124

Defects and instabilities in Hf-dielectric/SiON stacks (Invited Paper)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a review on the recent progress in understanding defects and instabilities in Hf-dielectric/SiON stacks will be given for both nMOSFETs and pMOSFETs. The key issues addressed for nMOSFETs include the capture cross section of electron traps, ... Keywords: Defects, Hf-silicates, HfO2, High-k dielectrics, Instability, NBTI, PBTI, Positive charges, Traps

J. F. Zhang

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Electrokinetic behavior of fluoride salts as explained from water structure considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Unlike the other silver halides, silver fluoride is positively charged in its saturated solution as determined by nonequilibrium electrophoresis measurements. In the absence of surface hydrolysis reactions, other fluoride salts (LiF, CaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2}) also are positively charged in their saturation solutions. Furthermore, the electrokinetic behavior of these fluoride salts is rather insensitive to the fluoride ion activity in neutral or acidic solutions, and reversal of the sign of the surface charge by fluoride addition is not possible. Based on FTIR transmission spectra to describe the water structure of ionic solutions, in situ FTIR/internal reflection spectroscopy (FTIR/IRS) has been used to spectroscopically characterize interfacial water at fluoride salt surfaces. The experimental spectra were examined by consideration of the O-H stretching region (3,000--3,800 cm{sup {minus}1}) associated with the vibrational spectra of interfacial water. These results reveal a unique hydration state for fluorides and explain the anomalous electrokinetic behavior of fluoride salts such as LiF, CaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2}, which show an unexpected insensitivity to the fluoride ion concentration in solution. It appears that this insensitivity is due to the formation of strong hydrogen bonding of the fluoride ions with water molecules. This hydration state prevents the accommodation of excess fluoride ions at surface lattice sites and accounts for the observed electrokinetic behavior.

Hu, Y.; Lu, Y.; Veeramasuneni, S.; Miller, J.D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Study on Modification and Fluoride-Adsorption Capacity of Zeolite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Adsorption and ion exchange is thought to be an effective method. Zeolite is a kind of normal adsorber. The adsorption capacity of natural zeolite is low, so it must be activated in order to attain a higher adsorption capacity. On this condition, ... Keywords: zeolite, modify, fluoride removal, adsorption capacity

Sun Xingbin; Xi Chengju; Hou Zhaochao

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Shape Memory Response of NiTiHfPd High Strength and High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, shape memory and superelastic properties of NiTiHfPd polycrystalline and single crystalline SMAs as functions of aging temperature and time were ...

128

Development of Continuous SiC Fiber Reinforced HfB 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Ceramic Matrix Composites. Presentation Title, Development of Continuous SiC Fiber Reinforced HfB2-SiC Composites for Aerospace Applications.

129

METHOD OF PRODUCING URANIUM METAL BY ELECTROLYSIS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for making uranium metal from oxidic material by electrolytic deposition on the cathode. The oxidic material admixed with two moles of carbon per one mole of uranium dioxide forms the anode, and the electrolyte is a mixture of from 40 to 75% of calcium fluoride or barium fluoride, 15 to 45% of uranium tetrafluoride, and from 10 to 20% of lithium fluoride or magnesium fluoride; the temperature of the electrolyte is between 1150 and 1175 deg C. (AEC)

Piper, R.D.

1962-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Chemistry of H2O and HF Under Extreme Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The predicted high pressure superionic phases of water and HF are investigated via ab initio molecular dynamics. These phases could potentially be achieved through either static compression with heating or through shock compression. We study water at densities of 2.0-3.0 g/cc (34-115 GPa) along the 2000K isotherm.We find that extremely rapid (superionic) diffusion of protons occurs in a fluid phase at pressures between 34 and 58 GPa. A transition to a stable body-centered cubic (bcc) O lattice with superionic proton conductivity is observed between 70 and 75 GPa, a much higher pressure than suggested in prior work. We find that all molecular species at pressures greater than 75 GPa are too short lived to be classified as bound states. Up to 95 GPa, we find a solid superionic phase characterized by covalent O-H bonding. Above 95 GPa, a transient network phase is found characterized by symmetric O-H hydrogen bonding with nearly 50% covalent character. Ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of HF were conducted at densities of 1.8-4.0 g/cc along the 900 K isotherm. According to our simulations, a unique form of (symmetric) hydrogen bonding could play a significant role in superionic conduction. Our work shows that superionic phases could be more prevalent in hydrogen bonded systems than previously thought, such as HCl and HBr.

Fried, L; Goldman, N; Kuo, I W; Mundy, C

2005-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Title The mechanism of HF formation in LiPF6 based organic carbonate electrolytes Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Lux, Simon F., Ivan T. Lucas, Elad Pollak, Stefano Passerini, Martin Winter, and Robert Kostecki Journal Electrochemistry Communications Volume 14 Start Page 47 Issue 1 Pagination 47-50 Date Published 01/2012 Keywords Hydrofluoric acid, LiPF6 degradation, Lithium ion batteries, spectroscopic ellipsometry Abstract Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to study the time-dependent formation of HF upon the thermal degradation of LiPF6 at 50 °C in a lithium ion battery electrolyte containing ethylene carbonate and diethyl carbonate. The generated HF was monitored by following the etching rate of a 300 nm thick SiO2 layer, grown on both sides of a silicon wafer substrate, as a function of the immersion time in the electrolyte at 50 °C. It was found that the formation of HF starts after 70 h of exposure time and occurs following several different phases. The amount of generated HF was calculated using an empirical formula correlating the etching rate to the temperature. Combining the results of the HF formation with literature data, a simplified mechanism for the formation of the HF involving LiPF6 degradation, and a simplified catalytical reaction pathway of the formed HF and silicon dioxide are proposed to describe the kinetics of HF formation.

132

Mechanism of plutonium metal dissolution in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An oxidation-reduction balance of the products of the dissolution of plutonium metal and alloys in HNO/sub 3/-HF-N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ solution shows that the major reactions during dissolution are the reduction of nitrate to NH/sub 3/, N/sub 2/ and N/sub 2/O by the metal, and the oxidation of H free radicals to NH/sub 3/ by N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. Reactions between HNO/sub 3/ and N/sub 2/H/sub 4/ produce varying amounts of HN/sub 3/. The reaction rate is greater for delta-Pu than alpha-Pu, and is increased by higher concentrations of HF and HNO/sub 3/. The low yield of reduced nitrogen species indicates that nitrate is reduced on the metal surface without producing a significant concentration of species that react with N/sub 2/H/sub 4/. It is conjectured that intermediate Pu valences and electron transfer within the metal are involved. 7 refs., 3 tabs.

Karraker, D G

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Interfacial and structural properties of sputtered HfO{sub 2} layers  

SciTech Connect

Magnetron sputtered HfO{sub 2} layers formed on a heated Si substrate were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometer (SE), x-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth profiling techniques. The results show that the formation of a SiO{sub x} suboxide layer at the HfO{sub 2}/Si interface is unavoidable. The HfO{sub 2} thickness and suboxide formation are highly affected by the growth parameters such as sputtering power, O{sub 2}/Ar gas ratio during sputtering, sputtering time, and substrate temperature. XRD spectra show that the deposited film has (111) monoclinic phase of HfO{sub 2}, which is also supported by FTIR spectra. The atomic concentration and chemical environment of Si, Hf, and O have been measured as a function of depth starting from the surface of the sample by XPS technique. It shows that HfO{sub 2} layers of a few nanometers are formed at the top surface. Below this thin layer, Si-Si bonds are detected just before the Si suboxide layer, and then the Si substrate is reached during the depth profiling by XPS. It is clearly understood that the highly reactive sputtered Hf atoms consume some of the oxygen atoms from the underlying SiO{sub 2} to form HfO{sub 2}, leaving Si-Si bonds behind.

Aygun, G. [Department of Physics, Izmir Institute of Technology, Urla, TR-35430 Izmir (Turkey); Yildiz, I. [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, TR-06531 Ankara (Turkey); Central Laboratory, Middle East Technical University, TR-06531 Ankara (Turkey)

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Mechanochemical-hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of fluoridated hydroxyapatite  

SciTech Connect

Fluoridated hydroxyapatite (FHAp) was successfully synthesized from the starting materials of CaCO{sub 3}, CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, and CaF{sub 2} via a mechanochemical-hydrothermal route. X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, surface area measurements, and scanning electron microscopy identified the resultant powders as FHAp nanocrystals with the specific surface areas of up to 114.72 m{sup 2}/g. The mechanism study revealed that under such mechanochemical-hydrothermal conditions the formation reactions of FHAp were completed in two stages. The starting materials firstly reacted into a poorly crystallized calcium-deficient apatite and the complete incorporation of fluoride ions into apatite occurred in the second stage.

Zhang Huigang [Multiphase Reaction Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhu Qingshan [Multiphase Reaction Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China)]. E-mail: qszhu@home.ipe.ac.cn; Xie Zhaohui [Multiphase Reaction Laboratory, Institute of Process Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 353, Beijing 100080 (China)

2005-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

135

Sources of carrier F-19 in F-18 fluoride  

SciTech Connect

Fluorine-18 is used for many PET radiopharmaceuticals. Theoretically {sup 18}F should be carrier free and a good candidate for nanochemistry. However, {sup 18}F has 10 to 1000 times more stable fluorine atoms than radioactive atoms. In order to understand the source of carrier fluoride and other ions associated with {sup 18}F radiosynthesis, anion concentrations of different components of {sup 18}F target systems as well as solvents and chemicals used in radiosynthesis were measured. Results: The enriched water used for production of {sup 18}F had low levels of anions. In general, the sources of anions, particularly of fluoride, were the chemical reagents used for synthesis and trace contaminants in tubing, valves and fittings. A major component of contamination was nitrate from irradiation of dissolved nitrogen gas in the target water.

Link, J. M.; Shoner, S. C.; Krohn, K. A. [University of Washington, Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Center, 1959 NE Pacific St., Box 356004, Seattle, WA 98195-6004 (United States)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

136

Determination of the Vapor Pressure of Lanthanum Fluoride  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary experiments have been made to determine the vapor pressure of lanthanum fluoride between 0.001 and 0.1 millimeter of mercury by means of the Knudsen effusion method. A tantalum cell for this purpose is described. Only preliminary results were obtained and they were all in a relatively high pressure region. However, a plot of the vapor pressure against the reciprocal of absolute temperature approximates a straight line such as would be predicted from theoretical considerations.

Stone, B. D.

1954-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fluoride-containing wastewater converted to synthetic fluorspar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the manufacture of uranium hexafluoride, sulfur hexafluoride, iodine pentafluoride, and antimony pentafluoride, the Allied Corporation's Metropolis Works (Metropolis, IL) generates approximately 250,000 gpd of process wastewater which contains substantial amounts of soluble fluoride. Most of the wastewater is also acidic. Alkaline waste and hydrated lime (calcium hydroxide) in a pair of neutralizers are used to precipitate the soluble fluoride as calcium fluoride. Due to the alkalinity, the material is considered a hazardous waste. The limited availability of land suitable for the construction of impoundment basins and the potential for eventual seepage from the basins presented a challenge to the management and technical staff at the Metropolis Works situation on-site. Efforts were directed toward developing a process to convert the calcium fluoride waste into a useful product. Excess lime waste could be converted to 90% CaF/sub 2/ by neutralizing the lime with hydrofluoric acid. The 90% CaF/sub 2/, closely resembling fluorspar, would be able to be used directly at other Allied plants as a substitute for natural fluorspar in the production of anhydrous hydrofluoric (AHF) acid. Engineering efforts to design a full-scale plant for the recovery of CaF/sub 2/ began in mid-1980. Construction of the plant begin in July, 1981. Since startup in mid-1982, the full scale recovery plant has been in continuous operation. Design capacity is 8000 tons/yr of synthetic fluorspar. The synthetic fluorspar is directly replacing an equivalent amount of imported natural fluorspar in the production of anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. Total cost to construct the CaF/sub 2/ recovery plant was $4.3 million. Currently realized cost savings of about $1 million/yr give the project an expected payback period of under five years.

Cipolla, A.J.; Shields, E.J.; Wickersham, C.P.; Toy, D.A.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Complexation of Plutonium (IV) with Fluoride at Variable Tempeartures  

SciTech Connect

Complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride was studied by solvent extraction at 25, 40 and 55 C in 2.2 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} HClO{sub 4}. The distribution ratio of Pu(IV) between the organic and aqueous phases decreased as the concentration of fluoride was increased due to the formation of Pu(IV)-F complexes in the aqueous phase. Two complexes, PuF{sup 3+} and PuF{sub 2}{sup 2+}, were identified under the conditions in this work and their stability constants at 25, 40 and 55 C and I = 2.2 mol {center_dot} kg{sup -1} HClO{sub 4} were determined from the distribution data. The Specific Ion Interaction approach (SIT) was used to extrapolate the constants to the state of infinite dilution. Data from this work indicate that the complexation of Pu(IV) with fluoride is endothermic and entropy-driven. The complexation becomes stronger at higher temperatures.

Xia, Yuanxian; Rao, Linfeng; Friese, Judah I.; Moore, Dean A.; Bachelor, P. P.

2009-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

139

Using Ionic Liquids to Make Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes  

or organic polarized electrolytes baths containing fluoride species such as NH 4 F, HF, or NaF. However, anodization-produced TiO 2 NT arrays are usually covered by

140

Behavior of americium, curium, and certain fission products in fluoride melts in the presence of s olid extraction agents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors consider the behavior of americium, curium, and certain fission products (europium, cerium, yttrium, and strontium) in fluoride and chlode-fluoride melts in the presence of nonisomorphous solid phases: calcium fluoride and lanthanum and zirconium oxides. It is shown that the trace components enter the solid calcium fluoride in a regular fashion only in the presence of an adequate amount of oxygen in the melt. The effect of oxygen on the coprecipitation with calcium fluoride occurs because oxygen compounds of the elements must be formed in the melt, and these are then coprecipitated with the calcium fluoride.

Alekseev, V.A.; Klokman, V.R.; Morozova, Z.E.; Z-iv, V.S.

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures and methods of making same  

SciTech Connect

The present invention includes pure single-crystalline metal oxide and metal fluoride nanostructures, and methods of making same. These nanostructures include nanorods and nanoarrays.

Wong, Stanislaus S. (Stony Brook, NY); Mao, Yuanbing (Los Angeles, CA)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

142

Grout formulation for disposal of low-level and hazardous waste streams containing fluoride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composition and related process for disposal of hazardous waste streams containing fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. the presence of fluoride in cement-based materials is disclosed. The presence of fluoride in waste materials acts as a set retarder and as a result, prevents cement-based grouts from setting. This problem is overcome by the present invention wherein calcium hydroxide is incorporated into the dry-solid portion of the grout mix. The calcium hydroxide renders the fluoride insoluble, allowing the grout to set up and immobilize all hazardous constituents of concern. 4 tabs.

McDaniel, E.W.; Sams, T.L.; Tallent, O.K.

1987-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

143

DISSOLUTION OF A CERIUM-TYPE PLUTONIUM-CONTAINING FLUORIDE CARRIER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The dissolution of a plutonium-containing lanthanum or cerous fluoride carrier precipitate by means of an aqueous, preferably acid, solution of ferric ions is described. (AEC)

Wahl, A.C.

1961-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Thermodynamics of neptunium(V) fluoride and sulfate at elevated temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rao, O. Tochiyama; “Chemical Thermodynamics of Compounds andUpdate on the chemical thermodynamics of uranium, neptunium,Thermodynamics of Neptunium(V) Fluoride and Sulfate at

Rao, Linfeng; Tian, Guoxin; Xia, Yuanxian; Friese, Judah I.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Fluoride Inhibition of Enolase: Crystal Structure and Thermodynamics  

SciTech Connect

Enolase is a dimeric metal-activated metalloenzyme which uses two magnesium ions per subunit: the strongly bound conformational ion and the catalytic ion that binds to the enzyme-substrate complex inducing catalysis. The crystal structure of the human neuronal enolase-Mg{sub 2}F{sub 2}P{sub i} complex (enolase fluoride/phosphate inhibitory complex, EFPIC) determined at 1.36 {angstrom} resolution shows that the combination of anions effectively mimics an intermediate state in catalysis. The phosphate ion binds in the same site as the phosphate group of the substrate/product, 2-phospho-d-glycerate/phosphoenolpyruvate, and induces binding of the catalytic Mg{sup 2+} ion. One fluoride ion bridges the structural and catalytic magnesium ions while the other interacts with the structural magnesium ion and the ammonio groups of Lys 342 and Lys 393. These fluoride ion positions correspond closely to the positions of the oxygen atoms of the substrate's carboxylate moiety. To relate structural changes resulting from fluoride, phosphate, and magnesium ions binding to those that are induced by phosphate and magnesium ions alone, we also determined the structure of the human neuronal enolase-Mg{sub 2}Pi complex (enolase phosphate inhibitory complex, EPIC) at 1.92 {angstrom} resolution. It shows the closed conformation in one subunit and a mixture of open and semiclosed conformations in the other. The EPFIC dimer is essentially symmetric while the EPIC dimer is asymmetric. Isothermal titration calorimetry data confirmed binding of four fluoride ions per dimer and yielded K{sub b} values of 7.5 x 10{sup 5} {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup 5}, 1.2 x 10{sup 5} {+-} 0.2 x 10{sup 5}, 8.6 x 10{sup 4} {+-} 1.6 x 10{sup 4}, and 1.6 x 10{sup 4} {+-} 0.7 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1}. The different binding constants indicate negative cooperativity between the subunits; the asymmetry of EPIC supports such an interpretation.

Qin, Jie; Chai, Geqing; Brewer, John M.; Lovelace, Leslie L.; Lebioda, Lukasz (SC)

2010-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

High-spin excitations in {sup 158,159,160}Hf from recoil-decay tagging  

SciTech Connect

The 270-MeV {sup 58}Ni+{sup A}Pd reaction was used for the first recoil-decay tagging measurement with Gammasphere coupled to the Fragment Mass Analyzer at Argonne National Laboratory. Level structures of {sup 158}Hf and {sup 159}Hf are identified for the first time, and that of {sup 160}Hf is extended. The systematical behavior of the energy levels in neighboring isotones and isotopes, as well as the aligned angular momenta as a function of rotational frequency, are examined. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Ding, K. Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Cizewski, J. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Seweryniak, D. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Amro, H. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Carpenter, M. P. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Davids, C. N. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Fotiades, N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); Janssens, R. V. F. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Lauritsen, T. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Lister, C. J. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)] (and others)

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

NTRM Producer Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... NTRM ® Producer Information. An NTRM ® (NIST Traceable Reference Material) is a commercially produced reference ...

2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Estimation of aluminium fluoride concentration in aluminium reduction cells through a soft sensors approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work exploits a model for Aluminium Fluoride Concentration Measurement in the Aluminium Smelting process. This process variable is usually measured every 50-100 hours since it requires long laboratory analysis. This variable has a strong influence ... Keywords: aluminium smelting process, bath chemistry, fluoride concentration, neural networks, soft sensors

Otacilio Fontes; Fábio M. Soares; Roberto Limão

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Optimal Control Theory Applied to an Objective Analysis of a Tidal Current Mapping by HF Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optimal control can provide a tool to perform an optimization of a tidal model via a data assimilation operation. A pilot study is presented here to test the theoretical and numerical feasibility of an assimilation of HF radar current ...

Jean-Luc Devenon

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Human equivalent antenna model for HF exposures: analytical versus numerical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the human exposure to HF radiation is analyzed using the simplified human equivalent antenna model featuring analytical and numerical approach, respectively. Namely, the human body is represented by an equivalent receiving straight thin ...

Dragan Poljak; Silvestar Sesnic; Ivana Zulim

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Observation of Wave Energy Evolution in Coastal Areas Using HF Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The capability of phased-array HF radar systems to sample the spatial distribution of wave energy is investigated in different storm scenarios and coastal configurations. First, a formulation introduced by D. E. Barrick to extract significant ...

Rafael J. Ramos; Hans C. Graber; Brian K. Haus

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Effect of irradiation on the surface microhardness of pure poly(vinyl fluoride), poly(vinylidene fluoride) and their isomorphic blends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many widely used polymers suffer main chain scission or crosslinking depending upon various physical parameters when exposed to radiation. Crosslinking and scission are two opposite consequences of irradiation. The preparation of pure Poly(vinyl fluoride) ...

A. K. Gupta; R. Bajpai; J. M. Keller

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Surface Termination and Roughness of Ge(100) Cleaned by HF and HCl Solutions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxide removal from Ge(100) surfaces treated by HCl and HF solutions with different concentrations are systematically studied by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES). SR-PES results show that clean surfaces without any oxide can be obtained after wet chemical cleaning followed by vacuum annealing with a residual carbon contamination of less than 0.02 monolayer. HF etching leads to a hydrogen terminated Ge surface whose hydrogen coverage is a function of the HF concentration. In contrast, HCl etching yields a chlorine terminated surface. Possible etching mechanisms are discussed. Surface roughness after HF and HCl treatments is also investigated by AFM, which shows that HF treatment leaves a rougher surface than HCl. Germanium (Ge) is increasingly being studied for MOSFET applications to take advantage of its high intrinsic electron and hole mobility. To fabricate high performance devices on Ge, it is essential to understand Ge surface chemistry and find an effective way to clean and passivate its surface. Although Si surface cleaning and passivation have been extensively studied, only recently has some research been done on Ge surfaces. Conventional XPS results show that HF etching removes Ge oxide and carbon contamination significantly, and HCl etching leads to a chlorine terminated Ge(111) surface, which only forms Ge monochloride. However, it is difficult to probe the details of the chemical nature of treated surfaces and quantify the surface termination and cleanness with conventional XPS, because of its limited surface sensitivity and resolution. In addition, little attention has been paid to the HF concentration, which turns out to be an important factor in the surface hydrogen passivation. In this work, we study the Ge(100) surfaces treated by aqueous HCl and HF solutions with three different concentrations by synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-PES) at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). Using SR-PES, we can tune the photon energy to achieve very high surface sensitivity and good resolution, so the chemical states of treated surfaces can be resolved unambiguously, and the surface termination and cleanness can be quantified. We find that HF treatment results in a hydrogen terminated surface, and the hydrogen coverage depends on the HF concentration. In contrast, a Cl terminated Ge(100) surface is achieved after HCl treatment. Both monochloride and dichloride are formed on the surface. The termination difference between HF etching and HCl etching can be explained by the etching mechanism. In both cases, the residual carbon and oxygen after chemical etching can be removed by vacuum annealing.

Sun, Shiyu; /SLAC, SSRL

2005-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

154

Subduction Controls of Hf and Nd Isotopes in Lavas of the Aleutian Island Arc  

SciTech Connect

The Hf and Nd isotopic compositions of 71 Quaternary lavas collected from locations along the full length of the Aleutian island arc are used to constrain the sources of Aleutian magmas and to provide insight into the geochemical behavior of Nd and Hf and related elements in the Aleutian subduction-magmatic system. Isotopic compositions of Aleutian lavas fall approximately at the center of, and form a trend parallel to, the terrestrial Hf-Nd isotopic array with {var_epsilon}{sub Hf} of +12.0 to +15.5 and {var_epsilon}{sub Nd} of +6.5 to +10.5. Basalts, andesites, and dacites within volcanic centers or in nearby volcanoes generally all have similar isotopic compositions, indicating that there is little measurable effect of crustal or other lithospheric assimilation within the volcanic plumbing systems of Aleutian volcanoes. Hafnium isotopic compositions have a clear pattern of along-arc increase that is continuous from the eastern-most locations near Cold Bay to Piip Seamount in the western-most part of the arc. This pattern is interpreted to reflect a westward decrease in the subducted sediment component present in Aleutian lavas, reflecting progressively lower rates of subduction westward as well as decreasing availability of trench sediment. Binary bulk mixing models (sediment + peridotite) demonstrate that 1-2% of the Hf in Aleutian lavas is derived from subducted sediment, indicating that Hf is mobilized out of the subducted sediment with an efficiency that is similar to that of Sr, Pb and Nd. Low published solubility for Hf and Nd in aqueous subduction fluids lead us to conclude that these elements are mobilized out of the subducted component and transferred to the mantle wedge as bulk sediment or as a silicate melt. Neodymium isotopes also generally increase from east to west, but the pattern is absent in the eastern third of the arc, where the sediment flux is high and increases from east to west, due to the presence of abundant terrigenous sediment in the trench east of the Amlia Fracture Zone, which is being subducting beneath the arc at Seguam Island. Mixing trends between mantle wedge and sediment end members become flatter in Hf-Nd isotope space at locations further west along the arc, indicating that the sediment end member in the west has either higher Nd/Hf or is more radiogenic in Hf compared to Nd. This pattern is interpreted to reflect an increase in pelagic clay relative to the terrigenous subducted sedimentary component westward along the arc. Results of this study imply that Hf does not behave as a conservative element in the Aleutian subduction system, as has been proposed for some other arcs.

Yogodzinski, Gene; Vervoort, Jeffery; Brown, Shaun Tyler; Gerseny, Megan

2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

155

Conceptual engineering design and economic evaluation of the burn-acid- leach aqueous process and of the burn-fluoride-volatility process for recovering spent Rover fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Declassified 24 Sep 1973. Two detailed, conceptual process, equipment, and plant designs were prepared for facilities for recovering spent Rover fuel (highly enriched uranium-graphite) at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plart. The results of the study indicate that the fluoridevolatility process is preferred on both economic and technical grounds. Both processes employ a comnion fuel shipping, storage, and charging system and use continuous, fluidized-bed oxidation of the fuel as the first step of the head-end operation. Subsequent operations in the aqueous process include batch leaching the ash with 5 M HF--10 M HNO/sub 3/ in two parallel lines of Teflon-lined leaching and feed-preparation equipment, followed by solvent extraction to decontaminate and recover the uranium as uranyl nitrate. Post-burning operations in the fluoride-volatiiity process include the continuous fluidized-bed and moving-bed fluorination of the ash followed by partial condensation to remove niobium pentafluoride and passage of the UF/sub 6/ through heated sodium fluoride pellets to completely decontaminate the uranium. The uranium is recovered as uranium hexafluoride. (auth)

Nicholson, E.L.

1965-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F]fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [{sup 18}F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substituent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is carried out by nucleophilic aromatic substitution with a no-carrier-added (NCA) [{sup 18}F]fluoride ion. The method can be used to synthesize various no-carrier-added aryl [{sup 18}F]fluoride compositions, including 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoro-L-DOPA, 2-[{sup 18}F]fluorotyrosine, 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, and 6-[{sup 18}F]fluorodopamine. In those instances when a racemic mixture of enantiomers is produced by the present invention, such as in the synthesis of 6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine, a preferred method also includes resolution of the racemic mixture on a chiral HPLC column. This procedure results in a high yield of enantiomerically pure [{sup 18}F] labeled isomers, for example [-]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine and [+]-6-[{sup 18}F]fluoronorepinephrine.

Ding, Yu-Shin; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fluoride in workplace air and in urine of workers concentrating fluorspar  

SciTech Connect

The urinary fluoride concentrations of workers exposed to calcium fluoride (CaF2) during fluorspar processing were measured. Personal dust measurement showed that the mean occupational exposure to fluoride for 12 workers in the most dusty environment was 24.3 mg/m3, which is 9.7 times the threshold limit value (TLV) of 2.5 mg/m3. Exposure was below the TLV for the remaining 23 workers. Urinary fluoride concentrations were measured pre- and postshift. The heavily exposed workers had a mean preshift concentration of 3.3 mg/liter (range 1.4-8.5 mg/liter), only slightly higher than the mean of 2.8 mg/liter (range 1.3-4.2 mg/liter) in the workers with fluoride exposure below the TLV. Four of the preshift concentrations exceeded the recommended upper limit of 4 mg/liter. The mean postshift concentration for workers exposed above the TLV was 4.4 mg/liter (range 2.4-7.1 mg/liter) and the difference between pre- and postshift concentrations was significant (p less than 0.05). Only one urinary concentration exceeded the recommended upper limit of 7 mg/liter. There was poor correlation between intensity of environmental exposure to fluorspar and postshift fluoride concentration in the urine. Eighteen workers provided a urine sample 7-14 hr after the end of a shift. The mean fluoride concentration was 4.7 mg/liter (range 2.4-11.7 mg/liter), which exceeded their postshift concentration by 0.2 mg/liter. These results indicate that the low aqueous solubility of fluorspar reduced the biologic availability of the fluoride ion but that this did not prevent excessive fluoride absorption in some workers.

Rees, D.; Rama, D.B.; Yousefi, V. (National Centre for Occupational Health, Johannesburg (South Africa))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

REDUCTION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE RETENTION ON BEDS OF MAGNESIUM FLUORIDE USED FOR REMOVAL OF TECHNETIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

The excessive loss of uranium incurred when discarding magnesium fluoride, (the adsorber used to selectively remove technetium hexafluoride from uranium hexafluoride streams) is a problem common to all volatility processes for recovering enriched uranium fuels. As a result of the work described, two schemes for the release of the uranium hexafluoride from the magnesium fluoride and its separation from the technetium hexafluoride are proposed. One scheme depends on preferential thermal desorption of the uranium hexafluoride at 350 deg C and the other on selective adsorption of the uranium hexafluoride on sodium fluoride pellets following the codesorption of the two hexafluorides with fluorine at 500 deg C from the magnesium fluoride pellets. These proposals are aimed at reducing the amount of retained uranium to less than 1 g per 1000 g of discardable magnesium fluoride. In the work reported, the deposition of uranium on magnesium fluoride as a function of heating, fluorination, and hydrogen fluoride pretreatment of the magnesium fluoride pellets prior to exposure to uranium hexafluoride was characterized in a series of gasometric studies. The dependence of the quantity of uranium hexafluoride adsorbed on pressure and temperature was also determined. The data show that physical adsorption is the mechanism for the deposition of most of the uranium hexafluoride on well- stabilized magnesium fluoride pellets. More than 90% of the adsorbate can be removed by heating to 350 deg C. Chemisorption (formation of a double salt) is probably not involved because of the small (<0.05) mole ratio of UF/sub 6//MgF/ sub 2/ observed. (auth)

Katz, S.

