National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fluorescent incandescent high

  1. High efficiency incandescent lighting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bermel, Peter; Ilic, Ognjen; Chan, Walker R.; Musabeyoglu, Ahmet; Cukierman, Aviv Ruben; Harradon, Michael Robert; Celanovic, Ivan; Soljacic, Marin

    2014-09-02

    Incandescent lighting structure. The structure includes a thermal emitter that can, but does not have to, include a first photonic crystal on its surface to tailor thermal emission coupled to, in a high-view-factor geometry, a second photonic filter selected to reflect infrared radiation back to the emitter while passing visible light. This structure is highly efficient as compared to standard incandescent light bulbs.

  2. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    B39. Lighting Equipment, Floorspace, 1999" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",67338,64321,38156,60344,20666,19223,17926 "Building Floorspace" "(Square

  3. A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lights | Department of Energy A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about

  4. ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    8. Lighting Equipment, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","All Lit Buildings","Lighting Equipment (more than one may apply)" ,,,"Incandescent","Standard Fluorescent","Compact Fluorescent","High-Intensity Discharge","Halogen" "All Buildings ................",4657,4172,2193,3778,607,430,572 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)"

  5. Energy-Saving Incandescents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    File Energy-saving incandescent lightbulbs - high-resolution EPS More Documents & Publications Energy-Saving Incandescents CFL Lightbulbs CFL Lightbulbs

  6. 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent lamps and incandescent reflectors lamps, as issued by the Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy on April 11, 2014.

  7. Energy-Saving Incandescents | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Image icon Energy-saving incandescent lighbulbs - high-resolution JPG More Documents & Publications Energy-Saving Incandescents CFL Lightbulbs Which Bulb Is Right for You? (High-Resolution JPG Billboard)

  8. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  9. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  10. Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Fluorescent Lamps Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps This tool calculates the payback period for your calc retrofit project. Modify the default values to suit your project requirements. Existing incandescent lamp wattage Watts Incandescent lamp cost dollars Incandescent lamp life 1000 hours calc wattage Watts calc cost dollars calc life (6000 hours for moderate use, 10000 hours for high use) 8000 hours Number of lamps in retrofit project Hours operating per week hours

  11. Laser-induced incandescence (LII)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Laser-induced incandescence (LII) HomeClimate & Earth SystemsClimate Measurement & ModelingLaser-induced incandescence (LII) ...

  12. Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting » Incandescent Lighting Incandescent Lighting Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lighting is the most common, and least energy efficient, type of lighting used in homes. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/TokenPhoto. Incandescent lamps are often considered the least energy efficient type of electric lighting commonly found in residential buildings. Although

  13. Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    courtesy of iStockphotoTokenPhoto. Incandescent lamps are often considered the least energy efficient type of electric lighting commonly found in residential buildings....

  14. Incandescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the filament hot with less electricity. They also provide excellent color rendition. Halogens are a little more expensive than standard incandescent lamps, but are less expensive...

  15. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-03-22

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  16. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2011-11-29

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  17. Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bradbury, Andrew M.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Kiss, Csaba

    2012-05-01

    Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

  18. Laser-induced incandescence (LII)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    induced incandescence (LII) - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  19. Incandescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a special filament inside a glass bulb filled that is usually filled with an inert gas. The descriptive name "incandescence" comes from the surface physics governed by the ...

  20. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    - by far the most common form of fluorescent lighting but rarely found in residential buildings -- are much more energy efficient than incandescent lamps and are ideally suited...

  1. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents November 5, 2014 - 11:39pm Addthis By...

  2. Dual LED/incandescent security fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauna, Kevin Wayne

    2005-06-21

    A dual LED and incandescent security lighting system uses a hybrid approach to LED illumination. It combines an ambient LED illuminator with a standard incandescent lamp on a motion control sensor. The LED illuminator will activate with the onset of darkness (daylight control) and typically remain on during the course of the night ("always on"). The LED illumination, typically amber, is sufficient to provide low to moderate level lighting coverage to the wall and ground area adjacent to and under the fixture. The incandescent lamp is integrated with a motion control circuit and sensor. When movement in the field of view is detected (after darkness), the incandescent lamp is switched on, providing an increased level of illumination to the area. Instead of an "always on" LED illuminator, the LEDs may also be switched off when the incandescent lamp is switched on.

  3. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent products to provide a similar amount of light. They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours). The two general types of fluorescent lamps are: Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) -- commonly found with integral ballasts and screw bases, these are popular lamps often used in household fixtures Fluorescent tube and circline

  4. Operating temperatures for a convectively cooled recessed incandescent light fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Toor, I.

    1980-12-01

    Test results are given for the operation of a recessed incandescent light fixture intended for residential use. The fixture is labeled for use in direct contact with attic thermal insulation. Temperature control of the powered fixture is provided by convective heat transfer from the ceiling side of the fixture. The fixture was operated at power levels up to two times the rated power of 75 watts and under thermal insulations up to R-40. In all operating configurations tested the fixture surface in contact with attic insulation was found to be less than 175/sup 0/C. The observed surface temperatures are judged to be safe for operation in contact with loose-fill or batt-type insulations. It was observed that the power leads inside one fixture configuration are exposed to temperatures as high as 168/sup 0/C. The electrical insulation could, therefore, have a limited life. The properties of the internal fixture wiring were not, however, studied in detail.

  5. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Electricity & Fuel » Lighting » How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each year. By replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR, you can save $75 each

  6. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades 1 of 3 PPG Industries and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are partnering to develop a new class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and façade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2 of 3 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group physicist Paul Berdahl

  7. High lumen compact fluorescents boost light output in new fixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-12-31

    Some compact fluorescent lamps aren`t so compact. General Electric (GE), OSRAM, and Philips have been expanding offerings in longer, more powerful, hard wired CFLs that generate enough light to serve applications once limited to conventional fluorescents and metal halide systems. All three of these manufacturers have for some time offered 18- to 40-watt high-output CFLs, which use a fluorescent tube doubled back on itself to produce a lot of light in a compact source. Now GE has introduced an even larger, more powerful 50-watt unit, and OSRAM is soon to follow suit with a 55-watt lamp. These new entries to the field of turbocharged CFLs can provide general lighting at ceiling heights of 12 feet or more as well as indirect lighting, floodlighting, and wall washing. They are such a concentrated source of light that they can provide the desired illumination using fewer lamps and fixtures than would be needed with competing sources.

  8. HIgh Rate X-ray Fluorescence Detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grudberg, Peter Matthew

    2013-04-30

    The purpose of this project was to develop a compact, modular multi-channel x-ray detector with integrated electronics. This detector, based upon emerging silicon drift detector (SDD) technology, will be capable of high data rate operation superior to the current state of the art offered by high purity germanium (HPGe) detectors, without the need for liquid nitrogen. In addition, by integrating the processing electronics inside the detector housing, the detector performance will be much less affected by the typically noisy electrical environment of a synchrotron hutch, and will also be much more compact than current systems, which can include a detector involving a large LN2 dewar and multiple racks of electronics. The combined detector/processor system is designed to match or exceed the performance and features of currently available detector systems, at a lower cost and with more ease of use due to the small size of the detector. In addition, the detector system is designed to be modular, so a small system might just have one detector module, while a larger system can have many ?? you can start with one detector module, and add more as needs grow and budget allows. The modular nature also serves to simplify repair. In large part, we were successful in achieving our goals. We did develop a very high performance, large area multi-channel SDD detector, packaged with all associated electronics, which is easy to use and requires minimal external support (a simple power supply module and a closed-loop water cooling system). However, we did fall short of some of our stated goals. We had intended to base the detector on modular, large-area detectors from Ketek GmbH in Munich, Germany; however, these were not available in a suitable time frame for this project, so we worked instead with pnDetector GmbH (also located in Munich). They were able to provide a front-end detector module with six 100 m^2 SDD detectors (two monolithic arrays of three elements each) along with associated preamplifiers; these detectors surpassed the performance we expected to get from the Ketek detectors, however they are housed in a sealed module, which does not offer the ease of repair and expandability we??d hoped to achieve with the Ketek SDD??s. Our packaging efforts were quite successful, as we came up with a very compact way to mount the detector and to house the associated electronics, as well as a very effective way to reliably take out the heat (from the electronics as well as the detector??s Peltier coolers) without risk of condensation and without external airflow or vibration, which could create problems for the target applications. While we were able to design compact processing electronics that fit into the detector assembly, they are still at the prototype stage, and would require a significant redesign to achieve product status. We have not yet tested this detector at a synchrotron facility; we do still plan on working with some close contacts at the nearby Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) to get some testing with the beam (using existing commercial electronics for readout, as the integrated processor is not ready for use).

  9. EA-1911: Energy Conservation Standards for Certain Reflector, Elliptical Reflector, and Bulged Reflector Incandescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for Certain Reflector, Elliptical Reflector, and Bulged Reflector Incandescent Lamps.

  10. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Incandescent A Type and Decorative Lamps and LED Replacements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses common omnidirectional incandescent lamps - A-type and small decorative, candelabra-type lamps - and their commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  11. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ... After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ...

  12. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing 2015 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Michael Zalich, Ph.D. Paul Berdahl, Ph.D. mzalich@ppg.com phberdahl@lbl.gov PPG Industries, Inc. LBNL Project Summary Timeline: Start date: October 1, 2013 Planned end date: September 30, 2015 Key Milestones 1. Additional Pigments Identified, End Q2 and Q6 2. 500g of 2 New Pigments, End Q3 and Q7 3. ESR Measured on New Cool Roof Coating, End Q4 and Q8 4. Potential Manufacturing Partner, Q3 and

  13. Red phosphors for use in high CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Vankatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-11-15

    Novel red emitting phosphors for use in fluorescent lamps resulting in superior color rendering index values compared to conventional red phosphors. Also disclosed is a fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer comprising blends of one or more of a blue phosphor, a blue-green phosphor, a green phosphor and a red a phosphor selected from the group consisting of SrY.sub.2 O.sub.4 :Eu.sup.3+, (Y,Gd)Al.sub.3 B.sub.4 O.sub.12 :Eu.sup.3+, and [(Y.sub.1-x-y-m La.sub.y)Gd.sub.x ]BO.sub.3 :Eu.sub.m wherein y<0.50 and m=0.001-0.3. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of the disclosed red phosphors in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over the course of the lamp life.

  14. b39.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables 121 Incandescent Standard Fluorescent Compact Fluorescent High-Intensity Discharge Halogen Table ...

  15. b38.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables 118 Incandescent Standard Fluorescent Compact Fluorescent High-Intensity Discharge Halogen Table ...

  16. Compact Fluorescent Plug-In Ballast-in-a-Socket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rebecca Voelker

    2001-12-21

    The primary goal of this program was to develop a ballast system for plug-in CFLs (compact fluorescent lamps) that will directly replace standard metal shell, medium base incandescent lampholders (such as Levition No. 6098) for use with portable lamp fixtures, such as floor, table and desk lamps. A secondary goal was to identify a plug-in CFL that is optimized for use with this ballast. This Plug-in CFL Ballastin-a-Socket system will allow fixture manufacturers to easily manufacture CFL-based high-efficacy portable fixtures that provide residential and commercial consumers with attractive, cost-effective, and energy-efficient fixtures for use wherever portable incandescent fixtures are used today. The advantages of this proposed system over existing CFL solutions are that the fixtures can only be used with high-efficacy CFLs, and they will be more attractive and will have lower life-cycle costs than screw-in or adapter-based CFL retrofit solutions. These features should greatly increase the penetration of CFL's into the North American market. Our work has shown that using integrated circuits it is quite feasible to produce a lamp-fixture ballast of a size comparable to the current Edison-screw 3-way incandescent fixtures. As for price points for BIAS-based fixtures, end-users polled by the Lighting Research Institute at RPI indicated that they would pay as much as an additional $10 for a lamp containing such a ballast. The ballast has been optimized to run with a 26 W amalgam triple biax lamp in the base-down position, yet can accept non-amalgam versions of the lamp. With a few part alterations, the ballast can be produced to support 32 W lamps as well. The ballast uses GE's existing L-Comp[1] power topology in the circuit so that the integrated circuit design would be a design that could possibly be used by other CFL and EFL products with minor modifications. This gives added value by reducing cost and size of not only the BIAS, but also possibly other integral CFL and future dimmable integral and plug-in versions of the EFL products.

  17. A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Work is progressing on totally different high efficiency lighting technologies as well. We'll be covering those in future blogs. Addthis Related Articles New Lighting Facts Label: ...

  18. Phosphor blends for high-CRI fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setlur, Anant Achyut; Srivastava, Alok Mani; Comanzo, Holly Ann; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Beers, William Winder; Toth, Katalin; Balazs, Laszlo D.

    2008-06-24

    A phosphor blend comprises at least two phosphors each selected from one of the groups of phosphors that absorb UV electromagnetic radiation and emit in a region of visible light. The phosphor blend can be applied to a discharge gas radiation source to produce light sources having high color rendering index. A phosphor blend is advantageously includes the phosphor (Tb,Y,LuLa,Gd).sub.x(Al,Ga).sub.yO.sub.12:Ce.sup.3+, wherein x is in the range from about 2.8 to and including 3 and y is in the range from about 4 to and including 5.

  19. Transition-Edge Sensor X-Ray Fluorescence (TES-XRF) for High Resolution

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Material Identification | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Transition-Edge Sensor X-Ray Fluorescence (TES-XRF) for High Resolution Material Identification X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) is a technique for material identification. A low energy electron gun bombards a thin foil anode to produce a spectrum of x-rays that irradiate a material sample. The interaction of the x-rays through the photoelectric effect induce a cascade of atomic transitions in the sample material that re-emit characteristic

  20. High efficiency and brightness fluorescent organic light emitting diode by triplet-triplet fusion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Zhang, Yifan

    2015-02-10

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer may include an organic host compound and at least one organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature. Various configurations are described for providing a range of current densities in which T-T fusion dominates over S-T annihilation, leading to very high efficiency fluorescent OLEDs.

  1. DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has published a final rule regarding the request for exclusion of 100 Watt R20 short incandescent reflector lamps from energy conservation standards.

  2. Effects of repetitive pulsing on multi-kHz planar laser-induced incandescence imaging in laminar and turbulent flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Michael, James B.; Venkateswaran, Prabhakar; Shaddix, Christopher R.; Meyer, Terrence R.

    2015-04-08

    Planar laser-induced incandescence (LII) imaging is reported at repetition rates up to 100 kHz using a burst-mode laser system to enable studies of soot formation dynamics in highly turbulent flames. Furthermore, to quantify the accuracy and uncertainty of relative soot volume fraction measurements, the temporal evolution of the LII field in laminar and turbulent flames is examined at various laser operating conditions. Under high-speed repetitive probing, it is found that LII signals are sensitive to changes in soot physical characteristics when operating at high laser fluences within the soot vaporization regime. For these laser conditions, strong planar LII signals aremore » observed at measurement rates up to 100 kHz but are primarily useful for qualitative tracking of soot structure dynamics. However, LII signals collected at lower fluences allow sequential planar measurements of the relative soot volume fraction with a sufficient signal-to-noise ratio at repetition rates of 10–50 kHz. Finally, guidelines for identifying and avoiding the onset of repetitive probe effects in the LII signals are discussed, along with other potential sources of measurement error and uncertainty.« less

  3. Subunits of highly Fluorescent Protein R-Phycoerythrin as Probes for Cell Imaging and Single-Molecule Detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragan Isailovic

    2005-12-17

    The purposes of our research were: (1) To characterize subunits of highly fluorescent protein R-Phycoerythrin (R-PE) and check their suitability for single-molecule detection (SMD) and cell imaging, (2) To extend the use of R-PE subunits through design of similar proteins that will be used as probes for microscopy and spectral imaging in a single cell, and (3) To demonstrate a high-throughput spectral imaging method that will rival spectral flow cytometry in the analysis of individual cells. We first demonstrated that R-PE subunits have spectroscopic and structural characteristics that make them suitable for SMD. Subunits were isolated from R-PE by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and detected as single molecules by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). In addition, R-PE subunits and their enzymatic digests were characterized by several separation and detection methods including HPLC, capillary electrophoresis, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and HPLC-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). Favorable absorption and fluorescence of the R-PE subunits and digest peptides originate from phycoerythrobilin (PEB) and phycourobilin (PUB) chromophores that are covalently attached to cysteine residues. High absorption coefficients and strong fluorescence (even under denaturing conditions), broad excitation and emission fluorescence spectra in the visible region of electromagnetic spectrum, and relatively low molecular weights make these molecules suitable for use as fluorescence labels of biomolecules and cells. We further designed fluorescent proteins both in vitro and in vivo (in Escherichia coli) based on the highly specific attachment of PEB chromophore to genetically expressed apo-subunits of R-PE. In one example, apo-alpha and apo-beta R-PE subunits were cloned from red algae Polisiphonia boldii (P. boldii), and expressed in E. coli. Although expressed apo-subunits formed inclusion bodies, fluorescent holo-subunits were formed after incubation of E. coli cells with PEB. Spectroscopic characterization of holo-subunits confirmed that the attachment of PEB chromophore to apo-subunits yielded holo-subunits containing both PEB and urobilin (UB). Fluorescence and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy showed polar location of holo-subunit inclusion bodies in E. coli cells. In another example, R-PE apo-subunits were genetically fused to cytoplasmic and periplasmic versions of E. coli maltose binding protein (MBP). Fluorescent proteins formed after attachment of PEB to MBP-subunit fusions in vitro and in vivo contained PEB as the sole chromophore, were soluble, and displayed high orange fluorescence. Fluorescence microscopy showed that fusions are located either throughout cells or at cell poles. In addition, cells containing fluorescent holo-subunits or MBP-subunit fusions were up to ten times brighter than control cells as measured by flow cytometry. Results show that the fluorescent proteins formed after non-enzymatic attachment of PEB to R-PE subunit fusions could be used as reporters of gene expression and protein localization in cells as well as fluorescence labels in flow cytometry. Finally, we demonstrated a high-throughput method able to record emission fluorescence spectra of individual cells containing fluorescent proteins. Upon excitation with a 488 mn argon-ion laser many bacterial cells were imaged by a 20X microscope objective while they moved through a capillary tube. Fluorescence was dispersed by a transmission diffraction grating, and an intensified charge-coupled device (ICCD) camera simultaneously recorded the zero and the first orders of the fluorescence from each cell. Single-cell fluorescence spectra were reconstructed from the distance between zero-order and first-order maxima as well as the length and the pixel intensity distribution of the first-order images. By using this approach, the emission spectrum of E. coli cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) was reconstructed. Also, fluorescence spectra of E

  4. High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes using thermally activated delayed fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishide, Jun-ichi; Hiraga, Yasuhide; Nakanotani, Hajime; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-06-09

    White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) have attracted much attention recently, aimed for next-generation lighting sources because of their high potential to realize high electroluminescence efficiency, flexibility, and low-cost manufacture. Here, we demonstrate high-efficiency WOLED using red, green, and blue thermally activated delayed fluorescence materials as emissive dopants to generate white electroluminescence. The WOLED has a maximum external quantum efficiency of over 17% with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage coordinates of (0.30, 0.38).

  5. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy signal formation in highly scattering media: theoretical and numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sergeeva, Ekaterina A; Katichev, A R; Kirillin, M Yu

    2011-01-24

    Using the radiative transfer theory and Monte Carlo simulations, we analyse the effect of scattering in a medium and of the size of the detector pinhole on the formation of the fluorescent signal in standard two-photon fluorescence microscopy (TPFM) systems. The theoretical analysis is based on a small-angle diffusion approximation of the radiative transfer equation, adapted to calculate the propagation of focused infrared radiation in media similar to the biological tissues in their optical properties. The accuracy of the model is evaluated by comparing the calculated excitation intensity in a highly scattering medium with the results of Monte Carlo simulations. To simulate a tightly focused Gaussian beam by the Monte Carlo method, the so called 'ray-optics' approach that correctly takes into account the finite size and shape of the beam waist is applied. It is shown that in the combined confocal and two-photon scanning microscopy systems not equipped with an external 'nondescanned' detector, the scattering significantly affects both the nonlinear excitation efficiency in the medium and the fluorescence collection efficiency of the system. In such systems, the rate of the useful TPFM signal in-depth decay is 1.5 - 2 times higher than in systems equipped with a 'nondescanned' detector. (application of lasers and laser-optical methods in life sciences)

  6. Micromolding of a Highly Fluorescent Reticular Coordination Polymer: Solvent-Mediated Reconfigurable Polymerization in a Soft Lithographic Mold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y You; H Yang; J Chung; J Kim; Y Jung; S Park

    2011-12-31

    Coordination polymerization of pyridine-based ligands and zinc or silver ions was controlled by soft lithographic micromolding in capillaries. The polymer patterns that are produced are highly fluorescent and supramolecularly structured.

  7. Fabrication of fluorescent composite with ultrafast aqueous synthesized high luminescent CdTe quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lei, E-mail: mejswu@ust.hk; Chen, Haibin, E-mail: mejswu@ust.hk, E-mail: mejswu@ust.hk; Wu, Jingshen, E-mail: mejswu@ust.hk, E-mail: mejswu@ust.hk [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong and Fok Ying Tung Graduate School, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong); Bi, Xianghong, E-mail: takubatch@gmail.com [Fok Ying Tung Graduate School, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (Hong Kong)

    2014-05-15

    Without precursor preparation, inert gas protection and enormous amount of additives and reductants, CdTe quantum dots (QDs) can be rapidly synthesized with high quality. A 600 nm photoluminescence peak wavelength could be obtained within 1 hour's refluxing through minimal addition of 1,2-diaminoethane (DAE). The theoretical design for the experiments are illustrated and further proved by the characterization results with different concentrations and reagents. On the other hand, generation of CdTe QDs was found even under room temperature by applying droplet quantity of DAE. This indicates that QDs can be synthesized with simply a bottle and no enormous additives required. The QDs were mixed into the epoxy matrix through solution casting method with cetyltrimethylammonium (CTA) capping for phase transfer. The acquired epoxy based nanocomposite exhibits good transparency, compatibility and fluorescence.

  8. Method and apparatus for enhanced evanescent fluorescence and color filtering using a high refractive index thin film coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kao, Hung Pin; Schoeniger, Joseph; Yang, Nancy

    2001-01-01

    A technique for increasing the excitation and collection of evanescent fluorescence radiation emanating from a fiber optic sensor having a high refractive index (n.sub.r), dielectric thin film coating has been disclosed and described. The invention comprises a clad optical fiber core whose cladding is removed on a distal end, the distal end coated with a thin, non-porous, titanium dioxide sol-gel coating. It has been shown that such a fiber will exhibit increased fluorescence coupling due in part by 1) increasing the intensity of the evanescent field at the fiber core surface by a constructive interference effect on the propagating light, and 2) increasing the depth of penetration of the field in the sample. The interference effect created by the thin film imposes a wavelength dependence on the collection of the fluorescence and also suggests a novel application of thin films for color filtering as well as increasing collected fluorescence in fiber sensors. Collected fluorescence radiation increased by up to 6-fold over that of a bare fused silica fiber having a numerical aperture (N.A.) of O.6.

  9. High sensitivity fluorescent single particle and single molecule detection apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan; Stryer, Lubert

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus is described for ultrasensitive detection of single fluorescent particles down to the single fluorescent molecule limit in a fluid or on a substrate comprising means for illuminating a predetermined volume of the fluid or area of the substrate whereby to emit light including background light from the fluid and burst of photons from particles residing in the area. The photon burst is detected in real time to generate output representative signal. The signal is received and the burst of energy from the fluorescent particles is distinguished from the background energy to provide an indication of the number, location or concentration of the particles or molecules.

  10. Highly Fluorescent Group 13 Metal Complexes with Cyclic, Aromatic Hydroxamic Acid Ligands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Michael; Moore, Evan G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2008-02-11

    The neutral complexes of two ligands based on the 1-oxo-2-hydroxy-isoquinoline (1,2-HOIQO) motif with group 13 metals (Al, Ga, In) show bright blue-violet luminescence in organic solvents. The corresponding transition can be attributed to ligand-centered singlet emission, characterized by a small Stokes shifts of only a few nm combined with lifetimes in the range between 1-3 ns. The fluorescence efficiency is high, with quantum yields of up to 37% in benzene solution. The crystal structure of one of the indium(III) complexes (trigonal space group R-3, a = b = 13.0384(15) {angstrom}, c = 32.870(8) {angstrom}, ? = {beta} = 90{sup o}, {gamma} = 120{sup o}, V = 4839.3(14) {angstrom}{sup 3}, Z = 6) shows a six-coordinate geometry around the indium center which is close to trigonal-prismatic, with a twist angle between the two trigonal faces of 20.7{sup o}. Time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations (Al and Ga: B3LYP/6-31G(d)); In: B3LYP/LANL2DZ of the fac and mer isomers with one of the two ligands indicate that there is no clear preference for either one of the isomeric forms of the metal complexes. In addition, the metal centers do not have a significant influence on the electronic structure, and as a consequence, on the predominant intraligand optical transitions.

  11. Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for incandescent bulbs such as table lamps, ceiling fixtures, and wall sconces. Globe lamps are similar to spiral lamps, but feature a globe or other decorative shape...

  12. Project Title: Radiochemical Analysis by High Sensitivity Dual-Optic Micro X-ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havrilla, George J.; Gao, Ning

    2002-06-01

    A novel dual-optic micro X-ray fluorescence instrument will be developed to do radiochemical analysis of high-level radioactive wastes at DOE sites such as Savannah River Site and Hanford. This concept incorporates new X-ray optical elements such as monolithic polycapillaries and double bent crystals, which focus X-rays. The polycapillary optic can be used to focus X-rays emitted by the X-ray tube thereby increasing the X-ray flux on the sample over 1000 times. Polycapillaries will also be used to collect the X-rays from the excitation site and screen the radiation background from the radioactive species in the specimen. This dual-optic approach significantly reduces the background and increases the analyte signal thereby increasing the sensitivity of the analysis. A doubly bent crystal used as the focusing optic produces focused monochromatic X-ray excitation, which eliminates the bremsstrahlung background from the X-ray source. The coupling of the doubly bent crystal for monochromatic excitation with a polycapillary for signal collection can effectively eliminate the noise background and radiation background from the specimen. The integration of these X-ray optics increases the signal-to-noise and thereby increases the sensitivity of the analysis for low-level analytes. This work will address a key need for radiochemical analysis of high-level waste using a non-destructive, multi-element, and rapid method in a radiation environment. There is significant potential that this instrumentation could be capable of on-line analysis for process waste stream characterization at DOE sites.

  13. Highly fluorescent silver nanoclusters in alumina-silica composite optical fiber

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halder, A.; Chattopadhyay, R.; Majumder, S.; Paul, M. C.; Das, S.; Bhadra, S. K.; Bysakh, S.; Unnikrishnan, M.

    2015-01-05

    An efficient visible fluorescent optical fiber embedded with silver nanoclusters (Ag-NCs) having size ∼1 nm, uniformly distributed in alumina-silica composite core glass, is reported. Fibers are fabricated in a repetitive controlled way through modified chemical vapour deposition process associated with solution doping technique. Fibers are drawn from the transparent preforms by conventional fiber drawing process. Structural characteristics of the doped fibers are studied using transmission electron microscopy and electron probe micro analysis. The oxidation state of Ag within Ag-NCs is investigated by X-ray photo electron spectroscopy. The observed significant fluorescence of the metal clusters in fabricated fibers is correlated with electronic model. The experimentally observed size dependent absorption of the metal clusters in fabricated fibers is explained with the help of reported results calculated by ab-initio density functional theory. These optical fibers may open up an opportunity of realizing tunable wavelength fiber laser without the help of rare earth elements.

  14. Implementation Report: Energy Conservation Standards Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Policy and Conservation Act GSFL - General Service Fluorescent Lamp GSIL - General Service Incandescent Lamp HID - High-Intensity Discharge (lamps) IEC - International ...

  15. 2010 Aug Report to Congress

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (lamps) FY - Fiscal Year GSFL - General Service Fluorescent Lamp GSIL - General Service Incandescent Lamp HID - High-Intensity Discharge (lamps) IEC - International ...

  16. Characterization of a new photo-fluorescent film dosimeter for high-radiation dose applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark K. ); Miller, Steven D. ); Kovacs, Andras; Mclaughlin, William L.; Slezsak, Istvan

    2001-12-01

    Characterization studies on one of the first versions of the Sunna fluorescent dosimeter have been published by Kovacs and McLaughlin. This present study describes testing results of a newer version of the dosimeter (Model and 61543;, batch 0399-20). This dosimeter is a 1-cm by 3-cm polymeric film of 0.5 mm thickness that emits a green fluorescence component at intensities almost linear with dose. The manufacturing method (injection molding) allows potential batch sizes on the order of a million while maintaining a signal precision on the order of+/- 1%. Studies include dose response, dose rate dependence, energy dependence, post-irradiation stability, environmental effects, and variation of response within a batch. Data for both food irradiation and sterilization dose levels were obtained. The results indicate that the green signal (0.3-200 kGy) works well for food irradiation dose levels, especially in refrigerated facilities that maintain tight temperature control. The green signal also works well in sterilization facilities because its irradiation temperature coefficient above room temperature is minimal at sterilization doses. If the user requires readout results in less than 22 hours after room temperature irradiation, the user can either calibrate for a specific post-irradiation readout time(s) or simply heat the dosimeters in a small laboratory oven to quickly stabilize the signal.

  17. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices.

  18. Effects of aggregate morphology and size on laser-induced incandescence and scattering from black carbon (mature soot)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bambha, Ray P.; Michelsen, Hope A.

    2015-07-03

    We have used a Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) to measure time-resolved laser-induced incandescence (LII) and laser scatter from combustion-generated mature soot with a fractal dimension of 1.88 extracted from a burner. We have also made measurements on restructured mature-soot particles with a fractal dimension of 2.3–2.4. We reproduced the LII and laser-scatter temporal profiles with an energy- and mass-balance model, which accounted for heating of particles passed through a CW-laser beam over laser–particle interaction times of ~10 μs. Furthermore, the results demonstrate a strong influence of aggregate size and morphology on LII and scattering signals. Conductive cooling competes with absorptivemore » heating on these time scales; the effects are reduced with increasing aggregate size and fractal dimension. These effects can lead to a significant delay in the onset of the LII signal and may explain an apparent low bias in the SP2 measurements for small particle sizes, particularly for fresh, mature soot. The results also reveal significant perturbations to the measured scattering signal from LII interference and suggest rapid expansion of the aggregates during sublimation.« less

  19. High-resolution Elemental Mapping of Human Placental Chorionic Villi Using Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punshon, Tracy; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Howard, Louisa; Jackson, Brian P.; Karagas, Margaret R.; Ornvold, Kim

    2015-09-01

    The placenta is the organ that mediates transport of nutrients and waste materials between mother and fetus. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microanalysis is a tool for imaging the distribution and quantity of elements in biological tissue, which can be used to study metal transport across biological membranes. Our aims were to pilot placental biopsy specimen preparation techniques that could be integrated into an ongoing epidemiology birth cohort study without harming rates of sample acquisition. We studied the effects of fixative (formalin or glutaraldehyde) and storage duration (30 days or immediate processing) on metal distribution and abundance and investigated a thaw-fixation protocol for archived specimens stored at -80 A degrees C. We measured fixative elemental composition with and without a placental biopsy via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantify fixative-induced elemental changes. Formalin-fixed specimens showed hemolysis of erythrocytes. The glutaraldehyde-paraformaldehyde solution in HEPES buffer (GTA-HEPES) had superior anatomical preservation, avoided hemolysis, and minimized elemental loss, although some cross-linking of exogenous Zn was evident. Elemental loss from tissue stored in fixative for 1 month showed variable losses (a parts per thousand 40 % with GTA-HEPES), suggesting storage duration be controlled for. Thawing of tissue held at -80 A degrees C in a GTA-HEPES solution provided high-quality visual images and elemental images

  20. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epstein, Richard I.; Edwards, Bradley C.; Buchwald, Melvin I.; Gosnell, Timothy R.

    1995-01-01

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  1. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  2. Note: A portable, light-emitting diode-based ruby fluorescence spectrometer for high-pressure calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Yejun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2011-04-15

    Ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with {approx}0.5 wt. % Cr doping) is one of the most widely used manometers at the giga-Pascal scale. Traditionally, its fluorescence is excited with intense laser sources. Here, I present a simple, robust, and portable design that employs light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead. This LED-based system is safer in comparison with laser-based ones.

  3. Improved Ga grading of sequentially produced Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells studied by high resolution X-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schöppe, Philipp; Schnohr, Claudia S.; Oertel, Michael; Kusch, Alexander; Johannes, Andreas; Eckner, Stefanie; Reislöhner, Udo; Ronning, Carsten; Burghammer, Manfred; Martínez-Criado, Gema

    2015-01-05

    There is particular interest to investigate compositional inhomogeneity of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cell absorbers. We introduce an approach in which focused ion beam prepared thin lamellas of complete solar cell devices are scanned with a highly focused synchrotron X-ray beam. Analyzing the resulting fluorescence radiation ensures high resolution compositional analysis combined with high spatial resolution. Thus, we are able to detect subtle variations of the Ga/(Ga + In) ratio down to 0.01 on a submicrometer scale. We observed that for sequentially processed solar cells a higher selenization temperature leads to absorbers with almost homogenous Ga/(Ga + In) ratio, which significantly improved the conversion efficiency.

  4. Quantum dot immunoassays in renewable surface column and 96-well plate formats for the fluorescence detection of Botulinum neurotoxin using high-affinity antibodies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Marvin G.; Grate, Jay W.; Tyler, Abby J.; Ozanich, Richard M.; Miller, Keith D.; Lou, Jianlong; Marks, James D.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2009-09-01

    A fluorescence sandwich immunoassay using high affinity antibodies and quantum dot (QD) reporters has been developed for detection of botulinum toxin serotype A (BoNT/A). For the development of the assay, a nontoxic recombinant fragment of the holotoxin (BoNT/A-HC-fragment) has been used as a structurally valid simulant for the full toxin molecule. The antibodies used, AR4 and RAZ1, bind to nonoverlapping epitopes present on both the full toxin and on the recombinant fragment. In one format, the immunoassay is carried out in a 96-well plate with detection in a standard plate reader. Detection down to 31 pM of the BoNT/Hc-fragment was demonstrated with a total incubation time of 3 hours, using AR4 as the capture antibody and QD-coupled RAZ1 as the reporter. In a second format, the AR4 capture antibody was coupled to Sepharose beads, and the immunochemical reactions were carried out in microcentrifuge tubes with an incubation time of 1 hour. These beads were subsequently captured and concentrated in a rotating rod renewable surface flow cell as part of a sequential injection fluidic system. This flow cell was equipped with a fiber optic system for fluorescence measurements. In PBS buffer solution matrix, the BoNT/A-HC-fragment was detected to concentrations as low as 5 pM using the fluidic measurement approach.