1964-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Lanthanum diffusion in the TiN/LaOx/HfSiO/SiO2/Si stack  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Band edge Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) devices are obtained by insertion of a thin LaO"x layer between the high-k (HfSiO) and metal gate (TiN). High temperature post deposition anneal induces Lanthanum diffusion across the HfSiO towards ... Keywords: APT, ATR-FTIR, HfSiO, Interfacial dipole, La, Metal/high-k stack, S-XPS, Threshold voltage tuning, TiN, ToF-SIMS

E. Martinez; P. Ronsheim; J. -P. Barnes; N. Rochat; M. Py; M. Hatzistergos; O. Renault; M. Silly; F. Sirotti; F. Bertin; N. Gambacorti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Polyvinylidene Fluoride-Based Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications Wensheng He, David Mountz, Tao Zhang, Chris Roger July 17, 2012 2 Outline Background on Arkema's polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) blend membrane technology Overview of membrane properties and performance Summary 3 Membrane Technology Polymer Blend * Kynar ® PVDF * Chemical and electrochemical stability * Mechanical strength * Excellent barrier against methanol * Polyelectrolyte * H + conduction and water uptake Flexible Blending Process  PVDF can be compatibilized with a number of polyelectrolytes  Process has been scaled to a pilot line Property Control * Morphology: 10-100s nm domains * Composition can be tailored to minimize methanol permeation, while optimizing

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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161

Spectroscopic analysis of Al and N diffusion in HfO{sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

X-ray photoelectron core level spectroscopy, secondary ion mass spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry, and extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements have been employed to distinguish the effects of Al and N diffusion on the local bonding and microstructure of HfO{sub 2} and its interface with the Si substrate in (001)Si/SiO{sub x}/2 nm HfO{sub 2}/1 nm AlO{sub x} film structures. The diffusion of Al from the thin AlO{sub x} cap layer deposited on both annealed and unannealed HfO{sub 2} has been observed following anneal in N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} ambient. Both N{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} subsequent anneals were performed to decouple incorporated nitrogen from thermal reactions alone. Causal variations in the HfO{sub 2} microstructure combined with the dependence of Al and N diffusion on initial HfO{sub 2} conditions are presented with respect to anneal temperature and ambient.

Lysaght, P. S.; Price, J.; Kirsch, P. D. [SEMATECH, 257 Fuller Rd, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Woicik, J. C.; Weiland, C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Sahiner, M. A. [Seton Hall University, 400 South Orange Ave, South Orange, New Jersey 07079 (United States)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

162

Removal of fluoride impurities from UF.sub.6 gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of purifying a UF.sub.6 gas stream containing one or more metal fluoride impurities composed of a transuranic metal, transition metal or mixtures thereof, is carried out by contacting the gas stream with a bed of UF.sub.5 in a reaction vessel under conditions where at least one impurity reacts with the UF.sub.5 to form a nongaseous product and a treated gas stream, and removing the treated gas stream from contact with the bed. The nongaseous products are subsequently removed in a reaction with an active fluorine affording agent to form a gaseous impurity which is removed from the reaction vessel. The bed of UF.sub.5 is formed by the reduction of UF.sub.6 in the presence of UV light. One embodiment of the reaction vessel includes a plurality of UV light sources as tubes on which UF.sub.5 is formed.

Beitz, James V. (Hinsdale, IL)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Spatial diagnostics of the laser induced lithium fluoride plasma  

SciTech Connect

We present spatial characteristics of the lithium fluoride plasma generated by the fundamental and second harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser. The plume emission has been recorded spatially using five spectrometers covering the spectral region from 200 nm to 720 nm. The electron density is measured from the Stark broadened line profile of the line at 610.37 nm, whereas the plasma temperature has been determined using the Boltzmann plot method including all the observed spectral lines of lithium. Both the plasma parameters; electron density and plasma temperature decrease with the increase of the distance from the target surface. The thermal conduction towards the target, the radiative cooling of the plasma, and the conversion of thermal energy into kinetic energy are the main mechanisms responsible for the spatially decrease of the plasma parameters.

Baig, M. A.; Qamar, Aisha; Fareed, M. A.; Anwar-ul-Haq, M.; Ali, Raheel [Atomic and Molecular Physics Laboratory, Department of Physics, Quaid-i-Azam University, 45320 Islamabad (Pakistan)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

164

Ytterbium-doped borate fluoride laser crystals and lasers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed from Yb-doped borate fluoride host crystals. The general formula for the host crystals is MM'(BO.sub.3)F, where M, M' are monovalent, divalent aria trivalent metal cations. A particular embodiment of the invention is Yb-doped BaCaBO.sub.3 F (Yb:BCBF). BCBF and some of the related derivative crystals are capable of nonlinear frequency conversion, whereby the fundamental of the laser is converted to a longer or shorter wavelength. In this way, these new crystals can simultaneously serve as self-frequency doubling crystals and laser materials within the laser resonator.

Schaffers, Kathleen I. (Pleasanton, CA); DeLoach, Laura D. (Manteca, CA); Payne, Stephen A. (Castro Valley, CA); Keszler, Douglas A. (Corvallis, OK)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Removal of fluoride impurities from UF/sub 6/ gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of purifying a UF/sub 6/ gas stream containing one or more metal fluoride impurities composed of a transuranic metal, transition metal or mixtures thereof, is carried out by contacting the gas stream with a bed of UF/sub 5/ in a reaction vessel under conditions where at least one impurity reacts with the UF/sub 5/ to form a nongaseous product and a treated gas stream, and removing the treated gas stream from contact with the bed. The nongaseous products are subsequently removed in a reaction with an active fluorine affording agent to form a gaseous impurity which is removed from the reaction vessel. The bed of UF/sub 5/ is formed by the reduction of UF/sub 6/ in the presence of uv light. One embodiment of the reaction vessel includes a plurality of uv light sources as tubes on which UF/sub 5/ is formed. 2 figures.

Beitz, J.V.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

166

FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS FOR THE RECOVERY OF URANIUM  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation and recovery of uraniunn from contaminants introduced by neutron irradiation by a halogenation and volatilization method are described. The irradiated uranium is dissolved in bromine trifluoride in the liquid phase. The uranium is converted to the BrF/sub 3/ soluble urmium hexafluoride compound whereas the fluorides of certain contaminating elements are insoluble in liquid BrF/sub 3/, and the reaction rate of the BrF/sub 3/ with certain other solid uranium contamirnnts is sufficiently slower than the reaction rate with uranium that substantial portions of these contaminating elements will remain as solids. These solids are then separated from the solution by a distillation, filtration, or centrifugation step. The uranium hexafluoride is then separated from the balance of the impurities and solvent by one or more distillations.

Katz, J.J.; Hyman, H.H.; Sheft, I.

1958-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Performance and reliability improvement of HfSiON gate dielectrics using chlorine plasma treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of chlorine plasma treatment on HfSiON gate dielectrics were investigated with respect to device performance and reliability characteristics. The chlorine plasma treatment was performed on atomic layer deposited HfSiON films to remove the residual carbon content. The optimal chlorine plasma treatment is shown to lower gate leakage current density without increasing equivalent oxide thickness of the gate stack. Secondary ion mass spectroscopy depth profiling showed that the carbon residue in HfSiON was reduced by the chlorine plasma treatment. It is demonstrated that an optimized chlorine plasma treatment improves the transistor I{sub on}-I{sub off} characteristics and reduces negative-bias temperature instability.

Park, Hong Bae; Ju, Byongsun [Samsung Electronics R and D Center (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Chang Yong; Park, Chanro; Park, Chang Seo [SEMATECH, Austin, Texas 78741 (United States); Lee, Byoung Hun [Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tea Wan; Kim, Beom Seok; Choi, Rino [Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

2009-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Band offsets in HfO{sub 2}/InGaZnO{sub 4} heterojunctions  

SciTech Connect

The valence band discontinuity ({Delta}E{sub V}) of sputter deposited HfO{sub 2}/InZnGaO{sub 4} (IGZO) heterostructures was obtained from x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements. The HfO{sub 2} exhibited a bandgap of 6.07 eV from absorption measurements. A value of {Delta}E{sub V} = 0.48 {+-} 0.025 eV was obtained by using the Ga 2p{sub 3/2}, Zn 2p{sub 3/2}, and In 3d{sub 5/2} energy levels as references. This implies a conduction band offset {Delta}E{sub C} of 2.39 eV in HfO{sub 2}/InGaZnO{sub 4} heterostructures and a nested interface band alignment.

Cho, Hyun [Department of Nanomechatronics Engineering, Pusan National University, Gyeongnam 627-706 (Korea, Republic of); Douglas, E. A.; Gila, B. P.; Craciun, V.; Lambers, E. S.; Pearton, S. J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States); Ren Fan [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

2012-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

169

Method for converting UF5 to UF4 in a molten fluoride salt  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reduction of UF.sub.5 to UF.sub.4 in a molten fluoride salt by sparging with hydrogen is catalyzed by metallic platinum. The reaction is also catalyzed by platinum alloyed with gold reaction equipment.

Bennett, Melvin R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kelmers, A. Donald (Oak Ridge, TN)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Study of Free-Fluoride Mold Powder Based on Titanium-Bearing ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sep 1, 2004 ... Study of Free-Fluoride Mold Powder Based on Titanium-Bearing Blast Furnace Slag by G.H. Wen, P. Tang, L. Zhang, Y. Liu, and S. Miao ...

171

Ions on the Electrodeposition of Titanium in Molten Fluoride-chloride ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electrochemical Behavior of Calcium-Lead Alloys in Molten Salt Electrolytes ... on the Corrosion of Ni-Cased Alloys (NiCrW and NiCrMo) in Molten Fluorides.

172

Characterization Report on Sand, Slag, and Crucible Residues and on Fluoride Residues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on the chemical characterization of the sand, slag, and crucible (SS and C) residues and the fluoride residues that may be shipped from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) to Savannah River Site (SRS).

Murray, A.M.

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

173

A METHOD FOR SEALING LITHIUM FLUORIDE WINDOWS TO PYREX VACUUM SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

A technique is described for sealing lithium fluoride windows to pyrex tubing using seals of silver chloride with intermediate siiver rings. Vacuum systems using these seals were satisfactory for several years. (J.R.D.)

Wildy, P.C.

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides  

SciTech Connect

Method for removal of plutonium impurity from americium oxides and fluorides. AmF.sub.4 is not further oxidized to AmF.sub.6 by the application of O.sub.2 F at room temperature, while plutonium compounds present in the americium sample are fluorinated to volatile PuF.sub.6, which can readily be separated therefrom, leaving the purified americium oxides and/or fluorides as the solid tetrafluoride.

FitzPatrick, John R. (Los Alamos, NM); Dunn, Jerry G. (Los Alamos, NM); Avens, Larry R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

The correlation of the electrical properties with electron irradiation and constant voltage stress for MIS devices based on high-k double layer (HfTiSiO: N and HfTiO:N) dielectrics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the influence of e-beam irradiation and constant voltage stress on the electrical characteristics of metal-insulator-semiconductor structures, with double layer high-k dielectric stacks containing HfTiSiO:N and HfTiO:N ultra-thin ... Keywords: Electrical properties, High-k dielectrics, Metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) devices

V. Mikhelashvili; P. Thangadurai; W. D. Kaplan; G. Eisenstein

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Calcium mobilization and phosphoinositide turnover in fluoride-activated human neutrophils  

SciTech Connect

Fluoride ion, at concentrations above 10 mM, has been found to activate a superoxide production response in human neutrophils which is strongly dependent on the presence of extracellular calcium. In an attempt to further explore the calcium requirement of fluoride-induced neutrophil activation, intracellular calcium concentrations were monitored through use of the fluorescent calcium probe, Quin 2. Fluoride ion, at concentrations between 10 and 20 mM, was found to elicit a rise in intracellular calcium levels which was characterized by a lag period of 4 to 10 min and a prolonged duration of action (greater than 20 min). In contrast, the chemotactic peptide, formylmethionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced a rise in intracellular calcium concentration which peaked within 1 min. Preincubation of cells with 1 ..mu..g/ml pertussis toxin resulted in inhibition of the FMLP-induced response, but not that elicited by fluoride. Furthermore, anion exchange chromatography indicated that inositol phosphate accumulation occurred in fluoride-treated cells in association with calcium mobilization. Recent evidence suggests that the FMLP receptor is coupled to phospholipase C and phosphoinositide turnover through a guanine nucleotide binding protein susceptible to inhibition by pertussis toxin. Present results suggest that fluoride ion may serve to activate this protein in a manner resistant to inhibition by pertussis toxin.

Strnad, C.F.; Wong, K.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electrical and physical characteristics of HfLaON-gated metal-oxide-semiconductor capacitors with various nitrogen concentration profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The comparative studies of electrical and physical characteristics of HfLaON-gated metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors with various nitrogen concentration profiles (NCPs) were investigated. Various NCPs in HfLaON gate dielectrics were adjusted ... Keywords: Charge trapping, Current-conduction, High-k dielectric, Metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS), Nitrogen concentration profiles (NCPs)

Chin-Lung Cheng; Jeng-Haur Horng; Hung-Yang Tsai

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

MicroPlanet Technology Corp formerly HF Capital Corp | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology Corp formerly HF Capital Corp Technology Corp formerly HF Capital Corp Jump to: navigation, search Name MicroPlanet Technology Corp (formerly HF Capital Corp) Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98104 Sector Efficiency Product MicroPlanet develops energy-efficiency products for homes and small businesses. Specifically they focus on custom voltage regulators that result in energy savings. On May 6, 2005, the company reverse-listed into Toronto Venture Exchange quoted HF Capital. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

179

Improving HF Radar Surface Current Measurements with Measured Antenna Beam Patterns  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-frequency (HF) radar system is deployed on the New Jersey continental shelf as part of a coastal ocean observatory. The system includes two remote transmit–receive sites in Brant Beach and Brigantine, New Jersey, and a central processing ...

Josh T. Kohut; Scott M. Glenn

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Properties of ALD HfTaxOy high-k layers deposited on chemical silicon oxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HfTa"xO"y high-k dielectric layers with different compositions were deposited using ALD on 1nm SiO"2 generated by ozone based cleaning of 200mm Si(100) surface. Physical characterization of blanket layers and C-V mapping demonstrates that the ALD layers ...

C. Zhao; T. Witters; P. Breimer; J. Maes; M. Caymax; S. De Gendt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Interpretation of Coastal HF Radar–Derived Surface Currents with High-Resolution Drifter Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dense arrays of surface drifters are used to quantify the flow field on time and space scales over which high-frequency (HF) radar observations are measured. Up to 13 drifters were repetitively deployed off the Santa Barbara and San Diego coasts ...

Carter Ohlmann; Peter White; Libe Washburn; Brian Emery; Eric Terrill; Mark Otero

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Plants producing DHA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CSIRO researchers published results in November 2012 showing that the long-chain n-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) can be produced in land plants in commercially valuable quantities. Plants producing DHA inform Magazine algae algal AOCS bi

183

The activity of calcium in calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The standard Gibbs energy of reaction Ca (1) + {und O} (mass pct, in Zr) = CaO (s) has been determined as follows by equilibrating molten calcium with solid zirconium in a CaO crucible: {Delta}G{degree} = {minus}64,300({+-}700) + 19.8({+-}3.5)T J/mol (1,373 to 1,623 K). The activities of calcium in the CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-MF{sub 2} (M: Ca, Ba, Mg) and CaO{sub satd.}-Ca-NaF systems were measured as a function of calcium composition at high calcium contents at 1,473 K on the basis of the standard Gibbs energy. The activities of calcium increase in the order of CaF{sub 2}, BaF{sub 2}, and MgF{sub 2} at the same calcium fraction of these fluxes. The observed activities are compared with those estimated by using the Temkin model for ionic solutions. Furthermore, the possibility of the removal of tramp elements such as tin, arsenic, antimony, bismuth, and lead from carbon-saturated iron by using calcium-metal-fluoride fluxes is discussed.

Ochifuji, Yuichiro; Tsukihashi, Fumitaka; Sano, Nobuo [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Metallurgy

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Atomic-layer-deposited Al2O3 and HfO2 on GaN: A comparative study on interfaces and electrical characteristics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Al"2O"3, HfO"2, and composite HfO"2/Al"2O"3 films were deposited on n-type GaN using atomic layer deposition (ALD). The interfacial layer of GaON and HfON was observed between HfO"2 and GaN, whereas the absence of an interfacial layer at Al"2O"3/GaN ... Keywords: Al2O3, Atomic-layer-deposition (ALD), GaN, HfO2, High k dielectric, MOS

Y. C. Chang; M. L. Huang; Y. H. Chang; Y. J. Lee; H. C. Chiu; J. Kwo; M. Hong

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

CURRENT STATUS OF INSTRUMENTATION FOR A FLUORIDE SALT HEAT TRANSPORT DEMONSTRATION LOOP  

SciTech Connect

A small forced convection liquid fluoride salt loop is under construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK in a heated pebble bed. Loop operation serves several purposes: (1) reestablishing the infrastructure necessary for fluoride salt loop testing, (2) demonstrating a wireless heating technique for simulating pebble type fuel, (3) demonstration of the integration of silicon carbide (SiC) and metallic components into a liquid salt loop, and (4) demonstration of the functionality of distinctive instrumentation required for liquid fluoride salts. Loop operation requires measurement of a broad set of process variables including temperature, flow, pressure, and level. Coolant chemistry measurements (as a corrosion indicator) and component health monitoring are also important for longer-term operation. Two dominating factors in sensor and instrument selection are the high operating temperature of the salt and its chemical environment.

Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

TESTING OF 304L STAINLESS STEEL IN NITRIC ACID ENVIRONMENTS WITH FLUORIDES AND CHLORIDES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Impure radioactive material processed in nitric acid solutions resulted in the presence of chlorides in a dissolver fabricated from 304L stainless steel. An experimental program was conducted to study the effects of chloride in nitric acid/fluoride solutions on the corrosion of 304L stainless steel. The test variables included temperature (80, 95, and 110 C) and the concentrations of nitric acid (6, 12, and 14 M), fluoride (0.01, 0.1, and 0.2 M) and chloride (100, 350, 1000, and 2000 ppm). The impact of welding was also investigated. Results showed that the chloride concentration alone was not a dominant variable affecting the corrosion, but rather the interaction of chloride with fluoride significantly affected corrosion.

Mickalonis, J.

2010-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

Structure and magnetic properties of the cubic oxide fluoride BaFeO{sub 2}F  

SciTech Connect

Fluorination of the parent oxide, BaFeO{sub 3-{delta}}, with polyvinylidine fluoride gives rise to a cubic compound with a=4.0603(4) A at 298 K. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra confirmed that all the iron is present as Fe{sup 3+}. Neutron diffraction data showed complete occupancy of the anion sites, indicating a composition BaFeO{sub 2}F, with a large displacement of the iron off-site. The magnetic ordering temperature was determined as T{sub N}=645{+-}5 K. Neutron diffraction data at 4.2 K established G-type antiferromagnetism with a magnetic moment per Fe{sup 3+} ion of 3.95 {mu}{sub B}. However, magnetisation measurements indicated the presence of a weak ferromagnetic moment that is assigned to the canting of the antiferromagnetic structure. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra in the temperature range 10-300 K were fitted with a model of fluoride ion distribution that retains charge neutrality of the perovskite unit cell. - Graphical abstract: The cubic oxide fluoride of composition BaFeO{sub 2}F has been synthesised and characterised. Highlights: > Fluorination of BaFeO{sub 3-{delta}} with polyvinylidene fluoride gives a cubic oxide fluoride of composition BaFeO{sub 2}F. > BaFeO{sub 2}F adopts a canted antiferromagnetic structure and is different from the related phase of composition SrFeO{sub 2}F. > A model of fluoride ion distribution about iron in BaFeO{sub 2}F has been explored.

Berry, Frank J., E-mail: f.j.berry.1@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom) and Department of Chemistry, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Coomer, Fiona C.; Hancock, Cathryn [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Helgason, Orn [Science Institute, University of Iceland, Dunhagi 3, IS-107 Reykjavik (Iceland); Moore, Elaine A. [Department of Chemistry, Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); Slater, Peter R.; Wright, Adrian J. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Thomas, Michael F. [Department of Physics, The University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3BX (United Kingdom)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

g-factor of the 2{sup+}{sub{1} state of {sup179}Hf.  

SciTech Connect

The g factor of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state of {sup 172}Hf was measured using the perturbed angular correlation technique in a static external magnetic field. The result, g(2{sub 1}{sup +}) = 0.25(5), is discussed in relation to the systematics of the previously reported g factors in the Hf isotopes and compared with the predictions of several models. An interesting outcome of the analysis presented in this paper is the agreement between the calculated g factors within the interacting boson approximation (IBA) and the results of a large-scale shell model calculation. This agreement supports the emphasis in the IBA on the valence space. The undershooting of the empirical g factors near midshell in both models suggests that they underestimate the role of the saturation of collectivity, which is explicitly incorporated into a phenomenological model that agrees better with the data.

Berant, Z.; Oster, E.; Wolf, A.; Casperson, R. J.; Werner, V.; McCutchan, E. A. (Physics); (Yale Univ.); (Nuclear Research Center Negev); (Rutgers Univ.); (Clark Univ.); (Univ. of Richmond); (Univ. of Surrey); (Rhodes Coll.); (Technische Univ. Darmstadt); (ENS CACHAN)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

g factor of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state of {sup 172}Hf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The g factor of the 2{sub 1}{sup +} state of {sup 172}Hf was measured using the perturbed angular correlation technique in a static external magnetic field. The result, g(2{sub 1}{sup +})=0.25(5), is discussed in relation to the systematics of the previously reported g factors in the Hf isotopes and compared with the predictions of several models. An interesting outcome of the analysis presented in this paper is the agreement between the calculated g factors within the interacting boson approximation (IBA) and the results of a large-scale shell model calculation. This agreement supports the emphasis in the IBA on the valence space. The undershooting of the empirical g factors near midshell in both models suggests that they underestimate the role of the saturation of collectivity, which is explicitly incorporated into a phenomenological model that agrees better with the data.

Berant, Z.; Wolf, A. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Nuclear Research Center Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Oster, E. [Nuclear Research Center Negev, Beer-Sheva 84190 (Israel); Casperson, R. J.; Werner, V.; Heinz, A.; Casten, R. F.; Terry, J. R.; Winkler, R.; Williams, E.; Qian, J.; Schmidt, A.; Smith, M. K.; Ahn, T. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Gurdal, G. [Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey 08903 (United States); McCutchan, E. A. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Brenner, D. S. [Wright Nuclear Structure Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Chemistry Department, Clark University, Worcester, Massachusetts 01610 (United States); Beausang, C. W. [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Regan, P. H. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Ross, T. [Physics Department, University of Richmond, Richmond, Virginia 23173 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)] (and others)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Extraction-x-ray fluorescent determination of the rare earthelements in calcium fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluorides of the alkaline earth metals, activated by rare earth ions, are used as active elements in lasers and scintillation detectors. In this work, the conditions of production of thin-layer emitters for the extraction x-ray fluorescent determination of 2.10/sup -4/-3.10/sup -3/% REE in calcium fluoride with preliminary concentration of the elements to be determined in the form of complexes with morin were studied. The possibility of a simultaneous determination of several REE present together was demonstrated. A mixture (4:1) of isopentanol and tributyl phosphate (TBP), analytical grade, which were additionally redistilled, was used.

Blank, A.B.; Belenko, L.E.; Shevtsov, N.I.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Fused Fluoride--Inconel System Under Cyclotron Irradiation--Preliminary Results  

SciTech Connect

The fused fluoride-Inconel reactor system was studied under irradiation with nominal 19 Mev deuterons as supplied by the Berkeley 60-inch cyclotron. Chemical, metallographic, magnetic susceptibility, electron diffraction and X-ray diffraction studies were made on the as-received materials, one control run and two irradiated runs. No changes in the fused fluoride fuel were noted. Accelerated intergranular corrosion and increased grain size were observed in the irradiated Inconel specimens. This report is based upon studies conducted for the Atomic Energy Commission under Contract AT-40-1-GEN-1064.

Goeddel, W.V.; Epp, Jr., A.A.

1951-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

192

Current Patterns on the West Florida Shelf from Joint Self-Organizing Map Analyses of HF Radar and ADCP Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess the spatial structures and temporal evolutions of distinct physical processes on the West Florida Shelf, patterns of ocean current variability are extracted from a joint HF radar and ADCP dataset acquired from August to September 2003 ...

Yonggang Liu; Robert H. Weisberg; Lynn K. Shay

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Influence of Fetch on the Response of Surface Currents to Wind Studied by HF Ocean Surface Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The momentum transfer from wind to sea generates surface currents through both the wind shear stress and the Stokes drift induced by waves. This paper addresses issues in the interpretation of HF radar measurements of surface currents and ...

Yadan Mao; Malcolm L. Heron

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Tests of Long-Range Ocean Data Telemetry Using Frequency-Agile HF Packet-switching Protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiences with two prototype telemetry systems developed for potential use with moored or drifting ocean instruments are described. The systems transfer data and commands between remote and base stations using direct high-frequency (HF) ...

David A. Brooks; Melbourne G. Briscoe

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The role of oxygen-related defects and hydrogen impurities in HfO2 and ZrO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the properties of oxygen-related defects and hydrogen impurities in monoclinic HfO"2 and ZrO"2 using first-principles calculations based on a hybrid functional. We examine how the formation energy of these defects depend on the Fermi level ... Keywords: Defects in semiconductors, First-principles calculations, HfO2, High-k dielectrics, Hydrogen impurities, Oxygen interstitial, Oxygen vacancy, Sources of fixed charge, ZrO2

J. L. Lyons; A. Janotti; C. G. Van de Walle

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Report on Produced Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

September 2009 Produced Water Volumes and Management Practices Page 3 Table of Contents Executive Summary ........................................................................................................................ 7 Chapter 1 - Introduction ............................................................................................................. 11 1.1 Purpose .......................................................................................................................... 11 1.2 Background ................................................................................................................... 11 1.3 Overview ....................................................................................................................... 11

197

Coal markets squeeze producers  

SciTech Connect

Supply/demand fundamentals seem poised to keep prices of competing fossil fuels high, which could cushion coal prices, but increased mining and transportation costs may squeeze producer profits. Are markets ready for more volatility?

Ryan, M.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Research | Children’s Health Substance Flow Analysis: A Case Study of Fluoride Exposure through Food and Beverages in Young Children Living in Ethiopia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Con t e x t: Dental and skeletal fluorosis is endemic in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. Children are especially vulnerable to excessive fluoride intake because their permanent teeth are still being formed. Strategies to reduce the total fluoride intake by children are thus warranted. Case presentation: By combining the results of field studies in Ethiopia, the relevant pathways for fluoride intake have been identified in 28 children 2–5 years of age living in two villages on the Wonji Shoa Sugar Estate in the Ethiopian Rift Valley. The focus of the present study was to simulate the fluoride intake of the children using the methods of material flow analysis (MFA) and substance flow analysis. Discussion: With a model based on MFA, we quantified the potential reduction in total fluoride intake given different scenarios—for example, by reducing the fluoride intake from drinking water and cooking water. The results show clearly that only by removing fluoride completely from both drinking and cooking water does the probability of remaining below the daily tolerable upper intake level exceed 50%. Both prepared food and food ingredients must be taken into consideration when assessing the total fluoride intake by children living in high-fluoride areas. Relevance: This knowledge will help health personnel, the government, and the food authorities to give scientifically based advice on strategies for reducing the total fluoride intake by children living in high-fluoride areas in the Ethiopian Rift Valley.

Marian Kjellevold Malde; Ruth Scheidegger; Kåre Julshamn; Hans-peter Bader

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

PILOT-SCALE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE FROM LEGACY PLUTONIUM MATERIALS USING VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. In 2011, SRNL adapted the technology for the removal of fluoride from fluoride-bearing salts. The method involved an in situ reaction between potassium hydroxide (KOH) and the fluoride salt to yield potassium fluoride (KF) and the corresponding oxide. The KF and excess KOH can be distilled below 1000{deg}C using vacuum salt distillation (VSD). The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated by a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attaned, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile material in the feed boat. Studies discussed in this report were performed involving the use of non-radioactive simulants in small-scale and pilot-scale systems as well as radioactive testing of a small-scale system with plutonium-bearing materials. Aspects of interest include removable liner design considerations, boat materials, in-line moisture absorption, and salt deposition.

Pierce, R. A.; Pak, D. J.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

200

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of uranium hexafluoride from the oxides of uranium is reported. In accordance with the method the higher oxides of uranium may be reduced to uranium dioxide (UO/sub 2/), the latter converted into uranium tetrafluoride by reaction with hydrogen fluoride, and the UF/sub 4/ convented to UF/sub 6/ by reaction with a fluorinating agent. The UO/sub 3/ or U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ is placed in a reaction chamber in a copper boat or tray enclosed in a copper oven, and heated to 500 to 650 deg C while hydrogen gas is passed through the oven. The oven is then swept clean of hydrogen and the water vapor formed by means of nitrogen and then while continuing to maintain the temperature between 400 and 600 deg C, anhydrous hydrogen fluoride is passed through. After completion of the conversion to uranium tetrafluoride, the temperature of the reaction chamber is lowered to ahout 400 deg C, and elemental fluorine is used as the fluorinating agent for the conversion of UF/sub 4/ into UF/sub 6/. The fluorine gas is passed into the chamber, and the UF/sub 6/ formed passes out and is delivered to a condenser.

Fowler, R.D.

1957-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Investigation of metal fluoride thermal energy storage materials: availability, cost, and chemistry. Final report, July 15, 1976--December 15, 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Storage of thermal energy in the 400 to 1000/sup 0/C range is attracting increasing consideration for use in solar power, central power, vehicular, and commercial process systems. This study investigates the practicality of using metal fluorides as the heat storage medium. The projected availability of metal fluorides has been studied and is shown to be adequate for widespread thermal storage use. Costs are projected and discussed in relation to thermal energy storage applications. Phase diagrams, heats of fusion, heat capacities, vapor pressures, toxicity, stability, volume changes, thermal conductivities, fusion kinetics, corrosion, and container materials of construction for a wide range of fluorides have been examined. Analyses of these data in consideration of thermal energy storage requirements have resulted in selection of the most cost-effective fluoride mixture for each of 23 temperature increments between 400 and 1000/sup 0/C. Thermo-physical properties of these 23 materials are presented. Comparison of fluoride with non-fluoride materials shows that the fluorides are suitable candidates for high temperature applications on the bases of cost, heat capacity/unit volume, heat capacity/unit weight, corrosive properties, and availability.

Eichelberger, J.L.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Process for producing hydrogen  

SciTech Connect

A process for producing hydrogen by an electrolysis of water with an aqueous solution of an alkali hydroxide is provided. It is to use an electrolytic cell prepared by bonding a gas and liquid permeable anode on one surface of a cation-exchange membrane of a fluorinated polymer and a gas and liquid permeable cathode on the other surface of the membrane. An economical metal can be used as the substance for the electrolytic cell. Hydrogen can be produced at a low voltage in stable for a long time.

Oda, Y.; Morimoto, T.; Suzuki, K.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

203

A Method for Producing Aluminium by Means of Metallothermic ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Heat Exchanger Solution for Aluminium Off-Gas Cooling and Heat Recovery ... The Effect of Calcium Fluoride on Alumina Solubility in Low Temperature ...

204

METHOD OF PRODUCING NEUTRONS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing neutrons is described in which there is employed a confinement zone defined between longitudinally spaced localized gradient regions of an elongated magnetic field. Changed particles and neutralizing electrons, more specifically deuterons and tritons and neutralizng electrons, are injected into the confinement field from ion sources located outside the field. The rotational energy of the parrticles is increased at the gradients by imposing an oscillating transverse electrical field thereacross. The imposition of such oscillating transverse electrical fields improves the reflection capability of such gradient fielda so that the reactive particles are retained more effectively within the zone. With the attainment of appropriate densities of plasma particles and provided that such particles are at a sufficiently high temperature, neutron-producing reactions ensue and large quantities of neutrons emerge from the containment zone. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1964-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Purex Processing of Dissolved Sand, Slag, and Crucible Containing High Levels of Boric Acid and Calcium Fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The plutonium solution obtained from the dissolution of SSC in F- Canyon will be high in fluoride. Flowsheet adjustments must be made to increase the plutonium extraction in the solvent extraction cycle to keep Pu losses from being excessive.

Kyser, E.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Tritium production analysis and management strategies for a Fluoride-salt-cooled high-temperature test reactor (FHTR)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Fluoride-salt-cooled High-temperature Test Reactor (FHTR) is a test reactor concept that aims to demonstrate the neutronics, thermal-hydraulics, materials, tritium management, and to address other reactor operational ...

Rodriguez, Judy N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

Vacuum distillation of chloride salts from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) and simulant PuO{sub 2} has been previously demonstrated at Department of Energy (DOE) sites using kilogram quantities of chloride salt. The apparatus for vacuum distillation contains a zone heated using a furnace and a zone actively cooled using either recirculated water or compressed air. During a vacuum distillation operation, a sample boat containing the feed material is placed into the apparatus while it is cool, and the system is sealed. The system is evacuated using a vacuum pump. Once a sufficient vacuum is attained, heating begins. Volatile salts distill from the heated zone to the cooled zone where they condense, leaving behind the non-volatile materials in the feed boat. The application of vacuum salt distillation (VSD) is of interest to the HB-Line Facility and the MOX Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). Both facilities are involved in efforts to disposition excess fissile materials. Many of these materials contain chloride and fluoride salt concentrations which make them unsuitable for dissolution without prior removal of the chloride and fluoride salts. Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and HB-Line designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a system for the distillation of chloride salts. Subsequent efforts are attempting to adapt the technology for the removal of fluoride. Fluoride salts of interest are less-volatile than the corresponding chloride salts. Consequently, an alternate approach is required for the removal of fluoride without significantly increasing the operating temperature. HB-Line Engineering requested SRNL to evaluate and demonstrate the feasibility of an alternate approach using both non-radioactive simulants and plutonium-bearing materials. Whereas the earlier developments targeted the removal of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl), the current activities are concerned with the removal of the halide ions associated with plutonium trifluoride (PuF{sub 3}), plutonium tetrafluoride (PuF{sub 4}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}). This report discusses non-radioactive testing of small-scale and pilot-scale systems and radioactive testing of a small-scale system. Experiments focused on demonstrating the chemistry for halide removal and addressing the primary engineering questions associated with a change in the process chemistry.

Pierce, R.; Pak, D.

2011-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

208

Variable dimensionality in the uranium fluoride/2-methyl-piperazine system: Synthesis and structures of UFO-5, -6, and -7; Zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials with unprecedented topologies  

SciTech Connect

Recently, low temperature (T < 300 C) hydrothermal reactions of inorganic precursors in the presence of organic cations have proven highly productive for the synthesis of novel solid-state materials. Interest in these materials is driven by the astonishingly diverse range of structures produced, as well as by their many potential materials chemistry applications. This report describes the high yield, phase pure hydrothermal syntheses of three new uranium fluoride phases with unprecedented structure types. Through the systematic control of the synthesis conditions the authors have successfully controlled the architecture and dimensionality of the phase formed and selectively synthesized novel zero-, one-, and two-dimensional materials.

Francis, R.J.; Halasyamani, P.S.; Bee, J.S.; O'Hare, D.

1999-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

209

Index of Semiconductor Process Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Hydrogen Bromide, HBr. Vinyl Fluoride. C 2 H 3 F. Hydrogen Chloride, HCl. Vinyl Chloride. C 2 H 3 Cl. Hydrogen Fluoride, HF. Trimethyl Gallium. ...

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

210

ORIGINAL PAPER Teeth of the red fox Vulpes vulpes (L., 1758) as a bioindicator in studies on fluoride pollution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2011. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Abstract An examination was made of fluoride content in the mandibular first molars of the permanent teeth of the red fox Vulpes vulpes living in north-west (NW) Poland. The teeth were first dried to a constant weight at 105°C and then ashed. Fluorides were determined potentiometrically, and their concentrations were expressed in dry weight (DW) and ash. The results were used to perform an indirect estimation of fluoride pollution in the examined region of Poland. The collected specimens (n=35) were classified into one of the three age categories: immature (im, 6– 12 months), subadult (subad, from 12 to 20 months) and adult (ad,>20 months). The mean concentrations (geometric mean) of fluoride were similar in the im and subad groups (230 and 296 mg/kg DW and 297 and 385 mg/kg ash, respectively), and significantly smaller than in the ad group (504 and 654 mg/kg, respectively, in DW and ash). Basing on other reports that the ?400 mg/kg DW concentration of fluoride in bones in the long-lived wild mammals generally reflects the geochemical background, it was found that 57 % of the foxes in NW Poland exceeded this value by 9 % to 170%. This indirectly reflects a moderate fluoride contamination in the tested region.

El?bieta Kalisi?ska; Mirona Palczewska-komsa; Bioindicator Bioaccumulation

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Plasma and vacuum ultraviolet induced charging of SiO{sub 2} and HfO{sub 2} patterned structures  

SciTech Connect

The authors compare the effects of plasma charging and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) irradiation on oxidized patterned Si structures with and without atomic-layer-deposited HfO{sub 2}. It was found that, unlike planar oxidized Si wafers, oxidized patterned Si wafers charge up significantly after exposure in an electron-cyclotron resonance plasma. The charging is dependent on the aspect ratio of the patterned structures. This is attributed to electron and/or ion shading during plasma exposure. The addition of a 10 nm thick HfO{sub 2} layer deposited on top of the oxidized silicon structures increases the photoemission yield during VUV irradiation, resulting in more trapped positive charge compared to patterns without the HfO{sub 2} dielectric.

Lauer, J. L.; Upadhyaya, G. S.; Sinha, H.; Kruger, J. B.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L. [Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Stanford Nanofabrication Facility, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94303 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Plasma Processing and Technology Laboratory and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Inverted organic solar cells comprising a solution-processed cesium fluoride interlayer  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the influence of solution-processed cesium fluoride (CsF) interlayers on the performance of inverted polymer solar cells comprising a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):[6,6]-phenyl C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester. The thickness of the CsF layer is optimized in terms of current-voltage characteristics by a variation of the solid content in solution. Capacitance-voltage characteristics reveal a shift of the built-in voltage at the cathode interface by about 0.3 V as compared to devices without a CsF layer, giving rise to an increase in open-circuit voltage by the same value. The vertical distribution of Cs{sup +} and F{sup +} ions is studied by secondary ion mass spectroscopy, indicating a strong diffusion of the alkaline fluoride into the organic layer stack.

Reinhard, Manuel; Zhang Zhenhao; Colsmann, Alexander; Lemmer, Uli [Light Technology Institute, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Engesserstrasse 13, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Hanisch, Jonas; Ahlswede, Erik [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg, Industriestrasse 6, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany)

2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

Applicability of the sludge processing technical standard to type IV waste tanks with high fluoride concentration  

SciTech Connect

Type IV waste tanks at the Savannah River Plant which contain ballast water (tanks 17, 18, 19, 20, and 24) have solution compositions that are generally within the database developed for corrosion protection of the sludge processing tanks. Therefore the technical standard covering tank chemistry limits during sludge processing is applicable to the Type TV tanks. However, Tank 20 contains levels of fluoride higher than those treated in the sludge processing database. To confirm the applicability of the sludge processing technical standard, cyclic potentiodynamic polarization scans for pitting susceptibility were run in a simulant of the Tank 20 contents. The nitrite inhibitor level specified by the standards did inhibit pitting corrosion in the simulant. Pitting was inhibited also at the same nitrite level but with 30 percent higher concentrations of chloride, fluoride, and sulfate. Thus the sludge processing technical standard has been shown to provide corrosion protection to type IV tanks containing ballast water.

Zapp, P.E.

1992-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Fluoride-added Pr-Fe-B die-upset magnets with increased electrical resistivity  

SciTech Connect

This work reports the effect of NdF{sub 3}, DyF{sub 3}, and CaF{sub 2} additions on the electrical resistivity and magnetic properties of Pr-Fe-B hot-pressed and die-upset permanent magnets. Composite magnets were synthesized from ground Pr{sub 14.5}Fe{sub 79.5}B{sub 6} melt-spun ribbons blended with 5 wt % of fluoride fine powders and consolidated by hot pressing at 650 deg. C, followed by die upsetting at 800 deg. C. While CaF{sub 2} is stable at the processing temperatures, the rare earth atoms separate from their fluorides to a certain degree with the assistance of the Pr-rich phase from the magnet matrix. Addition of fluorides increased the resistivity of the hot-pressed specimens by more than 200%. The resistivity of the die-upset specimens measured perpendicularly to the direction of the applied pressure, which is also the direction of magnetization, is, however, only slightly increased compared to the magnet counterparts without the fluoride addition. The intrinsic coercivity of Pr{sub 14.5}Fe{sub 79.5}B{sub 6} die-upset specimens is increased from 14.5 kOe to 15.3, 17.1, and 17.7 kOe for the addition of CaF{sub 2}, DyF{sub 3}, and NdF{sub 3}, respectively, at a slight expense of the residual flux.

Marinescu, M.; Liu, J. F. [Electron Energy Corporation, 924 Links Ave., Landisville, Pennsylvania 17538 (United States); Gabay, A. M.; Hadjipanayis, G. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

VOLATILITY PILOT PLANT MODIFICATIONS-HYDROGEN FLUORIDE CONDENSERS, FV-2004, FV-2005  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of-gas from the hydrofluorinator will be cooled and 94% of the hydrogen fluoride condensed by two heat exchangers connected in series. The first unit, watercooled, discharges gas and condensed vapor at 50 to 65 F. The second unit, freon-cooled, discharges condensed vapor and noncondensable hydrogen and nitrogen at --60 to -- 75 F. This report concerns a design description of tbe condensers and a heat transfer evaluation. The condensers will be fabricated at ORNL. (auth)

Mann, S.

1958-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Morphology and properties of sputtered HfN layers as a function of substrate temperature and sputtering atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

HfN layers were prepared by reactive rf-magnetron sputtering onto polished flat high speed steel (HSS) surfaces. Rectangular samples were mounted on a special holder providing temperatures in the range of 775 to 300 K along the length of the sample. The HfN layers were deposited at various total pressures and different N/sub 2//Ar ratios. The film morphology and composition was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), respectively, and correlated with mechanical properties like microhardness and adhesion. The results are discussed with respect to the sputtering conditions.

Jehn, H.A.; Kopacz, U.; Hofmann, S.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

THORIUM-BERYLLIUM ALLOYS AND METHOD OF PRODUCING SAME  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>The preparation is described of thorium-berylium alloys from halides of the metals by stmultaneously reducing thorium fluoride and beryllium fluoride with calcium at approximately 650 deg C and maintaining the temperature until the thorium-beryhltum alloy separates from the slag.

Spedding, F.H.; Wilhelm, H.A.; Keller, W.H.

1959-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Considerations of Alloy N for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Applications  

SciTech Connect

Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors (FHRs) are a promising new class of thermal-spectrum nuclear reactors. The reactor structural materials must possess high-temperature strength and chemical compatibility with the liquid fluoride salt as well as with a power cycle fluid such as supercritical water while remaining resistant to residual air within the containment. Alloy N was developed for use with liquid fluoride salts and it possesses adequate strength and chemical compatibility up to about 700 C. A distinctive property of FHRs is that their maximum allowable coolant temperature is restricted by their structural alloy maximum service temperature. As the reactor thermal efficiency directly increases with the maximum coolant temperature, higher temperature resistant alloys are strongly desired. This paper reviews the current status of Alloy N and its relevance to FHRs including its design principles, development history, high temperature strength, environmental resistance, metallurgical stability, component manufacturability, ASME codification status, and reactor service requirements. The review will identify issues and provide guidance for improving the alloy properties or implementing engineering solutions.

Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Muralidharan, Govindarajan [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Process for thermochemically producing hydrogen  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrogen is produced by the reaction of water with chromium sesquioxide and strontium oxide. The hydrogen producing reaction is combined with other reactions to produce a closed chemical cycle for the thermal decomposition of water.

Bamberger, Carlos E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Richardson, Donald M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Numerical simulations of turbulent flow fields caused by spraying of water on large releases of hydrogen fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of water sprays in absorbing HF releases was recently demonstrated in extended laboratory and field tests. In this paper, computer simulations are presented of the Hawk, Nevada Test Site, series of field tests. The model used, HFSPRAY, is a Eulerean/Lagrangian model which simulates the momentum, mass and energy interactions between a water spray and a turbulent plume of HF in air; the model can predict the flow velocities, temperature, water vapor, and HF concentration fields in two-dimensional large- geometries for spraying in any direction, (i.e., down-flow, inclined-down-flow, up-flow, and co-current horizontal flow). The model was validated against recent data on spraying of water on large releases of HF. 17 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Schatz, K.W. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Characterization of TiOxNy nanoparticles embedded in HfOxNy as charge trapping nodes for nonvolatile memory device applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silicon-oxide-nitride-oxide-silicon devices with nanoparticles (NPs) as charge trapping nodes (CTNs) are important to provide enhanced performance for nonvolatile memory devices. To study these topics, the TiO"xN"y metal oxide NPs embedded in the HfO"xN"y ... Keywords: Charge trapping nodes, HfOxNy, Nanoparticles, Nonvolatile memory devices, TiOxNy

Chien-Wei Liu; Chin-Lung Cheng; Kuei-Shu Chang-Liao; Jin-Tsong Jeng; Bau-Tong Dai; Chen-Pang Tsai

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

System for treating produced water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method were used to treat produced water. Field-testing demonstrated the removal of contaminants from produced water from oil and gas wells.

Sullivan, Enid J. (Los Alamos, NM); Katz, Lynn (Austin, TX); Kinney, Kerry (Austin, TX); Bowman, Robert S. (Lemitar, NM); Kwon, Soondong (Kyungbuk, KR)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Major Energy Producers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

206(92) 206(92) Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1992 January 1994 Elk. I nergy Information dministration This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office. All telephone orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office Superintendent of Documents McPherson Square Bookstore U.S. Government Printing Office 1510 H Street, N.W. Washington, DC 20402 Washington, DC 20005 (202)783-3238 (202)653-2050 FAX (202)512-2233 FAX (202)376-5055 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., eastern time, M-F 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., eastern time, M-F All mail orders should be directed to: U.S. Government Printing Office P.O. Box 371954 Pittsburgh, PA 15250-7954 Complimentary subscriptions and single issues are available to certain groups of subscribers, such as

224

Simulation of the Thorney Island Dense Gas Trial No. 8, using the code ADREA-HF  

SciTech Connect

In the framework of the evaluation of the three-dimensional, finite volume code ADREA-HF, a computational simulation of the Thorney Island Dense Gas Trial No. 8 is performed. A one-equation turbulence closure scheme is adopted in this first approach. The results of the simulation are compared with the experimental data in the form of concentration-time histories. The model predictions are satisfactory, with a tendency of the model to underestimate the maximum gas concentration and the time of its occurrence. The differences between model predictions and experimental data can be reduced by taking into account concentration fluctuations, utilization of finer numerical grids and improvements of the turbulence modeling. 3 refs., 14 figs.

Andronopoulos, S.; Wuertz, J. (Safety Technology Institute, Ispra (Italy)); Bartzis, J.G. (Institute for Nuclear Technology and Radiation Protection, Attiki (Greece)); Asimakopoulos, D. (Univ. of Athens (Greece))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Quality Control of Surface Wave Data Estimated from Low Signal-to-Noise Ratio HF Radar Doppler Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean wave spectra estimated by high-frequency (HF) radar are very sensitive to the noise of Doppler spectra. The method for estimating wave spectra has been improved. This method is a nonlinear inversion and can be applied to a single radar case ...

Yukiharu Hisaki

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

HF Radar Performance in a Low-Energy Environment: CODAR SeaSonde Experience on the West Florida Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three long-range (5 MHz) Coastal Ocean Dynamics Application Radar (CODAR) SeaSonde HF radars overlooking an array of as many as eight moored acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have operated on the West Florida Shelf since September 2003 ...

Yonggang Liu; Robert H. Weisberg; Clifford R. Merz; Sage Lichtenwalner; Gary J. Kirkpatrick

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Genetically Engineered Ethanol Producing Microorganisms. Battelle ...

228

A Guide to the NIST Chemistry WebBook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... case. Spaces are also ignored by the search algorithm, so both hydrogenfluoride and Hydrogen Fluoride will find HF. The ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Determining the absolute abundance of dinoflagellate cysts in recent marine sediments: The Lycopodium marker-grain method put to the test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is necessary for the removal of Ca2+ , to avoid calcium fluoride (CaF2) precipitation during HF treatment

Mucci, Alfonso

230

Development of a Forced-Convection Liquid-Fluoride-Salt Test Loop  

SciTech Connect

A small forced-convection molten-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. Objectives of the experiment include reestablishing infrastructure needed for fluoride-salt loop testing, developing a unique inductive heating technique for performing heat transfer (or other) experiments, measuring heat transfer characteristics in a liquid-fluoride-salt-cooled pebble bed, and demonstrating the use of silicon carbide (SiC) as a structural component for salt systems. The salt loop will consist of an Inconel 600 piping system, a sump-type pump, a SiC test section, and an air-cooled heat exchanger, as well as auxiliary systems needed to pre-heat the loop, transport salt into and out of the loop, and maintain an inert cover gas over the salt. A 30,000 Hz inductive heating system will be used to provide up to 250 kW of power to a 15 cm diameter SiC test section containing a packed bed of 3 cm graphite spheres. A SiC-to-Inconel 600 joint will use a conventional nickel/grafoil spiral wound gasket sandwiched between SiC and Inconel flanges. The loop system can provide up to 4.5 kg/s of salt flow at a head of 0.125 MPa and operate at a pressure just above atmospheric. Pebble Reynolds numbers of up to 2600 are possible with this configuration. A sump system is provided to drain and store the salt when not in use. Instrumentation on the loop will include pressure, temperature, and flow measurements, while the test section will be instrumented to provide pebble and FLiNaK temperatures.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Romanoski, Glenn R [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electron tunneling in MIS capacitors with the MBE-grown fluoride layers on Si(111) and Ge(111): Role of transverse momentum conservation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current-voltage characteristics of the metal-insulator-semiconductor tunneling structures with calcium fluoride are simulated using different theoretical models. The results are compared to the data of current measurements on the fabricated capacitors ... Keywords: Calcium fluoride, MIS capacitors, Transverse momentum conservation, Tunnel emitter phototransistor, Tunneling current

Y. Y. Illarionov; M. I. Vexler; S. M. Suturin; V. V. Fedorov; N. S. Sokolov; K. Tsutsui; K. Takahashi

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Heterogeneous catalysis in fluoride melts: reduction of uranium(V) and niobium(IV) by hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reduction of uranium(V) or niobium(IV) dissolved in fluoride melts at 550/sup 0/C by hydrogen gas in the absence of catalysts exhibits zero-order kinetics, i.e., the quantity reduced per unit time is independent of the concentration of dissolved species or the hydrogen gas partial pressure. Platinum catalysts accelerate the reaction rate 10- to 100-fold and, with uranium(V), the catalyzed reaction exhibits first-order kinetics, suggesting that the catalyzed reaction may be diffusion limited. Platinum was catalytically active when present as platinum black powder, sponge, sheet or powder that has sintered to or alloyed with the gold reaction crucible.

Kelmers, A.D.; Bennett, M.R.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Methods of using ionic liquids having a fluoride anion as solvents  

SciTech Connect

A method in one embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having a fluoride anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of about 90.degree. C. or less during the contacting. A method in another embodiment includes contacting a strongly hydrogen bonded organic material with an ionic liquid having an acetate or formate anion for solubilizing the strongly hydrogen bonded organic material; and maintaining the ionic liquid at a temperature of less than about 90.degree. C. during the contacting.

Pagoria, Philip (Livermore, CA); Maiti, Amitesh (San Ramon, CA); Gash, Alexander (Brentwood, CA); Han, Thomas Yong (Pleasanton, CA); Orme, Christine (Oakland, CA); Fried, Laurence (Livermore, CA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Produced water associated with the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Produced water associated with the oil and gas (O&G) industry annually introduces hundreds of billions of gallons of brackish wastewa- ter in the U.S. alone. Most produced water is highly saline companies pay to have this contaminated produced water trucked to reinjection sites for disposal--an expen

235

Testa Produce | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Testa Produce Testa Produce Jump to: navigation, search Name Testa Produce Facility Testa Produce Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Testa Produce Developer Testa Produce Energy Purchaser Testa Produce Location Chicago IL Coordinates 41.81065982°, -87.65433311° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.81065982,"lon":-87.65433311,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

Cylinder Leakage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

237

Properties of UF6  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as water vapor in the air, the UF6 and water react, forming corrosive hydrogen fluoride (HF) and a uranium-fluoride compound called uranyl fluoride (UO2F2). For more...

238

FAQ 21-What happens if a cylinder of uranium hexafluoride leaks...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(breach) occurs and the depleted UF6 is exposed to water vapor in the air, uranyl fluoride (UO2F2) and hydrogen fluoride (HF) are formed. The uranyl fluoride is a solid that...

239

Chemical Forms of Uranium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as water vapor in the air, the UF6 and water react, forming corrosive hydrogen fluoride (HF) and a uranium-fluoride compound called uranyl fluoride (UO2F2). For this reason,...

240

The crystal structure of Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As and structure-composition relations in the section Hf{sub 3}As-Nb{sub 3}As  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The title compound Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As was characterized by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction. It represents a new structure type of intermetallic compounds (space group Pnma; lattice parameters a=7.142(2) A, b=3.583(2) A, c=11.640(2) A) and shows a small homogeneity range corresponding to (0.1thermodynamic calculations employing the compound energy formalism (CEF) with the aim to model the experimentally observed site fraction data for both ternary compounds as well as Gibbs energies at the temperature of equilibration (1400 deg. C). - Graphical abstract: Hf{sub 1.5+{delta}}Nb{sub 1.5-{delta}}As with a new structure type (space group Pnma; lattice parameters a=7.142(2) A, b=3.583(2) A, c=11.640(2)A) was synthesized. Phase relations, energies and partial ordering in the section Hf{sub 3}As-Nb{sub 3}As were studied by first principle DFT calculations and thermodynamic modelling.

Warczok, Piotr; Chumak, Igor [Department of Inorganic Chemistry/Materials Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstr. 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria); Richter, Klaus W., E-mail: klaus.richter@univie.ac.a [Department of Inorganic Chemistry/Materials Chemistry, University of Vienna, Waehringerstr. 42, A-1090 Wien (Austria)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

BASIC STUDIES OF THE SEPARATION OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE FROM MIXTURES CONTAINING CHLORINE TRIFLUORIDE AND HYDROGEN FLUORIDE  

SciTech Connect

Processes for the conversion of uranium compounds or uranium metal to uranium hexafluoride ordinarily involve the use of a powerful fluorinating agent. Elemental fluorine is used when the scale of operations justifies the construction of a fluorine generating plant, but for smaller operation the use of the interhalogens of fluorine has definite advantages. These compounds provide a high concentration of fluorinating power at moderate temperatures and pressures and are more easily stored and transported than fluorine. In addition, fluorinations in the liquid phase often proceed more smoothly than those with gaseous fluorine. However, the use of . the interhalogens introduces the problem of separating the uranium hexafluoride from the unreacted reagent and from any by-products which may have been formed. The present work is concerned with the determination of the phase equilibrai among the materials uranium hexafluoride, chlorine trifluoride, and hydrogen fluoride. metal with chlorine trifluoride-hydrogen fluoride solutions or as a result of treating many uranium compounds and ores with chlorine trifluoride. These phase equilibria define the physical conditions necessary for separating the components by the processes of crystallization or distillation and have made possinle the successful Operation of a pilot plant for the direct recovery of uranium hexafluoride from spent metallic uranium fuel elements. (auth)

Bernhardt, H.A.; Barber, E.J.; Davis, W. Jr.; McGill, R.M.

1958-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

242

The determination of UO/sub 2/ and UF/sub 4/ in fused fluoride salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The determination of uranium oxide solubilities in fused fluoride salts is important in the electrolytic preparation of uranium metal. This project was initiated to develop a method for the determination of UO/sub 2/ separately from UF/sub 4/ in UF/sub 4/-CaF/sub 2/-LiF fused salts. Previous methods used for the determination of UO/sub 2/ in fused fluoride salts involved inert gas fusions where oxygen was liberated as CO/sub 2/, and hydrofluorination where oxygen was released as H/sub 2/O; but the special equipment used for these procedures was no longer available. These methods assumed that all of the oxygen liberated was due to UO/sub 2/ and does not consider impurities from reagents and other oxygen sources that amount to a bias of approximately 0.3 wt %. This titrimetric method eliminates the bias by selectively extracting the UF/sub 4/ with a Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ solution. The remaining uranium oxide residue is treated and titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint with NBS standard K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/. An aliquot of the Na/sub 2/EDTA-H/sub 3/BO/sub 3/ extract is also titrated gravimetrically to a potentiometric endpoint, this uranium component is determined and calculated as UF/sub 4/. 4 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Batiste, D.J.; Lee, D.A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Insights into the mechanisms on chemical reactions: reaction paths for chemical reactions. [Li + HF; OH + H/sub 2/  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We report reaction paths for two prototypical chemical reactions: Li + HF, an electron transfer reaction, and OH + H/sub 2/, an abstraction reaction. In the first reaction we consider the connection between the energetic terms in the reaction path Hamiltonian and the electronic changes which occur upon reaction. In the second reaction we consider the treatment of vibrational effects in chemical reactions in the reaction path formalism. 30 refs., 9 figs.

Dunning, T.H. Jr.; Rosen, E.; Eades, R.A.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is a summary report of the ICFA Beam Dynamics Workshop 'Accelerators for a Higgs Factory: Linear vs. Circular' (HF2012). It discusses four types of accelerators as possible candidates for a Higgs factory: linear e+e- colliders, circular e+e- colliders, muon collider and photon colliders. The comparison includes: physics reach, performance (energy and luminosity), upgrade potential, technology maturity and readiness, and technical challenges requiring further R&D.

Alain Blondel; Alex Chao; Weiren Chou; Jie Gao; Daniel Schulte; Kaoru Yokoya

2013-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

245

Skill Assessment of Resolving Ocean Surface Current Structure Using Compact-Antenna-Style HF Radar and the MUSIC Direction-Finding Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A skill analysis of the Multiple Signal Characterization (MUSIC) algorithm used in compact-antenna-style HF radar ocean current radial velocity/bearing determination is performed using simulation. The simulation is based upon three collocated ...