  5. High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an x-ray absorption spectroscopy beamline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Llorens, Isabelle; Lahera, Eric; Delnet, William; Proux, Olivier; Dermigny, Quentin; Gelebart, Frederic; Morand, Marc; Shukla, Abhay; Bardou, Nathalie; Ulrich, Olivier; and others

    2012-06-15

    Fluorescence detection is classically achieved with a solid state detector (SSD) on x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) beamlines. This kind of detection however presents some limitations related to the limited energy resolution and saturation. Crystal analyzer spectrometers (CAS) based on a Johann-type geometry have been developed to overcome these limitations. We have tested and installed such a system on the BM30B/CRG-FAME XAS beamline at the ESRF dedicated to the structural investigation of very dilute systems in environmental, material and biological sciences. The spectrometer has been designed to be a mobile device for easy integration in multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamlines or even with a laboratory x-ray source. The CAS allows to collect x-ray photons from a large solid angle with five spherically bent crystals. It will cover a large energy range allowing to probe fluorescence lines characteristic of all the elements from Ca (Z = 20) to U (Z = 92). It provides an energy resolution of 1-2 eV. XAS spectroscopy is the main application of this device even if other spectroscopic techniques (RIXS, XES, XRS, etc.) can be also achieved with it. The performances of the CAS are illustrated by two experiments that are difficult or impossible to perform with SSD and the complementarity of the CAS vs SSD detectors is discussed.

  6. EA-1664: Final Environmental Assessment

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    10 CFR Part 430 Energy Conservation Standards: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps

  7. Untitled

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0. Number of Lights by Bulb Type by Room, 1993 Bulb Type Incandescent Fluorescent Other Room Total Low Medium High Unknown Short Long Compact Halogen Other unknown Total 4,196 431...

  8. Adoption of Light-Emitting Diodes in Common Lighting Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamada, Mary; Chwastyk, Dan

    2013-05-01

    Report estimating LED energy savings in nine applications where LEDs compete with traditional lighting sources such as incandescent, halogen, high-pressure sodium, and certain types of fluorescent. The analysis includes indoor lamp, indoor luminaire, and outdoor luminaire applications.

  9. Bioanalytical Applications of Fluorescence Line-Narrowing and Non-Line-Narrowing Spectroscopy Interfaced with Capillary Electrophoresis and High-Performance Liquid Chromatography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Paul Roberts

    2002-06-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) are widely used analytical separation techniques with many applications in chemical, biochemical, and biomedical sciences. Conventional analyte identification in these techniques is based on retention/migration times of standards; requiring a high degree of reproducibility, availability of reliable standards, and absence of coelution. From this, several new information-rich detection methods (also known as hyphenated techniques) are being explored that would be capable of providing unambiguous on-line identification of separating analytes in CE and HPLC. As further discussed, a number of such on-line detection methods have shown considerable success, including Raman, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS), and fluorescence line-narrowing spectroscopy (FLNS). In this thesis, the feasibility and potential of combining the highly sensitive and selective laser-based detection method of FLNS with analytical separation techniques are discussed and presented. A summary of previously demonstrated FLNS detection interfaced with chromatography and electrophoresis is given, and recent results from on-line FLNS detection in CE (CE-FLNS), and the new combination of HPLC-FLNS, are shown.

  10. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Tungsten halogen lamps are more energy-efficient than standard incandescent lamps. They ... Fluorescent lights are about 3 to 4 times as efficient as incandescent lighting and last ...

  11. lighting in the library

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    lighting will be examined here: * replacing incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps * replacing incandescent exit signs with those lit by light emitting diodes (LED) * ...

  12. Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save ...

  13. Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Radiation DetectionFluorescent...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of fluorescent nanoparticles embedded in a transparent matrix. The invention addresses needs in research, security, and industry for detectors with improved light output and...

  14. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-06-30

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle – i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: • Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder – Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. • Environmental Impact Review – Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. • Drill-down Review – These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

  15. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  16. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Sue I.; Fergenson, David P.; Srivastava, Abneesh; Bogan, Michael J.; Riot, Vincent J.; Frank, Matthias

    2010-08-24

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  17. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  18. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  19. Fluorescent Lighting Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Light from a fluorescent lamp is first created by an electric current conducted through an inert gas producing ultraviolet light that is invisible to the human eye.

  20. Fluorescent Tube Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP temporarily suspended its energy efficiency requirements for fluorescent tube lamps as it evaluates the market impact of the pending 2012 minimum efficiency standards for fluorescent lamps. The program will issue updated energy efficiency requirements when the market distribution of this product category stabilizes and when doing so has the potential to result in significant Federal energy savings.

  1. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2010-08-03

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  2. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Sun, Yiru; Giebink, Noel; Thompson, Mark E.

    2009-01-06

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  3. Recombinant fluorescent protein microsphere calibration standard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nolan, John P.; Nolan, Rhiannon L.; Ruscetti, Teresa; Lehnert, Bruce E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for making recombinant fluorescent protein standard particles for calibration of fluorescence instruments.

  4. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  5. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs,...

  6. Integrated fluorescence analysis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buican, Tudor N.; Yoshida, Thomas M.

    1992-01-01

    An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

  7. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  8. Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Induced Fluorescence - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  9. Another Side of Light - D

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    D. Three quantum phenomena In fluorescence, matter absorbs light waves of a high frequency and then emits light of the same or lower frequency. This process was studied and named by George Gabriel Stokes in the mid-19th century. Today, fluorescence is familiar to us from fluorescent light bulbs. A fluorescent bulb's filament produces ultraviolet light, which is absorbed by the bulb's inner coating, which then emits lower-frequency visible light-more visible light than an incandescent bulb

  10. A Conversation With Tribal Leaders in Denver | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lights | Department of Energy A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about

  11. Fluorescent microthermographic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, D.L.

    1993-09-01

    In the early days of microelectronics, design rules and feature sizes were large enough that sub-micron spatial resolution was not needed. Infrared or IR thermal techniques were available that calculated the object`s temperature from infrared emission. There is a fundamental spatial resolution limitation dependent on the wavelengths of light being used in the image formation process. As the integrated circuit feature sizes began to shrink toward the one micron level, the limitations imposed on IR thermal systems became more pronounced. Something else was needed to overcome this limitation. Liquid crystals have been used with great success, but they lack the temperature measurement capabilities of other techniques. The fluorescent microthermographic imaging technique (FMI) was developed to meet this need. This technique offers better than 0.01{degrees}C temperature resolution and is diffraction limited to 0.3 {mu}m spatial resolution. While the temperature resolution is comparable to that available on IR systems, the spatial resolution is much better. The FMI technique provides better spatial resolution by using a temperature dependent fluorescent film that emits light at 612 nm instead of the 1.5 {mu}m to 12 {mu}m range used by IR techniques. This tutorial starts with a review of blackbody radiation physics, the process by which all heated objects emit radiation to their surroundings, in order to understand the sources of information that are available to characterize an object`s surface temperature. The processes used in infrared thermal imaging are then detailed to point out the limitations of the technique but also to contrast it with the FMI process. The FMI technique is then described in detail, starting with the fluorescent film physics and ending with a series of examples of past applications of FMI.

  12. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berthold, John W.; Malito, Michael L.; Jeffers, Larry

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  13. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  14. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander M.; Benson, Scott C.

    1999-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  15. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1997-07-08

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

  16. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1995-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  17. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander M.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  18. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, A.M.; Benson, S.C.

    1998-06-16

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

  19. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1997-01-01

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated.

  20. DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1995-03-28

    Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figures.

  1. X-ray fluorescence mapping

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    X-Ray Microscopy and Imaging: X-ray Fluorescence Mapping Of increasing scientific interest is the detection, quantification and mapping of elemental content of samples, often down...

  2. Untitled

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    position of the fixture affect the actual output of compact fluorescent bulbs, and the quality of the light may differ between compact fluorescents and incandescents....

  3. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  4. LucY: A versatile new fluorescent reporter protein

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, Jr., George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2015-04-23

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrastmore » to other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.« less

  5. 2014-12-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General Service

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Final Rule | Department of Energy 30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Final Rule 2014-12-30 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standard for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Final Rule This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule regarding energy conservation standards for general service fluorescent lamps and

  6. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including fluorescent luminaires. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  7. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Luminaires," using IESNA LM-41, ANSI C82.2-2002 for fluorescent ballasts, and ANSI C78.81-2005 for fluorescent lamps. Finding the Luminaire Efficacy Rating LERs should be...

  8. Fluorescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    October 17, 2013 - 5:39pm Addthis Light from a fluorescent lamp is first created by an ... the interior surface of the fluorescent lamp tube that efficiently converts the ...

  9. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  10. High Efficiency Integrated Package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ibbetson, James

    2013-09-15

    Solid-state lighting based on LEDs has emerged as a superior alternative to inefficient conventional lighting, particularly incandescent. LED lighting can lead to 80 percent energy savings; can last 50,000 hours – 2-50 times longer than most bulbs; and contains no toxic lead or mercury. However, to enable mass adoption, particularly at the consumer level, the cost of LED luminaires must be reduced by an order of magnitude while achieving superior efficiency, light quality and lifetime. To become viable, energy-efficient replacement solutions must deliver system efficacies of ≥ 100 lumens per watt (LPW) with excellent color rendering (CRI > 85) at a cost that enables payback cycles of two years or less for commercial applications. This development will enable significant site energy savings as it targets commercial and retail lighting applications that are most sensitive to the lifetime operating costs with their extended operating hours per day. If costs are reduced substantially, dramatic energy savings can be realized by replacing incandescent lighting in the residential market as well. In light of these challenges, Cree proposed to develop a multi-chip integrated LED package with an output of > 1000 lumens of warm white light operating at an efficacy of at least 128 LPW with a CRI > 85. This product will serve as the light engine for replacement lamps and luminaires. At the end of the proposed program, this integrated package was to be used in a proof-of-concept lamp prototype to demonstrate the component’s viability in a common form factor. During this project Cree SBTC developed an efficient, compact warm-white LED package with an integrated remote color down-converter. Via a combination of intensive optical, electrical, and thermal optimization, a package design was obtained that met nearly all project goals. This package emitted 1295 lm under instant-on, room-temperature testing conditions, with an efficacy of 128.4 lm/W at a color temperature of ~2873K and 83 CRI. As such, the package’s performance exceeds DOE’s warm-white phosphor LED efficacy target for 2013. At the end of the program, we assembled an A19 sized demonstration bulb housing the integrated package which met Energy Star intensity variation requirements. With further development to reduce overall component cost, we anticipate that an integrated remote converter package such as developed during this program will find application in compact, high-efficacy LED-based lamps, particularly those requiring omnidirectional emission.

  11. Fluorescence based chemical sensors for corrosion detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.E.; Agarwala, V.S.

    1997-12-01

    Several fluorescent materials have been identified as possible corrosion sensing coatings. These are either redox or metal ion complex materials. The redox materials are nonfluorescent in the reduced state and become fluorescent upon oxidation. Incorporated into paint coatings, they provide an early warning of corrosive conditions at the metal or alloy surface. The metal ion complex materials only fluoresce when the organic compound complexes with metal ions such as those generated in corrosion reactions. Fluorescent materials have been incorporated into paint coatings and on metal surfaces for the detection of corrosion. Oxine reacts with aluminum oxide on corroded aluminum to give a fluorescence that can be photographed in UV light. Several other materials were found to have good fluorescence but cannot be reversibly oxidized or reduced at the present time. More work will be done with these compounds as well as with Schiff bases to develop new fluorescent chemical sensing materials for smart coating on alloy surfaces.

  12. PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC w I Project Accomplishments Summary (Attachment I) CRADA NO. TSB-1449-97 Date: U 1 8 1 9 8 Revision: 1 A . Parties The project is a relationship between the Lawrence Livennore National Laboratoq (LLNL) and Optiphase, Inc. University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 7000 East Avenue, L-399 Livermore, CA 94550 Optiphase, h c 7652 Haskell Ave. Van Nuys, CA 91406 Technical Contact - D r . Pepe Davis (8 18)782-0997ext 1 12 B .

  13. Save Energy With A Picnic! | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for...

  14. Types of Lighting | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    selection. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Incandescent Outdoor solar Light-emitting diode (LED) Also learn how energy-efficient lightbulbs compare to traditional...

  15. APPLIANCE STANDARDS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Equipment General Service Incandescent Lamps General Service Fluorescent Lamps Small Electric Motors Electric Motors Water Heaters Furnace Fans Distribution Transformers Water...

  16. 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for General...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Conservation Standards for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-04-11 Issuance: Energy Conservation ...

  17. Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedele, Francesco; Eppstein, Margaret J. . E-mail: maggie.eppstein@uvm.edu; Laible, Jeffrey P.; Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.

    2005-11-20

    The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

  18. Chromosome characterization using single fluorescent dye

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crissman, Harry A.; Hirons, Gregory T.

    1995-01-01

    Chromosomes are characterized by fluorescent emissions from a single fluorescent dye that is excited over two different wavelengths. A mixture containing chromosomes is stained with a single dye selected from the group consisting of TOTO and YOYO and the stained chromosomes are placed in a flow cytometer. The fluorescent dye is excited sequentially by a first light having a wavelength in the ultraviolet range to excite the TOTO or YOYO to fluoresce at a first intensity and by a second light having a wavelength effective to excite the TOTO or YOYO dye to fluoresce at a second intensity. Specific chromosomes may be identified and sorted by intensity relationships between the first and second fluorescence emissions.

  19. Saccharide sensing molecules having enhanced fluorescent properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Cary, Douglas R.; Tran, Joe Anh

    2004-01-06

    The present invention provides formulae for fluorescent compounds that have a number of properties which make them uniquely suited for use in sensors of analytes such as saccharides. The advantageous fluorescent properties include favorable excitation wavelengths, emission wavelengths, fluorescence lifetimes, and photostability. Additional advantageous properties include enhanced aqueous solubility, as well as temperature and pH sensitivity. The compound comprises an aryl or a substituted phenyl botonic acid that acts as a substrate recognition component, a fluorescence switch component, and a fluorophore. Fluorescent compounds are described that are excited at wavelengths greater than 400 nm and emit at wavelengths greater than 450 nm, which is advantageous for optical transmission through skin. The fluorophore is typically selected from transition metal-ligand complexes and thiazine, oxazine, oxazone, or oxazine-one as well as anthracene compounds. The fluorescent compound can be immobilized in a glucose permeable biocompatible polymer matrix that is implantable below the skin.

  20. Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. File Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts -- v2.0 More Documents &

  1. Optical gating of perylene bisimide fluorescence using

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dithienylcyclopentene photochromic switches (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Optical gating of perylene bisimide fluorescence using dithienylcyclopentene photochromic switches Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Optical gating of perylene bisimide fluorescence using dithienylcyclopentene photochromic switches The emission of millions of fluorescence photons from a chromophore is controlled by the absorption of a few tens of photons in a photochromic molecule. The parameters that

  2. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, D.L.; Tangyunyong, P.

    1998-01-06

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC. 1 fig.

  3. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Daniel L.; Tangyunyong, Paiboon

    1998-01-01

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC.

  4. Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Industrial Technologies Industrial Technologies Find More Like This Return to Search Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (891 KB) Technology Marketing SummarySandia National Laboratories has created a method and apparatus for measuring the position of an object. It relies on the attenuation of fluorescence light carried inside a fluorescent optical fiber to determine the position of

  5. Optical gating of perylene bisimide fluorescence usingdithienylcyclop...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The emission of millions of fluorescence photons from a chromophore is controlled by the absorption of a few tens of photons in a photochromic molecule. The parameters that ...

  6. Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuresko, Daniel D.

    1980-01-01

    A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

  7. An Analog Filter Approach to Frequency Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-04-24

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entiremore » system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. The techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.« less

  8. An Analog Filter Approach to Frequency Domain Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainham, Clifford P.; O'Neill, Mary D.; McKenna, Ian J.

    2015-04-24

    The rate equations found in frequency domain fluorescence spectroscopy are the same as those found in electronics under analog filter theory. Laplace transform methods are a natural way to solve the equations, and the methods can provide solutions for arbitrary excitation functions. The fluorescence terms can be modeled as circuit components and cascaded with drive and detection electronics to produce a global transfer function. Electronics design tools such as Spicea can be used to model fluorescence problems. In applications, such as remote sensing, where detection electronics are operated at high gain and limited bandwidth, a global modeling of the entire system is important, since the filter terms of the drive and detection electronics affect the measured response of the fluorescence signals. The techniques described here can be used to separate signals from fast and slow fluorophores emitting into the same spectral band, and data collection can be greatly accelerated by means of a frequency comb driver waveform and appropriate signal processing of the response.

  9. Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Peplowski, Patrick N.

    2010-11-11

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) has the potential of addressing a wide variety of applications, which require isotopic and/or elemental information about a sample. We have investigated a variety of non-proliferation applications that may be addressed by NRF. From these applications, we have selected two, measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders and material verification in dismantlement, to investigate in more detail. Analytical models have been developed to evaluate these applications, and test measurements have been conducted to validate those models. We found that it is unlikely with current technology to address the requirements for UF6 cylinder enrichment measurements. In contrast, NRF is a very promising approach for material verification for dismantlement.

  10. Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carpenter, II, Robert W.; Rubenstein, Richard; Piltch, Martin; Gray, Perry

    2010-12-07

    A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

  11. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Typical Efficacies and Lifetimes of Lamps (1) Current Technology CRI (2) Incandescent 10 - 19 97 Halogen 14 - 20 99 Fluorescent - T5 25 - 55 52 - 75 Fluorescent - T8 35 - 87 7,500 - 20,000 52 - 90 Fluorescent - T12 35 - 92 7,500 - 20,000 50 - 92 Compact Fluorescent 40 - 70 82 Mercury Vapor 25 - 50 15 - 50 Metal Halide 65 - 70 High-Pressure Sodium 22 Low-Pressure Sodium 0 Solid State Lighting 33-97 Note(s): Source(s): 18 - 180 18,000 20 - 100 15,000 - 50,000 1) Theoretical maximum luminous

  12. Glucose sensing molecules having selected fluorescent properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Cary, Douglas R.; Tran, Joe Anh

    2004-01-27

    An analyte sensing fluorescent molecule that employs intramolecular electron transfer is designed to exhibit selected fluorescent properties in the presence of analytes such as saccharides. The selected fluorescent properties include excitation wavelength, emission wavelength, fluorescence lifetime, quantum yield, photostability, solubility, and temperature or pH sensitivity. The compound comprises an aryl or a substituted phenyl boronic acid that acts as a substrate recognition component, a fluorescence switch component, and a fluorophore. The fluorophore and switch component are selected such that the value of the free energy for electron transfer is less than about 3.0 kcal mol.sup.-1. Fluorescent compounds are described that are excited at wavelengths greater than 400 nm and emit at wavelengths greater than 450 nm, which is advantageous for optical transmission through skin. The fluorophore is typically selected from transition metal-ligand complexes and thiazine, oxazine, oxazone, or oxazine-one as well as anthracene compounds. The fluorescent compound can be immobilized in a glucose permeable biocompatible polymer matrix that is implantable below the skin.

  13. Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment...

  14. " A Heterodyne Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique to Determine...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Heterodyne Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique to Determine Simultaneously the Bulk ... molecule velocity distribution using a heterodyne laser induced fluorescence technique. ...

  15. Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to Market Compact Fluorescent Lighting in America: Lessons Learned on the Way to Market This report reviews ...

  16. 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; ...

  17. Elemental and Chemically Specific X-ray Fluorescence Imaging...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Published Article: Elemental and Chemically Specific X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Biological Systems Title: Elemental and Chemically Specific X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of ...

  18. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Accepted Manuscript: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae Prev Next Title: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence ...

  19. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Mark L.; Jett, James H.; Keller, Richard A.; Marrone, Babetta L.; Martin, John C.

    1996-01-01

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  20. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  1. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  2. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1996-03-12

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  3. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Taylor, John A.

    1994-06-28

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis.

  4. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, R.A.; Peck, K.

    1992-02-25

    A fluorescent scanner is designed for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier. The scanner includes a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from the volume to provide a display of the separated sample. 8 figs.

  5. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan

    1992-01-01

    A fluorescent scanner for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier including a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from said volume to provide a display of the separated sample.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  7. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Steven M.

    1988-01-01

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  8. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  9. Lighting Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homes & Buildings » Lighting & Daylighting » Lighting Basics Lighting Basics August 15, 2013 - 5:12pm Addthis Text Version There are many different types of artificial lights (formally called "lamps" in the lighting industry,) which have different applications and uses. Types of lighting include: Fluorescent Lighting High-intensity Discharge Lighting Incandescent Lighting LED Lighting. New lamp designs that use energy-efficient technology are now readily available in the

  10. Ultrabright fluorescent OLEDS using triplet sinks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yifan; Forrest, Stephen R; Thompson, Mark

    2013-06-04

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer further comprises an organic host compound, an organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature, and an organic dopant compound. The triplet energy of the dopant compound is lower than the triplet energy of the host compound. The dopant compound does not strongly absorb the fluorescent emission of the emitting compound.

  11. Blue-green phosphor for fluorescent lighting applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srivastava, Alok; Comanzo, Holly; Manivannan, Venkatesan; Setlur, Anant Achyut

    2005-03-15

    A fluorescent lamp including a phosphor layer including Sr.sub.4 Al.sub.14 O.sub.25 :Eu.sup.2+ (SAE) and at least one of each of a red, green and blue emitting phosphor. The phosphor layer can optionally include an additional, deep red phosphor and a yellow emitting phosphor. The resulting lamp will exhibit a white light having a color rendering index of 90 or higher with a correlated color temperature of from 2500 to 10000 Kelvin. The use of SAE in phosphor blends of lamps results in high CRI light sources with increased stability and acceptable lumen maintenance over, the course of the lamp life.

  12. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

    1992-05-12

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

  13. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Karin D.; Chu, Tun-Jen; Pitt, William G.

    1992-01-01

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

  14. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    techniques, including combustion synthesis; then characterize their absorbance, ... pigment (Al 2 O 3 :Cr) via combustion synthesis * Kingsley et al. recipe * Metal ...

  15. Size-dependent fluorescence of bioaerosols: Mathematical model using fluorescing and absorbing molecules in bacteria

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Doughty, David C.; Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Hill, Hanna H.

    2015-02-02

    This paper uses a mathematical model of fluorescent biological particles composed of bacteria and/or proteins (mostly as in Hill et al., 2013 [23]) to investigate the size-dependence of the total fluorescence emitted in all directions. The model applies to particles which have negligible reabsorption of fluorescence within the particle. The specific particles modeled here are composed of ovalbumin and of a generic Bacillus. The particles need not be spherical, and in some cases need not be homogeneous. However, the results calculated in this paper are for spherical homogeneous particles. Light absorbing and fluorescing molecules included in the model are aminomore » acids, nucleic acids, and several coenzymes. Here the excitation wavelength is 266 nm. The emission range, 300 to 370 nm, encompasses the fluorescence of tryptophan. The fluorescence cross section (CF) is calculated and compared with one set of published measured values. We investigate power law (Ady) approximations to CF, where d is diameter, and A and y are parameters adjusted to fit the data, and examine how y varies with d and composition, including the fraction as water. The particle's fluorescence efficiency (QF=CF/geometric-cross-section) can be written for homogeneous particles as QabsRF, where Qabs is the absorption efficiency, and RF, the fraction of the absorbed light emitted as fluorescence, is independent of size and shape. When QF is plotted vs. mid or mi(mr-1)d, where m=mr+imi is the complex refractive index, the plots for different fractions of water in the particle tend to overlap.« less

  16. Size-dependent fluorescence of bioaerosols: Mathematical model using fluorescing and absorbing molecules in bacteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Steven C.; Williamson, Chatt C.; Doughty, David C.; Pan, Yong-Le; Santarpia, Joshua L.; Hill, Hanna H.

    2015-02-02

    This paper uses a mathematical model of fluorescent biological particles composed of bacteria and/or proteins (mostly as in Hill et al., 2013 [23]) to investigate the size-dependence of the total fluorescence emitted in all directions. The model applies to particles which have negligible reabsorption of fluorescence within the particle. The specific particles modeled here are composed of ovalbumin and of a generic Bacillus. The particles need not be spherical, and in some cases need not be homogeneous. However, the results calculated in this paper are for spherical homogeneous particles. Light absorbing and fluorescing molecules included in the model are amino acids, nucleic acids, and several coenzymes. Here the excitation wavelength is 266 nm. The emission range, 300 to 370 nm, encompasses the fluorescence of tryptophan. The fluorescence cross section (CF) is calculated and compared with one set of published measured values. We investigate power law (Ady) approximations to CF, where d is diameter, and A and y are parameters adjusted to fit the data, and examine how y varies with d and composition, including the fraction as water. The particle's fluorescence efficiency (QF=CF/geometric-cross-section) can be written for homogeneous particles as QabsRF, where Qabs is the absorption efficiency, and RF, the fraction of the absorbed light emitted as fluorescence, is independent of size and shape. When QF is plotted vs. mid or mi(mr-1)d, where m=mr+imi is the complex refractive index, the plots for different fractions of water in the particle tend to overlap.

  17. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, John C.; Jett, James H.

    1986-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  18. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1984-01-06

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle.

  19. Apparatus for eliminating background interference in fluorescence measurements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, J.C.; Jett, J.H.

    1986-03-04

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for eliminating background interference during fluorescence measurements in a multiple laser flow cytometer. A biological particle stained with fluorescent dyes is excited by a laser. A fluorescence detector detects the fluorescence. The particle scatters light and a gate signal is generated and delayed until the biological particle reaches the next laser. The delayed signal turns on this next laser, which excites a different stained component of the same biological particle. 8 figs.

  20. Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps" webcast, held June 20, 2011.

  1. Better Fluorescent Lighting Through Physics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluorescent Lighting Through Physics Better Fluorescent Lighting Through Physics October 13, 2015 - 2:20pm Addthis National Labs are working with industry to make fluorescent lighting more environmentally friendly by reducing the need for rare earth elements. | iStock photo. National Labs are working with industry to make fluorescent lighting more environmentally friendly by reducing the need for rare earth elements. | iStock photo. Anne M. Stark Senior Public Information Officer, Lawrence

  2. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescents |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Planning | Department of Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning How Energy Efficiency Programs Can Support State Climate and Energy Planning Provides an overview of seven energy efficiency program types that offer large savings opportunities, including building energy codes, city-led efficiency programs, combined heat and power, energy savings performance contracting, industrial energy efficiency, low income energy efficiency, and ratepayer-funded energy

  3. DOE Requires Manufacturer and Labeler to Cease Sale of Incandescent...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Non-Compliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation and Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Company requiring that they halt the sale of 8 basic...

  4. How Energy-Efficient Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional Incandescent...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Light Bulbs Compare with Traditional ... The table below compares a 60 watt (W) traditional ... *Based on 2 hrsday of usage, an electricity rate of 11 ...

  5. Invisible-fluorescent identification tags for materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Linda A.; Allgood, Glenn O.; Smithwick, III, Robert W.

    2013-03-26

    A taggant composition including a taggant material that is invisible in light of the visible spectrum and fluoresces under a non-visible excitation energy, a binder, and a solvent in which the taggant material and the binder are dissolved. The taggant composition can be printed or otherwise applied to a material such as fabric to provide a detectable and identifiable indicium. A method and apparatus for detecting and decoding the taggant indicium are also provided.

  6. Fluorescent lighting with aluminum nitride phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherepy, Nerine J.; Payne, Stephen A.; Seeley, Zachary M.; Srivastava, Alok M.

    2016-05-10

    A fluorescent lamp includes a glass envelope; at least two electrodes connected to the glass envelope; mercury vapor and an inert gas within the glass envelope; and a phosphor within the glass envelope, wherein the phosphor blend includes aluminum nitride. The phosphor may be a wurtzite (hexagonal) crystalline structure Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN phosphor, where M may be drawn from beryllium, magnesium, calcium, strontium, barium, zinc, scandium, yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, praseodymium, europium, gadolinium, terbium, ytterbium, bismuth, manganese, silicon, germanium, tin, boron, or gallium is synthesized to include dopants to control its luminescence under ultraviolet excitation. The disclosed Al.sub.(1-x)M.sub.xN:Mn phosphor provides bright orange-red emission, comparable in efficiency and spectrum to that of the standard orange-red phosphor used in fluorescent lighting, Y.sub.2O.sub.3:Eu. Furthermore, it offers excellent lumen maintenance in a fluorescent lamp, and does not utilize "critical rare earths," minimizing sensitivity to fluctuating market prices for the rare earth elements.

  7. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L.

    1983-01-01

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  8. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  9. INITIAL OPERATION OF THE LEDA BEAM-INDUCED FLUORESCENCE DIAGNOSTIC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. KAMPERSCHROER; ET AL

    2000-06-01

    A diagnostic based on beam-induced fluorescence has been developed and used to examine the expanded beam in the High-Energy Beam Transport (HEBT) section of the Low Energy Demonstration Accelerator (LEDA). The system consists of a camera, a gas injector, a spectrometer, and a control system. Gas is injected to provide a medium for the beam to excite, the camera captures the resulting image of the fluorescing gas, and the spectrometer measures the spectrum of the emitted light. EPICS was used to control the camera and acquire and store images. Data analysis is presently being performed offline. A Kodak DCS420m professional CCD camera is the primary component of the optical system. InterScience, Inc. modified the camera with the addition of a gain of 4000 image intensifier, thereby producing an intensified camera with a sensitivity of {approximately}0.5 milli-lux. Light is gathered with a 1 inch format, 16-160 mm, Computar zoom lens. This lens is attached to the camera via a Century Precision Optics relay lens. Images obtained using only hydrogen from the beam stop exhibited features not yet understood. Images with good signal-to-noise ratio were obtained with the injection of sufficient nitrogen to raise the HEBT pressure to 2-8x10{sup {minus}6} torr. Two strong nitrogen lines, believed to be of the first negative group of N{sub 2}{sup +}, were identified at 391 and 428 nm.

  10. A portable time-domain LED fluorimeter for nanosecond fluorescence lifetime measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hongtao; Salthouse, Christopher D.; Qi, Ying; Mountziaris, T. J.; Chemical Engineering Department, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003

    2014-05-15

    Fluorescence lifetime measurements are becoming increasingly important in chemical and biological research. Time-domain lifetime measurements offer fluorescence multiplexing and improved handling of interferers compared with the frequency-domain technique. In this paper, an all solid-state, filterless, and highly portable light-emitting-diode based time-domain fluorimeter (LED TDF) is reported for the measurement of nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes. LED based excitation provides more wavelengths options compared to laser diode based excitation, but the excitation is less effective due to the uncollimated beam, less optical power, and longer latency in state transition. Pulse triggering and pre-bias techniques were implemented in our LED TDF to improve the peak optical power to over 100 mW. The proposed pulsing circuit achieved an excitation light fall time of less than 2 ns. Electrical resetting technique realized a time-gated photo-detector to remove the interference of the excitation light with fluorescence. These techniques allow the LED fluorimeter to accurately measure the fluorescence lifetime of fluorescein down to concentration of 0.5 μM. In addition, all filters required in traditional instruments are eliminated for the non-attenuated excitation/emission light power. These achievements make the reported device attractive to biochemical laboratories seeking for highly portable lifetime detection devices for developing sensors based on fluorescence lifetime changes. The device was initially validated by measuring the lifetimes of three commercial fluorophores and comparing them with reported lifetime data. It was subsequently used to characterize a ZnSe quantum dot based DNA sensor.

  11. High Efficiency, Illumination Quality OLEDs for Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Shiang; James Cella; Kelly Chichak; Anil Duggal; Kevin Janora; Chris Heller; Gautam Parthasarathy; Jeffery Youmans; Joseph Shiang

    2008-03-31

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate a 45 lumen per watt white light device based upon the use of multiple emission colors through the use of solution processing. This performance level is a dramatic extension of the team's previous 15 LPW large area illumination device. The fundamental material system was based upon commercial polymer materials. The team was largely able to achieve these goals, and was able to deliver to DOE a 90 lumen illumination source that had an average performance of 34 LPW a 1000 cd/m{sup 2} with peak performances near 40LPW. The average color temperature is 3200K and the calculated CRI 85. The device operated at a brightness of approximately 1000cd/m{sup 2}. The use of multiple emission colors particularly red and blue, provided additional degrees of design flexibility in achieving white light, but also required the use of a multilayered structure to separate the different recombination zones and prevent interconversion of blue emission to red emission. The use of commercial materials had the advantage that improvements by the chemical manufacturers in charge transport efficiency, operating life and material purity could be rapidly incorporated without the expenditure of additional effort. The program was designed to take maximum advantage of the known characteristics of these material and proceeded in seven steps. (1) Identify the most promising materials, (2) assemble them into multi-layer structures to control excitation and transport within the OLED, (3) identify materials development needs that would optimize performance within multilayer structures, (4) build a prototype that demonstrates the potential entitlement of the novel multilayer OLED architecture (5) integrate all of the developments to find the single best materials set to implement the novel multilayer architecture, (6) further optimize the best materials set, (7) make a large area high illumination quality white OLED. A photo of the final deliverable is shown. In 2003, a large area, OLED based illumination source was demonstrated that could provide light with a quality, quantity, and efficiency on par with what can be achieved with traditional light sources. The demonstration source was made by tiling together 16 separate 6-inch x 6-inch blue-emitting OLEDs. The efficiency, total lumen output, and lifetime of the OLED based illumination source were the same as what would be achieved with an 80 watt incandescent bulb. The devices had an average efficacy of 15 LPW and used solution-processed OLEDs. The individual 6-inch x 6-inch devices incorporated three technology strategies developed specifically for OLED lighting -- downconversion for white light generation, scattering for outcoupling efficiency enhancement, and a scalable monolithic series architecture to enable large area devices. The downconversion approach consists of optically coupling a blue-emitting OLED to a set of luminescent layers. The layers are chosen to absorb the blue OLED emission and then luminescence with high efficiency at longer wavelengths. The composition and number of layers are chosen so that the unabsorbed blue emission and the longer wavelength re-emission combine to make white light. A downconversion approach has the advantage of allowing a wide variety of colors to be made from a limited set of blue emitters. In addition, one does not have to carefully tune the emission wavelength of the individual electro-luminescent species within the OLED device in order to achieve white light. The downconversion architecture used to develop the 15LPW large area light source consisted of a polymer-based blue-emitting OLED and three downconversion layers. Two of the layers utilized perylene based dyes from BASF AG of Germany with high quantum efficiency (>98%) and one of the layers consisted of inorganic phosphor particles (Y(Gd)AG:Ce) with a quantum efficiency of {approx}85%. By independently varying the optical density of the downconversion layers, the overall emission spectrum could be adjusted to maximize performance for lighting (e.g. blackbody temperature, color rendering and luminous efficacy) while keeping the properties of the underlying blue OLED constant. The success of the downconversion approach is ultimately based upon the ability to produce efficient emission in the blue. Table 1 presents a comparison of the current performance of the conjugated polymer, dye-doped polymer, and dendrimer approaches to making a solution-processed blue OLED as 2006. Also given is the published state of the art performance of a vapor-deposited blue OLED. One can see that all the approaches to a blue OLED give approximately the same external quantum efficiency at 500 cd/m{sup 2}. However, due to its low operating voltage, the fluorescent conjugated polymer approach yields a superior power efficiency at the same brightness.