Tony de Paolo; Eric Terrill

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Generation of ELF and VLF waves by HF-modulated polar electrojet via a thermal instability process  

SciTech Connect

Generation of ELF and VLF waves via a thermal instability process in a HF-modulated polar electrojet has been investigated. It is shown that a positive feedback through the electron-neutral collisional heating process can cause the transient response of the plasma to the modulated HF heater to grow exponentially. The threshold fields of the instability under normal electrojet conditions are found to be about 2.25 V/m and 1.13 V/m for the operation of the o-mode and x-mode heaters with a 50% duty cycle, respectively. For a heater wave field of, e.g., 1.5 V/m, the instability can be excited by the x-mode heater within a few tens of millisecond. The predicted dependence of the ELF/VLF radiation amplitude on the percentage of the duty cycle of the HF modulation is identical to that of the recent observational results of Barr and Stubbe. 28 refs., 2 figs.

Kuo, S.P. (Polytechnic Univ., Farmingdale, NY (United States)); Lee, M.C. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States))

1993-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

247

Accelerated Publication: Drain current enhancement and negligible current collapse in GaN MOSFETs with atomic-layer-deposited HfO2 as a gate dielectric  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accumulation-type GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistors (MOSFET's) with atomic-layer-deposited HfO"2 gate dielectrics have been fabricated; a 4@mm gate-length device with a gate dielectric of 14.8nm in thickness (an equivalent SiO"2 ... Keywords: Atomic layer deposition (ALD), Current collapse, GaN, HfO2, Metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect-transistor (MOSFET)

Y. C. Chang; W. H. Chang; Y. H. Chang; J. Kwo; Y. S. Lin; S. H. Hsu; J. M. Hong; C. C. Tsai; M. Hong

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Cathodic processes at electrodes in potassium fluoride-hydrofluoric acid (1/2) and potassium hydroxide-water (1/2) melts and the effect of adsorbed catalyst poisons.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The industrial production of F2 is through the electrolysis process from HF melt. The reaction of HF??? F2+H2 includes the anodic production of F2 and… (more)

Gao, Lijun.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Effects of the oxygen precursor on the electrical and structural properties of HfO{sub 2} films grown by atomic layer deposition on Ge  

SciTech Connect

We report on the growth by atomic layer deposition of HfO{sub 2} films on HF-last treated Ge(001) substrates using HfCl{sub 4} as a Hf source and either O{sub 3} or H{sub 2}O as oxygen sources. The choice of the oxygen precursor strongly influences the structural, chemical, and electrical properties of the HfO{sub 2} films: Those grown using H{sub 2}O exhibit local epitaxial growth, a large amount of contaminants such as chlorine and carbon, and a large frequency dispersion of the capacitance-voltage (C-V) characteristics. Films grown using O{sub 3} are good insulators and exhibit well-shaped C-V curves with a minimum frequency dispersion of the accumulation capacitance. Moreover, they are smoother, less crystallized, and with a lower contaminant content than those grown using H{sub 2}O. However, the use of O{sub 3} leads to the formation of a 2 nm thick layer, possibly GeO{sub x}, at the HfO{sub 2}/Ge interface.

Spiga, S.; Wiemer, C.; Tallarida, G.; Scarel, G.; Ferrari, S.; Seguini, G.; Fanciulli, M. [Laboratorio Nazionale MDM-INFM, Via C. Olivetti 2, 20041 Agrate Brianza, MI (Italy)

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

250

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Minimum Free Energy Reaction Path for the E2 Reaction between Fluoro Ethane and a Fluoride Ion, such as the mechanism and the free-energy profile, remains an important challenge not only for enzyme catalysis1 of the reaction free-energy profile is very cumbersome with constrained molecular dynamics (MD) and umbrella

Nielsen, Steven O.

251

Dissolution and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies of thin copper oxide films on copper in semi-aqueous fluoride solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The selective dissolution of thin copper oxide films grown on copper in semi-aqueous formulations containing dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), ammonium fluoride (NH"4F) and water was studied. Optimization of the formulations was carried out by systematic evaluation ... Keywords: BEOL cleaning, Copper oxide removal, Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, SAF chemical system

N. Venkataraman; S. Raghavan

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Energy transfer kinetics in oxy-fluoride glass and glass-ceramics doped with rare-earth ions  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of donor-acceptor energy transfer kinetics in dual rare earths doped precursor oxy-fluoride glass and its glass-ceramics containing NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals is reported here, using three different donor-acceptor ion combinations such as Nd-Yb, Yb-Dy, and Nd-Dy. The precipitation of NaYF{sub 4} nano-crystals in host glass matrix under controlled post heat treatment of precursor oxy-fluoride glasses has been confirmed from XRD, FESEM, and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis. Further, the incorporation of dopant ions inside fluoride nano-crystals has been established through optical absorption and TEM-EDX analysis. The noticed decreasing trend in donor to acceptor energy transfer efficiency from precursor glass to glass-ceramics in all three combinations have been explained based on the structural rearrangements that occurred during the heat treatment process. The reduced coupling phonon energy for the dopant ions due to fluoride environment and its influence on the overall phonon assisted contribution in energy transfer process has been illustrated. Additionally, realization of a correlated distribution of dopant ions causing clustering inside nano-crystals has also been reported.

Sontakke, Atul D.; Annapurna, K. [Glass Science and Technology Section, CSIR-Central Glass and Ceramic Research Institute, 196, Raja S. C. Mullick Road, Kolkata - 700 032 (India)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Improving the performance of the organic thin-film transistors with thin insulating lithium fluoride buffer layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The pentacene-based organic thin-film transistors (OTFTs) with a thin insulating lithium fluoride (LiF) buffer layer between the pentacene and source/drain electrodes were fabricated. Compared with conventional OTFTs, the introduction of the buffer layer ... Keywords: OTFT, Organic thin-film transistor, Pentacene

Wei Hu; Yi Zhao; Jingying Hou; Chunsheng Ma; Shiyong Liu

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A literature review on the chemical and physical properties of uranyl fluoride (UO sub 2 F sub 2 )  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the preparation and properties of uranyl fluoride. Data are given on the crystal structure, solubility in water, specific gravity, density, specific heat, enthalpy, entropy, acidity, corrosion properties, and refractive indices. Empirical formulas are given to calculate specific gravity, density of aqueous solutions, molal volume, and refractive indices. 13 refs., 3 figs., 11 tabs.

Myers, W.L. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA) Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Method of producing molybdenum-99  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method of producing molybdenum-99, comprising accelerating ions by means of an accelerator; directing the ions onto a metal target so as to generate neutrons having an energy of greater than 10 MeV; directing the neutrons through a converter material comprising techentium-99 to produce a mixture comprising molybdenum-99; and, chemically extracting the molybdenum-99 from the mixture.

Pitcher, Eric John

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

256

Process for the hydroisomerization and hydrocracking of Fisher-Tropsch waxes to produce a syncrude and upgraded hydrocarbon products  

SciTech Connect

A process is described for producing a pumpable syncrude from a Fischer-Tropsch wax containing oxygenate compounds, which comprises: (1) separating the Fischer-Tropsch wax into (a) a low-boiling fraction which contains most of the oxygenate compounds and (b) a high-boiling fraction which is substantially free of water and oxygenate compounds, (2) reacting the high-boiling fraction from step (1) with hydrogen at hydroisomerization and mild hydrocracking conditions in the presence of a fluorided Group VIII metal-on-alumina catalyst to produce a C/sub 5/ + hydrocarbon product, and (3) combining the C/sub 5/ + hydrocarbon product from step (2) with the low-boiling fraction from step (1) to produce a pumpable, refinery processable syncrude that can be transported at atmospheric conditions.

Hamner, G.P.

1989-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

257

DISSOLUTION OF PLUTONIUM METAL USING NITRIC ACID SOLUTIONS CONTAINING POTASSIUM FLUORIDE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deinventory and deactivation of the Savannah River Site's (SRS's) FB-Line facility required the disposition of approximately 2000 items from the facility's vaults. Plutonium (Pu) scraps and residues which do not meet criteria for conversion to a mixed oxide fuel will be dissolved and the solution stored for subsequent disposition. Some of the items scheduled for dissolution are composite materials containing Pu and tantalum (Ta) metals. The preferred approach for handling this material is to dissolve the Pu metal, rinse the Ta metal with water to remove residual acid, and burn the Ta metal. The use of a 4 M nitric acid (HNO{sub 3}) solution containing 0.2 M potassium fluoride (KF) was initially recommended for the dissolution of approximately 500 g of Pu metal. However, prior to the use of the flowsheet in the SRS facility, a new processing plan was proposed in which the feed to the dissolver could contain up to 1250 g of Pu metal. To evaluate the use of a larger batch size and subsequent issues associated with the precipitation of plutonium-containing solids from the dissolving solution, scaled experiments were performed using Pu metal and samples of the composite material. In the initial experiment, incomplete dissolution of a Pu metal sample demonstrated that a 1250 g batch size was not feasible in the HB-Line dissolver. Approximately 45% of the Pu was solubilized in 4 h. The remaining Pu metal was converted to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Based on this work, the dissolution of 500 g of Pu metal using a 4-6 h cycle time was recommended for the HB-Line facility. Three dissolution experiments were subsequently performed using samples of the Pu/Ta composite material to demonstrate conditions which reduced the risk of precipitating a double fluoride salt containing Pu and K from the dissolving solution. In these experiments, the KF concentration was reduced from 0.2 M to either 0.15 or 0.175 M. With the use of 4 M HNO{sub 3} and a reduction in the KF concentration to 0.175 M, the dissolution of 300 g of Pu metal is expected to be essentially complete in 6 h. The dissolution of larger batch sizes would result in the formation of PuO{sub 2} solids. Incomplete dissolution of the PuO{sub 2} formed from the metal is not a solubility limitation, but can be attributed to a combination of reduced acidity and complexation of fluoride which slows the dissolution kinetics and effectively limits the mass of Pu dissolved.

Rudisill, T.; Crowder, M.; Bronikowski, M.

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

258

AN EXPERIMENT TO STUDY PEBBLE BED LIQUID-FLUORIDE-SALT HEAT TRANSFER  

SciTech Connect

A forced-convection liquid-fluoride-salt loop is being constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This loop was designed as a versatile experimental facility capable of supporting general thermal/fluid/corrosion testing of liquid fluoride salts. The initial test configuration is designed to support the Pebble Bed Advanced High-Temperature Reactor and incorporates a test section designed to examine the heat transfer behavior of FLiNaK salt in a heated pebble bed. The loop is constructed of Inconel 600 and is capable of operating at up to 700oC. It contains a total of 72 kg of FLiNaK salt and uses an overhung impeller centrifugal sump pump that can provide FLiNaK flow at 4.5 kg/s with a head of 0.125 MPa. The test section is made of silicon carbide (SiC) and contains approximately 600 graphite spheres, 3 cm in diameter. The pebble bed is heated using a unique inductive technique. A forced induction air cooler removes the heat added to the pebble bed. The salt level within the loop is maintained by controlling an argon cover gas pressure. Salt purification is performed in batch mode by transferring the salt from the loop into a specially made nickel crucible system designed to remove oxygen, moisture and other salt impurities. Materials selection for the loop and test section material was informed by 3 months of Inconel 600 and SiC corrosion testing as well as tests examining subcomponent performance in the salt. Several SiC-to-Inconel 600 mechanical joint designs were considered before final salt and gas seals were chosen. Structural calculations of the SiC test section were performed to arrive at a satisfactory test section configuration. Several pump vendors provided potential loop pump designs; however, because of cost, the pump was designed and fabricated in-house. The pump includes a commercial rotating dry gas shaft seal to maintain loop cover gas inventory. The primary instrumentation on the loop includes temperature, pressure, and loop flow rate measurement. Although techniques for all these measurements have improved, no commercial instrumentation was available for flow and pressure measurement that had been tested under these conditions. Instrumentation was tested and modified to meet both corrosion and temperature requirements. This paper discusses the issues encountered during the design and construction of the ORNL Liquid Salt Loop and should prove useful to those contemplating construction of similar high-temperature liquid-fluoride-salt facilities.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Aaron, Adam M [ORNL; Heatherly, Dennis Wayne [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Kisner, Roger A [ORNL; McCarthy, Mike [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Wilgen, John B [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The integration of Human Factors (HF) in the SAR process training course text  

SciTech Connect

This text provides the technical basis for a two-day course on human factors (HF), as applied to the Safety Analysis Report (SAR) process. The overall objective of this text and course is to: provide the participant with a working knowledge of human factors-related requirements, suggestions for doing a human safety analysis applying a graded approach, and an ability to demonstrate using the results of the human safety analysis, that human factors elements as defined by DOE (human factors engineering, procedures, training, oversight, staffing, qualifications), can support wherever necessary, nuclear safety commitments in the SAR. More specifically, the objectives of the text and course are: (1) To provide the SAR preparer with general guidelines for doing HE within the context of a graded approach for the SAR; (2) To sensitize DOE facility managers and staff, safety analysts and SAR preparers, independent reviewers, and DOE reviewers and regulators, to DOE Order 5480.23 requirements for HE in the SAR; (3) To provide managers, analysts, reviewers and regulators with a working knowledge of HE concepts and techniques within the context of a graded approach for the SAR, and (4) To provide SAR managers and DOE reviewers and regulators with general guidelines for monitoring and coordinating the work of preparers of HE inputs throughout the SAR process, and for making decisions regarding the safety relevance of HE inputs to the SAR. As a ready reference for implementing the human factors requirements of DOE Order 5480.22 and DOE Standard 3009-94, this course text and accompanying two-day course are intended for all persons who are involved in the SAR.

Ryan, T.G.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Cellulase producing microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulase--containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualifies for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor Technology Development and Demonstration Roadmap  

SciTech Connect

Fluoride salt-cooled High-temperature Reactors (FHRs) are an emerging reactor class with potentially advantageous performance characteristics, and fully passive safety. This roadmap describes the principal remaining FHR technology challenges and the development path needed to address the challenges. This roadmap also provides an integrated overview of the current status of the broad set of technologies necessary to design, evaluate, license, construct, operate, and maintain FHRs. First-generation FHRs will not require any technology breakthroughs, but do require significant concept development, system integration, and technology maturation. FHRs are currently entering early phase engineering development. As such, this roadmap is not as technically detailed or specific as would be the case for a more mature reactor class. The higher cost of fuel and coolant, the lack of an approved licensing framework, the lack of qualified, salt-compatible structural materials, and the potential for tritium release into the environment are the most obvious issues that remain to be resolved.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL] [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL] [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL] [ORNL; Pointer, William David [ORNL] [ORNL; Robb, Kevin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Overview of Component Testing Requirements for a Small Fluoride Salt-Cooled High Tempreature Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article summarizes the information necessary to provide reasonable assurance that components for a small fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor will meet their functional requirements. In support of the analysis of testing requirements, a simplified, conceptual description of the systems, structures, and components specific to this reactor class was developed. These reactor system elements were divided into major categories based on their functions: (1) reactor core systems, (2) heat transport system, (3) reactor auxiliary cooling system, and (4) instrumentation and controls system. An assessment of technical maturity for each element was made, and a gap analysis was performed to identify specific areas that require further testing. A prioritized list of the testing requirements was then developed. The prioritization was based on both the relative importance of the system to reactor viability, and performance and time requirements to perform the testing.

Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Crystal and Electronic Structures of Neptunium Nitrides Synthesized Using a Fluoride Route  

SciTech Connect

A low-temperature fluoride route was utilized to synthesize neptunium mononitride, NpN. Through the development of this process, two new neptunium nitride species, NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3}, were identified. The NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} have crystal structures isomorphous to those of UN{sub 2} and U{sub 2}N{sub 3}, respectively. NpN{sub 2} crystallizes in a face-centered cubic CaF{sub 2}-type structure with a space group of Fm3m and a refined lattice parameter of 5.3236(1) {angstrom}. The Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} adopts the body-centered cubic Mn{sub 2}O{sub 3}-type structure with a space group of Ia{bar 3}. Its refined lattice parameter is 10.6513(4) {angstrom}. The NpN synthesis at temperatures {le} 900 C using the fluoride route discussed here was also demonstrated. Previous computational studies of the neptunium nitride system have focused exclusively on the NpN phase because no evidence was reported experimentally on the presence of NpN{sub x} systems. Here, the crystal structures of NpN{sub 2} and Np{sub 2}N{sub 3} are discussed for the first time, confirming the experimental results by density functional calculations (DFT). These DFT calculations were performed within the local-density approximation (LDA+U) and the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA+U) corrected with an effective Hubbard parameter to account for the strong on-site Coulomb repulsion between Np 5f electrons. The effects of the spin-orbit coupling in the GGA+U calculations have also been investigated for NpN{sub 2} and NpN.

Silva, G W Chinthaka M [ORNL; Weck, Dr. Phil F. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL); Eunja, Dr. Kim [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Yeamans, Dr. Charles B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Cerefice, Gary S. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Sattelberger, Alfred P [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Czerwinski, Ken R. [University of Nevada, Las Vegas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Alternative Energy Producers Credit (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Alternative Energy Producers Credit for 35% of the eligible expenditures on renewable energy generation facilities to be claimed as a tax credit. However, this credit is reduced by the amount...

265

Methods of producing transportation fuel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Systems, methods, and heaters for treating a subsurface formation are described herein. At least one method for producing transportation fuel is described herein. The method for producing transportation fuel may include providing formation fluid having a boiling range distribution between -5.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. from a subsurface in situ heat treatment process to a subsurface treatment facility. A liquid stream may be separated from the formation fluid. The separated liquid stream may be hydrotreated and then distilled to produce a distilled stream having a boiling range distribution between 150.degree. C. and 350.degree. C. The distilled liquid stream may be combined with one or more additives to produce transportation fuel.

Nair, Vijay (Katy, TX); Roes, Augustinus Wilhelmus Maria (Houston, TX); Cherrillo, Ralph Anthony (Houston, TX); Bauldreay, Joanna M. (Chester, GB)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

266

Assessment of the Use of Nitrogen Trifluoride for Purifying Coolant and Heat Transfer Salts in the Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides an assessment of the use of nitrogen trifluoride for removing oxide and water-caused contaminants in the fluoride salts that will be used as coolants in a molten salt cooled reactor.

Scheele, Randall D.; Casella, Andrew M.

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Investigations of the g{sub K}-factors in the {sup 175,177,179}Hf Isotopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper the intrinsic g{sub K} and effective spin g{sub s} factors of the odd-mass {sup 175-179}Hf isotopes have been investigated within the Tamm-Dancoff approximation by using the realistic Saxon-Woods potential. The theoretically calculated g{sub K} and g{sub s}{sup eff} values are compared with experimental data. The comparison of the measured and calculated values of the effective g{sub s} factor shows that the spin polarization explains quite well the observed reduction of g{sub s} from its free-nucleon value.

Yakut, Hakan; Kuliev, Ali [Sakarya University, Department of physics, Sakarya (Turkey); Guliyev, Ekber [National Academy of Sciences, Institute of Physics, Baku (Azerbaijan)

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

268

TRANSURANIC ELEMENT, COMPOSITION THEREOF, AND METHODS FOR PRODUCING SEPARATING AND PURIFYING SAME  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of separating plutonium from fission products contained in an aqueous solution is described. Plutonium, in the tri- or tetravalent state, and the fission products are coprecipitated on lanthanum fluoride, lanthanum oxalate, cerous fluoride, cerous phosphate, ceric iodate, zirconyl phosphate, thorium iodate, or thorium fluoride. The precipitate is dissolved in acid, and the plutonium is oxidized to the hexavalent state. The fission products are selectively precipitated on a carrier of the above group but different from that used for the coprecipitation. The plutonium in the solution, after removal of the fission product precipitate, is reduced to at least the tetravalent state and precipitated on lanthanum fluoride, lanthanum phosphate, lanthanum oxalate, lanthanum hydroxide, cerous fluoride, cerous phosphate, cerous oxalate, cerous hydroxide, ceric iodate, zirconyl phosphate, zirconyl iodate, zirconium hydroxide, thorium fluoride, thorium oxalate, thorium iodate, thorium peroxide, uranium iodate, uranium oxalate, or uranium peroxide, again using a different carrier than that used for the precipitation of the fission products.

Wahl, A.C.

1961-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

269

Method for producing laser targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method for producing deuterium targets or pellets of 25.mu. to 75.mu. diameter. The pellets are sliced from a continuously spun solid deuterium thread at a rate of up to 10 pellets/second. The pellets after being sliced from the continuous thread of deuterium are collimated and directed to a point of use, such as a laser activated combustion or explosion chamber wherein the pellets are imploded by laser energy or laser produced target plasmas for neutral beam injection.

Jarboe, Thomas R. (Oakland, CA); Baker, William R. (Orinda, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

An AC phase measuring interferometer for measuring dn/dT of fused silica and calcium fluoride at 193 nm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method for the measurement of the change in index of refraction vs. temperature (dn/dT) of fused silica and calcium fluoride at the 193 nm wavelength has been developed in support of thermal modeling efforts for the development of 193 nm-based photolithographic exposure tools. The method, based upon grating lateral shear interferometry, uses a transmissive linear grating to divide a 193 nm laser beam into several beam paths by diffraction which propagate through separate identical material samples. One diffracted order passing through one sample overlaps the undiffracted beam from a second sample and forms interference fringes dependent upon the optical path difference between the two samples. Optical phase delay due to an index change from heating one of the samples causes the interference fringes to change sinusoidally with phase. The interferometer also makes use of AC phase measurement techniques through lateral translation of the grating. Results for several samples of fused silica and calcium fluoride are demonstrated.

Shagam, R.N.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Process for producing chalcogenide semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing chalcogenide semiconductor material is disclosed. The process includes forming a base metal layer and then contacting this layer with a solution having a low pH and containing ions from at least one chalcogen to chalcogenize the layer and form the chalcogenide semiconductor material.

Noufi, R.; Chen, Y.W.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

272

Synthesis of bulk FeHfBO soft magnetic materials and its loss characterization at megahertz frequency  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic core materials with low loss, high saturation magnetization, large permeability, and operating frequency above 1 MHz are in high demands for the next generation of miniaturized power electronics. Amorphous FeHfB ribbons with thickness around 20 {mu}m have been fabricated through melt-spinning. Different heat treatments were performed on the FeHfB ribbons, and the relations among heat treatments, microstructure, and magnetic properties have been explored. Properties such as coercivity (H{sub c}) of 2.0 Oe and saturation magnetic flux density (B{sub S}) of 1.2 T have been achieved in samples with exchange coupling. The losses can be minimized by balancing the hysteretic and eddy current losses and can be further reduced with additional magnetic field annealing. At 5 MHz with peak magnetic flux density of 20 mT, the materials show core losses comparable to the best ferrites, but with higher permeability value of about 200 and superior saturation induction of more than 1 T.

Zhou Yang; Kou Xiaoming; Warsi Muhammad, Asif; Lin Shuo; Harris, Brendan S.; Parsons, Paul E.; Xiao, John Q. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Mu Mingkai; Lee, Fred C. [Center for Power Electronics System, Virginia Polytechnic and State University, Blacksburg, Virginia 24060 (United States); Zhu Hao [Spectrum Magnetics LLC, Wilmington, Delaware 19804 (United States)

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

273

Effect of nitrogen incorporation on improvement of leakage properties in high-k HfO{sub 2} capacitors treated by N{sub 2}-plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nitrogen incorporation into the HfO{sub 2} films with an EOT (equivalent oxide thickness) of 9 A was performed by N{sub 2}-plasma to improve the electrical properties. The dielectric properties and a leakage current characteristics of the capacitors were investigated as a function of plasma power and plasma treatment temperature. The dielectric constant of the capacitors is not influenced by nitrogen incorporation. The N{sub 2}-plasma treatment at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits the most effective influence on improvement of the leakage current characteristics. Leakage current density of the capacitors treated at 300 deg. C and 70 W exhibits a half order of magnitude lower than that without plasma treatment. Nitrogen incorporated into the HfO{sub 2} films possesses the intrinsic effect that drastically reduce the electron leakage current through HfO{sub 2} dielectrics by deactivating the V{sub O} (oxygen vacancy) related gap states.

Seong, Nak-Jin; Yoon, Soon-Gil; Yeom, Seung-Jin; Woo, Hyun-Kyung; Kil, Deok-Sin; Roh, Jae-Sung; Sohn, Hyun-Chul [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Chungnam National University, Daeduk Science Town, 305-764, Daejon (Korea, Republic of); Hynix Semiconductor Inc., San 136-1 Ami-ri Bubal-eub Icheon-si Kyoungki-do, 467-701 (Korea, Republic of)

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

274

APPLICATION OF VACUUM SALT DISTILLATION TECHNOLOGY FOR THE REMOVAL OF FLUORIDE AND CHLORIDE FROM LEGACY FISSILE MATERIALS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Between September 2009 and January 2011, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the Savannah River Site (SRS) HB-Line Facility designed, developed, tested, and successfully deployed a production-scale system for the distillation of sodium chloride (NaCl) and potassium chloride (KCl) from plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}). Subsequent efforts adapted the vacuum salt distillation (VSD) technology for the removal of chloride and fluoride from less-volatile halide salts at the same process temperature and vacuum. Calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}), calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}), and plutonium fluoride (PuF{sub 3}) were of particular concern. To enable the use of the same operating conditions for the distillation process, SRNL employed in situ exchange reactions to convert the less-volatile halide salts to compounds that facilitated the distillation of halide without removal of plutonium. SRNL demonstrated the removal of halide from CaCl{sub 2}, CaF{sub 2} and PuF{sub 3} below 1000 C using VSD technology.

Pierce, R.; Peters, T.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H.sub.2, CO, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2 O, CH.sub.4, NH.sub.3, HCl, HF, H.sub.2 S, COS, N.sub.2, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N.sub.2 and H.sub.2. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000.degree. F.

Leininger, Thomas F. (Chino Hills, CA); Robin, Allen M. (Anaheim, CA); Wolfenbarger, James K. (Torrance, CA); Suggitt, Robert M. (Wappingers Falls, NY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Partial oxidation process for producing a stream of hot purified gas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A partial oxidation process is described for the production of a stream of hot clean gas substantially free from particulate matter, ammonia, alkali metal compounds, halides and sulfur-containing gas for use as synthesis gas, reducing gas, or fuel gas. A hydrocarbonaceous fuel comprising a solid carbonaceous fuel with or without liquid hydrocarbonaceous fuel or gaseous hydrocarbon fuel, wherein said hydrocarbonaceous fuel contains halides, alkali metal compounds, sulfur, nitrogen and inorganic ash containing components, is reacted in a gasifier by partial oxidation to produce a hot raw gas stream comprising H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O, CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, HCl, HF, H{sub 2}S, COS, N{sub 2}, Ar, particulate matter, vapor phase alkali metal compounds, and molten slag. The hot raw gas stream from the gasifier is split into two streams which are separately deslagged, cleaned and recombined. Ammonia in the gas mixture is catalytically disproportionated into N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}. The ammonia-free gas stream is then cooled and halides in the gas stream are reacted with a supplementary alkali metal compound to remove HCl and HF. Alkali metal halides, vaporized alkali metal compounds and residual fine particulate matter are removed from the gas stream by further cooling and filtering. The sulfur-containing gases in the process gas stream are then reacted at high temperature with a regenerable sulfur-reactive mixed metal oxide sulfur sorbent material to produce a sulfided sorbent material which is then separated from the hot clean purified gas stream having a temperature of at least 1000 F. 1 figure.

Leininger, T.F.; Robin, A.M.; Wolfenbarger, J.K.; Suggitt, R.M.

1995-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

277

Hydrothermal synthesis of new rare earth silicate fluorides: A novel class of polar materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Polar crystals provide an interesting avenue for materials research both in the structures they form and the properties they possess. This work describes the hydrothermal synthesis and structural characterization of three novel silicate fluorides. Compound (1), LiY{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 2} crystallizes in space group C2/c, with a=17.651(4) A, b=4.8868(10) A, c=11.625(2) A and {beta}=131.13(3) Degree-Sign . BaY{sub 2}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})F{sub 2} (2) crystallizes in space group P-1, with a=5.1576(10) A, b=6.8389(14) A, c=11.786(2) A, {alpha}=93.02(3) Degree-Sign , {beta}=102.05(3) Degree-Sign and {gamma}=111.55(3) Degree-Sign . Finally, the structure of Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5} (3) was determined in the polar orthorhombic space group Pba2, having unit cell parameters a=8.8864(18) A, b=12.764(3) A and c=5.0843(10) A. The structures are compared based on their building blocks and long range polarities. Aligned silicate tetrahedra segregated into a single layer in (3) impart the observed polarity. - Graphical abstract: The polar structure of Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural yttrium silicate fluoride minerals are briefly reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis and structures of LiY{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 2}, BaY{sub 2}(Si{sub 2}O{sub 7})F{sub 2} and Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5} are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ba{sub 2}Y{sub 3}(SiO{sub 4}){sub 2}F{sub 5} crystallizes in the polar space group Pba2. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polarity occurs primarily through aligned silicate tetrahedra in a segregated layer.