  12. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Grsoy, Do?a; Bier, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversionmoreapproaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.less

  13. Hyperspectral image reconstruction for x-ray fluorescence tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grsoy, Do?a; Bier, Tekin; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Newville, Matthew G.; De Carlo, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    A penalized maximum-likelihood estimation is proposed to perform hyperspectral (spatio-spectral) image reconstruction for X-ray fluorescence tomography. The approach minimizes a Poisson-based negative log-likelihood of the observed photon counts, and uses a penalty term that has the effect of encouraging local continuity of model parameter estimates in both spatial and spectral dimensions simultaneously. The performance of the reconstruction method is demonstrated with experimental data acquired from a seed of arabidopsis thaliana collected at the 13-ID-E microprobe beamline at the Advanced Photon Source. The resulting element distribution estimates with the proposed approach show significantly better reconstruction quality than the conventional analytical inversion approaches, and allows for a high data compression factor which can reduce data acquisition times remarkably. In particular, this technique provides the capability to tomographically reconstruct full energy dispersive spectra without compromising reconstruction artifacts that impact the interpretation of results.

  14. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 ?M with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase the concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 ?M may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.

  15. Superior optical nonlinearity of an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Tingchao; Sreejith, Sivaramapanicker; Zhao, Yanli; Gao, Yang; Grimsdale, Andrew C.; Lin, Xiaodong E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg; Sun, Handong E-mail: hdsun@ntu.edu.sg

    2015-03-16

    Strong multiphoton absorption and harmonic generation in organic fluorescent chromophores are, respectively, significant in many fields of research. However, most of fluorescent chromophores fall short of the full potential due to the absence of the combination of such different nonlinear upconversion behaviors. Here, we demonstrate that an exceptional fluorescent stilbene dye could exhibit efficient two- and three-photon absorption under the excitation of femtosecond pulses in solution phase. Benefiting from its biocompatibility and strong excited state absorption behavior, in vitro two-photon bioimaging and superior optical limiting have been exploited, respectively. Simultaneously, the chromophore could generate efficient three-photon excited fluorescence and third-harmonic generation (THG) when dispersed into PMMA film, circumventing the limitations of classical fluorescent chromophores. Such chromophore may find application in the production of coherent light sources of higher photon energy. Moreover, the combination of three-photon excited fluorescence and THG can be used in tandem to provide complementary information in biomedical studies.

  16. LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting Facts-listed products as well as products evaluated in the latest CALiPER reports. Eric Richman, also of PNNL, reported on a recently completed GATEWAY demonstration project, in which LED and

  17. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity

  18. Simultaneous neuron- and astrocyte-specific fluorescent marking (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Simultaneous neuron- and astrocyte-specific fluorescent marking Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simultaneous neuron- and astrocyte-specific fluorescent marking Systematic and simultaneous analysis of multiple cell types in the brain is becoming important, but such tools have not yet been adequately developed. Here, we aimed to generate a method for the specific fluorescent labeling of neurons and astrocytes, two major cell types in the brain, and we have

  19. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  20. Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps The Department of Energy (DOE) develops standardized data templates for reporting the results of tests conducted in accordance with current DOE test procedures. Templates may be used by third-party laboratories under contract with DOE that conduct testing in support of ENERGY STAR® verification, DOE rulemakings, and enforcement of the federal energy conservation standards. File Medium Base Compact Fluorescent Lamps --

  1. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by MOF Formation for Quantum Yield

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancement | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by MOF Formation for Quantum Yield Enhancement

  2. Organimetallic Fluorescent Complex Polymers For Light Emitting Applications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shi, Song Q.; So, Franky

    1997-10-28

    A fluorescent complex polymer with fluorescent organometallic complexes connected by organic chain spacers is utilized in the fabrication of light emitting devices on a substantially transparent planar substrate by depositing a first conductive layer having p-type conductivity on the planar surface of the substrate, depositing a layer of a hole transporting and electron blocking material on the first conductive layer, depositing a layer of the fluorescent complex polymer on the layer of hole transporting and electron blocking material as an electron transporting emissive layer and depositing a second conductive layer having n-type conductivity on the layer of fluorescent complex polymer.

  3. CMI-funded research creates better fluorescent lighting | The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CMI-funded research creates better fluorescent lighting General Electric (GE), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have created...

  4. Fluorescent tracking of nickel ions in human cultured cells ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent tracking of nickel ions in human cultured cells Citation Details In-Document ... B.V., Amsterdam, The Netherlands, All rights reserved; Country of input: International ...

  5. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and fluorescence microscopy of green algae Citation Details In-Document Search ... Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A ...

  6. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, Chiranjit; Steinkamp, John A.

    1999-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  7. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  8. Mapping protein collapse with single molecule fluorescence and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    spectroscopy Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mapping protein collapse with single molecule fluorescence and kinetic synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy ...

  9. Three-dimensional x-ray fluorescence mapping of a gold nanoparticle-loaded phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong; Wang, Ge; Wu, Xizeng

    2014-03-15

    Purpose : X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising technique with sufficient specificity and sensitivity for identifying and quantifying features in small samples containing high atomic number (Z) materials such as iodine, gadolinium, and gold. In this study, the feasibility of applying XRF to early breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is studied using a novel approach for three-dimensional (3D) x-ray fluorescence mapping (XFM) of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded objects in a physical phantom at the technical level. Methods : All the theoretical analysis and experiments are conducted under the condition of using x-ray pencil beam and a compactly integrated x-ray spectrometer. The penetrability of the fluorescence x-rays from GNPs is first investigated by adopting a combination of BR12 with 70 mm/50 mm in thickness on the excitation/emission path to mimic the possible position of tumor goldin vivo. Then, a physical phantom made of BR12 is designed to translate in 3D space with three precise linear stages and subsequently the step by step XFM scanning is performed. The experimental technique named as background subtraction is applied to isolate the gold fluorescence from each spectrum obtained by the spectrometer. Afterwards, the attenuations of both the incident primary x-ray beam with energies beyond the gold K-edge energy (80.725 keV) and the isolated gold K{sub α} fluorescence x-rays (65.99 –69.80 keV) acquired after background subtraction are well calibrated, and finally the unattenuated K{sub α} fluorescence counts are used to realize mapping reconstruction and to describe the linear relationship between gold fluorescence counts and corresponding concentration of gold solutions. Results : The penetration results show that the goldK{sub α} fluorescence x-rays have sufficient penetrability for this phantom study, and the reconstructed mapping results indicate that both the spatial distribution and relative concentration of GNPs within the designed BR12 phantom can be well identified and quantified. Conclusions : Although the XFM method in this investigation is still studied at the technical level and is not yet practical for routinein vivo mapping tasks with GNPs, the current penetrability measurements and phantom study strongly suggest the feasibility to establish and develop a 3D XFM system.

  10. Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.6 Lighting

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 2003 Lighted Floorspace for the Stock of Commercial Buildings, by Type of Lamp (1) Type of Lamp (Billion SF) (2) Standard Fluorescent 59.7 96% Incandescent 38.5 62% Compact Fluorescent 27.6 44% High-Intensity Discharge 20.6 33% Halogen 17.7 29% Note(s): Source(s): EIA, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: Building Characteristics Tables, June 2006, Table B44, p. 220. Lighted Floorspace Percent of Total Lighted Floorspace: 62.06 Billion SF Lighted Floorspace 1) Mall buildings

  11. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Junjing; Vine, David J.; Chen, Si; Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Jin, Qiaoling; Phillips, Nicholas W.; Peterka, Tom; Ross, Rob; Vogt, Stefan; Jacobsen, Chris J.

    2015-02-24

    Trace metals play important roles in normal and in disease-causing biological functions. X-ray fluorescence microscopy reveals trace elements with no dependence on binding affinities (unlike with visible light fluorophores) and with improved sensitivity relative to electron probes. However, X-ray fluorescence is not very sensitive for showing the light elements that comprise the majority of cellular material. Here we show that X-ray ptychography can be combined with fluorescence to image both cellular structure and trace element distribution in frozen-hydrated cells at cryogenic temperatures, with high structural and chemical fidelity. Ptychographic reconstruction algorithms deliver phase and absorption contrast images at a resolutionmore » beyond that of the illuminating lens or beam size. Using 5.2-keV X-rays, we have obtained sub–30-nm resolution structural images and ~90-nm–resolution fluorescence images of several elements in frozen-hydrated green algae. This combined approach offers a way to study the role of trace elements in their structural context.« less

  12. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian J.; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-29

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX?s photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  13. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Mozin, Vladimir; Prussin, Stanley

    2009-06-05

    This paper discusses the use of nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) techniques for the isotopic and quantitative assaying of radioactive material. Potential applications include age-dating of an unknown radioactive source, pre- and post-detonation nuclear forensics, and safeguards for nuclear fuel cycles Examples of age-dating a strong radioactive source and assaying a spent fuel pin are discussed. The modeling work has ben performed with the Monte Carlo radiation transport computer code MCNPX, and the capability to simulate NRF has bee added to the code. Discussed are the limitations in MCNPX's photon transport physics for accurately describing photon scattering processes that are important contributions to the background and impact the applicability of the NRF assay technique.

  14. Radioiodine detector based on laser induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, Jimmie R.; Baronavski, Andrew P.

    1980-01-01

    The invention involves the measurement of the concentration of the radioisotope .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the presence of a gas. The invention uses a laser to excite a sample of the .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a sample gas chamber and a reference sample of a known concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a reference gas chamber. The .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample and reference gas chamber each gives off fluorescence emissions which are received by photomultipliers which provide signals to a detector. The detector uses a ratioing technique to determine the concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample gas chamber.

  15. Enhanced-locality fiber-optic two-photon-fluorescence live-brain interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedotov, I. V.; Doronina-Amitonova, L. V.; Sidorov-Biryukov, D. A.; Fedotov, A. B.; Anokhin, K. V.; Kilin, S. Ya.; Sakoda, K.; Zheltikov, A. M.

    2014-02-24

    Two-photon excitation is shown to substantially enhance the locality of fiber-based optical interrogation of strongly scattering biotissues. In our experiments, a high-numerical-aperture, large-core-are fiber probe is used to deliver the 200-fs output of a 100-MHz mode-locked ytterbium fiber laser to samples of live mouse brain, induce two-photon fluorescence of nitrogen–vacancy centers in diamond markers in brain sample. Fiber probes with a high numerical aperture and a large core area are shown to enable locality enhancement in fiber-laser–fiber-probe two-photon brain excitation and interrogation without sacrificing the efficiency of fluorescence response collection.

  16. Design and evaluation of a device for fast multispectral time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yankelevich, Diego R.; Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, California 95616 ; Ma, Dinglong; Liu, Jing; Sun, Yang; Sun, Yinghua; Bec, Julien; Marcu, Laura; Elson, Daniel S.

    2014-03-15

    The application of time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) to in vivo tissue diagnosis requires a method for fast acquisition of fluorescence decay profiles in multiple spectral bands. This study focusses on development of a clinically compatible fiber-optic based multispectral TRFS (ms-TRFS) system together with validation of its accuracy and precision for fluorescence lifetime measurements. It also presents the expansion of this technique into an imaging spectroscopy method. A tandem array of dichroic beamsplitters and filters was used to record TRFS decay profiles at four distinct spectral bands where biological tissue typically presents fluorescence emission maxima, namely, 390, 452, 542, and 629 nm. Each emission channel was temporally separated by using transmission delays through 200 μm diameter multimode optical fibers of 1, 10, 19, and 28 m lengths. A Laguerre-expansion deconvolution algorithm was used to compensate for modal dispersion inherent to large diameter optical fibers and the finite bandwidth of detectors and digitizers. The system was found to be highly efficient and fast requiring a few nano-Joule of laser pulse energy and <1 ms per point measurement, respectively, for the detection of tissue autofluorescent components. Organic and biological chromophores with lifetimes that spanned a 0.8–7 ns range were used for system validation, and the measured lifetimes from the organic fluorophores deviated by less than 10% from values reported in the literature. Multi-spectral lifetime images of organic dye solutions contained in glass capillary tubes were recorded by raster scanning the single fiber probe in a 2D plane to validate the system as an imaging tool. The lifetime measurement variability was measured indicating that the system provides reproducible results with a standard deviation smaller than 50 ps. The ms-TRFS is a compact apparatus that makes possible the fast, accurate, and precise multispectral time-resolved fluorescence lifetime measurements of low quantum efficiency sub-nanosecond fluorophores.

  17. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; et al

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction ofmore » high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.« less

  18. Thermal green protein, an extremely stable, nonaggregating fluorescent protein created by structure-guided surface engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Close, Devin W.; Paul, Craig Don; Langan, Patricia S.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Halfmann, Randal; Rocha, Reginaldo C.; Waldo, Geoffery S.; Payne, Riley J.; Rucker, Joseph B.; Prescott, Mark; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.

    2015-05-08

    In this paper, we describe the engineering and X-ray crystal structure of Thermal Green Protein (TGP), an extremely stable, highly soluble, non-aggregating green fluorescent protein. TGP is a soluble variant of the fluorescent protein eCGP123, which despite being highly stable, has proven to be aggregation-prone. The X-ray crystal structure of eCGP123, also determined within the context of this paper, was used to carry out rational surface engineering to improve its solubility, leading to TGP. The approach involved simultaneously eliminating crystal lattice contacts while increasing the overall negative charge of the protein. Despite intentional disruption of lattice contacts and introduction of high entropy glutamate side chains, TGP crystallized readily in a number of different conditions and the X-ray crystal structure of TGP was determined to 1.9 Å resolution. The structural reasons for the enhanced stability of TGP and eCGP123 are discussed. We demonstrate the utility of using TGP as a fusion partner in various assays and significantly, in amyloid assays in which the standard fluorescent protein, EGFP, is undesirable because of aberrant oligomerization.

  19. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement Previous Next List Zhangwen Wei, Zhi-Yuan Gu, Ravi K. Arvapally, Ying-Pin Chen, Roy N. McDougald Jr., Joshua F. Ivy, Andrey A. Yakovenko, Dawei Feng, Mohammad A. Omary, and Hong-Cai Zhou, J. Am. Chem. Soc., 136, 8269-8276 (2014)

  20. Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-08-08

    A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope. 4 figs.

  1. Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W.; George, William A.

    1989-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope.

  2. Ultrahigh resolution multicolor colocalization of single fluorescent probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier; Lacoste, Thilo D.

    2005-01-18

    A novel optical ruler based on ultrahigh-resolution colocalization of single fluorescent probes is described. Two unique families of fluorophores are used, namely energy-transfer fluorescent beads and semiconductor nanocrystal (NC) quantum dots, that can be excited by a single laser wavelength but emit at different wavelengths. A novel multicolor sample-scanning confocal microscope was constructed which allows one to image each fluorescent light emitter, free of chromatic aberrations, by scanning the sample with nanometer scale steps using a piezo-scanner. The resulting spots are accurately localized by fitting them to the known shape of the excitation point-spread-function of the microscope.

  3. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-09

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  4. System and method for measuring fluorescence of a sample

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Riot, Vincent J

    2015-03-24

    The present disclosure provides a system and a method for measuring fluorescence of a sample. The sample may be a polymerase-chain-reaction (PCR) array, a loop-mediated-isothermal amplification array, etc. LEDs are used to excite the sample, and a photodiode is used to collect the sample's fluorescence. An electronic offset signal is used to reduce the effects of background fluorescence and the noises from the measurement system. An integrator integrates the difference between the output of the photodiode and the electronic offset signal over a given period of time. The resulting integral is then converted into digital domain for further processing and storage.

  5. Heat wave contributes to higher summer electricity demand in...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    drop 1.1 percent this year and then fall almost one-half percent in 2015. Compact fluorescent and LED lighting use about 75 percent less energy than traditional incandescent bulbs. ...

  6. School Energy Survey Student Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of 40 new power plants. INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Brightness 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens 850 lumens Life of Bulb 1,000...

  7. School Energy Survey Teacher Guide

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Key Student Guide Page 20 INCANDESCENT BULB HALOGEN COMPACT FLUORESCENT (CFL) LIGHT EMITTING DIODE (LED) Number of bulbs to get 25,000 hours 25 8.3 2.5 1 Cost of bulbs for 25,000...

  8. Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Life-Cycle Assessment of Energy and Environmental Impacts of LED Lighting Products Part I: Review of the Life-Cycle Energy Consumption of Incandescent, Compact Fluorescent, and LED ...

  9. The History of the Light Bulb | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Incandescent Bulbs Light the Way Long before Thomas Edison patented -- first in 1879 and ... Both Thomas Edison and Nikola Tesla experimented with fluorescent lamps in the 1890s, but ...

  10. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    41 51 61 INCANDESCENT HALOGEN CFL LED 0 500 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 COUNCIL BASELINE MARKET AVERAGE TYPE: CURRENT PRACTICE BASELINE EFFICACY Linear Fluorescent Lamps, 4ft...

  11. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  12. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  13. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Douglas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2002-09-24

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  14. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy at Micromolar Concentrations without Optical Nanoconfinement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Laurence, Ted A.; Ly, Sonny; Bourguet, Feliza; Fischer, Nicholas O.; Coleman, Matthew A.

    2014-08-14

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is an important technique for studying biochemical interactions dynamically that may be used in vitro and in cell-based studies. It is generally claimed that FCS may only be used at nM concentrations. We show that this general consensus is incorrect and that the limitation to nM concentrations is not fundamental but due to detector limits as well as laser fluctuations. With a high count rate detector system and applying laser fluctuation corrections, we demonstrate FCS measurements up to 38 μM with the same signal-to-noise as at lower concentrations. Optical nanoconfinement approaches previously used to increase themore » concentration range of FCS are not necessary, and further increases above 38 μM may be expected using detectors and detector arrays with higher saturation rates and better laser fluctuation corrections. This approach greatly widens the possibilities of dynamic measurements of biochemical interactions using FCS at physiological concentrations.« less

  15. Continuous Flow Cryostat for X-Ray Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weng, T.-C.; Linden, Peter J. E. M. van der; Glatzel, Pieter; Lapras, Christophe; Krzyzowski, Michael

    2010-06-23

    A continuous Helium flow cryostat was designed and built by Cryovac GMbH to specifications given by ESRF beamline ID26. The beamline has constructed a high energy resolution X-ray emission spectrometer using multiple spherically bent analyser crystals, together with the sample and detector on a vertical Rowland circle. The double shrouded cryostat has a low profile designed to fit into the spectrometer setup, the lowest detector position allows for a Bragg angle of 85 degrees with a 1 meter diameter Rowland circle. The cryostat has a temperature range of 5 to 300 Kelvin on the sample holder which is cooled by static Helium exchange gas. The cryostat has triple windows for beam entrance, transmission and fluorescence; the latter offers an opening angle of 80 degrees horizontally and 50 degrees vertically. The cryostat can be configured to work in two different operation modes: translation or rotation. The translation mode offers a displacement of 50 mm to accommodate multiple samples on the sample holder. The rotation mode is used for polarisation studies on single crystals.We show recent results obtained on Chromium containing molecular complexes; data collection was done at a temperature of 10 Kelvin to avoid radiation damage.

  16. Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fluorescence-based optimization of human bitter taste receptor expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Human TAS2 receptors (hTAS2Rs) perceive bitter tastants, but few studies have explored the structure-function relationships of these receptors. In this paper, we report our trials on

  17. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent In this study, an efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular

  18. The seasonal cycle of satellite chlorophyll fluorescence observations and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    its relationship to vegetation phenology and ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchange (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: The seasonal cycle of satellite chlorophyll fluorescence observations and its relationship to vegetation phenology and ecosystem-atmosphere carbon exchange Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The seasonal cycle of satellite chlorophyll fluorescence observations and its relationship to vegetation phenology and

  19. Photoswitchable Red Fluorescent Protein with a Large Stokes Shift (Journal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article) | SciTech Connect Photoswitchable Red Fluorescent Protein with a Large Stokes Shift Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Photoswitchable Red Fluorescent Protein with a Large Stokes Shift Authors: Piatkevich, Kiryl D. ; English, Brian P. ; Malashkevich, Vladimir N. ; Xiao, Hui ; Almo, Steven C. ; Singer, Robert H. ; Verkhusha, Vladislav V. [1] ; HHMI) [2] ; Helsinki) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (Einstein) ( Publication Date: 2014-11-19 OSTI Identifier: 1163388 Resource Type:

  20. Method and apparatus for detection of fluorescently labeled materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stern, David; Fiekowsky, Peter

    2004-05-25

    Fluorescently marked targets bind to a substrate 230 synthesized with polymer sequences at known locations. The targets are detected by exposing selected regions of the substrate 230 to light from a light source 100 and detecting the photons from the light fluoresced therefrom, and repeating the steps of exposure and detection until the substrate 230 is completely examined. The resulting data can be used to determine binding affinity of the targets to specific polymer sequences.

  1. Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Lighting and Other Electric Loads Healthcare Energy: Spotlight on Lighting and Other Electric Loads Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 Compact fluorescent, light-emitting diode, and energy-saving incandescent light bulbs. | Image by Dennis Schroeder/NREL 19469 The Building Technologies Office conducted a healthcare energy end-use monitoring project in partnership with two

  2. Studying Altocumulus Plus Virga with Ground-based Active and Passive Remote Sensors Zhien Wang1, Kenneth Sassen2, David Whiteman3, and Belay Demoz3 1University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville, MD 21228 2University of Alaska, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 3NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 E-mail: zhien@agnes.gsfc.nasa.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs December 9, 2013 - 4:13pm Addthis A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic A three-part Energy Department-funded study indicates LEDs are more environmentally friendly than compact fluorescent and incandescent lights. | Energy Department graphic

  3. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by MetalOrganic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Arvapally, Ravi K.; Chen, Ying-Pin; Ivy, Joshua F.; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Feng, Dawei; Omary, Mohammad A.; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metalorganic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm? blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  4. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, ZW; Gu, ZY; Arvapally, RK; Chen, YP; McDougald, RN; Ivy, JF; Yakovenko, AA; Feng, DW; Omary, MA; Zhou, HC

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 +/- 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm(-1) blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  5. Summer 2011 Intern Project- Michael Myers | Center for Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PHOSPHOR IMPLEMENTATION SCHEMES FOR EFFICIENT LED-BASED WHITE LIGHT Michael Myers Chemical ... Modern day lighting solutions include highly inefficient sources such as incandescent and ...

  6. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  7. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment was performed in September 2009 to test and demonstrate the applicability of the method to the quantitative measurement of an isotope of interest embedded in a thick target. The experiment, data analysis, and results are described in Section 4. The broad goal of our NRF studies is to assess the potential of the technique in safeguards applications. Three examples are analyzed in Section 5: the isotopic assay of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders, and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The study of NRF for the assay of SNF assemblies was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy as part of a large multi-lab/university effort to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. NRF is one of 14 NDA techniques being researched. The methodology for performing and analyzing quantitative NRF measurements was developed for determining Pu mass in SNF and is extensively discussed in this report. The same methodology was applied to the assessment of NRF for the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in MOX fuel. The analysis centers on determining suitable NRF measurement methods, measurement capabilities that could be realized with currently available instrumentation, and photon source and detector requirements for achieving useful NDA capabilities.

  8. Isotopic imaging via nuclear resonance fluorescence with laser-based Thomson radiation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barty, Christopher P. J.; Hartemann, Frederic V.; McNabb, Dennis P.; Pruet, Jason A.

    2009-07-21

    The present invention utilizes novel laser-based, high-brightness, high-spatial-resolution, pencil-beam sources of spectrally pure hard x-ray and gamma-ray radiation to induce resonant scattering in specific nuclei, i.e., nuclear resonance fluorescence. By monitoring such fluorescence as a function of beam position, it is possible to image in either two dimensions or three dimensions, the position and concentration of individual isotopes in a specific material configuration. Such methods of the present invention material identification, spatial resolution of material location and ability to locate and identify materials shielded by other materials, such as, for example, behind a lead wall. The foundation of the present invention is the generation of quasimonochromatic high-energy x-ray (100's of keV) and gamma-ray (greater than about 1 MeV) radiation via the collision of intense laser pulses from relativistic electrons. Such a process as utilized herein, i.e., Thomson scattering or inverse-Compton scattering, produces beams having diameters from about 1 micron to about 100 microns of high-energy photons with a bandwidth of .DELTA.E/E of approximately 10E.sup.-3.

  9. Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quiter, Brian; Ludewigt, Bernhard; Ambers, Scott

    2011-06-30

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of gamma rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. NRF promises the unique capability of directly quantifying a specific isotope without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as is required in other measurement techniques. We have analyzed the potential of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique for quantitative measurements of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the low concentrations of 239Pu in SNF and its small integrated NRF cross sections, the main challenge in achieving precise and accurate measurements lies in accruing sufficient counting statistics in a reasonable measurement time. Using analytical modeling, and simulations with the radiation transport code MCNPX that has been experimentally tested recently, the backscatter and transmission methods were quantitatively studied for differing photon sources and radiation detector types. Resonant photon count rates and measurement times were estimated for a range of photon source and detection parameters, which were used to determine photon source and gamma-ray detector requirements. The results indicate that systems based on a bremsstrahlung source and present detector technology are not practical for high-precision measurements of 239Pu in SNF. Measurements that achieve the desired uncertainties within hour-long measurements will either require stronger resonances, which may be expressed by other Pu isotopes, or require quasi-monoenergetic photon sources with intensities that are approximately two orders of magnitude higher than those currently being designed or proposed.This work is part of a larger effort sponsored by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative to develop an integrated instrument, comprised of individual NDA techniques with complementary features, that is fully capable of determining Pu mass in spent fuel assemblies.

  10. Crystallographic study of red fluorescent protein eqFP578 and its far-red variant Katushka reveals opposite pH-induced isomerization of chromophore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.; Shemiakina, Irina I.; Chudakov, Dmitriy M.; Artemyev, Igor; Wlodawer, Alexander; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei (Russ. Acad. Sci.); (SAIC); (NCI)

    2012-08-10

    The wild type red fluorescent protein eqFP578 (from sea anemone Entacmaea quadricolor, {lambda}{sub ex} = 552 nm, {lambda}{sub em} = 578 nm) and its bright far-red fluorescent variant Katushka ({lambda}{sub ex} = 588 nm, {lambda}{sub em} = 635 nm) are characterized by the pronounced pH dependence of their fluorescence. The crystal structures of eqFP578f (eqFP578 with two point mutations improving the protein folding) and Katushka have been determined at the resolution ranging from 1.15 to 1.85 {angstrom} at two pH values, corresponding to low and high level of fluorescence. The observed extinguishing of fluorescence upon reducing pH in eqFP578f and Katushka has been shown to be accompanied by the opposite trans-cis and cis-trans chromophore isomerization, respectively. Asn143, Ser158, His197 and Ser143, Leu174, and Arg197 have been shown to stabilize the respective trans and cis fluorescent states of the chromophores in eqFP578f and Katushka at higher pH. The cis state has been suggested as being primarily responsible for the observed far-red shift of the emission maximum of Katushka relative to that of eqFP578f.

  11. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  12. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  13. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan; Panjehpour, Masoud; Overholt, Bergein F.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  14. Biochip Image Grid Normalization Absolute Signal Fluorescence Measurement Using

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-04-17

    This software was developed to measure absolute fluorescent intensities of gel pads on a microchip in units defined by a standard fluorescent slide. It can accomodate varying measurement conditions (e.g. exposure time, sensitivity of detector, resolution of detector, etc.) as well as fluorescent microscopes with non-uniform sensitivity across their field of view allowing the user to compare measurements done on different detectors with varying exposure times, sensitivities, and resolutions. The software is designed both tomore » operate Roper Scientific, Inc. cameras and to use image files produced by the program supplied with that equipment for its calculations. the intensity of the gel pad signal is computed so as to reduce background influence.« less

  15. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedelacq,J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP.

  16. Digital optical phase conjugation of fluorescence in turbid tissue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vellekoop, Ivo M.; Cui Meng; Yang Changhuei

    2012-08-20

    We demonstrate a method for phase conjugating fluorescence. Our method, called reference free digital optical phase conjugation, can conjugate extremely weak, incoherent optical signals. It was used to phase conjugate fluorescent light originating from a bead covered with 0.5 mm of light-scattering tissue. The phase conjugated beam refocuses onto the bead and causes a local increase of over two orders of magnitude in the light intensity. Potential applications are in imaging, optical trapping, and targeted photochemical activation inside turbid tissue.

  17. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

    1992-12-29

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

  18. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael J.; Rubenstein, Francis M.; Whitman, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

  19. Fluorescence dye tagging scheme for mercury quantification and speciation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jiao, Hong; Catterall, Hannah

    2015-09-22

    A fluorescent dye or fluorophore capable of forming complexes with mercury comprises 6,8-difluoro-7-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromene-3-carboxylate amide, wherein the amide is formed by reacting the succinimidyl ester (Pacific Blue.TM.) with an amino acid containing a thiol group, such as cysteine or glutathione. Mercury complexes of the fluorophore fluoresce when excited by a UV or violet laser diode, and the detected intensity can be calibrated to quantify the concentration of mercury in a sample reacted with the fluorophore.

  20. Contemporary research with nuclear resonance fluorescence at the S-DALINAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zweidinger, M.; Beck, T.; Beller, J.; Gayer, U.; Mertes, L.; Pai, H.; Pietralla, N.; Ries, P.; Romig, C.; Werner, V.

    2015-02-24

    In the last decades many nuclear resonance fluorescence experiments aiming for low-lying dipole excitations were performed at the Darmstadt High Intensity Photon Setup at S-DALINAC facility. On the electric dipole side, quadrupole-octupole coupled states and the Pygmy Dipole Resonance are of particular interest. On the magnetic dipole side, the so-called scissors mode is in the focus of interest. Furthermore, using the method of resonant self absorption, the decay behavior of J{sup π} = 1{sup −} states was investigated in {sup 140}Ce.

  1. Quantitative characterization of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor flowfield using unified, laser-induced iodine fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, D.G.; McDaniel, J.C.

    1989-01-01

    A calibrated, nonintrusive optical technique, laser-induced iodine fluorescence (LIIF) was used to quantify the steady, compressible flowfield of a nonreacting, supersonic combustor. The combustor was configured with single and staged, transverse-air injection into a supersonic-air freestream behind a rearward-facing step. Pressure, temperature, two-velocity components, and injectant mole fraction were measured with high spatial resolution in the three-dimensional flowfields. These experimental results provide a benchmark set of data for validation of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) codes being developed to model supersonic combustor flowfields. 8 refs.

  2. Development of a Cell-Based Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer Reporter for Bacillus anthracis Lethal Factor Protease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimura, R H; Steenblock, E R; Camarero, J A

    2007-03-22

    We report the construction of a cell-based fluorescent reporter for anthrax lethal factor (LF) protease activity using the principle of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). This was accomplished by engineering an Escherichia coli cell line to express a genetically encoded FRET reporter and LF protease. Both proteins were encoded in two different expression plasmids under the control of different tightly controlled inducible promoters. The FRET-based reporter was designed to contain a LF recognition sequence flanked by the FRET pair formed by CyPet and YPet fluorescent proteins. The length of the linker between both fluorescent proteins was optimized using a flexible peptide linker containing several Gly-Gly-Ser repeats. Our results indicate that this FRET-based LF reporter was readily expressed in E. coli cells showing high levels of FRET in vivo in the absence of LF. The FRET signal, however, decreased 5 times after inducing LF expression in the same cell. These results suggest that this cell-based LF FRET reporter may be used to screen genetically encoded libraries in vivo against LF.

  3. World Record White OLED Performance Exceeds 100 lm/W

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Universal Display Corporation (UDC) has successfully demonstrated a record-breaking white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) with a power efficacy of 102 lm/W at 1000 cd/m2 using its proprietary, high-efficiency phosphorescent OLED technology. This achievement represents a significant milestone for OLED technology, demonstrating performance that surpasses the power efficacy of incandescent bulbs with less than 15 lm/W and fluorescent lamps at 60-90 lm/W. Funded in part by DOE, UDC's achievement is a major step toward DOE's roadmap goal of a 150 lm/W commercial OLED light source by 2015.

  4. Incentive Fee Determination Summary Contractor: Washington Closure Hanford LLC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Incandescent Lighting Basics Incandescent Lighting Basics August 16, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis Incandescent lamps consist of a wire filament inside a glass bulb that is usually filled with inert gas, and they produce light when an electric current heats the filament to a high temperature. Incandescent lamps have a low efficacy (10-17 lumens per watt) compared with other lighting options-because most of the energy released is in the form of heat rather than light-and a short average operating life

  5. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometer (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.

  6. Fluorescence spectra and biological activity of aerosolized bacillus spores and MS2 bacteriophage exposed to ozone at different relative humidities in a rotating drum

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ratnesar-Shumate, Shanna; Pan, Yong-Le; Hill, Steven C.; Kinahan, Sean; Corson, Elizabeth; Eshbaugh, Jonathan; Santarpia, Joshua L.

    2015-10-14

    Biological aerosols (bioaerosols) released into the environment may undergo physical and chemical transformations when exposed to atmospheric constituents such as solar irradiation, reactive oxygenated species, ozone, free radicals, water vapor and pollutants. Aging experiments were performed in a rotating drum chamber subjecting bioaerosols, Bacillus thuringiensis Al Hakam (BtAH) spores and MS2 bacteriophages to ozone at 0 and 150 ppb, and relative humidities (RH) at 10%, 50%, and 80+%. Fluorescence spectra and intensities of the aerosols as a function of time in the reaction chamber were measured with a single particle fluorescence spectrometer (SPFS) and an Ultra-Violet Aerodynamic Particle Sizer® Spectrometermore » (UV-APS). Losses in biological activity were measured by culture and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (q-PCR) assay. For both types of aerosols the largest change in fluorescence emission was between 280 and 400 nm when excited at 263 nm followed by fluorescence emission between 380 and 700 nm when excited at 351 nm. The fluorescence for both BtAH and MS2 were observed to decrease significantly at high ozone concentration and high RH when excited at 263 nm excitation. The decreases in 263 nm excited fluorescence are indicative of hydrolysis and oxidation of tryptophan in the aerosols. Fluorescence measured with the UV-APS (355-nm excitation) increased with time for both BtAH and MS2 aerosols. A two log loss of MS2 bacteriophage infectivity was observed in the presence of ozone at ~50% and 80% RH when measured by culture and normalized for physical losses by q-PCR. Viability of BtAH spores after exposure could not be measured due to the loss of genomic material during experiments, suggesting degradation of extracelluar DNA attributable to oxidation. The results of these studies indicate that the physical and biological properties of bioaerosols change significantly after exposure to ozone and water vapor.« less

  7. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  8. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Robert B.; Kimball, Alvin W.; Gesteland, Raymond F.; Ferguson, F. Mark; Dunn, Diane M.; Di Sera, Leonard J.; Cherry, Joshua L.

    1995-01-01

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  9. Purchasing Energy-Efficient General Service Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance for general service fluorescent lamps (GSFLs), a product category covered by FEMP efficiency requirements. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies purchase ENERGY STAR qualified or FEMP designated products in all product categories covered by these programs and in any acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  10. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, Bruce A.; Siminovitch, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  11. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  12. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, Philip E.; Maya, Jakob

    1987-01-01

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

  13. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  14. Energy-Efficient, High-Color-Rendering LED Lamps Using Oxyfluoride and Fluoride Phosphors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Setlur, A.; Radkov, E; Henderson, C; Her, J; Srivastava, A; Karkada, N; Kishore, M; Kumar, N; Aesram, D; et al.

    2010-01-01

    LED lamps using phosphor downconversion can be designed to replace incandescent or halogen sources with a 'warm-white' correlated color temperature (CCT) of 2700-3200 K and a color rendering index (CRI) greater than 90. However, these lamps have efficacies of {approx}70% of standard 'cool-white' LED packages (CCT = 4500-6000 K; CRI = 75-80). In this report, we describe structural and luminescence properties of fluoride and oxyfluoride phosphors, specifically a (Sr,Ca){sub 3}(Al,Si)O{sub 4}(F,O):Ce{sup 3+} yellow-green phosphor and a K{sub 2}TiF{sub 6}:Mn{sup 4+} red phosphor, that can reduce this gap and therefore meet the spectral and efficiency requirements for high-efficacy LED lighting. LED lamps with a warm-white color temperature (3088 K), high CRI (90), and an efficacy of {approx}82 lm/W are demonstrated using these phosphors. This efficacy is {approx}85% of comparable cool-white lamps using typical Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12}:Ce{sup 3+}-based phosphors, significantly reducing the efficacy gap between warm-white and cool-white LED lamps that use phosphor downconversion.

  15. Ruby and Sm:YAG fluorescence pressure gauges up to 120 GPa and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Ruby and Sm:YAG fluorescence pressure gauges up to 120 GPa and 700 K Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Ruby and Sm:YAG fluorescence pressure gauges up to 120 GPa and 700 K ...

  16. Raman and fluorescence characteristics of resonant inelastic X-ray scattering from doped superconducting cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, H. Y.; Jia, C. J.; Chen, Z. Y.; Wohlfeld, K.; Moritz, B.; Devereaux, T. P.; Wu, W. B.; Okamoto, J.; Lee, W. S.; Hashimoto, M.; et al

    2016-01-22

    Measurements of spin excitations are essential for an understanding of spin-mediated pairing for superconductivity; and resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) provides a considerable opportunity to probe high-energy spin excitations. However, whether RIXS correctly measures the collective spin excitations of doped superconducting cuprates remains under debate. Here we demonstrate distinct Raman- and fluorescence-like RIXS excitations of Bi1.5Pb0.6Sr1.54CaCu2O8+δ. Combining photon-energy and momentum dependent RIXS measurements with theoretical calculations using exact diagonalization provides conclusive evidence that the Raman-like RIXS excitations correspond to collective spin excitations, which are magnons in the undoped Mott insulators and evolve into paramagnons in doped superconducting compounds. In contrast,more » the fluorescence-like shifts are due primarily to the continuum of particle-hole excitations in the charge channel. Our results show that under the proper experimental conditions RIXS indeed can be used to probe paramagnons in doped high-Tc cuprate superconductors.« less

  17. Measurement of plutonium in spent nuclear fuel by self-induced x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Andrew S; Rudy, Cliff R; Tobin, Steve J; Charlton, William S; Stafford, A; Strohmeyer, D; Saavadra, S

    2009-01-01

    Direct measurement of the plutonium content in spent nuclear fuel is a challenging problem in non-destructive assay. The very high gamma-ray flux from fission product isotopes overwhelms the weaker gamma-ray emissions from plutonium and uranium, making passive gamma-ray measurements impossible. However, the intense fission product radiation is effective at exciting plutonium and uranium atoms, resulting in subsequent fluorescence X-ray emission. K-shell X-rays in the 100 keV energy range can escape the fuel and cladding, providing a direct signal from uranium and plutonium that can be measured with a standard germanium detector. The measured plutonium to uranium elemental ratio can be used to compute the plutonium content of the fuel. The technique can potentially provide a passive, non-destructive assay tool for determining plutonium content in spent fuel. In this paper, we discuss recent non-destructive measurements of plutonium X-ray fluorescence (XRF) signatures from pressurized water reactor spent fuel rods. We also discuss how emerging new technologies, like very high energy resolution microcalorimeter detectors, might be applied to XRF measurements.

  18. Fluorescence-based video profile beam diagnostics: Theory and experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, D.; Gilpatrick, D.; Shinas, M.; Garcia, R.; Yuan, V.; Zander, M.

    1994-05-01

    Inelastic collisions between accelerated particles and residual gas in the accelerator vessel can cause the residual gas to fluoresce. The gas fluorescence intensity is proportional to the current density of the particle beam. This process provides the foundation for a video diagnostic system to measure the profile and position of accelerated particle beams. This, in fact, has proven to be a useful diagnostic at several installations. This paper describes the light production process resulting from beam -- residual gas interactions and gives formulas for estimating the beam radiance for various conditions. Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) radiance calculations will be used as an example. In addition, measurement experiences with the GTA video diagnostics system will be discussed.

  19. Fluorescence-based video profile beam diagnostics: Theory and experience

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandoval, D.P.; Garcia, R.C.; Gilpatrick, J.D.; Shinas, M.A.; Wright, R.; Yuan, V.; Zander, M.E. )

    1994-10-10

    Inelastic collisions between accelerated particles and residual gas in the accelerator vessel can cause the residual gas to fluoresce. The gas fluorescence intensity is proportional to the current density of the particle beam. This process provides the foundation for a video diagnostics system to measure the profile and position of accelerated particle beams. This, in fact, has proven to be a useful diagnostic at several installations. This paper describes the light production process resulting from beam-residual gas interactions and gives formulas for estimating the beam radiance for various conditions. Ground Test Accelerator (GTA) radiance calculations will be used as an example. In addition, measurement experiences with the GTA video diagnostics system will be discussed.

  20. Fermentative Method for Making Nonoxide Fluorescent Nanoparticles (Quantum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dots) - Energy Innovation Portal Fermentative Method for Making Nonoxide Fluorescent Nanoparticles (Quantum Dots) Oak Ridge National Laboratory Contact ORNL About This Technology Incubation of quantum dots Incubation of quantum dots Technology Marketing SummaryA fermentative method for scalable, economical production of tailored quantum dots.DescriptionA method for manufacturing nanoparticles of certain nonoxide compounds of metals and nonmetals. The metals are typically Zn, Ag, Hg, Cd, Fe,

  1. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M.; Richardson, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  2. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-03

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons.

  3. Operating temperatures of recessed fluorescent fixtures with thermal insulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yarbrough, D.W.; Toor, I.A.

    1981-05-01

    Tests were performed to determine steady state surface temperatures for recessed fluorescent fixtures operated with and without thermal insulation on the top side of the fixture and to identify potential problems associated with the installation of thermal insulation. In addition to measuring temperatures, means were sought by which the fixtures can be thermally insulated and operated without fire hazards or damage to the fixture. (MCW)

  4. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Novel fluorescent heterodimeric DNA-staining energy transfer dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts. Kits and individual compounds are provided, where the kits find use for simultaneous detection of a variety of moieties, particularly using a single narrow wavelength irradiation source. The individual compounds are characterized by high donor quenching and high affinity to dsDNA as a result of optimizing the length of the linking group separating the two chromophores.

  5. Integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borowiec, Joseph Christopher; Cocoma, John Paul; Roberts, Victor David

    1998-01-01

    An integrated starting and running amalgam assembly for an electrodeless SEF fluorescent lamp includes a wire mesh amalgam support constructed to jointly optimize positions of a starting amalgam and a running amalgam in the lamp, thereby optimizing mercury vapor pressure in the lamp during both starting and steady-state operation in order to rapidly achieve and maintain high light output. The wire mesh amalgam support is constructed to support the starting amalgam toward one end thereof and the running amalgam toward the other end thereof, and the wire mesh is rolled for friction-fitting within the exhaust tube of the lamp. The positions of the starting and running amalgams on the wire mesh are jointly optimized such that high light output is achieved quickly and maintained, while avoiding any significant reduction in light output between starting and running operation.

  6. Office Of Nuclear Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Office Energy Checklist Office Energy Checklist This checklist outlines actions that conserve energy at the office. Checkbox Replace incandescent lights with compact fluorescent lights (CFLs) or light-emitting diodes (LEDs) for desk lamps and overhead lighting. Using CFLs instead of comparable incandescent bulbs can save about 50% on your lighting costs. CFLs use only one-fourth the energy and last up to 10 times longer. Checkbox Switch off all unnecessary lights. Use dimmers, motion sensors, or

  7. Parsons Infrastructure & Technology Group, Inc., Consent Order

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer Parents and Kids: Energize Your Summer June 21, 2013 - 11:33am Addthis Did you know: Incandescent light bulbs only convert about 10 percent of the energy they consume into light and the rest is released as heat. The Energy Department's Energy Bike demonstrates the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for power at their Earth Day

  8. Partial Shading in Monolithic Thin Film PV Modules: Analysis and Design |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Did you know: Incandescent light bulbs only convert about 10 percent of the energy they consume into light and the rest is released as heat. The Energy Department's Energy Bike demonstrates the physical effort it takes to power incandescent, compact fluorescent and LED light bulbs. Students from Churchill Road Elementary School in Virginia recently pedaled for power at their Earth Day assembly, learning firsthand about energy efficiency. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Did you know:

  9. Enhanced detection of fluorescence quenching in labeled cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crissman, H.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1987-11-30

    A method is provided for quantifying BrdU labeled DNA in cells. The BrdU is substituted onto the DNA and the DNA is stained with a first fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is quenchable by BrdU. The first fluorochrome is preferably a thymidine base halogen analogue, such as a Hoechst fluorochrome. The DNA is then stained with a second fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is substantially uneffected by BrdU. The second fluorochrome may be selected from the group consisting of mithramycin, chromomycin A3, olivomycin, propidium iodide and ethidium bromine. The fluorescence from the first and second fluorochromes is then measured to obtain first and second output signals, respectively. The first output signal is subtracted from the second output signal to obtain a difference signal which is functionally related to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into DNA. The technique is particularly useful for quantifying the synthesis of DNA during the S-phase of the cell cycle. 2 figs.

  10. Enhanced detection of fluorescence quenching in labeled cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crissman, Harry A.; Steinkamp, John A.

    1992-01-01

    A method is provided for quantifying BrdU labeled DNA in cells. The BrdU is incorporated into the DNA and the DNA is stained with a first fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is quenchable by BrdU. The first fluorochrome is preferably a thymidine base halogen analogue, such as a Hoechst fluorochrome. The DNA is then stained with a second fluorochrome having a fluorescence that is substantially uneffected by BrdU. The second fluorochrome may be selected from the group consisting of mithramycin, chromomycin A3, olivomycin, propidium iodide and ethidium bromine. The fluorescence from the first and second fluorochromes is then measured to obtain first and second output signals, respectively. The first output signal is substracted from the second output signal to obtain a difference signal which is functionally related to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into DNA. The technique is particularly useful for quantifying the synthesis of DNA during the S-phase of the cell cycle.

  11. The use of fluorescent compounds and complexes of metals as early warning detectors for corrosion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.E.; Agarwala, V.S.

    1994-12-31

    Several compounds have been identified which change their fluorescent behavior upon oxidation or reduction. These compounds have been investigated to determine the effects of temperature, pH, reduction conditions and re-oxidation behavior on their fluorescence. They have been incorporated into primer paint coatings for aluminum alloys and were found to fluoresce if the coating was scratched and exposed to air and moisture. Another compound was found to fluoresce with aluminum ions and its fluorescence behavior with varying conditions was also investigated. This compound, if added to a primer coating on an aluminum alloy, should fluoresce when aluminum ions begin to form as the alloy corrodes. Both of these methods appear to have potential to be early warning sensors for corrosion. Large surface areas of alloy material, such as are used in aircraft, could be scanned with UV light to detect the fluorescence of these materials indicating possible corrosion sites.

  12. ISSUANCE 2014-12-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

  13. ISSUANCE 2016-03-24: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification of Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamps Ballasts, Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Clarification of Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamps Ballasts, Final Rule

  14. High pressure effects on U L[subscript 3] x-ray absorption in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    High pressure effects on U Lsubscript 3 x-ray absorption in partial fluorescence yield ... Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High pressure effects on U Lsubscript 3 x-ray ...

  15. Evaluating the variability of ceramics with x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crown, P.L.; Schwalbe, L.A.; London, J.R.

    1984-01-01

    Our assessment of prehistoric trade in ceramics depends on our ability to identify and distinguish different sources of manufacture. For the American Southwest, archaeologists have proposed various models of ceramic manufacture and exchange. Until recently, conflicting hypotheses were tested mainly on the basis of petrographic analysis of nonplastic tempering materials. We have extended these analyses to include x-ray fluorescence (XRF). XRF provides a fast and inexpensive means of analyzing large numbers of samples. Since 1982, approximately 500 prehistoric sherds and 40 prepared clay and mineral samples have been examined with XRF. Multivariate statistical techniques have been applied to help identify groupings of samples with possible archaeological significance.

  16. Probing the photoluminescence properties of gold nanoclusters by fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, C. T. Lin, T. N.; Shen, J. L.; Center for Biomedical Technology, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan ; Lin, C. A.; Chang, W. H.; Department of Biomedical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Taiwan ; Cheng, H. W.; Tang, J.

    2013-12-21

    Gold nanoclusters (Au NCs) have attracted much attention for promising applications in biological imaging owing to their tiny sizes and biocompatibility. So far, most efforts have been focused on the strategies for fabricating high-quality Au NCs and then characterized by conventional ensemble measurement. Here, a fusion single-molecule technique combining fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and time-correlated single-photon counting can be successfully applied to probe the photoluminescence (PL) properties for sparse Au NCs. In this case, the triplet-state dynamics and diffusion process can be observed simultaneously and the relevant time constants can be derived. This work provides a complementary insight into the PL mechanism at the molecular levels for Au NCs in solution.

  17. Calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields for low-Z elements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nekkab, M.; Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, N. Kp; Ayliki, V.

    2015-03-30

    The analytical methods based on X-ray fluorescence are advantageous for practical applications in a variety of fields including atomic physics, X-ray fluorescence surface chemical analysis and medical research and so the accurate fluorescence yields (?{sub K}) are required for these applications. In this contribution we report a new parameters for calculation of K-shell fluorescence yields (?{sub K}) of elements in the range of 11?Z?30. The experimental data are interpolated by using the famous analytical function (?{sub k}/(1??{sub k})){sup 1/q} (were q=3, 3.5 and 4) vs Z to deduce the empirical K-shell fluorescence yields. A comparison is made between the results of the procedures followed here and those theoretical and other semi-empirical fluorescence yield values. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  18. A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang

    2002-04-11

    Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

  19. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube

  20. 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ballasts; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking | Department of Energy 4 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-10-14 Issuance: Test Procedures Correction for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on October 14,

  1. Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2011-07-15

    Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

  2. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  3. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  4. EA-1881: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to amend energy conservation standards for various consumer products and certain commercial and industrial equipment, including fluorescent lamp ballasts.

  5. A Stable Zr-Porphyrinic MOF Exhibiting pH-Dependent Fluorescence | Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome A Stable Zr-Porphyrinic MOF Exhibiting pH-Dependent Fluorescence

  6. Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line narrowing system (CE-FLNS) for on-line structural characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, R.J.; Small, G.J.; Shields, P.A.

    1999-04-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is interfaced with low temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization of separated molecular analytes. 21 figs.

  7. Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line narrowing system (CE-FLNS) for on-line structural characterization

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jankowiak, Ryszard J.; Small, Gerald J.; Shields, Peter A.

    1999-04-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is interfaced with low temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization of separated molecular analytes.

  8. Research and Development of a New Field Enhanced Low Temperature Thermionic Cathode that Enables Fluorescent Dimming and Loan Shedding without Auxiliary Cathode Heating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Jin

    2009-01-07

    This is the final report for project entitled 'Research and development of a new field enhanced low temperature thermionic cathode that enables fluorescent dimming and load shedding without auxiliary cathode heating', under Agreement Number: DE-FC26-04NT-42329. Under this project, a highly efficient CNT based thermionic cathode was demonstrated. This cathode is capable of emitting electron at a current density two order of magnitude stronger then a typical fluorescent cathode at same temperatures, or capable of emitting at same current density but at temperature about 300 C lower than that of a fluorescent cathode. Detailed fabrication techniques were developed including CVD growth of CNTs and sputter deposition of oxide thin films on CNTs. These are mature technologies that have been widely used in industry for large scale materials processing and device fabrications, thus, with further development work, the techniques developed in this project can be scaled-up in manufacturing environment. The prototype cathodes developed in this project were tested in lighting plasma discharge environment. In many cases, they not only lit and sustain the plasma, but also out perform the fluorescent cathodes in key parameters such like cathode fall voltages. More work will be needed to further evaluate more detailed and longer term performance of the prototype cathode in lighting plasma.

  9. Semiconductor Quantum Rods as Single Molecule FluorescentBiological Labels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Aihua; Gu, Weiwei; Boussert, Benjamine; Koski, Kristie; Gerion, Daniele; Manna, Liberato; Le Gros, Mark; Larabell, Carolyn; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-05-29

    In recent years, semiconductor quantum dots have beenapplied with great advantage in a wide range of biological imagingapplications. The continuing developments in the synthesis of nanoscalematerials and specifically in the area of colloidal semiconductornanocrystals have created an opportunity to generate a next generation ofbiological labels with complementary or in some cases enhanced propertiescompared to colloidal quantum dots. In this paper, we report thedevelopment of rod shaped semiconductor nanocrystals (quantum rods) asnew fluorescent biological labels. We have engineered biocompatiblequantum rods by surface silanization and have applied them fornon-specific cell tracking as well as specific cellular targeting. Theproperties of quantum rods as demonstrated here are enhanced sensitivityand greater resistance for degradation as compared to quantum dots.Quantum rods have many potential applications as biological labels insituations where their properties offer advantages over quantumdots.

  10. Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr.; Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2006-10-01

    Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

  11. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2015-07-14

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2014-04-01

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2011-06-07

    The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edward S.; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1996-02-20

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  15. Means and method for capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, Edwards; Kuhr, Werner G.

    1991-04-09

    A means and method for capillary zone electrphoresis with laser-induced indirect fluorescence detection. A detector is positioned on the capillary tube of a capillary zone electrophoresis system. The detector includes a laser which generates a laser beam which is imposed upon a small portion of the capillary tube. Fluorescence of the elutant electromigrating through the capillary tube is indirectly detected and recorded.

  16. Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2007-09-18

    The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

  17. Long wave fluorophore sensor compounds and other fluorescent sensor compounds in polymers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Walsh, Joseph C.; Heiss, Aaron M.; Noronha, Glenn; Vachon, David J.; Lane, Stephen M.; Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Peyser, Thomas A.; Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2004-07-20

    Fluorescent biosensor molecules, fluorescent biosensors and systems, as well as methods of making and using these biosensor molecules and systems are described. Embodiments of these biosensor molecules exhibit fluorescence emission at wavelengths greater than about 650 nm. Typical biosensor molecules include a fluorophore that includes an iminium ion, a linker moiety that includes a group that is an anilinic type of relationship to the fluorophore and a boronate substrate recognition/binding moiety, which binds glucose. The fluorescence molecules modulated by the presence or absence of polyhydroxylated analytes such as glucose. This property of these molecules of the invention, as well as their ability to emit fluorescent light at greater than about 650 nm, renders these biosensor molecules particularly well-suited for detecting and measuring in-vivo glucose concentrations.

  18. Laboratory-based micro-X-ray fluorescence setup using a von Hamos crystal spectrometer and a focused beam X-ray tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kayser, Y.; B?achucki, W.; Dousse, J.-Cl.; Hoszowska, J.; Neff, M.; Romano, V.

    2014-04-15

    The high-resolution von Hamos bent crystal spectrometer of the University of Fribourg was upgraded with a focused X-ray beam source with the aim of performing micro-sized X-ray fluorescence (XRF) measurements in the laboratory. The focused X-ray beam source integrates a collimating optics mounted on a low-power micro-spot X-ray tube and a focusing polycapillary half-lens placed in front of the sample. The performances of the setup were probed in terms of spatial and energy resolution. In particular, the fluorescence intensity and energy resolution of the von Hamos spectrometer equipped with the novel micro-focused X-ray source and a standard high-power water-cooled X-ray tube were compared. The XRF analysis capability of the new setup was assessed by measuring the dopant distribution within the core of Er-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers.

  19. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair for fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2010-08-17

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  20. DOE Requires Manufacturer and Labeler to Cease Sale of Incandescent Reflector Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE has issued Notices of Non-Compliance Determination to Westinghouse Lighting Corporation and Fuzhou Sunlight Lighting Electrical Appliance Company requiring that they halt the sale of 8 basic...

  1. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of Halogen Incandescent MR16 Lamps and LED Replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paget, M. L.; Lingard, R. D.; Myer, M. A.

    2008-11-01

    This benchmark report addresses the halogen MR16 lamp and its commercially available light-emitting diode (LED) replacements.

  2. CALiPER Benchmark Report: Performance of T12 and T8 Fluorescent Lamps and Troffers and LED Linear Replacement Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, M. A.; Paget, M. L.; Lingard, R. D.

    2009-01-01

    This report examines standard fluorescent lamps, the recessed troffers they are commonly used in, and available LED replacements for T12 and T8 fluorescent lamps and their application in fluorescent troffers.

  3. Nanoparticle-Based Immunochromatographic Test Strip with Fluorescent Detector for Quantification of Phosphorylated Acetycholinesterase: An Exposure Biomarker of Organophosphorous Agents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Weiying; Ge, Xiaoxiao; Tang, Yong; Du, Dan; Liu, Deli; Lin, Yuehe

    2013-09-21

    A nanoparticle-based fluorescence immunochromatographic test strip (FITS) coupled with a hand-held detector for highly selective and sensitive detection of phosphorylated acetylcholinesterase (AChE), an exposure biomarker of organophosphate (OP) pesticides and nerve agents, is reported. In this approach, OP-AChE adducts were selectively captured by quantum dot-tagged anti-AChE antibodies (Qdot-anti-AChE) and zirconia nanoparticles (ZrO2 NPs). The sandwich-like immunoreactions were performed among the Qdot-anti-AChE, OP-AChE and ZrO2 NPs to form Qdot-anti-AChE/OP-AChE/ZrO2 complex, which was detected by recording the fluorescence intensity of Qdot captured on the test line. Paraoxon was used as the model OP pesticides. Under optimal conditions, this portable FITS immunosensor demonstrates a highly linear absorption response over the range of 0.01 nM to 10 nM OP-AChE, with a detection limit of 4 pM, coupled with a good reproducibility. Moreover, the FITS immunosensor has been validated with OP-AChE spiked human plasma samples. This is the first report on the development of ZrO2 NPs-based FITS for detection of OP-AChE adduct. The FITS immunosensor provides a sensitive and low-cost sensing platform for on-site screening/evaluating OP pesticides and nerve agents poisoning.

  4. High dynamic range measurement of spectral responsivity and linearity of a radiation thermometer using a super-continuum laser and LEDs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Y. S.; Lee, D. H.; Park, C. W.; Park, S. N. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)] [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science 209 Gajeong-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-11

    To realize the temperature scale above the freezing point of silver according to the definition of ITS-90, the dynamic range of the spectral responsivity is one of the most important factors which limit its uncertainty. When the residual spectral response at both side bands of a spectral band is not negligible, a significant uncertainty can be caused by a low dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement. In general, incandescent lamps are used to measure the spectral responsivity and the linearity. The dynamic range of the spectral responsivity measurement is often limited by a trade-off with the desired spectral resolution, which is less than 6 decades. Nonlinearity is another limiting fact of uncertainties of the temperature scale. Tungsten lamps have disadvantage in the nonlinearity measurements in terms of adjustability of radiance level and spectral selectivity. We report spectral responsivity measurements of which the measurable dynamic range is enhanced 50 times after replacing a QTH lamp with a super continuum laser. We also present a spectrally selected linearity measurement over a wide dynamic range using high-brightness light emitting diode arrays to observe a slight saturation of linearity.

  5. Total internal reflection fluorescence spectrometer to study dynamic adsorption phenomena at liquid/liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tupy, M.J.; Blanch, H.W.; Radke, C.J.

    1998-08-01

    Adsorption at oil/water interfaces affects the performance of many industrial systems including oil recovery, extraction processes, cosmetic products, and food technology. However, no technique currently available can monitor adsorption dynamics using molecularly sensitive methods. The authors have constructed a novel total internal reflection fluorescence spectrometer (TIRFS) to follow dynamic adsorption events at the oil/water interface. The TIRFS monitors changes in fluorescence intensity and fluorescence spectra over time by maintaining an optical focus on the fluid interface during adsorption and desorption processes. Kinetic adsorption phenomena are examined by altering the composition of the aqueous phase and recording surface fluorescence response without mechanically disturbing the fluid/fluid interface. The spectrometer captures changes in the fluorescence intensity over tenths of seconds and maintains optical focus for periods of days. Mass transport of fluorescing surface-active material to and from the oil/water interface is accurately modeled using the simple one-dimensional diffusion equation. The geometry designed for this apparatus can be applied to other light-based techniques studying adsorption at liquid/liquid interfaces. Here, the authors apply the TIRFS apparatus to the study of {beta}-casein adsorption and desorption at an aliphatic oil/water interface. The observed increase in interfacial fluorescence due to {beta}-casein adsorption is slower than the diffusive flux, and desorption is found to be very slow if not irreversible. The TIRF spectrum indicates interaction of sorbed {beta}-casein with the oil phase and subsequent rearrangement of the native structure.

  6. LED exit signs: Improved technology leads the way to energy savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sardinsky, R.; Hawthorne, S.

    1994-12-31

    Recent innovations in light-emitting diode (LED) exit signs may make LED signs the best choice among the energy efficient options available. In the past, LED signs have offered low power consumption, projected long lamp life, and low maintenance requirements. Now, the best of the LED signs also offer improved optical designs that reduce their already low power consumption while improving visibility and appearance, and even reduce their cost. LED exit signs are gaining market share, and E Source expects this technology to eventually dominate over incandescent, compact fluorescent, and electroluminescent signs. More research is needed, however, to confirm manufacturers` claims of 20-year operating lives for LED signs. Conservative estimates place the number of exit signs in US buildings at about 40 million. Although each sign represents a very small part of a building`s load, exit signs are ready targets for energy efficiency upgrades -- they operate continuously and most use inefficient incandescent sources. With an LED sign, annual energy and maintenance costs can be reduced by more than 90 percent compared to a typical incandescent sign. Low annual costs help to offset the LED sign`s relatively high first cost. More than 25 utilities offer DSM incentives for energy efficient exit signs, and efficient alternatives are becoming more readily available. Recent improvements in optical designs enable many LED signs to visually out perform other sources. In addition to these benefits, LED exit signs have lower life cycle cost than most other options. The biggest barrier to their success, however, is that their first cost has been considerably higher than competing technologies. LED sign prices are falling rapidly, though, because manufacturers are continually improving optical designs of the fixtures to use fewer LEDs and thus even less energy while providing better performance.

  7. Electric Power | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Power Electric Power From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, <a href="/node/772396">learn more</a> about the long history of the light bulb. From incandescent bulbs to fluorescents to LEDs, learn more about the long history of the light bulb. Electricity -- the flow of electrical power -- is a secondary energy source, generated by the conversion of primary sources of energy, like fossil, nuclear, wind or solar. Keeping the power flowing to American homes and

  8. Single-molecule imaging at high fluorophore concentrations by local activation of dye

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Geertsema, Hylkje J.; Mangel, Walter F.; Schulte, Aartje C.; Spenkelink, Lisanne M.; McGrath, William J.; Morrone, Seamus R.; Sohn, Jungsan; Robinson, Andrew; van Oijen, Antoine M.

    2015-02-17

    Single-molecule fluorescence microscopy is a powerful approach to observe biomolecular interactions with high spatial and temporal resolution. Detecting fluorescent signals from individual, labeled proteins above high levels of background fluorescence remains challenging, however. For this reason, the concentrations of labeled proteins in in vitro assays are often kept low compared to their in vivo concentrations. Here, we present a new fluorescence imaging technique by which single fluorescent molecules can be observed in real time at high, physiologically relevant concentrations. The technique requires a protein and its macromolecular substrate to be labeled each with a different fluorophore. Then, making use ofmore » short-distance energy-transfer mechanisms, the fluorescence from only those proteins bound to their substrate are selectively activated. This approach is demonstrated by labeling a DNA substrate with an intercalating stain, exciting the stain, and using energy transfer from the stain to activate the fluorescence of only those labeled DNA-binding proteins bound to the DNA. Such an experimental design allowed us to observe the sequence-independent interaction of Cy5-labeled interferon-inducible protein 16 (IFI16) with DNA and the sliding via one-dimensional diffusion of Cy5-labeled adenovirus protease (pVIc-AVP) on DNA in the presence of a background of hundreds of nM Cy5 fluorophore.« less

  9. Deterministically Polarized Fluorescence from Single Dye Molecules Aligned in Liquid Crystal Host

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lukishova, S.G.; Schmid, A.W.; Knox, R.; Freivald, P.; Boyd, R. W.; Stroud, Jr., C. R.; Marshall, K.L.

    2005-09-30

    We demonstrated for the first time to our konwledge deterministically polarized fluorescence from single dye molecules. Planar aligned nematic liquid crystal hosts provide deterministic alignment of single dye molecules in a preferred direction.

  10. Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    The Strategy Guideline: High Performance Residential Lighting has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The high performance lighting strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner's expectations for high quality lighting.

  11. Algorithms for a hand-held miniature x-ray fluorescence analytical instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, W.T.; Newman, D.; Ziemba, F.

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of this joint program was to provide technical assistance with the development of a Miniature X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analytical Instrument. This new XRF instrument is designed to overcome the weaknesses of spectrometers commercially available at the present time. Currently available XRF spectrometers (for a complete list see reference 1) convert spectral information to sample composition using the influence coefficients technique or the fundamental parameters method. They require either a standard sample with composition relatively close to the unknown or a detailed knowledge of the sample matrix. They also require a highly-trained operator and the results often depend on the capabilities of the operator. In addition, almost all existing field-portable, hand-held instruments use radioactive sources for excitation. Regulatory limits on such sources restrict them such that they can only provide relatively weak excitation. This limits all current hand-held XRF instruments to poor detection limits and/or long data collection times, in addition to the licensing requirements and disposal problems for radioactive sources. The new XRF instrument was developed jointly by Quantrad Sensor, Inc., the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and the Department of Energy (DOE). This report describes the analysis algorithms developed by NRL for the new instrument and the software which embodies them.

  12. Conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps in India and Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Martino Jannuzzi, G. de (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA); Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia)

    1989-07-01

    We evaluate the conservation potential of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) for managing the rapidly increasing electrical energy and peak demand in India and Brazil. Using very conservative assumptions, we find that the cost of conserved energy using 16 W CFLs is 4 and 6 times less than the long range marginal cost of electricity for the two countries. The cost of avoided peak installed capacity is 6 and 9.5 times less than the cost of new installed capacity for India and Brazil. The analysis is undertaken from the three separate perspectives of the national economies, the consumers, and the utilities. We find that because residential electricity is subsidized, the consumers have little or no incentive to purchase and install the CFLs, unless they too are subsidized. However, the benefits of CFL installation to the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility are so large that subsidizing them is a paying proposition for the utility in almost all cases. As an illustration of a gradual introduction strategy for CFLs, we calculate a scenario where national savings of the order of US $1.2 million per day for India and US $2.5 million per day for Brazil are reached in 10 years by a small and gradual transfer of subsidy from residential electricity to CFLs. We then explore the barriers to immediate large scale introduction of these lamps in the two countries. Specific technical and marketing problems are identified and discussed, which would require solution before such an introduction can be attempted. Lastly, we discuss the range of policy instruments, in addition to a subsidy scheme, that can be used for promoting the diffusion of these lamps in the domestic and commercial sector. 47 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Enhanced multicolor fluorescence in bioimaging using deep-ultraviolet surface plasmon resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kikawada, Masakazu; Ono, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2014-06-02

    Enhanced multicolor fluorescence has been achieved using deep-ultraviolet surface plasmon resonance (DUV-SPR) on an aluminum thin film using the Kretschmann configuration. The film thickness and the incident angle of the light were optimized by calculations using the Fresnel equations. The presence of a surface oxide layer was also considered in the calculations. Experimental measurements showed that DUV-SPR led to a strong enhancement of the fluorescence intensity from both quantum dots and dye-labeled cells.

  14. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluorescent Lamps Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) SciTech Connect. This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit OSTI to utilize additional information resources in energy science and technology. A paper copy of this document is also available for sale to the public from the National Technical

  15. Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    algae (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Accepted Manuscript: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae « Prev Next » Title: Simultaneous cryo X-ray ptychographic and fluorescence microscopy of green algae × You are accessing a document from the Department of Energy's (DOE) Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science (PAGES). This site is a product of DOE's Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) and is provided as a public service. Visit

  16. Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Lewis, Cris; Mahan, Cynthia A.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2011-04-26

    Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

  17. Flow method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Miller, Thomasin C.; Lewis, Cris; Mahan, Cynthia A.; Wells, Cyndi A.

    2009-04-14

    Method and apparatus for screening chemicals using micro x-ray fluorescence. A method for screening a mixture of potential pharmaceutical chemicals for binding to at least one target binder involves flow-separating a solution of chemicals and target binders into separated components, exposing them to an x-ray excitation beam, detecting x-ray fluorescence signals from the components, and determining from the signals whether or not a binding event between a chemical and target binder has occurred.