McMillen, Colin D., E-mail: cmcmill@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 485 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Emirdag-Eanes, Mehtap, E-mail: mehtapemirdag@iyte.edu.tr [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce koyu, Urla, Izmir 35430 (Turkey)] [Department of Chemistry, Izmir Institute of Technology, Gulbahce koyu, Urla, Izmir 35430 (Turkey); Stritzinger, Jared T., E-mail: jstritz@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 485 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States); Kolis, Joseph W., E-mail: kjoseph@clemson.edu [Department of Chemistry and Center for Optical Materials Science and Engineering Technologies (COMSET), Clemson University, 485 H.L. Hunter Laboratories, Clemson, SC 29634 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

278

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can also be transferred to our laboratory. Molecular Target/use Radiotracer Name Structure Chemical Name Hexokinase/glucose metabolism, cancer, brain function 18 FDG 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose Dopamine D2/D3 receptors/addiction, psychiatric disorders [ 11 C]raclopride 3,5-dichloro-N-{[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin- 2-yl]methyl}-2-hydroxy-6- [ 11 C]methoxybenzamide Dopamine transporters / cocaine pharmacokinetics, addiction, neurological disorders [ 11 C]cocaine methyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-s(benzoyloxy)- 8-[ 11 C]methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1] octane-2-carboxylate Blood flow/nicotine pharmacokinetics [ 11 C]nicotine 3-[(2S)-1-[ 11 C]methylpyrrolidin-2-

279

Method of producing heavy oils  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of producing viscous oils from a subterranean reservoir containing unconsolidated or friable sand, the reservoir being penetrated by at least one well in fluid communication therewith comprising: (a) first, stimulating the reservoir by injecting steam through the well at a pressure sufficient to fracture the reservoir adjacent the well; (b) next, shutting in the well for a period of time; (c) then, completing the well adjacent the reservoir with a gravel pack; (d) then, producing oil from the reservoir through the well; and (e) periodically, subsequently stimulating the reservoir by injecting steam through the well and into the reservoir at a pressure below the pressure which would fracture the reservoir adjacent the well.

Ferguson, N.B.

1987-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

280

Process for producing advanced ceramics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the synthesis of homogeneous advanced ceramics such as SiC+AlN, SiAlON, SiC+Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, and Si.sub.3 N.sub.4 +AlN from natural clays such as kaolin, halloysite and montmorillonite by an intercalation and heat treatment method. Included are the steps of refining clays, intercalating organic compounds into the layered structure of clays, drying the intercalated mixture, firing the treated atmospheres and grinding the loosely agglomerated structure. Advanced ceramics produced by this procedure have the advantages of homogeneity, cost effectiveness, simplicity of manufacture, ease of grind and a short process time. Advanced ceramics produced by this process can be used for refractory, wear part and structure ceramics.

Kwong, Kyei-Sing (Tuscaloosa, AL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Method for producing carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Perry, William L. (Jemez Springs, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

282

Method for producing hydrophobic aerogels  

SciTech Connect

A method for treating a dried monolithic aerogel containing non-dispersed particles, with an organometallic surface modifying agent to produce hydrophobic aerogels. The dried, porous hydrophobic aerogels contain a protective layer of alkyl groups, such as methyl groups, on the modified surfaces of the pores of the aerogel. The alkyl groups at the aerogel surface typically contain at least one carbon-metal bond per group.

Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA); Poco, John F. (Livermore, CA); Coronado, Paul R. (Livermore, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Method for producing monodisperse aerosols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

Ortiz, Lawrence W. (Los Alamos, NM); Soderholm, Sidney C. (Pittsford, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Fullerenes produced by harnessing sunlight  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two independent groups of researchers have demonstrated that fullerenes can be produced by harnessing focused sunlight to vaporize carbon. Adapted to a large scale, generation of the carbon-cage molecules in solar furnaces might overcome yield-limiting problems associated with other fullerene production techniques, the researchers suggest. At Rice University, Houston, chemistry professor Richard E. Smalley and graduate students L.P. Felipe Chibante, Andreas Thess, J. Michael Alford, and Michael D. Diener used a parabolic mirror to focus sunlight on a graphite target to produce what appears to be a high yield of fullerenes. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, Colo., Roland R. Pitts, Mary Jane Hale, Carl Bingham, Allan Lewandowski, and David E.King, working in collaboration with Clark L. Fields, a chemistry professor at the University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, used NREL's high-flux solar furnace to produce soot that contains C[sub 60] and C[sub 70]. Papers describing the Rice and NREL results appeared together in last week's Journal of Physical Chemistry (97, 8696 and 8701 (1993)).

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

EVALUATION OF AUTOMATIC DATA PROCESSING IN THE FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PILOT PLANT  

SciTech Connect

Automatic data logging and digital-computer techniques were evaluated in the ORNL Fluoride Volatiltty Pilot Plant, The data reduction sequence consisted of encoding plant signals from conventional instrumentation, digitizing the encoded signals with an on-line automatic data logger, and processing the logged data off-line with a digital computer. Data reduction and computational codes were useful in disseminating process data, with photographic curve plots being the most efficient means. Considerable difficulty was experienced with logger output errors, which complicated the data processing and frequently resulted in erroneous results. After continuous operation of the data-processing sequence for 12 months it was concluded that output from a data logger is of limited use without recourse to a computer, loading of raw logger data to the computer and subsequent conversion to a useful form (engineering units) can account for up to 70% of total computer charges, and some backup to automatic data logging, either as continuous or manual recording, may be desirable because logger downtime may be as much as 5%. The use of the data reduction sequence will be continued in the pilot plant. Expanding the sequence to include on-line computation and process control features is not justified because of process limitations. (auth)

Moncrief, E. C.; Hill, M. C.

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Structure and dynamics in yttrium-based molten rare earth alkali fluorides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transport properties of molten LiF-YF3 mixtures have been studied by pulsed field gradient nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, potentiometric experiments, and molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated diffusion coefficients and electric conductivities compare very well with the measurements accross a wide composition range. We then extract static (radial distribution functions, coordination numbers distributions) and dynamic (cage correlation functions) quantities from the simulations. Then, we discuss the interplay between the microscopic structure of the molten salts and their dynamic properties. It is often considered that variations in the diffusion coefficient of the anions are mainly driven by the evolution of its coordination with the metallic ion (Y3+ here). We compare this system with fluorozirconate melts and demonstrate that the coordination number is a poor indicator of the evolution of the diffusion coefficient. Instead, we propose to use the ionic bonds lifetime. We show that the weak Y-F ionic bonds in LiF-YF3 do not induce the expected tendency of the fluoride diffusion coefficient to converge toward the one of yttrium cation when the content in YF3 increases. Implications on the validity of the Nernst-Einstein relation for estimating the electrical conductivity are discussed.

Maximilien Levesque; Vincent Sarou-Kanian; Mathieu Salanne; Mallory Gobet; Henri Groult; Catherine Bessada; Paul A. Madden; Anne-Laure Rollet

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Energy-Efficient, High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride and Fluoride Phosphors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

LED lamps using phosphor downconversion can be designed to replace incandescent or halogen sources with a 'warm-white' correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2700-3200 K and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90. However, these lamps have efficacies of {approx}70% of standard 'cool-white' LED packages (CCT = 4500-6000 K; CRI = 75-80). In this report, we describe structural and luminescence properties of fluoride and oxyfluoride phosphors, specifically a (Sr,Ca){sub 3}(Al,Si)O{sub 4}(F,O):Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green phosphor and a K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} red phosphor, that can reduce this gap and therefore meet the spectral and efficiency requirements for high-efficacy LED lighting. LED lamps with a warm-white color temperature (3088 K), high CRI (90), and an efficacy of {approx}82 lm/W are demonstrated using these phosphors. This efficacy is {approx}85% of comparable cool-white lamps using typical Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}-based phosphors, significantly reducing the efficacy gap between warm-white and cool-white LED lamps that use phosphor downconversion.

Setlur, A.; Radkov, E; Henderson, C; Her, J; Srivastava, A; Karkada, N; Kishore, M; Kumar, N; Aesram, D; et al.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Pulsed power considerations for electron beam pumped krypton fluoride lasers for inertial confinement fusion applications  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program is developing the krypton-fluoride excimer laser for use as an ICF driver. The KrF laser has a number of inherent characteristics that make it a promising driver candidate, such as short wavelength (0.25 {mu}m), broad bandwidth to target (>100 cm{sup {minus}1}), pulse-shaping with high dynamic range, and the potential for high overall efficiency (>5%) and repetitive operation. The large KrF laser amplifiers needed for ICF drivers are electron-beam pumped. A key issue for all laser ICF drivers is cost, and a leading cost component of a KrF laser driver is associated with the pulsed power and electron diode. Therefore, the efficient generation of electron beams is a high priority. The Los Alamos ICF program is investigating pulsed-power and diode designs and technologies to further the development of affordable KrF laser ICF drivers. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Rose, E.A.; McDonald, T.E.; Rosocha, L.A.; Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Smith, I.D. (Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Understanding Polymorphism Formation in Electrospun Fibers of Immiscible Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Blends  

SciTech Connect

Effects of electric poling, mechanical stretching, and dipolar interaction on the formation of ferroelectric ({beta} and/or {gamma}) phases in poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) have been studied in electrospun fibers of PVDF/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) and PVDF/polysulfone (PSF) blends with PVDF as the minor component, using wide-angle X-ray diffraction and Fourier transform infrared techniques. Experimental results of as-electrospun neat PVDF fibers (beaded vs. bead-free) showed that mechanical stretching during electrospinning, rather than electric poling, was effective to induce ferroelectric phases. For as-electrospun PVDF blend fibers with the non-polar PSF matrix, mechanical stretching during electrospinning again was capable of inducing some ferroelectric phases in addition to the major paraelectric ({alpha}) phase. However, after removing the mechanical stretching in a confined melt-recrystallization process, only the paraelectric phase was obtained. For as-electrospun PVDF blend fibers with the polar (or ferroelectric) PAN matrix, strong intermolecular interactions between polar PAN and PVDF played an important role in the ferroelectric phase formation in addition to the mechanical stretching effect during electrospinning. Even after the removal of mechanical stretching through the confined melt-recrystallization process, a significant amount of ferroelectric phases persisted. Comparing the ferroelectric phase formation between PVDF/PSF and PVDF/PAN blend fibers, we concluded that the local electric field-dipole interactions were the determining factor for the nucleation and growth of polar PVDF phases.

G Zhong; L Zhang; R Su; K Wang; H Fong; L Zhu

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

290

An Analysis of Testing Requirements for Fluoride Salt Cooled High Temperature Reactor Components  

SciTech Connect

This report provides guidance on the component testing necessary during the next phase of fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactor (FHR) development. In particular, the report identifies and describes the reactor component performance and reliability requirements, provides an overview of what information is necessary to provide assurance that components will adequately achieve the requirements, and then provides guidance on how the required performance information can efficiently be obtained. The report includes a system description of a representative test scale FHR reactor. The reactor parameters presented in this report should only be considered as placeholder values until an FHR test scale reactor design is completed. The report focus is bounded at the interface between and the reactor primary coolant salt and the fuel and the gas supply and return to the Brayton cycle power conversion system. The analysis is limited to component level testing and does not address system level testing issues. Further, the report is oriented as a bottom-up testing requirements analysis as opposed to a having a top-down facility description focus.

Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Compatibility of strontium-90 fluoride with containment materials at elevated temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ as a heat-source fuel requires that the /sup 90/Sr be adequately contained during heat-source service. A program for determining the compatibility of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ with containment materials at heat-source operating temperatures is described. These compatibility studies included: initial and supplemental screening tests; WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ capsule demonstration tests; thermal gradient test; and long-term tests. TZM, Haynes Alloy 25, and Hastelloy C-276 were the three materitals selected for evaluation at 600/sup 0/, 800/sup 0/ and 1000/sup 0/C for periods up to 30,000 h. Results showed that all three alloys suffered substantial attack when exposed to the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/, although the TZM was more resistant to attack than the Hastelloy C-276 and Haynes Alloy 25. The latter two alloys appeared to provide about equal resistance to fluoride attack for exposures longer than about 12,000 h. Attack of the alloys tested by the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ was due primarily to impurities.

Fullam, H.T.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Realization of high-quality HfO{sub 2} on In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As by in-situ atomic-layer-deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High {kappa} dielectric of HfAlO/HfO{sub 2} was an in-situ atomic-layer-deposited directly on molecular beam epitaxy grown In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As surface without using pre-treatments or interfacial passivation layers, where HfAlO (HfO{sub 2}:Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {approx} 4:1) with high re-crystallization temperature was employed as the top oxide layer. The HfAlO ({approx}4.5 nm)/HfO{sub 2} (0.8 nm)/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As metal oxide semiconductor capacitors have exhibited an oxide/In{sub 0.53}Ga{sub 0.47}As interface free of arsenic-related defective bonding, thermodynamic stability at 800 deg. C, and low leakage current densities of oxide thickness of less than 1 nm has been achieved by reducing the HfAlO thickness to {approx}2.7 nm with the same initial HfO{sub 2} thickness of {approx}0.8 nm.

Lin, T. D.; Hong, M. [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chang, Y. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. A.; Huang, M. L.; Lee, W. C. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Center for Condensed Matter Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

2012-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

293

Producing biofuels using polyketide synthases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides for a non-naturally occurring polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing a carboxylic acid or a lactone, and a composition such that a carboxylic acid or lactone is included. The carboxylic acid or lactone, or derivative thereof, is useful as a biofuel. The present invention also provides for a recombinant nucleic acid or vector that encodes such a PKS, and host cells which also have such a recombinant nucleic acid or vector. The present invention also provides for a method of producing such carboxylic acids or lactones using such a PKS.

Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

294

METHOD FOR PRODUCING THORIUM TETRACHLORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing thorium tetrachloride from thorium concentrate comprises reacting thorium concentrates with a carbonaceous reducing agent in excess of 0.05 part by weight per part of thoriferous concentrate at a temperature in excess of 1300 deg C, cooling and comminuting the mass, chlorinating the resulting comminuting mass by suspending in a gaseous chlorinating agent in a fluidized reactor at a temperatare maintained between about l85 deg C and 770 deg C, and removing the resulting solid ThCl/sub 4/ from the reaction zone.

Mason, E.A.; Cobb, C.M.

1960-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

61 - 18370 of 26,764 results. 61 - 18370 of 26,764 results. Page EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold. http://energy.gov/nepa/eis-0359-uranium-hexafluoride-conversion-facility-paducah-kentucky-site Page EIS-0393: Montanore Project, Montana

296

EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, 59: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site EIS-0359: Uranium Hexafluoride Conversion Facility at the Paducah, Kentucky Site Summary This site-specific EIS considers the construction, operation, maintenance, and decontamination and decommissioning of the proposed depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) conversion facility at three locations within the Paducah site; transportation of depleted uranium conversion products and waste materials to a disposal facility; transportation and sale of the hydrogen fluoride (HF) produced as a conversion co-product; and neutralization of HF to calcium fluoride and its sale or disposal in the event that the HF product is not sold. This EIS also considers a no action alternative that assumes continued storage of DUF6 at the Paducah site. A

297

Number of Producing Gas Wells  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Producing Gas Wells Producing Gas Wells Period: Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Area 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 View History U.S. 452,945 476,652 493,100 487,627 514,637 482,822 1989-2012 Alabama 6,591 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 1989-2012 Alaska 239 261 261 269 277 185 1989-2012 Arizona 7 6 6 5 5 5 1989-2012 Arkansas 4,773 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 1989-2012 California 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 1989-2012 Colorado 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 1989-2012 Gulf of Mexico 2,552 1,527 1,984 1,852 1,559 1,474 1998-2012 Illinois 43 45 51 50 40 40 1989-2012 Indiana 2,350 525 563 620 914 819 1989-2012 Kansas

298

Thin air-plasma-treated alkali fluoride layers for improved hole extraction in copper phthalocyanine/C70-based solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Alkali fluorides, mostly LiF and CsF, are well-known to improve electron injection/extraction in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and organic solar cells (OSCs). They are also utilized, though to a lesser extent, for hole injection in OLEDs. Here we demonstrate a new role for such fluorides in enhancing OSCs’ hole extraction.We show that an ultrathin air-plasmatreated alkali fluoride layer between the indium tin oxide (ITO) anode and the active layer in copper phthalocyanine ðCuPcÞ?C70-based OSCs increases the short circuit current by up to ?17% for cells with LiF and ?7% for cells with NaF or CsF. The effects of the fluoride layer thickness and treatment duration were evaluated, as were OSCs with oxidized and plasma-treated Li and UV-ozone treated LiF. Measurements included current voltage, absorption, external quantum efficiency (EQE), atomic force microscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, which showed the presence of alkali atoms F and O at the treated ITO/fluoride surface. The EQE of optimized devices with LiF increased at wavelengths >560 nm, exceeding the absorption increase. Overall, the results indicate that the improved performance is due largely to enhanced hole extraction, possibly related to improved energy-level alignment at the fluorinated ITO/CuPc interface, reduced OSC series resistance, and in the case of LiF, improved absorption.

Xiao, Teng; Cui, Weipan; Cai, Min; Liu, Rui; Anderegg, James W.; Shinar, Joseph; Shinar, Ruth

2012-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

299

Phase transformation of "chem-prep" PZT 95/5-2Nb HF1035 ceramic under quasi-static loading conditions.  

SciTech Connect

Specimens of poled and unpoled ''chem-prep'' PNZT ceramic from batch HF1035 were tested under hydrostatic, uniaxial, and constant stress difference loading conditions at -55, 25, and 75 C. The objective of this experimental study was to characterize the mechanical properties and conditions for the ferroelectric (FE) to antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transformations of this ''chem-prep'' PNZT ceramic to aid grain-scale modeling efforts in developing and testing realistic response models for use in simulation codes. As seen from a previously characterized material (batch HF803), poled ceramic from HF1035 was seen to undergo anisotropic deformation during the transition from a FE to an AFE phase. Also, the phase transformation was found to be permanent for the two low temperature conditions, whereas the transformation can be completely reversed at the highest temperature. The rates of increase in the phase transformation pressures with temperature were practically identical for both unpoled and poled PNZT HF1035 specimens. We observed that temperature spread the phase transformation over mean stress analogous to the observed spread over mean stress due to shear stress. Additionally, for poled ceramic samples, the FE to AFE phase transformation was seen to occur when the normal compressive stress, acting perpendicular to a crystallographic plane about the polar axis, equals the hydrostatic pressure at which the transformation otherwise takes place.

Montgomery, Stephen Tedford; Lee, Moo Yul; Meier, Diane A.; Hofer, John H.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 26, NO. 6, PAGES 667-670, MARCH 15, 1999 Observation of topside ionospheric MF/HF radio  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ionospheric MF/HF radio emission from space S. D. Bale Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California `auroral roar', although to propa- gate to the spacecraft they must have been generated above spectrum as viewed from space. Introduction Observations of ionospheric radio emission in the MF (0.3-3 MHz

California at Berkeley, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Band offsets of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} oxides deposited by atomic layer deposition technique on hydrogenated diamond  

SciTech Connect

High-k oxide insulators (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}) have been deposited on a single crystalline hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) epilayer by an atomic layer deposition technique at temperature as low as 120 Degree-Sign C. Interfacial electronic band structures are characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Based on core-level binding energies and valence band maximum values, valence band offsets are found to be 2.9 {+-} 0.2 and 2.6 {+-} 0.2 eV for Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions, respectively. Band gaps of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} have been determined to be 7.2 {+-} 0.2 and 5.4 {+-} 0.2 eV by measuring O 1s energy loss spectra, respectively. Both the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/H-diamond and HfO{sub 2}/H-diamond heterojunctions are concluded to be type-II staggered band configurations with conduction band offsets of 1.2 {+-} 0.2 and 2.7 {+-} 0.2 eV, respectively.

Liu, J. W.; Liao, M. Y.; Imura, M. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Koide, Y. [Optical and Electronic Materials Unit, National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Nanofabrication Platform, NIMS, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Center of Materials Research for Low Carbon Emission, NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2012-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ultrahigh-Strength Nano-Grained Composites Produced by High ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Processing of pure aluminum, titanium and nickel through the .... Mechanical Properties and Microstructure Evolutions of Ultrafine-Grained Al during ... of Ferroelectric Poly(Vinylidene Fluoride-Trifluoroethylene) Copolymer Films ... Sonochemistry as a Tool for Synthesis of Ion-Substituted Calcium Phosphate ...

303

A theory of the electronic properties of calcium fluoride(111) and silicon(111) surfaces and the CaF[sub 2]/Si(111) interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The author has used an empirical tight binding-Green's function (ETB-GF) method to investigate the surface and interface properties of crystalline solids. The method allows the study of a semi-infinite sample and calculation of the positions of the localized states, their strengths, and how they decay into the bulk. This ETB-GF method can be used to calculate densities of the bulk states at each layer along with the individual contributions of the various orbitals and how they are modified by the presence of the surface. This technique has been used to calculate the bulk and surface properties of silicon (111) and calcium fluoride (111) as well as the interface properties of these two materials. For silicon, the author has extended the existing empirical tight binding Hamiltonian of Chadi and Cohen (CC) by incorporating two additional second nearest neighbor (2nn) terms. This resulted in a much better agreement in the conduction band with the empirical pseudopotential method (EPM) calculation of Chelikowsky and Cohen including more accurate gaps at [Lambda], X, and L, with a slightly less accurate valence band structure. The calculation of the As-passivated Si (111) system shows that it produces an unoccupied surface state in the band gap and two resonance states inside the valence band in close agreement with those found in previous experimental studies. This calculation predicts the existence of another localized state in the conduction band which has remained experimentally undetected. The material parameters were determined for CaF[sub 2] and the local density of states (LDOS) calculated for bulk CaF[sub 2] and the ideal, unrelaxed, unreconstructed surface layer. Surface states are shown at the fluorine and calcium layers due to cleaving of the bonds at the surface. The interface properties were studied of CaF[sub 2]/Si (111) and the LDOS calculated at each side of the interface. The results show an interface state in the gap.

Engle, W.P.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Structure-Directing Roles and Interactions of Fluoride and Organocations with Siliceous Zeolite Frameworks  

SciTech Connect

Interactions of fluoride anions and organocations with crystalline silicate frameworks are shown to depend subtly on the architectures of the organic species, which significantly influence the crystalline structures that result. One- and two-dimensional (2D) {sup 1}H, {sup 19}F, and {sup 29}Si nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy measurements establish distinct intermolecular interactions among F{sup -} anions, imidazolium structure-directing agents (SDA{sup +}), and crystalline silicate frameworks for as-synthesized siliceous zeolites ITW and MTT. Different types and positions of hydrophobic alkyl ligands on the imidazolium SDA{sup +} species under otherwise identical zeolite synthesis compositions and conditions lead to significantly different interactions between the F{sup -} and SDA{sup +} ions and the respective silicate frameworks. For as-synthesized zeolite ITW, F{sup -} anions are established to reside in the double-four-ring (D4R) cages and interact strongly and selectively with D4R silicate framework sites, as manifested by their strong {sup 19}F{sup 29}Si dipolar couplings. By comparison, for as-synthesized zeolite MTT, F{sup -} anions reside within the 10-ring channels and interact relatively weakly with the silicate framework as ion pairs with the SDA{sup +} ions. Such differences manifest the importance of interactions between the imidazolium and F{sup -} ions, which account for their structure-directing influences on the topologies of the resulting silicate frameworks. Furthermore, 2D {sup 29}Si{l_brace}{sup 29}Si{r_brace} double-quantum NMR measurements establish {sup 29}Si-O-{sup 29}Si site connectivities within the as-synthesized zeolites ITW and MTT that, in conjunction with synchrotron X-ray diffraction analyses, establish insights on complicated order and disorder within their framework structures.

Shayib, Ramzy M.; George, Nathan C.; Seshadri, Ram; Burton, Allen W.; Zones, Stacey I.; Chmelka, Bradley F. (UCSB); (Chevron ETC)

2012-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

305

Using Energy Efficiency and Producing it Renewably  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Energy Efficiency and Producing it Renewably Title Using Energy Efficiency and Producing it Renewably Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2011 Authors Gadgil,...

306

NETL: Produced Water Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PWMIS Home Produced Water Management Information System The Produced Water Management Information System is an online resource for technical and regulatory information for managing...

307

NETL: Produced Water Management Information System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Produced Water Management Technology Descriptions Fact Sheet - Underground Injection for Disposal PWMIS Home Intro to Produced Water Technology Descriptions Basic Separation...

308

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl (18E) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

Ding, Yu-Shin (Central Islip, NY); Fowler, Joanna S. (Bellport, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

No-carrier-added (NCA) aryl ([sup 18]F) fluorides via the nucleophilic aromatic substitution of electron rich aromatic rings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for synthesizing no-carrier-added (NCA) aryl [.sup.18 F] fluoride substituted aromatic aldehyde compositions bearing an electron donating group is described. The method of the present invention includes the step of reacting aromatic nitro aldehydes having a suitably protected hydroxyl substitutent on an electron rich ring. The reaction is The U.S. Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract Number DE-AC02-76CH00016, between the U.S. Department of Energy and Associated Universities Inc.

Yushin Ding; Fowler, J.S.; Wolf, A.P.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

310

Study of the validity of a combined potential model using the hybrid reverse Monte Carlo method in fluoride glass system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The choice of appropriate interaction models is among the major disadvantages of conventional methods such as molecular dynamics and Monte Carlo simulations. On the other hand, the so-called reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) method, based on experimental data, can be applied without any interatomic and/or intermolecular interactions. The RMC results are accompanied by artificial satellite peaks. To remedy this problem, we use an extension of the RMC algorithm, which introduces an energy penalty term into the acceptance criteria. This method is referred to as the hybrid reverse Monte Carlo (HRMC) method. The idea of this paper is to test the validity of a combined potential model of coulomb and Lennard-Jones in a fluoride glass system BaMnMF_{7} (M=Fe,V) using HRMC method. The results show a good agreement between experimental and calculated characteristics, as well as a meaningful improvement in partial pair distribution functions. We suggest that this model should be used in calculating the structural properties and in describing the average correlations between components of fluoride glass or a similar system. We also suggest that HRMC could be useful as a tool for testing the interaction potential models, as well as for conventional applications.

S. M. Mesli; M. Habchi; M. Kotbi; H. Xu

2013-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

311

DRY FLUORINE SEPARATION METHOD  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Preparation and separation of U/sup 233/ by irradiation of ThF/sub 4/ is described. During the neutron irradiation to produce Pa/sup 233/ a fluorinating agent such as HF, F/sub 2/, or HF + F/sub 2/ is passed through the ThF/sub 4/ powder to produce PaF/sub 5/. The PaF/sub 5/, being more volatile, is removed as a gas and allowed to decay radioactively to U/sup 233/ fluoride. A batch procedure in which ThO/sub 2/ or Th metal is irradiated and fluorinated is suggested. Some Pa and U fluoride volatilizes away. Then the remainder is fluorinated with F/sub 2/ to produce very volatile UF/sub 6/ which is recovered. (T.R.H.)

Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

1959-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

312

Vortex Diode Analysis and Testing for Fluoride Salt-Cooled High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect

Fluidic diodes are presently being considered for use in several fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor designs. A fluidic diode is a passive device that acts as a leaky check valve. These devices are installed in emergency heat removal systems that are designed to passively remove reactor decay heat using natural circulation. The direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS) uses DRACS salt-to-salt heat exchangers (DHXs) that operate in a path parallel to the core flow. Because of this geometry, under normal operating conditions some flow bypasses the core and flows through the DHX. A flow diode, operating in reverse direction, is-used to minimize this flow when the primary coolant pumps are in operation, while allowing forward flow through the DHX under natural circulation conditions. The DRACSs reject the core decay heat to the environment under loss-of-flow accident conditions and as such are a reactor safety feature. Fluidic diodes have not previously been used in an operating reactor system, and therefore their characteristics must be quantified to ensure successful operation. This report parametrically examines multiple design parameters of a vortex-type fluidic diode to determine the size of diode needed to reject a particular amount of decay heat. Additional calculations were performed to size a scaled diode that could be tested in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory Liquid Salt Flow Loop. These parametric studies have shown that a 152.4 mm diode could be used as a test article in that facility. A design for this diode is developed, and changes to the loop that will be necessary to test the diode are discussed. Initial testing of a scaled flow diode has been carried out in a water loop. The 150 mm diode design discussed above was modified to improve performance, and the final design tested was a 171.45 mm diameter vortex diode. The results of this testing indicate that diodicities of about 20 can be obtained for diodes of this size. Experimental results show similar trends as the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) results presented in this report; however, some differences exist that will need to be assessed in future studies. The results of this testing will be used to improve the diode design to be tested in the liquid salt loop system.

Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Elkassabgi, Yousri M. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; De Leon, Gerardo I. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Fetterly, Caitlin N. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Ramos, Jorge A. [Texas A& M University, Kingsville; Cunningham, Richard Burns [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Nano-Hydroxyapatite/Fluoridated and Unfluoridated Bioactive Glass Composites: Structural Analysis and Bioactivity Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biphasic bioceramic composites containing nano-hydroxyapatite (HAP) and nanosized bioactive glasses have been prepared in the form of pellets and have been examined for the effects of bioglass concentrations and sintering temperature on the structural transformations and bioactivity behavior. Pure stoichiometric nano-HAP was synthesized using sol-gel technique. Two bioglasses synthesized in this work--fluoridated bioglass (Cao-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}O{sub 3}-CaF{sub 2}) and unfluoridated bioglass (Cao-P{sub 2}O{sub 5}-Na{sub 2}O{sub 3}) designated as FBG and UFBG respectively, were added to nano-HAP with concentrations of 5, 10, 12 and 15%. The average particle sizes of synthesized HAP and bioglasses were 23 nm and 35 nm, respectively. The pellets were sintered at four different temperatures i.e. 1000 deg. C, 1150 deg. C, 1250 deg. C and 1350 deg. C. The investigations involved study of structural and bioactivity behavior of green and sintered pellets and their deviations from original materials i.e. HAP, FBG and UFBG, using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The phase composition of the sintered pellets was found to be non-stoichiometric HAP with {alpha}-TCP (tricalcium phosphate) and {beta}-TCP. It was revealed from SEM images that bonding mechanism was mainly solid state sintering for all pellets sintered at 1000 deg. C and 1150 deg. C and also for pellets with lower concentrations of bioglass i.e. 5% and 10% sintered at 1250 deg. C. Partly liquid phase sintering was observed for pellets with higher bioglass concentrations of 12% and 15% sintered at 1250 deg. C and same behaviour was noted for pellets at all concentrations of bioglasses at 1350 deg. C. The sintered density, hardness and compression strength of pellets have been influenced both by the concentration of the bioglasses and sintering temperature. It was observed that the biological HAP layer formation was faster on the green pellets surface than on pure HAP and sintered pellets, showing higher bioactivity in the green pellets.

Batra, Uma [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh-160012 (India); Kapoor, Seema [University Institute of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Panjab University, Chandigarh-160014 (India); Sharma, J. D. [Department of Materials and Metallurgical Engineering, PEC University of Technology, Chandigarh (India)

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

314

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Requirements Biodiesel is defined as a fuel that is composed of mono-alkyl esters of long-chain fatty acids derived from plant or animal matter, meets the

315

CORROSION ASSOCIATED WITH FLUORINATION IN THE OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY FLUORIDE VOLATILITY PROCESS  

SciTech Connect

: : 9 7 7 8 6 9 : = 7 9 9used during the fluorination of fused-salt fuels and subsequent associated operations in the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Fluoride Volatility Process was evaluated. Corrosive attack is reported as mils per month based on molten salt residence time or mils per hour based on fluorine exposure time. Two fluorinators were used in the VPP to carry out the fluorination reactions. These vessels, Mark I and Mark II, were fabricated into right cylinders, approx 4 1/2 ft in height, from the same heat of L (low carbon nickel. The first vessel contained equimolar NaF- ZrF/sub 4/ or NaF-ZrF/sub 4/-UF/sub 4/ (48-48-4 mole%) for approx 1250 hr at 600 to 725 deg C. Over a period of 61 hr, 57,500 standard liters of F/sub 2/ were sparged into the slats. This constituted a F/sub 2/:U mole ratio of 3:1 beyond theoretical requirements. The Mark II fluorinator contained fluoride salts of approxi-mately the same compositions plus small additions of PuF/sub 4/ during three runs. The salts were kept molten at 540 to 730 deg C for approx 1950 hr and about sixty 500 standard liters of F/sub 2/ were sparged into the Mark II melts in 92 hr. Both fluorinators sustained large corrosion losses consisting of extensive wall thinning, severe interior inter- granular attack, and a moderate exterior oxidation attack. Maximum deterioration on the Mark I vessel occurred in the middle vapor region at a calculated rate of 1.2 mils/hr, based on fluorine sparge time, or 46 mils/month, based on time of exposure to molten salts. The second vessel showed maximum attack in the salt-containing region at similarly calculated rates of 1.1 mils/hr and 60 mils/month. Some evidence was found to indicate that the intergranular attack may have resulted from sulfur in the systems. Bulk metal losses from the vessel's walls were believed to be the result of cyclic losses of NiF/sub 2/ ""protective'' films. The shift in maximum corrosion attack geometry in the two fluorinators is believed to have resulted from differences in operating conditions. The Mark II vessel experienced higher temperatures, longer fluorine exposure times, and uranium residence times in its salt baths. Specimens removed from the wall of the first fluorinator showed a variation in aversge ASTM grain-size number of 5 or 6 to >1, the largest grains being found in the middle vapor region. The second vessel had a more uniform grain-size pattern, average ASTM grain-size numbers varying from 3 to 5 to 2 to 4. The variations in grain sizes are believed to have resulted from variable heating rates during initial usage. Examinations of bench-scale reactors, where simulated fluorination environments were provided to study process variables and corrosion, showed that A nickel had the highest degree of corrosion resistance as a fluorinator materiai of construction when compared with Inconel and INOR-8. Intergranular penetration and subsequent sloughing of whole grains seemed to be the predominant mode of corrosive attack on the Inconel vessel. At the higher test temperatures, 600 deg C, INOR-8 miniature fluorinators showed large bulk metal losses plus selective losses of chromium, molybdenum, and iron from the exposed alloy surfaces. Evidence of a marked reduction in attack on nickel and INOR-8 was found during lower temperature studies at 450 to 525 deg C. Scouting corrosion tests were performed in the VPP's fluorinators using rod, sheet, or wire specimens of commercial and developmental alloys. These tests were subjected to serious limitations due to the lack of control over operating conditions and thus considerable variation in the corrosion of L nickel control specimens resulted. Those nickel-rich alloys containing iron and cobalt showed some superiority in corrosion resistsnce when com- pared with L nickel specimens. Nickel-rich alloys containing molybdenum additions showed variable behavior in the fluorination environment. Additional experimental nickelbase alloy corrosion specimens, containing magnesium,

Litman, A.P.; Goldman, A.E.

1961-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Spectroscopic differentiation between O-atom vacancy and divacancy defects, respectively, in TiO2 and HfO2 by X-ray absorption spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Defect state features have been detected in second derivative O K edge spectra for thin films of nano-crystalline TiO"2 and HfO"2. Based on soft X-ray photoelectron band edge spectra, and the occurrence of occupied band edge 4f states in Gd(Sc,Ti)O"3, ... Keywords: Bound resonance states, Divacancies, Immobile and mobile vacancies, Monovacancies, Pre-edge regime, X-ray absorption spectroscopy

G. Lucovsky; K. -B. Chung; J. -W. Kim; D. Norlund

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

 The Oregon Department of Energy provides a tax credit for agricultural producers or collectors of biomass.  The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in...

318

PRODUCING ENERGY AND RADIOACTIVE FISSION PRODUCTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent broadly discloses the production of plutonium by the neutron bombardment of uranium to produce neptunium which decays to plutonium, and the fissionability of plutonium by neutrons, both fast and thermal, to produce energy and fission products.

Segre, E.; Kennedy, J.W.; Seaborg, G.T.

1959-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

319

Survey of renewable chemicals produced from ...  

RESEARCH Open Access Survey of renewable chemicals produced from lignocellulosic biomass during ionic liquid pretreatment Patanjali Varanasi1,2, ...

320

Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated ...  

Method to Produce Highly Digestible, Pretreated Lignocellulosic Biomass Using Anhydrous Liquid Ammonia Inventors: Shishir Chundawat, Leonardo Sousa, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Experiments with Wind to Produce Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nat EXPERIMENTS WITH WIND TO PRODUCE ENERGY Curriculum: Wind Power (simple machines, weatherclimatology, aerodynamics, leverage, mechanics, atmospheric pressure, and energy...

322

Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program: Data Compilation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Code USEC United States Enrichment Corporation Chemicals AlF 3 aluminum trifluoride CaF 2 calcium fluoride CO carbon monoxide Fe iron HF hydrogen fluoride HNO 3 nitric acid Mg...

323

Definition: Independent Power Producer | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producer Producer Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Independent Power Producer Any entity that owns or operates an electricity generating facility that is not included in an electric utility's rate base. This term includes, but is not limited to, cogenerators and small power producers and all other nonutility electricity producers, such as exempt wholesale generators, who sell electricity.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition An Independent Power Producer is an entity, which is not a public utility, but which owns facilities to generate electric power for sale to utilities and end users. NUGs may be privately held facilities, corporations, cooperatives such as rural solar or wind energy producers, and non-energy industrial concerns capable of feeding excess energy into

324

Low-Temperature Fluorination of Soft-Templated Mesoporous Carbons for a High-Power Lithium/Carbon Fluoride Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soft-templated mesoporous carbons and activated mesoporous carbons were fluorinated using elemental fluorine between room temperature and 235 C. The mesoporous carbons were prepared via self-assembly synthesis of phloroglucinol formaldehyde as a carbon precursor in the presence of triblock ethylene oxide propylene oxide ethylene oxide copolymer BASF Pluronic F127 as the template. The F/C ratios ranged from 0.15 to 0.75 according to gravimetric, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Materials have mesopore diameters up to 11 nm and specific surface areas as high as 850 m2 g 1 after fluorination as calculated from nitrogen adsorption isotherms at 196 C. Furthermore, the materials exhibit higher discharge potentials and energy and power densities as well as faster reaction kinetics under high current densities than commercial carbon fluorides with similar fluorine contents when tested as cathodes for Li/CFx batteries.

Fulvio, Pasquale F [ORNL; Dai, Sheng [ORNL; Guo, Bingkun [ORNL; Mahurin, Shannon Mark [ORNL; Mayes, Richard T [ORNL; Sun, Xiao-Guang [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Brown, Suree [ORNL; Adcock, Jamie [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Effect of dispersed calcium fluoride particles on the solubility of molybdenum in iron. [And of Copper in Cobalt  

SciTech Connect

In this paper the results of studying composites containing 20 at. % Mo and 12 vol. % CaF/sub 2/ are presented. A proposed model for the partial ionization of the metal atoms in the zone of contact with calcium fluoride was used to analyze the phase diagrams of the transition elements having limited solubility. The system Co-Cu was found to satisfy best all the conditions of the proposed model. A composite based on cobalt containing 20 at. % Cu and 12.5 vol.% CaF/sub 2/ was prepared. After sintering at 1273/sup 0/K and then quenching in water the solubility limit of copper in cobalt was found to be exceeded by 11 to 13 at. % by x-ray structural and x-ray microspectral analyses.

Shveikin, G.P.; Antsiferov, V.N.; Postnikov, V.S.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

FAQ 30-Have there been accidents involving uranium hexafluoride...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UF6 was released, which reacted with steam from the process and created HF and uranyl fluoride. This accident resulted in two deaths from HF inhalation and three individuals...

327

Using Ionic Liquids to Make Titanium Dioxide Nanotubes - Energy ...  

... used fabrication method is anodization of titanium metal in aqueous or organic polarized electrolytes baths containing fluoride species such as NH4F, HF, or NaF.

328

High-Value Fluorine Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compounds Baseline plans call for production of anhydrous or aqueous Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) from the DU hexafluoride conversion plant and subsequent recycle of these...

329

06-09-2010 NNSA-B-10-0111  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Filter Correlation (GFC) radiometry (a remote sensing technique) to detect Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) gas in the troposphere. This research and development project would use gas...

330

Chemical Management  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Plan HAZMAT Hazardous Materials HEPA High Efficiency Particulate Air HF Hydrogen Fluoride HMIS Hazardous Materials Information System HAZWOPER Hazardous Waste Operations and...

331

Microsoft Word - FLYSHEET  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Decommissioning (D&D) activities on or near uranium hexafluoride (UF 6 ) and hydrogen fluoride gas (HF) lines resulted in an uncontrolled hazardous material release. The events...

332

Process for producing ethanol from syngas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method for producing ethanol, the method comprising establishing an atmosphere containing methanol forming catalyst and ethanol forming catalyst; injecting syngas into the atmosphere at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce methanol; and contacting the produced methanol with additional syngas at a temperature and for a time sufficient to produce ethanol. The invention also provides an integrated system for producing methanol and ethanol from syngas, the system comprising an atmosphere isolated from the ambient environment; a first catalyst to produce methanol from syngas wherein the first catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a second catalyst to product ethanol from methanol and syngas, wherein the second catalyst resides in the atmosphere; a conduit for introducing syngas to the atmosphere; and a device for removing ethanol from the atmosphere. The exothermicity of the method and system obviates the need for input of additional heat from outside the atmosphere.

Krause, Theodore R; Rathke, Jerome W; Chen, Michael J

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method of producing amorphous thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention dicloses a method for sintering particulate material (such as silica) with a laser beam to produce amorphous optical thin films on substrates.

Brusasco, R.M.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

How to Enhance Creativity and Produce Breakthroughs,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

'Incentives for Innovation' - A talk at Brookhaven Lab on How to Enhance Creativity and Produce Breakthroughs, July 18 July 2, 2013 Gustavo Manso UPTON, NY - Gustavo Manso,...

335

Producing Beneficial Materials from Biomass and Biodiesel ...  

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have created a process to produce olefins from polyols that may be biomass derived. The team is also the first to ...

336

Producer perception of fed cattle price risk.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Risk is an inevitable part of agricultural production and all producers face various forms of risk. Output price has been shown to be the major… (more)

Riley, John Michael

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Optimized Cleaning Method for Producing Device Quality InP(100) Surfaces  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A very effective, two-step chemical etching method to produce clean InP(100) surfaces when combined with thermal annealing has been developed. The hydrogen peroxide/sulfuric acid based solutions, which are successfully used to clean GaAs(100) surfaces, leave a significant amount of residual oxide on the InP surface which can not be removed by thermal annealing. Therefore, a second chemical etching step is needed to remove the oxide. We found that strong acid solutions with HCl or H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} are able to remove the surface oxide and leave the InP surface passivated with elemental P which is, in turn, terminated with H. This yields a hydrophobic surface and allows for lower temperatures to be used during annealing. We also determined that the effectiveness of oxide removal is strongly dependent on the concentration of the acid. Surfaces cleaned by HF solutions were also studied and result in a hydrophilic surface with F terminated surface In atoms. The chemical reactions leading to the differences in behavior between InP and GaAs are analyzed and the optimum cleaning method for InP is discussed.

Sun, Y.

2005-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

338

Negative effect of crystallization on the mechanism of laser damage in a HfO{sub 2}/SiO{sub 2} multilayer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Elucidation of the mechanisms of laser damage is indispensable in realizing high resistance mirrors for the next generation of ultra-short pulse high intensity lasers. In this study, the surface and a section of the laser-damaged area of a laser mirror were observed with a laser microscope and a transmission electron microscope (cross-sectional TEM), respectively. A grain boundary of HfO{sub 2} microcrystal was observed in the damaged area. This observation and an evaluation of the mirror's damage resistance showed that the formation of crystals in the multilayer mirror is one of the major determinants of damage resistance.

Tateno, Ryo [Shimadzu Corporation, 1, Nishinokyo-Kuwabaracho Nakagyo-ku, Kyoto 604-8511 (Japan); Okada, Hajime; Otobe, Tomohito; Kawase, Keigo; Koga, James K.; Kosuge, Atsushi; Nagashima, Keisuke; Sugiyama, Akira [Kansai Photon Science Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 8-1-7 Umemidai, Kizugawa-shi, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Kunihiro [Department of Electrical and Communication Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100, Kujirai Kawagoe-shi, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3) 3) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 ii This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 iii The Financial Reporting System, 1977-1993 diskette is available from the Energy Information Administration.

340

Method for producing uranium atomic beam source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for producing a beam of neutral uranium atoms is obtained by vaporizing uranium from a compound UM.sub.x heated to produce U vapor from an M boat or from some other suitable refractory container such as a tungsten boat, where M is a metal whose vapor pressure is negligible compared to that of uranium at the vaporization temperature. The compound, for example, may be the uranium-rhenium compound, URe.sub.2. An evaporation rate in excess of about 10 times that of conventional uranium beam sources is produced.

Krikorian, Oscar H. (Danville, CA)

1976-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING AND MANIPULATING PLASMAS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical pinch discharge apparatus is described for producing and manipulating high-temperature plasmas. The apparatus may be of either the linear or toroidal pinch discharge type. Arrangements are provided whereby stabilizing fields may be trapped in the plasma external to the main pinch discharge path and the boundary condition of the stabilizing field programed so as to stabilize the discharge or to promote instabilities in the discharge as desired. The produced plasmas may be employed for various purposes, and fusion neutrons have been produced with the apparatus.

Colgate, S.A.; Ferguson, J.P.; Furth, H.P.; Wright, R.E.

1960-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Why Sequencea Biogas-Producing Microbial Community?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? a Biogas-Producing Microbial Community? The world population is steadily growing, and so is the amount of waste produced by human activity. For example, an estimated 236 million tons of municipal solid waste are produced annually in the U.S., 50% of which is biomass. At the same time, energy sources are rapidly depleting. Converting organic waste to renewable biofuel by anaerobic digestion hence represents one appealing option to mitigate this problem. Biogas is a natural by-product of the decomposition of organic matter in an oxygen-free environment and comprises primarily methane and carbon dioxide. This naturally occurring process has been known for more than a century. More recently, it has been gaining importance as more efficient anaerobic digestion technologies have been developed to treat and recover energy (in

343

Methods and systems for producing syngas  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and systems are provided for producing syngas utilizing heat from thermochemical conversion of a carbonaceous fuel to support decomposition of at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells. Simultaneous decomposition of carbon dioxide and water or steam by one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells may be employed to produce hydrogen and carbon monoxide. A portion of oxygen produced from at least one of water and carbon dioxide using one or more solid-oxide electrolysis cells is fed at a controlled flow rate in a gasifier or combustor to oxidize the carbonaceous fuel to control the carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide ratio produced.

Hawkes, Grant L; O& #x27; Brien, James E; Stoots, Carl M; Herring, J. Stephen; McKellar, Michael G; Wood, Richard A; Carrington, Robert A; Boardman, Richard D

2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

344

Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

In order to prevent waste and to avoid the drilling of unnecessary wells and to encourage the development of coal seam natural gas producing areas in Louisiana, the commissioner of conservation is...

345

Producing tritium in a homogenous reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for the joint production and separation of tritium. Tritium is produced in an aqueous homogenous reactor and heat from the nuclear reaction is used to distill tritium from the lower isotopes of hydrogen.

Cawley, William E. (Richland, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Optical interference produced by artificial light  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wireless infrared transmission systems for indoor use are affected by noise and interference induced by natural and artificial ambient light. This paper presents a characterisation (through extensive measurements) of the interference produced by artificial ...

Adriano J. C. Moreira; Rui T. Valadas; A. M. de Oliveira Duarte

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Produced Water Management and Beneficial Use  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large quantities of water are associated with the production of coalbed methane (CBM) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming. The chemistry of co-produced water often makes it unsuitable for subsequent uses such as irrigated agriculture. However, co-produced waters have substantial potential for a variety of beneficial uses. Achieving this potential requires the development of appropriate water management strategies. There are several unique characteristics of co-produced water that make development of such management strategies a challenge. The production of CBM water follows an inverse pattern compared to traditional wells. CBM wells need to maintain low reservoir pressures to promote gas production. This need renders the reinjection of co-produced waters counterproductive. The unique water chemistry of co-produced water can reduce soil permeability, making surface disposal difficult. Unlike traditional petroleum operations where co-produced water is an undesirable by-product, co-produced water in the PRB often is potable, making it a highly valued resource in arid western states. This research project developed and evaluated a number of water management options potentially available to CBM operators. These options, which focus on cost-effective and environmentally-sound practices, fall into five topic areas: Minimization of Produced Water, Surface Disposal, Beneficial Use, Disposal by Injection and Water Treatment. The research project was managed by the Colorado Energy Research Institute (CERI) at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and involved personnel located at CERI, CSM, Stanford University, Pennsylvania State University, the University of Wyoming, the Argonne National Laboratory, the Gas Technology Institute, the Montana Bureau of Mining and Geology and PVES Inc., a private firm.

Terry Brown; Carol Frost; Thomas Hayes; Leo Heath; Drew Johnson; David Lopez; Demian Saffer; Michael Urynowicz; John Wheaton; Mark Zoback

2007-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

348

Method of producing amorphous thin films  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method of producing thin films by sintering which comprises: a. coating a substrate with a thin film of an inorganic glass forming parulate material possessing the capability of being sintered, and b. irridiating said thin film of said particulate material with a laser beam of sufficient power to cause sintering of said material below the temperature of liquidus thereof. Also disclosed is the article produced by the method claimed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The deteriorating dollar: Producers discuss the ramifications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

U.S. dollar pricing of crude is once again up for debate due to declines in the dollar earlier this year. Oil producers that have been stung by these fluctuations are searching for remedies while others caution that the cure may be worse than the sickness. This issue of Energy Dente examines the dollar`s direction and the effect on oil producing nations` economic welfare.

NONE

1995-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Tungsten isotopic compositions in stardust SiC grains from the Murchison meteorite: Constraints on the s-process in the Hf-Ta-W-Re-Os region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the first tungsten isotopic measurements in stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains recovered from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. The isotopes 182W, 183W, 184W, 186W and 179Hf, 180Hf were measured on both an aggregate (KJB fraction) and single stardust SiC grains (LS+LU fraction) believed to have condensed in the outflows of low-mass carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The SiC aggregate shows small deviations from terrestrial (=solar) composition in the 182W/184W and 183W/184W ratios, with deficits in 182W and 183W with respect to 184W. The 186W/184W ratio, however, shows no apparent deviation from the solar value. Tungsten isotopic measurements in single mainstream stardust SiC grains revealed lower than solar 182W/184W, 183W/184W, and 186W/184W ratios. We have compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of W isotopic ratios in the envelopes of AGB stars. These ratios are affected by the slow neutron-capture process and match...

Ávila, J N; Ireland, T R; Gyngard, F; Zinner, E; Cristallo, S; Holden, P; Buntain, J; Amari, S; Karakas, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

HfO2 Gate Dielectric on (NH4)2S Passivated (100) GaAs Grown by Atomic Layer Deposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interface between hafnium oxide grown by atomic layer deposition and (100) GaAs treated with HCl cleaning and (NH{sub 4}){sub 2}S passivation has been characterized. Synchrotron radiation photoemission core level spectra indicated successful removal of the native oxides and formation of passivating sulfides on the GaAs surface. Layer-by-layer removal of the hafnia film revealed a small amount of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed at the interface during the dielectric deposition. Traces of arsenic and sulfur out-diffusion into the hafnia film were observed after a 450 C post-deposition anneal, and may be the origins for the electrically active defects. Transmission electron microscopy cross section images showed thicker HfO{sub 2} films for a given precursor exposure on S-treated GaAs versus the non-treated sample. In addition, the valence-band and the conduction-band offsets at the HfO{sub 2}/GaAs interface were deduced to be 3.18 eV and a range of 0.87-0.97 eV, respectively. It appears that HCl+(NH{sub 4})2{sub S} treatments provide a superior chemical passivation for GaAs and initial surface for ALD deposition.

Chen, P.T.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Sun, Y.; /SLAC, SSRL; Kim, E.; McIntyre, P.C.; /Stanford U., Materials Sci. Dept.; Tsai, W.; Garner, M.; /Intel, Santa Clara; Pianetta, P.; /SLAC, SSRL; Nishi, Y.; /Stanford U., Elect. Eng. Dept.; Chui, C.O.; /UCLA

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

352

Physics of enriched uranyl fluoride deposit characterizations using active neutron and gamma interrogation techniques with {sup 252}Cf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method was developed and successfully applied to characterize large uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 21}) deposits at the former Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. These deposits were formed by a wet air in-leakage into the UF{sub 6} process gas lines over a period of years. The resulting UO{sub 2}F{sub 2} is hygroscopic, readily absorbing moisture from the air to form hydrates as UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}-nH{sub 2}O. The ratio of hydrogen to uranium, denoted H/U, can vary from 0--16, and has significant nuclear criticality safety impacts for large deposits. In order to properly formulate the required course of action, a non-intrusive characterization of the distribution of the fissile material within the pipe, its total mass, and amount of hydration was needed. The Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) previously developed at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant for identification of uranium weapons components in storage containers was used to successfully characterize the distribution, hydration, and total mass of these deposits.

Wyatt, M.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering; Uckan, T.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Valentine, T.E. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Hannon, T.F. [East Tennessee Technology Park, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Pre-Conceptual Design of a Fluoride-Salt-Cooled Small Modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor (SmAHTR)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the results of a study conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 2010 to explore the feasibility of small modular fluoride salt-cooled high temperature reactors (FHRs). A preliminary reactor system concept, SmATHR (for Small modular Advanced High Temperature Reactor) is described, along with an integrated high-temperature thermal energy storage or salt vault system. The SmAHTR is a 125 MWt, integral primary, liquid salt cooled, coated particle-graphite fueled, low-pressure system operating at 700 C. The system employs passive decay heat removal and two-out-of-three , 50% capacity, subsystem redundancy for critical functions. The reactor vessel is sufficiently small to be transportable on standard commercial tractor-trailer transport vehicles. Initial transient analyses indicated the transition from normal reactor operations to passive decay heat removal is accomplished in a manner that preserves robust safety margins at all times during the transient. Numerous trade studies and trade-space considerations are discussed, along with the resultant initial system concept. The current concept is not optimized. Work remains to more completely define the overall system with particular emphasis on refining the final fuel/core configuration, salt vault configuration, and integrated system dynamics and safety behavior.

Greene, Sherrell R [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Holcomb, David Eugene [ORNL; Carbajo, Juan J [ORNL; Ilas, Dan [ORNL; Cisneros, Anselmo T [ORNL; Varma, Venugopal Koikal [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL; Yoder Jr, Graydon L [ORNL; Qualls, A L [ORNL; Peretz, Fred J [ORNL; Flanagan, George F [ORNL; Clayton, Dwight A [ORNL; Bradley, Eric Craig [ORNL; Bell, Gary L [ORNL; Hunn, John D [ORNL; Pappano, Peter J [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ii Produced Water Pretreatment for Water Recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling and slickwater hydrofracturing have enabled shale gas to become a significant contributor to the United States ’ energy supply. Hydrofracturing typically requires 2MM – 6.5MM gallons of water per shale gas well. About 15-25 % of this water returns to the surface as “flowback ” within 30 days after hydrofracturing. “Produced water ” continues to flow at a much reduced rate, e.g. 2-10 bbl/day, for the life of the well. In addition to high salinity and hardness levels (Mg, Ca, Sr, Ba), much Marcellus produced water also contains significant levels of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM), particularly radium. The near absence of disposal wells in Pennsylvania initially forced much of the produced water to be trucked into Ohio for disposal by deep-well injection (UIC). Currently up to 95 % of the

Principal Investigator; James M. Silva; James M. Silva; Hope Matis; William L. Kostedt Iv; Vicki Watkins

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Method for producing small hollow spheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method is disclosed for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T [approx gt] 600 C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10[sup 3] [mu]m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants. 1 fig.

Hendricks, C.D.

1979-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

Ren, Zhifen (Newton, MA); Wen, Jian Guo (Newton, MA); Lao, Jing Y. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Li, Wenzhi (Brookline, MA)

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

357

Method for producing small hollow spheres  

SciTech Connect

Method for producing small hollow spheres of glass, metal or plastic, wherein the sphere material is mixed with or contains as part of the composition a blowing agent which decomposes at high temperature (T .gtorsim. 600.degree. C). As the temperature is quickly raised, the blowing agent decomposes and the resulting gas expands from within, thus forming a hollow sphere of controllable thickness. The thus produced hollow spheres (20 to 10.sup.3 .mu.m) have a variety of application, and are particularly useful in the fabrication of targets for laser implosion such as neutron sources, laser fusion physics studies, and laser initiated fusion power plants.

Hendricks, Charles D. (Livermore, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

United Wisconsin Grain Producers UWGP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name United Wisconsin Grain Producers (UWGP) Place Friesland, Wisconsin Product Bioethanol producer using corn as feedstock References United Wisconsin Grain Producers...

359

Probabilistic human health risk assessment from offshore produced water.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Offshore oil and gas facilities are producing huge amounts of produced water during the production. The produced water contains formation water, injected water, small volumes… (more)

Chowdhury, Mohammad Khaled H., 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

FAQ 7-How is depleted uranium produced?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? How is depleted uranium produced? Depleted uranium is produced during the uranium enrichment process. In the United States, uranium is enriched through the gaseous diffusion process in which the compound uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is heated and converted from a solid to a gas. The gas is then forced through a series of compressors and converters that contain porous barriers. Because uranium-235 has a slightly lighter isotopic mass than uranium-238, UF6 molecules made with uranium-235 diffuse through the barriers at a slightly higher rate than the molecules containing uranium-238. At the end of the process, there are two UF6 streams, with one stream having a higher concentration of uranium-235 than the other. The stream having the greater uranium-235 concentration is referred to as enriched UF6, while the stream that is reduced in its concentration of uranium-235 is referred to as depleted UF6. The depleted UF6 can be converted to other chemical forms, such as depleted uranium oxide or depleted uranium metal.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

Older adults as digital content producers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Older adults are normally characterized as consumers, rather than producers, of digital content. Current research concerning the design of technologies for older adults typically focuses on providing access to digital resources. Access is important, ... Keywords: older adults, social connection, user-generated content

Jenny Waycott; Frank Vetere; Sonja Pedell; Lars Kulik; Elizabeth Ozanne; Alan Gruner; John Downs

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Using RFID technology in produce traceability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, food safety events occur because of epizooty. Many countries build food traceability systems to solve these problems. However, the current food traceability system must be executed by paper work and need a lot of manpower. It also cannot ... Keywords: RFID, food safety, food supply chain, produce traceability

Ruey-Shun Chen; C-C Chen; K. C. Yeh; Y-C Chen; C-W Kuo

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Delivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for economic storage, handling and delivery of hydrogen. Office of Fossil Energy Milestone · 2006: Define & Petroleum Technology Office of Fossil Energy June 3, 2003 Hydrogen Coordination Meeting #12;Key NearDelivery of Hydrogen Produced from Natural Gas Christopher Freitas Office of Natural Gas

364

Electrolysis method for producing hydrogen and oxygen  

SciTech Connect

A novel electrolytic cell produces a mixture of highly ionized hydrogen and oxygen gases by a method combining electrolysis and radiolysis of an aqueous electrolyte. The electrolyte, which may be 25 percent of potassium hydroxide, is introduced into the cell and is simultaneously subjected to an electrolyting current and intense irradiation by electromagnetic radiation of frequency less than 10/sup -10/ meters.

Horvath, S.

1978-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Method of producing a chemical hydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing a chemical hydride is described and which includes selecting a composition having chemical bonds and which is capable of forming a chemical hydride; providing a source of a hydrocarbon; and reacting the composition with the source of the hydrocarbon to generate a chemical hydride.