  18. Organic light-emitting device with a phosphor-sensitized fluorescent emission layer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen (Ann Arbor, MI); Kanno, Hiroshi (Osaka, JP)

    2009-08-25

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters. The emissive region of the devices of the present invention comprise at least one phosphor-sensitized layer which has a combined emission from a phosphorescent emitter and a fluorescent emitter. In preferred embodiments, the invention relates to white-emitting OLEDS (WOLEDs).

  19. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jeffers, Larry A.; Malito, Michael L.

    1996-01-01

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method.

  20. On-line measurement of lignin in wood pulp by color shift of fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jeffers, L.A.; Malito, M.L.

    1996-01-23

    Lignin concentrations from wood pulp samples are measured by applying an excitation light at a selected wavelength to the samples in order to cause the lignin to emit fluorescence. A spectral distribution of the fluorescence emission is then determined. The lignin concentration is then calculated based on the spectral distribution signal. The spectral distribution is quantified by either a wavelength centroid method or a band ratio method. 6 figs.

  1. Elemental and Chemically Specific X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Biological

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Systems (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES DOE PAGES Search Results Published Article: Elemental and Chemically Specific X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Biological Systems Title: Elemental and Chemically Specific X-ray Fluorescence Imaging of Biological Systems Authors: Pushie, M. Jake ; Pickering, Ingrid J. ; Korbas, Malgorzata ; Hackett, Mark J. ; George, Graham N. Publication Date: 2014-09-10 OSTI Identifier: 1179591 Type: Published Article Journal Name: Chemical Reviews Additional Journal

  2. Novel Fluorescent Cationic Phospholipid, O-4-Napthylimido-1-Butyl-DOPC,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Exhibits Unusual Foam Morphology, Forms Hexagonal and Cubic Phases in Mixtures, and Transfects DNA (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Novel Fluorescent Cationic Phospholipid, O-4-Napthylimido-1-Butyl-DOPC, Exhibits Unusual Foam Morphology, Forms Hexagonal and Cubic Phases in Mixtures, and Transfects DNA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Novel Fluorescent Cationic Phospholipid, O-4-Napthylimido-1-Butyl-DOPC, Exhibits Unusual Foam Morphology, Forms Hexagonal and Cubic Phases in

  3. Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction Authors: Pal, S., Varghese, R., Deng, Z., Zhao, Z., Kumar, A., Yan, H., and Liu, Y. Title: Site-Specific Synthesis and In Situ Immobilization of Fluorescent Silver Nanoclusters on DNA Nanoscaffolds by Use of the Tollens Reaction Source: Angewandte Chemie International Edition Year: 2011

  4. Solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy with increased emission and super resolution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liau, Z. L.; Porter, J. M.; Liau, A. A.; Chen, J. J.; Salmon, W. C.; Sheu, S. S.

    2015-01-07

    We investigate solid-immersion fluorescence microscopy suitable for super-resolution nanotechnology and biological imaging, and have observed limit of resolution as small as 15?nm with microspheres, mitochondria, and chromatin fibers. We have further observed that fluorescence efficiency increases with excitation power density, implicating appreciable stimulated emission and increased resolution. We discuss potential advantages of the solid-immersion microscopy, including combined use with previously established super-resolution techniques for reaching deeper beyond the conventional diffraction limit.

  5. Feasibility of x ray fluorescence for spent fuel safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, Corey Ross; Mozin, Vladimir; Tobin, Stephen J; Fensin, Michael L; White, Julia M; Croft, Stephen; Stafford, Alissa; Charlton, William

    2010-01-01

    Quantifying the Pu content in spent nuclear fuel is necessary for many reasons, in particular to verify that diversion or other illicit activities have not occurred. Therefore, safeguarding the world's nuclear fuel is paramount to responsible nuclear regulation and public acceptance, but achieving this goal presents many difficulties from both a technical and economic perspective. The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of NA-24 is funding a large collaborative effort between multiple laboratories and universities to improve spent nuclear fuel safeguards methods and equipment. This effort involves the current work of modeling several different nondestructive assay (NDA) techniques. Several are being researched, because no single NDA technique, in isolation, has the potential to properly characterize fuel assemblies and offer a robust safeguards measure. The insights gained from this research, will be used to down-select from the original set a few of the most promising techniques that complement each other. The goal is to integrate the selected instruments to create an accurate measurement system for fuel verification that is also robust enough to detect diversions. These instruments will be fabricated and tested under realistic conditions. This work examines one of the NDA techniques; the feasibility of using x ray emission peaks from Pu and U to gather information about their relative quantities in the spent fuel. X Ray Fluorescence (XRF), is unique compared to the investigated techniques in that it is the only one able to give the elemental ratio of Pu to U, allowing the possibility of a Pu gram quantity for the assembly to be calculated. XRF also presents many challenges, mainly its low penetration, since the low energy x rays of interest are effectively shielded by the first few millimeters of a fuel pin. This paper will explore the results of Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code calculations of spent fuel x ray peaks. The MCNPX simulations will be benchmarked against measurements taken at Oak Ridge. Analysis of the feasibility of XRFs role in spent nuclear fuel safeguards efforts, particularly in the context of the overall NGSI effort will be discussed.

  6. Stable and responsive fluorescent carbon nanotube silica gels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    These results demonstrate a new route for the preparation of highly luminescent SWNTsilica composite materials that are potentially useful for future sensing applications. ...

  7. High throughput protein production screening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beernink, Peter T.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Segelke, Brent W.

    2009-09-08

    Methods, compositions, and kits for the cell-free production and analysis of proteins are provided. The invention allows for the production of proteins from prokaryotic sequences or eukaryotic sequences, including human cDNAs using PCR and IVT methods and detecting the proteins through fluorescence or immunoblot techniques. This invention can be used to identify optimized PCR and WT conditions, codon usages and mutations. The methods are readily automated and can be used for high throughput analysis of protein expression levels, interactions, and functional states.

  8. A divergent route to core- and peripherally functionalized diazacoronenes that act as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Bo; Dai, Jing; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Chen, Teresa L.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; Teat, Simon J.; Zhang, Qichun; Wang, Linwang; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-31

    Combining core annulation and peripheral group modification, we have demonstrated a divergent synthesis of a family of highly functionalized coronene derivatives from a readily accessible dichlorodiazaperylene intermediate. Various reactions, such as aromatic nucleophilic substitution, Kumada coupling and Suzuki coupling proceed effectively on ?-positions of the pyridine sites, giving rise to alkoxy, thioalkyl, alkyl or aryl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition to peripheral group modulation, the aromatic core structures can be altered by annulation with thiophene or benzene ring systems. Corresponding single crystal X-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that the heteroatom linkages not only impact the solid state packing, but also significantly influence the optoelectronic properties. Moreover, these azacoronene derivatives display significant acid-induced spectroscopic changes, suggesting their great potential as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors.

  9. A divergent route to core- and peripherally functionalized diazacoronenes that act as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    He, Bo; Dai, Jing; Zherebetskyy, Danylo; Chen, Teresa L.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; Teat, Simon J.; Zhang, Qichun; Wang, Linwang; Liu, Yi

    2015-03-31

    Combining core annulation and peripheral group modification, we have demonstrated a divergent synthesis of a family of highly functionalized coronene derivatives from a readily accessible dichlorodiazaperylene intermediate. Various reactions, such as aromatic nucleophilic substitution, Kumada coupling and Suzuki coupling proceed effectively on α-positions of the pyridine sites, giving rise to alkoxy, thioalkyl, alkyl or aryl substituted polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. In addition to peripheral group modulation, the aromatic core structures can be altered by annulation with thiophene or benzene ring systems. Corresponding single crystal X-ray diffraction and optical studies indicate that the heteroatom linkages not only impact the solid state packing,more » but also significantly influence the optoelectronic properties. Moreover, these azacoronene derivatives display significant acid-induced spectroscopic changes, suggesting their great potential as colorimetric and fluorescence proton sensors.« less

  10. Using star tracks to determine the absolute pointing of the Fluorescence Detector telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Donato, Cinzia; Sanchez, Federico; Santander, Marcos; Natl.Tech.U., San Rafael; Camin, Daniel; Garcia, Beatriz; Grassi, Valerio; /Milan U. /INFN, Milan

    2005-05-01

    To accurately reconstruct a shower axis from the Fluorescence Detector data it is essential to establish with high precision the absolute pointing of the telescopes. To d that they calculate the absolute pointing of a telescope using sky background data acquired during regular data taking periods. The method is based on the knowledge of bright star's coordinates that provide a reliable and stable coordinate system. it can be used to check the absolute telescope's pointing and its long-term stability during the whole life of the project, estimated in 20 years. They have analyzed background data taken from January to October 2004 to determine the absolute pointing of the 12 telescopes installed both in Los Leones and Coihueco. The method is based on the determination of the mean-time of the variance signal left by a star traversing a PMT's photocathode which is compared with the mean-time obtained by simulating the track of that star on the same pixel.

  11. Characterization of energy response for photon-counting detectors using x-ray fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Huanjun; Cho, Hyo-Min; Molloi, Sabee; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of characterizing a Si strip photon-counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: X-ray fluorescence was generated by using a pencil beam from a tungsten anode x-ray tube with 2 mm Al filtration. Spectra were acquired at 90 from the primary beam direction with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector based on an edge illuminated Si strip detector. The distances from the source to target and the target to detector were approximately 19 and 11 cm, respectively. Four different materials, containing silver (Ag), iodine (I), barium (Ba), and gadolinium (Gd), were placed in small plastic containers with a diameter of approximately 0.7 cm for x-ray fluorescence measurements. Linear regression analysis was performed to derive the gain and offset values for the correlation between the measured fluorescence peak center and the known fluorescence energies. The energy resolutions and charge-sharing fractions were also obtained from analytical fittings of the recorded fluorescence spectra. An analytical model, which employed four parameters that can be determined from the fluorescence calibration, was used to estimate the detector response function. Results: Strong fluorescence signals of all four target materials were recorded with the investigated geometry for the Si strip detector. The average gain and offset of all pixels for detector energy calibration were determined to be 6.95 mV/keV and ?66.33 mV, respectively. The detectors energy resolution remained at approximately 2.7 keV for low energies, and increased slightly at 45 keV. The average charge-sharing fraction was estimated to be 36% within the investigated energy range of 2045 keV. The simulated detector output based on the proposed response function agreed well with the experimental measurement. Conclusions: The performance of a spectral imaging system using energy-resolved photon-counting detectors is very dependent on the energy calibration of the detector. The proposed x-ray fluorescence technique offers an accurate and efficient way to calibrate the energy response of a photon-counting detector.

  12. A fluorescence-based method for rapid and direct determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Shan, Huimei; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Ma, Teng; Shang, Jianying; Pan, Duoqiang

    2015-01-01

    A new method was developed for rapid and direct measurement of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aqueous samples using fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra of tri- to deca-BDE (BDE 28, 47, 99, 153, 190, and 209) commonly found in environment were measured at variable emission and excitation wavelengths. The results revealed that the PBDEs have distinct fluorescence spectral profiles and peak positions that can be exploited to identify these species and determine their concentrations in aqueous solutions. The detection limits as determined in deionized water spiked with PBDEs are 1.71-5.82 ng/L for BDE 28, BDE 47, BDE 190, and BDEmore » 209 and 45.55–69.95 ng/L for BDE 99 and BDE 153. The effects of environmental variables including pH, humic substance, and groundwater chemical composition on PBDEs measurements were also investigated. These environmental variables affected fluorescence intensity, but their effect can be corrected through linear additivity and separation of spectral signal contribution. Compared with conventional GC-based analytical methods, the fluorescence spectroscopy method is more efficient as it only uses a small amount of samples (2-4 mL), avoids lengthy complicated concentration and extraction steps, and has a low detection limit of a few ng/L.« less

  13. A fluorescence-based method for rapid and direct determination of polybrominated diphenyl ethers in water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shan, Huimei; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Ma, Teng; Shang, Jianying; Pan, Duoqiang

    2015-01-01

    A new method was developed for rapid and direct measurement of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in aqueous samples using fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescence spectra of tri- to deca-BDE (BDE 28, 47, 99, 153, 190, and 209) commonly found in environment were measured at variable emission and excitation wavelengths. The results revealed that the PBDEs have distinct fluorescence spectral profiles and peak positions that can be exploited to identify these species and determine their concentrations in aqueous solutions. The detection limits as determined in deionized water spiked with PBDEs are 1.71-5.82 ng/L for BDE 28, BDE 47, BDE 190, and BDE 209 and 45.5569.95 ng/L for BDE 99 and BDE 153. The effects of environmental variables including pH, humic substance, and groundwater chemical composition on PBDEs measurements were also investigated. These environmental variables affected fluorescence intensity, but their effect can be corrected through linear additivity and separation of spectral signal contribution. Compared with conventional GC-based analytical methods, the fluorescence spectroscopy method is more efficient as it only uses a small amount of samples (2-4 mL), avoids lengthy complicated concentration and extraction steps, and has a low detection limit of a few ng/L.

  14. Method for detecting point mutations in DNA utilizing fluorescence energy transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parkhurst, Lawrence J.; Parkhurst, Kay M.; Middendorf, Lyle

    2001-01-01

    A method for detecting point mutations in DNA using a fluorescently labeled oligomeric probe and Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is disclosed. The selected probe is initially labeled at each end with a fluorescence dye, which act together as a donor/acceptor pair for FRET. The fluorescence emission from the dyes changes dramatically from the duplex stage, wherein the probe is hybridized to the complementary strand of DNA, to the single strand stage, when the probe is melted to become detached from the DNA. The change in fluorescence is caused by the dyes coming into closer proximity after melting occurs and the probe becomes detached from the DNA strand. The change in fluorescence emission as a function of temperature is used to calculate the melting temperature of the complex or T.sub.m. In the case where there is a base mismatch between the probe and the DNA strand, indicating a point mutation, the T.sub.m has been found to be significantly lower than the T.sub.m for a perfectly match probelstand duplex. The present invention allows for the detection of the existence and magnitude of T.sub.m, which allows for the quick and accurate detection of a point mutation in the DNA strand and, in some applications, the determination of the approximate location of the mutation within the sequence.

  15. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.; Lanzirotti, A.; Newville, M.; Proslier, T.; Stodolna, J.; Sutton, S.; Tyliszczak, T.; Westphal, A.J.; Zasadzinski, J. (UCB)

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotron techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial resolution better than 25 nm. Limiting factors for Stardust STXM analyses were self-imposed limits of photon dose due to radiation damage concerns, and significant attenuation of <1500 eV X-rays by {approx}80{micro}m thick, {approx}25 mg/cm{sup 3} density silica aerogel capture medium. In practice, the ISPE team characterized the major, light elements using STXM (O, Mg, Al, Si) and the heavier minor and trace elements using SXRF. The two data sets overlapped only with minor Fe and Ni ({approx}1% mass abundance), providing few quantitative cross-checks. New improved standards for cross calibration are essential for consortium-based analyses of Stardust interstellar and cometary particles, IDPs. Indeed, they have far reaching application across the whole synchrotron-based analytical community. We have synthesized three ALD multilayers simultaneously on silicon nitride membranes and silicon and characterized them using RBS (on Si), XRF (on Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}) and STXM/XAS (holey Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}). The systems we have started to work with are Al-Zn-Fe and Y-Mg-Er. We have found these ALD multi-layers to be uniform at {micro}m- to nm scales, and have found excellent consistency between four analytical techniques so far. The ALD films can also be used as a standard for e-beam instruments, eg., TEM EELS or EDX. After some early issues with the consistency of coatings to the back-side of the membrane windows, we are confident to be able to show multi-analytical agreement to within 10%. As the precision improves, we can use the new standards to verify or improve the tabulated cross-sections.

  16. Average M shell fluorescence yields for elements with 70?Z?92

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahoul, A.; Deghfel, B.; Aylikci, V.; Aylikci, N. K.; Nekkab, M.

    2015-03-30

    The theoretical, experimental and analytical methods for the calculation of average M-shell fluorescence yield (?{sup }{sub M}) of different elements are very important because of the large number of their applications in various areas of physical chemistry and medical research. In this paper, the bulk of the average M-shell fluorescence yield measurements reported in the literature, covering the period 1955 to 2005 are interpolated by using an analytical function to deduce the empirical average M-shell fluorescence yield in the atomic range of 70?Z?92. The results were compared with the theoretical and fitted values reported by other authors. Reasonable agreement was typically obtained between our result and other works.

  17. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-23

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of usingmorestereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.less

  18. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  19. Quantitative measurement of binary liquid distributions using multiple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halls, Benjamin R.; Meyer, Terrence R.; Kastengren, Alan L.

    2015-01-01

    The complex geometry and large index-of-refraction gradients that occur near the point of impingement of binary liquid jets present a challenging environment for optical interrogation. A simultaneous quadruple-tracer x-ray fluorescence and line-of-sight radiography technique is proposed as a means of distinguishing and quantifying individual liquid component distributions prior to, during, and after jet impact. Two different pairs of fluorescence tracers are seeded into each liquid stream to maximize their attenuation ratio for reabsorption correction and differentiation of the two fluids during mixing. This approach for instantaneous correction of x-ray fluorescence reabsorption is compared with a more time-intensive approach of using stereographic reconstruction of x-ray attenuation along multiple lines of sight. The proposed methodology addresses the need for a quantitative measurement technique capable of interrogating optically complex, near-field liquid distributions in many mixing systems of practical interest involving two or more liquid streams.

  20. Charge Transfer Fluorescence and 34 nm Exciton Diffusion Length in Polymers with Electron Acceptor End Traps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaikowski, L.; Mauro, G.; Bird, M.; Karten, B.; Asaoka, S.; Wu, Q.; Cook, A. R.; Miller, J.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are as large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. The efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.

  1. Charge transfer fluorescence and 34 nm exciton diffusion length in polymers with electron acceptor end traps

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zaikowski, Lori; Mauro, Gina; Bird, Matthew; Karten, Brianne; Asaoka, Sadayuki; Wu, Qin; Cook, Andrew R.; Miller, John R.

    2014-12-22

    Photoexcitation of conjugated poly-2,7-(9,9-dihexylfluorene) polyfluorenes with naphthylimide (NI) and anthraquinone (AQ) electron-acceptor end traps produces excitons that form charge transfer states at the end traps. Intramolecular singlet exciton transport to end traps was examined by steady state fluorescence for polyfluorenes of 17 to 127 repeat units in chloroform, dimethylformamide (DMF), tetrahydrofuran (THF), and p-xylene. End traps capture excitons and form charge transfer (CT) states at all polymer lengths and in all solvents. The CT nature of the end-trapped states is confirmed by their fluorescence spectra, solvent and trap group dependence and DFT descriptions. Quantum yields of CT fluorescence are asmore » large as 46%. This strong CT emission is understood in terms of intensity borrowing. Energies of the CT states from onsets of the fluorescence spectra give the depths of the traps which vary with solvent polarity. For NI end traps the trap depths are 0.06 (p-xylene), 0.13 (THF) and 0.19 eV (CHCl3). For AQ, CT fluorescence could be observed only in p-xylene where the trap depth is 0.27 eV. Quantum yields, emission energies, charge transfer energies, solvent reorganization and vibrational energies were calculated. Fluorescence measurements on chains >100 repeat units indicate that end traps capture ~50% of the excitons, and that the exciton diffusion length LD =34 nm, which is much larger than diffusion lengths reported in polymer films or than previously known for diffusion along isolated chains. As a result, the efficiency of exciton capture depends on chain length, but not on trap depth, solvent polarity or which trap group is present.« less

  2. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants by illuminating the phytoplankton or higher plants with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes.

  3. Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Benjamin P.; Havrilla, George J.; Mann, Grace

    2010-12-28

    Method for detecting binding events using micro-X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Receptors are exposed to at least one potential binder and arrayed on a substrate support. Each member of the array is exposed to X-ray radiation. The magnitude of a detectable X-ray fluorescence signal for at least one element can be used to determine whether a binding event between a binder and a receptor has occurred, and can provide information related to the extent of binding between the binder and receptor.

  4. Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a firing gasoline-direct-injection engine: Effects of residual exhaust gas on quantitative PLIF Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantitative planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging of multi-component fuel/air mixing in a

  5. X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS OF HANFORD LOW ACTIVITY WASTE SIMULANTS METHOD DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jurgensen, A; David Missimer, D; Ronny Rutherford, R

    2007-08-08

    The x-ray fluorescence laboratory (XRF) in the Analytical Development Directorate (ADD) of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) was requested to develop an x-ray fluorescence spectrometry method for elemental characterization of the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) pretreated low activity waste (LAW) stream to the LAW Vitrification Plant. The WTP is evaluating the potential for using XRF as a rapid turnaround technique to support LAW product compliance and glass former batching. The overall objective of this task was to develop an XRF analytical method that provides rapid turnaround time (<8 hours), while providing sufficient accuracy and precision to determine variations in waste.

  6. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants is revealed. The phytoplankton or higher plants are illuminated with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes. 14 figs.

  7. Strategy Guideline. High Performance Residential Lighting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holton, J.

    2012-02-01

    This report has been developed to provide a tool for the understanding and application of high performance lighting in the home. The strategies featured in this guide are drawn from recent advances in commercial lighting for application to typical spaces found in residential buildings. This guide offers strategies to greatly reduce lighting energy use through the application of high quality fluorescent and light emitting diode (LED) technologies. It is important to note that these strategies not only save energy in the home but also serve to satisfy the homeowner’s expectations for high quality lighting.

  8. Magnetic hydrogel with high coercivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szeri, H.; Alvero?lu, E.; Kurtan, U.; ?enel, M.; Baykal, A.

    2013-08-01

    Highlights: Polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles have been prepared. Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with high coercivity. Magnetic nanoparticles makes the gel more homogeneous and do not diffuse out of the gel during water intake. These gels are useful in applications as wastewater treatment once gels are magnetized before its usage. - Abstract: This study investigates the synthesis and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels containing magnetic BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} nanoparticles. Structural, electrical, and magnetic characterization of the gels have been performed with X-ray powder diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, DC conductivity, magnetization and fluorescence spectroscopy techniques. The preparation and characterization of polyacrylamide (PAAm) hydrogels that contain 5 and 10 mg BaFe{sub 12}O{sub 19} (16 and 21 nm diameter) nanoparticles are described herein. It is seen from the fluorescence spectra that, nanoparticles surrounded to pyranine molecules so that some of pyranine molecules could not bound to the polymer strands. Electrical measurements show that presence of nanoparticles make the gel more homogeneous. Magnetization measurements reveal that hydrogels have hard magnetic properties with quite high coercivity of 4.2 kOe, which does not change with swelling. This feature makes these gels useful in applications as wastewater treatment if they are magnetized before use.

  9. Today LED Holiday Lights, Tomorrow the World?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.

    2004-12-20

    This article for The APEM Advantage, the quarterly newsletter of the Association of Professional Energy Managers (APEM) describes the recent increase in the popularity of light emitting diode (LED) lighting and compares LED light output with that of incandescent and compact fluorescent lighting.

  10. ORISE: Enhancing Energy Efficiency Through Peer Review

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enhancing Energy Efficiency ORISE scientific peer review helps evaluate technologies that advance renewable energy ORISE Reviews and Evaluates Technologies that Advance Energy Efficiency In addition to renewable energy and changes in individual behavior, energy efficiency is generally achieved through the development of more efficient technologies. Buildings are being constructed with more energy efficient systems, fluorescent light bulbs are replacing incandescent lights, and new vehicle

  11. Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, William Newell (Niskayuna, NY); Thomas, Robert James (Rexford, NY)

    1999-01-01

    A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast.

  12. Fluorescence technique for on-line monitoring of state of hydrogen-producing microorganisms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seibert, Michael; Makarova, Valeriya; Tsygankov, Anatoly A.; Rubin, Andrew B.

    2007-06-12

    In situ fluorescence method to monitor state of sulfur-deprived algal culture's ability to produce H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion, comprising: a) providing sulfur-deprived algal culture; b) illuminating culture; c) measuring onset of H.sub.2 percentage in produced gas phase at multiple times to ascertain point immediately after anerobiosis to obtain H.sub.2 data as function of time; and d) determining any abrupt change in three in situ fluorescence parameters; i) increase in F.sub.t (steady-state level of chlorophyll fluorescence in light adapted cells); ii) decrease in F.sub.m', (maximal saturating light induced fluorescence level in light adapted cells); and iii) decrease in .DELTA.F/F.sub.m'=(F.sub.m'-F.sub.t)/F.sub.m' (calculated photochemical activity of photosystem II (PSII) signaling full reduction of plastoquinone pool between PSII and PSI, which indicates start of anaerobic conditions that induces synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme for subsequent H.sub.2 production that signal oxidation of plastoquinone pool asmain factor to regulate H.sub.2 under sulfur depletion.

  13. Filter-fluorescer measurement of low-voltage simulator x-ray energy spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, G.T.; Craven, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    X-ray energy spectra of the Maxwell Laboratories MBS and Physics International Pulserad 737 were measured using an eight-channel filter-fluorescer array. The PHOSCAT computer code was used to calculate channel response functions, and the UFO code to unfold spectrum.

  14. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip windowmore » surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.« less

  15. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, Michael

    1998-01-01

    A novel design for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment.

  16. Compact fluorescent lamp using horizontal and vertical insulating septums and convective venting geometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.

    1998-02-10

    A novel design is described for a compact fluorescent lamp, including a lamp geometry which will increase light output and efficacy of the lamp in a base down operating position by providing horizontal and vertical insulating septums positioned in the ballast compartment of the lamp to provide a cooler coldspot. Selective convective venting provides additional cooling of the ballast compartment. 9 figs.

  17. Dimeric fluorescent energy transfer dyes comprising asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine chromophores

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1996-01-01

    Novel fluorescent DNA-staining dyes are provided combining asymmetric cyanine azole-indolenine dyes, which provide for strong DNA affinity, large Stokes shifts and emission in the red region of the spectrum. The dyes find particular application in gel electrophoresis and for labels which may be bound to a variety of compositions in a variety of contexts.

  18. Synthesis and preliminary biological evaluations of fluorescent or 149Promethium labeled Trastuzumab-polyethylenimine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fitzsimmons, Jonathan; Nayak, Tapan; Cutler, Cathy; Atcher, Robert

    2015-12-30

    Radioimmunotherapy utilize a targeting antibody coupled to a therapeutic isotope to target and treat a tumor or disease. In this study we examine the synthesis and cell binding of a polymer scaffold containing a radiotherapeutic isotope and a targeting antibody. Methods: The multistep synthesis of a fluorescent or 149Promethium-labeled Trastuzumab-polyethyleneimine (PEI), Trastuzumab, or PEI is described. In vitro uptake, internalization and/or the binding affinity to the Her2/neu expressing human breast adenocarcinoma SKBr3 cells was investigated with the labeled compounds. Fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab-PEI was internalized more into cells at 2 and 18 h than fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab or PEI. The fluorescent-labeled Trastuzumab wasmore » concentrated on the cell surface at 2 and 18 h and the labeled PEI had minimal uptake. DOTA-PEI was prepared and contained an average of 16 chelates per PEI; the compound was radio-labeled with 149Promethium and conjugated to Trastuzumab. The purified 149Pm-DOTA-PEI-Trastuzumab had a radiochemical purity of 96.7% and a specific activity of 0.118 TBq/g. The compound demonstrated a dissociation constant for the Her2/neu receptor of 20.30 ± 6.91 nM. In conclusion, the results indicate the DOTA-PEI-Trastuzumab compound has potential as a targeted therapeutic carrier, and future in vivo studies should be performed.« less

  19. Correlative Electron and Fluorescence Microscopy of Magnetotactic Bacteria in Liquid: Toward In Vivo Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woehl, Taylor J.; Kashyap, Sanjay; Firlar, Emre; Perez-Gonzalez, Teresa; Faivre, Damien; Trubitsyn, Denis; Bazylinski, Dennis A.; Prozorov, Tanya

    2014-10-31

    Magnetotactic bacteria biomineralize ordered chains of uniform, membrane-bound magnetite or greigite nanocrystals that exhibit nearly perfect crystal structures and species-specific morphologies. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is a critical technique for providing information regarding the organization of cellular and magnetite structures in these microorganisms. However, conventional TEM can only be used to image air-dried or vitrified bacteria removed from their natural environment. Here we present a correlative scanning TEM (STEM) and fluorescence microscopy technique for imaging viable cells of Magnetospirillum magneticum strain AMB-1 in liquid using an in situ fluid cell TEM holder. Fluorescently labeled cells were immobilized on microchip window surfaces and visualized in a fluid cell with STEM, followed by correlative fluorescence imaging to verify their membrane integrity. Notably, the post-STEM fluorescence imaging indicated that the bacterial cell wall membrane did not sustain radiation damage during STEM imaging at low electron dose conditions. We investigated the effects of radiation damage and sample preparation on the bacteria viability and found that approximately 50% of the bacterial membranes remained intact after an hour in the fluid cell, decreasing to ~30% after two hours. These results represent a first step toward in vivo studies of magnetite biomineralization in magnetotactic bacteria.

  20. Sunna 535-nm photo-fluorescent film dosimeter response to different environmental conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark K.; Kovacs, Andras; Mclaughlin, William L.; Miller, Steven D.); Puhl, James M.

    2003-12-01

    Evaluations on the influence of environmental variabilities on the red fluorescence component of the Sunna Model? photo-fluorescent dosimeter have previously been reported. This present paper describes the environmental effects on the response of the green fluorescence component of the same dosimeter, which is manufactured using the injection molding technique. The results presented include temperature, relative humidity, and light influences both during and after irradiation. The green fluorescence signal shows a significant dependence on irradiation temperature below room temperature at 1%/C. Above room temperature (approximately 24C to 60C), the irradiation temperature effect varies from -0.1-1.0%/C, depending on the absorbed dose level. For facilities with irradiation temperatures between 30-60C and absorbed dose levels above 10 kGy, irradiation temperature effects are minimal. Light-effects results indicate that the dosimeter is influenced by ultraviolet and blue wavelengths during irradiation as well as during the post-irradiation stabilization period (approx. 22 hours), requiring the use of light-tight packaging. Results also show that the dosimeter exhibits negligible effects from ambient moisture during and after irradiation when in the range of 33-95% relative humidity.

  1. High throughput optical scanner

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Basiji, David A. (Seattle, WA); van den Engh, Gerrit J. (Seattle, WA)

    2001-01-01

    A scanning apparatus is provided to obtain automated, rapid and sensitive scanning of substrate fluorescence, optical density or phosphorescence. The scanner uses a constant path length optical train, which enables the combination of a moving beam for high speed scanning with phase-sensitive detection for noise reduction, comprising a light source, a scanning mirror to receive light from the light source and sweep it across a steering mirror, a steering mirror to receive light from the scanning mirror and reflect it to the substrate, whereby it is swept across the substrate along a scan arc, and a photodetector to receive emitted or scattered light from the substrate, wherein the optical path length from the light source to the photodetector is substantially constant throughout the sweep across the substrate. The optical train can further include a waveguide or mirror to collect emitted or scattered light from the substrate and direct it to the photodetector. For phase-sensitive detection the light source is intensity modulated and the detector is connected to phase-sensitive detection electronics. A scanner using a substrate translator is also provided. For two dimensional imaging the substrate is translated in one dimension while the scanning mirror scans the beam in a second dimension. For a high throughput scanner, stacks of substrates are loaded onto a conveyor belt from a tray feeder.

  2. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, S.W.; Cates, M.R.; Boatner, L.A.; Gillies, G.T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO{sub 4}:Dy{sub x},Eu{sub y} wherein: 0.1 wt % {<=} x {<=} 20 wt % and 0.1 wt % {<=} y {<=} 20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopant. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions. 2 figs.

  3. High temperature thermometric phosphors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allison, Stephen W.; Cates, Michael R.; Boatner, Lynn A.; Gillies, George T.

    1999-03-23

    A high temperature phosphor consists essentially of a material having the general formula LuPO.sub.4 :Dy.sub.(x),Eu.sub.y) wherein: 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.20 wt % and 0.1 wt %.ltoreq.y.ltoreq.20 wt %. The high temperature phosphor is in contact with an article whose temperature is to be determined. The article having the phosphor in contact with it is placed in the environment for which the temperature of the article is to be determined. The phosphor is excited by a laser causing the phosphor to fluoresce. The emission from the phosphor is optically focused into a beam-splitting mirror which separates the emission into two separate emissions, the emission caused by the dysprosium dopant and the emission caused by the europium dopent. The separated emissions are optically filtered and the intensities of the emission are detected and measured. The ratio of the intensity of each emission is determined and the temperature of the article is calculated from the ratio of the intensities of the separate emissions.

  4. Fluorescent and cathodoluminescent phophors structurally related to sodalite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, Mark L. F.; Shea, Lauren E.

    1998-01-01

    Blue, quantum-confined phosphors for field-emission displays made by reducing metal (M) sulfoaluminates at high temperature. This yields phases of the type M.sub.4 (AlO.sub.2).sub.6 S. Bulk sulfide contaminant mixed with the reduced sulfoaluminate phase is removed by treating it with a chelating agent in nonaqueous solution. A photometric cathodoluminescence efficiency of 9 lumen/watt at 1000 V for Sr.sub.3 PbS(AlO.sub.2).sub.6 is observed. Undoped Sr.sub.4 S(AlO).sub.6 displays 5 lumen/watt at 1000 V, with excellent blue chromatic saturation.

  5. Zero energy-storage ballast for compact fluorescent lamps

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schultz, W.N.; Thomas, R.J.

    1999-08-31

    A CFL ballast includes complementary-type switching devices connected in series with their gates connected together at a control node. The switching devices supply a resonant tank circuit which is tuned to a frequency near, but slightly lower than, the resonant frequency of a resonant control circuit. As a result, the tank circuit restarts oscillations immediately following each zero crossing of the bus voltage. Such rapid restarts avoid undesirable flickering while maintaining the operational advantages and high efficacy of the CFL ballast. 4 figs.

  6. Fluorescent and cathodoluminescent phosphors structurally related to sodalite

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Phillips, M.L.F.; Shea, L.E.

    1998-09-29

    Blue, quantum-confined phosphors are disclosed for field-emission displays made by reducing metal (M) sulfoaluminates at high temperature. This yields phases of the type M{sub 4}(AlO{sub 2}){sub 6}S. Bulk sulfide contaminant mixed with the reduced sulfoaluminate phase is removed by treating it with a chelating agent in nonaqueous solution. A photometric cathodoluminescence efficiency of 9 lumen/watt at 1,000 V for Sr{sub 3}PbS(AlO{sub 2}){sub 6} is observed. Undoped Sr{sub 4}S(AlO){sub 6} displays 5 lumen/watt at 1,000 V, with excellent blue chromatic saturation. 2 figs.