Klingler, Kerry M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Zollinger, William T. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilding, Bruce M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Bingham, Dennis N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wendt, Kraig M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

366

Process for producing fluid fuel from coal  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Process for producing fluid fuel from coal. Moisture-free coal in particulate form is slurried with a hydrogen-donor solvent and the heated slurry is charged into a drum wherein the pressure is so regulated as to maintain a portion of the solvent in liquid form. During extraction of the hydrocarbons from the coal, additional solvent is added to agitate the drum mass and keep it up to temperature. Subsequently, the pressure is released to vaporize the solvent and at least a portion of the hydrocarbons extracted. The temperature of the mass in the drum is then raised under conditions required to crack the hydrocarbons in the drum and to produce, after subsequent stripping, a solid coke residue. The hydrocarbon products are removed and fractionated into several cuts, one of which is hydrotreated to form the required hydrogen-donor solvent while other fractions can be hydrotreated or hydrocracked to produce a synthetic crude product. The heaviest fraction can be used to produce ash-free coke especially adapted for hydrogen manufacture. The process can be made self-sufficient in hydrogen and furnishes as a by-product a solid carbonaceous material with a useful heating value.

Hyde, Richard W. (Winchester, MA); Reber, Stephen A. (Waltham, MA); Schutte, August H. (Lexington, MA); Nadkarni, Ravindra M. (Arlington, MA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Beneficial Reuse of San Ardo Produced Water  

SciTech Connect

This DOE funded study was performed to evaluate the potential for treatment and beneficial reuse of produced water from the San Ardo oilfield in Monterey County, CA. The potential benefits of a successful full-scale implementation of this project include improvements in oil production efficiency and additional recoverable oil reserves as well as the addition of a new reclaimed water resource. The overall project was conducted in two Phases. Phase I identified and evaluated potential end uses for the treated produced water, established treated water quality objectives, reviewed regulations related to treatment, transport, storage and use of the treated produced water, and investigated various water treatment technology options. Phase II involved the construction and operation of a small-scale water treatment pilot facility to evaluate the process's performance on produced water from the San Ardo oilfield. Cost estimates for a potential full-scale facility were also developed. Potential end uses identified for the treated water include (1) agricultural use near the oilfield, (2) use by Monterey County Water Resources Agency (MCWRA) for the Salinas Valley Water Project or Castroville Seawater Intrusion Project, (3) industrial or power plant use in King City, and (4) use for wetlands creation in the Salinas Basin. All of these uses were found to have major obstacles that prevent full-scale implementation. An additional option for potential reuse of the treated produced water was subsequently identified. That option involves using the treated produced water to recharge groundwater in the vicinity of the oil field. The recharge option may avoid the limitations that the other reuse options face. The water treatment pilot process utilized: (1) warm precipitation softening to remove hardness and silica, (2) evaporative cooling to meet downstream temperature limitations and facilitate removal of ammonia, and (3) reverse osmosis (RO) for removal of dissolved salts, boron, and organics. Pilot study results indicate that produced water from the San Ardo oilfield can be treated to meet project water quality goals. Approximately 600 mg/l of caustic and 100 mg/l magnesium dosing were required to meet the hardness and silica goals in the warm softening unit. Approximately 30% of the ammonia was removed in the cooling tower; additional ammonia could be removed by ion exchange or other methods if necessary. A brackish water reverse osmosis membrane was effective in removing total dissolved solids and organics at all pH levels evaluated; however, the boron treatment objective was only achieved at a pH of 10.5 and above.

Robert A. Liske

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Luminescence from self-trapped holes in manganese-doped calcium fluoride single crystals  

SciTech Connect

Thermally stimulated luminescence (TSL) and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements on x-irradiated CaF/sub 2/:Mn (0.1 wt %) single crystals have been conducted in the interval 70 to 300 K. Prominent TSL peaks occur near 150 K (345- and 495-nm emission) and 200 K (predominantly 495-nm emission) with thermal decay of ESR centers at these same temperatures. Taken collectively the data suggest that 150 K TSL emission is due to mobile holes from V/sub K/ centers recombining with both trapped electrons and Mn/sup +/ ions, i.e., V/sub K/ + e/sup -/ ..-->.. 345-nm emission, and V/sub K/ + Mn/sup +/ ..-->.. (Mn/sup 2 +/)* + hv (495-nm emission). Additionally, H centers are formed by transformation of V/sub K/ centers. At 200 K, holes from H centers recombine with Mn/sup +/ to produce excited-state (Mn/sup 2 +/)* which decays by emitting 495-nm radiation.

Jahan, M.S.; Cooke, D.W.; Alexander, C. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

The Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR) for Producing Hydrogen to Manufacture Liquid Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional world oil production is expected to peak within a decade. Shortfalls in production of liquid fuels (gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel) from conventional oil sources are expected to be offset by increased production of fuels from heavy oils and tar sands that are primarily located in the Western Hemisphere (Canada, Venezuela, the United States, and Mexico). Simultaneously, there is a renewed interest in liquid fuels from biomass, such as alcohol; but, biomass production requires fertilizer. Massive quantities of hydrogen (H2) are required (1) to convert heavy oils and tar sands to liquid fuels and (2) to produce fertilizer for production of biomass that can be converted to liquid fuels. If these liquid fuels are to be used while simultaneously minimizing greenhouse emissions, nonfossil methods for the production of H2 are required. Nuclear energy can be used to produce H2. The most efficient methods to produce H2 from nuclear energy involve thermochemical cycles in which high-temperature heat (700 to 850 C) and water are converted to H2 and oxygen. The peak nuclear reactor fuel and coolant temperatures must be significantly higher than the chemical process temperatures to transport heat from the reactor core to an intermediate heat transfer loop and from the intermediate heat transfer loop to the chemical plant. The reactor temperatures required for H2 production are at the limits of practical engineering materials. A new high-temperature reactor concept is being developed for H2 and electricity production: the Advanced High-Temperature Reactor (AHTR). The fuel is a graphite-matrix, coated-particle fuel, the same type that is used in modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (MHTGRs). The coolant is a clean molten fluoride salt with a boiling point near 1400 C. The use of a liquid coolant, rather than helium, reduces peak reactor fuel and coolant temperatures 100 to 200 C relative to those of a MHTGR. Liquids are better heat transfer fluids than gases and thus reduce three temperature losses in the system associated with (1) heat transfer from the fuel to the reactor coolant, (2) temperature rise across the reactor core, and (3) heat transfer across the heat exchangers between the reactor and H2 production plant. Lowering the peak reactor temperatures and thus reducing the high-temperature materials requirements may make the AHTR the enabling technology for low-cost nuclear hydrogen production.

Forsberg, C.W.; Peterson, P.F.; Ott, L.

2004-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

370

TUNGSTEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS IN STARDUST SiC GRAINS FROM THE MURCHISON METEORITE: CONSTRAINTS ON THE s-PROCESS IN THE Hf-Ta-W-Re-Os REGION  

SciTech Connect

We report the first tungsten isotopic measurements in stardust silicon carbide (SiC) grains recovered from the Murchison carbonaceous chondrite. The isotopes {sup 182,183,184,186}W and {sup 179,180}Hf were measured on both an aggregate (KJB fraction) and single stardust SiC grains (LS+LU fraction) believed to have condensed in the outflows of low-mass carbon-rich asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars with close-to-solar metallicity. The SiC aggregate shows small deviations from terrestrial (= solar) composition in the {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W and {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W ratios, with deficits in {sup 182}W and {sup 183}W with respect to {sup 184}W. The {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratio, however, shows no apparent deviation from the solar value. Tungsten isotopic measurements in single mainstream stardust SiC grains revealed lower than solar {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W, {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W, and {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratios. We have compared the SiC data with theoretical predictions of the evolution of W isotopic ratios in the envelopes of AGB stars. These ratios are affected by the slow neutron-capture process and match the SiC data regarding their {sup 182}W/{sup 184}W, {sup 183}W/{sup 184}W, and {sup 179}Hf/{sup 180}Hf isotopic compositions, although a small adjustment in the s-process production of {sup 183}W is needed in order to have a better agreement between the SiC data and model predictions. The models cannot explain the {sup 186}W/{sup 184}W ratios observed in the SiC grains, even when the current {sup 185}W neutron-capture cross section is increased by a factor of two. Further study is required to better assess how model uncertainties (e.g., the formation of the {sup 13}C neutron source, the mass-loss law, the modeling of the third dredge-up, and the efficiency of the {sup 22}Ne neutron source) may affect current s-process predictions.

Avila, Janaina N.; Ireland, Trevor R.; Holden, Peter [Research School of Earth Sciences, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Lugaro, Maria; Buntain, Joelene [Centre for Stellar and Planetary Astrophysics, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800 (Australia); Gyngard, Frank; Zinner, Ernst; Amari, Sachiko [Laboratory for Space Sciences and the Department of Physics, Washington University, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130 (United States); Cristallo, Sergio [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Granada 18071 (Spain); Karakas, Amanda, E-mail: janaina.avila@anu.edu.au [Mount Stromlo Observatory, Australian National University, Weston Creek, ACT 2611 (Australia)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Definition: Co-Produced Geothermal System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-Produced water is the water that is produced as a by-product during oil and gas production. If there is enough water produced at a high enough temperature co-produced water...

372

Reduction of native oxides on InAs by atomic layer deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2}  

SciTech Connect

Thin high-{kappa} oxide films on InAs, formed by atomic layer deposition, are the key to achieve high-speed metal-oxide-semiconductor devices. We have studied the native oxide and the interface between InAs and 2 nm thick Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} or HfO{sub 2} layers using synchrotron x-ray photoemission spectroscopy. Both films lead to a strong oxide reduction, obtaining less than 10% of the native As-oxides and between 10% and 50% of the native In-oxides, depending on the deposition temperature. The ratio of native In- to As-oxides is determined to be 2:1. The exact composition and the influence of different oxidation states and suboxides is discussed in detail.

Timm, R.; Fian, A.; Hjort, M.; Thelander, C.; Lind, E.; Andersen, J. N.; Wernersson, L.-E.; Mikkelsen, A. [Department of Physics, Nanometer Structure Consortium, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, 22 100 Lund (Sweden)

2010-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

373

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5) 5) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 January 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1995 ii To download the Financial Reporting System 1977-1995 data files, access the Energy Information Center's FTP site, at ftp: //ftp.eia.doe.gov or access the Energy Information Administration's Home Page at http://www.eia.doe.gov.

374

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 January 1998 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1996 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1996 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information

375

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 January 1999 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1997 ii The Financial Reporting System 1977-1997 data files can be downloaded from the Energy Information Administration's

376

Method for producing catalysis from coal  

SciTech Connect

A method for producing catalysts from coal is provided comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal, heating the aqueous mixture to treat the coal, drying the now-heated aqueous mixture, reheating the mixture to form carbonized material, cooling the mixture, removing excess alkali from the carbonized material, and recovering the carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in controlled atmospheres, and the carbonized material is a hydrocracking or hydrodehalogenation catalyst for liquid phase reactions. The invention also provides for a one-step method for producing catalysts from coal comprising mixing an aqueous alkali solution with the coal to create a mixture, heating the aqueous mixture from an ambient temperature to a predetermined temperature at a predetermined rate, cooling the mixture, and washing the mixture to remove excess alkali from the treated and carbonized material, wherein the entire process is carried out in a controlled atmosphere.

Farcasiu, Malvina (Pittsburgh, PA); Derbyshire, Frank (Lexington, KY); Kaufman, Phillip B. (Library, PA); Jagtoyen, Marit (Lexington, KY)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Clean Energy Producing and Exporting Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a theoretical discussion of policy making in the energy industry that adopt policy theories to develop strategies for better energy management. The paper aims to present the applicability of existing policies as methods of management and control of energy in its industry, underlying the importance of OPEC’s role with reference to the EU, US and the Far East. Initial findings suggest that further research is needed to help identify the necessary strategies for an international organization. OPEC is proposed as a starting point for these investigations. Further study into developing an organization to allow for international producers and consumers needs is also needed. Questions regarding the need for such an organization, with best fitting structure are being investigated. The model developed will be presented to various Natural Gas producing countries such as Iran, Iraq, Russia, and Saudi to name a few and will ultimately be set up the same way that OPEC was.

Atighetchi, K.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Method of producing silicon carbide articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of producing articles comprising reaction-bonded silicon carbide (SiC) and graphite (and/or carbon) is given. The process converts the graphite (and/or carbon) in situ to SiC, thus providing the capability of economically obtaining articles made up wholly or partially of SiC having any size and shape in which graphite (and/or carbon) can be found or made. When the produced articles are made of an inner graphite (and/or carbon) substrate to which SiC is reaction bonded, these articles distinguish SiC-coated graphite articles found in the prior art by the feature of a strong bond having a gradual (as opposed to a sharply defined) interface which extends over a distance of mils. A method for forming SiC whisker-reinforced ceramic matrices is also given. The whisker-reinforced articles comprise SiC whiskers which substantially retain their structural integrity.

Milewski, John V. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

PROCESS FOR PRODUCING ALKYL ORTHOPHOSPHORIC ACID EXTRACTANTS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is given for producing superior alkyl orthophosphoric acid extractants for use in solvent extraction methods to recover and purify various metals such as uranium and vanadium. The process comprises slurrying P/sub 2/O/ sub 5/ in a solvent diluent such as kerosene, benzene, isopropyl ether, and the like. An alipbatic alcohol having from nine to seventeen carbon atoms, and w- hcrein ihc OH group is situated inward of the terminal carbon atoms, is added to the slurry while the reaction temperature is mainiained below 60 deg C. The alcohol is added in the mole ratio of about 2 to l, alcohol to P/sub 2/O/sub 5/. A pyrophosphate reaotion product is formed in the slurry-alcohol mixture. Subsequently, the pyrophosphate reaction product is hydrolyzed with dilute mineral acid to produce the desired alkyl orthophosphoric aeid extractant. The extraetant may then be separated and utilized in metal-recovery, solvent- extraction processes. (AEC)

Grinstead, R.R.

1962-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

380

Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

April 25, 2013 April 25, 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 The eighth in a series of reports required by section 1245 (d) (4) (A) of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 April 2013 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Availability and Price of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Produced in Countries Other Than Iran 1 Table of Contents March - April 2013 Update ........................................................................................................................... 2 Tables ............................................................................................................................................................ 4 Figures ......................................................................................................................................................... 10

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers. 6 figs.

Murphy, J.T.; Miller, J.R.

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers.

Murphy, James T. (Los Alamos, NM); Miller, John R. (Penfield, NY)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof is disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

Diebold, James P. (Lakewood, CO); Evans, Robert J. (Lakewood, CO)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Process for producing furan from furfural aldehyde  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process of producing furan and derivatives thereof as disclosed. The process includes generating furfural aldehyde vapors and then passing those vapors over a zeolite catalyst at a temperature and for a residence time effective to decarbonylate the furfural aldehydes to form furans and derivatives thereof. The resultant furan vapors and derivatives are then separated. In a preferred form, the furfural aldehyde vapors are generated during the process of converting biomass materials to liquid and gaseous fuels.

Diebold, J.P.; Evans, R.J.

1987-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

385

Adventures in Laser Produced Plasma Research  

SciTech Connect

In the UK the study of laser produced plasmas and their applications began in the universities and evolved to a current system where the research is mainly carried out at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory Central Laser Facility ( CLF) which is provided to support the universities. My own research work has been closely tied to this evolution and in this review I describe the history with particular reference to my participation in it.

Key, M

2006-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

386

Method and apparatus for producing cryogenic targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and apparatus are given for producing cryogenic inertially driven fusion targets in the fast isothermal freezing (FIF) method. Improved coupling efficiency and greater availability of volume near the target for diagnostic purposes and for fusion driver beam propagation result. Other embodiments include a new electrical switch and a new explosive detonator, all embodiments making use of a purposeful heating by means of optical fibers.

Murphy, J.T.; Miller, J.R.

1981-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

387

Do Producer Prices Lead Consumer Prices?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increased rapidly. Excluding food and energy, prices of crude materials and intermediate goods rose at annual rates of 7.2 and 16.7 percent, respectively. At the same time, however, prices of consumer goods and services excluding food and energy increased a more modest 2.9 percent. Many analysts are concerned that recent increases in the prices of crude and intermediate goods may be passed through to consumers, resulting in a higher rate of inflation in consumer prices later this year and perhaps in 1996. This article examines whether price increases at the early stages of production should be expected to move through the production chain, leading to increases in consumer prices. In the first section, a review of basic economic theory suggests there should be a pass-through effect—that is, producer prices should lead and thereby help predict consumer prices. A more sophisticated analysis, though, suggests the pass-through effect may be weak. In the second section, an examination of the empirical evidence indicates that producer prices are not always good predictors of consumer prices. The article Todd E. Clark is an economist at the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. Mangal Goswami, a research associate at the bank, helped prepare the article. concludes that the recent increases in some producer prices do not necessarily signal higher inflation.

E. Clark

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

NONE

1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

389

Method of producing a cellulase-containing cell-free fermentate produced from microorganism ATCC 55702  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bacteria which produce large amounts of cellulose-containing cell-free fermentate have been identified. The original bacterium (ATCC 55703) was genetically altered using nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) treatment to produce the enhanced cellulase producing bacterium (ATCC 55702), which was identified through replicate plating. ATCC 55702 has improved characteristics and qualities for the degradation of cellulosic waste materials for fuel production, food processing, textile processing, and other industrial applications. ATCC 55702 is an improved bacterial host for genetic manipulations using recombinant DNA techniques, and is less likely to destroy genetic manipulations using standard mutagenesis techniques.

Dees, H. Craig (Lenoir City, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1) 1) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 2001 January 2003 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. The information contained herein should be attributed to the Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration

391

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

392

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, Lars G. (Athens, GA); Carriera, Laura H. (Athens, GA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

High ethanol producing derivatives of Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Derivatives of the newly discovered microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus which under anaerobic and thermophilic conditions continuously ferment substrates such as starch, cellobiose, glucose, xylose and other sugars to produce recoverable amounts of ethanol solving the problem of fermentations yielding low concentrations of ethanol using the parent strain of the microorganism Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus are disclosed. These new derivatives are ethanol tolerant up to 10% (v/v) ethanol during fermentation. The process includes the use of an aqueous fermentation medium, containing the substrate at a substrate concentration greater than 1% (w/v).

Ljungdahl, L.G.; Carriera, L.H.

1983-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

394

Proposal to produce large compact toroids  

SciTech Connect

Relatively large, hot compact toroids might be produced in the annular space between two concentric one-turn coils. With currents in the two coils flowing in the same direction, the magnetic fields on each side of the plasma are in opposite directions. As the fields are raised, the plasma ring is heated and compressed radially towards the center of the annular space. By the addition of two sets of auxiliary coils, the plasma ring can be ejected out one end of the two-coil system into a long axial magnetic field.

Phillips, J.A.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

Agblevor, Foster A. (Lakewood, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Method of producing .beta.-spodumene bodies  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Beta-spodumene bodies and method of preparing the bodies that involves providing a uniform plastic batch of inorganic raw materials, organic binder, and vehicle, wherein the inorganic raw materials are composed of, in percent by weight, about 75% to 95% minerals, and about 5% to 25% glass. The batch is formed into a green body that is fired to produce a body composed substantially of beta-spodumene, and having a thermal expansion coefficient of <10.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C.(0-800.degree. C.), and a strength of .gtoreq.4 Ksi.

Chyung, Kenneth (Painted Post, NY); Day, J. Paul (Big Flats, NY); Holleran, Louis M. (Big Flats, NY); Olszewski, Anthony R. (Bath, NY)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 is the eighteenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 24 major U.S. energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the United States and abroad.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Co-sputtering yttrium into hafnium oxide thin films to produce ferroelectric properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thin film capacitors were fabricated by sputtering TiN-Y doped HfO{sub 2}-TiN stacks on silicon substrates. Yttrium was incorporated into the HfO{sub 2} layers by simultaneously sputtering from Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and HfO{sub 2} sources. Electric polarization and relative permittivity measurements yield distinct ferroelectric properties as a result of low yttrium dopant concentrations in the range of 0.9-1.9 mol. %. Grazing incidence x-ray diffraction measurements show the formation of an orthorhombic phase in this range. Compared to atomic layer deposition films, the highest remanent polarization and the highest relative permittivity were obtained at significantly lower doping concentrations in these sputtered films.

Olsen, T. [NaMLab gGmbH, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Alberta, Edmonton T6G 2V4 (Canada); Schroeder, U.; Mueller, S.; Krause, A.; Martin, D.; Singh, A. [NaMLab gGmbH, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Mueller, J. [Fraunhofer CNT, 01099 Dresden (Germany); Geidel, M. [Institute of Semiconductors and Microsystems, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany); Mikolajick, T. [NaMLab gGmbH, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Institute of Semiconductors and Microsystems, Technische Universitaet Dresden, 01062 Dresden (Germany)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

399

Method of producing particulate-reinforced composites and composties produced thereby  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A process for producing particle-reinforced composite materials through utilization of an in situ reaction to produce a uniform dispersion of a fine particulate reinforcement phase. The process includes forming a melt of a first material, and then introducing particles of a second material into the melt and subjecting the melt to high-intenisty acoustic vibration. A chemical reaction initiates between the first and second materials to produce reaction products in the melt. The reaciton products comprise a solide particulate phase, and the high-intensity acoustic vibration fragments and/or separates the reaction products into solid particles that are dispersed in the melt and are smaller than the particles of the second material. Also encompassed are particles-reinforced composite materials produced by such a process.

Han, Qingyou; Liu, Zhiwei

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ice Crystals Produced by Expansion: Experiments and Application to Aircraft-produced Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of ice crystals as a result of the expansion and cooling of moist air was investigated by laboratory experiment. In particular, the warmest expanded air temperature that produces crystals was sought as a function of the initial ...

T. C. Foster; J. Hallett

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Method for producing and treating coal gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of generating a de-sulphurized volatile matter and a relatively low Btu gas includes the initial step of pyrolyzing coal to produce volatile matter and a char. The volatile matter is fed to a first de-sulphurizer containing a de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. At the same time, the char is gasified to produce a relatively low Btu gas. The low Btu gas is fed to a second de-sulphurizer containing the de-sulphurizing agent to remove sulphur therefrom. A regenerator is provided for removing sulphur from the de-sulphurizing agent. Portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved among the first de-sulphurizer, the second de-sulphurizer, and the regenerator such that the regenerator regenerates the de-sulphurizing agent. Preferably, the portions of the de-sulphurizing agent are moved from the second de-sulphurizer to the first de-sulphurizer, from the first de-sulphurizer to the regenerator, and from the regenerator to the second de-sulphurizer.

Calderon, Albert (P.O. Box 126, Bowling Green, OH 43402)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Trip Report-Produced-Water Field Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) conducted field testing of a produced-water pretreatment apparatus with assistance from faculty at the Texas A&M University (TAMU) protein separation sciences laboratory located on the TAMU main campus. The following report details all of the logistics surrounding the testing. The purpose of the test was to use a new, commercially-available filter media housing containing modified zeolite (surfactant-modified zeolite or SMZ) porous medium for use in pretreatment of oil and gas produced water (PW) and frac-flowback waters. The SMZ was tested previously in October, 2010 in a lab-constructed configuration ('old multicolumn system'), and performed well for removal of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) from PW. However, a less-expensive, modular configuration is needed for field use. A modular system will allow the field operator to add or subtract SMZ filters as needed to accommodate site specific conditions, and to swap out used filters easily in a multi-unit system. This test demonstrated the use of a commercial filter housing with a simple flow modification and packed with SMZ for removing BTEX from a PW source in College Station, Texas. The system will be tested in June 2012 at a field site in Pennsylvania for treating frac-flowback waters. The goals of this test are: (1) to determine sorption efficiency of BTEX in the new configuration; and (2) to observe the range of flow rates, backpressures, and total volume treated at a given flow rate.

Sullivan, Enid J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Green method to produce propylene oxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Materials Argonne National Laboratory Center for Nanoscale Materials U.S. Department of Energy Search CNM ... Search Argonne Home > Center for Nanoscale Materials > CNM Home About CNM Research Facilities People For Users Publications News & Highlights News Research Highlights Newsletters CNM Images on Flickr Events Jobs CNM Users Organization Contact Us Other DOE Nanoscale Science Research Centers Green method to produce propylene oxide conversion of propylene to polyene oxide via silver nanoclusters Simulation of propylene to propylene oxide conversion via silver nanoclusters supported on an alumina surface. Propylene oxide is an important chemical whose current industrial production is energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Attempts to solve this problem by using catalysts based on bulk silver surfaces with

404

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4) 4) Distribution Category UC-950 Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1994 January 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Energy Markets and End Use U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or any other organization. Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Energy Markets and End Use of the Energy Information Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, under the general direction of W. Calvin Kilgore. The project was directed by Mark E. Rodekohr, Director of the Energy Markets and Contingency Information Division (202) 586-1441, and Mary E. Northup, Chief of

405

Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transparent, light-harvesting material Transparent, light-harvesting material Scientists produce transparent, light-harvesting material The material could be used in development of transparent solar panels. November 3, 2010 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact James E. Rickman Communications Office (505) 665-9203

406

North African producers cooperate to improve outlook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new commercial outlook on the oil and gas business is starting to emanate from Algeria. Foreign companies are being lured back into the exploration business with new production-sharing contracts. And in the LNG business, where Algeria is on of the major producers, exports to the United States have been resumed at world market prices. Deliveries to Britain are due to resume later this year and new contracts have been signed for deliveries to Turkey and Greece, all at competitive market prices. Excluded from this turnaround in attitudes are Algeria's traditional customers for LNG in Europe. Sonatrach, the Algerian state energy company, is still insisting on prices that make imported LNG up to 30% more expensive than gas from other sources. As a result LNG liftings have declined and gas companies in France, Belgium, and Spain are in dispute with Sonatrach over prices.

Not Available

1988-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

407

Wellbore stress distribution produced by moisture adsorption  

SciTech Connect

For this study, the authors evaluated the stress distribution produced by moisture adsorption around a wellbore by applying the mechanics of deformable solids. This paper shows that the moisture-adsorption process is governed by a diffusion equation and that the equations governing the moisture-induced stress around the hole are similar to those equations used in thermoelasticity. A computational method is developed for calculating the stress distribution around the borehole, and the experimental procedure for obtaining the material constants needed in the computation is presented. This paper also studies the effect of borehole pressure on the stress distribution around the hole. Results show that the magnitude and distribution of stresses around the borehole are very sensitive to the adsorption characteristics and the moisture-induced modulus change of the material.

Yew, C.H.; Chenevert, M.E.; Wang, C.L.; Osisanya, S.O. (Univ. of Texas, TX (US))

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Process for producing dispersed particulate composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is directed to a process for forming noninterwoven dispersed particulate composite products. In one case a composite multi-layer film product comprises a substantially noninterwoven multi-layer film having a plurality of discrete layers. This noninterwoven film comprises at least one discrete layer of a first material and at least one discrete layer of a second material. In another case the first and second materials are blended together with each other. In either case, the first material comprises a metalloid and the second material a metal compound. At least one component of a first material in one discrete layer undergoes a solid state displacement reaction with at least one component of a second material thereby producing the requisite noninterwoven composite film product. Preferably, the first material comprises silicon, the second material comprises Mo.sub.2 C, the third material comprises SiC and the fourth material comprises MoSi.sub.2.

Henager, Jr., Charles H. (Richland, WA); Hirth, John P. (Viola, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Superheater Corrosion Produced By Biomass Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About 90% of the world's bioenergy is produced by burning renewable biomass fuels. Low-cost biomass fuels such as agricultural wastes typically contain more alkali metals and chlorine than conventional fuels. Although the efficiency of a boiler's steam cycle can be increased by raising its maximum steam temperature, alkali metals and chlorine released in biofuel boilers cause accelerated corrosion and fouling at high superheater steam temperatures. Most alloys that resist high temperature corrosion protect themselves with a surface layer of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}. However, this Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} can be fluxed away by reactions that form alkali chromates or volatilized as chromic acid. This paper reviews recent research on superheater corrosion mechanisms and superheater alloy performance in biomass boilers firing black liquor, biomass fuels, blends of biomass with fossil fuels and municipal waste.

Sharp, William (Sandy) [SharpConsultant; Singbeil, Douglas [FPInnovations; Keiser, James R [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1996  

SciTech Connect

This publication examines developments in the operations of the major US e energy-producing companies on a corporate level, by major line of business, by major function within each line of business, and by geographic area. In 1996, 24 companies filed Form EIA-28. The analysis and data presented in this report represents the operations of the Financial Reporting System companies in the context of their worldwide operations and in the context of the major energy markets which they serve. Both energy and nonenergy developments of these companies are analyzed. Although the focus is on developments in 1996, important trends prior to that time are also featured. Sections address energy markets in 1996; key financial developments; oil and gas exploration, development, and production; downstream petroleum in 1996; coal and alternative energy; and foreign direct investment in US energy. 30 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Automated apparatus for producing gradient gels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus for producing a gradient gel which serves as a standard medium for a two-dimensional analysis of proteins, the gel having a density gradient along its height formed by a variation in gel composition, with the apparatus including first and second pumping means each including a plurality of pumps on a common shaft and driven by a stepping motor capable of providing small incremental changes in pump outputs for the gel ingredients, the motors being controlled, by digital signals from a digital computer, a hollow form or cassette for receiving the gel composition, means for transferring the gel composition including a filler tube extending near the bottom of the cassette, adjustable horizontal and vertical arms for automatically removing and relocating the filler tube in the next cassette, and a digital computer programmed to automatically control the stepping motors, arm movements, and associated sensing operations involving the filling operation.