  7. The development and deployment of a ground-based, laser-induced fluorescence instrument for the in situ detection of iodine monoxide radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thurlow, M. E. Hannun, R. A.; Lapson, L. B.; Anderson, J. G.; Co, D. T.; Argonne-Northwestern Solar Energy Research Center and Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, 2145 Sheridan Road, Evanston, Illinois 60208-3113 ; O'Brien, A. S.; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 ; Hanisco, T. F.; NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 614, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771

    2014-04-15

    High abundances of iodine monoxide (IO) are known to exist and to participate in local photochemistry of the marine boundary layer. Of particular interest are the roles IO plays in the formation of new particles in coastal marine environments and in depletion episodes of ozone and mercury in the Arctic polar spring. This paper describes a ground-based instrument that measures IO at mixing ratios less than one part in 10{sup 12}. The IO radical is measured by detecting laser-induced fluorescence at wavelengths longer that 500 nm. Tunable visible light is used to pump the A{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ′} = 2) ← X{sup 2}Π{sub 3/2} (v{sup ″} = 0) transition of IO near 445 nm. The laser light is produced by a solid-state, Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser at 5 kHz repetition rate. The laser-induced fluorescence instrument performs reliably with very high signal-to-noise ratios (>10) achieved in short integration times (<1 min). The observations from a validation deployment to the Shoals Marine Lab on Appledore Island, ME are presented and are broadly consistent with in situ observations from European Coastal Sites. Mixing ratios ranged from the instrumental detection limit (<1 pptv) to 10 pptv. These data represent the first in situ point measurements of IO in North America.

  8. ISSUANCE 2015-08-14: Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Reopening of the Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Reopening of the Comment Period

  9. ISSUANCE 2015-06-17: Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Standards for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts, Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Framework Document

  10. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades Addthis 1 of 3 PPG Industries and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory are partnering to develop a new class of dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and façade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2 of 3 Berkeley Lab Heat Island Group physicist Paul

  11. Multispectral UV Fluorescence Detection of a Dilute Constituent in an Optically Dense Matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, O.H.; Gray, P.C., Wehlburg, C.M.; Rubenstein, R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

    1998-10-15

    Multispectral UV fluorescence measurements were made of an optically dense medium (fetal bovine serum, FBS) spiked with sodium salicylate at concentrate ions from 0.2 to 500 pg/ml . Analysis of the spectra show that, depending on experimental conditions, reasonably good estimates of concentration can be obtained across the entire range of concentrate ions. Experimental conditions required for recovering these estimates are demonstrated.

  12. Relative fluorescent efficiency of sodium salicylate between 90 and 800 eV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angel, G.C.; Samson, J.A.R.; Williams, G.

    1986-01-01

    The relative fluorescent quantum efficiency of sodium salicylate was measured between 90 and 800 eV (138 -15 A) by the use of synchrotron radiation. A general increase in efficiency was observed in this spectral range except for abrupt decreases in efficiency at the carbon and oxygen K-edges. Beyond the oxygen K-edge (532 eV) the efficiency increased linearly with the incident photon energy to the limit of the present observations.

  13. Luminescent studies of fluorescent chromophore-doped silica aerogels for flat panel display applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glauser, S.A.C. [California Univ., Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Lee, H.W.H. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The remarkable optical and electronic properties of doped and undoped silica aerogels establish their utility as unique, mulitfunctional host materials for fluorescent dyes and other luminescent materials for display and imaging applications. We present results on the photoluminescence, absorption, and photoluminescence excitation spectra of undoped silica aerogels and aerogels doped with Er{sup 3+}, rhodamine 6G (R6G), and fluorescein. 4 refs., 12 figs.

  14. 2015-01-28 Issuance: Test Procedure for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts; Final Rule Correction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register final rule correction regarding test procedures for fluorescent lamp ballasts, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on January 28, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  15. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence at MIT | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Applications of Nuclear Science Applications of Nuclear Science Archives Small Business Innovation Research / Small Business Technology Transfer Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) Community Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301)

  16. Systematic Method for the Kinetic Modeling of Temporally Resolved Hyperspectral Microscope Images of Fluorescently Labeled Cells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accelerated paper Systematic Method for the Kinetic Modeling of Temporally Resolved Hyperspectral Microscope Images of Fluorescently Labeled Cells PATRICK J. CUTLER, DAVID M. HAALAND, and PAUL J. GEMPERLINE* Department of Chemistry, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina 27858 (P.J.C., P.J.G.); and Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0895 (D.M.H.) In this paper we report the application of a novel method for fitting kinetic models to temporally resolved

  17. Alexa Fluor-labeled Fluorescent Cellulose Nanocrystals for Bioimaging Solid Cellulose in Spatially Structured Microenvironments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Mo, Kai-For; Shin, Yongsoon; Vasdekis, Andreas; Warner, Marvin G.; Kelly, Ryan T.; Orr, Galya; Hu, Dehong; Dehoff, Karl J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Wilkins, Michael J.

    2015-03-18

    Cellulose nanocrystal materials have been labeled with modern Alexa Fluor dyes in a process that first links the dye to a cyanuric chloride molecule. Subsequent reaction with cellulose nanocrystals provides dyed solid microcrystalline cellulose material that can be used for bioimaging and suitable for deposition in films and spatially structured microenvironments. It is demonstrated with single molecular fluorescence microscopy that these films are subject to hydrolysis by cellulose enzymes.

  18. A method of measuring gold nanoparticle concentrations by x-ray fluorescence for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Di; Li Yuhua; Wong, Molly D.; Liu Hong

    2013-05-15

    Purpose: This paper reports a technique that enables the quantitative determination of the concentration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) through the accurate detection of their fluorescence radiation in the diagnostic x-ray spectrum. Methods: Experimentally, x-ray fluorescence spectra of 1.9 and 15 nm GNP solutions are measured using an x-ray spectrometer, individually and within chicken breast tissue samples. An optimal combination of excitation and emission filters is determined to segregate the fluorescence spectra at 66.99 and 68.80 keV from the background scattering. A roadmap method is developed that subtracts the scattered radiation (acquired before the insertion of GNP solutions) from the signal radiation acquired after the GNP solutions are inserted. Results: The methods effectively minimize the background scattering in the spectrum measurements, showing linear relationships between GNP solutions from 0.1% to 10% weight concentration and from 0.1% to 1.0% weight concentration inside a chicken breast tissue sample. Conclusions: The investigation demonstrated the potential of imaging gold nanoparticles quantitatively in vivo for in-tissue studies, but future studies will be needed to investigate the ability to apply this method to clinical applications.

  19. Yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (Phialidium): structure and structure-based mutagenesis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z., E-mail: vzpletnev@gmail.com; Souslova, Ekaterina; Chudakov, Dmitry M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Lukyanov, Sergey [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Nizhny Novgorod State Medical Academy, Nizhny Novgorod (Russian Federation); Martynov, Vladimir I.; Arhipova, Svetlena; Artemyev, Igor [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation); Wlodawer, Alexander [National Cancer Institute, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Pletnev, Sergei [National Cancer Institute, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); SAIC-Frederick, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2013-06-01

    The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The yellow fluorescent protein phiYFPv (?{sub em}{sup max} ? 537 nm) with improved folding has been developed from the spectrally identical wild-type phiYFP found in the marine jellyfish Phialidium. The latter fluorescent protein is one of only two known cases of naturally occurring proteins that exhibit emission spectra in the yelloworange range (535555 nm). Here, the crystal structure of phiYFPv has been determined at 2.05 resolution. The yellow chromophore formed from the sequence triad Thr65-Tyr66-Gly67 adopts the bicyclic structure typical of fluorophores emitting in the green spectral range. It was demonstrated that perfect antiparallel ?-stacking of chromophore Tyr66 and the proximal Tyr203, as well as Val205, facing the chromophore phenolic ring are chiefly responsible for the observed yellow emission of phiYFPv at 537 nm. Structure-based site-directed mutagenesis has been used to identify the key functional residues in the chromophore environment. The obtained results have been utilized to improve the properties of phiYFPv and its homologous monomeric biomarker tagYFP.

  20. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, R.E.; Dolbeare, F.A.

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes. No Drawings

  1. Methods and kits for nucleic acid analysis using fluorescence resonance energy transfer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwok, Pui-Yan; Chen, Xiangning

    1999-01-01

    A method for detecting the presence of a target nucleotide or sequence of nucleotides in a nucleic acid is disclosed. The method is comprised of forming an oligonucleotide labeled with two fluorophores on the nucleic acid target site. The doubly labeled oligonucleotide is formed by addition of a singly labeled dideoxynucleoside triphosphate to a singly labeled polynucleotide or by ligation of two singly labeled polynucleotides. Detection of fluorescence resonance energy transfer upon denaturation indicates the presence of the target. Kits are also provided. The method is particularly applicable to genotyping.

  2. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  3. Characterization of supernumerary ring marker chromosomes by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blennow, E.; Nordenskjoeld, M. ); Asadi, E. ); Anneren, G.; Berggren, E.; Nordenskjoeld, M.

    1993-08-01

    Five cases with small supernumerary ring chromosomes are characterized at the molecular level. Routine chromosome banding analysis was insufficient for identification of the ring chromosomes, and none of them was DA/DAPI positive. Fluorescence in situ hybridization utilizing repetitive centromeric probes for all chromosomes has determined that one of these five ring chromosomes originates in each of chromosomes 4, 7, 8, 9, and 20. Chromosome painting with chromosome-specific libraries has confirmed this and excluded the involvement of additional chromosomes in the rearrangements. 30 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Nelson, T.; Kalinin, K.; Kuzmenko, V.; Velizhanin, K. A.; Tretiak, S.

    2015-04-28

    In this study, an efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics (ESMD) is implemented and tested by exploring the solvatochromic effects in substituted p-phenylene vinylene oligomers. A continuum solvent model is used which has very little computational overhead. This allows simulations of ESMD with solvent effects on the scale of hundreds of picoseconds for systems of up to hundreds of atoms. At these time scales, solvatochromic shifts in fluoresence spectra can be described. Solvatochromic shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra from ESMD are compared with time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experiments.

  5. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert E. [557 Escondido Cir., Livermore, CA 94550; Dolbeare, Frank A. [5178 Diane La., Livermore, CA 94550

    1980-10-21

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 4-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  6. Fluorescence method for enzyme analysis which couples aromatic amines with aromatic aldehydes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Robert E.; Dolbeare, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    Analysis of proteinases is accomplished using conventional amino acid containing aromatic amine substrates. Aromatic amines such as 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine (4M2NA), 2-naphthylamine, aminoisophthalic acid dimethyl ester, p-nitroaniline, 5-methoxy-1-aminofluorene and coumarin derivatives resulting from enzymatic hydrolysis of the substrate couples with aromatic aldehydes such as 5-nitrosalicylaldehyde (5-NSA), benzaldehyde and p-nitrobenzaldehyde to produce Schiff-base complexes which are water insoluble. Certain Schiff-base complexes produce a shift from blue to orange-red (visible) fluorescence. Such complexes are useful in the assay of enzymes.

  7. Impurity detection in the APEX tokamak by in-situ doppler shift laser fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pellin, M.J.; Young, C.E.; Gruen, D.M.; Norem, J.H.

    1981-01-01

    Laser fluorescence spectroscopy (LFS) is a promising impurity atoms generated from surfaces exposed to fusion plasmas. Here the first continuous wave laser fluorescene measurement of impurities generated during a single tokamak pulse is reported. The results point out the promise of LFS as an essentially real time, in-situ diagnostic allowing a detailed comparison of impurity generation and transport with Tokamak parameters and operating conditions. Results presented will include the Zr-atom density and velocity distribution produced from a Zr-metal target during an Apex Tokamak discharge.

  8. High PRF high current switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moran, Stuart L.; Hutcherson, R. Kenneth

    1990-03-27

    A triggerable, high voltage, high current, spark gap switch for use in pu power systems. The device comprises a pair of electrodes in a high pressure hydrogen environment that is triggered by introducing an arc between one electrode and a trigger pin. Unusually high repetition rates may be obtained by undervolting the switch, i.e., operating the trigger at voltages much below the self-breakdown voltage of the device.

  9. Thermally activated delayed fluorescence from {sup 3}n?* to {sup 1}n?* up-conversion and its application to organic light-emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Qisheng; Nomura, Hiroko [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Miyazaki, Hiroshi [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); Functional Materials Laboratory, Nippon Steel and Sumikin Chemical Co., Ltd, 4680 Nakabaru, Sakinohama, Tobata, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka 8048503 (Japan); Adachi, Chihaya, E-mail: adachi@cstf.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and Center for Organic Photonics and Electronics Research (OPERA), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan); International Institute for Carbon Neutral Energy Research (WPI-I2CNER), Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-07-07

    Intense n?* fluorescence from a nitrogen-rich heterocyclic compound, 2,5,8-tris(4-fluoro-3-methylphenyl)-1,3,4,6,7,9,9b-heptaazaphenalene (HAP-3MF), is demonstrated. The overlap-forbidden nature of the n?* transition and the higher energy of the {sup 3}??* state than the {sup 3}n?* one lead to a small energy difference between the lowest singlet (S{sub 1}) and triplet (T{sub 1}) excited states of HAP-3MF. Green-emitting HAP-3MF has a moderate photoluminescence quantum yield of 0.26 in both toluene and doped film. However, an organic light-emitting diode containing HAP-3MF achieved a high external quantum efficiency of 6.0%, indicating that HAP-3MF harvests singlet excitons through a thermally activated T{sub 1} ? S{sub 1} pathway in the electroluminescent process.

  10. OH-Planar Fluorescence Measurements of Pressurized, Hydrogen Premixed Flames in the SimVal Combustor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strakey, P.A.; Woodruff, S.D.; Williams, T.C.; Schefer, R.W.

    2008-07-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence measurements of the hydroxyl radical in lean, premixed natural gas flames augmented with hydrogen are presented. The experiments were conducted in the Simulation Validation combustor at the National Energy Technology Laboratory at operating pressures from 1 to 8 atmospheres. The data, which were collected in a combustor with well-controlled boundary conditions, are intended to be used for validating computational fluid dynamics models under conditions directly relevant to land-based gas turbine engines. The images, which show significant effects of hydrogen on local flame quenching, are discussed in terms of a turbulent premixed combustion regime and nondimensional parameters such as Karlovitz number. Pressure was found to thin the OH region, but only had a secondary effect on overall flame shape compared with the effects of hydrogen addition, which was found to decrease local quenching and shorten the turbulent flame brush. A method to process the individual images based on local gradients of fluorescence intensity is proposed, and results are presented. Finally, the results of several large eddy simulations are presented and compared with the experimental data in an effort to understand the issues related to model validation, especially for simulations that do not include OH as an intermediate species.

  11. Crystal structure of phototoxic orange fluorescent proteins with α tryptophan-based chromophore

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Gorbachev, Dmitry A.; Egorov, Evgeny S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2015-12-23

    Phototoxic fluorescent proteins represent a sparse group of genetically encoded photosensitizers that could be used for precise light-induced inactivation of target proteins, DNA damage, and cell killing. Only two such GFP-based fluorescent proteins (FPs), KillerRed and its monomeric variant SuperNova, were described up to date. We present a crystallographic study of their two orange successors, dimeric KillerOrange and monomeric mKiller-Orange, at 1.81 and 1.57 Å resolution, respectively. They are the first orange-emitting protein photosensitizers with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Gln65-Trp66-Gly67). Same as their red progenitors, both orange photosensitizers have a water-filled channel connecting the chromophore to the β-barrel exterior and enablingmore » transport of ROS. In both proteins, Trp66 of the chromophore adopts an unusual trans-cis conformation stabilized by H-bond with the nearby Gln159. This trans-cis conformation along with the water channel was shown to be a key structural feature providing bright orange emission and phototoxicity of both examined orange photosensitizers.« less

  12. Fluorescent growth bands in irradiated-bitumen nodules: Evidence of episodic hydrocarbon migration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, B.

    1997-01-01

    Minute rims of solid bitumen ({approximately}40-50 {mu}m thick) surround detrital radioactive grains in the Permian-Triassic sandstones and Arranoo Member of the Kockatea Shale from the northern Perth basin, Australia. The bitumen formed as Th- and U-bearing minerals (monazite, xenotime, zircon, thorite) irradiated and immobilized fluid hydrocarbons coming within range of alpha-particle emissions. using transmitted light and scanning electron microscopy and rims appear compositionally homogeneous, but under blue/violet epifluorescent illumination the bitumen displays complex concentric and contorted banding. These fluorescent textures indicate that multiple influxes of hydrocarbons passed through the reservoir sandstones. Following radiation-induced immobilization of hydrocarbons from the first oil influx, the bitumen nodules grew through a process of swelling and expansion outward form the mineral core during subsequent oil influxes, producing graded fluorescent growth bands. Oil droplets and lamellae also were adsorbed onto the outer portion of the nodules. Such bitumen nodules are a new and potentially important source of data for understanding the movement of hydrocarbons in sedimentary basins, specifically for identifying hydrocarbon pathways, the number of discrete hydrocarbon pulses, and the relative timing of oil migration.

  13. Nonflame, source-induced sulfur fluorescence detector for sulfur-containing compounds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gage, D.R.; Farwell, S.O.

    1980-12-01

    Results of some preliminary investigations of the fluorescence spectra of S/sub 2/ and the non-flame production of S/sub 2/ from sulfur-containing molecules are reported. Passage of the gas to be analyzed through a catalyst-oven containing a plug of NiO/sub 2//Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ catalyst containing 10 wt% NiO/sub 2/ and heated to 400/sup 0/C resulted in conversion of H/sub 2/S to S/sub 2/ and elemental sulfur. The S/sub 2/ was detected by measurement of its fluorescence bands at 260 and 310nm, and elemental sulfur condensed on the cool parts of the apparatus. However, determination of sulfur-content of gas mixtures with the apparatus described herein were not as repeatable as desired, and the work is being continued on various facets of the non-flame system with work being directed toward the evaluation of different catalysts, catalyst temperature, design of a smaller detector geometry utilizing a pulsed-light excitation source, a windowless cell, and optical filters instead of monochromators to select the S/sub 2/ excitation and emission wavelengths. (BLM)

  14. Crystal structure of phototoxic orange fluorescent proteins with α tryptophan-based chromophore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletneva, Nadya V.; Pletnev, Vladimir Z.; Sarkisyan, Karen S.; Gorbachev, Dmitry A.; Egorov, Evgeny S.; Mishin, Alexander S.; Lukyanov, Konstantin A.; Dauter, Zbigniew; Pletnev, Sergei

    2015-12-23

    Phototoxic fluorescent proteins represent a sparse group of genetically encoded photosensitizers that could be used for precise light-induced inactivation of target proteins, DNA damage, and cell killing. Only two such GFP-based fluorescent proteins (FPs), KillerRed and its monomeric variant SuperNova, were described up to date. We present a crystallographic study of their two orange successors, dimeric KillerOrange and monomeric mKiller-Orange, at 1.81 and 1.57 Å resolution, respectively. They are the first orange-emitting protein photosensitizers with a tryptophan-based chromophore (Gln65-Trp66-Gly67). Same as their red progenitors, both orange photosensitizers have a water-filled channel connecting the chromophore to the β-barrel exterior and enabling transport of ROS. In both proteins, Trp66 of the chromophore adopts an unusual trans-cis conformation stabilized by H-bond with the nearby Gln159. This trans-cis conformation along with the water channel was shown to be a key structural feature providing bright orange emission and phototoxicity of both examined orange photosensitizers.

  15. Synchrotron Radiation {mu}-X Ray Fluorescence on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burattini, E.; Cinque, G.; Bellisola, G.; Fracasso, G.; Colombatti, M.; Monti, F.

    2003-01-24

    Synchrotron Radiation micro X-Ray Fluorescence (SR {mu}-XRF) was applied for the first time to map the trace element content on Multicellular Tumor Spheroids (MTS), i.e. human cell clusters used as an in vitro model for testing micrometastases responses to antitumoral drugs. In particular, immunotoxin molecules composed of a carrier protein (Transferrin) bound to a powerful cytotoxin (Ricin A), were here considered as representatives of a class of therapheutic macromolecules used in cancer theraphy. Spheroids included in polyacrylamide gel and placed inside quartz capillaries were studied at the ESRF ID22 beamline using a 15 keV monochromatic photon microbeam. Elemental maps (of Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) on four groups of spheroids grown under different conditions were studied: untreated, treated only with the carrier molecule or with the toxin alone, and with the complete immunotoxin molecule (carrier+toxin). The results indicate that the distribution of Zn and, to some extent, Cu in the spheroid cells is homogeneous and independent of the treatment type. Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence (TR-XRF) was also applied to quantify the average trace element content in the spheroids. Future developments of the technique are finally outlined on the basis of these preliminary results.

  16. Dual x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and method for fluid analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bary W.; Shepard, Chester L.

    2005-02-22

    Disclosed are an X-ray fluorescence (SRF) spectrometer and method for on-site and in-line determination of contaminant elements in lubricating oils and in fuel oils on board a marine vessel. An XRF source block 13 contains two radionuclide sources 16, 17 (e.g. Cd 109 and Fe 55), each oriented 180 degrees from the other to excite separate targets. The Cd 109 source 16 excites sample lube oil flowing through a low molecular weight sample line 18. The Fe 55 source 17 excites fuel oil manually presented to the source beam inside a low molecular weight vial 26 or other container. Two separate detectors A and B are arranged to detect the fluorescent x-rays from the targets, photons from the analyte atoms in the lube oil for example, and sulfur identifying x-rays from bunker fuel oil for example. The system allows both automated in-line and manual on-site analysis using one set of signal processing and multi-channel analyzer electronics 34, 37 as well as one computer 39 and user interface 43.

  17. Flourescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ... After boiling and then combustion, a fluorescent red pigment is formed. Image: University ...

  18. SU-E-T-20: A Novel Hybrid CBCT, Bioluminescence and Fluorescence Tomography System for Preclinical Radiation Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, B; Eslami, S; Iordachita, I; Yang, Y; Patterson, M; Wong, J; Wang, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A novel standalone bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography (BLT and FT) system equipped with high resolution CBCT has been built in our group. In this work, we present the system calibration method and validate our system in both phantom and in vivo environment. Methods: The CBCT is acquired by rotating the animal stage while keeping the x-ray source and detector panel static. The optical signal is reflected by the 3-mirror system to a multispectral filter set and then delivered to the CCD camera with f/1.4 lens mounted. Nine fibers passing through the stage and in contact with the mouse skin serve as the light sources for diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and FT. The anatomical information and optical properties acquired from the CBCT and DOT, respectively, are used as the priori information to improve the BLT/FT reconstruction accuracy. Flat field correction for the optical system was acquired at multiple wavelengths. A home-built phantom is used to register the optical and CBCT coordinates. An absolute calibration relating the CCD photon counts rate to the light fluence rate emitted at animal surface was developed to quantify the bioluminescence power or fluorophore concentration. Results: An optical inhomogeneous phantom with 2 light sources (3mm separation) imbedded is used to test the system. The optical signal is mapped onto the mesh generated from CBCT for optical reconstruction. Our preliminary results show that the center of mass can be reconstructed within 2.8mm accuracy. A live mouse with the light source imbedded is also used to validate our system. Liver or lung metastatic luminescence tumor model will be used for further testing. Conclusion: This hybrid system transforms preclinical research to a level that even sub-palpable volume of cells can be imaged rapidly and non-invasively, which largely extends the scope of radiobiological research. The research is supported by the NCI grant R01CA158100-01.

  19. Near-infrared fluorescence glucose sensing based on glucose/galactose-binding protein coupled to 651-Blue Oxazine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Faaizah; Pickup, John C.

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: We showed that the NIR fluorophore, 651-Blue Oxazine, is solvatochromic (polarity sensitive). Blue Oxazine was covalently attached to mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP). Fluorescence intensity of GBP-Blue Oxazine increased with addition of glucose. Fluorescence from bead-immobilised GBP-Blue Oxazine was detectable through skin in vitro. This shows proof-of-concept for non-invasive glucose sensing using GBP-Blue Oxazine. -- Abstract: Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dyes that are environmentally sensitive or solvatochromic are useful tools for protein labelling in in vivo biosensor applications such as glucose monitoring in diabetes since their spectral properties are mostly independent of tissue autofluorescence and light scattering, and they offer potential for non-invasive analyte sensing. We showed that the fluorophore 651-Blue Oxazine is polarity-sensitive, with a marked reduction in NIR fluorescence on increasing solvent polarity. Mutants of glucose/galactose-binding protein (GBP) used as the glucose receptor were site-specifically and covalently labelled with Blue Oxazine using click chemistry. Mutants H152C/A213R and H152C/A213R/L238S showed fluorescence increases of 15% and 21% on addition of saturating glucose concentrations and binding constants of 6 and 25 mM respectively. Fluorescence responses to glucose were preserved when GBP-Blue Oxazine was immobilised to agarose beads, and the beads were excited by NIR light through a mouse skin preparation studied in vitro. We conclude GBP-Blue Oxazine shows proof-of-concept as a non-invasive continuous glucose sensing system.

  20. The fluorescence action spectra of some saturated hydrocarbon liquids for excitation energies above and below their ionization thresholds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostafin, A.E.; Lipsky, S. )

    1993-04-01

    Fluorescence action spectra have been obtained for the neat liquids, [ital cis]-decalin, [ital trans]-decalin, bicyclohexyl, cyclohexane, methylcyclohexane, isobutylcyclohexane, 2,3,4-trimethylpentane, 2,3-dimethylbutane, 3-methylhexane, 3-methylpentane, [ital n]-decane, [ital n]-dodecane, and [ital n]-pentadecane at excitation energies, [epsilon], ranging from their absorption onsets (at ca. 7 eV) to 10.3 eV. For all compounds, with the exception of [ital cis]-decalin, the fluorescence quantum yield is observed to monotonically decline with increasing [epsilon], reaching a minimum value at an energy, [epsilon][sub [ital m

  1. Simultaneous determination of thorium, niobium, lead, and zinc by photon-induced x-ray fluorescence of lateritic material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBrecque, J.J.; Adames, D.; Parker, W.C.

    1981-01-01

    A rapid method is presented for the simultaneous determinations of thorium, niobium, lead, and zinc in lateritic material from Cerro Impacto, Estado Bolivar, Venezuela. This technique uses a PDP - 11/05 processor - based photon induced x-ray fluorescence system. The total variations of approximately 5% for concentrations of approximately 1 and 10% for concentrations of approximately 0.1% were obtained with only 500 s of fluorescent time. The values obtained by this method were in agreement with values measured by conventional flame atomic absorption spectroscopy for lead and zinc. The values for thorium measured were in agreement with the reported values for the reference materials supplied by NBL.

  2. Localization of human elav-like neuronal protein 1 (Hel-N1) on chromosome 9p21 by chromosome microdissection polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Jian; Knops, J.F.; Longshore, J.W.; King, P.H.

    1996-08-15

    Hel-N1 is a member of the highly conserved elav family of neuronal genes. It shares considerable sequence homology with HuD, another human member, and both genes are expressed in brain. HuD was recently mapped to chromosome 1p34. Here, we have utilized chromosome microdissection polymerase chain reaction and fluorescence in situ hybridization to map Hel-N1 to chromosome 9p21. The different chromosomal locations of these homologous genes underscore their distinct identities. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  3. 2D laser-collision induced fluorescence in low-pressure argon discharges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.

    2015-09-25

    Development and application of laser-collision induced fluorescence (LCIF) diagnostic technique is presented for the use of interrogating argon plasma discharges. Key atomic states of argon utilized for the LCIF method are identified. A simplified two-state collisional radiative model is then used to establish scaling relations between the LCIF, electron density, and reduced electric fields (E/N). The procedure used to generate, detect and calibrate the LCIF in controlled plasma environments is discussed in detail. LCIF emanating from an argon discharge is then presented for electron densities spanning 109 e cm–3 to 1012 e cm–3 and reduced electric fields spanning 0.1 Td to 40 Td. Lastly, application of the LCIF technique for measuring the spatial distribution of both electron densities and reduced electric field is demonstrated.

  4. X-Ray Fluorescence to Determine Zn in Bolivian Children using Hair Samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tellería Narvaez, C.A.; Fernández Alcázar, S.; Barrientos Zamora, F.G.; Chungara Castro, J.; Luna Lauracia, I.; Mamani Tola, H.; Mita Peralta, E.; Muñoz Gosálvez, A.O.; Romero Bolaños, L.E.; Ramírez Ávila, G.M.

    2014-06-15

    As a first step in the evaluation of nutritional levels in Bolivian children (8–13 years-old), we carried out X-Ray Fluorescence measurements in hair samples of children belonging to different social classes and living either in rural areas or in cities. The aim of this study is to contribute to health policies tending to improve the global health of children and consequently avoid malnutrition. Our method intends to have maximum reliability and at the same time be as simple as possible from an experimental point of view. Additionally, we use this method to determine some other elements such as Fe, Cu, Pb, As and Hg, the latter three considered as contaminants that could be present in children living in areas which neighbor mines and industries. This work will be complemented by some biological and medical tests.

  5. Functionalization of cubic boron nitride films with rhodamine B and their fluorescent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, W. M.; Zhang, H. Y.; Wang, P. F.; Ye, Q.; Yang, Y.; He, B.; Bello, I.; Lee, S. T.; Zhang, W. J.

    2011-08-08

    Fluorophore-functionalized cubic boron nitride (cBN) films grown by chemical vapor deposition were achieved by immobilizing rhodamine B isothiocyanate onto their surfaces. To perform the immobilization, the cBN substrates were modified with amino groups by photochemical reaction between hydrogen-terminated cBN surfaces and allylamine. The surface analysis of hydrogen-terminated cBN films surfaces and after functionalization with x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy verified that rhodamine B was indeed attached to the cBN surfaces with covalent bonding. The rhodamine B-functionalized cBN surfaces showed significant variation in fluorescent spectra and confocal imaging upon the treatment in acidic or basic solutions.

  6. 100-OL-1 Operable Unit Field Portable X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer Pilot Study Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bunn, Amoret L.; Fritz, Brad G.; Wellman, Dawn M.

    2014-07-15

    A pilot study is being conducted to support the approval of the Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) Work Plan to evaluate the 100-OL-1 Operable Unit (OU) pre-Hanford orchard lands. Based on comments received by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington State Department of Ecology, the pilot study will evaluate the use of field portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry measurements for evaluating lead and arsenic concentrations on the soil surface as an indicator of past use of lead arsenate pesticide residue in the OU. The work will be performed in the field during the summer of 2014, and assist in the planning for the characterization activities in the RI/FS.

  7. 2D laser-collision induced fluorescence in low-pressure argon discharges

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barnat, E. V.; Weatherford, B. R.

    2015-09-25

    Development and application of laser-collision induced fluorescence (LCIF) diagnostic technique is presented for the use of interrogating argon plasma discharges. Key atomic states of argon utilized for the LCIF method are identified. A simplified two-state collisional radiative model is then used to establish scaling relations between the LCIF, electron density, and reduced electric fields (E/N). The procedure used to generate, detect and calibrate the LCIF in controlled plasma environments is discussed in detail. LCIF emanating from an argon discharge is then presented for electron densities spanning 109 e cm–3 to 1012 e cm–3 and reduced electric fields spanning 0.1 Tdmore » to 40 Td. Lastly, application of the LCIF technique for measuring the spatial distribution of both electron densities and reduced electric field is demonstrated.« less

  8. Temperature dependence of photoluminescence properties in a thermally activated delayed fluorescence emitter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Niwa, Akitsugu; Kobayashi, Takashi Nagase, Takashi; Naito, Hiroyoshi; Goushi, Kenichi; Adachi, Chihaya

    2014-05-26

    Using steady-state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, we have investigated the temperature dependence of PL properties of 1,2,3,5-tetrakis(carbazol-9-yl)-4,6-dicyano-benzene (4CzIPN), which have a small energy gap between its singlet and triplet excited states and thus exhibits efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence [H. Uoyama et al., Nature 492, 235 (2012)]. Below around 100?K, PL quantum efficiency of 4CzIPN thin films is largely suppressed and strong photoexcitation intensity dependence appears. These features can be explained by using rate equations for the densities of singlet and triplet excited states considering a triplet-triplet annihilation process.

  9. Real-time method and apparatus for measuring the temperature of a fluorescing phosphor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Beshears, David L.; Simpson, Marc L.; Cates, Michael R.; Allison, Steve W.

    1999-01-01

    A method for determining the temperature of a fluorescing phosphor is provided, together with an apparatus for performing the method. The apparatus includes a photodetector for detecting light emitted by a phosphor irradiated with an excitation pulse and for converting the detected light into an electrical signal. The apparatus further includes a differentiator for differentiating the electrical signal and a zero-crossing discrimination circuit that outputs a pulse signal having a pulse width corresponding to the time period between the start of the excitation pulse and the time when the differentiated electrical signal reaches zero. The width of the output pulse signal is proportional to the decay-time constant of the phosphor.

  10. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  11. Portable high precision pressure transducer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Piper, T.C.; Morgan, J.P.; Marchant, N.J.; Bolton, S.M.

    1994-04-26

    A high precision pressure transducer system is described for checking the reliability of a second pressure transducer system used to monitor the level of a fluid confined in a holding tank. Since the response of the pressure transducer is temperature sensitive, it is continually housed in an battery powered oven which is configured to provide a temperature stable environment at specified temperature for an extended period of time. Further, a high precision temperature stabilized oscillator and counter are coupled to a single board computer to accurately determine the pressure transducer oscillation frequency and convert it to an applied pressure. All of the components are powered by the batteries which during periods of availability of line power are charged by an on board battery charger. The pressure readings outputs are transmitted to a line printer and a vacuum fluorescent display. 2 figures.

  12. Red-shifted fluorescent proteins mPlum and mRaspberry and polynucleotides encoding the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.; Wang, Lei

    2008-07-01

    Methods using somatic hypermutation (SHM) for producing polypeptide and nucleic acid variants, and nucleic acids encoding such polypeptide variants are disclosed. Such variants may have desired properties. Also disclosed are novel polypeptides, such as improved fluorescent proteins, produced by the novel methods, and nucleic acids, vectors, and host cells comprising such vectors.

  13. Fluorescence energy transfer efficiency in labeled yeast cytochrome c: a rapid screen for ion biocompatibility in aqueous ionic liquids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, Sheila N; Zhao, Hua; Pandey, Siddharth; Heller, William T; Bright, Frank; Baker, Gary A

    2011-01-01

    A fluorescence energy transfer de-quenching assay was implemented to follow the equilibrium unfolding behaviour of site-specific tetramethylrhodamine-labelled yeast cytochrome c in aqueous ionic liquid solutions; additionally, this approach offers the prospect of naked eye screening for biocompatible ion combinations in hydrated ionic liquids.

  14. Dose Response and Post-irradiation Characteristics of the Sunna 535-nm Photo-Fluorescent Film Dosimeter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark K.; Kovacs, Andras; Miller, Steven D.; Mclaughlin, William L.

    2003-06-09

    Results of characterization studies on one of the first versions of the Sunna photo-fluorescent dosimeter ? have previously been reported, and describe the performance of the red fluorescence component. This present paper describes dose response and post-irradiation characteristics of the green fluorescence component from the same dosimeter film (Sunna Model ?), which is manufactured using the injection molding technique. This production method may supply batch sizes on the order of 1 million dosimeter film elements while maintaining a signal precision (1?) on the order of ?1% without the need to correct for variability of film thickness. The dosimeter is a 1-cm by 3-cm polymeric film of 0.5-mm thickness that emits green fluorescence at intensities increasing almost linearly with dose. The data presented include dose response, post-irradiation growth, heat treatment, dosimeter aging, dose rate dependence, energy dependence, dose fractionation, variation of response within a batch, and the stability of the fluorimeter response. The results indicate that, as a routine dosimeter, the green signal provides a broad range of response at food irradiation (0.3 to 5 kGy), medical sterilization (5 to 40 kGy), and polymer cross-linking (40 to 250 kGy) dose levels.

  15. Luminescent Lanthanide Reporters for High-Sensitivity Novel Bioassays.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anstey, Mitchell; Fruetel, Julia A.; Foster, Michael E.; Hayden, Carl C.; Buckley, Heather L.; Arnold, John

    2013-09-01

    Biological imaging and assay technologies rely on fluorescent organic dyes as reporters for a number of interesting targets and processes. However, limitations of organic dyes such as small Stokes shifts, spectral overlap of emission signals with native biological fluorescence background, and photobleaching have all inhibited the development of highly sensitive assays. To overcome the limitations of organic dyes for bioassays, we propose to develop lanthanide-based luminescent dyes and demonstrate them for molecular reporting applications. This relatively new family of dyes was selected for their attractive spectral and chemical properties. Luminescence is imparted by the lanthanide atom and allows for relatively simple chemical structures that can be tailored to the application. The photophysical properties offer unique features such as narrow and non-overlapping emission bands, long luminescent lifetimes, and long wavelength emission, which enable significant sensitivity improvements over organic dyes through spectral and temporal gating of the luminescent signal.Growth in this field has been hindered due to the necessary advanced synthetic chemistry techniques and access to experts in biological assay development. Our strategy for the development of a new lanthanide-based fluorescent reporter system is based on chelation of the lanthanide metal center using absorbing chromophores. Our first strategy involves %22Click%22 chemistry to develop 3-fold symmetric chelators and the other involves use of a new class of tetrapyrrole ligands called corroles. This two-pronged approach is geared towards the optimization of chromophores to enhance light output.

  16. High e

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    e ne rgy data s am ple ● NuMI beam events provide an useful calibration sample ● Collected over 70K candidates before shutdown The highest energy events are prim arily from kaon decays. Two sam ples at high energy provide normalization and shape inform ation for kaon backgrounds to oscillation analysis: ● ν e events passing oscillation event selection cuts ● ν µ induced CCQE, CCπ+events Reconstructed neutrino energy EνQE(GeV) ν from other particles ν from pions ν from Kaons -

  17. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size, development time, nor concerns related to the use of Pu in measurement systems. This report discusses basic NRF measurement concepts, i.e., backscatter and transmission methods, and photon source and {gamma}-ray detector options in Section 2. An analytical model for calculating NRF signal strengths is presented in Section 3 together with enhancements to the MCNPX code and descriptions of modeling techniques that were drawn upon in the following sections. Making extensive use of the model and MCNPX simulations, the capabilities of the backscatter and transmission methods based on bremsstrahlung or quasi-monoenergetic photon sources were analyzed as described in Sections 4 and 5. A recent transmission experiment is reported on in Appendix A. While this experiment was not directly part of this project, its results provide an important reference point for our analytical estimates and MCNPX simulations. Used fuel radioactivity calculations, the enhancements to the MCNPX code, and details of the MCNPX simulations are documented in the other appendices.

  18. Ultrasound guided fluorescence molecular tomography with improved quantification by an attenuation compensated born-normalization and in vivo preclinical study of cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Baoqiang; Berti, Romain; Abran, Maxime; Lesage, Frédéric; Montreal Heart Institute, Montreal, Quebec H1T 1C8

    2014-05-15

    Ultrasound imaging, having the advantages of low-cost and non-invasiveness over MRI and X-ray CT, was reported by several studies as an adequate complement to fluorescence molecular tomography with the perspective of improving localization and quantification of fluorescent molecular targets in vivo. Based on the previous work, an improved dual-modality Fluorescence-Ultrasound imaging system was developed and then validated in imaging study with preclinical tumor model. Ultrasound imaging and a profilometer were used to obtain the anatomical prior information and 3D surface, separately, to precisely extract the tissue boundary on both sides of sample in order to achieve improved fluorescence reconstruction. Furthermore, a pattern-based fluorescence reconstruction on the detection side was incorporated to enable dimensional reduction of the dataset while keeping the useful information for reconstruction. Due to its putative role in the current imaging geometry and the chosen reconstruction technique, we developed an attenuation compensated Born-normalization method to reduce the attenuation effects and cancel off experimental factors when collecting quantitative fluorescence datasets over large area. Results of both simulation and phantom study demonstrated that fluorescent targets could be recovered accurately and quantitatively using this reconstruction mechanism. Finally, in vivo experiment confirms that the imaging system associated with the proposed image reconstruction approach was able to extract both functional and anatomical information, thereby improving quantification and localization of molecular targets.

  19. Performance of T12 and T8 Fluorescent Lamps and Troffers and LED Linear Replacement Lamps CALiPER Benchmark Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, Michael; Paget, Maria L.; Lingard, Robert D.

    2009-01-16

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Commercially Available LED Product Evaluation and Reporting (CALiPER) Program was established in 2006 to investigate the performance of light-emitting diode (LED) based luminaires and replacement lamps. To help users better compare LED products with conventional lighting technologies, CALiPER has also performed benchmark research and testing of traditional (i.e., non-LED) lamps and fixtures. This benchmark report addresses standard 4-foot fluorescent lamps (i.e., T12 and T8) and the 2-foot by 4-foot recessed troffers in which they are commonly used. This report also examines available LED replacements for T12 and T8 fluorescent lamps, and their application in fluorescent troffers. The construction and operation of linear fluorescent lamps and troffers are discussed, as well as fluorescent lamp and fixture performance, based on manufacturer data and CALiPER benchmark testing. In addition, the report describes LED replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, and compares their bare lamp and in situ performance with fluorescent benchmarks on a range of standard lighting measures, including power usage, light output and distribution, efficacy, correlated color temperature, and the color rendering index. Potential performance and application issues indicated by CALiPER testing results are also examined.

  20. A multi-channel monolithic Ge detector system for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucher, J.J.; Allen, P.G.; Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Madden, N.W.; Cork, C.; Luke, P.; Pehl, D.; Malone, D.

    1995-03-01

    Construction and performance of a monolithic quad-pixel Ge detector for fluorescence x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at synchrotron radiation sources are described. The detector semiconductor element has an active surface area of 4.0 cm{sup 2} which is electrically separated into four 1.0 cm{sup 2} pixels, with little interfacial dead volume. Spatial response of the array shows that cross-talk between adjacent pixels is < 10% for 5.9 keV photons that fall within 0.5 mm of the pixel boundaries. The detector electronics system uses pre-amplifiers built at LBNL with commercial Tennelec Model TC 244 amplifiers. Using an {sup 55}Fe test source (MnK{sub {alpha}}, 5.9 keV), energy resolution of better than 200 eV is achieved with a 4 {mu}sec peaking time. At 0.5 {mu}sec peaking time, pulse pileup results in a 75% throughput efficiency for an incoming count rate of 100 kHz. Initial XAS fluoresncece measurements at the beamline 4 wiggler end stations at SSRL show that the detector system has several advantages over commercial x-ray spectrometers for low-concentration counting.

  1. X-ray optics for scanning fluorescence microscopy and other applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryon, R.W.; Warburton, W.K.

    1992-05-01

    Scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy is analogous to scanning electron microscopy. Maps of chemical element distribution are produced by scanning with a very small x-ray beam. Goal is to perform such scanning microscopy with resolution in the range of <1 to 10 {mu}m, using standard laboratory x-ray tubes. We are investigating mirror optics in the Kirkpatrick-Baez (K-B) configuration. K-B optics uses two curved mirrors mounted orthogonally along the optical axis. The first mirror provides vertical focus, the second mirror provides horizontal focus. We have used two types of mirrors: synthetic multilayers and crystals. Multilayer mirrors are used with lower energy radiation such as Cu K{alpha}. At higher energies such as Ag K{alpha}, silicon wafers are used in order to increase the incidence angles and thereby the photon collection efficiency. In order to increase the surface area of multilayers which reflects x-rays at the Bragg angle, we have designed mirrors with the spacing between layers graded along the optic axis in order to compensate for the changing angle of incidence. Likewise, to achieve a large reflecting surface with silicon, the wafers are placed on a specially designed lever arm which is bent into a log spiral by applying force at one end. In this way, the same diffracting angle is maintained over the entire surface of the wafer, providing a large solid angle for photon collection.

  2. Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

    2009-09-23

    We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

  3. Heat shock-induced interactions among nuclear HSFs detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Ahn, Sang-Gun

    2015-07-31

    The cellular response to stress is primarily controlled in cells via transcriptional activation by heat shock factor 1 (HSF1). HSF1 is well-known to form homotrimers for activation upon heat shock and subsequently bind to target DNAs, such as heat-shock elements, by forming stress granules. A previous study demonstrated that nuclear HSF1 and HSF2 molecules in live cells interacted with target DNAs on the stress granules. However, the process underlying the binding interactions of HSF family in cells upon heat shock remains unclear. This study demonstrate for the first time that the interaction kinetics among nuclear HSF1, HSF2, and HSF4 upon heat shock can be detected directly in live cells using dual color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (FCCS). FCCS analyses indicated that the binding between HSFs was dramatically changed by heat shock. Interestingly, the recovery kinetics of interaction between HSF1 molecules after heat shock could be represented by changes in the relative interaction amplitude and mobility. - Highlights: • The binding interactions among nuclear HSFs were successfully detected. • The binding kinetics between HSF1s during recovery was quantified. • HSF2 and HSF4 strongly formed hetero-complex, even before heat shock. • Nuclear HSF2 and HSF4 bound to HSF1 only after heat shock.

  4. The Demand Side: Behavioral Patterns and Unpicked Low-Hanging Fruit

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    The Demand Side: Behavioral Patterns and Unpicked Low-Hanging Fruit James Sweeney Stanford University Director Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (Née: Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency) Professor, Management Science and Engineering 6 Source: McKinsey & Co. Increased commercial space Gasoline Price Controls Compact Fluorescent Penetration LED: Traffic Lights, Task Lighting Appliance Energy Labeling Gasoline Rationing Much Incandescent Lighting Congestion Pricing Personal Computer

  5. The Department of Energy Announces Major Cold War Legacy Waste Cleanup

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Demand Side: Behavioral Patterns and Unpicked Low-Hanging Fruit James Sweeney Stanford University Director Precourt Energy Efficiency Center (Née: Precourt Institute for Energy Efficiency) Professor, Management Science and Engineering 6 Source: McKinsey & Co. Increased commercial space Gasoline Price Controls Compact Fluorescent Penetration LED: Traffic Lights, Task Lighting Appliance Energy Labeling Gasoline Rationing Much Incandescent Lighting Congestion Pricing Personal Computer

  6. Photo: US ITER/ORNL INSIDE: ITER Site Progress

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo Gallery: Energy Literacy in 2013 Photo Gallery: Energy Literacy in 2013 December 18, 2013 - 10:27am Addthis In celebration of Earth Day in April, elementary school students at Churchill Road Elementary School in McLean, Virginia, learned about energy literacy by riding the Energy Department’s energy bike. The bike enabled students to pedal for power and experience the difference in physical effort necessary to power incandescent, compact fluorescent, and LED lighting. This lesson

  7. National Lighting Energy Consumption

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lighting Energy National Lighting Energy Consumption Consumption 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all 390 Billion kWh used for lighting in all commercial buildings in commercial buildings in 2001 2001 LED (<.1% ) Incandescent 40% HID 22% Fluorescent 38% Lighting Energy Consumption by Lighting Energy Consumption by Breakdown of Lighting Energy Breakdown of Lighting Energy Major Sector and Light Source Type Major Sector and Light Source Type Source: Navigant Consulting, Inc., U.S. Lighting

  8. NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices NGL Downlight Demonstration Project: Alston & Bird, LLP, Law Offices As of 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates 700 million downlight luminaires were installed in residential and commercial buildings; light-emitting diode (LED) luminaires represent less than 1% of this installed base. Downlight luminaires using conventional incandescent, halogen, and compact fluorescent lamps have

  9. Earth Day 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy 5 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies EXC-12-0005 - In the Matter of Halco Lighting Technologies On July 10, 2012, OHA issued a decision granting an Application for Exception filed by Halco Lighting Technologies (Halco) for relief from the provisions of 10 C.F.R. Part 430, Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for General Service Fluorescent Lamps and Incandescent Reflector Lamps (Lighting Efficiency Standards). In its exception

  10. Method of using a nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy standard. [SO/sub 2/ in gases by fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, L.D.; Bennett, D.W.; Davis, J.F.

    1983-05-09

    (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SI)/sub 2/NH with SO/sub 2/. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/O and a new solid compound (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/). Both (CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiNSO and (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO/sub 2/ pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/Si)/sub 2/NH, whereby any SO/sub 2/ present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO/sub 2/ in the original gas sample. The solid product (NH/sub 4/)((CH/sub 3/)/sub 3/SiOSO/sub 2/) may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy, wherein the resonance peaks of either /sup 1/H, /sup 13/C, /sup 15/N, or /sup 29/Si may be used as a reference.

  11. X-ray crystal structure and properties of Phanta, a weakly fluorescent photochromic GFP-like protein

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paul, Craig Don; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Olsen, Seth; Devenish, Rodney J.; Close, Devin W.; Bell, Toby D. M.; Bradbury, Andrew; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Prescott, Mark

    2015-04-29

    Phanta is a reversibly photoswitching chromoprotein (ΦF, 0.003), useful for pcFRET, that was isolated from a mutagenesis screen of the bright green fluorescent eCGP123 (ΦF, 0.8). We have investigated the contribution of substitutions at positions His193, Thr69 and Gln62, individually and in combination, to the optical properties of Phanta. Single amino acid substitutions at position 193 resulted in proteins with very low ΦF, indicating the importance of this position in controlling the fluorescence efficiency of the variant proteins. The substitution Thr69Val in Phanta was important for supressing the formation of a protonated chromophore species observed in some His193 substituted variants,more » whereas the substitution Gln62Met did not significantly contribute to the useful optical properties of Phanta. X-ray crystal structures for Phanta (2.3 Å), eCGP123T69V (2.0 Å) and eCGP123H193Q (2.2 Å) in their non-photoswitched state were determined, revealing the presence of a cis-coplanar chromophore. We conclude that changes in the hydrogen-bonding network supporting the cis-chromophore, and its contacts with the surrounding protein matrix, are responsible for the low fluorescence emission of eCGP123 variants containing a His193 substitution.« less

  12. Structural and dynamic changes associated with beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion mutations in enhanced green fluorescent protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arpino, James A. J. [Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT Wales (United Kingdom); Rizkallah, Pierre J., E-mail: rizkallahp@cardiff.ac.uk [Cardiff University, Heath Park, Cardiff CF14 4XN Wales (United Kingdom); Jones, D. Dafydd, E-mail: rizkallahp@cardiff.ac.uk [Cardiff University, Park Place, Cardiff CF10 3AT Wales (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-01

    The beneficial engineered single-amino-acid deletion variants EGFP{sup D190?} and EGFP{sup A227?} have been studied. Single-amino-acid deletions are a common part of the natural evolutionary landscape but are rarely sampled during protein engineering owing to limited and prejudiced molecular understanding of mutations that shorten the protein backbone. Single-amino-acid deletion variants of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) have been identified by directed evolution with the beneficial effect of imparting increased cellular fluorescence. Biophysical characterization revealed that increased functional protein production and not changes to the fluorescence parameters was the mechanism that was likely to be responsible. The structure EGFP{sup D190?} containing a deletion within a loop revealed propagated changes only after the deleted residue. The structure of EGFP{sup A227?} revealed that a flipping mechanism was used to adjust for residue deletion at the end of a ?-strand, with amino acids C-terminal to the deletion site repositioning to take the place of the deleted amino acid. In both variants new networks of short-range and long-range interactions are generated while maintaining the integrity of the hydrophobic core. Both deletion variants also displayed significant local and long-range changes in dynamics, as evident by changes in B factors compared with EGFP. Rather than being detrimental, deletion mutations can introduce beneficial structural effects through altering core protein properties, folding and dynamics, as well as function.

  13. Low axial drift stage and temperature controlled liquid cell for z-scan fluorescence correlation spectroscopy in an inverted confocal geometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allgeyer, Edward S.; Sterling, Sarah M.; Neivandt, David J.; Mason, Michael D.

    2011-05-15

    A recent iteration of fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), z-scan FCS, has drawn attention for its elegant solution to the problem of quantitative sample positioning when investigating two-dimensional systems while simultaneously providing an excellent method for extracting calibration-free diffusion coefficients. Unfortunately, the measurement of planar systems using (FCS and) z-scan FCS still requires extremely mechanically stable sample positioning, relative to a microscope objective. As axial sample position serves as the inherent length calibration, instabilities in sample position will affect measured diffusion coefficients. Here, we detail the design and function of a highly stable and mechanically simple inverted microscope stage that includes a temperature controlled liquid cell. The stage and sample cell are ideally suited to planar membrane investigations, but generally amenable to any quantitative microscopy that requires low drift and excellent axial and lateral stability. In the present work we evaluate the performance of our custom stage system and compare it with the stock microscope stage and typical sample sealing and holding methods.

  14. THE SAP3 COMPUTER PROGRAM FOR QUANTITATIVE MULTIELEMENT ANALYSIS BY ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielson, K. K.; Sanders, R. W.

    1982-04-01

    SAP3 is a dual-function FORTRAN computer program which performs peak analysis of energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectra and then quantitatively interprets the results of the multielement analysis. It was written for mono- or bi-chromatic excitation as from an isotopic or secondary excitation source, and uses the separate incoherent and coherent backscatter intensities to define the bulk sample matrix composition. This composition is used in performing fundamental-parameter matrix corrections for self-absorption, enhancement, and particle-size effects, obviating the need for specific calibrations for a given sample matrix. The generalized calibration is based on a set of thin-film sensitivities, which are stored in a library disk file and used for all sample matrices and thicknesses. Peak overlap factors are also determined from the thin-film standards, and are stored in the library for calculating peak overlap corrections. A detailed description is given of the algorithms and program logic, and the program listing and flow charts are also provided. An auxiliary program, SPCAL, is also given for use in calibrating the backscatter intensities. SAP3 provides numerous analysis options via seventeen control switches which give flexibility in performing the calculations best suited to the sample and the user needs. User input may be limited to the name of the library, the analysis livetime, and the spectrum filename and location. Output includes all peak analysis information, matrix correction factors, and element concentrations, uncertainties and detection limits. Twenty-four elements are typically determined from a 1024-channel spectrum in one-to-two minutes using a PDP-11/34 computer operating under RSX-11M.

  15. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Degueldre, Claude Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O? lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg?) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (~0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am? species within an [AmO?]? coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix. - Graphical abstract: Americium LIII XAFS spectra recorded for the irradiated MOX sub-sample in the rim zone for a 300 ?m300 ?m beam size area investigated over six scans of 4 h. The records remain constant during multi-scan. The analysis of the XAFS signal shows that Am is found as trivalent in the UO? matrix. This analytical work shall open the door of very challenging analysis (speciation of fission product and actinides) in irradiated nuclear fuels. - Highlights: Americium was characterized by microX-ray absorption spectroscopy in irradiated MOX fuel. The americium redox state as determined from XAS data of irradiated fuel material was Am(III). In the sample, the Am? face an AmO??coordination environment in the (Pu,U)O? matrix. The americium dioxide is reduced by the uranium dioxide matrix.

  16. Monochromatic wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence providing sensitive and selective detection of uranium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montoya, Velma M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chen, Zewu [XOS; Wei, Fuzhong [XOS

    2010-01-01

    Monochromatic wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (MWDXRF) is a sensitive and selective method for elemental compositional analyses. The basis for this instrumental advance is the doubly curved crystal (DCC) optic. Previous work has demonstrated the feasibility of sensitive trace element detection for yttrium as a surrogate for curium in aqueous solutions. Additional measurements have demonstrated similar sensitivity in several different matrix environments which attests to the selectivity of the DCC optic as well as the capabilities of the MWDXRF concept. The objective of this effort is to develop an improved Pu characterization method for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The MWDXRF prototype instrument is the second step in a multi-year effort to achieve an improved Pu assay. This work will describe a prototype MWDXRF instrument designed for uranium detection and characterization. The prototype consists of an X-ray tube with a rhodium anode and a DCC excitation optic incorporated into the source. The DCC optic passes the RhK{alpha} line at 20.214 keV for monochromatic excitation of the sample. The source is capable of 50 W power at 50 kV and 1.0 mA operation. The x-ray emission from the sample is collected by a DCC optic set at the UL{alpha} line of 13.613 keV. The collection optic transmits the UL{alpha} x-rays to the silicon drift detector. The x-ray source, sample, collection optic and detector are all mounted on motion controlled stages for the critical alignment of these components. The sensitivity and selectivity of the instrument is obtained through the monochromatic excitation and the monochromatic detection. The prototype instrument performance has a demonstrated for sensitivity for uranium detection of around 2 ppm at the current state of development. Further improvement in sensitivity is expected with more detailed alignment.

  17. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    2000-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a cationic chain. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye.

  18. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

    1998-07-21

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a cationic chain. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye. 10 figs.

  19. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Mathies, Richard A.; Hung, Su-Chun; Ju, Jingyue

    1998-01-01

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures.

  20. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1998-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a cationic chain. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye.

  1. Dyes designed for high sensitivity detection of double-stranded DNA

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, Alexander N.; Benson, Scott C.

    1994-01-01

    Novel fluorescent dyes are provided, characterized by having a fluorophore joined to a polycationic chain of at least two positive charges. The dyes are found to provide for high enhancement upon binding to nucleic acid and have strong binding affinities to the nucleic acid, as compared to the fluorophore without the polycationic chain. The dyes find use in detection of dsDNA in gel electrophoresis and solution at substantially higher sensitivities using substantially less dye.

  2. Cyanine dyes with high-absorbance cross section as donor chromophores in energy transfer labels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glazer, A.N.; Mathies, R.A.; Hung, S.C.; Ju, J.

    1998-12-29

    Cyanine dyes are used as the donor fluorophore in energy transfer labels in which light energy is absorbed by a donor fluorophore and transferred to an acceptor fluorophore which responds to the transfer by emitting fluorescent light for detection. The cyanine dyes impart an unusually high sensitivity to the labels thereby improving their usefulness in a wide variety of biochemical procedures, particularly nucleic acid sequencing, nucleic acid fragment sizing, and related procedures. 22 figs.

  3. Detection limits for actinides in a monochromatic, wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, Michael L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Havrilla, George J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recent developments in x-ray optics have made it possible to examine the L x-rays of actinides using doubly-curved crystals in a bench-top device. A doubly-curved crystal (DCC) acts as a focusing monochromatic filter for polychromatic x-rays. A Monochromatic, Wavelength-Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence (MWDXRF) instrument that uses DCCs to measure Cm and Pu in reprocessing plant liquors was proposed in 2007 by the authors at Los Alamos National Laboratory. A prototype design of this MWDXRF instrument was developed in collaboration with X-ray Optical Systems Inc. (XOS), of East Greenbush, New York. In the MWDXRF instrument, x-rays from a Rhodium-anode x-ray tube are passed through a primary DCC to produce a monochromatic beam of 20.2-keV photons. This beam is focused on a specimen that may contain actinides. The 20.2-keV interrogating beam is just above the L3 edge of Californium; each actinide (with Z = 90 to 98) present in the specimen emits characteristic L x-rays as the result of L3-shell vacancies. In the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRf, these x-rays enter a secondary DCC optic that preferentially passes 14.961-keV photons, corresponding to the L-alpha-1 x-ray peak of Curium. In the present stage of experimentation, Curium-bearing specimens have not been analyzed with the prototype MWDXRF instrument. Surrogate materials for Curium include Rubidium, which has a K-beta-l x-ray at 14.961 keV, and Yttrium, which has a K-alpha-1 x-ray at 14.958 keV. In this paper, the lower limit of detection for Curium in the LANL-XOS prototype MWDXRF instrument is estimated. The basis for this estimate is described, including a description of computational models and benchmarking techniques used. Detection limits for other actinides are considered, as well as future safeguards applications for MWDXRF instrumentation.

  4. L Prize Drives Technology Innovation, Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-04-30

    Fact sheet that provides an overview of DOE's L Prize competition, which challenges industry to develop high-quality, high-efficiency SSL products to replace 60W incandescent and PAR38 halogen light bulbs, and highlights the competition's first 60W winner from Philips Lighting North America.

  5. Engineering ESPT Pathways Based on Structural Analysis of LSSmKate Red Fluorescent Proteins with Large Stokes Shift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piatkevich, K.; Malashkevich, V; Almo, S; Verkhusha, V

    2010-01-01

    LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2 are monomeric red fluorescent proteins (RFPs) with large Stokes shifts (LSSs), which allows for efficient separation of absorbance and emission maxima, as well as for excitation with conventional two-photon laser sources. These LSSmKates differ by a single amino acid substitution at position 160 and exhibit absorbance maxima around 460 nm, corresponding to a neutral DsRed-like chromophore. However, excitation at 460 nm leads to fluorescence emission above 600 nm. Structures of LSSmKate1 and LSSmKate2, determined at resolutions of 2.0 and 1.5 {angstrom}, respectively, revealed that the predominant DsRed-chromophore configurations are cis for LSSmKate1 but trans for LSSmKate2. Crystallographic and mutagenesis analyses, as well as isotope and temperature dependences, suggest that an excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) is responsible for the LSSs observed in LSSmKates. Hydrogen bonding between the chromophore hydroxyl and Glu160 in LSSmKate1 and a proton relay involving the chromophore tyrosine hydroxyl, Ser158, and the Asp160 carboxylate in LSSmKate2 represent the putative ESPT pathways. Comparisons with mKeima LSS RFP suggest that similar proton relays could be engineered in other FPs. Accordingly, we mutated positions 158 and 160 in several conventional red-shifted FPs, including mNeptune, mCherry, mStrawberry, mOrange, and mKO, and the resulting FP variants exhibited LSS fluorescence emission in a wide range of wavelengths from 560 to 640 nm. These data suggest that different chromophores formed by distinct tripeptides in different environments can be rationally modified to yield RFPs with novel photochemical properties.

  6. Laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the Ca dimer deposited on helium and mixed helium/xenon clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaveau, Marc-Andr; Pothier, Christophe; Briant, Marc; Mestdagh, Jean-Michel

    2014-12-09

    We study how the laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy of the calcium dimer deposited on pure helium clusters is modified by the addition of xenon atoms. In the wavelength range between 365 and 385 nm, the Ca dimer is excited from its ground state up to two excited electronic states leading to its photodissociation in Ca({sup 1}P)+Ca({sup 1}S): this process is monitored by recording the Ca({sup 1}P) fluorescence at 422.7nm. One of these electronic states of Ca{sub 2} is a diexcited one correlating to the Ca(4s4p{sup 3}P(+Ca(4s3d{sup 3}D), the other one is a repulsive state correlating to the Ca(4s4p1P)+Ca(4s21S) asymptote, accounting for the dissociation of Ca{sub 2} and the observation of the subsequent Ca({sup 1}P) emission. On pure helium clusters, the fluorescence exhibits the calcium atomic resonance line Ca({sup 1}S?{sup 1}P) at 422.7 nm (23652 cm{sup ?1}) assigned to ejected calcium, and a narrow red sided band corresponding to calcium that remains solvated on the helium cluster. When adding xenon atoms to the helium clusters, the intensity of these two features decreases and a new spectral band appears on the red side of calcium resonance line; the intensity and the red shift of this component increase along with the xenon quantity deposited on the helium cluster: it is assigned to the emission of Ca({sup 1}P) associated with the small xenon aggregate embedded inside the helium cluster.

  7. Phosphate glass useful in high energy lasers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hayden, Yuiko T.; Guesto-Barnak, Donna

    1992-01-01

    A low-or no-silica, low- or no-alkali phosphate glass useful as a laser amplifier in a multiple pass, high energy laser system having a high thermal conductivity, K.sub.90.degree. C. >0.85 W/mK, a low coefficient of thermal expansion, .alpha..sub.20.degree.-300.degree. C. <80.times.10.sup.-7 /.degree.C., low emission cross section, .sigma.<2.5.times.10.sup.-20 cm.sup.2, and a high fluorescence lifetime, .tau.>325 .mu.secs at 3 wt. % Nd doping, consisting essentially of (on an oxide composition basis): wherein Ln.sub.2 O.sub.3 is the sum of lanthanide oxides; .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is <5, R being Li, Na, K, Cs, and Rb; the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <24 unless .SIGMA.R.sub.2 O is 0, then the sum of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and MgO is <42; and the ratio of MgO to B.sub.2 O.sub.3 is 0.48-4.20.

  8. High speed nucleic acid sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Korlach, Jonas; Webb, Watt W.; Levene, Michael; Turner, Stephen; Craighead, Harold G.; Foquet, Mathieu

    2011-05-17

    The present invention is directed to a method of sequencing a target nucleic acid molecule having a plurality of bases. In its principle, the temporal order of base additions during the polymerization reaction is measured on a molecule of nucleic acid. Each type of labeled nucleotide comprises an acceptor fluorophore attached to a phosphate portion of the nucleotide such that the fluorophore is removed upon incorporation into a growing strand. Fluorescent signal is emitted via fluorescent resonance energy transfer between the donor fluorophore and the acceptor fluorophore as each nucleotide is incorporated into the growing strand. The sequence is deduced by identifying which base is being incorporated into the growing strand.

  9. High Quality Down Lighting Luminaire with 73% Overall System Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Harrison; Steven C. Allen; Joseph Bernier; Robert Harrison

    2010-08-31

    This report summarizes work to develop a high flux, high efficiency LED-based downlight at OSRAM SYLVANIA under US Department of Energy contract DE-FC26-08NT01582. A new high power LED and electronic driver were developed for these downlights. The LED achieved 100 lumens per watt efficacy and 1700 lumen flux output at a correlated color temperature of 3500K. The driver had 90% electrical conversion efficiency while maintaining excellent power quality with power factor >0.99, and total harmonic distortion <10%. Two styles of downlights using the LED and driver were shown to exceed the project targets for steady-state luminous efficacy and flux of 70 lumens per watt and 1300 lumens, respectively. Compared to similar existing downlights using compact fluorescent or LED sources, these downlights had much higher efficacy at nearly the same luminous flux.

  10. Failure Mechanisms and Color Stability in Light-Emitting Diodes during Operation in High- Temperature Environments in Presence of Contamination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lall, Pradeep; Zhang, Hao; Davis, J Lynn

    2015-05-26

    The energy efficiency of light-emitting diode (LED) technology compared to incandescent light bulbs has triggered an increased focus on solid state luminaries for a variety of lighting applications. Solid-state lighting (SSL) utilizes LEDs, for illumination through the process of electroluminescence instead of heating a wire filament as seen with traditional lighting. The fundamental differences in the construction of LED and the incandescent lamp results in different failure modes including lumen degradation, chromaticity shift and drift in the correlated color temperature. The use of LED-based products for safety-critical and harsh environment applications necessitates the characterization of the failure mechanisms and modes. In this paper, failure mechanisms and color stability has been studied for commercially available vertical structured thin film LED (VLED) under harsh environment conditions with and without the presence of contaminants. The VLED used for the study was mounted on a ceramic starboard in order to connect it to the current source. Contamination sources studied include operation in the vicinity of vulcanized rubber and adhesive epoxies in the presence of temperature and humidity. Performance of the VLEDs has been quantified using the measured luminous flux and color shift of the VLEDs subjected to both thermal and humidity stresses under a forward current bias of 350 mA. Results indicate that contamination can result in pre-mature luminous flux degradation and color shift in LEDs.

  11. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-06-15

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending onmore » the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable subdiffraction limit images.« less

  12. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and its effects on elemental distributions in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in x-ray fluorescence microanalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jin, Qiaoling; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Deng, Junjing; Mak, Rachel; Moonier, Nena; et al

    2015-02-23

    Rapidly-frozen hydrated (cryopreserved) specimens combined with cryo-scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy provide an ideal approach for investigating elemental distributions in biological cells and tissues. However, because cryopreservation does not deactivate potentially infectious agents associated with Risk Group 2 biological materials, one must be concerned with contamination of expensive and complicated cryogenic x-ray microscopes when working with such materials. We employed ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to decontaminate previously cryopreserved cells under liquid nitrogen, and then investigated its effects on elemental distributions under both frozen hydrated and freeze dried states with x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We show that the contents and distributions of most biologicallymore » important elements remain nearly unchanged when compared with non-ultraviolet-irradiated counterparts, even after multiple cycles of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and cryogenic x-ray imaging. This provides a potential pathway for rendering Risk Group 2 biological materials safe for handling in multiuser cryogenic x-ray microscopes without affecting the fidelity of the results.« less

  13. Ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and its effects on elemental distributions in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells in x-ray fluorescence microanalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, Qiaoling; Vogt, Stefan; Lai, Barry; Chen, Si; Finney, Lydia; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Ward, Jesse; Deng, Junjing; Mak, Rachel; Moonier, Nena; Jacobsen, Chris; Brody, James P.

    2015-02-23

    Rapidly-frozen hydrated (cryopreserved) specimens combined with cryo-scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy provide an ideal approach for investigating elemental distributions in biological cells and tissues. However, because cryopreservation does not deactivate potentially infectious agents associated with Risk Group 2 biological materials, one must be concerned with contamination of expensive and complicated cryogenic x-ray microscopes when working with such materials. We employed ultraviolet germicidal irradiation to decontaminate previously cryopreserved cells under liquid nitrogen, and then investigated its effects on elemental distributions under both frozen hydrated and freeze dried states with x-ray fluorescence microscopy. We show that the contents and distributions of most biologically important elements remain nearly unchanged when compared with non-ultraviolet-irradiated counterparts, even after multiple cycles of ultraviolet germicidal irradiation and cryogenic x-ray imaging. This provides a potential pathway for rendering Risk Group 2 biological materials safe for handling in multiuser cryogenic x-ray microscopes without affecting the fidelity of the results.

  14. Super-resolution of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles using enhanced dark-field illumination based on wavelength-modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Peng; Lee, Seungah; Yu, Hyunung; Fang, Ning; Ho Kang, Seong

    2015-06-15

    Super-resolution imaging of fluorescence-free plasmonic nanoparticles (NPs) was achieved using enhanced dark-field (EDF) illumination based on wavelength-modulation. Indistinguishable adjacent EDF images of 103-nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs), 40-nm gold nanorods (GNRs), and 80-nm silver nanoparticles (SNPs) were modulated at their wavelengths of specific localized surface plasmon scattering. The coordinates (x, y) of each NP were resolved by fitting their point spread functions with a two-dimensional Gaussian. The measured localization precisions of GNPs, GNRs, and SNPs were 2.5 nm, 5.0 nm, and 2.9 nm, respectively. From the resolved coordinates of NPs and the corresponding localization precisions, super-resolution images were reconstructed. Depending on the spontaneous polarization of GNR scattering, the orientation angle of GNRs in two-dimensions was resolved and provided more elaborate localization information. This novel fluorescence-free super-resolution method was applied to live HeLa cells to resolve NPs and provided remarkable subdiffraction limit images.

  15. Phase-resolved nanosecond spectrofluorometry: theory, instrumentation, and new applications of multicomponent analysis by subnanosecond fluorescence lifetimes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattheis, J.R.; Mitchell, G.W.; Spencer, R.D.

    1982-03-01

    We describe a new method, phase-resolved subnanosecond spectroscopy (PRS), for the spectral differentiation of fluorophores in a mixture. The technique required adding a phase-variable rectifying detector to the SLM 4800S phasespectrofluorometer. The theory of PRS is based on the sinusoidal fluorescence emission of a population of molecules in response to sinusodially modulated exicitation light. The total a-c fluorescence signal is passed through the phase-variable detector which nulls the emission signal of any component in quadrature with the reference angle. The emission characteristics of the remaining component, or components, are more readily and accurately revealed. We investigated the sensitivity and selectivity of PRS. The sensitivity of PRS was demonstrated by nulling the contribution of the Raman scatter band of a nanomolar solution of quinine bisulfate to the real-time emission spectrum resolved at 8-nm bandpass. We demonstrated the selectivity of PRS by resolving the emission spectrum of anthracene and perylene from a 1 : 1 mixture with a lifetime differential of only 600 ps. The emission spectra of 2.2-phenylene bis-(5-phenyloxazole) and dimethyl 2.2-phenylene bis-(5-phenyloxazole) were also resolved from a 1 : 1 mixture in ethanol. The lifetime differential here was only 200 ps.

  16. Selenium Preferentially Accumulates in the Eye Lens Following Embryonic Exposure: A Confocal X-ray Fluorescence Imaging Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choudhury, Sanjukta; Thomas, Jith; Sylvain, Nicole J.; Ponomarenko, Olena; Gordon, Robert A.; Heald, Steve M.; Janz, David M.; Krone, Patrick H.; Coulthard, Ian; George, Graham N.; Pickering, Ingrid J.

    2015-02-17

    Maternal transfer of elevated selenium (Se) to offspring is an important route of Se exposure for fish in the natural environment. However, there is a lack of information on the tissue specific spatial distribution and speciation of Se in the early developmental stages of fish, which provide important information about Se toxicokinetics. The effect of maternal transfer of Se was studied by feeding adult zebrafish a Se-elevated or a control diet followed by collection of larvae from both groups. Novel confocal synchrotron-based techniques were used to investigate Se within intact preserved larvae. Confocal X-ray fluorescence imaging was used to compare Se distributions within specific planes of an intact larva from each of the two groups. The elevated Se treatment showed substantially higher Se levels than the control; Se preferentially accumulated to highest levels in the eye lens, with lower levels in the retina, yolk and other tissues. Confocal X-ray absorption spectroscopy was used to determine that the speciation of Se within the eye lens of the intact larva was a selenomethionine-like species. Preferential accumulation of Se in the eye lens may suggest a direct cause-and-effect relationship between exposure to elevated Se and Se-induced ocular impairments reported previously. This study illustrates the effectiveness of confocal X-ray fluorescence methods for investigating trace element distribution and speciation in intact biological specimens

  17. Detection device for high explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grey, A.E.; Partin, J.K.; Stone, M.L.; Von Wandruszka, R.M.; Reagen, W.K.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.

    1992-10-20

    A portable fiber optic detector is described that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by electrostatically attracting the target chemical to an aromatic compound coating on an optical fiber. Attaching the target chemical to the coated fiber reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator. 5 figs.

  18. Detection device for high explosives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grey, Alan E.; Partin, Judy K.; Stone, Mark L.; Von Wandruszka, Ray M.; Reagen, William K.; Ingram, Jani C.; Lancaster, Gregory D.

    1992-01-01

    A portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by electrostatically attracting the target chemical to an aromatic compound coating on an optical fiber. Attaching the target chemical to the coated fiber reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  19. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. I. 2D density mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Britun, Nikolay Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos; Snyders, Rony

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. This paper deals with two-dimensional density mapping in the discharge volume obtained by laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The time-resolved density evolution of Ti neutrals, singly ionized Ti atoms (Ti{sup +}), and Ar metastable atoms (Ar{sup met}) in the area above the sputtered cathode is mapped for the first time in this type of discharges. The energetic characteristics of the discharge species are additionally studied by Doppler-shift laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The questions related to the propagation of both the neutral and ionized discharge particles, as well as to their spatial density distributions, are discussed.

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.1 Residential Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 Annual Cost Active Idle Off Active Idle Off ($) (2) Kitchen Coffee Maker 1,000 70 0 38 229 8,493 58 5.6 Dishwasher (3) 365 (4) 120 11.6 Microwave Oven 1,500 3 70 8,690 131 12.6 Toaster Oven 1,051 37 54 5.2 Refrigerator-Freezer 660 63.1 Freezer 470 45.0 Lighting 18-W Compact Fluorescent 18 1,189 20 2.1 60-W Incandescent Lamp 60 672 40 3.9 100-W Incandescent Lamp 100 672 70 6.4 Torchiere Lamp-Halogen 300 1,460 440 42.0 Bedroom and Bathroom Hair Dryer 710 50 40 3.4 Waterbed Heater 350 3,051 1,070

  1. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Energy Physics science-innovationassetsimagesicon-science.jpg High Energy Physics Investigating the field of high energy physics through experiments that strengthen our ...

  2. Acting Globally: Potential Carbon Emissions Mitigation Impacts from an International Standards and Labelling Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A; Letschert, Virginie E.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Egan, Christine

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents an analysis of the potential impacts of an international initiative designed to support and promote the development and implementation of appliances standards and labelling programs throughout the world. As part of previous research efforts, LBNL developed the Bottom Up Energy Analysis System (BUENAS), an analysis framework that estimates impact potentials of energy efficiency policies on a global scale. In this paper, we apply this framework to an initiative that would result in the successful implementation of programs focused on high priority regions and product types, thus evaluating the potential impacts of such an initiative in terms of electricity savings and carbon mitigation in 2030. In order to model the likely parameters of such a program, we limit impacts to a five year period starting in 2009, but assume that the first 5 years of a program will result in implementation of 'best practice' minimum efficiency performance standards by 2014. The 'high priority' regions considered are: Brazil, China, the European Union,India, Mexico and the United States. The products considered are: refrigerators, air conditioners, lighting (both fluorescent and incandescent), standby power (for consumer electronics) and televisions in the residential sector, and air conditioning and lighting in commercial buildings. In 2020, these regions and enduses account for about 37percent of global residential electricity and 29percent of electricity in commercial buildings. We find that 850Mt of CO2 could be saved in buildings by 2030 compared to the baseline forecast.

  3. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Land, Cecil E.; Peercy, Paul S.

    1983-01-01

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Implanted ions include H.sup.+, He.sup.+, Ne.sup.+, Ar.sup.+, as well as chemically reactive ions from Fe, Cr, and Al. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the absorption characteristics of the PLZT material from near-UV light to visible light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to the positive ions at sufficient density, from 1.times.10.sup.12 to 1.times.10.sup.17, and with sufficient energy, from 100 to 500 KeV, to provide photosensitivity enhancement. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%, a lead zirconate content of 62 to 70 mole %, and a lead titanate content of 38 to 30%. The ions are implanted at a depth of 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate.

  4. Photosensitivity enhancement of PLZT ceramics by positive ion implantation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peercy, P.S.; Land, C.E.

    1980-06-13

    The photosensitivity of lead lanthanum zirconate titanate (PLZT) ceramic material used in high resolution, high contrast, and non-volatile photoferroelectric image storage and display devices is enhanced significantly by positive ion implantation of the PLZT near its surface. Ions that are implanted include H/sup +/, He/sup +/, Ar/sup +/, and a preferred co-implant of Ar/sup +/ and Ne/sup +/. The positive ion implantation advantageously serves to shift the band gap energy threshold of the PLZT material from near-uv light to visible blue light. As a result, photosensitivity enhancement is such that the positive ion implanted PLZT plate is sensitive even to sunlight and conventional room lighting, such as fluorescent and incandescent light sources. The method disclosed includes exposing the PLZT plate to these positive ions of sufficient density and with sufficient energy to provide an image. The PLZT material may have a lanthanum content ranging from 5 to 10%; a lead zirconate content ranging from 62 to 70 mole %; and a lead titanate content ranging from 38 to 30%. The region of ion implantation is in a range from 0.1 to 2 microns below the surface of the PLZT plate. Density of ions is in the range from 1 x 10/sup 12/ to 1 x 10/sup 17/ ions/cm/sup 2/ and having an energy in the range from 100 to 500 keV.

  5. Quantifying the number of color centers in single fluorescent nanodiamonds by photon correlation spectroscopy and Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hui, Y.Y.; Chang, Y.-R.; Lee, H.-Y.; Chang, H.-C.; Lim, T.-S.; Fann Wunshain

    2009-01-05

    The number of negatively charged nitrogen-vacancy centers (N-V){sup -} in fluorescent nanodiamond (FND) has been determined by photon correlation spectroscopy and Monte Carlo simulations at the single particle level. By taking account of the random dipole orientation of the multiple (N-V){sup -} fluorophores and simulating the probability distribution of their effective numbers (N{sub e}), we found that the actual number (N{sub a}) of the fluorophores is in linear correlation with N{sub e}, with correction factors of 1.8 and 1.2 in measurements using linearly and circularly polarized lights, respectively. We determined N{sub a}=8{+-}1 for 28 nm FND particles prepared by 3 MeV proton irradiation.

  6. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, B.; Mishra, B.; Miller, C.; Wang, W.; Lai, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Kemner, K. M.; Liang, L.

    2014-05-23

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobes to directly visualize and quantify the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 μg g–1 Hg is found on suspended particles. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM), possibly as Hg-NOM-iron oxide ternary complexes. The diatom-bound Hg is mostly found on outer surfaces of themore » cells, suggesting passive sorption of inorganic Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, is an important sink for Hg in natural aquatic environments.« less

  7. Development of a Silicon Drift Detector Array: An X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer for Remote Surface Mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaskin, J.A.; De Geronimo, G.; Carini, G.A.; Chen, W.; Elsner, R.F.; Kramer, G.; Keister, J.W.; Li, Z.; Ramsey, B.D.; Rehak, P.; Siddons, D.P.

    2009-09-11

    Over the past three years NASA Marshall Space Flight Center has been collaborating with Brookhaven National Laboratory to develop a modular Silicon Drift Detector (SDD) X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) intended for fine surface mapping of the light elements of the moon. The value of fluorescence spectrometry for surface element mapping is underlined by the fact that the technique has recently been employed by three lunar orbiter missions; Kaguya, Chandrayaan-1, and Chang'e. The SDD-XRS instrument we have been developing can operate at a low energy threshold (i.e. is capable of detecting Carbon), comparable energy resolution to Kaguya (<150 eV at 5.9 keV) and an order of magnitude lower power requirement, making much higher sensitivities possible. Furthermore, the intrinsic radiation resistance of the SDD makes it useful even in radiation-harsh environments such as that of Jupiter and its surrounding moons.

  8. Real-time method and apparatus for measuring the decay-time constant of a fluorescing phosphor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Britton, Jr., Charles L.; Beshears, David L.; Simpson, Marc L.; Cates, Michael R.; Allison, Steve W.

    1999-01-01

    A method for determining the decay-time constant of a fluorescing phosphor is provided, together with an apparatus for performing the method. The apparatus includes a photodetector for detecting light emitted by a phosphor irradiated with an excitation pulse and for converting the detected light into an electrical signal. The apparatus further includes a differentiator for differentiating the electrical signal and a zero-crossing discrimination circuit that outputs a pulse signal having a pulse width corresponding to the time period between the start of the excitation pulse and the time when the differentiated electrical signal reaches zero. The width of the output pulse signal is proportional to the decay-time constant of the phosphor.

  9. Two-color two-photon excited fluorescence of indole: Determination of wavelength-dependent molecular parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbrich, Sebastian; Al-Hadhuri, Tawfik; Gericke, Karl-Heinz; Shternin, Peter S. Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.; Smolin, Andrey G.

    2015-01-14

    We present a detailed study of two-color two-photon excited fluorescence in indole dissolved in propylene glycol. Femtosecond excitation pulses at effective wavelengths from 268 to 293.33 nm were used to populate the two lowest indole excited states {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}L{sub b} and polarized fluorescence was then detected. All seven molecular parameters and the two-photon polarization ratio ? containing information on two-photon absorption dynamics, molecular lifetime ?{sub f}, and rotation correlation time ?{sub rot} have been determined from experiment and analyzed as a function of the excitation wavelength. The analysis of the experimental data has shown that {sup 1}L{sub b}{sup 1}L{sub a} inversion occurred under the conditions of our experiment. The two-photon absorption predominantly populated the {sup 1}L{sub a} state at all excitation wavelengths but in the 287289 nm area which contained an absorption hump of the {sup 1}L{sub b} state 0-0 origin. The components of the two-photon excitation tensor S were analyzed giving important information on the principal tensor axes and absorption symmetry. The results obtained are in a good agreement with the results reported by other groups. The lifetime ?{sub f} and the rotation correlation time ?{sub rot} showed no explicit dependence on the effective excitation wavelength. Their calculated weighted average values were found to be ?{sub f} = 3.83 0.14 ns and ?{sub rot} = 0.74 0.06 ns.

  10. Use of Standard Fluorescent UV Weathering Lamps to Perform UV Conditioning

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Our latest geothermal technologies awards are for those who think outside of the box (and below the surface). Secretary of Energy Steven Chu announced $20 million towards the research and development of non-conventional geothermal energy technologies in three areas: low temperatures fluids, geothermal fluids recovered from oil and gas wells and highly pressurized geothermal fluids. As the Secretary said, these

  11. High efficiency and high concentration in photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Luque, A.

    1999-10-01

    In this paper, the authors present the state-of-the-art of multijunction solar cells and the future prospects of this technology. Their use in terrestrial applications will likely be for concentrators operating at very high concentrations. Some trends are also discussed and the authors present a cost calculation showing that highly efficient cells under very high concentration would be able to produce electricity at costs competitive with electricity generation costs for some utilities.

  12. High Performance Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HPC INL Logo Home High-Performance Computing INL's high-performance computing center provides general use scientific computing capabilities to support the lab's efforts in advanced...

  13. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; Doughty, Benjamin; Yang, Bin

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  14. High pressure, high current, low inductance, high reliability sealed terminals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hsu, John S. [Oak Ridge, TN; McKeever, John W. [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-03-23

    The invention is a terminal assembly having a casing with at least one delivery tapered-cone conductor and at least one return tapered-cone conductor routed there-through. The delivery and return tapered-cone conductors are electrically isolated from each other and positioned in the annuluses of ordered concentric cones at an off-normal angle. The tapered cone conductor service can be AC phase conductors and DC link conductors. The center core has at least one service conduit of gate signal leads, diagnostic signal wires, and refrigerant tubing routed there-through. A seal material is in direct contact with the casing inner surface, the tapered-cone conductors, and the service conduits thereby hermetically filling the interstitial space in the casing interior core and center core. The assembly provides simultaneous high-current, high-pressure, low-inductance, and high-reliability service.

  15. Determining heavy metals in spent compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) and their waste management challenges: Some strategies for improving current conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taghipour, Hassan; Amjad, Zahra; Jafarabadi, Mohamad Asghari; Gholampour, Akbar; Norouz, Prviz

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Heavy metals in spent compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) determined. • Current waste management condition of CFLs in Iran assessed. • Currently, waste of CFLs is disposed by municipal waste stream in waste landfills. • We propose extended producer responsibility (EPR) for CFLs waste management. - Abstract: From environmental viewpoint, the most important advantage of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) is reduction of green house gas emissions. But their significant disadvantage is disposal of spent lamps because of containing a few milligrams of toxic metals, especially mercury and lead. For a successful implementation of any waste management plan, availability of sufficient and accurate information on quantities and compositions of the generated waste and current management conditions is a fundamental prerequisite. In this study, CFLs were selected among 20 different brands in Iran. Content of heavy metals including mercury, lead, nickel, arsenic and chromium was determined by inductive coupled plasma (ICP). Two cities, Tehran and Tabriz, were selected for assessing the current waste management condition of CFLs. The study found that waste generation amount of CFLs in the country was about 159.80, 183.82 and 153.75 million per year in 2010, 2011 and 2012, respectively. Waste generation rate of CFLs in Iran was determined to be 2.05 per person in 2012. The average amount of mercury, lead, nickel, arsenic and chromium was 0.417, 2.33, 0.064, 0.056 and 0.012 mg per lamp, respectively. Currently, waste of CFLs is disposed by municipal waste stream in waste landfills. For improving the current conditions, we propose by considering the successful experience of extended producer responsibility (EPR) in other electronic waste management. The EPR program with advanced recycling fee (ARF) is implemented for collecting and then recycling CFLs. For encouraging consumers to take the spent CFLs back at the end of the products’ useful life, a proportion of ARF (for example, 50%) can be refunded. On the other hand, the government and Environmental Protection Agency should support and encourage recycling companies of CFLs both technically and financially in the first place.

  16. Significance of Cytochrome P450 System Responses and Levels of Bile Fluorescent Aromatic Compounds in Marine Wildlife Following Oil Spills

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Richard F.; Anderson, Jack W.

    2005-07-01

    The relationships among cytochrome P450 induction in marine wildlife species, levels of fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC) in their bile, the chemical composition of the inducing compounds, the significance of the exposure pathway, and any resulting injury, as a consequence of exposure to crude oil following a spill, are reviewed. Fish collected after oil spills often show increases in cytochrome P450 system activity, cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and bile fluorescent aromatic compounds (FAC), that are correlated with exposure to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in the oil. There is also some evidence for increases in bile FAC and induction of cytochrome P450 in marine birds and mammals after oil spills. However, when observed, increases in these exposure indicators are transitory and generally decrease to background levels within one year after the exposure. Laboratory studies have shown induction of cytochrome P450 systems occurs after exposure of fish to crude oil in water, sediment or food. Most of the PAH found in crude oil (dominantly 2- and 3-ring PAH) are not strong inducers of cytochrome P450. Exposure to the 4-ring chrysenes or the photooxidized products of the PAH may account for the cytochrome P450 responses in fish collected from oil-spill sites. The contribution of non-spill background PAH, particularly combustion-derived (pyrogenic) PAH, to bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses can be confounding and needs to be considered when evaluating oil spill effects. The ubiquity of pyrogenic PAH makes it important to fully characterize all sources of PAH, including PAH from natural resources, e.g. retene, in oil spill studies. In addition, such parameters as species, sex, age, ambient temperature and season need to be taken into account. While increases in fish bile FAC and cytochrome P450 system responses, can together, be sensitive general indicators of PAH exposure after an oil spill, there is little unequivocal evidence to suggest a linkage to higher order biological effects, e.g. toxicity, lesions, reproductive failure.

  17. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, Eric H.; Legros, Mark; Madden, Norm W.; Goulding, Fred; Landis, Don

    1998-01-01

    A broad bandwidth high resolution x-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces x-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available x-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for x-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical x-ray and particle spectroscopy.

  18. Broadband high resolution X-ray spectral analyzer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Silver, E.H.; Legros, M.; Madden, N.W.; Goulding, F.; Landis, D.

    1998-07-07

    A broad bandwidth high resolution X-ray fluorescence spectrometer has a performance that is superior in many ways to those currently available. It consists of an array of 4 large area microcalorimeters with 95% quantum efficiency at 6 keV and it produces X-ray spectra between 0.2 keV and 7 keV with an energy resolution of 7 to 10 eV. The resolution is obtained at input count rates per array element of 10 to 50 Hz in real-time, with analog pulse processing and thermal pile-up rejection. This performance cannot be matched by currently available X-ray spectrometers. The detectors are incorporated into a compact and portable cryogenic refrigerator system that is ready for use in many analytical spectroscopy applications as a tool for X-ray microanalysis or in research applications such as laboratory and astrophysical X-ray and particle spectroscopy. 6 figs.

  19. High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells High Temperature, ...

  20. High strength, high ductility low carbon steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koo, Jayoung; Thomas, Gareth

    1978-01-01

    A high strength, high ductility low carbon steel consisting essentially of iron, 0.05-0.15 wt% carbon, and 1-3 wt% silicon. Minor amounts of other constituents may be present. The steel is characterized by a duplex ferrite-martensite microstructure in a fibrous morphology. The microstructure is developed by heat treatment consisting of initial austenitizing treatment followed by annealing in the (.alpha. + .gamma.) range with intermediate quenching.

  1. High strength and high toughness steel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Parker, Earl R.; Zackay, Victor F.

    1979-01-01

    A structural steel which possess both high strength and high toughness and has particular application of cryogenic uses. The steel is produced by the utilization of thermally induced phase transformation following heating in a three-phase field in iron-rich alloys of the Fe-Ni-Ti system, with a preferred composition of 12% nickel, 0.5% titanium, the remainder being iron.

  2. A comparison of ion beam measurements by retarding field energy analyzer and laser induced fluorescence in helicon plasma devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gulbrandsen, N. Fredriksen, Å.; Carr, J.; Scime, E.

    2015-03-15

    Both Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIF) and Retarding Field Energy Analyzers (RFEA) have been applied to the investigation of beams formed in inductively coupled helicon plasmas. While the LIF technique provides a direct measurement of the velocity distribution in the plasma, the RFEA measures ion flux as a function of a retarding potential. In this paper, we present a method to compare the two techniques, by converting the LIF velocity distribution to an equivalent of a RFEA measurement. We applied this method to compare new LIF and RFEA measurements in two different experiments; the Hot Helicon Experiment (HELIX) - Large Experiment on Instabilities and Anisotropies (LEIA) at West Virginia University and Njord at University of Tromsø. We find good agreement between beam energies of the two methods. In agreement with earlier observations, the RFEA is found to measure ion beams with densities too low for the LIF to resolve. In addition, we present measurements of the axial development of the ion beam in both experiments. Beam densities drop exponentially with distance from the source, both in LIF and RFEA measurements. The effective quenching cross section from LIF in LEIA is found to be σ{sub b,*}=4×10{sup −19} m{sup 2}, and the effective beam collisional cross sections by RFEA in Njord to be σ{sub b}=1.7×10{sup −18} m{sup 2}.

  3. X-ray fluorescence mapping of mercury on suspended mineral particles and diatoms in a contaminated freshwater system

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gu, B.; Mishra, B.; Miller, C.; Wang, W.; Lai, B.; Brooks, S. C.; Kemner, K. M.; Liang, L.

    2014-09-30

    Mercury (Hg) bioavailability and geochemical cycling is affected by its partitioning between the aqueous and particulate phases. We applied a synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (XRF) microprobe to visualize and quantify directly the spatial localization of Hg and its correlations with other elements of interest on suspended particles from a Hg-contaminated freshwater system. Up to 175 μg g−1 Hg is found on suspended particles, but less than 0.01% is in the form of methylmercury. Mercury is heterogeneously distributed among phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms) and mineral particles that are rich in iron oxides and natural organic matter (NOM). The diatom-bound Hg is mostly foundmore » on outer surfaces of the cells, suggesting passive sorption of Hg on diatoms. Our results indicate that localized sorption of Hg onto suspended particles, including diatoms and NOM-coated oxide minerals, may play an important role in affecting the partitioning, reactivity, and biogeochemical cycling of Hg in natural aquatic environments.« less

  4. CHARACTERIZATION OF SALT PARTICLE INDUCED CORROSION PROCESSES BY SYNCHROTRON GENERATED X-RAY FLUORESCENCE AND COMPLEMENTARY SURFACE ANALYSIS TOOLS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NEUFELD, A.K.; COLE, I.S.; BOND, A.M.; ISAACS, H.S.; FURMAN, S.A.

    2001-03-25

    The benefits of using synchrotron-generated X-rays and X-ray fluorescence analysis in combination with other surface analysis techniques have been demonstrated. In studies of salt-induced corrosion, for example, the detection of Rb ions in the area of secondary spreading when salt-containing micro-droplets are placed on zinc surfaces, further supports a mechanism involving cation transport during the corrosion and spreading of corrosive salt on exposed metal surfaces. Specifically, the new analytical data shows that: (a) cations are transported radially from a primary drop formed from a salt deposit in a thin film of secondary spreading around the drop; (b) subsequently, micro-pools are formed in the area of secondary spreading, and it is likely that cations transported within the thin film accumulate in these micro-pools until the area is dehydrated; (c) the mechanism of cation transport into the area of secondary spreading does not include transport of the anions; and (d) hydroxide is the counter ion formed from oxygen reduction at the metal surface within the spreading layer. Data relevant to iron corrosion is also presented and the distinct differences relative to the zinc situation are discussed.

  5. Vertical cavity surface-emitting laser scanning cytometer for high speed analysis of cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gourley, P.L.; McDonald, A.E.; Gourley, M.F.

    1995-12-31

    We have constructed a new semiconductor laser device that may be useful in high speed characterization of cell morphology for diagnosis of disease. This laser device has critical advantages over conventional cell fluorescence detection methods since it provides intense, monochromatic, low-divergence fight signals that are emitted from lasing modes confined by a cell. Further, the device integrates biological structures with semiconductor materials at the wafer level to reduce device size and simplify cell preparation. In this paper we discuss operational characteristics of the prototype cytometer and present preliminary data for blood cells and dielectric spheres.

  6. Studying single nanocrystals under high pressure using an x-ray nanoprobe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Lin; Ding Yang; Yang Wenge; Patel, Umesh; Xiao Zhili; Cai Zhonghou; Mao, Wendy L.; Mao Hokwang

    2011-04-15

    In this report, we demonstrate the feasibility of applying a 250-nm focused x-ray beam to study a single crystalline NbSe{sub 3} nanobelt under high-pressure conditions in a diamond anvil cell. With such a small probe, we not only resolved the distribution and morphology of each individual nanobelt in the x-ray fluorescence maps but also obtained the diffraction patterns from individual crystalline nanobelts with thicknesses of less than 50 nm. Single crystalline diffraction measurements on NbSe{sub 3} nanobelts were performed at pressures up to 20 GPa.

  7. High Explosives Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration High Explosives Application Facility A Livermore scientist uses a laser spectroscopic method with a diamond anvil DOE/NNSA has identified LLNL's High Explosives Applications Facility (HEAF) as the complex-wide "Center of Excellence" for High-Explosives Research and Development. In this capacity, HEAF is a source of subject matter expertise for high explosives and other energetic materials. Its mission is to provide this expertise to serve multiple government

  8. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  9. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  10. High School Internship Program

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High School Internship Program High School Internship Program Point your career towards Los Alamos Lab: work with the best minds on the planet in an inclusive environment that is rich in intellectual vitality and opportunities for growth. Contact Program Manager Scott Robbins Student Programs (505) 667-3639 Email Program Coordinator Brenda Montoya Student Programs (505) 667-4866 Email Opportunities for Northern New Mexico high school seniors The High School Internship Program provides qualified

  11. High performance systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vigil, M.B.

    1995-03-01

    This document provides a written compilation of the presentations and viewgraphs from the 1994 Conference on High Speed Computing given at the High Speed Computing Conference, {open_quotes}High Performance Systems,{close_quotes} held at Gleneden Beach, Oregon, on April 18 through 21, 1994.

  12. Fast methods for analysis of neurotransmitters from single cell and monitoring their releases in central nervous system by capillary electrophoresis, fluorescence microscopy and luminescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Ziqiang

    1999-12-10

    Fast methods for separation and detection of important neurotransmitters and the releases in central nervous system (CNS) were developed. Enzyme based immunoassay combined with capillary electrophoresis was used to analyze the contents of amino acid neurotransmitters from single neuron cells. The release of amino acid neurotransmitters from neuron cultures was monitored by laser induced fluorescence imaging method. The release and signal transduction of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) in CNS was studied with sensitive luminescence imaging method. A new dual-enzyme on-column reaction method combined with capillary electrophoresis has been developed for determining the glutamate content in single cells. Detection was based on monitoring the laser-induced fluorescence of the reaction product NADH, and the measured fluorescence intensity was related to the concentration of glutamate in each cell. The detection limit of glutamate is down to 10{sup {minus}8} M level, which is 1 order of magnitude lower than the previously reported detection limit based on similar detection methods. The mass detection limit of a few attomoles is far superior to that of any other reports. Selectivity for glutamate is excellent over most of amino acids. The glutamate content in single human erythrocyte and baby rat brain neurons were determined with this method and results agreed well with literature values.

  13. Excited state carrier dynamics in CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} semisconductor alloys as studied by ultrafast fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadd, S.E.

    1995-08-01

    This dissertation discusses studies of the electron-hole pair dynamics of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1-x} semiconductor alloys for the entire compositional range from x = 1 to x = 0 as examined by the ultrafast fluorescence techniques of time correlated single photon counting and fluorescence upconversion. Specifically, samples with x = 1, .75, .5, .25, and 0 were studied each at a spread of wavelengths about its respective emission maximum which varies according to {lambda} = 718nm - 210x nm. The decays of these samples were found to obey a Kohlrausch distribution, exp [(t/{tau}){sup {beta}}], with the exponent 3 in the range .5-.7 for the alloys. These results are in agreement with those expected for localization due to local potential variations resulting from the random distribution of sulfur and selenium atoms on the element VI A sub-lattice. This localization can be understood in terms of Anderson localization of the holes in states whose energy distribution tails into the forbidden energy band-gap. Because these states have energy dependent lifetimes, the carriers can decay via many parallel channels. This distribution of channels is the ultimate source of the Kohlrausch form of the fluorescence decays.

  14. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A.; Dane, Clifford B.

    1993-01-01

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  15. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  16. High Tech Halloween

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High Tech Halloween High Tech Halloween WHEN: Oct 30, 2015 4:00 PM - 6:30 PM WHERE: Bradbury Science Museum 1350 Central Avenue, Los Alamos, New Mexico, 87544 USA CONTACT: Linda Anderman (505) 665-9196 CATEGORY: Bradbury INTERNAL: Calendar Login High Tech Halloween Event Description High-Tech Halloween is the Bradbury Science Museum's contribution to Downtown Los Alamos' annual Trick-or-Treat on MainStreet event taking place the Friday before Halloween. At this year's High-Tech Halloween, you

  17. Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors Low Cost, High Temperature, High Ripple Current DC Bus Capacitors 2010 DOE Vehicle Technologies and Hydrogen...

  18. High-pressure, high-temperature plastic deformation of sintered...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: High-pressure, high-temperature plastic deformation of sintered diamonds Citation Details In-Document Search Title: High-pressure, high-temperature plastic ...

  19. Establishment of stable synthetic mutualism without co-evolution between microalgae and bacteria demonstrated by mutual transfer of metabolites (NanoSIMS isotopic imaging) and persistent physical association (Fluorescent in situ hybridization)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de-Bashan, Luz E.; Mayali, Xavier; Bebout, Brad M.; Weber, Peter K.; Detweiler, Angela M.; Hernandez, Juan- Pablo; Prufert-Bebout, Leslie; Bashan, Yoav

    2016-03-03

    The demonstration of a mutualistic interaction requires evidence of benefits for both partners as well as stability of the association over multiple generations. A synthetic mutualism between the freshwater microalga Chlorella sorokiniana and the soil-derived plant growth-promoting bacterium (PGPB) Azospirillum brasilense was created when both microorganisms were co-immobilized in alginate beads. Using stable isotope enrichment experiments followed by high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) imaging of single cells, we demonstrated transfer of carbon and nitrogen compounds between the two partners. Further, using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), mechanical disruption and scanning electron microscopy, we demonstrated the stability of their physicalmore » association for a period of 10 days after the aggregated cells were released from the beads. The bacteria significantly enhanced the growth of the microalgae while the microalgae supported growth of the bacteria in a medium where it could not otherwise grow. In conclusion, we propose that this microalga-bacterium association is a true synthetic mutualism independent of co-evolution. (155 words).« less

  20. The surface structure of ?-uranophane and its interaction with Eu(III) An integrated computational and fluorescence spectroscopy study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuta, Jadwiga; Wang, Zheming; Wisuri, Katy; Wander, Matthew C F.; Wall, Nathalie; Clark, Aurora E.

    2013-02-15

    Uranophane is a rare U(VI) secondary silicate mineral formed in nature by the oxidation of the primary mineral uraninite. It is also relevant to the long-term geochemistry of nuclear waste repositories, where it can be formed under oxidizing conditions and has the potential to act as a secondary barrier to the migration of radionuclides through mineral sorption reactions. A combination of classical molecular dynamics and ab-initio density functional theory (DFT) has been employed to investigate the uranophane|water interface as well as the interfacial reactivity of the U(VI) silicate toward acidic conditions and radionuclide ion sorption. The sorption simulations have been complemented by experimental sorption studies and laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy to help identify the molecular structure of the surface sorbed species. Experimental distances and essential coordination numbers are properly captured by the simulation results within bulk uranophane, while interfacial water is found to orient primarily with the hydrogen-atoms directed towards the negatively charged surface. Sorption sites for water are observed to belong to 3 different groups: (1) those involving uranyl oxygen, (2) involving uranyl and silica hydroxyl oxygen atoms, and (3) involving hydroxyl hydrogen. The pKa of the surface -OH groups have been calculated using a variety of models, including a bond valence approach and utilization of the energetics of deprotonation within DFT. Under basic conditions, deprotonation of the Si-OH groups is likely responsible for uranophane dissolution. Finally, the stability and structure of surface sorbed Eu3+ has been examined, with a stable inner-sphere species being observed.