Anderson, Norman L. (Clarendon Hills, IL)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Rocky Mountain Basins Produced Water Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Historical records for produced water data were collected from multiple sources, including Amoco, British Petroleum, Anadarko Petroleum Corporation, United States Geological Survey (USGS), Wyoming Oil and Gas Commission (WOGC), Denver Earth Resources Library (DERL), Bill Barrett Corporation, Stone Energy, and other operators. In addition, 86 new samples were collected during the summers of 2003 and 2004 from the following areas: Waltman-Cave Gulch, Pinedale, Tablerock and Wild Rose. Samples were tested for standard seven component "Stiff analyses", and strontium and oxygen isotopes. 16,035 analyses were winnowed to 8028 unique records for 3276 wells after a data screening process was completed. [Copied from the Readme document in the zipped file available at http://www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/oil-gas/Software/database.html] Save the Zipped file to your PC. When opened, it will contain four versions of the database: ACCESS, EXCEL, DBF, and CSV formats. The information consists of detailed water analyses from basins in the Rocky Mountain region.

413

Performance profiles of major energy producers 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance Profiles of Major Energy Producers 1993 is the seventeenth annual report of the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Financial Reporting System (FRS). The report examines financial and operating developments in energy markets, with particular reference to the 25 major US energy companies required to report annually on Form EIA-28. Financial information is reported by major liens of business, including oil and gas production, petroleum refining and marketing, other energy operations, and nonenergy businesses. Financial and operating results are presented in the context of energy market developments with a view toward identifying changing corporate strategies and measuring the performance of ongoing operations both in the US and abroad. This year`s report analyzes financial and operating developments for 1993 (Part 1: Developments in 1993) and also reviews key developments during the 20 years following the Arab Oil Embargo of 1973--1974 (Part 2: Major Energy Company Strategies Since the Arab Oil Embargo). 49 figs., 104 tabs.

NONE

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

System and method for producing metallic iron  

SciTech Connect

A hearth furnace 10 for producing metallic iron material has a furnace housing 11 having a drying/preheat zone 12, a conversion zone 13, a fusion zone 14, and optionally a cooling zone 15, the conversion zone 13 is between the drying/preheat zone 12 and the fusion zone 14. A moving hearth 20 is positioned within the furnace housing 11. A hood or separation barrier 30 within at least a portion of the conversion zone 13, fusion zone 14 or both separates the fusion zone 14 into an upper region and a lower region with the lower region adjacent the hearth 20 and the upper region adjacent the lower region and spaced from the hearth 20. An injector introduces a gaseous reductant into the lower region adjacent the hearth 20. A combustion region may be formed above the hood or separation barrier.

Bleifuss, Rodney L. (Grand Rapids, MN); Englund, David J. (Bovey, MN); Iwasaki, Iwao (Grand Rapids, MN); Fosnacht, Donald R. (Hermantown, MN); Brandon, Mark M. (Charlotte, NC); True, Bradford G. (Charlotte, NC)

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

415

How is shale gas produced? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? How is shale gas produced? Energy.gov Careers...

416

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or collectors of biomass. The credit can be used for eligible biomass used to produce biofuel; biomass used in facilities such as those producing electricity from anaerobic...

417

Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cancer therapy gets a boost from new isotope Isotope production facility produces cancer-fighting actinium A new medical isotope project shows promise for rapidly producing major...

418

Changes related to "Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Special page Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Coal seam natural gas producing areas (Louisiana)" Coal seam natural gas producing areas...

419

Spectral optical properties of selected photosynthetic microalgae producing biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microalgae Producing Biofuels Euntaek Lee, Ri-Liang Heng,Microalgae Producing Biofuels”, Journal of Quantitativeconverted into liquid biofuels [50–53]. On the other hand,

Lee, Euntaek; Heng, Ri-Liang; Pilon, Laurent

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Treatment of Oilfield Produced Water with Dissolved Air Flotation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water is one of the major by products of oil and gas exploitation which is produced in large amounts up to 80% of the… (more)

Jaji, Kehinde Temitope

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Management of produced water in oil and gas operations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Produced water handling has been an issue of concern for oil and gas producers as it is one of the major factors that cause abandonment… (more)

Patel, Chirag V.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Biological pretreatment of produced water for reuse applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Co-produced water from the oil and gas industry represents a significant waste stream in the United States. Produced water is characterized by high levels of… (more)

Kwon, Soondong, 1973-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Cost-Effective Enzyme for Producing Biofuels from Cellulosic ...  

Potential to be produced in-house: The enzyme could potentially be produced in house by biorefineries, reducing one of the cost impediments to cellulosic biofuels.

424

Property Tax Exemption for Wind and Geothermal Energy Producers...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Savings Property Tax Exemption for Wind and Geothermal Energy Producers Property Tax Exemption for Wind and Geothermal Energy Producers...

425

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) Biomass Producer or Collector Tax Credit (Oregon) Eligibility Agricultural Industrial Savings For Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative...

426

DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today DOE's Early Investment in Shale Gas Technology Producing Results Today February 2, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis...

427

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse...

428

DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce Greenhouse Gas-Free Hydrogen at Existing Nuclear Power Plants DOE Seeks Industry Proposals for Feasibility Study to Produce...

429

Clean Hydrogen Producers Ltd CHP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydrogen Producers Ltd CHP Jump to: navigation, search Name Clean Hydrogen Producers Ltd (CHP) Place Geneva, Switzerland Zip 1209 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen, Solar Product Swiss...

430

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under PURPA Docket (Georgia) Capacity and Energy Payments to Small Power Producers and Cogenerators Under...

431

High-pressure synthesis, crystal structure, and structural relationship of the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}  

SciTech Connect

Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus at 7.5 GPa and 1100 deg. C, representing the first known ytterbium fluoride borate. The compound exhibits isolated BO{sub 3}-groups next to ytterbium cations and fluoride anions, showing a structure closely related to the other known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}. Monoclinic Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} crystallizes in space group C2/c with the lattice parameters a=2028.2(4) pm, b=602.5(2) pm, c=820.4(2) pm, and beta=100.63(3){sup o} (Z=4). Three different ytterbium cations can be identified in the crystal structure, each coordinated by nine fluoride and oxygen anions. None of the five crystallographically independent fluoride ions is coordinated by boron atoms, solely by trigonally-planar arranged ytterbium cations. In close proximity to the above mentioned compounds RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}, Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9} can be described via alternating layers with the formal compositions 'YbBO{sub 3}' and 'YbF{sub 3}' in the bc-plane. - Graphical abstract: High-pressure/high-temperature synthesis (multianvil technique) led to the first ytterbium fluoride borate Yb{sub 5}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 9}, built up from isolated BO{sub 3}-groups. The compound shows structural relations to the known rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 3}(BO{sub 3}){sub 2}F{sub 3} (RE=Sm, Eu, Gd) and Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}.

Haberer, Almut [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Huppertz, Hubert, E-mail: hubert.huppertz@uibk.ac.a [Institut fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie, Leopold-Franzens-Universitaet Innsbruck, Innrain 52a, A-6020 Innsbruck (Austria)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

432

Method for producing ceramic particles and agglomerates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for generating spherical and irregularly shaped dense particles of ceramic oxides having a controlled particle size and particle size distribution. An aerosol containing precursor particles of oxide ceramics is directed into a plasma. As the particles flow through the hot zone of the plasma, they melt, collide, and join to form larger particles. If these larger particles remain in the hot zone, they continue melting and acquire a spherical shape that is retained after they exit the hot zone, cool down, and solidify. If they exit the hot zone before melting completely, their irregular shape persists and agglomerates are produced. The size and size distribution of the dense product particles can be controlled by adjusting several parameters, the most important in the case of powder precursors appears to be the density of powder in the aerosol stream that enters the plasma hot zone. This suggests that particle collision rate is responsible for determining ultimate size of the resulting sphere or agglomerate. Other parameters, particularly the gas flow rates and the microwave power, are also adjusted to control the particle size distribution.

Phillips, Jonathan (Santa Fe, NM); Gleiman, Seth S. (Santa Fe, NM); Chen, Chun-Ku (Albuquerque, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Economics of producing fuel pellets from biomass  

SciTech Connect

An engineering economic analysis of a biomass pelleting process was performed for conditions in North America. The pelletization of biomass consists of a series of unit operations: drying, size reduction, densifying, cooling, screening, and warehousing. Capital and operating cost of the pelleting plant was estimated at several plant capacities. Pellet production cost for a base case plant capacity of 6 t/h was about $51/t of pellets. Raw material cost was the largest cost element of the total pellet production cost followed by personnel cost, drying cost, and pelleting mill cost. An increase in raw material cost substantially increased the pellet production cost. Pellet plants with a capacity of more than 10 t/h decreased the costs to roughly $40/t of pellets. Five different burner fuels - wet sawdust, dry sawdust, biomass pellets, natural gas, and coal were tested for their effect on the cost of pellet production. Wet sawdust and coal, the cheapest burner fuels, produced the lowest pellet production cost. The environmental impacts due to the potential emissions of these fuels during the combustion process require further investigation.

Mani, S.; Sokhansanj, S.; Bi, X.; Turhollow, A. [University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada). Dept. of Biology & Chemical Engineering

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

434

Performance profiles of major energy producers, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy industry generally and petroleum and natural gas operations in particular are frequently reacting to a variety of unsettling forces. Falling oil prices, economic upswings, currency devaluations, increasingly rigorous environmental quality standards, deregulation of electricity markets, and continued advances in exploration and production technology were among the challenges and opportunities to the industry in 1997. To analyze the extent to which these and other developments have affected energy industry financial and operating performance, strategies, and industry structure, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) maintains the Financial Reporting Systems (FRS). Through Form EIA-28, major US energy companies annually report to the FRS. Financial and operating information is reported by major lines of business, including oil and gas production (upstream), petroleum refining and marketing (downstream), other energy operations, and nonenergy business. Performance Profiles of Major Producers 1997 examines the interplays of energy markets, companies` strategies, and government policies (in 1997 and in historical context) that gave rise to the results given here. The report also analyzes other key aspects of energy company financial performance as seen through the multifaceted lens provided by the FRS data and complementary data for industry overall. 41 figs., 77 tabs.

NONE

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 .mu.m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10.sup.-6 torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 .mu.m.

Hasoon, Falah S. (Arvada, CO); Nelson, Art J. (Longmont, CO)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10{sup {minus}6} torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m.

Hasoon, F.S.; Nelson, A.J.

1996-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

437

Number of Producing Gas Wells (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Count) Count) Data Series: Wellhead Price Imports Price Price of Imports by Pipeline Price of LNG Imports Exports Price Price of Exports by Pipeline Price of LNG Exports Pipeline and Distribution Use Price Citygate Price Residential Price Commercial Price Industrial Price Vehicle Fuel Price Electric Power Price Proved Reserves as of 12/31 Reserves Adjustments Reserves Revision Increases Reserves Revision Decreases Reserves Sales Reserves Acquisitions Reserves Extensions Reserves New Field Discoveries New Reservoir Discoveries in Old Fields Estimated Production Number of Producing Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Oil Wells Gross Withdrawals From Shale Gas Wells Gross Withdrawals From Coalbed Wells Repressuring Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed Vented and Flared Marketed Production Natural Gas Processed NGPL Production, Gaseous Equivalent Dry Production Imports By Pipeline LNG Imports Exports Exports By Pipeline LNG Exports Underground Storage Capacity Underground Storage Injections Underground Storage Withdrawals Underground Storage Net Withdrawals LNG Storage Additions LNG Storage Withdrawals LNG Storage Net Withdrawals Total Consumption Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Lease Fuel Plant Fuel Pipeline & Distribution Use Delivered to Consumers Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Power Period:

438

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Producer Tax Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Tax Refund A biodiesel producer may apply for a refund of Iowa state sales or use taxes paid on purchases. To qualify, the producer must be registered with

439

Impact of SF{sub 6} plasma treatment on performance of TaN-HfO{sub 2}-InP metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor  

SciTech Connect

In this work, the experimental impact of SF{sub 6} plasma treatment on the performance of InP metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors is presented. S and F are incorporated into atomic layer deposited HfO{sub 2} via postgate SF{sub 6} plasma treatment. The decreased subthreshold swing, gate leakage (I{sub g}), and increased effective channel mobility ({mu}{sub eff}) indicate that better interface and bulk oxide quality have been achieved with SF{sub 6} plasma treatment due to the formation of stronger Hf-F bonds. Drive current (I{sub d}), transconductance (G{sub m}), and effective channel mobility ({mu}{sub eff}) are improved by 22.3%, 35%, and 35%, respectively, compared with those of control devices.

Wang Yanzhen; Chen Yenting; Zhao Han; Xue Fei; Zhou Fei; Lee, Jack C. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Microelectronics Research Center, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States)

2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

440

Report on the Fracture Analysis of HfB{sub 2}-SiC and ZrB{sub 2}-SiC Composites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hafnium diboride-silicon carbide (HS) and zirconium diboride-silicon carbide (ZS) composites are potential materials for high temperature, thermal shock applications such as for components on re-entry vehicles. In order to establish material constants necessary for evaluation of in situ fracture, bars fractured in four-point flexure were examined using fractographic principles. The fracture toughness was determined from measurements of the critical crack sizes and the strength values and the crack branching constants were established to use in forensic fractography for future in-flight tests. The fracture toughnesses range from about 13 MPam{sup 1/2} at room temperature to about 6 MPam{sup 1/2} at 1400 C for ZrB{sub 2}-Sic composites and from about 13 MPam{sup 1/2} at room temperature to about 4 MPam{sup 1/2} at 1400 C for HfB{sub 2}-SiC composites. Thus, the toughnesses of either the HS or ZS composites have the potential for use in thermal shock applications. Processing and manufacturing defects limited the strength of the test bars. However, examination of the microstructure on the fracture surfaces shows that the processing of these composites can be improved. There is potential for high toughness composites with high strength to be used in thermal shock conditions if the processing and handling are controlled.

MECHOLSKY, JR. JOHN J.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Crystal structure and antiferromagnetic ordering of quasi-2D [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]TaF{sub 6} (pyz = pyrazine).  

SciTech Connect

The crystal structure of the title compound was determined by X-ray diffraction at 90 and 295 K. Copper(II) ions are coordinated to four bridging pyz ligands to form square layers in the ab-plane. Bridging HF{sub 2}{sup -} ligands join the layers together along the c-axis to afford a tetragonal, three-dimensional (3D) framework that contains Taf{sub 6}{sup -} anions in every cavity. At 295 K, the pyz rings lie exactly perpendicular to the layers and cooling to 90 K induces a canting of those rings. Magnetically, the compound exhibits 2D antiferromagnetic correlations within the 2D layers with an exchange interaction of -13.1(1) K. Weak interlayer interactions, as mediated by Cu-F-H-F-Cu, leads to long-range magnetic order below 4.2 K. Pulsed-field magnetization data at 0.5 K show a concave curvature with increasing B and reveal a saturation magnetization at 35.4 T.

Manson, J. L.; Schlueter, J. A.; McDonald, R. D.; Singleton, J.; Materials Science Division; Eastern Washington Univ.; LANL

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Co-Produced Geothermal Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Produced Geothermal Systems Produced Geothermal Systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Technologies There are many types of Geothermal Technologies that take advantage of the earth's heat: Hydrothermal Systems Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Sedimentary Geothermal Systems Co-Produced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Direct Use Ground Source Heat Pumps Dictionary.png Co-Produced Geothermal System: Co-Produced water is the water that is produced as a by-product during oil and gas production. If there is enough water produced at a high enough temperature co-produced water can be utilized for electricity production. Other definitions:Wikipedia Reegle General Air Cooled Co-Produced geothermal system demonstration at RMOTC oil site.

443

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Biodiesel Producer Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Biodiesel Producer Fuel Tax Municipalities, counties, or school districts producing biodiesel must file a return documenting their biodiesel production activities and pay $0.03 of

444

NM WAIDS: A PRODUCED WATER QUALITY AND INFRASTRUCTURE GIS DATABASE FOR NEW MEXICO OIL PRODUCERS  

SciTech Connect

The New Mexico Water and Infrastructure Data System (NM WAIDS) seeks to alleviate a number of produced water-related issues in southeast New Mexico. The project calls for the design and implementation of a Geographical Information System (GIS) and integral tools that will provide operators and regulators with necessary data and useful information to help them make management and regulatory decisions. The major components of this system are: (1) Databases on produced water quality, cultural and groundwater data, oil pipeline and infrastructure data, and corrosion information. (2) A web site capable of displaying produced water and infrastructure data in a GIS or accessing some of the data by text-based queries. (3) A fuzzy logic-based, site risk assessment tool that can be used to assess the seriousness of a spill of produced water. (4) A corrosion management toolkit that will provide operators with data and information on produced waters that will aid them in deciding how to address corrosion issues. The various parts of NM WAIDS will be integrated into a website with a user-friendly interface that will provide access to previously difficult-to-obtain data and information. Primary attention during the first six months of this project was focused on creating the water quality databases for produced water and surface water, along with collecting of corrosion information and building parts of the corrosion toolkit. Work on the project to date includes: (1) Creation of a water quality database for produced water analyses. The database was compiled from a variety of sources and currently has over 7000 entries for New Mexico. (2) Creation of a web-based data entry system for the water quality database. This system allows a user to view, enter, or edit data from a web page rather than having to directly access the database. (3) Creation of a semi-automated data capturing system for use with standard water quality analysis forms. This system improves the accuracy and speed of water quality data entry. (4) Acquisition of ground water data from the New Mexico State Engineer's office, including chloride content and TDS (Total Dissolved Solids) for over 30,000 data points in southeast New Mexico. (5) Creation of a web-based scale prediction tool, again with a web-based interface, that uses two common scaling indices to predict the likelihood of scaling. This prediction tool can either run from user input data, or the user can select samples from the water analysis database. (6) Creation of depth-to-groundwater maps for the study area. (7) Analysis of water quality data by formation. (8) Continuation of efforts to collect produced water quality information from operators in the southeast New Mexico area. (9) Qualitative assessment of produced water from various formations regarding corrosivity. (10) Efforts at corrosion education in the region through operator visits. Future work on this project will include: (1) Development of an integrated web and GIS interface for all the information collected in this effort. (2) Continued development of a fuzzy logic spill risk assessment tool that was initially developed prior to this project. Improvements will include addition of parameters found to be significant in determining the impact of a brine spill at a specific site. (3) Compilation of both hard copy and online corrosion toolkit material.

Martha Cather; Robert Lee; Ibrahim Gundiler; Andrew Sung

2003-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

445

Electrical characterization and modeling of the Au/CaF{sub 2}/nSi(111) structures with high-quality tunnel-thin fluoride layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Au/CaF{sub 2}/nSi(111) structures with 4-5 monolayers of epitaxial fluoride are fabricated and electrically tested. The leakage current in these structures was substantially smaller than in similar samples reported previously. Simulations adopting a Franz-type dispersion relation with Franz mass of m{sub F}approx1.2m{sub 0} for carriers in the forbidden band of CaF{sub 2} reproduced the measured current-voltage curves quite satisfactorily. Roughly, these curves could also be reproduced using the parabolic dispersion law with the electron mass of m{sub e}=1.0m{sub 0}, which is a material constant rather than a fitting parameter. Experimental facts and their comparison to modeling results allow qualification of the crystalline quality of fabricated structures as sufficient for device applications.

Vexler, M. I. [Institut fuer Elektronische Bauelemente und Schaltungstechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Sokolov, N. S.; Suturin, S. M.; Banshchikov, A. G. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Tyaginov, S. E. [A. F. Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 26 Polytechnicheskaya Str., 194021 St.-Petersburg (Russian Federation); Christian-Dopper-Laboratory and Institut fuer Mikroelektronik, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 25-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Grasser, T. [Christian-Dopper-Laboratory and Institut fuer Mikroelektronik, TU Wien, Gusshausstrasse 25-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

High-T{sub c} and high-J{sub c} SmFeAs(O,F) films on fluoride substrates grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Superconducting thin films of SmFeAs(O,F) were prepared by molecular beam epitaxy on fluoride substrates. In our process, F-free SmFeAsO films were grown first, and F was subsequently introduced to the films by diffusion from an overlayer of SmF{sub 3}. By this simple process, record high T{sub c}, namely, T{sub c}{sup on} (T{sub c}{sup end}) = 57.8 K (56.4 K) was obtained in a film on CaF{sub 2}. Furthermore, the films on CaF{sub 2} showed high critical current density over 1 MA/cm{sup 2} in the self-field at 5 K. The correlation between superconductivity and epitaxial strain in SmFeAs(O,F) films is discussed.

Ueda, Shinya; Takeda, Soichiro; Takano, Shiro; Naito, Michio [Department of Applied Physics, Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); TRIP, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Chiyoda, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Yamamoto, Akiyasu [Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2011-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

447

Methods for producing partially digested restriction DNA fragments and for producing a partially modified PCR product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method of making a partially modified PCR product from a DNA fragment with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In a standard PCR process, the DNA fragment is combined with starting deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a primer, a buffer and a DNA polymerase in a PCR mixture. The PCR mixture is then reacted in the PCR producing copies of the DNA fragment. The improvement of the present invention is adding an amount of a modifier at any step prior to completion of the PCR process thereby randomly and partially modifying the copies of the DNA fragment as a partially modified PCR product. The partially modified PCR product may then be digested with an enzyme that cuts the partially modified PCR product at unmodified sites thereby producing an array of DNA restriction fragments.

Wong, Kwong-Kwok (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Effective passivation of In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As by HfO{sub 2} surpassing Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} via in-situ atomic layer deposition  

SciTech Connect

High {kappa} gate dielectrics of HfO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} were deposited on molecular beam epitaxy-grown In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As pristine surface using in-situ atomic-layer-deposition (ALD) without any surface treatment or passivation layer. The ALD-HfO{sub 2}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface showed notable reduction in the interfacial density of states (D{sub it}), deduced from quasi-static capacitance-voltage and conductance-voltage (G-V) at room temperature and 100 Degree-Sign C. More significantly, the midgap peak commonly observed in the D{sub it}(E) of ALD-oxides/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As is now greatly diminished. The midgap D{sub it} value decreases from {>=}15 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} to {approx}2-4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 12} eV{sup -1} cm{sup -2} for ALD-HfO{sub 2}. Further, thermal stability at 850 Degree-Sign C was achieved in the HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As, whereas C-V characteristics of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/p-In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As degraded after the high temperature annealing. From in-situ x-ray photoelectron spectra, the AsO{sub x}, which is not the oxidized state from the native oxide, but is an induced state from adsorption of trimethylaluminum and H{sub 2}O, was found at the ALD-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface, while that was not detected at the ALD-HfO{sub 2}/In{sub 0.2}Ga{sub 0.8}As interface.

Chang, Y. H.; Chiang, T. H. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. A.; Liu, Y. T.; Lin, H. Y.; Huang, M. L.; Kwo, J. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Lin, T. D.; Hong, M. [Graduate Institute of Applied Physics and Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Pi, T. W. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center, Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

449

Low temperature fluorination of Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} with polyvinylidine fluoride: An X-ray powder diffraction and Moessbauer spectroscopy study  

SciTech Connect

Fluorination of the Ruddlesden Popper phase, Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} by heat treatment with polyvinylidine fluoride (PVDF) gives a range of novel oxide fluoride compounds. Fluorination with 1 mol equivalent PVDF leads to a filling of the normal Ruddlesden Popper structure anion sites and a material of composition Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 5+x}F{sub 2-x} (x Almost-Equal-To 0.28(4)) which contains both Fe{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+}. Increasing the amount of PVDF to 2 mol equivalent leads to an increase in anion content due to filling of half the interstitial sites within the structure, with iron being completely reduced to Fe{sup 3+} leading to a composition Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}F{sub 4}. An increase in the amount of PVDF to Almost-Equal-To 3 mol equivalent leads to a further increase in unit cell volume, attributed to complete filling of the interstitial sites and a composition Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}F{sub 6}. {sup 57}Fe Moessbauer spectra in the temperature range 10-300 K demonstrated the complexity of the magnetic interactions in each of the three phases which reflect different local compositions of oxygen and fluorine around the iron ions thus influencing the superexchange pathways. - Graphical abstract: Low temperature (375 Degree-Sign C) fluorination of Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} with poly(vinylidene fluoride) leads to the production of three new Ruddlesden Popper oxide fluorides with progressive filling of the anion sites within the structure. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorination of Sr{sub 3}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 7-x} using PVDF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The control of the fluorine content with amount of PVDF used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The synthesis of three new Fe based oxide fluorides. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The identification of the structures of these oxide fluorides.

Hancock, Cathryn A. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Herranz, Tirma; Marco, Jose F. [Instituto de Quimica Fisica, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Seranno 119, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Berry, Frank J. [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Slater, Peter R., E-mail: p.r.slater@bham.ac.uk [School of Chemistry, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

450

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame. 1 fig.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

451

Method for producing flame retardant porous products and products produced thereby  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

452

Method for Producing Flame Retardant Porous Products and Products Produced Thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for fire retarding porous products used for thermal energy storage and products produced thereby is provided. The method includes treating the surface of the phase change material-containing porous products with a urea fire-retarding agent. Upon exposure to a flame, the urea forms an adduct with the phase change material which will not sustain combustion (is self-extinguishing) in air. No halogens or metal oxides are contained in the fire retardant, so no potentially noxious halide smoke or fumes are emitted if the product is continuously exposed to a flame.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

453

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit

454

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil Carbon Pollution Being Captured, Stored and Used to Produce More Domestic Oil May 10, 2013 - 11:38am...

455

Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale Florida Project Produces Nation's First Cellulosic Ethanol at Commercial-Scale July 31, 2013 - 1:37pm Addthis...

456

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much carbon dioxide is produced by burning gasoline and diesel fuel? About 19.64 pounds of carbon dioxide (CO 2) are produced from burning a gallon of gasoline ...

457

NETL: News Release - DOE's Produced Water Program Yields New...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

15, 2007 DOE's Produced Water Program Yields New Web Tool Cost-Effectively Treating Produced Water Boosts U.S. Energy, Water Supplies Washington, DC - A comprehensive new program...

458

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ANALYSIS OF METHANE PRODUCING COMMUNITIES WITHIN UNDERGROUND COAL BEDS by Elliott Paul Barnhart.........................................................................................8 Coal and Metabolite Enrichment Studies ..................................................................................14 Ability of the Consortium to Produce Methane from Coal and Metabolites ................16

Maxwell, Bruce D.

459

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 Sales of Fossil Fuels Produced from Federal and Indian Lands, FY 2003 through FY 2011 This...

460

Vehicle Technologies Office: New Methods Produce Low-Temperature...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New Methods Produce Low-Temperature, Soot-Free Diesel Combustion to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: New Methods Produce Low-Temperature, Soot-Free Diesel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluoride hf produced" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Multi-echelon inventory optimization for fresh produce  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For fresh produce, the product freshness is a key value to end consumers. Retailers try to maximize product freshness at retail stores while maintaining high product availability. Fresh produce that is close to the end of ...

Limvorasak, Saran

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Air Bubbles Produced by Breaking Wind Waves: A Laboratory Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air bubbles produced by breaking wind waves are measured in a laboratory tank to study bubble clouds produced in freshwater under various wind and wave conditions. Vertical entrainment of bubbles and their size compositions are found to be ...

Paul A. Hwang; Y-H. L. Hsu; Jin Wu

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Producers Alliance Producers Alliance Jump to: navigation, search Name USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance Place Sacramento, California Sector Biomass Product National trade association of biomass power producers in US. References USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance is a company located in Sacramento, California . References ↑ "USA Biomass Power Producers Alliance" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=USA_Biomass_Power_Producers_Alliance&oldid=352626" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages

464

System to Continuously Produce Carbon Fiber via Microwave-Assisted ...  

Biomass and Biofuels; Building ... Carbon and graphite fibers are conventionally produced through the controlled pyrolysis of fibrous organic carbon precursors ...

465

Carbon Films Produced from Ionic Liquid Precursors - Energy ...  

Energy Storage Carbon Films Produced from Ionic Liquid Precursors Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Contact ORNL About This Technology Technology Marketing ...

466

ATP-Funded Optics Technology Produces Large Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

1.B.8: ATP-Funded Optics Technology Produces Large Energy Savings in Petroleum Refineries and Distribution Systems, ...

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

467

Costs of Producing Switchgrass for Biomass in Southern Iowa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Costs of Producing Switchgrass for Biomass in Southern Iowa The different costs associated with producing switchgrass primarily for biomass in southern Iowa are presented in this fact sheet. It does: s Management Guide for the Produc- tion of Switchgrass for Biomass Fuel in Southern Iowa, February 1997 (PM

Duffy, Michael D.

468

ccsd00001732, Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water with a melted NaCl is used as a test liquid. The liquid plasma is produced by the fundamental waveccsd­00001732, version 2 ­ 7 Nov 2004 Development behavior of liquid plasma produced by YAG laser the hazardous material called the environment material. Then, the plasma produced in liquid by the laser light

469

NETL: Releases & Briefs - Producing hydrogen from water, without  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Producing Hydrogen from Water, without Electrolysis Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Electrochemical potential difference drives the reaction Researchers at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have patented a "Method of Generating Hydrogen by Catalytic Decomposition of Water." The invention potentially leapfrogs current capital and energy intensive processes that produce hydrogen from fossil fuels or through the electrolysis of water. According to co-inventor Arun Bose, "Hydrogen can be produced by electrolysis, but the high voltage requirements are a commercial barrier. The invention provides a new route for producing hydrogen from water by using mixed proton-electron conducting membranes." Water is

470

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuel Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuel Producer Excise Tax and Inspection Exemption on AddThis.com...

471

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Excise Tax Exemption Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Excise Tax Exemption for Biodiesel Produced by Schools on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State

472

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach