Sample records for fluorescence sxf spectrometer

  1. Portable x-ray fluorescence spectrometer. Innovative technology summary report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the application of portable X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry to characterize materials related to deactivation and decommissioning (D and D) of contaminated facilities. Two portable XRF instruments manufactured by TN Spectrace were used in a technology evaluation as part of the Large-Scale Demonstration Project (LSDP) held at the Chicago Pile-5 Research Reactor (CP-5) located at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The LSDP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Are (DDFA). The objective of the LSDP is to demonstrate innovative technologies or technology applications potentially beneficial to the D and D of contaminated facilities. The portable XRF technology offers several potential benefits for rapid characterization of facility components and contaminants, including significant cost reduction, fast turnaround time,a nd virtually no secondary waste. Field work for the demonstration of the portable XRF technology was performed from August 28--September 3, 1996 and October 30--December 13, 1996.

  2. Dual x-ray fluorescence spectrometer and method for fluid analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bary W.; Shepard, Chester L.

    2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed are an X-ray fluorescence (SRF) spectrometer and method for on-site and in-line determination of contaminant elements in lubricating oils and in fuel oils on board a marine vessel. An XRF source block 13 contains two radionuclide sources 16, 17 (e.g. Cd 109 and Fe 55), each oriented 180 degrees from the other to excite separate targets. The Cd 109 source 16 excites sample lube oil flowing through a low molecular weight sample line 18. The Fe 55 source 17 excites fuel oil manually presented to the source beam inside a low molecular weight vial 26 or other container. Two separate detectors A and B are arranged to detect the fluorescent x-rays from the targets, photons from the analyte atoms in the lube oil for example, and sulfur identifying x-rays from bunker fuel oil for example. The system allows both automated in-line and manual on-site analysis using one set of signal processing and multi-channel analyzer electronics 34, 37 as well as one computer 39 and user interface 43.

  3. Subwavenumber charge-coupled device spectrometer calibration using molecular iodine laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Joseph G. [Department of Physics, Drexel University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Hernandez-Diaz, Carlos; Williamson, J. Charles [Department of Chemistry, Willamette University, Salem, Oregon 97301 (United States)

    2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometers configured with charge-coupled devices (CCD) or other array-based detectors require calibration to convert from the pixel coordinate to a spectral coordinate. A CCD calibration method well suited for Raman spectroscopy has been developed based on the 514.5 nm Ar{sup +} laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrum of room-temperature molecular iodine vapor. Over 360 primary and secondary I{sub 2} LIF calibration lines spanning 510-645 nm were identified as calibrant peaks using an instrumental resolution of 1 cm{sup -1}. Two instrument calibration functions were evaluated with these peaks: a second-order polynomial and a function derived from simple optomechanical considerations. The latter function provided better fitting characteristics. Calibration using I{sub 2} LIF was tested with measurements of both laser light scattering and Raman spectra. The I{sub 2} LIF reference spectra and the signal spectra were recorded simultaneously, with no cross talk, by separating the two signals spatially along the vertical axis of the CCD imager. In this way, every CCD image could be independently calibrated. An accuracy and a precision of {+-}0.05 cm{sup -1} were achieved with this calibration technique.

  4. Hyper-filter-fluorescer spectrometer for x-rays above 120 keV

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Ching L. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus utilizing filter-fluorescer combinations is provided to measure short bursts of high fluence x-rays above 120 keV energy, where there are no practical absorption edges available for conventional filter-fluorescer techniques. The absorption edge of the prefilter is chosen to be less than that of the fluorescer, i.e., E.sub.PRF E.sub.F. In this way, the response function is virtually zero between E.sub.PRF and E.sub.F and well defined and enhanced in an energy band of less than 1000 keV above the 120 keV energy.

  5. EMSL - fluorescence spectrometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    class"field-item even" property"schema:citation">Lee AC, D Du, B Chen, CK Heng, TM Lim, and Y Lin.2014."Electrochemical detection of leukemia oncogenes using...

  6. fluorescence spectrometer | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and early disease diagnostic applications. Citation: Lee AC, D Du, B Chen, CK Heng, TM Lim, and Y Lin.2014."Electrochemical detection of leukemia oncogenes using...

  7. Note: A portable, light-emitting diode-based ruby fluorescence spectrometer for high-pressure calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng Yejun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with {approx}0.5 wt. % Cr doping) is one of the most widely used manometers at the giga-Pascal scale. Traditionally, its fluorescence is excited with intense laser sources. Here, I present a simple, robust, and portable design that employs light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead. This LED-based system is safer in comparison with laser-based ones.

  8. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  9. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kahl, William K. (Knoxville, TN); Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN); Evans, III, Boyd M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlar, Troy A. (Knoxville, TN); Cunningham, Joseph P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  10. Correlation spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Michael B. (Albuquerque, NM); Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Flemming, Jeb H. (Albuquerque, NM); Jones, Gary D. (Tijeras, NM); Tigges, Chris P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  11. Multidimensional spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zanni, Martin Thomas (Madison, WI); Damrauer, Niels H. (Boulder, CO)

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  12. Spectrometer gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  13. Spectrometer gun

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  14. AUTOMATED ELEMENTAL ANALYSIS USING ENERGY DISPERSIVE X-RAY FLUORESCENCE ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaklevic, J.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    upon the x-ray fluorescence (XRF) method for the elementalnon-destructive nature of XRF is especially important whereconcentrations are measured in the XRF spectrometer and the

  15. Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

  16. The Filter Difference Spectrometer

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Difference Spectrometer (FDS) is used for molecular vibrational spectroscopy by inelastic neutron scattering. The instrument is designed for high count rates by use of large...

  17. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldman, D.S.

    1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer is disclosed for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the waveguide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the waveguide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis. 16 figs.

  18. Broad band waveguide spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldman, Don S. (Folsom, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

  19. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epstein, Richard I. (Santa Fe, NM); Edwards, Bradley C. (Los Alamos, NM); Buchwald, Melvin I. (Santa Fe, NM); Gosnell, Timothy R. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement.

  20. Fluorescent refrigeration

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

    1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

  1. Stopped-Flow Absorbance/Fluorescence Spectrometer | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a 4-syringe stopped-flow system that offers the capability to carry out complex, multi-mixing experiments with the lowest rates of aging and deadtimes. The 4-syringe system...

  2. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manglos, S.H.

    1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

  3. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, Charles E. (Westmont, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle spectrometer for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode.

  4. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A charged particle spectrometer is described for performing ultrasensitive quantitative analysis of selected atomic components removed from a sample. Significant improvements in performing energy and angular refocusing spectroscopy are accomplished by means of a two dimensional structure for generating predetermined electromagnetic field boundary conditions. Both resonance and non-resonance ionization of selected neutral atomic components allow accumulation of increased chemical information. A multiplexed operation between a SIMS mode and a neutral atomic component ionization mode with EARTOF analysis enables comparison of chemical information from secondary ions and neutral atomic components removed from the sample. An electronic system is described for switching high level signals, such as SIMS signals, directly to a transient recorder and through a charge amplifier to the transient recorder for a low level signal pulse counting mode, such as for a neutral atomic component ionization mode. 12 figs.

  5. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian (Port Jefferson, NY); Kulkarni, Pramod (Port Jefferson Station, NY)

    2007-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  6. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Young, Charles E. (Westmont, IL); Pellin, Michael J. (Naperville, IL)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected autoionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy.

  7. Photo ion spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gruen, D.M.; Young, C.E.; Pellin, M.J.

    1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are described for extracting for quantitative analysis ions of selected atomic components of a sample. A lens system is configured to provide a slowly diminishing field region for a volume containing the selected atomic components, enabling accurate energy analysis of ions generated in the slowly diminishing field region. The lens system also enables focusing on a sample of a charged particle beam, such as an ion beam, along a path length perpendicular to the sample and extraction of the charged particles along a path length also perpendicular to the sample. Improvement of signal to noise ratio is achieved by laser excitation of ions to selected auto-ionization states before carrying out quantitative analysis. Accurate energy analysis of energetic charged particles is assured by using a preselected resistive thick film configuration disposed on an insulator substrate for generating predetermined electric field boundary conditions to achieve for analysis the required electric field potential. The spectrometer also is applicable in the fields of SIMS, ISS and electron spectroscopy. 8 figs.

  8. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  9. Mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  10. The IPNS resonance detector spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, R.K.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the resonance detector method of neutron spectroscopy, a foil is placed in the scattered neutron beam and scattered neutrons having the resonance energy are detected by detecting the capture gammas resulting from the resonance absorption of the neutrons. A prototype resonance detector spectrometer called the Electron Volt Spectrometer (EVS) has been built and operated. The instrument is described, the current understanding of the background of the instrument is discussed, software developed to simulate the detector efficiency is described and compared with experimental results, and a test of the use of foil-thickness difference techniques to improve resolution is presented. (LEW)

  11. Time of flight mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

  12. MICE Spectrometer Magnet System Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The first magnets for the muon ionization cooling experimentwill be the tracker solenoids that form the ends of the MICE coolingchannel. The primary purpose of the tracker solenoids is to provide auniform 4 T field (to better than +-0.3 percent over a volume that is 1meter long and 0.3 meters in diameter) spectrometer magnet field for thescintillating fiber detectors that are used to analyze the muons in thechannel before and after ionization cooling. A secondary purpose for thetracker magnet is the matching of the muon beam between the rest of theMICE cooling channel and the uniform field spectrometer magnet. Thetracker solenoid is powered by three 300 amp power supplies. Additionaltuning of the spectrometer is provided by a pair of 50 amp power suppliesacross the spectrometer magnet end coils. The tracker magnet will becooled using a pair of 4 K pulse tube coolers that each provide 1.5 W ofcooling at 4.2 K. Final design and construction of the tracker solenoidsbegan during the summer of 2006. This report describes the progress madeon the construction of the tracker solenoids.

  13. An improved scintillation beta spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClary, Jimmy Fred

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~i'TILLATIGR 3ZTA SPECTROMETER ~ ~ ? ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ o ~ ~ SPECTRAL eSPC. .TSZ: OP DIP. Z. -W. T 3110TOIXLTI" LIL"-i O'TiiODZS ZiISSIOH SPECTRA OP iaI(T1) AiiD AHTRRACZHZ. . . . . ?. . . . . . ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 TIIL' SCATTZRI'iG 1'ROBLZ. Iii 3ETA SPECTROSCOPY...

  14. E781 Hyperon Spectrometer Constants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph T. Lach

    2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a discussion of the physical measurements, sizes, distances and magnetic fields of the Hyperon Spectrometer Magnet and its components. Some we get from construction drawings (like the target dimensions) and others from measurements in differing coordinate systems. Included also are the properties of the hyperon productions targets used in E781.

  15. PUBLISHED VERSION Gamma ray spectrometer for ITER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray Scintillation Spectrometer Rev. Sci. Instrum. 24, 1096 (1953); 10.1063/1.1770609 An Automatic Recording Gamma for the spectrometer is presented. Keywords: tokamak, DT plasma, alpha- particles, diagnostics, gamma- spectrometry

  16. A short working distance multiple crystal x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dickinson, B.; Seidler, G. T.; Webb, Z. W.; Bradley, J. A.; Nagle, K. P. [Department of Physics, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Heald, S. M. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratories, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Gordon, R. A. [Department of Physics, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia V5A 1S6 (Canada); Chou, I. M. [U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, Virginia 20192 (United States)

    2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For x-ray spot sizes of a few tens of microns or smaller, a millimeter-sized flat analyzer crystal placed {approx}1 cm from the sample will exhibit high energy resolution while subtending a collection solid angle comparable to that of a typical spherically bent crystal analyzer (SBCA) at much larger working distances. Based on this observation and a nonfocusing geometry for the analyzer optic, we have constructed and tested a short working distance (SWD) multicrystal x-ray spectrometer. This prototype instrument has a maximum effective collection solid angle of 0.14 sr, comparable to that of 17 SBCA at 1 m working distance. We find good agreement with prior work for measurements of the Mn K{beta} x-ray emission and resonant inelastic x-ray scattering for MnO, and also for measurements of the x-ray absorption near-edge structure for Dy metal using L{alpha}{sub 2} partial-fluorescence yield detection. We discuss future applications at third- and fourth-generation light sources. For concentrated samples, the extremely large collection angle of SWD spectrometers will permit collection of high-resolution x-ray emission spectra with a single pulse of the Linac Coherent Light Source. The range of applications of SWD spectrometers and traditional multi-SBCA instruments has some overlap, but also is significantly complementary.

  17. Sample rotating turntable kit for infrared spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eckels, Joel Del (Livermore, CA); Klunder, Gregory L. (Oakland, CA)

    2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An infrared spectrometer sample rotating turntable kit has a rotatable sample cup containing the sample. The infrared spectrometer has an infrared spectrometer probe for analyzing the sample and the rotatable sample cup is adapted to receive the infrared spectrometer probe. A reflectance standard is located in the rotatable sample cup. A sleeve is positioned proximate the sample cup and adapted to receive the probe. A rotator rotates the rotatable sample cup. A battery is connected to the rotator.

  18. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  19. Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chastagner, P.

    2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

  20. Safe biodegradable fluorescent particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Sue I. (Berkeley, CA); Fergenson, David P. (Alamo, CA); Srivastava, Abneesh (Santa Clara, CA); Bogan, Michael J. (Dublin, CA); Riot, Vincent J. (Oakland, CA); Frank, Matthias (Oakland, CA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A human-safe fluorescence particle that can be used for fluorescence detection instruments or act as a safe simulant for mimicking the fluorescence properties of microorganisms. The particle comprises a non-biological carrier and natural fluorophores encapsulated in the non-biological carrier. By doping biodegradable-polymer drug delivery microspheres with natural or synthetic fluorophores, the desired fluorescence can be attained or biological organisms can be simulated without the associated risks and logistical difficulties of live microorganisms.

  1. Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Bruce H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

  2. Automated mass spectrometer grows up

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McInteer, B.B.; Montoya, J.G.; Stark, E.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1980 we reported the development of an automated mass spectrometer for large scale batches of samples enriched in nitrogen-15 as ammonium salts. Since that time significant technical progress has been made in the instrument. Perhaps more significantly, administrative and institutional changes have permitted the entire effort to be transferred to the private sector from its original base at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. This has ensured the continuance of a needed service to the international scientific community as revealed by a development project at a national laboratory, and is an excellent example of beneficial technology transfer to private industry.

  3. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA)

    2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  4. Electron Spectrometer: Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System - Versaprobe Electron Spectrometer: Scanning Multiprobe Surface Analysis System - Versaprobe The SMSAS is a multi-technique surface...

  5. Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with Laser Interface Electron Spectrometer: XPS with Laser Interface This ultrahigh vacuum machine can be applied as a routine means for analyzing the structure and chemical...

  6. Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evaluation of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Moderate Resolution the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS). Key goals were to assess the nature of these relationships as they varied between sensors

  7. Fluorescent Tube Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP temporarily suspended its energy efficiency requirements for fluorescent tube lamps as it evaluates the market impact of the pending 2012 minimum efficiency standards for fluorescent lamps. The program will issue updated energy efficiency requirements when the market distribution of this product category stabilizes and when doing so has the potential to result in significant Federal energy savings.

  8. Birefringent Fourier-transform imaging spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey, Andy

    Birefringent Fourier-transform imaging spectrometer Andrew Robert Harvey and David William Fletcher.r.Harvey@hw.ac.uk http://www.ece.eps.hw.ac.uk/~arharvey Abstract: Fourier-transform imaging spectrometers offer important, for application in harsh environments, deployment of Fourier-transform instruments based on traditional moving

  9. Recombinant fluorescent protein microsphere calibration standard

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nolan, John P. (Santa Fe, NM); Nolan, Rhiannon L. (Santa Fe, NM); Ruscetti, Teresa (Los Alamos, NM); Lehnert, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for making recombinant fluorescent protein standard particles for calibration of fluorescence instruments.

  10. An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle Measurements An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle...

  11. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen (Ann Arbor, MI); Sun, Yiru (Princeton, NJ); Giebink, Noel (Ann Arbor, MI); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

    2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  12. Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ); Sun, Yiru (Princeton, NJ); Giebink, Noel (Princeton, NJ); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

  13. Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

  14. LCLS Injector Straight-Ahead Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limborg-Deprey , C.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrometer design was modified to allow the measurement of uncorrelated energy spread for the nominal lattice. One bunch from every 120 each second would be sent to the straight ahead spectrometer while the transverse cavity is on. The implementation of this 'stealing mode' will not be available for the LCLS commissioning and the early stage of operation. However, the spectrometer was redesigned to retain that option. The energy feedback relies independently on the beam position of the beam in the dispersive section of dogleg 1 (DL1). The main modification of the spectrometer design is the Pole face rotation of 7.5 degrees on both entrance and exit faces. The location and range of operation of the 3 quadrupoles remains unchanged relative to those of the earlier design.

  15. Ultra High Mass Range Mass Spectrometer System

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. [Knoxville, TN

    2005-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Applicant's present invention comprises mass spectrometer systems that operate in a mass range from 1 to 10.sup.16 DA. The mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system comprising an aerodynamic lens system, a reverse jet being a gas flux generated in an annulus moving in a reverse direction and a multipole ion guide; a digital ion trap; and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises a quadrupole mass spectrometer system comprising an inlet system having a quadrupole mass filter and a thermal vaporization/ionization detector system. Applicant's present invention further comprises an inlet system for use with a mass spectrometer system, a method for slowing energetic particles using an inlet system. Applicant's present invention also comprises a detector device and a method for detecting high mass charged particles.

  16. Visible spectrometer utilizing organic thin film absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiefenbruck, Laura C. (Laura Christine)

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I modeled and developed a spectrometer for the visible wavelength spectrum, based on absorption characteristics of organic thin films. The device uses fundamental principles of linear algebra to reconstruct ...

  17. A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Tom

    A SUPERCONDUCTING-SOLENOID ISOTOPE SPECTROMETER FOR PRODUCTION OF NEUTRON-RICH NUCLEI ( 136 Xe Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory's weekly \\Green Sheet," 30 July 1999 #12; c Thomas W. O'Donnell 2000 All

  18. Optical Calibration For Jefferson Lab HKS Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Yuan; L. Tang

    2005-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to accept very forward angle scattering particles, Jefferson Lab HKS experiment uses an on-target zero degree dipole magnet. The usual spectrometer optics calibration procedure has to be modified due to this on-target field. This paper describes a new method to calibrate HKS spectrometer system. The simulation of the calibration procedure shows the required resolution can be achieved from initially inaccurate optical description.

  19. Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

  20. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berthold, J.W.; Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring lignin concentration with time resolved fluorescence in an undiluted wood pulp or black liquor sample, on a real-time, in situ basis is described, comprising: light source means for applying excitation light pulses at a selected wavelength and at known time intervals to the undiluted sample for causing the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light with a fluorescence intensity that monotonically decreases in a quenched fluorescence regime; light detector means for measuring the emission light at the known time intervals and establishing signals indicative thereof; switching means for turning said light detector means on at precise specified time intervals after each excitation light pulse; and signal processing means connected to the light source means and the light detector means for comparing intensities of the emission light from the lignin in the quenched fluorescence regime to the intensities of the excitation light pulses on a time resolved basis for providing a measurement of the lignin concentration in the undiluted sample as a function of the time resolved emission light intensity.

  1. SXF (Standard eXchange Format) An accelerator lattice as a single sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (see example) but this is depre­ cated since the data are more consistently treated in entry and exit.0001 ...] � entry.dev = -- kl=[0.0001 ...] kls=[0.0001 ...] � exit.dev = -- kl=[0.0001 ...] kls=[0.0001 ...] � align : : : g, with one entry for each element. The list resembles a MAD ``sequence'' describing the entire

  2. Multiphoton Add fluorescent dye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Braun, Paul

    in toluene was prepared at 0.96 w/w. The monomer used was trimethylolpropane triacrylate (TMPTA) (Aldrich in toluene; the toluene was removed by rotovapping. For fluorescence imaging in colloidal crystals the electro-optic modulator is used to regulate the power of the beam, selectively exposing the regions

  3. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mould, R A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the nRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during the dark period associated with shelving.

  4. Optical Shelving: Suppressed Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard A Mould

    2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The shelving phenomenon of quantum optics, originally observed by Dehmelt, is analyzed in terms of the qRules that are given in another paper. The heuristic value of these rules is apparent because they not only describe the dark period during shelving, but they reveal the mechanism that enforces the suppression of fluorescence during that time.

  5. Fluorescent Protein Applications in Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Straight, Aaron

    . The Identification of Green Fluorescent Protein III. Formation of the GFP Chromophore IV. The Structure of GFP V environment. II. The Identification of Green Fluorescent Protein The isolation of green fluorescent protein of Aequorea, Shimomura et al. noted that the lumines- cence from aequorin was blue rather than the green

  6. Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

  7. Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay Biosensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay Biosensor for Rapid Sensitive Botulinum Toxin Detection in an Automated Renewable Surface Fluorescence Sandwich Immunoassay...

  8. Single-molecule Fluorescence Spectroelectrochemistry of Cresyl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluorescence Spectroelectrochemistry of Cresyl Violet. Abstract: We coupled scanning fluorescence microscopy with a potentiostat via a three-electrode electrochemical...

  9. Wide size range fast integrated mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Jian

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A mobility spectrometer to measure a nanometer particle size distribution is disclosed. The mobility spectrometer includes a conduit and a detector. The conduit is configured to receive and provide fluid communication of a fluid stream having a charged nanometer particle mixture. The conduit includes a separator section configured to generate an electrical field of two dimensions transverse to a dimension associated with the flow of the charged nanometer particle mixture through the separator section to spatially separate charged nanometer particles of the charged nanometer particle mixture in said two dimensions. The detector is disposed downstream of the conduit to detect concentration and position of the spatially-separated nanometer particles.

  10. Compact Imaging Spectrometer Utilizing Immersed Gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA); Lerner, Scott A. (Corvallis, OR); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2006-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through an optical element to the detector array.

  11. The Air-Fluorescence Yield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Arqueros; F. Blanco; D. Garcia-Pinto; M. Ortiz; J. Rosado

    2008-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Detection of the air-fluorescence radiation induced by the charged particles of extensive air showers is a well-established technique for the study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. Fluorescence telescopes provide a nearly calorimetric measure of the primary energy. Presently the main source of systematic uncertainties comes from our limited accuracy in the fluorescence yield, that is, the number of fluorescence photons emitted per unit of energy deposited in the atmosphere by the shower particles. In this paper the current status of our knowledge on the fluorescence yield both experimental an theoretical will be discussed.

  12. Magnetic fluorescent lamp

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

    1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  13. Broadband Infrared Heterodyne Spectrometer: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, C G; Cunningham, C T; Tringe, J W

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the most important results of our effort to develop a new class of infrared spectrometers based on a novel broadband heterodyne design. Our results indicate that this approach could lead to a near-room temperature operation with performance limited only by quantum noise carried by the incoming signal. Using a model quantum-well infrared photodetector (QWIP), we demonstrated key performance features of our approach. For example, we directly measured the beat frequency signal generated by superimposing local oscillator (LO) light of one frequency and signal light of another through a spectrograph, by injecting the LO light at a laterally displaced input location. In parallel with the development of this novel spectrometer, we modeled a new approach to reducing detector volume though plasmonic resonance effects. Since dark current scales directly with detector volume, this ''photon compression'' can directly lead to lower currents. Our calculations indicate that dark current can be reduced by up to two orders of magnitude in an optimized ''superlens'' structure. Taken together, our spectrometer and dark current reduction strategies provide a promising path toward room temperature operation of a mid-wave and possibly long-wave infrared spectrometer.

  14. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  15. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osipenko, M; Ricco, G; Caiffi, B; Pompili, F; Pillon, M; Angelone, M; Verona-Rinati, G; Cardarelli, R; Mila, G; Argiro, S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  16. Neutron spectrometer for fast nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Osipenko; M. Ripani; G. Ricco; B. Caiffi; F. Pompili; M. Pillon; M. Angelone; G. Verona-Rinati; R. Cardarelli; G. Mila; S. Argiro

    2015-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe the development and first tests of a neutron spectrometer designed for high flux environments, such as the ones found in fast nuclear reactors. The spectrometer is based on the conversion of neutrons impinging on $^6$Li into $\\alpha$ and $t$ whose total energy comprises the initial neutron energy and the reaction $Q$-value. The $^6$LiF layer is sandwiched between two CVD diamond detectors, which measure the two reaction products in coincidence. The spectrometer was calibrated at two neutron energies in well known thermal and 3 MeV neutron fluxes. The measured neutron detection efficiency varies from 4.2$\\times 10^{-4}$ to 3.5$\\times 10^{-8}$ for thermal and 3 MeV neutrons, respectively. These values are in agreement with Geant4 simulations and close to simple estimates based on the knowledge of the $^6$Li(n,$\\alpha$)$t$ cross section. The energy resolution of the spectrometer was found to be better than 100 keV when using 5 m cables between the detector and the preamplifiers.

  17. Imaging mass spectrometer with mass tags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felton, James S.; Wu, Kuang Jen J.; Knize, Mark G.; Kulp, Kristen S.; Gray, Joe W.

    2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of analyzing biological material by exposing the biological material to a recognition element, that is coupled to a mass tag element, directing an ion beam of a mass spectrometer to the biological material, interrogating at least one region of interest area from the biological material and producing data, and distributing the data in plots.

  18. BREAKING NEWS! EMSL's 21 T mass spectrometer at field | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a Q&A is available on the 21T FTICR mass spectrometer web page. EMSL's new 21 Tesla Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer is now at its full magnetic field...

  19. Development and performance of a miniature, low cost mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemond, Brian D. (Brian David Thomson)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature, low cost mass spectrometer has been developed that is capable of unit resolution over a mass range of 10 to 50 AMU. The design of the mass spectrometer incorporates several new features that enhance the ...

  20. Study of elementary reactions with the HADES dielectron spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Ramstein

    2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Results obtained with the HADES dielectron spectrometer at GSI are discussed, with emphasis on dilepton production in elementary reactions.

  1. Calibrations of a multichannel soft x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blake, R.L.; Hockaday, R.G.; Grosso, J.S.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A time resolved, 14 channel spectrometer with an absolutely calibrated response, was developed to cove an x-ray photon energy spectrum from 70 to 650 eV. The spectrometer utilized a combination of thin film prefilters, layered synthetic microstructure (LSM) diffractors, metal coated plastic scintillators, and photomultiplier detector tubes. Calibration of the spectrometer was done piecemeal for each component with standard techniques and the component calibrations were convolved to get a complete spectrometer response function. The two calibration procedures were compared.

  2. Development of Mossbauer spectrometer and it's application to characterization of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FeCO3 Development of Mossbauer spectrometer and it's application to characterization of FeCO3 film #12; #12; FeCO3 Development of Mossbauer spectrometer and it. #12;#12;#12; Development of Mossbauer spectrometer and it's application to characterization of FeCO3

  3. STORM/PALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STORMPALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope STORMPALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope EMSL has developed and offers Fluorescence, Super Resolution STORM...

  4. Fluorescence analyzer for lignin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berthold, John W. (Salem, OH); Malito, Michael L. (Hubbard, OH); Jeffers, Larry (Alliance, OH)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

  5. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  6. Method of multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for analyzing analytes from a sample introduced into a Spectrometer by generating a pseudo random sequence of a modulation bins, organizing each modulation bin as a series of submodulation bins, thereby forming an extended pseudo random sequence of submodulation bins, releasing the analytes in a series of analyte packets into a Spectrometer, thereby generating an unknown original ion signal vector, detecting the analytes at a detector, and characterizing the sample using the plurality of analyte signal subvectors. The method is advantageously applied to an Ion Mobility Spectrometer, and an Ion Mobility Spectrometer interfaced with a Time of Flight Mass Spectrometer.

  7. Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the alpha-particle spectrometer concept, and outlines challenges involved in the magnetic field design. Tagged photon interrogation: We investigated a method for discriminating fissile from benign cargo-material response to an energy-tagged photon beam. The method relies upon coincident detection of the tagged photon and a photoneutron or photofission neutron produced in the target material. The method exploits differences in the shape of the neutron production cross section as a function of incident photon energy in order to discriminate photofission yield from photoneutrons emitted by non-fissile materials. Computational tests of the interrogation method as applied to material composition assay of a simple, multi-layer target suggest that the tagged-photon information facilitates precise (order 1% thickness uncertainty) reconstruction of the constituent thicknesses of fissile (uranium) and high-Z (Pb) constituents of the test targets in a few minutes of photon-beam exposure. We assumed an 18-MeV endpoint tagged photon beam for these simulations. The report addresses several candidate design and data analysis issues for beamline infrastructure required to produce a tagged photon beam in a notional AI-dedicated facility, including the accelerator and tagging spectrometer.

  8. Neutron spectrometer for improved SNM search.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vance, Andrew L.; Aigeldinger, Georg

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the exception of large laboratory devices with very low sensitivities, a neutron spectrometer have not been built for fission neutrons such as those emitted by special nuclear materials (SNM). The goal of this work was to use a technique known as Capture Gated Neutron Spectrometry to develop a solid-state device with this functionality. This required modifications to trans-stilbene, a known solid-state scintillator. To provide a neutron capture signal we added lithium to this material. This unique triggering signal allowed identification of neutrons that lose all of their energy in the detector, eliminating uncertainties that arise due to partial energy depositions. We successfully implemented a capture gated neutron spectrometer and were able to distinguish an SNM like fission spectrum from a spectrum stemming from a benign neutron source.

  9. Imaging spectrometer wide field catadioptric design

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp; Michael P. (Danville, CA)

    2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A wide field catadioptric imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The catadioptric design has zero Petzval field curvature. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, a system with a catadioptric lens and a dioptric lens for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the system for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the system for receiving the light and the system for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light through the system for receiving the light to the detector array.

  10. Compact imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA); Lerner, Scott A. (Corvallis, OR); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, means for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the means for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the means for receiving the light and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light to the means for receiving the light, and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the detector array.

  11. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmons, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) is described for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units. 4 figs.

  12. Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Andresen, Brian D. (Livermore, CA); Eckels, Joel D. (Livermore, CA); Kimmons, James F. (Manteca, CA); Myers, David W. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

  13. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D'Silva, Arthur (Ames, IA)

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conducts is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer.

  14. Capillary zone electrophoresis-mass spectrometer interface

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    D`Silva, A.

    1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for providing equal electrical potential between two loci unconnected by solid or liquid electrical conductors is provided. The device comprises a first electrical conducting terminal, a second electrical conducting terminal connected to the first terminal by a rigid dielectric structure, and an electrically conducting gas contacting the first and second terminals. This device is particularly suitable for application in the electrospray ionization interface between a capillary zone electrophoresis apparatus and a mass spectrometer. 1 fig.

  15. Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Filby, Evan E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

  16. What Happened with Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A

    2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrometer solenoid is supposed to be the first magnets installed in MICE [1]-[4]. This report described what happened during the test of the MICE spectrometer solenoid 2B. First, the report describes the temperatures in the magnet, the cooler top plate and the shield during the run where the magnet quenched at 258 A. During this quench, a lead between the bottom of the HTS leads and the diode bank burned out causing the magnet to quench. Second, three methods for measuring the net heat flow into the cold mass are described. Third, there is a discussion of possible resistive heating in the HTS leads between liquid helium temperature and the copper plate, which is at about 50 K. Fourth, there is a discussion of the measured first stage heat loads in the magnet, when there is no current in the magnet. The first stage heat load calculations are based on knowing the first stage temperatures of the three two-stage pulse tube coolers and the single stage GM cooler. Fifth, the estimated heat load to the first stage when the magnet has current in it is discussed. Sixth, there is a comparison of the stage 1 heat loads in magnet 1A [5], magnet 2A [6], and magnet 2B [7]. Finally there is a discussion of recommended changes for improving the spectrometer solenoids so that the coolers can keep them cold.

  17. Identification of Nucleotides with Identical Fluorescent Labels Based on Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Identification of Nucleotides with Identical Fluorescent Labels Based on Fluorescence Polarization for discriminating among the four DNA nucleotides la- beled identically with tetramethylrhodamine is described and demonstrated. Labeled nucleotides were dissolved in buffered surfactant solutions. In room temperature 4.5 m

  18. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence.E. Norman, UC Berkeley Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, privatepp. 349. G. Warren et al. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of

  19. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  20. Dual waveband compact catadioptric imaging spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A catadioptric dual waveband imaging spectrometer that covers the visible through short-wave infrared, and the midwave infrared spectral regions, dispersing the visible through shortwave infrared with a zinc selenide grating and midwave infrared with a sapphire prism. The grating and prism are at the cold stop position, enabling the pupil to be split between them. The spectra for both wavebands are focused onto the relevant sections of a single dual waveband detector. Spatial keystone distortion is controlled to less than one tenth of a pixel over the full wavelength range, facilitating the matching of the spectra in the midwave infrared with the shorter wavelength region.

  1. Study of Active Shielding for {gamma} - Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bikit, I.; Mrdja, D.; Forkapic, S.; Todorovic, N.; Veskovic, M.; Slivka, J.; Conkic, Lj.; Krmar, M.; Varga, E. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Sciences, University of Novi Sad, Trg Dositeja Obradovica 4, 21 000 Novi Sad (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The features of the ground located gamma ray spectrometer shielded passively with 12 cm of lead and actively by five 0.5m x 0.5m x 0.05m plastic veto shields are described. The detector mass related background was 0.345 C/kg s. The 511 keV annihilation line was reduced by the factor of 7 by the anticoincidence gate. It is shown that the plastic shields increase the neutron capture gamma line intensities due to neutron thermalization.

  2. 140 GHz pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.

    1985-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency energy pulsing system suitable for use in a pulsed microwave spectrometer, including means for generating a high frequency carrier signal, and means for generating a low frequency modulating signal. The carrier signal is continuously fed to a modulator and the modulating signal is fed through a pulse switch to the modulator. When the pulse switch is on, the modulator will produce sideband signals above and below the carrier signal frequency. A frequency-responsive device is tuned to one of the sideband signals and sway from the carrier frequency so that the high frequency energization of the frequency-responsive device is controlled by the pulse switch.

  3. Micro-optical-mechanical system photoacoustic spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack; Benett, William J.; Tooker, Angela C.; Alameda, Jennifer B.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All-optical photoacoustic spectrometer sensing systems (PASS system) and methods include all the hardware needed to analyze the presence of a large variety of materials (solid, liquid and gas). Some of the all-optical PASS systems require only two optical-fibers to communicate with the opto-electronic power and readout systems that exist outside of the material environment. Methods for improving the signal-to-noise are provided and enable mirco-scale systems and methods for operating such systems.

  4. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  5. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  6. aerosol mass spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004. The concentration of a species Zhang, Qi 8 Development of a thermal desorption chemical ionization mobility mass spectrometer for the speciation of ultrafine aerosols. Open...

  7. alpha spectrometers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flight CERN Preprints Summary: The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle detector designed to detect antimatter. During the 10-day test flight on the space shuttle in...

  8. atomic emission spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Characterization of Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO2 for carbon cycle science Susan footprint ave ** Crevoisier et al., 2009 0.22K error at 700...

  9. The Results of Tests of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Virostek, Steve P.

    2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The spectrometer magnets are the largest magnets in both mass and surface area within the MICE ooling channel. Like all of the other magnets in MICE, the spectrometer solenoids are kept cold using 1.5 W (at 4.2 K) pulse tube coolers. The MICE spectrometer solenoid is quite possibly the largest magnet that has been cooled using small coolers. Two pectrometer magnets have been built and tested. This report discusses the results of current and cooler tests of both magnets.

  10. antiparticle spectrometer gaps: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The General Antiparticle Spectrometer (GAPS) - Hunt for dark matter using low-energy antideuterons CERN Preprints Summary: The GAPS experiment is...

  11. alpha magnetic spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Testing and Final Construction of the Superconducting Magnet for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer MIT - DSpace Summary: The Alpha...

  12. Evaluation of a portable x-ray fluorescence survey meter for the quantitative determination of trace metals in welding fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fehrenbacher, Mary Catherine

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometry Sensitivity Excitation Sources 12 16 Spectrometers and Detectors SHIELDED METAL ARC WELDING Health Effects of Welding THE PORTABLE X ? RAY FLUORESCENCE SURVEY METER METHODOLOGY RESULTS DISCUSSION OF RESULTS CAELUS I QblS RECQvfvt... Appendix C Basic Principle of AAS VITA Page 65 66 67 68 76 84 V1 11 LIST OF FIGURES Page 1. Transitions giving x-radiation 2. Fluorescent yield 3. Interaction of x-rays with matter 4. Particle size effects on x-ray intensity. . . 15 5...

  13. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quiter, Brian Joseph

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

  14. GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN The green revolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Tim

    GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN The green revolution Green fluorescent protein allows gene expression a fluorescent product when expressed. Just such a molecule, green fluorescent protein (GFP), has recently green light when disturbed (often seen when riding in a boat at night). In Aequorea, the green

  15. Fluorescence of molecular excimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nurmukhametov, R.N.; Sakhno, T.V.; Saukov, G.G.; Khakhel, O.A. [L. Ya. Karpov Research Physiochemical Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomena of excimer fluorescence are most thoroughly studied in solutions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Therefore, excimer formation is usually treated with reference to molecules of this class of compounds. In the literature, only a qualitative picture of the energetics of excimer formation is given. It is assumed that dimerization of electron-excited and unexcited molecules is followed by the splitting of molecular electron-excited levels. PAH molecules are characterized by two lower excited levels: {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}L{sub b} (according to Platt`s classification). The S{sub 1}* state of some PAH compounds (e.g., naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene) is {sup 1}L{sub b}, while in other PAH (anthracene, naphthacene, perylene, etc.) it is the {sup 1}L{sub a} state. It is assumed that the {sup 1}L{sub a}-level is split more significantly than the {sup 1}L{sub b} level. Therefore, for all PAH investigated the excimer state is described as a lower-lying component of the split {sup 1}L{sub a} level. Quantum-chemical consideration of the splitting of electron levels of PAH molecules in excimers is undertaken. Unfortunately, in this case the description is also of a qualitative character. In the cited work, a correlation is noted between the energy of the {sup 1}L{sub a} state of the molecule and the wave number corresponding to the maximum of the emission band of the excimer. However, it does not give the wavelength of the maximum of the excimer band for some PAH, in other words, a definite dependence of the position of this band on molecular structure. The present work is devoted to a search for an answer to this question.

  16. Spectrometer for new gravitational experiment with UCN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulin, G V; Goryunov, S V; Kustov, D V; Geltenbort, P; Jentschel, M; Strepetov, A N; Bushuev, V A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an experimental installation for a new test of the weak equivalence principle for neutron. The device is a sensitive gravitational spectrometer for ultra-cold neutrons allowing to precisely compare the gain in kinetic energy of free falling neutrons to quanta of energy ${\\hbar}{\\Omega}$ transferred to the neutron via a non stationary device, i.e. a quantum modulator. The results of first test experiments indicate a collection rate allowing measurements of the factor of equivalence $ { \\gamma}$ with a statistical uncertainty in the order of $5{\\times}10^{-3}$ per day. A number of systematic effects were found, which partially can be easily corrected. For the elimination of others more detailed investigations and analysis are needed. Some possibilities to improve the device are also discussed.

  17. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coutts, Gerald W. (Livermore, CA); Bushman, John F. (Oakley, CA); Alger, Terry W. (Tracy, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum housing and pumping system for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof.

  18. 140 GHz pulsed Fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolbe, W.F.; Leskovar, B.

    1987-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency energy pulsing system suitable for use in a pulsed microwave spectrometer, including means for generating a high frequency carrier signal, and means for generating a low frequency modulating signal is disclosed. The carrier signal is continuously fed to a modulator and the modulating signal is fed through a pulse switch to the modulator. When the pulse switch is on, the modulator will produce sideband signals above and below the carrier signal frequency. A frequency-responsive device is tuned to one of the sideband signals and away from the carrier frequency so that the high frequency energization of the frequency-responsive device is controlled by the pulse switch. 5 figs.

  19. 140 GHz pulsed fourier transform microwave spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolbe, William F. (Oakland, CA); Leskovar, Branko (Moraga, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high frequency energy pulsing system suitable for use in a pulsed microwave spectrometer (10), including means (11, 19) for generating a high frequency carrier signal, and means (12) for generating a low frequency modulating signal. The carrier signal is continuously fed to a modulator (20) and the modulating signal is fed through a pulse switch (23) to the modulator. When the pulse switch (23) is on, the modulator (20) will produce sideband signals above and below the carrier signal frequency. A frequency-responsive device (31) is tuned to one of the sideband signals and away from the carrier frequency so that the high frequency energization of the frequency-responsive device (31) is controlled by the pulse switch (23).

  20. Mass spectrometer vacuum housing and pumping system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, G.W.; Bushman, J.F.; Alger, T.W.

    1996-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A vacuum housing and pumping system is described for a portable gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GC/MS). The vacuum housing section of the system has minimum weight for portability while designed and constructed to utilize metal gasket sealed stainless steel to be compatible with high vacuum operation. The vacuum pumping section of the system consists of a sorption (getter) pump to remove atmospheric leakage and outgassing contaminants as well as the gas chromatograph carrier gas (hydrogen) and an ion pump to remove the argon from atmospheric leaks. The overall GC/MS system has broad application to contaminants, hazardous materials, illegal drugs, pollution monitoring, etc., as well as for use by chemical weapon treaty verification teams, due to the light weight and portability thereof. 7 figs.

  1. An improved selective excitation double Mossbauer spectrometer J. van Lieropa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Dominic

    An improved selective excitation double Mossbauer spectrometer J. van Lieropa) and D. H. Ryan, operation and performance of a selective excitation double Mossbauer SEDM spectrometer are described circuitry together with Wissel Mossbauer velocity transducers and electronics supplies energy

  2. MICROMACHINED FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETER ON SILICON OPTICAL BENCH PLATFORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Namkyoo

    MICROMACHINED FOURIER TRANSFORM SPECTROMETER ON SILICON OPTICAL BENCH PLATFORM Kyoungsik Yu1 a miniaturized Fourier transform spectrometer implemented on a silicon optical bench platform. The optical-etching. A spectral resolution of 45 nm near 1550 nm wavelength is demonstrated. Keywords: Fourier transform

  3. LANL/Green Star spectrometer tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampson, T.E.; Cremers, T.L.; Vo, D.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Seldiakov, Y.P.; Dorin, A.B.; Kondrashov, M.V. [Green Star, Moscow (Russian Federation); Timoshin, V.I. [VNIINM, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US and Russia have agreed to the joint development of a nondestructive assay system for use to support the dismantlement of nuclear weapons in Russia. This nondestructive assay system will be used to measure plutonium produced by the conversion of Russian nuclear weapons. The NDA system for Russia will be patterned after the ARIES NDA system being constructed at Los Alamos. One goal of the program is to produce an NDA system for use in Russia that maximizes the use of Russian resources to facilitate maintenance and future upgrades. The Green Star SBS50 Single Board Spectrometer system (Green Star Ltd., Moscow, Russia) has been suggested for use as the data acquisition component for gamma ray instruments in the system. Possible uses are for plutonium isotopic analysis and also segmented gamma scanning. Green Star has also developed analysis software for the SBS50. This software, both plutonium isotopic analysis and uranium enrichment analysis, was developed specifically for customs/border inspection applications (low counting rate applications and identification as opposed to quantification) and was not intended for MC and A applications. Because of the relative immaturity of the Green Star plutonium isotopic analysis software (it has been under development for only one year and is patterned after US development circa 1980), it was tentatively agreed, before the tests, that the Russian NDA system would use the Los Alamos PC/FRAM software for plutonium isotopic analysis. However, it was also decided to include the Green Star plutonium isotopic software in the testing, both to quantify its performance for MC and A applications and also to provide additional data to Green Star for further development of their software. The main purpose of the testing was to evaluate the SBS-50 spectrometer as a data acquisition device for use with LANL software.

  4. Ion mobility spectrometer, spectrometer analyte detection and identification verification system, and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Atkinson, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus for ion mobility spectrometry and analyte detection and identification verification system are disclosed. The apparatus is configured to be used in an ion mobility spectrometer and includes a plurality of reactant reservoirs configured to contain a plurality of reactants which can be reacted with the sample to form adducts having varying ion mobilities. A carrier fluid, such as air or nitrogen, is used to carry the sample into the spectrometer. The plurality of reactants are configured to be selectively added to the carrier stream by use inlet and outlet manifolds in communication with the reagent reservoirs, the reservoirs being selectively isolatable by valves. The invention further includes a spectrometer having the reagent system described. In the method, a first reactant is used with the sample. Following a positive result, a second reactant is used to determine whether a predicted response occurs. The occurrence of the second predicted response tends to verify the existence of a component of interest within the sample. A third reactant can also be used to provide further verification of the existence of a component of interest. A library can be established of known responses of compounds of interest with various reactants and the results of a specific multi-reactant survey of a sample can be compared against the library to determine whether a component detected in the sample is likely to be a specific component of interest.

  5. Three-dimensional x-ray fluorescence mapping of a gold nanoparticle-loaded phantom

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Liu, Hong, E-mail: liu@ou.edu [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)] [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Wang, Ge [Biomedical Imaging Cluster and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)] [Biomedical Imaging Cluster and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); Wu, Xizeng [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, Alabama 35233 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose : X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising technique with sufficient specificity and sensitivity for identifying and quantifying features in small samples containing high atomic number (Z) materials such as iodine, gadolinium, and gold. In this study, the feasibility of applying XRF to early breast cancer diagnosis and treatment is studied using a novel approach for three-dimensional (3D) x-ray fluorescence mapping (XFM) of gold nanoparticle (GNP)-loaded objects in a physical phantom at the technical level. Methods : All the theoretical analysis and experiments are conducted under the condition of using x-ray pencil beam and a compactly integrated x-ray spectrometer. The penetrability of the fluorescence x-rays from GNPs is first investigated by adopting a combination of BR12 with 70 mm/50 mm in thickness on the excitation/emission path to mimic the possible position of tumor goldin vivo. Then, a physical phantom made of BR12 is designed to translate in 3D space with three precise linear stages and subsequently the step by step XFM scanning is performed. The experimental technique named as background subtraction is applied to isolate the gold fluorescence from each spectrum obtained by the spectrometer. Afterwards, the attenuations of both the incident primary x-ray beam with energies beyond the gold K-edge energy (80.725 keV) and the isolated gold K{sub ?} fluorescence x-rays (65.99 69.80 keV) acquired after background subtraction are well calibrated, and finally the unattenuated K{sub ?} fluorescence counts are used to realize mapping reconstruction and to describe the linear relationship between gold fluorescence counts and corresponding concentration of gold solutions. Results : The penetration results show that the goldK{sub ?} fluorescence x-rays have sufficient penetrability for this phantom study, and the reconstructed mapping results indicate that both the spatial distribution and relative concentration of GNPs within the designed BR12 phantom can be well identified and quantified. Conclusions : Although the XFM method in this investigation is still studied at the technical level and is not yet practical for routinein vivo mapping tasks with GNPs, the current penetrability measurements and phantom study strongly suggest the feasibility to establish and develop a 3D XFM system.

  6. Improving the resolution of chopper spectrometers at pulsed neutron sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, J.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Mildner, D.F.R. (National Bureau of Standards, Washington, DC (USA). Center for Analytical Chemistry)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the relationships between intensity and resolution in pulsed-source chopper spectrometers, including the effects of Soller collimation, narrower rotor slits and higher rotor speeds. The basis is a simplified description of a spectrometer, approximately optimizing the rotor pulse and lighthouse effects. the analysis includes a new treatment of the angular distribution transmitted through a system consisting of a coarse collimator and a Soller collimator. The results encourage the prospect for a reasonably easily accomplished, higher resolution, optional configuration of the pulsed source chopper spectrometers at IPNS. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Open-split interface for mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Diehl, John W. (Grand Forks, ND)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open-split interface includes a connector body having four leg members projecting therefrom within a single plane, the first and third legs being coaxial and the second and fourth legs being coaxial. A tubular aperture extends through the first and third legs and a second tubular aperture extends through the second and fourth legs, connecting at a juncture within the center of the connector body. A fifth leg projects from the connector body and has a third tubular aperture extending therethrough to the juncture of the first and second tubular apertures. A capillary column extends from a gas chromatograph into the third leg with its end adjacent the juncture. A flow restrictor tube extends from a mass spectrometer through the first tubular aperture in the first and third legs and into the capillary columnm end, so as to project beyond the end of the third leg within the capillary column. An annular gap between the tube and column allows excess effluent to pass to the juncture. A pair of short capillary columns extend from separate detectors into the second tubular aperture in the second and fourth legs, and are oriented with their ends spaced slightly from the first capillary column end. A sweep flow tube is mounted in the fifth leg so as to supply a helium sweep flow to the juncture.

  8. The High-Acceptance Dielectron Spectrometer HADES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; B. Bannier; R. Bassini; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Boehmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Diaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; W. Enghardt; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Froehlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Heilmann; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; D. Mishra; E. Moriniere; J. Mousa; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. PerezCavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebac; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wuestenfel; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou; P. Zumbruch

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    HADES is a versatile magnetic spectrometer aimed at studying dielectron production in pion, proton and heavy-ion induced collisions. Its main features include a ring imaging gas Cherenkov detector for electron-hadron discrimination, a tracking system consisting of a set of 6 superconducting coils producing a toroidal field and drift chambers and a multiplicity and electron trigger array for additional electron-hadron discrimination and event characterization. A two-stage trigger system enhances events containing electrons. The physics program is focused on the investigation of hadron properties in nuclei and in the hot and dense hadronic matter. The detector system is characterized by an 85% azimuthal coverage over a polar angle interval from 18 to 85 degree, a single electron efficiency of 50% and a vector meson mass resolution of 2.5%. Identification of pions, kaons and protons is achieved combining time-of-flight and energy loss measurements over a large momentum range. This paper describes the main features and the performance of the detector system.

  9. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer for Hinode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culhane,J.; Harra, L.; James, A.; Al-Janabi, K.; Bradley, L.; Chaudry, R.; Rees, K.; Tandy, J.; Thomas, P.; et al

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode will observe solar corona and upper transition region emission lines in the wavelength ranges 170?-?210 Angstroms and 250?-?290 Angstroms . The line centroid positions and profile widths will allow plasma velocities and turbulent or non-thermal line broadenings to be measured. We will derive local plasma temperatures and densities from the line intensities. The spectra will allow accurate determination of differential emission measure and element abundances within a variety of corona and transition region structures. These powerful spectroscopic diagnostics will allow identification and characterization of magnetic reconnection and wave propagation processes in the upper solar atmosphere. We will also directly study the detailed evolution and heating of coronal loops. The EIS instrument incorporates a unique two element, normal incidence design. The optics are coated with optimized multilayer coatings. We have selected highly efficient, backside-illuminated, thinned CCDs. These design features result in an instrument that has significantly greater effective area than previous orbiting EUV spectrographs with typical active region 2?-?5 s exposure times in the brightest lines. EIS can scan a field of 6x8.5 arc?min with spatial and velocity scales of 1 arc?sec and 25 km?s-1 per pixel. The instrument design, its absolute calibration, and performance are described in detail in this paper. EIS will be used along with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) and the X-ray Telescope (XRT) for a wide range of studies of the solar atmosphere.

  10. Upgrades of imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers for high-resolution and high-temperature plasma diagnostics on EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyu, B., E-mail: blu@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, F. D.; Fu, J.; Li, Y. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); Pan, X. Y.; Chen, J.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230031 (China); School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Delgado-Aparicio, L. F.; Pablant, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Y. J. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); WCI for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Ye, M. Y. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Upgrade of the imaging X-ray crystal spectrometers continues in order to fulfill the high-performance diagnostics requirements on EAST. For the tangential spectrometer, a new large pixelated two-dimensional detector was deployed on tokamaks for time-resolved X-ray imaging. This vacuum-compatible detector has an area of 83.8 325.3 mm{sup 2}, a framing rate over 150 Hz, and water-cooling capability for long-pulse discharges. To effectively extend the temperature limit, a double-crystal assembly was designed to replace the previous single crystals for He-like argon line measurement. The tangential spectrometer employed two crystal slices attached to a common substrate and part of He- and H-like Ar spectra could be recorded on the same detector when crystals were chosen to have similar Bragg angles. This setup cannot only extend the measurable Te up to 10 keV in the core region, but also extend the spatial coverage since He-like argon ions will be present in the outer plasma region. Similarly, crystal slices for He-like iron and argon spectra were adopted on the poloidal spectrometer. Wavelength calibration for absolute rotation velocity measurement will be studied using cadmium characteristic L-shell X-ray lines excited by plasma radiation. A Cd foil is placed before the crystal and can be inserted and retracted for in situ wavelength calibration. The Geant4 code was used to estimate X-ray fluorescence yield and optimize the thickness of the foil.

  11. Ion spectrometer composed of time-of-flight and Thomson parabola spectrometers for simultaneous characterization of laser-driven ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, I. W.; Kim, C. M.; Sung, J. H.; Yu, T. J.; Lee, S. K.; Kim, I. J.; Jin, Y.-Y.; Jeong, T. M.; Hafz, N.; Pae, K. H.; Noh, Y.-C.; Ko, D.-K.; Lee, J. [Advanced Photonics Research Institute and Center for Femto-Atto Science and Technology, GIST, Gwangju 500-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yogo, A.; Pirozhkov, A. S.; Ogura, K.; Orimo, S.; Sagisaka, A.; Nishiuchi, M.; Daito, I. [Advanced Photon Research Center and Photo Medical Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); and others

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion spectrometer, composed of a time-of-flight spectrometer (TOFS) and a Thomson parabola spectrometer (TPS), has been developed to measure energy spectra and to analyze species of laser-driven ions. Two spectrometers can be operated simultaneously, thereby facilitate to compare the independently measured data and to combine advantages of each spectrometer. Real-time and shot-to-shot characterizations have been possible with the TOFS, and species of ions can be analyzed with the TPS. The two spectrometers show very good agreement of maximum proton energy even for a single laser shot. The composite ion spectrometer can provide two complementary spectra measured by TOFS with a large solid angle and TPS with a small one for the same ion source, which are useful to estimate precise total ion number and to investigate fine structure of energy spectrum at high energy depending on the detection position and solid angle. Advantage and comparison to other online measurement system, such as the TPS equipped with microchannel plate, are discussed in terms of overlay of ion species, high-repetition rate operation, detection solid angle, and detector characteristics of imaging plate.

  12. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including fluorescent ballasts, which is a FEMP designated product category. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  13. Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements across a variety of product categories, including fluorescent luminaires. Federal laws and requirements mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law.

  14. Single-ultrafine-particle mass spectrometer development and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glagolenko, Stanislav Yurievich

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-ultrafine-particle mass spectrometer was constructed and deployed for size-resolved ultrafine aerosol composition measurements during the winter of 2002-2003 in College Station, Texas. Three separate experiments were held between December...

  15. Tunable light source for use in photoacoustic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bisson, Scott E.; Kulp, Thomas J.; Armstrong, Karla M.

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a photoacoustic spectrometer that is field portable and capable of speciating complex organic molecules in the gas phase. The spectrometer has a tunable light source that has the ability to resolve the fine structure of these molecules over a large wavelength range. The inventive light source includes an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) having combined fine and coarse tuning. By pumping the OPO with the output from a doped-fiber optical amplifier pumped by a diode seed laser, the inventive spectrometer is able to speciate mixtures having parts per billion of organic compounds, with a light source that has a high efficiency and small size, allowing for portability. In an alternative embodiment, the spectrometer is scanned by controlling the laser wavelength, thus resulting in an even more compact and efficient design.

  16. Design and Simulation of a Boron-loaded Neutron Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Thomas

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    spectrometer, consisting of plastic scintillating fibers in a hexagonal array, was simulated via Monte Carlo. Fiber size and boron content were varied to optimize response characteristics. The results were compared to industry standard multi...

  17. airborne imaging spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADC dynamic range, because the low-energy pulse signal has a larger gain than the high-energy pulse signal. The spectrometer can clearly distinguish the photopeaks at 239, 352,...

  18. TRACES Centre Thermo GFS35 Graphite Furnace Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    TRACES Centre Thermo GFS35 Graphite Furnace Spectrometer Standard Operating Procedure 1. Turn. Click on the lamp icon a. ID the lamp of choice and click the `Off' button to `On' b. Non-Thermo lamps

  19. TRACES Centre Thermo iCE 3500 Flame AA Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Mathew G. - Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto

    TRACES Centre Thermo iCE 3500 Flame AA Spectrometer Standard Operating Procedure 1. Turn on the lamp icon a. ID the lamp of choice and click the `Off' button to `On' b. Non-Thermo lamps MUST

  20. The FIRE infrared spectrometer at Magellan: construction and commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simcoe, Robert A.

    We describe the construction and commissioning of FIRE, a new 0.8-2.5?m echelle spectrometer for the Magellan/ Baade 6.5 meter telescope. FIRE delivers continuous spectra over its full bandpass with nominal spectral ...

  1. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer for fusion reactor ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krasilnikov, V.; Amosov, V.; Kaschuck, Yu.; Skopintsev, D. [Institution PROJECT CENTER ITER, 1, Akademik Kurchatov Sq., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact diamond neutral particle spectrometer with digital signal processing has been developed for fast charge-exchange atoms and neutrons measurements at ITER fusion reactor conditions. This spectrometer will play supplementary role for Neutral Particle Analyzer providing 10 ms time and 30 keV energy resolutions for fast particle spectra in non-tritium ITER phase. These data will also be implemented for independent studies of fast ions distribution function evolution in various plasma scenarios with the formation of a single fraction of high-energy ions. In tritium ITER phase the DNPS will measure 14 MeV neutrons spectra. The spectrometer with digital signal processing can operate at peak counting rates reaching a value of 10{sup 6} cps. Diamond neutral particle spectrometer is applicable to future fusion reactors due to its high radiation hardness, fast response and high energy resolution.

  2. atomic absorption spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption spectrometer First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Educational Multiwavelength...

  3. Fluorescent Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    Fluorescent Magnetic Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications V.M.Dao, Dr. G. Coullerez, Dr. L, the main goal was to synthesize and to characterize novel fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles (NPs) involve superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), a fluorescently-labeled polymer

  4. Developing in-spectrometer photochemistry and integration of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    capability on the scanning multi-probe surface analysis system (SMSAS) for photocatalysis and photochemistry studies and 2) a fluorescent microscope with a mercury lamp as...

  5. C-III flow measurements with a coherence imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, T. R.; Allen, S. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Howard, J. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes a coherence imaging spectrometer capable of making spatially resolved CIII flow measurements in the DIII-D lower divertor. The spectrometer exploits a periscope view of the plasma to produce line-of-sight averaged velocity measurements of CIII. From these chord averaged flow measurements, a 2D poloidal cross section of the CIII flow is tomographically reconstructed. Details of the diagnostic setup, acquired data, and data analysis will be presented, along with prospects for future applications.

  6. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and oxyhydroxide minerals. A cryogenic fluorescence spectroscopic study of uranyl carbonate, phosphate, and...

  7. Fluorescence based chemical sensors for corrosion detection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.E. [LeTourneau Univ., Longview, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Agarwala, V.S. [Naval Air Warfare Center Aircraft Div., Patuxent River, MD (United States)

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several fluorescent materials have been identified as possible corrosion sensing coatings. These are either redox or metal ion complex materials. The redox materials are nonfluorescent in the reduced state and become fluorescent upon oxidation. Incorporated into paint coatings, they provide an early warning of corrosive conditions at the metal or alloy surface. The metal ion complex materials only fluoresce when the organic compound complexes with metal ions such as those generated in corrosion reactions. Fluorescent materials have been incorporated into paint coatings and on metal surfaces for the detection of corrosion. Oxine reacts with aluminum oxide on corroded aluminum to give a fluorescence that can be photographed in UV light. Several other materials were found to have good fluorescence but cannot be reversibly oxidized or reduced at the present time. More work will be done with these compounds as well as with Schiff bases to develop new fluorescent chemical sensing materials for smart coating on alloy surfaces.

  8. Fluorescent optical liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A liquid level sensor comprising a transparent waveguide containing fluorescent material that is excited by light of a first wavelength and emits at a second, longer wavelength. The upper end of the waveguide is connected to a light source at the first wavelength through a beveled portion of the waveguide such that the input light is totally internally reflected within the waveguide above an air/liquid interface in a tank but is transmitted into the liquid below this interface. Light is emitted from the fluorescent material only in those portions of the waveguide that are above the air/liquid interface, to be collected at the upper end of the waveguide by a detector that is sensitive only to the second wavelength. As the interface moves down in the tank, the signal strength from the detector will increase.

  9. EXTENDING THE USEFUL LIFE OF OLDER MASS SPECTROMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, S.; Cordaro, J.; Holland, M.; Jones, V.

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal ionization and gas mass spectrometers are widely used across the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex and contractor laboratories. These instruments support critical missions, where high reliability and low measurement uncertainty are essential. A growing number of these mass spectrometers are significantly older than their original design life. The reality is that manufacturers have declared many of the instrument models obsolete, with direct replacement parts and service no longer available. Some of these obsolete models do not have a next generation, commercially available replacement. Today's budget conscious economy demands for the use of creative funds management. Therefore, the ability to refurbish (or upgrade) these valuable analytical tools and extending their useful life is a cost effective option. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has the proven expertise to breathe new life into older mass spectrometers, at a significant cost savings compared to the purchase and installation of new instruments. A twenty-seven year old Finnigan MAT-261{trademark} Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometer (TIMS), located at the SRS F/H Area Production Support Laboratory, has been successfully refurbished. Engineers from the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) fabricated and installed the new electronics. These engineers also provide continued instrument maintenance services. With electronic component drawings being DOE Property, other DOE Complex laboratories have the option to extend the life of their aged Mass Spectrometers.

  10. Method for increasing the dynamic range of mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail; Smith, Richard D.; Udseth, Harold R.

    2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for enhancing the dynamic range of a mass spectrometer by first passing a sample of ions through the mass spectrometer having a quadrupole ion filter, whereupon the intensities of the mass spectrum of the sample are measured. From the mass spectrum, ions within this sample are then identified for subsequent ejection. As further sampling introduces more ions into the mass spectrometer, the appropriate rf voltages are applied to a quadrupole ion filter, thereby selectively ejecting the undesired ions previously identified. In this manner, the desired ions may be collected for longer periods of time in an ion trap, thus allowing better collection and subsequent analysis of the desired ions. The ion trap used for accumulation may be the same ion trap used for mass analysis, in which case the mass analysis is performed directly, or it may be an intermediate trap. In the case where collection is an intermediate trap, the desired ions are accumulated in the intermediate trap, and then transferred to a separate mass analyzer. The present invention finds particular utility where the mass analysis is performed in an ion trap mass spectrometer or a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer.

  11. Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Radiation DetectionFluorescent Nanoparticles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorking OutsideFluorescent Lightingfor

  12. Ultracold-neutron infrastructure for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; K. H. Andersen; P. Courtois; M. Kreuz; S. Mironov; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov; T. Soldner; F. Vezzu; O. Zimmer

    2009-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational spectrometer GRANIT will be set up at the Institut Laue Langevin. It will profit from the high ultracold neutron density produced by a dedicated source. A monochromator made of crystals from graphite intercalated with potassium will provide a neutron beam with 0.89 nm incident on the source. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium, in a vessel made from BeO ceramics with Be windows. A special extraction technique has been tested which feeds the spectrometer only with neutrons with a vertical velocity component v < 20 cm/s, thus keeping the density in the source high. This new source is expected to provide a density of up to 800 1/cm3 for the spectrometer.

  13. Ultracold-neutron infrastructure for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Courtois, P; Kreuz, M; Mironov, S; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Pignol, G; Protasov, K V; Soldner, T; Vezzu, F; Zimmer, O

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The gravitational spectrometer GRANIT will be set up at the Institut Laue Langevin. It will profit from the high ultracold neutron density produced by a dedicated source. A monochromator made of crystals from graphite intercalated with potassium will provide a neutron beam with 8.9 Angstrom incident on the source. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium, in a vessel made from BeO ceramics with Be windows. A special extraction technique has been tested which feeds the spectrometer only with neutrons with a vertical velocity component v = 20 cm/s, thus keeping the density in the source high. This new source is expected to provide a density of up to R = 800 cm-3 for the spectrometer.

  14. Wavelength calibration of the JWST-MIRI medium resolution spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez-Galarza, J R; Hernan-Caballero, A; Azzollini, R; Glasse, A; Kendrew, S; Brandl, B; Lahuis, F

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the wavelength and spectral resolution characterisation of the Integral Field Unit (IFU) Medium Resolution Spectrometer for the Mid-InfraRed Instrument (MIRI), to fly onboard the James Webb Space Telescope in 2014. We use data collected using the Verification Model of the instrument and develop an empirical method to calibrate properties such as wavelength range and resolving power in a portion of the spectrometer's full spectral range (5-28 microns). We test our results against optical models to verify the system requirements and combine them with a study of the fringing pattern in the instrument's detector to provide a more accurate calibration. We show that MIRI's IFU spectrometer will be able to produce spectra with a resolving power above R=2800 in the wavelength range 6.46-7.70 microns, and that the unresolved spectral lines are well fitted by a Gaussian profile.

  15. A mobile Magnetic Sensor Unit for the KATRIN Main Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osipowicz, A; Letnev, J; Marte, P; Mller, A; Spengler, A; Unru, A; 10.1088/1748-0221/7/06/T06002

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino experiment (KATRIN) aims to measure the electron neutrino mass with an unprecedented sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2, using b decay electrons from tritium decay. For the control of magnetic field in the main spectrometer area of the KATRIN experiment a mobile magnetic sensor unit is constructed and tested at the KATRIN main spectrometer site. The unit moves on inner rails of the support structures of the low field shaping coils which are arranged along the the main spectrometer. The unit propagates on a caterpillar drive and contains an electro motor, battery pack, board electronics, 2 triaxial flux gate sensors and 2 inclination senors. During operation all relevant data are stored on board and transmitted to the master station after the docking station is reached.

  16. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

    1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

  17. Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Daniel D. (Livermore, CA); Keville, Robert F. (Valley Springs, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion trap which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10.sup.9 and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10.sup.4 ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products.

  18. The MARTE VNIR Imaging Spectrometer Experiment: Design and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Dunagan, Stephen

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design, operation, and data analysis methods employed on the VNIR imaging spectrometer instrument that was part of the Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). The imaging spectrometer is a hyperspectral scanning pushbroom device sensitive to VNIR wavelengths from 400-1000 nm. During the MARTE project, the spectrometer was deployed to the Rio Tinto region of Spain. We analyzed subsets of 3 cores from Rio Tinto using a new band modeling technique. We found most of the MARTE drill cores to contain predominantly goethite, though spatially coherent areas of hematite were identified in Core 23. We also distinguished non Fe-bearing minerals that were subsequently analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be primarily muscovite. We present drill core maps that include spectra of goethite, hematite, and non Fe-bearing minerals.

  19. Saccharide sensing molecules having enhanced fluorescent properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Cary, Douglas R.; Tran, Joe Anh

    2004-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides formulae for fluorescent compounds that have a number of properties which make them uniquely suited for use in sensors of analytes such as saccharides. The advantageous fluorescent properties include favorable excitation wavelengths, emission wavelengths, fluorescence lifetimes, and photostability. Additional advantageous properties include enhanced aqueous solubility, as well as temperature and pH sensitivity. The compound comprises an aryl or a substituted phenyl botonic acid that acts as a substrate recognition component, a fluorescence switch component, and a fluorophore. Fluorescent compounds are described that are excited at wavelengths greater than 400 nm and emit at wavelengths greater than 450 nm, which is advantageous for optical transmission through skin. The fluorophore is typically selected from transition metal-ligand complexes and thiazine, oxazine, oxazone, or oxazine-one as well as anthracene compounds. The fluorescent compound can be immobilized in a glucose permeable biocompatible polymer matrix that is implantable below the skin.

  20. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Tangyunyong, Paiboon (Albuquerque, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC.

  1. Scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barton, D.L.; Tangyunyong, P.

    1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A scanning fluorescent microthermal imaging (FMI) apparatus and method is disclosed, useful for integrated circuit (IC) failure analysis, that uses a scanned and focused beam from a laser to excite a thin fluorescent film disposed over the surface of the IC. By collecting fluorescent radiation from the film, and performing point-by-point data collection with a single-point photodetector, a thermal map of the IC is formed to measure any localized heating associated with defects in the IC. 1 fig.

  2. Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence in Paleontology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Thomas G.; Falk, Amanda Renee; Pittman, Michael; Sereno, Paul C.; Martin, Larry D.; Burnham, David A.; Gong, Enpu; Xu, Xing; Wang, Yinan

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    . doi: 10.1371/journal.pone. 0009223 PMID: 20169153 8. Warren TS, Gleason S, Bostwick RC, Verbeek ER. Ultraviolet light and fluorescent minerals: under- standing, collecting and displaying fluorescent minerals. GemGuides Book. 1999. 9. Hibbs AR. Confocal... fake and genuine vertebrate fossils. Journal of Paleontological Techniques. 2008; 2:15. Laser-Stimulated Fluorescence in Paleontology PLOS ONE | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0125923 May 27, 2015 22 / 22 ...

  3. Bragg x-ray survey spectrometer for ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varshney, S. K.; Jakhar, S. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Barnsley, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); O'Mullane, M. G. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Several potential impurity ions in the ITER plasmas will lead to loss of confined energy through line and continuum emission. For real time monitoring of impurities, a seven channel Bragg x-ray spectrometer (XRCS survey) is considered. This paper presents design and analysis of the spectrometer, including x-ray tracing by the Shadow-XOP code, sensitivity calculations for reference H-mode plasma and neutronics assessment. The XRCS survey performance analysis shows that the ITER measurement requirements of impurity monitoring in 10 ms integration time at the minimum levels for low-Z to high-Z impurity ions can largely be met.

  4. The NIF x-ray spectrometer calibration campaign at Omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prez, F.; Kemp, G. E.; Barrios, M. A.; Pino, J.; Scott, H.; Ayers, S.; Chen, H.; Emig, J.; Colvin, J. D.; Fournier, K. B., E-mail: fournier2@llnl.gov [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P. O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Regan, S. P.; Bedzyk, M.; Shoup, M. J.; Agliata, A.; Yaakobi, B.; Marshall, F. J.; Hamilton, R. A. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Jaquez, J.; Farrell, M.; Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The calibration campaign of the National Ignition Facility X-ray Spectrometer (NXS) was carried out at the OMEGA laser facility. Spherically symmetric, laser-driven, millimeter-scale x-ray sources of K-shell and L-shell emission from various mid-Z elements were designed for the 218 keV energy range of the NXS. The absolute spectral brightness was measured by two calibrated spectrometers. We compare the measured performance of the target design to radiation hydrodynamics simulations.

  5. Extended Evaluations of the Commercial Spectrometer Systems for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duc T. Vo

    1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safeguards applications require the best of the spectrometer system with excellent resolution, stability, and throughput. Instruments must perform well in all situations and environments. Data communication to the computer should be convenient, fast, and reliable. The software should have all the necessary tools and be easy to use. Portable systems should be small in size, lightweight, and have a long battery life. Nine commercially available spectrometer systems are tested with five different germanium detectors. Considering the performance of the Digital Signal Processors (DSP), digital-based spectroscope y may become the way of future gamma-ray spectroscopy.

  6. Waveguide-integrated photonic crystal spectrometer with camera readout

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meng, Fan; Shiue, Ren-Jye; Li, Luozhou; Nie, Jing; Harris, Nicholas C.; Chen, Edward H.; Schrder, Tim; Englund, Dirk, E-mail: englund@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Wan, Noel [Department of Physics, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Pervez, Nadia [Chromation Partners LLC, 18 Bridge Street Suite 2J, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Kymissis, Ioannis [Chromation Partners LLC, 18 Bridge Street Suite 2J, Brooklyn, New York 11201 (United States); Department of Electrical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States)

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate an infrared spectrometer based on waveguide-coupled nanocavity filters in a planar photonic crystal structure. The input light is coupled into the waveguide, from which spectral components are dropped into the cavities and radiated off-chip for detection on a commercial InGaAs camera. The spectrometer has a footprint of only 60??m by 8??m. The spectral resolution is about 1?nm in the operation bandwidth of 15221545?nm. By substituting the membrane material and structure parameters, this design can be easily extended into the visible regime and developed for a variety of highly efficient, miniature photonic applications.

  7. Development of multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arikawa, Y., E-mail: arikawa-y@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Utsugi, M.; Iwasa, Y.; Sarukura, N.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Murata, T. [Kumamoto University, 2-40-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer for down-scattered neutron (DSN) measurements in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments has been developed. Our compact-size 256-channel lithium-glass-scintillator-based spectrometer has been implemented and tested in ICF experiments with the GEKKO XII laser. We have performed time calibration of the 256-channel analog-to-digital convertor system used for DSN measurements via X-ray pulse signals. We have clearly observed the DD-primary fusion neutron signal and have successfully studied the detector's impulse response. Our detector is soon to be implemented in future ICF experiments.

  8. The Results of Recent MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoid Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A; Virostek, Steve P.; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The MICE spectrometer solenoid magnets will be the first magnets to be installed within the MICE cooling channel. The MICE spectrometer solenoids may be the largest magnets that have been cooled using small two stage coolers. During the previous test of this magnet, the cooler first stage temperatures were too high. The causes of some of the extra first stage heat load has been identified and corrected. The rebuilt magnet had a single stage GM cooler in addition to the three pulse tube coolers. The added cooler reduces the temperature of the top of the HTS leads, the shield and of the first stage of the pulse tube coolers.

  9. A 100-kc modulation system for an EPR microwave spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank Edwin

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE PAGE II-1 Molecular Structure of DPPH 22 II-2 11-3 III-1 IV-1 Hyperfine Splitting in the DPPH EPR Spectrum . 25 Hyperfine Splitting in the Mn EpR Spectrum , . 27 100-kc Field Modulation and Detection System . 4I Typical... spectrometer. Most EPR spectrometers induce transitions at microwave frequencies and split the Zeeman levels with a polarizing field of 3400 gauss' The inherent advantage of operating in this region is that high sensitivities can be realized from small...

  10. LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting...

  11. Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schuresko, Daniel D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

  12. Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    FEMP provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category.

  13. FAA Fluorescent Penetrant Laboratory Inspections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WINDES,CONNOR L.; MOORE,DAVID G.

    2000-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The Federal Aviation Administration Airworthiness Assurance NDI Validation Center currently assesses the capability of various non-destructive inspection (NDI) methods used for analyzing aircraft components. The focus of one such exercise is to evaluate the sensitivity of fluorescent liquid penetrant inspection. A baseline procedure using the water-washable fluorescent penetrant method defines a foundation for comparing the brightness of low cycle fatigue cracks in titanium test panels. The analysis of deviations in the baseline procedure will determine an acceptable range of operation for the steps in the inspection process. The data also gives insight into the depth of each crack and which step(s) of the inspection process most affect penetrant sensitivities. A set of six low cycle fatigue cracks produced in 6.35-mm thick Ti-6Al-4V specimens was used to conduct the experiments to produce sensitivity data. The results will document the consistency of the crack readings and compare previous experiments to find the best parameters for water-washable penetrant.

  14. Modulated optical solid-state spectrometer applications in plasma diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howard, John

    Modulated optical solid-state spectrometer applications in plasma diagnostics John Howard Plasma A new electro-optically modulated optical solid-state MOSS interferometer has been constructed for the measurement of the low order spectral moments of line emission from optically thin radiant media

  15. Integration and commissioning of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alberto Belloni; for the ATLAS collaboration

    2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently waiting to record the first collision data in spring 2009. Its muon spectrometer is designed to achieve a momentum resolution of 10% pT(mu) = 1 TeV/c. The spectrometer consists of a system of three superconducting air-core toroid magnets and is instrumented with three layers of Monitored Drift Tube chambers (Cathode Strip Chambers in the extreme forward region) as precision detectors. Resistive Plate Chambers in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers in the endcap regions provide a fast trigger system. The spectrometer passed important milestones in the last year. The most notable milestone was the installation of the inner layer of endcap muon chambers, which constituted the last big piece of the ATLAS detector to be lowered in the ATLAS cavern. In addition, during the last two years most of the muon detectors were commissioned with cosmic rays while being assembled in the underground experimental cavern. We will report on our experience with the precision and trigger chambers, the optical spectrometer alignment system, the level-1 trigger, and the ATLAS data acquisition system. Results of the global performance of the muon system from data with magnetic field will also be presented.

  16. Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    Photonic Crystal Slot Waveguide Spectrometer for Detection of Methane 1 Funded by Environmental. of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Texas, Austin #12;Motivation No other chip based optical Similar to: Doping of Semiconductor 3 #12;4 Photonic Crystal Bio-Chemical Sensors Loncar et al, Appl. Phys

  17. Analysis of a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, F.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron spectrometer is analyzed. The spectrum is resolved using a time-of-flight method in which the angular position of a rapidly spinning wheel is used to measure time. The measurement method is summarized, the data-analysis problem is formulated, units are discussed, the calibration technique is described, and a spectral transformation is developed.

  18. Portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence analysis in the identification of unknown laboratory hazards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying, E-mail: liu.ying.48r@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Imashuku, Susumu; Sasaki, Nobuharu; Ze, Long; Kawai, Jun [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takano, Shotaro; Sohrin, Yoshiki [Institute for Chemical Research, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Seki, Hiroko; Miyauchi, Hiroya [Kyoto Prefectural Technology Center for Small and Medium Enterprises, Chudojiminami machi, Shimogyo-ku, Kyoto 600-8813 (Japan)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, a portable total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TXRF) spectrometer was used to analyze unknown laboratory hazards that precipitated on exterior surfaces of cooling pipes and fume hood pipes in chemical laboratories. With the aim to examine the accuracy of TXRF analysis for the determination of elemental composition, analytical results were compared with those of wavelength-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, scanning electron microscope and energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry, energy-dispersive x-ray fluorescence spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry, x-ray diffraction spectrometry (XRD), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Detailed comparison of data confirmed that the TXRF method itself was not sufficient to determine all the elements (Z?>?11) contained in the samples. In addition, results suggest that XRD should be combined with XPS in order to accurately determine compound composition. This study demonstrates that at least two analytical methods should be used in order to analyze the composition of unknown real samples.

  19. A method of measuring gold nanoparticle concentrations by x-ray fluorescence for biomedical applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Di; Li Yuhua; Wong, Molly D.; Liu Hong [Center for Bioengineering and School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: This paper reports a technique that enables the quantitative determination of the concentration of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) through the accurate detection of their fluorescence radiation in the diagnostic x-ray spectrum. Methods: Experimentally, x-ray fluorescence spectra of 1.9 and 15 nm GNP solutions are measured using an x-ray spectrometer, individually and within chicken breast tissue samples. An optimal combination of excitation and emission filters is determined to segregate the fluorescence spectra at 66.99 and 68.80 keV from the background scattering. A roadmap method is developed that subtracts the scattered radiation (acquired before the insertion of GNP solutions) from the signal radiation acquired after the GNP solutions are inserted. Results: The methods effectively minimize the background scattering in the spectrum measurements, showing linear relationships between GNP solutions from 0.1% to 10% weight concentration and from 0.1% to 1.0% weight concentration inside a chicken breast tissue sample. Conclusions: The investigation demonstrated the potential of imaging gold nanoparticles quantitatively in vivo for in-tissue studies, but future studies will be needed to investigate the ability to apply this method to clinical applications.

  20. A novel fluorescence detection method for organosilanes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, H.X.; Craw, M.T.; Depew, M.C.; Wan, J.K.S. (Queen's Univ., Kingston, Ontario (Canada))

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quinones such as phenanthraquinone and anthraquinone react with organosilanes giving persistent, strongly fluorescent radicals. The reactions are photochemically initiated, rapid, and facile; detection of concentrations of silanes in the 10{sup {minus}7} M range are readily achieved. The staring materials do not fluorescence making the procedure simple, selective and specific.

  1. Correction to ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography carbon monoxide total columns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laat, Jos de

    Correction to ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography carbon to ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography carbon monoxide total columns, doi:10.1029/2007JD009378. [1] In the paper ``Scanning Imaging Absorption Spec- trometer

  2. Oil Spill Detection and Mapping Along the Gulf of Mexico Coastline Based on Imaging Spectrometer Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Meryem Damla

    2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    based on hyperspectral images acquired along the coastline of the Gulf of Mexico. A number of AVIRIS (Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer) imaging spectrometer images were investigated in this research collected over Bay Jimmy and Wilkinson...

  3. Mass Spectrometer: Time of Flight Secondary Ion (ToF SIMS) -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - 1997 Mass Spectrometer: Time of Flight Secondary Ion (ToF SIMS) - 1997 The Physical Electronics Instruments (PHI) Model T2100 time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometer...

  4. Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mass Spectrometer: FT-ICR, 6T (Ion Surface Collisions) The 6-Tesla High-Field Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer (FT-ICR MS), is a unique...

  5. Upgrade of the neon soft X-ray spectrometer for Alcator C-Mod

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podpaly, Yuri Anatoly

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study plasma rotation, temperature, and impurity density, a Neon Soft X-ray Spectrometer (NeSoXs) was installed on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. This spectrometer used a spherically bent mica crystal as the ...

  6. SU-E-I-67: X-Ray Fluorescence for Energy Response Calibration of a Photon Counting Detector: A Simulation Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cho, H; Ding, H; Ziemer, B; Molloi, S [University of California, Irvine, CA (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of energy calibration and energy response characterization of a photon counting detector using x-ray fluorescence. Methods: A comprehensive Monte Carlo simulation study was done to investigate the influence of various geometric components on the x-ray fluorescence measurement. Different materials, sizes, and detection angles were simulated using Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) Monte Carlo package. Simulations were conducted using 100 kVp tungsten-anode spectra with 2 mm Al filter for a single pixel cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with 3 3 mm2 in detection area. The fluorescence material was placed 300 mm away from both the x-ray source and the detector. For angular dependence measurement, the distance was decreased to 30 mm to reduce the simulation time. Compound materials, containing silver, barium, gadolinium, hafnium, and gold in cylindrical shape, were simulated. The object size varied from 5 to 100 mm in diameter. The angular dependence of fluorescence and scatter were simulated from 20 to 170 with an incremental step of 10 to optimize the fluorescence to scatter ratio. Furthermore, the angular dependence was also experimentally measured using a spectrometer (X-123CdTe, Amptek Inc., MA) to validate the simulation results. Results: The detection angle between 120 to 160 resulted in more optimal x-ray fluorescence to scatter ratio. At a detection angle of 120, the object size did not have a significant effect on the fluorescence to scatter ratio. The experimental results of fluorescence angular dependence are in good agreement with the simulation results. The K? and K? peaks of five materials could be identified. Conclusion: The simulation results show that the x-ray fluorescence procedure has the potential to be used for detector energy calibration and detector response characteristics by using the optimal system geometry.

  7. Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Peplowski, Patrick N.

    2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) has the potential of addressing a wide variety of applications, which require isotopic and/or elemental information about a sample. We have investigated a variety of non-proliferation applications that may be addressed by NRF. From these applications, we have selected two, measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders and material verification in dismantlement, to investigate in more detail. Analytical models have been developed to evaluate these applications, and test measurements have been conducted to validate those models. We found that it is unlikely with current technology to address the requirements for UF6 cylinder enrichment measurements. In contrast, NRF is a very promising approach for material verification for dismantlement.

  8. High-precision CO2 isotopologue spectrometer with a difference-frequency-generation laser source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    High-precision CO2 isotopologue spectrometer with a difference-frequency-generation laser source A precision laser spectrometer for the detection of CO2 isotopes is reported. The spectrometer measures the fundamental absorption signatures of 13 C and 12 C isotopes in CO2 at 4.32 m using a tunable mid-IR laser

  9. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathode Materials. Hard X-ray Fluorescence Measurements of Heteroepitaxial Solid Oxide Fuel Cell...

  10. Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nondestructive Isotopic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    7, (1959) pp. 54. [12] B.J. Quiter, ``Nuclear ResonanceFluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay,'' University ofclandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence,"

  11. Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to Image Core...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to Image Core-Shell Photoswitching Nanoparticles and their Self-Assemblies . Super-Resolution Fluorescence Nanoscopy Applied to...

  12. Glucose sensing molecules having selected fluorescent properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Satcher, Jr., Joe H.; Lane, Stephen M.; Darrow, Christopher B.; Cary, Douglas R.; Tran, Joe Anh

    2004-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An analyte sensing fluorescent molecule that employs intramolecular electron transfer is designed to exhibit selected fluorescent properties in the presence of analytes such as saccharides. The selected fluorescent properties include excitation wavelength, emission wavelength, fluorescence lifetime, quantum yield, photostability, solubility, and temperature or pH sensitivity. The compound comprises an aryl or a substituted phenyl boronic acid that acts as a substrate recognition component, a fluorescence switch component, and a fluorophore. The fluorophore and switch component are selected such that the value of the free energy for electron transfer is less than about 3.0 kcal mol.sup.-1. Fluorescent compounds are described that are excited at wavelengths greater than 400 nm and emit at wavelengths greater than 450 nm, which is advantageous for optical transmission through skin. The fluorophore is typically selected from transition metal-ligand complexes and thiazine, oxazine, oxazone, or oxazine-one as well as anthracene compounds. The fluorescent compound can be immobilized in a glucose permeable biocompatible polymer matrix that is implantable below the skin.

  13. Hiding patterns with daylight fluorescent inks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romain Rossier; Roger D. Hersch; School Of Computer; Communication Sciences; Ecole Polytechnique; Fdrale Lausanne

    We propose a method for hiding patterns within printed images by making use of classical and of two daylight fluorescent magenta and yellow inks. Under the D65 illuminant we establish in the CIELAB space the gamut of a classical cmyk printer and the gamut of the same printer using a combination of classical inks with daylight fluorescent inks. These gamuts show that a significant part of the classical ink gamut can be reproduced by combining classical inks with daylight fluorescent inks. By printing parts of images with a combination of classical and daylight fluorescent inks instead of using classical inks only, we can hide security patterns within printed images. Under normal daylight, we do not see any difference between the parts printed with classical inks only and the parts printed with daylight fluorescent inks and classical inks. By changing the illumination, e.g. by viewing the printed image under a tungsten lamp or under a UV lamp, the daylight fluorescent inks change their colors and reveal the security pattern formed by combinations of classical inks and of daylight fluorescent inks.

  14. Photosystem II fluorescence lifetime imaging in avocado leaves: Contributions of the lutein-epoxide and violaxanthin cycles to fluorescence quenching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    Photosystem II fluorescence lifetime imaging in avocado leaves: Contributions of the lutein a fluorescence were made on leaves of avocado plants to study whether rapidly reversible Dp

  15. Inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for beam plasma research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yushkov, Yu. G., E-mail: yuyushkov@gmail.com; Zolotukhin, D. B.; Tyunkov, A. V. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, 40 Lenin Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Savkin, K. P. [Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, 2/3, Akademichesky Ave., Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper describes the design and principle of operation of an inverse time-of-flight spectrometer for research in the plasma produced by an electron beam in the forevacuum pressure range (520 Pa). In the spectrometer, the deflecting plates as well as the drift tube and the primary ion beam measuring system are at high potential with respect to ground. This provides the possibility to measure the mass-charge constitution of the plasma created by a continuous electron beam with a current of up to 300 mA and electron energy of up to 20 keV at forevacuum pressures in the chamber placed at ground potential. Research results on the mass-charge state of the beam plasma are presented and analyzed.

  16. Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ATLAS Collaboration

    2010-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

  17. Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

  18. Polarization Measurements in Photoproduction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Pasyuk

    2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A significant part of the experimental program in Hall-B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the studies of the structure of baryons. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), availability of circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and recent addition of polarized targets provides remarkable opportunity for single, double and in some cases triple polarization measurements in photoproduction. An overview of the experiments will be presented.

  19. Extracting source parameters from beam monitors on a chopper spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abernathy, Douglas L [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intensity distributions of beam monitors in direct-geometry time-of-flight neutron spectrometers provide important information about the instrument resolution. For short-pulse spallation neutron sources in particular, the asymmetry of the source pulse may be extracted and compared to Monte Carlo source simulations. An explicit formula using a Gaussian-convolved Ikeda-Carpenter distribution is given and compared to data from the ARCS instrument at the Spallation Neutron Source.

  20. Compact Refractive Imaging Spectrometer Designs Utilizing Immersed Gratings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lerner, Scott A. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA); Bixler, Jay V. (Oakland, CA); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Isabella T. (San Jose, CA)

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first means for receiving the light and focusing the light, an immersed diffraction grating that receives the light from the first means and defracts the light, a second means for receiving the light from the immersed diffraction grating and focusing the light, and an image plane that receives the light from the second means

  1. Design and construction of an experimental mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wall, Robert F.

    1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiment Station, the Texas A and M Research Foundation, and the Westinghouse Electric Corporation. The Westinghouse Electric Corporation donated a mass spectrometer and recorder of their manufacture to the col? lege and established a fellowship... in mass spectrometry. This instrument is of the 90? magnetic sector type, and em? ploys automatic magnetic mass scanning and recording. The experience gained with this instrument and the assistance of the Westinghouse fellows has been invaluable...

  2. Low background HPGe spectrometer in investigations of 2? decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rukhadze, Ekaterina [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic)] [Institute of Experimental and Applied Physics, CTU in Prague, Horska 3a/22, 128 00 Prague 2 (Czech Republic); Collaboration: OBELIX Collaboration; TGV Collaboration; SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The low background high sensitive HPGe spectrometer called OBELIX is briefly described. The calibration measurements using {sup 152}Eu, {sup 133}Ba and La{sub 2}O{sub 3} sources in different geometries, the obtained efficiency curves for OBELIX HPGe detector, the results of measurements of radioactivity of the NEMO-3 sources ({sup 100}Mo, {sup 150}Nd) as well as future plans for OBELIX detector (e.g. 0?EC/EC decay of {sup 106}Cd) are presented.

  3. A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

  4. Probing the denatured state ensemble with fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, Roy Willis

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    around the original tryptophan substitutions in RNase Sa. Regardless of the denaturant, ?max for the proteins and model compounds differed very little, 349.3 1.2 nm. However, significant differences were observed in the fluorescence intensity at ?max...

  5. Fluorescence Imaging for Nuclear Arms Control Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feener, Jessica S

    2014-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    treaties. Specifically, this technique uses fluorescence imaging to determine fissile material attributes in verifying, during the dismantlement process, an uncanned nuclear warhead or warhead component without revealing sensitive information. This could...

  6. Fluorescence-based optical glucose sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meledeo, Michael Adam

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous studies have indicated that optical means of blood glucose detection are feasible and provide a minimally invasive alternative to current commercially available modalities. Fluorescence spectroscopy has shown promise in many examples...

  7. Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nondestructive Isotopic Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spent fuel assay using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Annual Meeting of the Institute of Nuclear Materials Management,

  8. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figures.

  9. Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

    1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

  10. Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, S.M.

    1983-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

  11. Test of an LED Monitoring System for the PHOS Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blick, A M; Erin, S V; Kharlov, Yu V; Lobanov, M O; Mikhailov, Yu V; Minaev, N G; Petrov, V A; Sadovsky, S A; Samoylenko, V D; Suzdalev, V I; Senko, V A; Tikhonov, V V

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Preprint submitted to Elsevier Print on 26th January 2000A prototype monitoring system for the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is described in detail. The prototype consists of Control and Master modules. The first one is 8x8 matrix of Light Emitting Diodes coupled with stable generators of current pulses. The system provides an individual control for each of the 64 channels of PHOS prototype based on lead-tungstate crystals. A long term stability of order of 10-3 has been achieved in integral beam tests of the monitoring system and PHOS prototypes.

  12. Continuous time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O.; Feldman, William C.

    2004-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuous time-of-flight mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating an electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the electric field. A source of continuous ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between arrival of a secondary electron out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a first predetermined location and arrival of a sample ion out of said ionized atoms or molecules at a second predetermined location.

  13. Miniature quadrupole mass spectrometer having a cold cathode ionization source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Felter, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved quadrupole mass spectrometer is described. The improvement lies in the substitution of the conventional hot filament electron source with a cold cathode field emitter array which in turn allows operating a small QMS at much high internal pressures then are currently achievable. By eliminating of the hot filament such problems as thermally "cracking" delicate analyte molecules, outgassing a "hot" filament, high power requirements, filament contamination by outgas species, and spurious em fields are avoid all together. In addition, the ability of produce FEAs using well-known and well developed photolithographic techniques, permits building a QMS having multiple redundancies of the ionization source at very low additional cost.

  14. New results from the LASS (Large Aperture Superconducting Solenoid) spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aston, D.; Awaji, N.; Bienz, T.; Bird, F.; D'Amore, J.; Dunwoodie, W.; Endorf, R.; Fujii, K.; Hayashii, H.; Iwata, S.

    1987-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    New results are presented from analyses of several mesonic and baryonic states containing one or more strange quarks. The data are taken from a high statistics (4 events/nb) study of K p interactions at 11 GeV/c carried out in the LASS Spectrometer at SLAC. New information is reported on the underlying K* states and also evidence for selective coupling of K eta to the K*'s; on the strangeonium members of the axial vector nonets in the K anti K channel; and on evidence for an * state.

  15. Light Baryon Spectroscopy using the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Volker Crede

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Baryons are complex systems of confined quarks and gluons and exhibit the characteristic spectra of excited states. The systematics of the baryon excitation spectrum is important to our understanding of the effective degrees of freedom underlying nucleon matter. High-energy electrons and photons are a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing a microscope for examining the nucleon and the strong nuclear force. Current experimental efforts with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory utilize highly-polarized frozen-spin targets in combination with polarized photon beams. The status of the recent double-polarization experiments and some preliminary results are discussed in this contribution.

  16. Cryostat for Ultra-low-energy Threshold Germanium Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aalseth, Craig E.; Bonicalzi, Ricco; Fast, James E.; Hossbach, Todd W.; Orrell, John L.; Overman, Cory T.; VanDevender, Brent A.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract: This paper presents progress on the development of a cryostat intended to improve upon the low-energy threshold (below 0.5 keV) of p-type point contact germanium gamma-ray spectrometers. Ultra-low energy thresholds are important in the detection of low-energy nuclear recoils, an event class relevant to both dark matter direct detection and measurement of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. The cryostat design, including a thermal and electrical-field model, is presented. A prototype cryostat has been assembled and data acquired to evaluate its vacuum and thermal performance.

  17. Cryostat for Ultra-low-energy Threshold Germanium Spectrometers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craig E. Aalseth; Ricco M. Bonicalzi; James E. Fast; Todd W. Hossbach; John L. Orrell; Cory T. Overman; Brent A. Vandevender

    2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents progress on the development of a cryostat intended to improve upon the low-energy threshold (below 0.5 keV) of p-type point contact germanium gamma-ray spectrometers. Ultra-low energy thresholds are important in the detection of low-energy nuclear recoils, an event class relevant to both dark matter direct detection and measurement of coherent neutrino-nucleus scattering. The cryostat design, including a thermal and electrical-field model, is given. A prototype cryostat has been assembled and data acquired to evaluate its vacuum and thermal performance.

  18. Report on First Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Stave, Sean; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    On Feb. 17 and 18 2011, six items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer. After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials, with the exception of silver. We observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours, except for 198Au which has a half-life of 2.7 d.

  19. Material characterization using a hyperspectral infrared imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aimonetti, W D; Bixler, J V; Roberts, R S

    1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform spectroscopy has found application in many areas including chemometrics, biomedical and biochemical studies, and atmospheric chemistry. This paper describes an investigation into the application of the LLNL Hyperspectral Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (HIRIS) to the non-destructive evaluation of man-made and natural materials. We begin by describing the HIRIS system and the objects studied in the investigation. Next, we describe the technique used to collect the hyperspec- tral imagery, and discuss the processing required to transform the data into usable form. We then describe a technique to analyze the data, and provide some preliminary results.

  20. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  1. Linear electric field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); Feldman, William C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A linear electric field ion mass spectrometer having an evacuated enclosure with means for generating a linear electric field located in the evacuated enclosure and means for injecting a sample material into the linear electric field. A source of pulsed ionizing radiation injects ionizing radiation into the linear electric field to ionize atoms or molecules of the sample material, and timing means determine the time elapsed between ionization of atoms or molecules and arrival of an ion out of the ionized atoms or molecules at a predetermined position.

  2. FTIR spectrometer with solid-state drive system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An FTIR spectrometer (10) and method using a solid-state drive system with thermally responsive members (27) that are subject to expansion upon heating and to contraction upon cooling. Such members (27) are assembled in the device (10) so as to move an angled, reflective surface (22) a small distance. The sample light beam (13) is received at a detector (24) along with a reference light beam (13) and there it is combined into a resulting signal. This allows the "interference" between the two beams to occur for spectral analysis by a processor (29).

  3. Positron lifetime spectrometer using a DC positron beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Moxom, Jeremy

    2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    An entrance grid is positioned in the incident beam path of a DC beam positron lifetime spectrometer. The electrical potential difference between the sample and the entrance grid provides simultaneous acceleration of both the primary positrons and the secondary electrons. The result is a reduction in the time spread induced by the energy distribution of the secondary electrons. In addition, the sample, sample holder, entrance grid, and entrance face of the multichannel plate electron detector assembly are made parallel to each other, and are arranged at a tilt angle to the axis of the positron beam to effectively separate the path of the secondary electrons from the path of the incident positrons.

  4. Lessons Learned for the MICE Coupling Solenoid from the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A.; Wang, Li; Pan, Heng; Wu, Hong; Guo, Xinglong; Li, S. Y.; Zheng, S. X.; Virostek, Steve P.; DeMello, Allen J.; Li, Derun; Trillaud, Frederick; Zisman, Michael S.

    2010-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Tests of the spectrometer solenoids have taught us some important lessons. The spectrometer magnet lessons learned fall into two broad categories that involve the two stages of the coolers that are used to cool the magnets. On the first spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the connection of the cooler 2nd-stage to the magnet cold mass. On the first test of the second spectrometer magnet, the problems were centered on the cooler 1st-stage temperature and its effect on the operation of the HTS leads. The second time the second spectrometer magnet was tested; the cooling to the cold mass was still not adequate. The cryogenic designs of the MICE and MuCOOL coupling magnets are quite different, but the lessons learned from the tests of the spectrometer magnets have affected the design of the coupling magnets.

  5. Supercontinuum Stimulated Emission Depletion Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesoine, Michael; Bose, Sayantan; Petrich, Jacob; Smith, Emily

    2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercontinuum (SC) stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime imaging is demonstrated by using time-correlated single-photon counting (TCSPC) detection. The spatial resolution of the developed STED instrument was measured by imaging monodispersed 40-nm fluorescent beads and then determining their fwhm, and was 36 9 and 40 10 nm in the X and Y coordinates, respectively. The same beads measured by confocal microscopy were 450 50 and 430 30 nm, which is larger than the diffraction limit of light due to underfilling the microscope objective. Underfilling the objective and time gating the signal were necessary to achieve the stated STED spatial resolution. The same fluorescence lifetime (2.0 0.1 ns) was measured for the fluorescent beads by using confocal or STED lifetime imaging. The instrument has been applied to study Alexa Fluor 594-phalloidin labeled F-actin-rich projections with dimensions smaller than the diffraction limit of light in cultured cells. Fluorescence lifetimes of the actin-rich projections range from 2.2 to 2.9 ns as measured by STED lifetime imaging.

  6. A solenoidal electron spectrometer for a precision measurement of the neutron $?$-asymmetry with ultracold neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Plaster; R. Carr; B. W. Filippone; D. Harrison; J. Hsiao; T. M. Ito; J. Liu; J. W. Martin; B. Tipton; J. Yuan

    2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an electron spectrometer designed for a precision measurement of the neutron $\\beta$-asymmetry with spin-polarized ultracold neutrons. The spectrometer consists of a 1.0-Tesla solenoidal field with two identical multiwire proportional chamber and plastic scintillator electron detector packages situated within 0.6-Tesla field-expansion regions. Select results from performance studies of the spectrometer with calibration sources are reported.

  7. PRISMA Spectrometer EVR Spectra And Collection Efficiencies In Gas-Filled Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dragosavac, D. R.; Ujic, P. N.; Subotic, K. M. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences VINCA, PO Box 522, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Scarlassara, F. [Universita di Padova, Padova (Italy); INFN Sezione di Padova, Padova (Italy)

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to study nuclear fusion reaction, the heavy-ion magnetic spectrometer PRISMA installed at INFN Legnaro is planned to be modified to work in Gas-Filled Mode. For that purpose, the possible response of the spectrometer will be examined in Rutherford scattering experiments which simulate the fusion reaction products. predictions for the evaporation residue (EVR) position spectra and collection efficiencies, as well as the respective spectrometer set ups, as determined using the algorithm of ANAMARI code, are presented.

  8. High gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    OHara, David

    2009-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    During contract # DE-FG02-ER83545, Parallax Research, Inc. developed a High gain, Fast Scan Broad Spectrum Parallel beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for use on Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM). This new spectrometer allows very fast high resolution elemental analysis of samples in an electron microscope. By comparison to previous WDS spectrometers, it can change from one energy position to another very quickly and has an extended range compared to some similar products.

  9. Fluorescence energy transfer enhancement in aluminum nanoapertures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Torres, Juan; Moparthi, Satish Babu; Grigoriev, Victor; Wenger, Jrome

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Zero-mode waveguides (ZMWs) are confining light into attoliter volumes, enabling single molecule fluorescence experiments at physiological micromolar concentrations. Among the fluorescence spectroscopy techniques that can be enhanced by ZMWs, F\\"{o}rster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is one of the most widely used in life sciences. Combining zero-mode waveguides with FRET provides new opportunities to investigate biochemical structures or follow interaction dynamics at micromolar concentration with single molecule resolution. However, prior to any quantitative FRET analysis on biological samples, it is crucial to establish first the influence of the ZMW on the FRET process. Here, we quantify the FRET rates and efficiencies between individual donor-acceptor fluorophore pairs diffusing in aluminum zero-mode waveguides. Aluminum ZMWs are important structures thanks to their commercial availability and the large literature describing their use for single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy. We also compare the ...

  10. Light ion transfer reactions with the HELIOS spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Back, B. B. [Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Collaboration: HELIOS Collaboration

    2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Light-ion induced transfer and inelastic scattering reactions on stable or long-lived targets have been used extensively to study the structure of nuclei near the line of {beta}-stability, and much of the detailed information on the single-particle structure of nuclei has been derived from such studies. Recently, however, a substantial expansion of the range of isotopes, for which this nuclear structure information can be obtained, has presented itself by using radioactive beams in inverse kinematics reactions. Such beams are now available at a number of facilities around the world, including the in-flight production method and CARIBU facility at ATLAS. The HELIOS spectrometer, which has been used since August 2008 at ATLAS, circumvents many of the problems associated with inverse kinematics. In this talk I will discuss the principle of the spectrometer as well as some of main physics results that have been obtained to date in nuclei ranging from {sup 13}B to {sup 137}Xe using both stable and radioactive beams.

  11. High resolution, high rate X-ray spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goulding, Frederick S. (Lafayette, CA); Landis, Donald A. (Pinole, CA)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pulse processing system (10) for use in an X-ray spectrometer in which a ain channel pulse shaper (12) and a fast channel pulse shaper (13) each produce a substantially symmetrical triangular pulse (f, p) for each event detected by the spectrometer, with the pulse width of the pulses being substantially independent of the magnitude of the detected event and with the pulse width of the fast pulses (p) being substantially shorter than the pulse width of the main channel pulses (f). A pile-up rejector circuit (19) allows output pulses to be generated, with amplitudes linearly related to the magnitude of the detected events, whenever the peak of a main channel pulse (f) is not affected by a preceding or succeeding main channel pulse, while inhibiting output pulses wherein peak magnitudes of main channel pulses are affected by adjacent pulses. The substantially symmetrical triangular main channel pulses (f) are generated by the weighted addition (27-31) of successive RC integrations (24, 25, 26) of an RC differentiated step wave (23). The substantially symmetrical triangular fast channel pulses (p) are generated by the RC integration ( 43) of a bipolar pulse (o) in which the amplitude of the second half is 1/e that of the first half, with the RC time constant of integration being equal to one-half the width of the bipolar pulse.

  12. Performance of a Moderating Neutron Spectrometer That Uses Scintillating Fibers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bliss, Mary; Craig, Richard A.; Barnett, Debra S.; Anderson, Dale N.; Smart, John E.; Knopf, Michael A.; Hartley, Stacey A.

    2001-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bonner sphere is the canonical example of instruments that provide a measure of neutron spectra by using moderating and absorbing materials together with thermal-neutron detectors. For such spectrometers, the instrument response reflects a statistical average of the energy spectrum. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has developed neutron-sensitive cerium-activated scintillating fibers composed of lithium-silicate glass. These fibers present an enabling technology for efficient neutron spectroscopy. A moderating spectrometer was built as a testbed for materials identification. Based on the results of Monte Carlo experiments, six fiber layers are separated by polyethylene layers whose thickness has been chosen to maximize neutron spectral information. The completed, self-contained instrument, including electronics and data logging computer has a mass less than 35 kg, slightly more than half of which is polyethylene. Measurements have been performed by this instrument with various sources representing hard and soft neutron spectra. Because this instrument is a technology testbed, the data are recorded as pulse-height spectra. Results and future directions are presented.

  13. The response of a Bonner Sphere spectrometer to charged hadrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agosteo, S; Fass, A; Silari, M; 10.1093/rpd/nch187

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bonner sphere spectrometers (BSSs) are employed in neutron spectrometry and dosimetry since many years. Recent developments have seen the addition to a conventional BSS of one or more detectors (moderator plus thermal neutron counter) specifically designed to improve the overall response of the spectrometer to neutrons above 10 MeV. These additional detectors employ a shell of material with a high mass number (such as lead) within the polyethylene moderator, in order to slow down high-energy neutrons via (n, xn) reactions. A BSS can be used to measure neutron spectra both outside accelerator shielding and from an unshielded target. Measurements were recently performed at CERN of the neutron yield and spectral fluence at various angles from unshielded, semithick copper, silver and lead targets, bombarded by a mixed proton/pion beam with 40 GeV per c momentum. These experiments have provided evidence that under certain circumstances, the use of lead-enriched moderators may present a problem: these detectors wer...

  14. Ultrabright fluorescent OLEDS using triplet sinks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yifan; Forrest, Stephen R; Thompson, Mark

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer further comprises an organic host compound, an organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature, and an organic dopant compound. The triplet energy of the dopant compound is lower than the triplet energy of the host compound. The dopant compound does not strongly absorb the fluorescent emission of the emitting compound.

  15. Design, Syntheses and Applications of Fluorescent Dyes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Liangxing

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    .11. Normalized UV absorbance and fluorescence of 1h and the labeled streptavidin 1s in 0.1 M lithium phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 ..................... 54 3.1. Spectra of BODIPYs 9 in CH 2 Cl 2 ........................................................... 65...) ............................................................ 94 4.8. Dependence of electronic spectra of 15h on pH ..................................... 96 4.9. UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence spectra of rosamine 25 and 25 labeled avidin in 0.1 M phosphate buffer, pH 7...

  16. CODED SPECTROSCOPY FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ABSTRACT CODED SPECTROSCOPY FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA by Scott Thomas Mc FOR ETHANOL DETECTION IN DIFFUSE, FLUORESCENT MEDIA by Scott Thomas McCain Department of Electrical

  17. Modelling of a Fluorescent Lamp Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, op gezag van de Rector Magnificus, prof.dr. R.A. van Santen, voor een TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITEIT EINDHOVEN Hartgers, Albertus Modelling of a Fluorescent Lamp Plasma / by Albertus Hartgers. - Eindhoven : Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, 2003. - Proefschrift. ISBN 90-386-1665-1 NUR 924

  18. Oil Classification with Fluorescence Spectroscopy Engineering Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universitt

    detected by these channels. The investigation used three methods to examine crude oil, heavy oil, sludge1 Oil Classification with Fluorescence Spectroscopy Engineering Physics Master of Engineering and classification of oil spills on water surfaces. It is an overview of the laser remote sensor technique

  19. DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caldwell, Karin D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chu, Tun-Jen (Salt Lake City, UT); Pitt, William G. (Orem, UT)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

  20. Text-Alternative Version: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Below is the text-alternative version of the "LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps" webcast, held June 20, 2011.

  1. Confocal, FLIM & Multi-Photon Fluorescence Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    supports quantitative fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) for investigating molecular interaction dynamics in living cells. The system also includes differential...

  2. Dynamic multiplexed analysis method using ion mobility spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer in which the effectiveness and efficiency of the multiplexed method is optimized by automatically adjusting rates of passage of analyte materials through an IMS drift tube during operation of the system. This automatic adjustment is performed by the IMS instrument itself after determining the appropriate levels of adjustment according to the method of the present invention. In one example, the adjustment of the rates of passage for these materials is determined by quantifying the total number of analyte molecules delivered to the ion trap in a preselected period of time, comparing this number to the charge capacity of the ion trap, selecting a gate opening sequence; and implementing the selected gate opening sequence to obtain a preselected rate of analytes within said IMS drift tube.

  3. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  4. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Norman W. (Sparks, NV); Goulding, Frederick S. (Lafayette, CA); Asztalos, Stephen J. (Oakland, CA)

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  5. THE ABSOLUTE CALIBRATION OF THE EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Landi, Enrico [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the absolute calibration of the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode by comparing EIS full-disk mosaics with irradiance observations from the EUV Variability Experiment on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We also use extended observations of the quiet corona above the limb combined with a simple differential emission measure model to establish new effective area curves that incorporate information from the most recent atomic physics calculations. We find that changes to the EIS instrument sensitivity are a complex function of both time and wavelength. We find that the sensitivity is decaying exponentially with time and that the decay constants vary with wavelength. The EIS short wavelength channel shows significantly longer decay times than the long wavelength channel.

  6. Linear electronic field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent atomic ions and emits secondary electrons; an electrode which produces secondary electrons upon contact with a constituent atomic ion in second drift region; a stop detector comprising a first ion detection region and a second ion detection region; and a timing means connected to the pulsed ionization source, to the first ion detection region, and to the second ion detection region.

  7. Two wide-angle imaging neutral-atom spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McComas, D.J.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Two Wide-angle Imaging Neutral-atom Spectrometers (TWINS) mission provides a new capability for stereoscopically imaging the magnetosphere. By imaging the charge exchange neutral atoms over a broad energy range (1 < E , {approximately} 100 keV) using two identical instruments on two widely-spaced high-altitude, high-inclination spacecraft, TWINS will enable the 3-dimensional visualization and the resolution of large scale structures and dynamics within the magnetosphere for the first time. These observations will provide a leap ahead in the understanding of the global aspects of the terrestrial magnetosphere and directly address a number of critical issues in the ``Sun-Earth Connections`` science theme of the NASA Office of Space Science.

  8. Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

  9. Report on Second Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stave, Sean C.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary On August 18 and 19 2011, five items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS). After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials. As during the first activation run, we observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation of the samples was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours to days, except for 60Co which has a half-life of 5.3 y.

  10. Simulation-guided optimization of small-angle analyzer geometry in the neutron backscattering spectrometer SPHERES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuttke, Joachim; Zamponi, Michaela [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ, Lichtenbergstrae 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Forschungszentrum Jlich GmbH, Jlich Centre for Neutron Science at MLZ, Lichtenbergstrae 1, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The resolution of neutron backscattering spectrometers deteriorates at small scattering angles where analyzers deviate from exact backscattering. By reducing the azimuth angle range of the analyzers, the resolution can be improved with little loss of peak intensity. Measurements at the spectrometer SPHERES are in excellent agreement with simulations, which proves the dominance of geometric effects.

  11. Echelle grating multi-order imaging spectrometer utilizing a catadioptric lens

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chrisp, Michael P; Bowers, Joel M

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A cryogenically cooled imaging spectrometer that includes a spectrometer housing having a first side and a second side opposite the first side. An entrance slit is on the first side of the spectrometer housing and directs light to a cross-disperser grating. An echelle immersions grating and a catadioptric lens are positioned in the housing to receive the light. A cryogenically cooled detector is located in the housing on the second side of the spectrometer housing. Light from the entrance slit is directed to the cross-disperser grating. The light is directed from the cross-disperser grating to the echelle immersions grating. The light is directed from the echelle immersions grating to the cryogenically cooled detector on the second side of the spectrometer housing.

  12. Measurement and model assessment of fluorescence lifetime sensing in multiply scattering media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuwana, Eddy

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    fluorescence sensor and the reliability of fluorescence lifetime measurement verify the prospect of this technology for implantable purposes....

  13. Proposal for the award of thin-walled precision aluminium alloy tubes for the Atlas Muon Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Proposal for the award of thin-walled precision aluminium alloy tubes for the Atlas Muon Spectrometer

  14. Upgrades of the high resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, B.; Wang, F.; Fu, J.; Li, Y.; Wan, B. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); Shi, Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui (China); National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, MS37-B332, Princeton, New Jersey 08543-0451 (United States); Lee, S. G. [National Fusion Research Institute, 52 Eoeun-Dong, Yusung-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two imaging x-ray crystal spectrometers, the so-called 'poloidal' and 'tangential' spectrometers, were recently implemented on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) to provide spatially and temporally resolved impurity ion temperature (T{sub i}), electron temperature (T{sub e}) and rotation velocity profiles. They are derived from Doppler width of W line for Ti, the intensity ratio of Li-like satellites to W line for Te, and Doppler shift of W line for rotation. Each spectrometer originally consisted of a spherically curved crystal and a two-dimensional multi-wire proportional counter (MWPC) detector. Both spectrometers have now been upgraded. The layout of the tangential spectrometer was modified, since it had to be moved to a different port, and the spectrometer was equipped with two high count rate Pilatus detectors (Model 100 K) to overcome the count rate limitation of the MWPC and to improve its time resolution. The poloidal spectrometer was equipped with two spherically bent crystals to record the spectra of He-like and H-like argon simultaneously and side by side on the original MWPC. These upgrades are described, and new results from the latest EAST experimental campaign are presented.

  15. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

    1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

  16. DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

  17. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Salwen, C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prototype gamma-ray spectrometers utilizing xenon gas at high pressure, suitable for applications in the nuclear safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation communities, have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These spectrometers function as ambient-temperature ionization chambers detecting gamma rays with good efficiency in the energy range 50 keV - 2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. They are capable of prolonged, low-power operation without a requirement for cryogenic fluids or other cooling mechanisms, and with the addition of small quantities of {sup 3}He gas, can function simultaneously as efficient thermal neutron detectors.

  18. A high-resolution imaging x-ray crystal spectrometer for high energy density plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Hui, E-mail: chen33@llnl.gov, E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Magee, E.; Nagel, S. R.; Park, J.; Schneider, M. B.; Stone, G.; Williams, G. J.; Beiersdorfer, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550-9234 (United States); Bitter, M., E-mail: chen33@llnl.gov, E-mail: bitter@pppl.gov; Hill, K. W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Kerr, S. [Department of Applied Science, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2R3 (Canada)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Adapting a concept developed for magnetic confinement fusion experiments, an imaging crystal spectrometer has been designed and tested for HED plasmas. The instrument uses a spherically bent quartz [211] crystal with radius of curvature of 490.8 mm. The instrument was tested at the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory by irradiating titanium slabs with laser intensities of 10{sup 19}10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. He-like and Li-like Ti lines were recorded, from which the spectrometer performance was evaluated. This spectrometer provides very high spectral resolving power (E/dE > 7000) while acquiring a one-dimensional image of the source.

  19. A source of ultra-cold neutrons for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt-Wellenburg, P; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Plonka, C; Soldner, T; Vezzu, F; Zimmer, O

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the status of the development of a dedicated high density ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source dedicated to the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons to UCN in superfluid helium. Tests have shown that UCN produced inside the liquid can be extracted into vacuum. Furthermore a dedicated neutron selection channel was tested to maintain high initial density and extract only neutrons with a vertical velocity component 20 cm/s for the spectrometer. This new source would have a phase-space density of 0.18 cm-3(m/s)-3 for the spectrometer.

  20. A source of ultra-cold neutrons for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; P. Geltenbort; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; C. Plonka; T. Soldner; F. Vezzu; O. Zimmer

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the status of the development of a dedicated high density ultra-cold neutron (UCN) source dedicated to the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons to UCN in superfluid helium. Tests have shown that UCN produced inside the liquid can be extracted into vacuum. Furthermore a dedicated neutron selection channel was tested to maintain high initial density and extract only neutrons with a vertical velocity component 20 cm/s for the spectrometer. This new source would have a phase-space density of 0.18 cm-3(m/s)-3 for the spectrometer.

  1. X-ray crystal spectrometer upgrade for ITER-like wall experiments at JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shumack, A. E., E-mail: amy.shumack@ccfe.ac.uk [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); FOM Institute DIFFER, P.O. Box 1207, NL-3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Rzadkiewicz, J. [National Centre for Nuclear Research, Andrzeja So?tana 7, 05-400 Otwock (Poland); Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Karpinski, L. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Jakubowska, K. [Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Hery 23, 01-497 Warsaw (Poland); Universit Bordeaux, CNRS, CEA, CELIA, UMR 5107, F-33405 Talence (France); Scholz, M. [Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, ul. Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakw (Poland); Byszuk, A.; Cieszewski, R.; Kasprowicz, G.; Pozniak, K.; Wojenski, A.; Zabolotny, W. [Institute of Electronic Systems, Warsaw University of Technology, 00-665 Warsaw (Poland); Dominik, W. [Faculty of Physics, Institute of Experimental Physics, Warsaw University, 00-681 Warsaw (Poland); Conway, N. J.; Dalley, S.; Tyrrell, S.; Zastrow, K.-D. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Figueiredo, J. [EFDA-CSU, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Associao EURATOM/IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fuso Nuclear, Instituto Superior Tcnico, Av Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); and others

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The high resolution X-Ray crystal spectrometer at the JET tokamak has been upgraded with the main goal of measuring the tungsten impurity concentration. This is important for understanding impurity accumulation in the plasma after installation of the JET ITER-like wall (main chamber: Be, divertor: W). This contribution provides details of the upgraded spectrometer with a focus on the aspects important for spectral analysis and plasma parameter calculation. In particular, we describe the determination of the spectrometer sensitivity: important for impurity concentration determination.

  2. High-Sensitivity Delayed-Coincidence Spectrometer to Search for Short-Lived Nuclear States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morozov, V A; Norseev, Yu V; Sereeter, Z; Zlokazov, V B

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-sensitivity four-dimensional triple-coincidence spectrometer with two detectors is developed on the basis of an autocorrelation single-crystal scintillation time 4{\\pi} spectrometer and a semiconductor HPGe detector. The delayed-coincidence spectrometer is designed for searching for isomeric nano- and microsecond states in short-lived nuclei and for their related gamma-rays. Half-lives of short-lived states are measured in the range from 4 ns to 4 {\\mu}s. The sufficient activity of the monoisotopic source for the investigations does not exceed 0.01 {\\mu}Ci.

  3. ASIC for SDD-Based X-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G De Geronimo; P Rehak; K Ackley; G Carini; W Chen; J Fried; J Keister; S Li; Z Li; et al.

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for high-resolution x-ray spectrometers (XRS). The ASIC reads out signals from pixelated silicon drift detectors (SDDs). The pixel does not have an integrated field effect transistor (FET); rather, readout is accomplished by wire-bonding the anodes to the inputs of the ASIC. The ASIC dissipates 32 mW, and offers 16 channels of low-noise charge amplification, high-order shaping with baseline stabilization, discrimination, a novel pile-up rejector, and peak detection with an analog memory. The readout is sparse and based on custom low-power tristatable low-voltage differential signaling (LPT-LVDS). A unit of 64 SDD pixels, read out by four ASICs, covers an area of 12.8 cm{sup 2} and dissipates with the sensor biased about 15 mW/cm{sup 2}. As a tile-based system, the 64-pixel units cover a large detection area. Our preliminary measurements at -44 C show a FWHM of 145 eV at the 5.9 keV peak of a {sup 55}Fe source, and less than 80 eV on a test-pulse line at 200 eV.

  4. In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Jorabchi, Kaveh (Arlington, VA); Kahen, Kaveh (Kleinburg, CA)

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

  5. Multichannel CdZnTe Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. P. Doty; C. L. Lingren; B. A. Apotovsky; J. Brunsch; J. F. Butler; T. Collins; R. L. Conwell; S. Friesenhahn; J. Gormley; B. Pi; S. Zhao (Digirad Corp., San Diego, CA); F. L. Augustine, Augustine Engineering, Encinitas, CA; B. A. Bennet; E. Cross; R. B. James (Sandia Nat'l. Labs.)

    1998-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A 3 cm{sup 3} multichannel gamma spectrometer for DOE applications is under development by Digirad Corporation. The device is based on a position sensitive detector packaged in a compact multi-chip module (MCM) with integrated readout circuitry. The modular, multichannel design will enable identification and quantitative analysis of radionuclides in extended sources, or sources containing low levels of activity. The MCM approach has the advantages that the modules are designed for imaging applications, and the sensitivity can be arbitrarily increased by increasing the number of pixels, i.e. adding modules to the instrument. For a high sensitivity probe, the outputs for each pixel can be corrected for gain and offset variations, and summed digitally. Single pixel results obtained with discrete low noise readout indicate energy resolution of 3 keV can be approached with currently available CdZnTe. The energy resolution demonstrated to date with MCMs for 511 keV gamma rays is 10 keV.

  6. Addition and recombination reactions of unsaturated radicals using a novel laser kinetics spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismail, Huzeifa

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the construction of a novel, low-noise laser kinetics spectrometer. A quasi-CW (picosecond pulse), tunable Ti:Sapphire laser is used to detect various transient species in laser flash photolysis ...

  7. What Caused the Lead burn-out in Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Michael A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MICE Note 324 What Caused the Lead burn-out in SpectrometerThe magnet failed because a lead to coil M2 failed before itof the magnet when the lead failure occurred. The lead that

  8. Flat Quartz-Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Nuclear Forensics Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodsell, Alison

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    structure. The higher energy background radiation was blocked from reaching the detector using a customized collimator and shielding system. A flat quartz-crystal x-ray spectrometer system was designed specifically to fit the constraints and requirements...

  9. Calibration of a gated flat field spectrometer as a function of x-ray intensity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiong, Gang; Yang, Guohong; Li, Hang; Zhang, Jiyan, E-mail: zhangjiyanzjy@sina.com; Zhao, Yang; Hu, Zhimin; Wei, Minxi; Qing, Bo; Yang, Jiamin; Liu, Shenye; Jiang, Shaoen [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)] [Research Center of Laser Fusion, China Academy of Engineering Physics, P. O. Box 919-986, Mianyang 621900 (China)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an experimental determination of the response of a gated flat-field spectrometer at the Shenguang-II laser facility. X-rays were emitted from a target that was heated by laser beams and then were divided into different intensities with a step aluminum filter and collected by a spectrometer. The transmission of the filter was calibrated using the Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The response characteristics of the spectrometer were determined by comparing the counts recorded by the spectrometer with the relative intensities of the x-rays transmitted through the step aluminum filter. The response characteristics were used to correct the transmission from two shots of an opacity experiment using the same samples. The transmissions from the two shots are consistent with corrections, but discrepant without corrections.

  10. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Friedrich, Stephan (San Jose, CA); , Niedermayr, Thomas R. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

    2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  11. Progress on the Modeling and Modification of the MICE Superconducting Spectrometer Solenoids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virostek, S.P.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    updated calculations confirmed the measured heat load of ~6of these calculations was the direct heat load into the coldcalculations was carried out in order to characterize the spectrometer solenoid heat loads

  12. Characterization of AP-MALDI and ESI for a differential mobility spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agrawal, Priya

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following thesis entails the construction, testing, modification, and analysis of two systems that couple sample ion introduction methods with a Differential Mobility Spectrometer (DMS). The sample ionization methods ...

  13. The new very small angle neutron scattering spectrometer at Laboratoire Leon Brillouin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sylvain Desert; Vincent Thevenot; Julian Oberdisse; Annie Brulet

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and characteristics of the new very small angle neutron scattering spectrometer under construction at the Laboratoire Leon Brillouin is described. Its goal is to extend the range of scattering vectors magnitudes towards 2x10{-4} /A. The unique feature of this new spectrometer is a high resolution two dimensional image plate detector sensitive to neutrons. The wavelength selection is achieved by a double reflection supermirror monochromator and the collimator uses a novel multibeam design.

  14. Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Biedermann, C; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Graf, A; Gu, M F; Hill, K W; Barnsley, R

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The parameters of the ITER core plasmas will be measured using the Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (CIXS), a high-resolution crystal spectrometer focusing on the L-shell spectra of highly ionized tungsten atoms. In order to correctly infer the plasma properties accurate atomic data are required. Here, some aspects of the underlying physics are discussed using experimental data and theoretical predictions from modeling.

  15. Upgrade of the PNNL TEPC and Multisphere Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scherpelz, Robert I.; Conrady, Matthew M.

    2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has used two types of instruments, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and the multisphere spectrometer for characterizing neutron radiation fields in support of neutron dosimetry at the Hanford site. The US Department of Energy recently issued new requirements for radiation protection standards in 10 CFR 835 which affect the way that neutron dose equivalent rates are evaluated. In response to the new requirements, PNNL has upgraded the analyses used in conjunction with the TEPC and multisphere. The analysis software for the TEPC was modified for this effort, and a new analysis code was selected for the multisphere. These new analysis techniques were implemented and tested with measurement data that had been collected in previous measurements. In order to test the effectiveness of the changes, measurements were taken in PNNLs Low Scatter Room using 252Cf sources in both unmoderated and D2O-moderated configurations that generate well-characterized neutron fields. The instruments were also used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in their Neutron Free-in-Air calibration room, also using neutron sources that generate well-characterized neutron fields. The results of the software modifications and the measurements are documented in this report. The TEPC measurements performed at PNNL agreed well with accepted dose equivalent rates using the traditional analysis, agreeing with the accepted value to within 13% for both unmoderated and moderated 252Cf sources. When the new analysis was applied to the TEPC measurement data, the results were high compared to the new accepted value. A similar pattern was seen for TEPC measurements at LANL. Using the traditional analysis method, results for all neutron sources showed good agreement with accepted values, nearly always less than 10%. For the new method of analysis, however, the TEPC responded with higher dose equivalent rates than accepted, by as much as 25%. The reason for the overresponse is that there is very little attenuation of the neutrons by tissue, so it cannot match the effect of attenuation by 1 cm of tissue called for in the new standards. This could be corrected with a modified instrument with a thicker wall, or by analytical means that would need to be developed. The multisphere spectrometer performed reasonably well both at PNNL and at LANL. It could produce a neutron spectrum that was similar to the accepted spectrum, and total flux values were usually within 15% of the accepted values. Dose equivalent rates were usually within 18% of the accepted values. The average energies, however, were usually lower than the accepted values. The performance of this instrument could be much better than seen in this study. If PNNL were to add some moderating spheres to its measurement set and calculate a new set of instrument response functions, performance could be improved. The multisphere could then be a more useful instrument for assessing the dose equivalent rate in the workplace.

  16. Preliminary results from the lunar prospector alpha particle spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, S. L. (Stefanie L.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lunar Prospector Alpha Particle Spectrometer (LP APS) builds on Apollo heritage and maps the distribution of outgassing sites on the Moon. The APS searches for lunar surface gas release events and maps their distribution by detecting alpha particles produced by the decay of gaseous radon-222 (5.5 MeV, 3.8 day half-life) and solid polonium-210 (5.3 MeV, 138 day half-life, but remains on the surface with a 21 year half-life as lead-210), which are radioactive daughters from the decay of uranium-238. Radon is in such small quantities that it is not released directly from the lunar interior, rather it is entrained in a stream of gases and serves as a tracer for such gases. Once released, the radon spreads out by 'bouncing' across the surface on ballistic trajectories in a random-walk process. The 3.8 day half-life of radon-222 allows the gas to spread out by several 100 km before it decays and allows the APS to detect gas release events up to a few days after they occur. The long residence time (10s of years) of the lead-210 precursor to the polonium-210 allows the mapping of gas vents which have been active over the last approximately 50 years. Because radon and polonium are daughter products of the decay of uranium, the background level of alpha particle activity is a function of the lunar crustal uranium distribution. Using radioactive radon and polonium as tracers, the Apollo 15 and 16 Command Module orbital alpha particle experiments obtained evidence for the release of gases at several sites beneath the orbit tracks, especially over the Aristarchus Plateau and Mare Fecunditatis [1]. Aristarchus crater had previously been identified by ground-based observers as the site of transient optical events [2]. The Apollo 17 surface mass spectrometer showed that argon-40 is released from the lunar interior every few months, apparently in concert with some of the shallow moonquakes that are believed to be of tectonic origin [3]. The latter tectonic events could be associated with very young scarps identified in the lunar highlands [4] and are believed to indicate continued global contraction. Such quakes could open fissures leading to the release of gases that are trapped below the surface. The detection of radon-222 outgassing events at the margins of Fecunditatis basin was surprising because the observed surface distribution of uranium and thorium do not extend sufficiently eastward to cover Fecunditatis. If the Apollo detections prove sound, then those alpha particle emissions indicate substantial subsurface concentrations of uranium-238 within Fecunditatis. A primary goal of the APS was to map gas-release events, thus allowing both an appraisal of the current level of tectonic activity on the Moon and providing a probe of subsurface uranium concentrations.

  17. Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

  18. Absolute Calibration of the Auger Fluorescence Detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Bauleo; J. Brack; L. Garrard; J. Harton; R. Knapik; R. Meyhandan; A. C. Rovero; A. Tamashiro; D. Warner; for the Auger Collaboration

    2005-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Absolute calibration of the Pierre Auger Observatory fluorescence detectors uses a light source at the telescope aperture. The technique accounts for the ombined effects of all detector components in a single measurement. The calibrated 2.5 m diameter light source fills the aperture, providing uniform illumination to each pixel. The known flux from the light source and the response of the acquisition system give the required calibration for each pixel. In the lab, light source uniformity is studied using CCD images and the intensity is measured relative to NIST-calibrated photodiodes. Overall uncertainties are presently 12%, and are dominated by systematics.

  19. Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf Flash2010-45.pdfFlash2011-43and Statement ofStrikeFluorescent

  20. Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorking OutsideFluorescent

  1. Fluorescent Pigments for High-Performance Cool Roofing and Facades...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    dark-colored pigments for cool metal roof and faade coatings that incorporate near-infrared fluorescence and reflectance to improve energy performance. Image: PPG Industries 2...

  2. Satellite-detected fluorescence reveals global physiology of ocean phytoplankton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2000. Jassby, A. D. and Platt, T. : Mathematical formulationTopliss, B. J. and Platt, T. : Passive fluorescence andrates (Topliss and Platt, 1986; Kiefer et al. , 1989) and

  3. atomic fluorescence spectrometry: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S. Chapman 2010-12-08 9 Quantification of trace metals in deciduous tooth enamel using energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry. Open Access Theses and Dissertations...

  4. Fluorescent Multiblock ?-Conjugated Polymer Nanoparticles for In Vivo Tumor Targeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Eilaf

    Highly fluorescent multiblock conjugated polymer nanoparticles with folic acid surface ligands are highly effective for bioimaging and in vivo tumor targeting. The targeted nanoparticles were preferentially localized in ...

  5. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  6. aequorea green fluorescent: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants. Jim Haseloff Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: light, and an accessory green fluorescent protein (GFP), which accepts energy from aequorin and reImaging green...

  7. Modeling of highly loaded fluorescent lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lister, G.G.; Lawler, J.E.; Curry, J.J.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical modeling of the positive column of fluorescent lamps under conditions of high current density are of current interest, particularly in view of recent developments in electrodeless lamps. Current models tend to overestimate radiation output, and consequently the maintenance electric field in these discharges. Under highly loaded conditions, mercury-rare gas fluorescent lamps exhibit strong mercury depletion on axis (cataphoresis), and an understanding of resonance radiation transport under these conditions is therefore vital to the development of models with a predictive capability. The authors have explored the effect of radial cataphoresis on resonance radiation trapping for situations in which the radiation transport is dominated by foreign gas broadening, Doppler broadening, or resonance collisional broadening of the spectral line. Several different production rates per unit volume of resonance (excited) atoms have also been studied. It is advantageous in many cases to parameterize the trapped decay rate in terms of the total number of ground state atoms in the positive column independent of their radial distribution. The results of this work have been included in a numerical model of the positive column and the predicted influence on discharge parameters will be presented for cases of interest to highly loaded lamps.

  8. AugEX: AUGER ELECTRON AND X-RAY SPECTROMETER ON CHANDRAYAAN-2 ROVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bapat, Bhas

    for determining elemental composition which have a space heritage X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Particle-induced X-ray fluorescence (XRF) Expected Advantage: cover low Z elements with higher sensitivity than XRF or PIXE. ACHARYA-ray absorption or charged particle bombardment X-ray emission induced by X-ray absorption: XRF X-ray emission

  9. Data for Users of Handheld Ion Mobility Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keith A. Daum; Sandra L. Fox

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical detection technology end-user surveys conducted by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in 2005 and 2007 indicated that first responders believed manufacturers claims for instruments sometimes were not supported in field applications, and instruments sometimes did not meet their actual needs. Based on these findings, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) asked INL to conduct a similar survey for handheld ion mobility spectrometers (IMS), which are used by a broad community of first responders as well as for other applications. To better access this broad community, the INL used the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC), Public Safety Technology Center (PSTC) to set up an online framework to gather information from users of handheld IMS units. This framework (Survey Monkey) was then used to perform an online Internet survey, augmented by e-mail prompts, to get information from first responders and personnel from various agencies about their direct experience with handheld IMS units. Overall, 478 individuals responded to the survey. Of these, 174 respondents actually owned a handheld IMS. Performance and satisfaction data from these 174 respondents are captured in this report. The survey identified the following observations: The most common IMS unit used by respondents was the Advanced Portable Detector (APD 2000), followed by ChemRae, Sabre 4000, Sabre 2000, Draeger Multi IMS, Chemical Agent Monitor-2, Chemical Agent Monitor, Vapor Tracer, and Vapor Tracer 2. The primary owners were HazMat teams (20%), fire services (14%), local police (12%), and sheriffs departments (9%). IMS units are seldom used as part of an integrated system for detecting and identifying chemicals but instead are used independently. Respondents are generally confused about the capabilities of their IMS unit. This is probably a result of lack of training. Respondents who had no training or fewer than 8 hours were not satisfied with the overall operation of the handheld IMS unit. IMS units were used for detecting a range of analytes. The most common use was for detection of hazardous chemicals, followed by detection of explosives, illicit drugs, chemical warfare, nerve agents, and radiation. One IMS unit had dual capability as a radiation detector. Respondents who did not own an IMS listed prohibitive cost of equipment as the main factor for not having one. Respondents who were highly satisfied with the overall operation of the handheld IMS obtained the IMS through a direct purchase. In comparison, the respondents who were not satisfied had obtained the handheld IMS through a DHS grant.

  10. A QUANTUM BAND MODEL OF THE {nu}{sub 3} FUNDAMENTAL OF METHANOL (CH{sub 3}OH) AND ITS APPLICATION TO FLUORESCENCE SPECTRA OF COMETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villanueva, G. L.; DiSanti, M. A.; Mumma, M. J. [Solar System Exploration Division, Mailstop 690.3, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Xu, L.-H., E-mail: Geronimo.Villanueva@nasa.gov [Department of Physics and Centre for Laser, Atomic, and Molecular Sciences, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, New Brunswick E2L 4L5 (Canada)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) radiates efficiently at infrared wavelengths, dominating the C-H stretching region in comets, yet inadequate quantum-mechanical models have imposed limits on the practical use of its emission spectra. Accordingly, we constructed a new line-by-line model for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental band of methanol at 2844 cm{sup -1} (3.52 {mu}m) and applied it to interpret cometary fluorescence spectra. The new model permits accurate synthesis of line-by-line spectra for a wide range of rotational temperatures, ranging from 10 K to more than 400 K. We validated the model by comparing simulations of CH{sub 3}OH fluorescent emission with measured spectra of three comets (C/2001 A2 LINEAR, C/2004 Q2 Machholz and 8P/Tuttle) acquired with high-resolution infrared spectrometers at high-altitude sites. The new model accurately describes the complex emission spectrum of the {nu}{sub 3} band, providing distinct rotational temperatures and production rates at greatly improved confidence levels compared with results derived from earlier fluorescence models. The new model reconciles production rates measured at infrared and radio wavelengths in C/2001 A2 (LINEAR). Methanol can now be quantified with unprecedented precision and accuracy in astrophysical sources through high-dispersion spectroscopy at infrared wavelengths.

  11. Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scholand, Michael

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

  12. Development and Application of Fluorescent SDF-1 Derivatives Ryo Masuda,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takada, Shoji

    #12;1 Development and Application of Fluorescent SDF-1 Derivatives Ryo Masuda, Shinya Oishi of Medicine, 2-1 Seiryocho, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8575, Japan. #12;2 Abstract Background: SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling, structure-activity relationship analyses of fluorescent SDF-1 derivatives were carried out. Results: Several

  13. Improved ``Optical Highlighter'' Probes Derived from Discosoma Red Fluorescent Protein

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, Jonathan

    , Minneapolis, Minnesota ABSTRACT The tetrameric red fluorescent protein, DsRed, undergoes a rapid red to green-emitting species of DsRed and an enhancement of emission from the ``immature'' green species, likely caused by dequenching of fluorescence resonance energy transfer occurring within the protein tetramer. Here, we have

  14. Gregorio Weber International Prize in Biological Fluorescence 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, David J.

    Gregorio Weber International Prize in Biological Fluorescence 2008 The Gregorio Weber International Prize in Biological Fluorescence (Weber Prize) is awarded for research related to a doctoral (or finalists. Weber Prizes were awarded in 2002 and 2005. The third Weber Prize will be awarded in 2008

  15. Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernal, Javier

    - mentation techniques are less accurate than k-means clustering with multiple clusters. Segmentation accuracy fluorescence microscopy; k-means cluster; image segmentation; cell edge; bivariate simi- larity index NUMEROUSComparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells Alden A. Dima,1

  16. Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy at high concentrations using gold bowtie nanoantennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Shanhui

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy at high concentrations using gold bowtie nanoantennas Anika A to extremely low concentrations. Plasmonic gold bowtie nanoantennas enhance a single molecule's fluorescence relative to a large background of unenhanced molecules, and here we show that bowties can extend FCS

  17. Teal fluorescent proteins: Characterization of a reversibly photoswitchable variant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Robert E.

    libraries of variants. mTFP1 has proven to be a particularly useful new member of the FP `toolbox green fluorescent protein (GFP) in 1961 when he was isolating aequorin, a calcium improved variants of GFP, including the variant known as enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), were

  18. Application of Quantitative Fluorescence and Absorption-Edge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Application of Quantitative Fluorescence and Absorption-Edge Computed Microtomography to Image, Chicago, Illinois 60637 This paper shows that synchrotron-based fluorescence and absorption-edge computed, which had a well-correlated metal coating. Absorption-edge CMT showed the three-dimensional distribution

  19. SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUTHERLAND,J.C.

    2002-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

  20. Radioiodine detector based on laser induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDonald, Jimmie R. (Upper Marlboro, MD); Baronavski, Andrew P. (Alexandria, VA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention involves the measurement of the concentration of the radioisotope .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the presence of a gas. The invention uses a laser to excite a sample of the .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a sample gas chamber and a reference sample of a known concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in a reference gas chamber. The .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample and reference gas chamber each gives off fluorescence emissions which are received by photomultipliers which provide signals to a detector. The detector uses a ratioing technique to determine the concentration of .sup.129 I.sub.2 in the sample gas chamber.

  1. Fluorescence in nonlocal dissipative periodic structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Intravaia; Kurt Busch

    2015-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach for the description of fluorescence from optically active material embedded in layered periodic structures. Based on an exact electromagnetic Green's tensor analysis, we determine the radiative properties of emitters such as the local photonic density of states, Lamb shifts, line widths etc. for a finite or infinite sequence of thin alternating plasmonic and dielectric layers. In the effective medium limit, these systems may exhibit hyperbolic dispersion relations so that the large wave-vector characteristics of all constituents and processes become relevant. These include the finite thickness of the layers, the nonlocal properties of the constituent metals, and local-field corrections associated with an emitter's dielectric environment. In particular, we show that the corresponding effects are non-additive and lead to considerable modifications of an emitter's luminescence properties.

  2. A solenoidal electron spectrometer for a precision measurement of the neutron $\\beta$-asymmetry with ultracold neutrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaster, B; Filippone, B W; Harrison, D; Hsiao, J; Ito, T M; Liu, J; Martin, J W; Tipton, B; Yuan, J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an electron spectrometer designed for a precision measurement of the neutron $\\beta$-asymmetry with spin-polarized ultracold neutrons. The spectrometer consists of a 1.0-Tesla solenoidal field with two identical multiwire proportional chamber and plastic scintillator electron detector packages situated within 0.6-Tesla field-expansion regions. Select results from performance studies of the spectrometer with calibration sources are reported.

  3. A simplified spectrometer based on a fast digital oscilloscope for the measurement of high energy $?$-rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Markochev; N. V. Eremin

    2014-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A simplified digital spectrometer for the study of $\\gamma$-rays with energies up to $\\sim100$ MeV is presented and tested. The spectrometer is only consisted of a fast digital oscilloscope and three scintillation detectors which can work in single or in coincidence modes: two BGO-detectors comprising $\\varnothing\\,7.62\\times7.62$ cm BGO-crystalls and one plastic detector which includes an organic polystyrene-based scintillator. The basic properties of the spectrometer (energy resolution, time resolution, $\\gamma$-rays detection efficiency) were studied exhaustively also using a Geant4-based Monte-Carlo simulation. Several numerical algorithms for processing of waveforms in offline mode were proposed and tested to perform digital timing, pulse area measurement and processing of pile-up events without rejection. As a result, the spectrometer demonstrated $\\sim10\\%$ better energy resolution than was obtained by a common 10-bit CAMAC ADC with the same detectors. And the developed algorithm based on the pulse shape analysis for processing of pile-up events showed high efficiency under severe conditions (the portion of pile-ups contained $\\sim30\\%$). The measured maximum counting rate of the spectrometer was $1.8\\times10^5$ waveforms/sec.

  4. Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Chris I.

    Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium labeled for shipment to a recycling plant for mercury, glass and aluminum recovery. The beneficial re can be recycled infinitely without losing its purity or strength. While the primary end product

  5. Application of the BINS superheated drop detector spectrometer to the {sup 9}Be(p,xn) neutron energy spectrum determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Fulvio, A.; Ciolini, R.; Mirzajani, N.; Romei, C.; D'Errico, F. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Nucleare e della Produzione, Universita di Pisa, Pisa (Italy); Bedogni, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Esposito, J.; Zafiropoulos, D.; Colautti, P. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, Legnaro (Padova) (Italy)

    2013-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In the framework of TRASCO-BNCT project, a Bubble Interactive Neutron Spectrometer (BINS) device was applied to the characterization of the angle-and energy-differential neutron spectra generated by the {sup 9}Be(p,xn)reaction. The BINS spectrometer uses two superheated emulsion detectors, sequentially operated at different temperatures and thus provides a series of six sharp threshold responses, covering the 0.1-10 MeV neutron energy range. Spectrum unfolding of the data was performed by means of MAXED code. The obtained angle, energy-differential spectra were compared with those measured with a Bonner sphere spectrometer, a silicon telescope spectrometer and literature data.

  6. Comparison of improved Aura Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) CO2 with HIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulawik, S.S.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometer stare ozone profiles with ARC-IONS sondespriori of trace gas profile estimates from the TroposphericHIPPO and SGP aircraft profile measurements S. S. Kulawik ,

  7. X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analysis of Obsidian Artifacts from Shoofly Ruin, Central Arizona

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shackley, M. Steven

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-RAY FLUORESCENCE (XRF) ANALYSIS OF OBSIDIAN ARTIFACTS FROM62:426-437. SOUTHWEST XRF PAPER Table 1. X-ray fluorescence

  8. Air Fluorescence Relevant for Cosmic-Ray Detection - Summary of the 5th Fluorescence Workshop, El Escorial 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernando Arqueros; Joerg R. Hoerandel; Bianca Keilhauer

    2008-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    High-energy cosmic rays with energies exceeding $10^{17}$ eV are frequently observed by measurements of the fluorescence light induced by air showers. A major contribution to the systematic uncertainties of the absolute energy scale of such experiments is the insufficient knowledge of the fluorescence light yield of electrons in air. The aim of the 5th Fluorescence Workshop was to bring together experimental and theoretical expertise to discuss the latest progress on the investigations of the fluorescence light yield. The results of the workshop will be reviewed as well as the present status of knowledge in this field. Emphasis is given to the fluorescence light yield important for air shower observations and its dependence on atmospheric parameters, like pressure, temperature, and humidity. The effects of the latest results on the light observed from air showers will be discussed.

  9. Quantum states of neutrons in the gravitational and centrifugal potentials in a new GRANIT spectrometer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We will discuss the scientific program to be studied in a new gravitational spectrometer GRANIT in a broad context of quantum states (quantum behaviour) of ultracold neutrons (UCN) in gravitational [1] and centrifugal [2] potentials, as well as applications of these phenomena/spectrometer to various domains of physics, ranging from studies of fundamental short-range interactions and symmetries to neutron quantum optics and reflectometry using UCN. All these topics, as well as related instrumental and methodical developments have been discussed during dedicated GRANIT-2010 Workshop [3]. The GRANIT spectrometer has been recently installed at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France [4] and could become operational in near future. 1. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2002), Nature 415, 297. 2. V.V. Nesvizhevsky et al (2010), Nature Physics 6, 114. 3. GRANIT-2010, Les Houches, 14-19 february 2010. 4. M. Kreuz et al (2009), NIM 611, 326.

  10. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; et al

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al. , Opt. Commun.133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ~10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burnmorecan be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to 15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~25-40 km/s.less

  11. Development and characterization of a multiple-coincidence ion-momentum imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laksman, J.; Colin, D.; Mnsson, E. P.; Sorensen, S. L.; Gisselbrecht, M. [Department of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)] [Department of Synchrotron Radiation Research, Lund University, Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance of a high-resolution momentum-imaging spectrometer for ions which is optimized for experiments using synchrotron radiation is presented. High collection efficiency is achieved by a focusing electrostatic lens; a long drift tube improves mass resolution and a position-sensitive detector enables measurement of the transverse momentum of ions. The optimisation of the lens for particle momentum measurement at the highest resolution is described. We discuss the overall performance of the spectrometer and present examples demonstrating the momentum resolution for both kinetics and for angular measurements in molecular fragmentation for carbon monoxide and fullerenes. Examples are presented that confirm that complete space-time focussing is possible for a two-field three-dimensional imaging spectrometer.

  12. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al. , Opt. Commun.133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ?10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ?50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to 15?20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ?25?40 km/s.

  13. Characterization of a new modular decay total absorption gamma-ray spectrometer (DTAS) for FAIR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montaner Piza, A.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Guadilla, V.; Marin, E.; Rice, S.; Rubio, B. [Instituto de Fisica Corpuscular, CSIC-Univ. de Valencia, Apdo. Correos 22085, E-46071 Valencia (Spain)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Beta-decay studies are one of the main goals of the DEcay SPECtroscopy experiment (DESPEC) to be installed at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). DESPEC aims at the study of nuclear structure of exotic nuclei. A new modular Decay Total Absorption gamma-ray Spectrometer (DTAS) is being built at IFIC and is specially adapted to studies at fragmentation facilities such as the Super Fragment Separator (Super-FRS) at FAIR. The designed spectrometer is composed of 16 identical NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals. This work focuses on the characterization of these independent modules, as an initial step for the characterization of the full spectrometer. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to understand the detector response.

  14. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylstra, A. B., E-mail: zylstra@mit.edu; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Sguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ?10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ?50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to 15?20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ?25?40 km/s.

  15. A firmware-defined digital direct-sampling NMR spectrometer for condensed matter physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pikulski, M., E-mail: marekp@ethz.ch; Shiroka, T.; Ott, H.-R.; Mesot, J. [Laboratorium fr Festkrperphysik, ETH Hnggerberg, CH-8093 Zrich, Switzerland and Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the design and implementation of a new digital, broad-band nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometer suitable for probing condensed matter. The spectrometer uses direct sampling in both transmission and reception. It relies on a single, commercially-available signal processing device with a user-accessible field-programmable gate array (FPGA). Its functions are defined exclusively by the FPGA firmware and the application software. Besides allowing for fast replication, flexibility, and extensibility, our software-based solution preserves the option to reuse the components for other projects. The device operates up to 400?MHz without, and up to 800?MHz with undersampling, respectively. Digital down-conversion with 10?MHz passband is provided on the receiver side. The system supports high repetition rates and has virtually no intrinsic dead time. We describe briefly how the spectrometer integrates into the experimental setup and present test data which demonstrates that its performance is competitive with that of conventional designs.

  16. Laser sampling system for an inductively-coupled atomic emission spectrometer. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser sampling system was attached to a Perkin Elmer Optima 3000 inductively-coupled plasma, atomic emission spectrometer that was already installed and operating in the Chemistry and Geochemistry Department at the Colorado School of Mines. The use of the spectrometer has been highly successful. Graduate students and faculty from at least four different departments across the CSM campus have used the instrument. The final report to NSF is appended to this final report. Appendices are included which summarize several projects utilizing this instrument: acquisition of an inductively-coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometer for the geochemistry program; hydrogen damage susceptibility assessment for high strength steel weldments through advanced hydrogen content analysis, 1996 and 1997 annual reports; and methods for determination of hydrogen distribution in high strength steel welds.

  17. A compact neutron spectrometer for characterizing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McCluskey, M.; Mastrosimone, D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact spectrometer for measurements of the primary deuterium-tritium neutron spectrum has been designed and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility [T. Boehly et al. , Opt. Commun.133, 495 (1997)]. This instrument uses the recoil spectrometry technique, where neutrons produced in an implosion elastically scatter protons in a plastic foil, which are subsequently detected by a proton spectrometer. This diagnostic is currently capable of measuring the yield to ~10% accuracy, and mean neutron energy to ~50 keV precision. As these compact spectrometers can be readily placed at several locations around an implosion, effects of residual fuel bulk flows during burn can be measured. Future improvements to reduce the neutron energy uncertainty to 15-20 keV are discussed, which will enable measurements of fuel velocities to an accuracy of ~25-40 km/s.

  18. Electron pair emission detected by time-of-flight spectrometers: Recent progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huth, Michael; Schumann, Frank O. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Chiang, Cheng-Tien; Trtzschler, Andreas; Kirschner, Jrgen [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany); Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-Universitt Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Widdra, Wolf [Institute of Physics, Martin-Luther-Universitt Halle-Wittenberg, Von-Danckelmann-Platz 3, D-06120 Halle (Saale) (Germany); Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle (Germany)

    2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results for electron coincidence spectroscopy using two time-of-flight (ToF) spectrometers. Excited by electron impact, the energy and momentum distribution of electron pairs emitted from the Cu(111) surface are resolved and a spectral feature related to the Shockley surface state is identified. By combining the two ToF spectrometers with a high-order harmonic generation light source, we demonstrate double photoemission spectroscopy in the laboratory that required synchrotron radiation in the past. Utilizing this setup, we report results for (?,2e) on NiO(001) on Ag(001) excited with light at 30?eV photon energy.

  19. Foil cycling technique for the VESUVIO spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schooneveld, E. M.; Mayers, J.; Rhodes, N. J.; Pietropaolo, A.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.; Gorini, G.; Perelli-Cippo, E.; Tardocchi, M. [ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche-Istituto Nazionale per la Fisica della Materia, Universita degli Studi di Roma Tor Vergata, Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita degli Studi di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica 'G. Occhialini', Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 2, I-20126 Milan (Italy) and CNR-INFM, Universita degli Studi di Milano Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 2, I-20126 Milan (Italy)

    2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports a novel experimental technique, namely, the foil cycling technique, developed on the VESUVIO spectrometer (ISIS spallation source) operating in the resonance detector configuration. It is shown that with a proper use of two foils of the same neutron absorbing material it is possible, in a double energy analysis process, to narrow the width of the instrumental resolution of a spectrometer operating in the resonance detector configuration and to achieve an effective subtraction of the neutron and gamma backgrounds. Preliminary experimental results, obtained from deep inelastic neutron scattering measurements on lead, zirconium hydride, and deuterium chloride samples, are presented.

  20. Next-Generation Germanium Spectrometer Background Reduction Techniques at 2 MeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodzinski, Ronald L.

    2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Majorana project, a next-generation 76Ge neutrinoless double-beta decay experiment being undertaken by a large international collaboration, has the goal of measuring the neutrinoless double-beta decay rate by observing monochromatic events at 2039 keV in 500 kg of isotopically enriched 76Ge gamma-ray spectrometers. In order to achieve the desired sensitivity limit, the background in the 2037-2041 keV region must be reduced to <1 event per year in the entire germanium array. The effects of various background reduction techniques, and the combination thereof, to produce a huge 76Ge spectrometer array with virtually zero background are discussed.

  1. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S. [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  2. Ultrahigh resolution multicolor colocalization of single fluorescent probes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Shimon; Michalet, Xavier; Lacoste, Thilo D.

    2005-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical ruler based on ultrahigh-resolution colocalization of single fluorescent probes is described. Two unique families of fluorophores are used, namely energy-transfer fluorescent beads and semiconductor nanocrystal (NC) quantum dots, that can be excited by a single laser wavelength but emit at different wavelengths. A novel multicolor sample-scanning confocal microscope was constructed which allows one to image each fluorescent light emitter, free of chromatic aberrations, by scanning the sample with nanometer scale steps using a piezo-scanner. The resulting spots are accurately localized by fitting them to the known shape of the excitation point-spread-function of the microscope.

  3. Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

    1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope. 4 figs.

  4. Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. Environmental Impact Review Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. Drill-down Review These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

  5. A method to measure the resonance transitions between the gravitationally bound quantum states of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyerovich, Alex

    of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer M. Kreuz a , V.V. Nesvizhevsky a,?, P. Schmidt-Wellenburg a , T bound quantum states of neutrons in the GRANIT spectrometer. The purpose of GRANIT is to improve quantum states, the transition probability will sharply increase. The GRANIT experiment is motivated

  6. FY08 Annual Report for Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Caggiano, Joseph A.

    2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    FY08 annual report for project the "Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Imaging" project. Reviews accomplishments of last 3 years, including U-235 signature search, comparison of different photon sources, and examination of NRF measurements using monochromatic photon source.

  7. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

    2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  8. LIGHT-INDUCED CHANGES IN THE FLUORESCENCE YIELD OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    given during the transient slightly hastens and heightens P. Methyl viologen, an exogenous system I fluorescence intensity is the redox state of Q, the electron acceptor in the system It reaction center (9). Fig

  9. THE HISTORY AND TECHNICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH FREQUENCY FLUORESCENT LIGHTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, John H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec. 1953. "Hi-Volt-Cycle Lighting ~ Launched i n a Hi-Wide2, F e b r u a r y , 19 53. "Lighting Your Plant with Highg h Frequency Fluorescent Lighting John H. Campbell December

  10. Large core polymer optical backplanes for fluorescence detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kevin Shao-Kwan

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescence based sensors are used for determining environmental parameters such as dissolved oxygen or pH in biological systems without disturbing a biological system's equilibrium. Recently, there has been a drive to ...

  11. REDUCING INCIDENTAL FLUORESCENCE IN LIVE CELL IMAGING A. Altinok 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    , the technique is based on staining bio molecules selectively with proteins carrying fluorescence dyes of known. For instance, length measurements in Fig.1 would lack accuracy since the ends of the objects are blurry within

  12. SHORT COMMUNICATION The Chlorophyll Fluorescence Ratio F735/F700

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gitelson, Anatoly

    sylvatica L.), elm (Ulmus minor 1988; Dahn et al., 1992). In green leaves, about 90% of Miller), and wild of reabsorption of the Chl fluorescence was quan- titatively estimated (Dahn et al., 1992; Gunther et al

  13. Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Youvan, Dougalas C.; Silva, Christopher M.; Bylina, Edward J.; Coleman, William J.; Dilworth, Michael R.; Yang, Mary M.

    2003-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

  14. Exploring the mechanome with optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brau, Ricardo R. (Ricardo Rafael), 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence into an instrument capable of making combined, coincident measurements adds an observable dimension that allows for the examination of the localized ...

  15. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Cabantous, Stephanie (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  16. An Enhanced Monomeric Blue Fluorescent Protein with the High Chemical Stability of the Chromophore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verkhusha, Vladislav V.

    An Enhanced Monomeric Blue Fluorescent Protein with the High Chemical Stability of the Chromophore Commonly used monomeric blue fluorescent proteins suffer from moderate brightness. The brightest of them, m transition from a blue fluorescent state with absorbance at 401 nm to a non-fluorescent state with absorbance

  17. Progress on the Fabrication and Testing of the MICE Spectrometer Solenoids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Virostek, Steve; Green, M.A.; Li, Derun; Zisman, Michael

    2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) is an international collaboration that will demonstrate ionization cooling in a section of a realistic cooling channel using a muon beam at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK. At each end of the cooling channel a spectrometer solenoid magnet consisting of five superconducting coils will provide a 4 tesla uniform field region. The scintillating fiber tracker within the magnet bore will measure the muon beam emittance as it enters and exits the cooling channel. The 400 mm diameter warm bore, 3 meter long magnets incorporate a cold mass consisting of two coil sections wound on a single aluminum mandrel: a three-coil spectrometer magnet and a two-coil section that matches the solenoid uniform field into the MICE cooling channel. The fabrication of the first of two spectrometer solenoids has been completed, and preliminary testing of the magnet is nearly complete. The key design features of the spectrometer solenoid magnets are presented along with a summary of the progress on the training and testing of the first magnet.

  18. An In-Situ Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Detecting Gaseous VOCs in Unsaturated Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, R. Jacob

    An In-Situ Ion Mobility Spectrometer Sensor System for Detecting Gaseous VOCs in Unsaturated Soils and will be ultimately equipped with water content, temperature, and pressure sensors. The proposed system is designed knowledge, an in-situ IMS for detection of subsurface gaseous VOCs has not been previously developed. VOCs

  19. A personal computer-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer Constantin Job

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Michael F.

    A personal computer-based nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer Constantin Job Arizona Research of Arizona,, lkson, Arizona 85721 (Received 24 May 1994; accepted for publication 27 July 1994) Nuclear engineering, agriculture, geology, archaeology, and others have the possibility of utilizing magnetic

  20. Chemometric calibration of infrared spectrometers: selection and validation of variables by non-linear models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verleysen, Michel

    regression (PCR) and partial least squares regression (PLSR). Then, we will propose to incorporate non-linearChemometric calibration of infrared spectrometers: selection and validation of variables by non-linear (step by step) for the selection of spectral variables, using linear regression or neural networks

  1. Field-Deployable, High-Resolution, Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    as a powerful tool to characterize aerosols. A number of laser ablation instruments have been developed and trigger a laser ablation time-of-flight mass spectrometer, which determines the composition of the sized surface rather than by ablation lasers.8-10 At present, the most commonly used instrument of this type

  2. Measurements with the high flux lead slowing-down spectrometer at LANL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    slow down by scattering interactions with the lead and thus enable measurements of neutron.40.Sc Keywords: Lead-slowing-down spectrometer; Lithium; Alpha; Cross section; Neutron reactions 1.elsevier.com/locate/nimb Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 261 (2007) 953955 NIM BBeam Interactions

  3. The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) on the New

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stern, S. Alan

    The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) on the New Horizons and ~2.5 W. Keywords: New Horizons, PEPSSI, Pluto, Energetic particle instrument #12;Abbreviations 1PPS of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309, USA 6 443-778-5435, 443-778-0386, Ralph.mcnutt@jhuapl.edu The Pluto Energetic

  4. airborne gamma-ray spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    gamma-ray spectrometer First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Digital Logarithmic Airborne...

  5. anti-compton gamma-ray spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    anti-compton gamma-ray spectrometer First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Monte Carlo...

  6. Results for the response function determination of the Compact Neutron Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gagnon-Moisan; M. Reginatto; A. Zimbal

    2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Neutron Spectrometer (CNS) is a Joint European Torus (JET) Enhancement Project, designed for fusion diagnostics in different plasma scenarios. The CNS is based on a liquid scintillator (BC501A) which allows good discrimination between neutron and gamma radiation. Neutron spectrometry with a BC501A spectrometer requires the use of a reliable, fully characterized detector. The determination of the response matrix was carried out at the Ion Accelerator Facility (PIAF) of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). This facility provides several monoenergetic beams (2.5, 8, 10, 12 and 14 MeV) and a 'white field'(Emax ~17 MeV), which allows for a full characterization of the spectrometer in the region of interest (from ~1.5 MeV to ~17 MeV. The energy of the incoming neutrons was determined by the time of flight method (TOF), with time resolution in the order of 1 ns. To check the response matrix, the measured pulse height spectra were unfolded with the code MAXED and the resulting energy distributions were compared with those obtained from TOF. The CNS project required modification of the PTB BC501A spectrometer design, to replace an analog data acquisition system (NIM modules) with a digital system developed by the 'Ente per le Nuove tecnologie, l'Energia e l'Ambiente' (ENEA). Results for the new digital system were evaluated using new software developed specifically for this project.

  7. A high-resolution soft x-ray spectrometer on the MAST tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, M.J.; Barnsley, R.; Keenan, F.; Meyer, H.; Bunting, C.A.; Carolan, P.G.; Conway, N.J.; Cunningham, G.; Lehane, I.; Tournianski, M.R. [Queens University, Belfast, N. Ireland BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); EURATOM/UKAEA Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A curved crystal spectrometer in Johann configuration has been implemented on MAST to obtain values for electron temperature, ion temperature and toroidal velocity. The spectrometer is used to examine medium Z impurities in the soft x-ray region by utilising a Silicon (111) crystal, bent using a 4 pin bending jig, and a CCD detector ({delta}t=8 ms). Helium-like Argon emissions from 3.94 to 4.00 A have been examined using a crystal radius of 859.77 mm. The Bragg angle and crystal radius can be adjusted with relative ease. The spectrometer can be scanned toroidally and poloidally to include a radial view which facilitates absolute velocity measurements by assuming radial velocity =0. Doppler shifts of 2.3x10{sup -5} A (1.8 kms{sup -1}) can be measured. The line of sight is shared with a neutral particle analyzer, which enables in situ ion temperature comparisons. Ray tracing has been used for the development of new imaging spectrometers, using spherical/toroidal crystals, planned to be implemented on MAST.

  8. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  9. absorption gamma-ray spectrometer: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    absorption gamma-ray spectrometer First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Digital Logarithmic...

  10. Development of laser excited atomic fluorescence and ionization methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winefordner, J.D.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress report: May 1, 1988 to December 31, 1991. The research supported by DE-FG05-88ER13881 during the past (nearly) 3 years can be divided into the following four categories: (1) theoretical considerations of the ultimate detection powers of laser fluorescence and laser ionization methods; (2) experimental evaluation of laser excited atomic fluorescence; (3) fundamental studies of atomic and molecular parameters in flames and plasmas; (4) other studies.

  11. LucY: A Versatile New Fluorescent Reporter Protein

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Auldridge, Michele E.; Cao, Hongnan; Sen, Saurabh; Franz, Laura P.; Bingman, Craig A.; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M.; Phillips, George N.; Mead, David; Steinmetz, Eric J.; Michnick, Stephen W.

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the discovery, isolation, and use of a novel yellow fluorescent protein. Lucigen Yellow (LucY) binds one FAD molecule within its core, thus shielding it from water and maintaining its structure so that fluorescence is 10-fold higher than freely soluble FAD. LucY displays excitation and emission spectra characteristic of FAD, with 3 excitation peaks at 276nm, 377nm, and 460nm and a single emission peak at 530nm. These excitation and emission maxima provide the large Stokes shift beneficial to fluorescence experimentation. LucY belongs to the MurB family of UDP-N-acetylenolpyruvylglucosamine reductases. The high resolution crystal structure shows that in contrastmoreto other structurally resolved MurB enzymes, LucY does not contain a potentially quenching aromatic residue near the FAD isoalloxazine ring, which may explain its increased fluorescence over related proteins. Using E. coli as a system in which to develop LucY as a reporter, we show that it is amenable to circular permutation and use as a reporter of protein-protein interaction. Fragmentation between its distinct domains renders LucY non-fluorescent, but fluorescence can be partially restored by fusion of the fragments to interacting protein domains. Thus, LucY may find application in Protein-fragment Complementation Assays for evaluating protein-protein interactions.less

  12. Application of fluorescence microscopy to coal-derived resid characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the usefulness of a fluorescence microscopy methodology to analyze coal-derived resids and interpret the data in the light of liquefaction processing conditions, process response, the inferred resid reactivity, and in relation to results of other analytical data. The fluorescence technique utilized has been widely applied to coal and kerogen characterization, albeit with some modifications, but is novel in its application to the characterization of coal liquids. Fluorescence is the emission of light energy which occurs when electrons, having been excited to a higher energy orbital, return to their lower energy ground state. The majority of organic molecules that fluoresce are those with conjugated double bonds (chromophores), such as aromatics, characterized by pi-electrons less strongly bound within the molecule than sigma electrons, that can be excited to anti-bonding pi-orbitals. Increasing the extent of pi-bond conjugation (i.e. larger molecular size) generally imparts a shift in absorption and emission spectra to longer wavelengths. Resid fluorescence largely depends on the concentration and degree of conjugation of aromatic chromophores in the high molecular weight liquids, possibly with ancillary effects from oxygen functionalities. In this context, fluorescence analysis of liquefaction resids can potentially evaluate process performance, since direct liquefaction processes endeavor to break down the macromolecular structure of coal, and reduce the molecular weight of polycondensed aromatics through hydrogenation, the opening of ring structures, and heteroatom removal.

  13. Application of fluorescence microscopy to coal-derived resid characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rathbone, R.F.; Hower, J.C.; Derbyshire, F.J.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study evaluates the usefulness of a fluorescence microscopy methodology to analyze coal-derived resids and interpret the data in the light of liquefaction processing conditions, process response, the inferred resid reactivity, and in relation to results of other analytical data. The fluorescence technique utilized has been widely applied to coal and kerogen characterization, albeit with some modifications, but is novel in its application to the characterization of coal liquids. Fluorescence is the emission of light energy which occurs when electrons, having been excited to a higher energy orbital, return to their lower energy ground state. The majority of organic molecules that fluoresce are those with conjugated double bonds (chromophores), such as aromatics, characterized by pi-electrons less strongly bound within the molecule than sigma electrons, that can be excited to anti-bonding pi-orbitals. Increasing the extent of pi-bond conjugation (i.e. larger molecular size) generally imparts a shift in absorption and emission spectra to longer wavelengths. Resid fluorescence largely depends on the concentration and degree of conjugation of aromatic chromophores in the high molecular weight liquids, possibly with ancillary effects from oxygen functionalities. In this context, fluorescence analysis of liquefaction resids can potentially evaluate process performance, since direct liquefaction processes endeavor to break down the macromolecular structure of coal, and reduce the molecular weight of polycondensed aromatics through hydrogenation, the opening of ring structures, and heteroatom removal.

  14. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by MetalOrganic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Arvapally, Ravi K.; Chen, Ying-Pin; Ivy, Joshua F.; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Feng, Dawei; Omary, Mohammad A.; Zhou, Hong-Cai [UNT

    2014-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metalorganic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm? blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  15. Study of thermal neutron capture gamma rays using a lithium-drifted germanium spectrometer / [by] Victor John Orphan [and] Norman C. Rasmussen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orphan, V. J.

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A gamma-ray spectrometer, using a 30 cc coaxial Ge(Li) detector, which can be operated as a pair spectrometer at high energies and in the Compton suppression mode at low energies provides an effective means of obtaining ...

  16. HYSPEC : A CRYSTAL TIME OF FLIGHT HYBRID SPECTROMETER FOR THE SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHAPIRO,S.M.; ZALIZNYAK,I.A.

    2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This document lays out a proposal by the Instrument Development Team (IDT) composed of scientists from leading Universities and National Laboratories to design and build a conceptually new high-flux inelastic neutron spectrometer at the pulsed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge. This instrument is intended to supply users of the SNS and scientific community, of which the IDT is an integral part, with a platform for ground-breaking investigations of the low-energy atomic-scale dynamical properties of crystalline solids. It is also planned that the proposed instrument will be equipped with a polarization analysis capability, therefore becoming the first polarized beam inelastic spectrometer in the SNS instrument suite, and the first successful polarized beam inelastic instrument at a pulsed spallation source worldwide. The proposed instrument is designed primarily for inelastic and elastic neutron spectroscopy of single crystals. In fact, the most informative neutron scattering studies of the dynamical properties of solids nearly always require single crystal samples, and they are almost invariably flux-limited. In addition, in measurements with polarization analysis the available flux is reduced through selection of the particular neutron polarization, which puts even more stringent limits on the feasibility of a particular experiment. To date, these investigations have mostly been carried out on crystal spectrometers at high-flux reactors, which usually employ focusing Bragg optics to concentrate the neutron beam on a typically small sample. Construction at Oak Ridge of the high-luminosity spallation neutron source, which will provide intense pulsed neutron beams with time-averaged fluxes equal to those at medium-flux reactors, opens entirely new opportunities for single crystal neutron spectroscopy. Drawing upon experience acquired during decades of studies with both crystal and time-of-flight (TOF) spectrometers, the IDT has developed a conceptual design for a focused-beam, hybrid time-of-flight instrument with a crystal monochromator for the SNS called HYSPEC (an acronym for hybrid spectrometer). The proposed instrument has a potential to collect data more than an order of magnitude faster than existing steady-source spectrometers over a wide range of energy transfer ({h_bar}{omega}) and momentum transfer (Q) space, and will transform the way that data in elastic and inelastic single-crystal spectroscopy are collected. HYSPEC is optimized to provide the highest neutron flux on sample in the thermal and epithermal neutron energy ranges at a good-to-moderate energy resolution. By providing a flux on sample several times higher than other inelastic instruments currently planned for the SNS, the proposed instrument will indeed allow unique ground-breaking measurements, and will ultimately make polarized beam studies at a pulsed spallation source a realistic possibility.

  17. Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

  18. A Compact, Backscattering Deplolarization Cloud Spectrometer for Ice and Water Discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, David

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was to develop a compact optical particle spectrometer, small enough for operation on UAVS, that measures the optical diameter of cloud hydrometeors and differentiates their water phase (liquid or solid). To reach this goal, a work plan was laid out that would complete three objectives: 1) Evaluation of designs for an optical particle spectrometer that measures the component of light backscattered at two polarization angles. 2) Testing of selected designs on an optical bench. 3) Construction and preliminary testing of a prototype instrument based on the selected, optimum design. A protoype instrument was developed and tested in an icing wind tunnel where the results showed good measurement of cloud droplets and ice particles.

  19. A method for Removing Surface Contamination on Ultra-pure Copper Spectrometer Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoppe, Eric W.; Seifert, Allen; Aalseth, Craig E.; Day, Anthony R.; Farmer, Orville T.; Hossbach, Todd W.; McIntyre, Justin I.; Miley, Harry S.; Smart, John E.; Warren, Glen A.

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectrometers for the lowest-level radiometric measurements require materials of extreme radiopurity. Measurements of rare nuclear decays, e.g. neutrinoless double-beta decay, can require construction and shielding materials with bulk radiopurity reaching one micro-Becquerel per kilogram or less. When such extreme material purity is achieved, surface contamination, particularly solid daughters in the natural radon decay chains, can become the limiting background. High-purity copper is an important material for ultra-low-background spectrometers and thus is the focus of this work. A method for removing surface contamination at very low levels without attacking the bulk material is described. An assay method using a low-background proportional counter made of the material under examination is employed, and the resulting preliminary result of achievable surface contamination levels is presented.

  20. The gamma-ray spectrometer HORUS and its applications for nuclear astrophysics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Netterdon; V. Derya; J. Endres; C. Fransen; A. Hennig; J. Mayer; C. Mller-Gatermann; A. Sauerwein; P. Scholz; M. Spieker; A. Zilges

    2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A dedicated setup for the in-beam measurement of absolute cross sections of astrophysically relevant charged-particle induced reactions is presented. These, usually very low, cross sections at energies of astrophysical interest are important to improve the modeling of the nucleosynthesis processes of heavy nuclei. Particular emphasis is put on the production of the $p$ nuclei during the astrophysical $\\gamma$ process. The recently developed setup utilizes the high-efficiency $\\gamma$-ray spectrometer HORUS, which is located at the 10 MV FN tandem ion accelerator of the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Cologne. The design of this setup will be presented and results of the recently measured $^{89}$Y(p,$\\gamma$)$^{90}$Zr reaction will be discussed. The excellent agreement with existing data shows, that the HORUS spectrometer is a powerful tool to determine total and partial cross sections using the in-beam method with high-purity germanium detectors.

  1. The new cold neutron chopper spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source: Design and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlers, G.; Podlesnyak, A. A.; Niedziela, J. L.; Iverson, E. B. [Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Sokol, P. E. [Department of Physics, Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana 47405 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  2. The new Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source -- Design and Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehlers, Georg [ORNL; Podlesnyak, Andrey A [ORNL; Niedziela, Jennifer L [ORNL; Iverson, Erik B [ORNL; Sokol, Paul E [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design and performance of the new cold neutron chopper spectrometer (CNCS) at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge are described. CNCS is a direct-geometry inelastic time-of-flight spectrometer, designed essentially to cover the same energy and momentum transfer ranges as IN5 at ILL, LET at ISIS, DCS at NIST, TOFTOF at FRM-II, AMATERAS at J-PARC, PHAROS at LANSCE, and NEAT at HZB, at similar energy resolution. Measured values of key figures such as neutron flux at sample position and energy resolution are compared between measurements and ray tracing Monte Carlo simulations, and good agreement (better than 20% of absolute numbers) has been achieved. The instrument performs very well in the cold and thermal neutron energy ranges, and promises to become a workhorse for the neutron scattering community for quasielastic and inelastic scattering experiments.

  3. Optimising a Muon Spectrometer for Measurements at the ISIS Pulsed Muon Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giblin, S R; King, P J C; Tomlinson, S; Jago, S J S; Randall, L J; Roberts, M J; Norris, J; Howarth, S; Mutamba, Q B; Rhodes, N J; Akeroyd, F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes the development of a state-of-the-art muon spectrometer for the ISIS pulsed muon source. Conceived as a major upgrade of the highly successful EMU instrument, emphasis has been placed on making effective use of the enhanced flux now available at the ISIS source. This has been achieved both through the development of a highly segmented detector array and enhanced data acquisition electronics. The pulsed nature of the ISIS beam is particularly suited to the development of novel experiments involving external stimuli, and therefore the ability to sequence external equipment has been added to the acquisition system. Finally, the opportunity has also been taken to improve both the magnetic field and temperature range provided by the spectrometer, to better equip the instrument for running the future ISIS user programme.

  4. Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

  5. Spectrometer for X-ray emission experiments at FERMI free-electron-laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poletto, L., E-mail: poletto@dei.unipd.it; Frassetto, F.; Miotti, P. [CNR - Institute of Photonics and Nanotechnologies (CNR-IFN), via Trasea 7, I-35131 Padova (Italy); Di Cicco, A.; Iesari, F. [Physics Division, School of Science and Technology, Universit di Camerino, I-62032 Camerino (Italy); Finetti, P. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); Grazioli, C. [Department of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Trieste, Via L. Giorgieri 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Kivimki, A. [CNR-Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Laboratorio TASC, I-34149 Trieste (Italy); Stagira, S. [Politecnico di Milano Department of Physics, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Coreno, M. [ELETTRA - Sincrotrone Trieste, Basovizza Area Science Park, S. S. 14 - km 163,5, I-34149, Basovizza (TS) (Italy); CNR Istituto di Struttura della Materia (CNR-ISM), UOS Basovizza, I-34149 Trieste (Italy)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable and compact photon spectrometer to be used for photon in-photon out experiments, in particular x-ray emission spectroscopy, is presented. The instrument operates in the 25800 eV energy range to cover the full emissions of the FEL1 and FEL2 stages of FERMI. The optical design consists of two interchangeable spherical varied-lined-spaced gratings and a CCD detector. Different input sections can be accommodated, with/without an entrance slit and with/without an additional relay mirror, that allow to mount the spectrometer in different end-stations and at variable distances from the target area both at synchrotron and at free-electron-laser beamlines. The characterization on the Gas Phase beamline at ELETTRA Synchrotron (Italy) is presented.

  6. Development of a ten inch manipulators-based, flexible, broadband two-crystal spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steel, A. B., E-mail: steel1@llnl.gov; Dunn, J.; Emig, J.; Beiersdorfer, P.; Brown, G. V.; Shepherd, R.; Marley, E. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hoarty, D. J. [Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed and implemented a broadband X-ray spectrometer with a variable energy range for use at the Atomic Weapons Establishment's Orion Laser. The spectrometer covers an energy bandwidth of ?12 keV using two independently mounted, movable Bragg diffraction crystals. Using combinations of cesium hydrogen pthlate, ammonium dihydrogen phosphate, and pentaerythritol crystals, spectra covering the 1.42.5, 1.853.15, or 3.555.1 keV energy bands have been measured. Image plate is used for detection owing to its high dynamic range. Background signals caused by high energy X-rays and particles commonly produced in high energy laser experiments are reduced by a series of tantalum baffles and filters installed between the source and crystal and also between the crystals and detector.

  7. Elimination of ``memory`` from sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chastgner, P.

    1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a method for preparing the sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer for analysis of a subsequent sample following analysis of a previous sample comprising the flushing of the system interior with supercritical CO{sub 2} and venting the interior. The method eliminates the effect of system ``memory`` on the subsequent analysis, especially following persistent samples such as xenon and krypton.

  8. Investigation of gamma induced degradation of Amberlite 200 cation resin by mass spectrometer and liquid chromatograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freitag, Albert Antonio

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1977 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering INVESTIGATION OI' GAMMA INDUCED DEGRADATION OF AMBERLITE 200 CATION RESIN BY MASS SPECTROMETER AND LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPH A Thesis by ALBERT ANTONIO FREITAG... and to Dr. Robert G. Cochran, Head of the Nuclear Engineering Department, for providing the financial support necessary for completion of this work. DEDICATION I dedicate this work to my wife, Diann, for her tolerance and support. Vi TADLE OF CONTL...

  9. Portable gas chromatograph mass spectrometer for on-site chemical analyses

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haas, Jeffrey S. (San Ramon, CA); Bushman, John F. (Oakley, CA); Howard, Douglas E. (Livermore, CA); Wong, James L. (Livermore, CA); Eckels, Joel D. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable, lightweight (approximately 25 kg) gas chromatograph mass spectrometer, including the entire vacuum system, can perform qualitative and quantitative analyses of all sample types in the field. The GC/MS has a conveniently configured layout of components for ease of serviceability and maintenance. The GC/MS system can be transported under operating or near-operating conditions (i.e., under vacuum and at elevated temperature) to reduce the downtime before samples can be analyzed on-site.

  10. A magnetic spectrometer measurement of the charge ratio of energetic cosmic ray muons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateman, Benjamin Jefferson

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A MAGNETIC SPECTROIIETER MEASUREPIENT OF THE CHARGE PATIO OF ENEIFGFTIC COSMIC RAY MUONS A Thesis BENJAMIN JEF1'EIHSON BATFIKN, JR. Submdtted to the Graduate College of the Texas AAM University in Daltial full'Ills, 'ent of the requirellents... magnet ~ 2 Schematic representation of the magnets, counters and spark chambers to form a spectrometer-telescope. A typical muon trajectory is shown. . . . . . . . ~ 3 End view of the eighteen-lamina magnet. 4 The winding process 5 The complete...

  11. High Gain, Fast Scan, Broad Spectrum, Parallel Beam Wavelength Dispersive X-ray Spectrometer for SEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David OHara; Dr. Eric Lochmer

    2003-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Parallax Research, Inc. proposes to produce a new type of x-ray spectrometer for use with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) that would have the energy resolution of WDS and the ease of use of EDS with sufficient gain for lower energies that it can be used at low beam currents as is EDS. Parallax proposes to do this by development of new multiple reflection x-ray collimation optics, new diffractor technology, new detector technology and new scan algorithms.

  12. Acceptance and resolution simulation studies for the dielectron spectrometer HADES at GSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Schicker; A. Brenschede; K. Garrow; H. Schoen; A. Balanda; H. Bokemeyer; J. Friese; W. Karig; P. Kienle; W. Koenig; W. Kuehn; F. Lefevre; V. Metag; G. Roche; P. Salabura; A. Schroeter; J. Stroth; H. Tsertos

    1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Design studies for a second generation Dilepton Spectrometer to be built at the SIS accelerator of GSI are presented. The basic design parameters of this system are specified and the different detector components for charged particle tracking and for lepton identification are described. The geometrical acceptance for lepton pairs is given. Results on single track momentum resolution and on lepton pair mass resolution are reported.

  13. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Panjehpour, M.; Overholt, B.F.

    1996-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample. 5 figs.

  14. Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

  15. Engineering and Characterization of a Superfolder Green Fluorescent Protein

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pedelacq,J.; Cabantous, S.; Tran, T.; Terwilliger, T.; Waldo, G.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) often misfold when expressed as fusions with other proteins. We have generated a robustly folded version of GFP, called 'superfolder' GFP, that folds well even when fused to poorly folded polypeptides. Compared to 'folding reporter' GFP, a folding-enhanced GFP containing the 'cycle-3' mutations and the 'enhanced GFP' mutations F64L and S65T, superfolder GFP shows improved tolerance of circular permutation, greater resistance to chemical denaturants and improved folding kinetics. The fluorescence of Escherichia coli cells expressing each of eighteen proteins from Pyrobaculum aerophilum as fusions with superfolder GFP was proportional to total protein expression. In contrast, fluorescence of folding reporter GFP fusion proteins was strongly correlated with the productive folding yield of the passenger protein. X-ray crystallographic structural analyses helped explain the enhanced folding of superfolder GFP relative to folding reporter GFP.

  16. Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

  17. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size, development time, nor concerns related to the use of Pu in measurement systems. This report discusses basic NRF measurement concepts, i.e., backscatter and transmission methods, and photon source and {gamma}-ray detector options in Section 2. An analytical model for calculating NRF signal strengths is presented in Section 3 together with enhancements to the MCNPX code and descriptions of modeling techniques that were drawn upon in the following sections. Making extensive use of the model and MCNPX simulations, the capabilities of the backscatter and transmission methods based on bremsstrahlung or quasi-monoenergetic photon sources were analyzed as described in Sections 4 and 5. A recent transmission experiment is reported on in Appendix A. While this experiment was not directly part of this project, its results provide an important reference point for our analytical estimates and MCNPX simulations. Used fuel radioactivity calculations, the enhancements to the MCNPX code, and details of the MCNPX simulations are documented in the other appendices.

  18. Photosynthesis: Research for Food, Fuel and Future--15th International Conference on Photosynthesis518 FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) of Avocado Leaves during Slow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    518 FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) of Avocado Leaves during Slow Fluorescence avocado leaves (Persea americana Mill.) during the slow part of chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence transient

  19. Status of SuperSpec: A Broadband, On-Chip Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hailey-Dunsheath, S; Barry, P S; Bradford, C M; Chattopadhyay, G; Day, P; Doyle, S; Hollister, M; Kovacs, A; LeDuc, H G; Mauskopf, P; McKenney, C M; Monroe, R; O'Brient, R; Padin, S; Reck, T; Swenson, L; Tucker, C E; Zmuidzinas, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SuperSpec is a novel on-chip spectrometer we are developing for multi-object, moderate resolution (R = 100 - 500), large bandwidth (~1.65:1) submillimeter and millimeter survey spectroscopy of high-redshift galaxies. The spectrometer employs a filter bank architecture, and consists of a series of half-wave resonators formed by lithographically-patterned superconducting transmission lines. The signal power admitted by each resonator is detected by a lumped element titanium nitride (TiN) kinetic inductance detector (KID) operating at 100-200 MHz. We have tested a new prototype device that is more sensitive than previous devices, and easier to fabricate. We present a characterization of a representative R=282 channel at f = 236 GHz, including measurements of the spectrometer detection efficiency, the detector responsivity over a large range of optical loading, and the full system optical efficiency. We outline future improvements to the current system that we expect will enable construction of a photon-noise-lim...

  20. The lead-glass electromagnetic calorimeters for the magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Mkrtchyan; R. Carlini; V. Tadevosyan; J. Arrington; A. Asaturyan; M. E. Christy; D. Dutta; R. Ent; H. C. Fenker; D. Gaskell; T. Horn; M. K. Jones; C. E. Keppel; D. J. Mack; S. P. Malace; A. Mkrtchyan; M. I. Niculescu; J. Seely; V. Tvaskis; S. A. Wood; S. Zhamkochyan

    2012-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The electromagnetic calorimeters of the various magnetic spectrometers in Hall C at Jefferson Lab are presented. For the existing HMS and SOS spectrometers design considerations, relevant construction information, and comparisons of simulated and experimental results are included. The energy resolution of the HMS and SOS calorimeters is better than $\\sigma/E \\sim 6%/\\sqrt E $, and pion/electron ($\\pi/e$) separation of about 100:1 has been achieved in energy range 1 -- 5 GeV. Good agreement has been observed between the experimental and simulated energy resolutions, but simulations systematically exceed experimentally determined $\\pi^-$ suppression factors by close to a factor of two. For the SHMS spectrometer presently under construction details on the design and accompanying GEANT4 simulation efforts are given. The anticipated performance of the new calorimeter is predicted over the full momentum range of the SHMS. Good electron/hadron separation is anticipated by combining the energy deposited in an initial (preshower) calorimeter layer with the total energy deposited in the calorimeter.

  1. GeMini: The Next Generation Mechanically-Cooled Germanium Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burks, M

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The next-generation mechanically-cooled germanium spectrometer has been developed. GeMini (GErmanium MINIature spectrometer) has been designed to bring high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy to a range of demanding field environments. Intended applications include short-notice and surprise inspections where positive nuclide identification of radioactive materials is required. GeMini weighs 2.75 kg (6 lbs) total including the detector, cryostat, cryocooler, batteries, electronics and readout. It is very low power allowing it to operate for 10 hours on a single set of rechargeable batteries. This instrument employs technology adapted from the gamma-ray spectrometer currently flying on NASA's Mercury MESSENGER spacecraft. Specifically, infrared shielding techniques allow for a vast reduction of thermal load. This in turn allows for a smaller, lighter-weight design, well-suited for a hand-held instrument. Two working prototypes have been built and tested in the lab. The target energy resolution is 3 keV fwhm or better for 1332 keV gamma-rays. The detectors currently achieve around 4.5 keV resolution, which is slightly higher than our goal due to microphonic noise. Our present work focuses on improving the resolution through mechanical and electronic means of reducing the microphonic noise. This paper will focus on the performance of the instrument and its applicability for inspectors in the field.

  2. What Caused the Lead burn-out in Spectrometer Magnet 2B

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Michael A

    2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectrometer solenoids are supposed to be the first magnets installed in the MICE Cooling Channel. The results of the test of Spectrometer Magnet 2B are reported in a previous MICE Note. Magnet 2B was tested with all five coils connected in series. The magnet failed because a lead to coil M2 failed before it could be trained to its full design current of 275 A. First, this report describes the condition of the magnet when the lead failure occurred. The lead that failed was between the cold mass feed-through and the heavy lead that connected to coil M2 and the quench protection diodes. It is believed that the lead failed because the minimum propagation zone (MPZ) length was too short. The quench was probably triggered by lead motion in the field external to the magnet center coil. The effect of heat transfer on quench propagation and MPZ length is discussed. The MPZ length is compared for a number of cases that apply to the spectrometer solenoid 2B as built and as it has been repaired. The required heat transfer coefficient for cryogenic stability and the quench propagation velocity along the leads are compared for various parts of the Magnet leads inside the cold mass cryostat. The effect of the insulation on leads on heat transfer is and stability is discussed.

  3. A design study of VOR: a versatile optimal resolution chopper spectrometer for the ESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deen, P P; Andersen, K H; Hall-Wilton, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VOR, the versatile optimal resolution chopper spectrometer, is designed to probe dynamic phenomena that are currently inaccessible for inelastic neutron scattering due to flux limitations. VOR is a short instrument by the standards of the European Spallation Source (ESS), 30.2 m moderator to sample, and provides instantaneous access to a broad dynamic range, 1 - 120 meV within each ESS period. The short instrument length combined with the long ESS pulse width enables a quadratic flux increase, even at longer wavelengths, by relaxing energy resolution from $\\Delta$E/E = 1% up to $\\Delta$E/E = 7%. This is impossible both on a long chopper spectrometer at the ESS and with instruments at short pulsed sources. In comparison to current day chopper spectrometers, VOR can offer an order of magnitude improvement in flux for equivalent energy resolutions, $\\Delta$E/E = 1-3%. Further relaxing the energy resolution enables VOR to gain an extra order of magnitude in flux. In addition, VOR has been optimised for repetition...

  4. Results for the response function determination of the Compact Neutron Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagnon-Moisan, F; Zimbal, A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Neutron Spectrometer (CNS) is a Joint European Torus (JET) Enhancement Project, designed for fusion diagnostics in different plasma scenarios. The CNS is based on a liquid scintillator (BC501A) which allows good discrimination between neutron and gamma radiation. Neutron spectrometry with a BC501A spectrometer requires the use of a reliable, fully characterized detector. The determination of the response matrix was carried out at the Ion Accelerator Facility (PIAF) of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). This facility provides several monoenergetic beams (2.5, 8, 10, 12 and 14 MeV) and a 'white field'(Emax ~17 MeV), which allows for a full characterization of the spectrometer in the region of interest (from ~1.5 MeV to ~17 MeV. The energy of the incoming neutrons was determined by the time of flight method (TOF), with time resolution in the order of 1 ns. To check the response matrix, the measured pulse height spectra were unfolded with the code MAXED and the resulting energy distribut...

  5. An Ion Doppler Spectrometer Instrument for Ion Temperature and Flow Measurements on SSPX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J D; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Romero-Talamas, C A; Moller, J M; Morse, E C

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution ion Doppler spectrometer has been installed on the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment to measure ion temperatures and plasma flow. The system is composed of a 1 meter focal length Czerny-Turner spectrometer with diffraction grating line density of 2400 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra between 300 and 600 nm. A 16-channel photomultiplier tube detection assembly combined with output coupling optics provides a spectral resolution of 0.0126 nm per channel. We calculate in some detail the mapping of curved slit images onto the linear detector array elements. This is important in determining wavelength resolution and setting the optimum vertical extent of the slit. Also, because of the small wavelength window of the IDS, a miniature fiber optic survey spectrometer sensitive to a wavelength range 200 to 1100 nm and having resolution 0.2 nm, is used to obtain a time-integrated spectrum for each shot to verify specific impurity line radiation. Several measurements validate the systems operation. Doppler broadening of C III 464.72 nm line in the plasma shows time-resolved ion temperatures up to 250 eV for hydrogen discharges, which is consistent with neutral particle energy analyzer measurements. Flow measurements show a sub-Alfvenic plasma flow ranging from 5 to 45 km/s for helium discharges.

  6. Superresolution of a compact neutron spectrometer at energies relevant for fusion diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reginatto, M.; Zimbal, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to achieve resolution that is better than the instrument resolution (i.e., superresolution) is well known in optics, where it has been extensively studied. Unfortunately, there are only a handful of theoretical studies concerning superresolution of particle spectrometers, even though experimentalists are familiar with the enhancement of resolution that is achievable when appropriate methods of data analysis are used, such as maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Knowledge of the superresolution factor is in many cases important. For example, in applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, the temperature of a burning plasma is an important physical parameter which may be inferred from the width of the peak of the neutron energy spectrum, and the ability to determine this width depends on the superresolution factor. Kosarev has derived an absolute limit for resolution enhancement using arguments based on a well known theorem of Shannon. Most calculations of superresolution factors in the literature, however, are based on the assumption of Gaussian, translationally invariant response functions and therefore not directly applicable to neutron spectrometers which typically have response functions not satisfying these requirements. In this work, we develop a procedure that allows us to overcome these difficulties and we derive estimates of superresolution for liquid scintillator spectrometers of a type commonly used for neutron measurements. Theoretical superresolution factors are compared to experimental results.

  7. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

    2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment was performed in September 2009 to test and demonstrate the applicability of the method to the quantitative measurement of an isotope of interest embedded in a thick target. The experiment, data analysis, and results are described in Section 4. The broad goal of our NRF studies is to assess the potential of the technique in safeguards applications. Three examples are analyzed in Section 5: the isotopic assay of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders, and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The study of NRF for the assay of SNF assemblies was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy as part of a large multi-lab/university effort to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. NRF is one of 14 NDA techniques being researched. The methodology for performing and analyzing quantitative NRF measurements was developed for determining Pu mass in SNF and is extensively discussed in this report. The same methodology was applied to the assessment of NRF for the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in MOX fuel. The analysis centers on determining suitable NRF measurement methods, measurement capabilities that could be realized with currently available instrumentation, and photon source and detector requirements for achieving useful NDA capabilities.

  8. Design of a Real-Time Scanning Electrical Mobility Spectrometer and its Application in Study of Nanoparticle Aerosol Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Gagan

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time, mobile Scanning Electrical Mobility Spectrometer (SEMS) was designed using a Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) and Differential Mobility Analyzer (DMA) to measure the size distribution of nanoparticles. The SEMS was calibrated using...

  9. Direct and quantitative broadband absorptance spectroscopy on small objects using Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and bilayer cantilever probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Wei-Chun

    A measurement platform is introduced that combines a bilayer cantilever probe with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer to measure absolute spectral absorptance between wavelengths of 3??m and 18??m directly and ...

  10. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

    1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

  11. An Event Reconstruction Method for the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujii, T.; Ogio, S.; Yamazaki, K. [Graduate Schiool of Science, Osaka City University, Sumiyoshi, Osaka 558-8585 (Japan); Fukushima, M.; Ikeda, D.; Sagawa, H.; Takahashi, Y.; Tameda, Y. [Institute of Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Hayashi, K.; Ishimori, R.; Kobayashi, Y.; Tokuno, H.; Tsunesada, Y. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Honda, K.; Tomida, T. [Graduate School of Medicine and Engineering, University of Yamanashi, Kofu, Yamanashi 400-8511 (Japan); Udo, S. [Faculty of Engineering, Kanagawa University, Yokohama, Kanagawa 221-8686 (Japan)

    2011-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure arrival directions, energies and mass composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays with air fluorescence detector telescopes. The longitudinal profile of the cosmic ray induced extensive air shower cascade is imaged on focal plane of the telescope camera. Here, we show an event reconstruction method to obtain the primary information from data collected by the Telescope Array Fluorescence Detectors. In particular, we report on an ''Inverse Monte Carlo (IMC)'' method in which the reconstruction process searches for an optimum solution via repeated Monte Carlo simulations including characteristics of all detectors, atmospheric conditions, photon emission and scattering processes.

  12. Longitudinal Shower Profile Reconstruction from Fluorescence and Cherenkov Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Unger; R. Engel; F. Schssler; R. Ulrich

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, longitudinal shower profiles are reconstructed in fluorescence light experiments by treating the Cherenkov light contribution as background. Here we will argue that, due to universality of the energy spectra of electrons and positrons, both fluorescence and Cherenkov light can be used simultaneously as signal to infer the longitudinal shower development. We present a new profile reconstruction method that is based on the analytic least-square solution for the estimation of the shower profile from the observed light signal and discuss the extrapolation of the profile with a Gaisser-Hillas function.

  13. A versatile detector for total fluorescence and electron yield experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thielemann, N. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, P. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Foehlisch, A. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The combination of a non-coated silicon photodiode with electron repelling meshes makes a versatile detector for total fluorescence yield and electron yield techniques highly suitable for x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In particular, a copper mesh with a bias voltage allows to suppress or transmit the electron yield signal. The performance of this detection scheme has been characterized by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies of thermal oxidized silicon and sapphire. The results show that the new detector probes both electron yield and for a bias voltage exceeding the maximum photon energy the total fluorescence yield.

  14. Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA); Rubenstein, Francis M. (Berkeley, CA); Whitman, Richard E. (Richmond, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

  15. Fluorescent Dye Encapsulated ZnO Particles with Cell-specific...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the visible fluorescence emission of the dye or UV fluorescence emission of ZnO, and anti-cancerantibacterial treatments using the selective toxicity of the nanoscale ZnO outer...

  16. Classification with Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines: application to oil fluorescence spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Carl von Ossietzky Universitt

    methods to examine crude oils, heavy refined oils, and sludge oils: the channels relationships method (CRMClassification with Artificial Neural Networks and Support Vector Machines: application to oil, and Oil fluorescence ABSTRACT: This paper reports on oil classification with fluorescence spectroscopy

  17. Detection of Ethylene Gas by Fluorescence Turn-On of a Conjugated Polymer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy Manning

    Ripe fruits: The fluorescence of a conjugated polymer is quenched by the presence of copper(I) moieties. Upon exposure to ethylene gas the copper complexes bind to ethylene and no longer quench the polymer fluorescence ...

  18. Extending the utility of enzymes for site-specific targeting of fluorescent probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Daniel S. (Daniel Shao-Chen)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Genetically encodable fluorescence reporters such as the green fluorescent protein (GFP) are useful for studying protein expression, localization, and dynamics in a variety of biological systems. GFP and its related variants, ...

  19. Surfactant Diffusion into Lysozyme Crystal Matrices Investigated by Quantitative Fluorescence Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velev, Orlin D.

    the infusion of lysozyme crystals with pyrene-based fluorescent surfactants by quantitative fluorescence 10-10 to 30 10-10 cm2 /s, depending on the type and size of the surfactant. The slow infusion

  20. Optical gating of perylene bisimide fluorescence using dithienylcyclopentene photochromic switches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prs, Martti; Khler, Jrgen, E-mail: juergen.koehler@uni-bayreuth.de [Experimental Physics IV, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Experimental Physics IV, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Grf, Katja; Bauer, Peter; Thelakkat, Mukundan [Applied Functional Polymers, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)] [Applied Functional Polymers, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2013-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of millions of fluorescence photons from a chromophore is controlled by the absorption of a few tens of photons in a photochromic molecule. The parameters that determine the efficiency of this process are investigated, providing insights for the development of an all-optical gate.

  1. EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES Two-photon excitation chlorophyll fluorescence lifetime imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Jianan

    at higher Cd concentration was clearly identified. The decay of chlorophyll fluorescence extracted from) toxicity Abbreviations Cd Cadmium PS Photosystem LHCII Light-harvesting complex II PAM Pulse and Computer Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), Clear Water Bay, Kowloon

  2. Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

    1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

  3. Diffusion of Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles Studied by Fluorescence Correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Granick, Steve

    Diffusion of Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles Studied by Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy Jiang of Brownian motion of polystyrene nanoparticles is controlled by tuning their hydro- dynamic radius through coefficient of the particles. This study has initiated our further studies on the interaction of nanoparticles

  4. Aqueous Ferrofluid of Magnetite Nanoparticles: Fluorescence Labeling and Magnetophoretic Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swihart, Mark T.

    functionalization of magnetite nanoparticles using citric acid to produce a stable aqueous dispersionAqueous Ferrofluid of Magnetite Nanoparticles: Fluorescence Labeling and Magnetophoretic ControlVed: October 8, 2004 A method is presented for the preparation of a biocompatible ferrofluid containing dye-functionalized

  5. Classification of Protein Localization Patterns Obtained via Fluorescence Light Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    of the microscope. They should also be in- sensitive to the wide variability in cell morphology that is present in fluores- cence light microscope images of mammalian cells. Such images are generated on a regular basis by labeling one or more subcellular structures with fluorescent dyes and then collecting images

  6. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

    1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

  7. Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pelton, Bruce A. (825 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Siminovitch, Michael (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

  8. Cellubrevin-targeted Fluorescence Uncovers Heterogeneity in the Recycling Endosomes*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machen, Terry E.

    Cellubrevin-targeted Fluorescence Uncovers Heterogeneity in the Recycling Endosomes* (Received, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-3200 The pH and trafficking of recycling endosomes have-enriched recycling endosomes (pHCb) and FITC-transferrin to measure the pH of transferrin- enriched recycling

  9. Enhanced Archaerhodopsin Fluorescent Protein Voltage Yiyang Gong1,2*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Silvia

    Enhanced Archaerhodopsin Fluorescent Protein Voltage Indicators Yiyang Gong1,2* , Jin Zhong Li1 by nearly three-fold in comparison to Arch-D95N. Citation: Gong Y, Li JZ, Schnitzer MJ (2013) Enhanced; Published June 19, 2013 Copyright: 2013 Gong et al. This is an open-access article distributed under

  10. Identication of Major Water-Soluble Fluorescent Components of Some

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    limits for PAHs in water are in the parts-per-billion to parts-per- trillion range for a varietyIdentication of Major Water-Soluble Fluorescent Components of Some Petrochemicals M. GRONER, A. R the ultraviolet (UV) uorescence of water after exposure to gasoline, diesel fuel and crude oil are pre- sented

  11. Automatically Identifying Scatter in Fluorescence Data using Robust Techniques.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (PARAFAC) to fluorescence excitation-emission data (EEM). The scatter does not contain any relevant handle first and second order Rayleigh scatter as well as Raman scatter in various types of EEM data of such a measurement is an excitation-emission matrix (EEM). When several samples (I) are mea- sured the data can

  12. Laser fluorescence EEM probe for cone penetrometer pollution analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, J.; Hart, S.J.; Taylor, T.A.; Kenny, J.E. [Tufts Univ., Medford, MA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) excitation-emission matrix (EEM) probe has been developed in the laboratory, and installed and tested in a cone penetrometer. The laser excitation system uses the fourth harmonic of a flashlamp-pumped Nd:YAG laser (at 266 nm) to pump a Raman shifter. Up to ten laser beams (in the wavelength region of 257 to 400 nm) from the Raman shifter are launched into optical fibers that are connected to the optical fibers of the cone penetrometer probe through standard connectors. In the probe head, the laser radiation is focused onto the outer surface of sapphire windows that are in contact with the soils. The fluorescence emission is collected by ten collection fibers that take the fluorescence to a detection system consisting of a spectrograph and a CCD detector. This probe allows real-time collection of LIF-EEMs of pollutants adsorbed on solids or dissolved in groundwater. LIF-EEMs provide a substantial amount of spectral information that can be used to determine the composition and quantity of pollutants in soils. This probe can be used to measure POL (petroleum, oil, lubricants), PAH (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and other fluorescent pollutants. The LIF-EEM instrument has been developed in the laboratory, and installed in a cone penetrometer truck for a field test at Hill Air Force Base, Utah. The experience of the test will be discussed.

  13. Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosen, Joseph

    Optimal resolution in Fresnel incoherent correlation holographic fluorescence microscopy Gary, Israel 4 rosen@ee.bgu.ac.il *gbrooker@jhu.edu Abstract: Fresnel Incoherent Correlation Holography (FINCH. Rosen and G. Brooker, "Digital spatially incoherent Fresnel holography," Opt. Lett. 32(8), 912914 (2007

  14. Amplifying Fluorescent Polymers Direct Synthesis of an OligonucleotidePoly-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Weihong

    Amplifying Fluorescent Polymers Direct Synthesis of an OligonucleotidePoly- (phenylene ethynylene bioprobes can be constructed with these polymers for selective target recog- nition. To achieve this objective, the polymer must be conjugated with a biomolecule such as a DNA strand, a peptide, or a protein

  15. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

    1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

  16. Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Robert B. (Salt Lake City, UT); Kimball, Alvin W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Gesteland, Raymond F. (Salt Lake City, UT); Ferguson, F. Mark (Salt Lake City, UT); Dunn, Diane M. (West Valley City, UT); Di Sera, Leonard J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Cherry, Joshua L. (Salt Lake City, UT)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

  17. REGULAR PAPER Modulation of the fluorescence yield in heliobacterial cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . They are thought to use a light-driven cyclic electron transport pathway to pump protons, and thereby phos brief flashes is inversely correlated to the variable fluorescence. Using pump-probe spectros- copy), or conversion to heat. When photosynthetic systems are operating efficiently, photochemistry dominates

  18. Assaying protein import into mitochondria using fluorescence spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cargill, Holly Beth

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex, and the inner mitochondrial membrane (IM) via the Translocase of the Inner Membrane 23 (TIM23) complex. A novel system was set up to examine the import of matrix-targeted preproteins into mitochondria using fluorescence...

  19. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; ONions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  20. Detection of counterfeit U.S. paper money using intrinsic fluorescence lifetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levene, Michael J.

    -photon spectral and lifetime fluorescence microscopy," Appl. Opt. 43(27), 5173­5182 (2004). #118121 - $15.00 USD

  1. spectrometer | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Computational and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: A Case Study on Abstract: Redox flow battery (RFB) is a promising candidate for energy storage component in designing resilient...

  2. Caged Molecular Fluorescence Velocimetry to measure meso-to micro-scale thermal flow fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaesung

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (CPL). The system utilizes a microscope objective lens, caged molecular fluorescence probes, Nd:YAG laser for UV light source, Ar-ion laser for 488 nm fluorescence pumping, and a color CCD camera to record a series of fluorescent images. Caged...

  3. 428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    428 BIOCHIMICAET BIOPHYSICAACTA BBA 46126 pH CONTROL OF THE CHLOROPHYLL a FLUORESCENCE IN ALGAE on the "slow" (min) time course of Chlorophyll a fluorescence yield in the green alga Chlorella pyrenoidosa and in the blue-green alga Anacystis nidulans. In Chlorella, the decay of fluorescence yield, in the I- to 5-rain

  4. Fluorescence Behavioral Imaging (FBI) Tracks Identity in Heterogeneous Groups of Drosophila

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floreano, Dario

    Fluorescence Behavioral Imaging (FBI) Tracks Identity in Heterogeneous Groups of Drosophila Pavan describe Fluorescence Behavioral Imaging (FBI), a toolkit that uses transgenic fluorescence to discriminate-source software for automated, high-accuracy determination of genetic identity. Using FBI, we measure courtship

  5. Fluorescence quenching of water-soluble porphyrins. A novel fluorescence quenching of anionic porphyrin by anionic anthraquinone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kano, K.; Sato, T.; Yamada, S.; Ogawa, T.

    1983-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The fluorescence quenching of 5-phenyl-10,15,20-tris(p-sulfonatophenyl)porphine (TPPS/sup 3 -/) and 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphine (TMPyP/sup 4 +/) has been studied in water (pH 8.0) by using 9,10-anthra-quinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS/sup 2 -/) and methyl viologen (MV/sup 2 +/) as quenchers. While electrostatic repulsion is expected, AQDS/sup 2 -/ quenched the TPPS/sup 3 -/ fluorescence more efficiently than MV/sup 2 +/. The steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements indicated that static quenching took place in the TPPS/sup 3 -/-AQDS/sup 2 -/ system. Studies on the absorption spectra and the effects of ionic strength on the fluorescence quenching indicated the formation of the ground-state complex of TPPS/sup 3 -/ and AQDS/sup 2 -/. The thermodynamic parameters (..delta..H and ..delta..S) suggested that the ground-state complex was formed via van der Walls interaction.

  6. Fluorescent Probe Solubilization in the Headgroup and Core Regions of Micelles: Fluorescence Lifetime and Orientational Relaxation Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayer, Michael D.

    the microheterogeneous medium under investigation. To ascertain that the probe is located in the target environment in the hydrocarbon core region of the micelle. In this environment the chromophores have a considerably longer to be applied successfully, the fluorescent molecule must be tailored to probe the desired environment within

  7. Wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer on Joint Texas Experimental Tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, W.; Chen, Z. Y., E-mail: zychen@hust.edu.cn; Jin, W.; Huang, D. W.; Ding, Y. H.; Li, J. C.; Zhang, X. Q.; Zhuang, G. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Lee, S. G.; Shi, Y. J. [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The wavelength calibration of x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer is a key issue for the measurements of plasma rotation. For the lack of available standard radiation source near 3.95 and there is no other diagnostics to measure the core rotation for inter-calibration, an indirect method by using tokamak plasma itself has been applied on joint Texas experimental tokamak. It is found that the core toroidal rotation velocity is not zero during locked mode phase. This is consistent with the observation of small oscillations on soft x-ray signals and electron cyclotron emission during locked-mode phase.

  8. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software test plan and report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document presents the test plan and report for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  9. Spatially resolvable optical emission spectrometer for analyzing density uniformity of semiconductor process plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Changhoon; Ryoo, Hoonchul; Lee, Hyungwoo; Hahn, Jae W. [Nano Photonics Laboratory, School of Mechanical Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Sinchon-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Se-Yeon; Yi, Hun-Jung [Manufacturing Technology Team, Memory Division, Semiconductor Business, Samsung Electronics, Hwasung-City, Gyeonggi-do 445-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We proposed a spatially resolved optical emission spectrometer (SROES) for analyzing the uniformity of plasma density for semiconductor processes. To enhance the spatial resolution of the SROES, we constructed a SROES system using a series of lenses, apertures, and pinholes. We calculated the spatial resolution of the SROES for the variation of pinhole size, and our calculated results were in good agreement with the measured spatial variation of the constructed SROES. The performance of the SROES was also verified by detecting the correlation between the distribution of a fluorine radical in inductively coupled plasma etch process and the etch rate of a SiO{sub 2} film on a silicon wafer.

  10. A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Iwata; Y. Inoue; M. Minowa

    2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to probe $\\alpha$-emitting radioactivity in bulk material.

  11. Progress in development of neutron energy spectrometer for deuterium plasma operation in KSTAR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tomita, H., E-mail: tomita@nagoya-u.jp; Yamashita, F.; Nakayama, Y.; Morishima, K.; Yamamoto, Y.; Sakai, Y.; Hayashi, S.; Kawarabayashi, J.; Iguchi, T. [Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Cheon, M. S. [Diagnostics Technology Team, ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Isobe, M. [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Ogawa, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two types of DD neutron energy spectrometer (NES) are under development for deuterium plasma operation in KSTAR to understand behavior of beam ions in the plasma. One is based on the state-of-the-art nuclear emulsion technique. The other is based on a coincidence detection of a recoiled proton and a scattered neutron caused by an elastic scattering of an incident DD neutron, which is called an associated particle coincidence counting-NES. The prototype NES systems were installed at J-port in KSTAR in 2012. During the 2012 and 2013 experimental campaigns, multiple shots-integrated neutron spectra were preliminarily obtained by the nuclear emulsion-based NES system.

  12. A radial collimator for a time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, M. B.; Abernathy, D. L. [Quantum Condensed Matter Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Niedziela, J. L.; Loguillo, M. J.; Overbay, M. A. [Instrument and Source Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have engineered and installed a radial collimator for use in the scattered beam of a neutron time-of-flight spectrometer at a spallation neutron source. The radial collimator may be used with both thermal and epithermal neutrons, reducing the detected scattering intensity due to material outside of the sample region substantially. The collimator is located inside of the sample chamber of the instrument, which routinely cycles between atmospheric conditions and cryogenic vacuum. The oscillation and support mechanism of the collimator allow it to be removed from use without breaking vacuum. We describe here the design and characterization of this radial collimator.

  13. Development of a cold cathode ion source for a mass spectrometer type vacuum leak detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Harold Albert

    1947-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of about 7 cm., discharge voltage of about 2000 volts, discharge current of 10 ma., and a magnetic field strength of approximately 2200 Oersteds. As a leak detector it had a differential sensitivity of one part of helium in 10,000 parts of air ? about... for this ion souree as for the first type tested# Be? cause of the simpler construction and fewer components reauired, it appears that this type of source would have some valuable possibili? ties as a mass spectrometer ion source for the leak detector...

  14. A photoelectron velocity map imaging spectrometer for experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Keeffe, P.; Bolognesi, P.; Coreno, M.; Avaldi, L. [CNR-IMIP, Area della Ricerca di Roma 1, Monterotondo Scalo (Italy); Moise, A.; Richter, R.; Cautero, G.; Stebel, L.; Sergo, R. [Sincrotrone Trieste SCpA, Area Science Park, I-34149 Basovizza (Trieste) (Italy); Pravica, L. [The University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, Western Australia (Australia); Ovcharenko, Y. [Institute of Electron Physics, 88017 Uzhgorod (Ukraine)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A velocity map imaging/ion time-of-flight spectrometer designed specifically for pump-probe experiments combining synchrotron and laser radiations is described. The in-house built delay line detector can be used in two modes: the high spatial resolution mode and the coincidence mode. In the high spatial resolution mode a kinetic energy resolution of 6% has been achieved. The coincidence mode can be used to improve signal-to-noise ratio for the pump-probe experiments either by using a gate to count electrons only when the laser is present or by recording coincidences with the ion formed in the ionization process.

  15. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  16. Fluorescence quenching of CdSe quantum dots on graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xi Tao; Hua Ni, Zhen, E-mail: zhni@seu.edu.cn; Yan Nan, Hai; Hui Wang, Wen [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of MEMS of the Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)] [Department of Physics and Key Laboratory of MEMS of the Ministry of Education, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China); Yan Liao, Chun [Physics Department, National Photoelectric Technology and Functional Materials and Application of Science and Technology International Cooperation Base, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China)] [Physics Department, National Photoelectric Technology and Functional Materials and Application of Science and Technology International Cooperation Base, Northwest University, Xi'an 710069 (China); Zhang, Yan; Wei Zhao, Wei [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Design and Fabrication of Micro-Nano Biomedical Instruments, School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)] [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Design and Fabrication of Micro-Nano Biomedical Instruments, School of Mechanical Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 211189 (China)

    2013-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We studied systematically the fluorescence quenching of CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on graphene and its multilayers, as well as graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Raman intensity of QDs was used as a quantitatively measurement of its concentration in order to achieve a reliable quenching factor (QF). It was found that the QF of graphene (?13.1) and its multilayers is much larger than rGO (?4.4), while GO (?1.5) has the lowest quenching efficiency, which suggests that the graphitic structure is an important factor for quenching the fluorescence of QDs. It was also revealed that the QF of graphene is not strongly dependent on its thicknesses.

  17. Archaeometrical studies using X-ray fluorescence methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pauna, Catalina; Constantinescu, B.; Constantin, F.; Bugoi, R.; Stan, D.; Vasilescu, A. [National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, POB MG-6, 077125, Bucharest (Romania)

    2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Elemental analysis contributes to authentication (knowing the elemental composition and considering the information about the usual composition of the objects in different historical periods it can be established if the item is original or fake), provenance studies (minor and trace elements indicates ores origin and 'consequently' mines location), (relative) dating of archaeological objects (e.g. for painted items--the chemical recipes for pigments can offer information about the age of objects). The paper gives a general layout for the NIPNE Archaeometry Laboratory's applications using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), micro--Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (micro-PIXE), micro-Synchrotron Radiation Induced X-Ray Fluorescence (micro--SR-XRF) methods.

  18. Noise induced narrowing of metamolecule fluorescence spectral line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. S. Andrianov; N. M. Chtchelkatchev; A. A. Pukhov

    2015-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider metamolecule consisting of bosonic mode correlated with the two-level system: it can be, for example, plasmonic mode interacting with the quantum dot or molecule in the resonator. We focus on the parameter range where all the correlations are strong and of the same order: interaction between bosonic mode correlated with the two-level system, external coherent drive and dissipation. Quantum Monte-Carlo simulations show a fluorescence of this system at dissipation larger than the driving amplitude and strong (by the order of magnitude) narrowing of its spectral line. This effect may be related to kind of a quantum stochastic resonance. We show that the fluorescence corresponds to finite domain over the coherent drive with sharp lower threshold and there is splitting of the Wigner function.

  19. DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hammond, Mark L. (Angier, NC); Jett, James H. (Los Alamos, NM); Keller, Richard A. (Los Alamos, NM); Marrone, Babetta L. (Los Alamos, NM); Martin, John C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for sizing DNA fragments using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA piece or the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is linearly related to the fragment length. The distribution of DNA fragment sizes forms a characterization of the DNA piece for use in forensic and research applications.

  20. Rotational orderdisorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletnev, Sergei, E-mail: svp@ncifcrf.gov [SAIC-Frederick Inc., Basic Research Program, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Morozova, Kateryna S.; Verkhusha, Vladislav V. [Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 1300 Morris Park Avenue, Bronx, New York 10461 (United States); Dauter, Zbigniew, E-mail: svp@ncifcrf.gov [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, MCL, National Cancer Institute, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); SAIC-Frederick Inc., Basic Research Program, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the rotational orderdisorder structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is presented. In the last decade, advances in instrumentation and software development have made crystallography a powerful tool in structural biology. Using this method, structural information can now be acquired from pathological crystals that would have been abandoned in earlier times. In this paper, the orderdisorder (OD) structure of fluorescent protein FP480 is discussed. The structure is composed of tetramers with 222 symmetry incorporated into the lattice in two different ways, namely rotated 90 with respect to each other around the crystal c axis, with tetramer axes coincident with crystallographic twofold axes. The random distribution of alternatively oriented tetramers in the crystal creates a rotational OD structure with statistically averaged I422 symmetry, although the presence of very weak and diffuse additional reflections suggests that the randomness is only approximate.

  1. COMBINED FLUORESCENT AND GOLD PROBES FOR MICROSCOPIC AND MORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    POWELL,R.D.HAINFELD,J.F.

    2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanogold{reg_sign}, a gold cluster with a core of gold atoms 1.4 nm in diameter, has proven to be a superior probe label for electron microscopy (EM), giving both higher labeling density and improved access to previously hindered or restricted antigens. It may be visualized by autometallography (AMG) for use in light microscopy (LM): silver-and gold-amplified Nanogold detection has proven to be one of the most sensitive methods available for the detection of low copy number targets such as viral DNA in cells and tissue specimens. AMG enhancement has also made Nanogold an effective detection label in blots and gels. The following protocols will be described: Labeling of nuclear components in cells. Protocol for in situ hybridization and detection with fluorescein-Nanogold--or Cy3{trademark}-Nanogold-labeled streptavidin. Nanogold is an inert molecule, and generally does not interact with biological molecules unless a specific chemical reactivity is introduced into the molecule. Conjugates are prepared using site-specific chemical conjugation through reactive chemical functionalities introduced during Nanogold preparation, which allows the gold label to be attached to a specific site on the conjugate biomolecule. For example, a maleimido-Nanogold derivative, which is specific for thiol binding, is frequently attached to the hinge region of an antibody at a unique thiol site generated by selective reduction of a hinge disulfide. This site is remote from the antigen combining region, and the Nanogold, therefore, does not compromise target binding. Nanogold may also be prepared with specific reactivity towards amines or other unique chemical groups. This mode of attachment enables the preparation of probes labeled with both Nanogold and fluorescent labels. Different chemical reactivities are used to attach the Nanogold and the fluorescent groups to different sites in the conjugate biomolecule, as shown in Figure 7.1. In this manner, the two labels are spaced sufficiently far apart that fluorescent resonance energy transfer does not quench the fluorescent signal, and the probes may be used to label specimens for fluorescent and EM observation in a single staining procedure. This reduces the complexity of the staining procedure, allowing less specimen perturbation, and also enables a higher degree of correlation between the fluorescence and EM localization of the target, thus increasing the usefulness of the complementary data sets. Since gold and fluorescent-labeled probes are often used at different concentrations under different conditions, optimum procedures for the use of fluorescent and gold probes may entail some degree of compromise between the most appropriate conditions for the two types of probes. However, the chemical stability of the Nanogold label means that it is generally stable to a wide range of use conditions, and the following protocols have been found to be effective for labeling specimens with combined fluorescein and Nanogold-labeled antibody Fab' probes and with combined Cy3 and Nanogold-labeled streptavidin.

  2. 2{pi} spectrometer: A new apparatus for the investigation of ion surface interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morosov, V.A.; Kalinin, A.; Szilagyi, Z.; Barat, M.; Roncin, P. [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, Bat 351, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay Cedex F 91405 (France)] [Laboratoire des Collisions Atomiques et Moleculaires, Bat 351, Universite Paris Sud, Orsay Cedex F 91405 (France)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new spectrometer for studying ion surface interaction is described. This apparatus is built around a secondary electron and ion detector with a very large acceptance angle and made of 16 individual microchannel plate detectors located on a half sphere. A simultaneous detection of the scattered projectiles with an additional position sensitive detector allows measurements of the correlation between all these particles using a multicoincidence technique. With this spectrometer, a large variety of measurements are possible such as the energy spectra of the secondary electrons as well as the statistics of the number of ejected electrons, the scattering pattern of the reflected projectiles and their charge-state distribution, the analysis of the sputtered ions. Some examples are given concerning the impact of multiply charged ions on a LiF single crystal. The dependence of the secondary electron multiplicity as a function of the charge state, of the surface channeling condition, and of the scattering angle of the reflected ion, is given as a type of information provided by the analysis of the correlation. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. A split imaging spectrometer for temporally and spatially resolved titanium absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hager, J. D., E-mail: hager@lanl.gov; Lanier, N. E.; Kline, J. L.; Flippo, K. A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Bruns, H. C.; Schneider, M.; Saculla, M.; McCarville, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a temporally and a spatially resolved spectrometer for titanium x-ray absorption spectroscopy along 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight. Each line-of-sight of the instrument uses an elliptical crystal to acquire both the 2p and 3p Ti absorption lines on a single, time gated channel of the instrument. The 2 axial symmetric lines-of-sight allow the 2p and 3p absorption features to be measured through the same point in space using both channels of the instrument. The spatially dependent material temperature can be inferred by observing the 2p and the 3p Ti absorption features. The data are recorded on a two strip framing camera with each strip collecting data from a single line-of-sight. The design is compatible for use at both the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility. The spectrometer is intended to measure the material temperature behind a Marshak wave in a radiatively driven SiO{sub 2} foam with a Ti foam tracer. In this configuration, a broad band CsI backlighter will be used for a source and the Ti absorption spectrum measured.

  4. The magnetic shielding for the neutron decay spectrometer aSPECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gertrud Konrad; Fidel Ayala Guardia; Stefan Baeler; Michael Borg; Ferenc Glck; Werner Heil; Stefan Hiebel; Raquel Munoz Horta; Yury Sobolev

    2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Many experiments in nuclear and neutron physics are confronted with the problem that they use a superconducting magnetic spectrometer which potentially affects other experiments by their stray magnetic field. The retardation spectrometer aSPECT consists, inter alia, of a superconducting magnet system that produces a strong longitudinal magnetic field of up to 6.2T. In order not to disturb other experiments in the vicinity of aSPECT, we had to develop a magnetic field return yoke for the magnet system. While the return yoke must reduce the stray magnetic field, the internal magnetic field and its homogeneity should not be affected. As in many cases, the magnetic shielding for aSPECT must manage with limited space. In addition, we must ensure that the additional magnetic forces on the magnet coils are not destructive. In order to determine the most suitable geometry for the magnetic shielding for aSPECT, we simulated a variety of possible geometries and combinations of shielding materials of non-linear permeability. The results of our simulations were checked through magnetic field measurements both with Hall and nuclear magnetic resonance probes. The experimental data are in good agreement with the simulated values: The mean deviation from the simulated exterior magnetic field is (-1.7+/-4.8)%. However, in the two critical regions, the internal magnetic field deviates by 0.2% respectively <1E-4 from the simulated values.

  5. Development of a fluorescent antibody test for equine infectious anemia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lester, Thomas Lee

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Moore The development of a direct fluorescent antibody technique for a reliable laboratory and diagnostic test for equine infectious anemia (EIA) was described. A specific antiserum was produced by inoculation of goats with EIA virus derived from... the Texas and Illinois strains of EIA virus in cell culture and in known infected horses and against the Wyoming strain of EIA virus in inoculated horses. Its specificity was further substantiated by testing it against heterologous viruses including...

  6. Contraband Detection with Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence: Feasibility and Impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pruet, J; Lange, D

    2007-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report they show that cargo interrogation systems developed to thwart trafficking of illicit nuclear materials could also be powerful tools in the larger fight against contraband smuggling. In particular, in addition to detecting special nuclear materials, cargo scanning systems that exploit nuclear resonance fluorescence to detect specific isotopes can be used to help find: chemical weapons; some drugs as well as some chemicals regulated under the controlled substances act; precious metals; materials regulated under export control laws; and commonly trafficked fluorocarbons.

  7. Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwon, Sun Kuk

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    emission computed tomography SUV standard uptake values SLN sentinel lymph node TK tyrosine kinase TBR target to background ratio Symbols ? pharmacokinetic parameter ? pharmacokinetic parameter )(tC BOUND concentration of dye... bound to integrin receptor either in the vascular or extravascular compartments )(tC LAREXTRAVASCU concentration of dye in extravascular space )(tC VASCULAR concentration of dye in vascular space 0 I background fluorescence intensity c k...

  8. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence and Isotopic Mapping of Containers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M S; McNabb, D P

    2008-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    National security programs have expressed interest in developing systems to isotopically map shipping containers, fuel assemblies, and waste barrels for various materials including special nuclear material (SNM). Current radiographic systems offer little more than an ambiguous density silhouette of a container's contents. In this paper we will present a system being developed at LLNL to isotopically map containers using the nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) method. Recent experimental measurements on NRF strengths in SNM are discussed.

  9. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Berman, Samuel M. (San Francisco, CA); Richardson, Robert W. (Pelham, NY)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  10. Enhanced detection of fluorescence quenching in labeled cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crissman, H.A.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1987-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is provided for quantifying BrdU labeled DNA in cells. The BrdU is substituted onto the DNA and the DNA is stained with a first fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is quenchable by BrdU. The first fluorochrome is preferably a thymidine base halogen analogue, such as a Hoechst fluorochrome. The DNA is then stained with a second fluorochrome having a fluorescence which is substantially uneffected by BrdU. The second fluorochrome may be selected from the group consisting of mithramycin, chromomycin A3, olivomycin, propidium iodide and ethidium bromine. The fluorescence from the first and second fluorochromes is then measured to obtain first and second output signals, respectively. The first output signal is subtracted from the second output signal to obtain a difference signal which is functionally related to the quantity of BrdU incorporated into DNA. The technique is particularly useful for quantifying the synthesis of DNA during the S-phase of the cell cycle. 2 figs.

  11. ISSUANCE 2014-12-29: Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Clarification for Energy Conservation Standards and Test Procedures for Fluorescent Lamp Ballasts

  12. High-resolution, high-transmission soft x-ray spectrometer for the study of biological samples

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fuchs, Oliver; Weinhardt, L.; Blum, M.; Weigand, M.; Umbach, E.; Bar, M.; Heske, Clemens; Denlinger, Jonathan; Chuang, Y.-D.; McKinney, Wayne; Hussain, Zahid; Gullikson, Eric; Jones, M.; Batson, Phil; Nelles, B.; Follath, R.

    2009-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a variable line-space grating spectrometer for soft x-rays that covers the photon energy range between 130 and 650 eV. The optical design is based on the Hettrick-Underwood principle and tailored to synchrotron-based studies of radiation-sensitive biological samples. The spectrometer is able to record the entire spectral range in one shot, i.e., without any mechanical motion, at a resolving power of 1200 or better. Despite its slitless design, such a resolving power can be achieved for a source spot as large as 30x3000 mu m2, which is important for keeping beam damage effects in radiation-sensitive samples low. The high spectrometer efficiency allows recording of comprehensive two-dimensional resonant inelastic soft x-ray scattering (RIXS) maps with good statistics within several minutes. This is exemplarily demonstrated for a RIXS map of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite, which was taken within 10 min.

  13. Qualification of a high-efficiency, gated spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dppner, T.; Kritcher, A. L.; Bachmann, B.; Burns, S.; Hawreliak, J.; House, A.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Ma, T.; Pak, A.; Swift, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Neumayer, P. [Gesellschaft fr Schwerionenphysik, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Kraus, D. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Falcone, R. W. [University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Glenzer, S. H. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94309 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed, built, and successfully fielded a highly efficient and gated Bragg crystal spectrometer for x-ray Thomson scattering measurements on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It utilizes a cylindrically curved Highly Oriented Pyrolytic Graphite crystal. Its spectral range of 7.410?keV is optimized for scattering experiments using a Zn He-? x-ray probe at 9.0 keV or Mo K-shell line emission around 18 keV in second diffraction order. The spectrometer has been designed as a diagnostic instrument manipulator-based instrument for the NIF target chamber at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, USA. Here, we report on details of the spectrometer snout, its novel debris shield configuration and an in situ spectral calibration experiment with a Brass foil target, which demonstrated a spectral resolution of E/?E = 220 at 9.8 keV.

  14. CAMEA ESS - The Continuous Angle Multi-Energy Analysis Indirect Geometry Spectrometer for the European Spallation Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, P G; Mark, M; Bertelsen, M; Larsen, J; Christensen, N B; Lefmann, K; Jacobsen, J; Niedermayer, Ch; Juranyi, F; Ronnow, H M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CAMEA ESS neutron spectrometer is designed to achieve a high detection efficiency in the horizontal scattering plane, and to maximize the use of the long pulse European Spallation Source. It is an indirect geometry time-of-flight spectrometer that uses crystal analysers to determine the final energy of neutrons scattered from the sample. Unlike other indirect gemeotry spectrometers CAMEA will use ten concentric arcs of analysers to analyse scattered neutrons at ten different final energies, which can be increased to 30 final energies by use of prismatic analysis. In this report we will outline the CAMEA instrument concept, the large performance gain, and the potential scientific advancements that can be made with this instrument.

  15. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  16. Characterization of dissolved organic matter fluorescence in the South Atlantic Bight with use of PARAFAC model: Relationships between fluorescence and its

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durako, Michael J.

    [aCDOM(350)] and CDOM excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence were used to estimate annual (PARAFAC) of CDOM EEM spectra identified six components: three terrestrial humic-like, one marine humic concentration and aCDOM(350), total fluorescence intensity and the intensities of respective EEM components. DOC

  17. The Hazards of Use and Disposal of Compact Fluorescent Bulbs Compact fluorescent lights (aka. CFLs) work by exciting a phosphorous coating within the tube to emit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroncelli, Mark

    The Hazards of Use and Disposal of Compact Fluorescent Bulbs Compact fluorescent lights (aka. CFLs the bulb to be an efficient light source. By comparison, older home thermometers contain 500 milligrams decade. HOW SHOULD I DISPOSE OF CFL'S? The presence of mercury requires that all CFL bulbs are properly

  18. Design and commissioning of a high magnetic field muon spin relaxation spectrometer at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, J. S.; McKenzie, I.; Baker, P. J.; Cottrell, S. P.; Giblin, S. R.; Hillier, A. D.; Holsman, B. H.; King, P. J. C.; Nightingale, J. B.; Pratt, F. L.; Rhodes, N. J. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Blundell, S. J.; Lancaster, T. [Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Good, J.; Mitchell, R.; Owczarkowski, M.; Poli, S. [Cryogenic Limited, 30 Acton Park Industrial Estate, The Vale, Acton, London W3 7QE (United Kingdom); Scheuermann, R. [Laboratory for Muon Spin Spectroscopy, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Salman, Z. [ISIS Facility, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Clarendon Laboratory, Department of Physics, Oxford University, Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The high magnetic field (HiFi) muon instrument at the ISIS pulsed neutron and muon source is a state-of-the-art spectrometer designed to provide applied magnetic fields up to 5 T for muon studies of condensed matter and molecular systems. The spectrometer is optimised for time-differential muon spin relaxation studies at a pulsed muon source. We describe the challenges involved in its design and construction, detailing, in particular, the magnet and detector performance. Commissioning experiments have been conducted and the results are presented to demonstrate the scientific capabilities of the new instrument.

  19. A user's guide to SWIFT: A Monte Carlo technique for inference of differential energy spectra from multisphere spectrometer measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanna, R.S.; O'Brien, K.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SWIFT is a FORTRAN-77 program written for the VAX-11/750 computer. Its purpose is to unfold neutron spectra from multisphere spectrometer measurements using the Monte Carlo technique. This guide describes the code in sufficient detail to enable a user, with a background in FORTRAN programming, to alter the code for use with other spectrometers and/or to install it on computers other than the VAX-11/750. The code and the required input and resulting output are described. As an aid to its implementation, input and output for a sample problem are also presented. 19 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  20. Improved ion optics for introduction of ions into a 9.4-T Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yu; Leach, Franklin E.; Kaiser, Nathan K.; Dang, Xibei; Ibrahim, Yehia M.; Norheim, Randolph V.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.; Marshall, Alan G.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry provides unparalleled mass accuracy and resolving power.[1],[2] With electrospray ionization (ESI), ions are typically transferred into the mass spectrometer through a skimmer, which serves as a conductance-limiting orifice. However, the skimmer allows only a small fraction of incoming ions to enter the mass spectrometer. An ion funnel, originally developed by Smith and coworkers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)[3-5] provides much more efficient ion focusing and transfer. The large entrance aperture of the ion funnel allows almost all ions emanating from a heated capillary to be efficiently captured and transferred, resulting in nearly lossless transmission.

  1. EMSL Research and Capability Development Proposals Developing in-spectrometer photochemistry and integration of molecular imaging techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    capability on the scanning multi-probe surface analysis system (SMSAS) for photocatalysis and photochemistry) The photon exposure capability on the SMSAS for photocatalysis and photochemistry studies 2) Fluorescent

  2. Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

  3. A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

  4. Development and operation of a high-throughput accurate-wavelength lens-based spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Ronald E., E-mail: rbell@pppl.gov [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm{sup ?1} grating is matched with fast f/1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy ?0.075 arc sec. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount at the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  5. A Design for a Compact Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manard, M.

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of a prototype, compact time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) is described. The system primarily consists of an ion acceleration/focusing/steering assembly (AFSA), an 8 cm field-free region, a 4 cm, dual-stage reflectron and a miniature microchannel plate detector. Consequently, the resulting flight length of the system is 12 cm. The system has been designed with the capability to sample directly from atmosphere at ambient pressures. This is accomplished through the use of an electrodynamic ion funnel, housed in an intermediate-vacuum chamber that is coupled to the inlet of the TOF chamber. TOF spectra were obtained using noble gases (Ar, Kr and Xe) as test chemicals. These measured flight times were used to probe the performance of the instrument. A temporal resolution (tflight/?t) of approximately 125, acquired using 129Xe+, has been measured for the system.

  6. Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

  7. Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

  8. The High Momentum Spectrometer Drift Chambers in Hall C at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vulcan, William; Kross, Brian; Beaufait, Joseph; Baker, O.; Carlini, Roger; Majewski, Stanislaw; Johnson, A.; McCauley, A.; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana; Cha, Jinseok; Shin, Taeksu; Naing, Win; Danagoulian, Samuel

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mutiwire drift chambers to be used in the High Momentum Spectrometer (HMS) at the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) have been designed and constructed, and recently employed in initial data-taking runs.These chambers are used to reconstruct scattered charged particle momenta in the HMS using 12C and BeO2 targets for incident electron energies up to 2.2 GeV.Offline analysis of the data indicate that these drift chambers have spatial resolution (per plane) of about 115 mu-m (sigma) in rates approaching a KHz/wire/mm.It is expected that this performance will improve at higher momenta where multiple scattering contributions are smaller.

  9. Development and Operation of High-throughput Accurate-wavelength Lens-based Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, Ronald E

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-throughput spectrometer for the 400-820 nm wavelength range has been developed for charge exchange recombination spectroscopy or general spectroscopy. A large 2160 mm-1 grating is matched with fast f /1.8 200 mm lenses, which provide stigmatic imaging. A precision optical encoder measures the grating angle with an accuracy < 0.075 arc seconds. A high quantum efficiency low-etaloning CCD detector allows operation at longer wavelengths. A patch panel allows input fibers to interface with interchangeable fiber holders that attach to a kinematic mount behind the entrance slit. Computer-controlled hardware allows automated control of wavelength, timing, f-number, automated data collection, and wavelength calibration.

  10. Operation of a high purity germanium crystal in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John L. Orrell; Craig E. Aalseth; John F. Amsbaugh; Peter J. Doe; Todd W. Hossbach

    2006-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A high purity germanium crystal was operated in liquid argon as a Compton suppressed radiation spectrometer. Spectroscopic quality resolution of less than 1% of the full-width half maximum of full energy deposition peaks was demonstrated. The construction of the small apparatus used to obtain these results is reported. The design concept is to use the liquid argon bath to both cool the germanium crystal to operating temperatures and act as a scintillating veto. The scintillation light from the liquid argon can veto cosmic-rays, external primordial radiation, and gamma radiation that does not fully deposit within the germanium crystal. This technique was investigated for its potential impact on ultra-low background gamma-ray spectroscopy. This work is based on a concept initially developed for future germanium-based neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments.

  11. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Frenje, J. A. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Seguin, F. H. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Li, C. K. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Petrasso, R. D. [MIT, Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center; Glebov, V. Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Katz, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Magoon, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Sangster, T. C. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Shoup, M. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ulreich, J. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energitics; Ashabranner, R. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Carpenter, A. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Felker, B. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); LePape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McKernan, M. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Moran, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Yeoman, M. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Zacharias, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fletcher, K. [State Univ. of New York at Geneseo, NY (United States); Farrell, M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Jasion, D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Paguio, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

  12. SIEMENS ADVANCED QUANTRA FTICR MASS SPECTROMETER FOR ULTRA HIGH RESOLUTION AT LOW MASS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, W; Laura Tovo, L

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Siemens Advanced Quantra Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometer was evaluated as an alternative instrument to large double focusing mass spectrometers for gas analysis. High resolution mass spectrometers capable of resolving the common mass isomers of the hydrogen isotopes are used to provide data for accurate loading of reservoirs and to monitor separation of tritium, deuterium, and helium. Conventional double focusing magnetic sector instruments have a resolution that is limited to about 5000. The Siemens FTICR instrument achieves resolution beyond 400,000 and could possibly resolve the tritium ion from the helium-3 ion, which differ by the weight of an electron, 0.00549 amu. Working with Y-12 and LANL, SRNL requested Siemens to modify their commercial Quantra system for low mass analysis. To achieve the required performance, Siemens had to increase the available waveform operating frequency from 5 MHz to 40 MHz and completely redesign the control electronics and software. However, they were able to use the previous ion trap, magnet, passive pump, and piezo-electric pulsed inlet valve design. NNSA invested $1M in this project and acquired four systems, two for Y-12 and one each for SRNL and LANL. Siemens claimed a $10M investment in the Quantra systems. The new Siemens Advanced Quantra demonstrated phenomenal resolution in the low mass range. Resolution greater than 400,000 was achieved for mass 2. The new spectrometer had a useful working mass range to 500 Daltons. However, experiments found that a continuous single scan from low mass to high was not possible. Two useful working ranges were established covering masses 1 to 6 and masses 12 to 500 for our studies. A compromise performance condition enabled masses 1 to 45 to be surveyed. The instrument was found to have a dynamic range of about three orders of magnitude and quantitative analysis is expected to be limited to around 5 percent without using complex fitting algorithms. Analysis of low concentration ions, at the ppm level, required a separate analysis using ion ejection techniques. Chemical ionization due to the formation of the MH{sup +} ion or MD{sup +} increased the complexity of the spectra compared to magnetic sector mass spectra and formation of the protonated or deuterated complex was a dynamic function of the trap ion concentration. This made quantitative measurement more of a challenge. However, the resolution of the instrument was far superior to any other mass spectrometry technique that has been applied to the analysis of the hydrogen isotopes. The piezo-electric picoliter injection device offers a new way of submitting small quantities of atmospheric pressure sample gas for analysis. The new software had many improvements over the previous version but significant flaws in the beta codes remain that make the prototype units less than ideal. The instrument is a promising new technology that experience will likely improve. Unfortunately, Siemens has concluded that the technology will not be a commercial success and has decided to stop producing this product.

  13. X-ray imaging crystal spectrometer for extended X-ray sources

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bitter, Manfred L. (Princeton, NJ); Fraenkel, Ben (Jerusalem, IL); Gorman, James L. (Bordentown, NJ); Hill, Kenneth W. (Lawrenceville, NJ); Roquemore, A. Lane (Cranbury, NJ); Stodiek, Wolfgang (Princeton, NJ); von Goeler, Schweickhard E. (Princeton, NJ)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokomak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters using the imaging properties for Bragg angles near 45. For a Bragg angle of 45.degree., the spherical crystal focuses a bundle of near parallel X-rays (the cross section of which is determined by the cross section of the crystal) from the plasma to a point on a detector, with parallel rays inclined to the main plain of diffraction focused to different points on the detector. Thus, it is possible to radially image the plasma X-ray emission in different wavelengths simultaneously with a single crystal.

  14. Effect of a spectrometer magnet on the beam-beam interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornacchia, M; Parzen, G

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of experimental apparatus in the interaction regions of an intersecting beam accelerator changes the configuration of the crossing beams. This changes the space-charge forces with respect to the standard, magnet-free crossing. The question is: what is the maximum allowable perturbation caused by the spectrometer magnet that can be tolerated from the point of view of the beam dynamics. This paper is limited to the perturbations that the curved trajectories cause the beam-beam space charge nonlinearities. The question has arisen of how one defines the strength of the perturbation. The only solution is to compute the strength of the most important nonlinear resources. In what follows, the computational method used in calculating these resonances is described, and compared with those induced by random orbit errors.

  15. Velocity-space sensitivity of the time-of-flight neutron spectrometer at JET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, A. S., E-mail: Ajsen@fysik.dtu.dk; Salewski, M.; Korsholm, S. B.; Leipold, F.; Nielsen, S. K.; Rasmussen, J.; Stejner, M. [Association Euratom - DTU, Technical University of Denmark, Department of Physics, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark); Eriksson, J.; Ericsson, G.; Hjalmarsson, A. [Association Euratom - VR, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The velocity-space sensitivities of fast-ion diagnostics are often described by so-called weight functions. Recently, we formulated weight functions showing the velocity-space sensitivity of the often dominant beam-target part of neutron energy spectra. These weight functions for neutron emission spectrometry (NES) are independent of the particular NES diagnostic. Here we apply these NES weight functions to the time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR at JET. By taking the instrumental response function of TOFOR into account, we calculate time-of-flight NES weight functions that enable us to directly determine the velocity-space sensitivity of a given part of a measured time-of-flight spectrum from TOFOR.

  16. Invited Article: Characterization of background sources in space-based time-of-flight mass spectrometers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilbert, J. A.; Gershman, D. J.; Gloeckler, G.; Lundgren, R. A.; Zurbuchen, T. H. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, 2455 Hayward St, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Orlando, T. M.; McLain, J. [Georgia Institute of Technology, 225 North Ave NW, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States); Steiger, R. von [International Space Science Institute, Hallerstrasse 6, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland and Physikalisches Institut, Universitt Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    For instruments that use time-of-flight techniques to measure space plasma, there are common sources of background signals that evidence themselves in the data. The background from these sources may increase the complexity of data analysis and reduce the signal-to-noise response of the instrument, thereby diminishing the science value or usefulness of the data. This paper reviews several sources of background commonly found in time-of-flight mass spectrometers and illustrates their effect in actual data using examples from ACE-SWICS and MESSENGER-FIPS. Sources include penetrating particles and radiation, UV photons, energy straggling and angular scattering, electron stimulated desorption of ions, ion-induced electron emission, accidental coincidence events, and noise signatures from instrument electronics. Data signatures of these sources are shown, as well as mitigation strategies and design considerations for future instruments.

  17. Mass spectrometer with electron source for reducing space charge effects in sample beam

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Houk, Robert S.; Praphairaksit, Narong

    2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A mass spectrometer includes an ion source which generates a beam including positive ions, a sampling interface which extracts a portion of the beam from the ion source to form a sample beam that travels along a path and has an excess of positive ions over at least part of the path, thereby causing space charge effects to occur in the sample beam due to the excess of positive ions in the sample beam, an electron source which adds electrons to the sample beam to reduce space charge repulsion between the positive ions in the sample beam, thereby reducing the space charge effects in the sample beam and producing a sample beam having reduced space charge effects, and a mass analyzer which analyzes the sample beam having reduced space charge effects.

  18. The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; et al

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, iontemperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describesmoreab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.less

  19. Plasma Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer for Elemental and Isotopic Measurements: Past, Present, and Future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chuji; Winstead, Christopher B.; Duan, Yixiang; Scherrer, Susan T.; Koirala, Sudip P.; Jang, Ping-Rey; Miller, George P.; Mazzotti, Fabio J.

    2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies using Plasma Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (plasma-CRDS) show much promise of this newly developed technique for ultra-sensitive elemental/isotopic measurements. Plasma-CRDS, since its introduction in 1997, has experienced three major stages: (i) the early stage demonstration of the technical feasibility, (ii) the recent advancement on its technical improvements and extensive applications for elemental/isotopic measurements as well as plasma diagnostics and (iii) the most recent progress on the improvement of the instrument configurations based on a diode laser-compact microwave plasma-CRDS. Research and development in many aspects of this technique is vigorously under processing in our laboratories. This paper reports a brief review on the plasma-CRDS technique, its applications and the most recent advancement. Discussions on future developments toward a new generation of plasma- CRDS-based spectrometers for ultra-sensitive elemental/isotopic measurements are also presented.

  20. IBIS: An inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic neutron spectrometer for the SNS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, J. K.; Robertson, Lee; Herwig, Kenneth W. [Instrument and Source Development Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Wildgruber, Christoph U. [Chemical and Engineering Division, Spallation Neutron Source, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The high power target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) currently has about 20 completed neutron scattering instruments. With a broad coverage of the momentum transfer (Q)-energy (E) space, these instruments serve an extensive user community. In an effort to further expand the scientific capabilities of the SNS instrument suites, we propose a low background, inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic spectrometer for the SNS which will expand the Q-E coverage of the current instrument suite and facilitate the study of inelastic and quasi-elastic scatterings at low Q values. The possible location for the proposed instrument is either beamline 8 which views the decoupled water moderator, or beamline 14A, which views a cold, coupled super critical hydrogen moderator. The instrument parameters, optimizations, and performances at these two beamline locations are discussed.

  1. Study of Calibration of Solar Radio Spectrometers and the quiet-Sun Radio Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Chengming; Tan, Baolin; Fu, Qijun; Liu, Yuying; Xu, Guirong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents a systematic investigation of the influence of weather conditions on the calibration errors by using Gaussian fitness, least chi-square linear fitness and wavelet transform to analyze the calibration coefficients from observations of the Chinese Solar Broadband Radio Spectrometers (at frequency bands of 1.0-2.0 GHz, 2.6-3.8 GHz, and 5.2-7.6 GHz) during 1997-2007. We found that calibration coefficients are influenced by the local air temperature. Considering the temperature correction, the calibration error will reduce by about $10\\%-20\\%$ at 2800 MHz. Based on the above investigation and the calibration corrections, we further study the radio emission of the quiet-Sun by using an appropriate hybrid model of the quiet-Sun atmosphere. The results indicate that the numerical flux of the hybrid model is much closer to the observation flux than that of other ones.

  2. Deuterium density profile determination at JET using a neutron camera and a neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eriksson, J., E-mail: jacob.eriksson@physics.uu.se; Castegnetti, G.; Conroy, S.; Ericsson, G.; Hellesen, C. [EURATOM-VR, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University (Sweden); Giacomelli, L. [Department of Physics, Universit degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca, Milano (Italy); EURATOM-CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon (United Kingdom)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we estimate the fuel ion density profile in deuterium plasmas at JET, using the JET neutron camera, the neutron time-of-flight spectrometer TOFOR, and fusion reactivities modeled by the transport code TRANSP. The framework has been tested using synthetic data, which showed that the density profile could be reconstructed with an average accuracy of the order of 10 %. The method has also been applied to neutron measurements from a neutral beam heated JET discharge, which gave n{sub d}/n{sub e} ? 0.6 0.3 in the plasma core and n{sub d}/n{sub e} ? 0.4 0.3 towards the edge. Correction factors for detector efficiencies, neutron attenuation, and back-scattering are not yet included in the analysis; future work will aim at refining the estimated density.

  3. Mass measurements near the $r$-process path using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Van Schelt; D. Lascar; G. Savard; J. A. Clark; S. Caldwell; A. Chaudhuri; J. Fallis; J. P. Greene; A. F. Levand; G. Li; K. S. Sharma; M. G. Sternberg; T. Sun; B. J. Zabransky

    2012-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The masses of 40 neutron-rich nuclides from Z = 51 to 64 were measured at an average precision of $\\delta m/m= 10^{-7}$ using the Canadian Penning Trap mass spectrometer at Argonne National Laboratory. The measurements, of fission fragments from a $^{252}$Cf spontaneous fission source in a helium gas catcher, approach the predicted path of the astrophysical $r$ process. Where overlap exists, this data set is largely consistent with previous measurements from Penning traps, storage rings, and reaction energetics, but large systematic deviations are apparent in $\\beta$-endpoint measurements. Differences in mass excess from the 2003 Atomic Mass Evaluation of up to 400 keV are seen, as well as systematic disagreement with various mass models.

  4. Data acquisition system with pulse height capability for the TOFED time-of-flight neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z. J.; Peng, X. Y.; Zhang, X.; Du, T. F.; Hu, Z. M.; Cui, Z. Q.; Ge, L. J.; Xie, X. F.; Yuan, X.; Li, X. Q.; Zhang, G. H.; Chen, J. X.; Fan, T. S., E-mail: tsfan@pku.edu.cn [School of Physics and State Key Laboratory of Nuclear Physics and Technology, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gorini, G.; Nocente, M.; Tardocchi, M. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universit di Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Piazza della Scienza 3, 20126 Milano (Italy); Istituto di Fisica del Plasma P. Caldirola, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Hu, L. Q.; Zhong, G. Q.; Lin, S. Y.; Wan, B. N. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031, Anhui (China)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A new time-of-flight neutron spectrometer TOFED has been constructed for installation at Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak. A data acquisition system combining measurements of flight time and energy from the interaction of neutrons with the TOFED scintillators has been developed. The data acquisition system can provide a digitizing resolution better than 1.5% (to be compared with the >10% resolution of the recoil particle energy in the plastic scintillators) and a time resolution <1 ns. At the same time, it is compatible with high count rate event recording, which is an essential feature to investigate phenomena occurring on time scales faster than the slowing down time (?100 ms) of the beam ions in the plasma. Implications of these results on the TOFED capability to resolve fast ion signatures in the neutron spectrum from EAST plasmas are discussed.

  5. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States)] [The Palladino Company, Inc., 720 Fillmore St., San Francisco, CA 94117 (United States); Dempsey, Gregg [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States)] [United States Environmental Protection Agency, P.O. Box 98517, Las Vegas, NV 89193-8517 (United States); Klemovich, Ron [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)] [HydroGeoLogic, Inc., 6340 Glenwood, Suite 200, Building No. 7, Overland Park, KS 66202 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  6. Tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser based spectrometer for angle resolved photoemission spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, Rui; Mou, Daixiang; Wu, Yun; Huang, Lunan; Kaminski, Adam [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States) [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Ames Laboratory, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); McMillen, Colin D.; Kolis, Joseph [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Clemson University, Clemson, South Carolina 29634 (United States); Giesber, Henry G.; Egan, John J. [Advanced Photonic Crystals LLC, Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708 (United States)] [Advanced Photonic Crystals LLC, Fort Mill, South Carolina 29708 (United States)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an angle-resolved photoemission spectrometer with tunable vacuum ultraviolet laser as a photon source. The photon source is based on the fourth harmonic generation of a near IR beam from a Ti:sapphire laser pumped by a CW green laser and tunable between 5.3 eV and 7 eV. The most important part of the set-up is a compact, vacuum enclosed fourth harmonic generator based on potassium beryllium fluoroborate crystals, grown hydrothermally in the US. This source can deliver a photon flux of over 10{sup 14} photon/s. We demonstrate that this energy range is sufficient to measure the k{sub z} dispersion in an iron arsenic high temperature superconductor, which was previously only possible at synchrotron facilities.

  7. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Evans, R.

    1991-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the [sup 196]Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of [+-]0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour. 8 figures.

  8. Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Evans, Roger (N. Hampton, NH)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the .sup.196 Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of .+-.0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour.

  9. Wavelength Determination for Solar Features Observed by the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown,C.; Hara, H.; Kamio, S.; Feldman, U.; Seely, J.; Doschek, G.; Mariska, J.; Korendyke, C.; Lang, J.; Dere, K.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A wavelength calibration of solar lines observed by the high resolution EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode satellite is reported. Spectral features of the quiet sun and of two mildly active areas were measured and calibrated. A listing of the stronger observed lines with identification of the leading contributor ions is presented. 41 lines are reported, with 90% identified. Wavelength precisions (2{sigma}) of {+-}0.0031 Angstroms for the EIS short band and {+-}0.0029 Angstroms for the EIS long band are obtained. These lines, typical of 1-2x10{sup 6} K plasmas, are recommended as standards for the establishment of EIS wavelength scales. The temperature of EIS varies by about 1.5 C around the orbit and also with spacecraft pointing. The correlation of these temperature changes with wavelength versus pixel number scale changes is reported.

  10. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield for extending by 103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions. Sci. Instrum. 85, 063502 (2014); 10.1063/1.4880203 D 3 He -proton emission imaging for inertial

  11. A high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer for mapping the heliopause and 3-D Solar Wind using He+ 30.4nm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    A high-throughput, high-resolution spectrometer for mapping the heliopause and 3-D Solar Wind using Entrance slit farm with ~ 1000 slits Photon counting imager Concave grating used near normal incidence >> Need a higher throughput diffuse EUV spectrometer solar wind respond to coronal

  12. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  13. Developing a narrow-line laser spectrometer based on a tunable continuous-wave dye laser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Chun; Lv, Shasha; Bi, Jin [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, Fang [College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Li, Liufeng; Chen, Lisheng [Wuhan Institute of Physics and Mathematics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); State Key Laboratory of Magnetic Resonance and Atomic and Molecular Physics, Wuhan 430071, China and Laboratory of Atomic Frequency Standards, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the development of a dye-laser-based spectrometer operating at 550600 nm. The spectrometer will be used to detect an ultra-narrow clock transition ({sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 3}P{sub 0}) in an Ytterbium optical lattice clock and perform high-resolution spectroscopy of iodine molecules trapped in the sub-nanometer channels of zeolite crystal (AlPO{sub 4}-11). Two-stage Pound-Drever-Hall frequency stabilization is implemented on the tunable continuous-wave dye laser to obtain a reliable operation and provide stable laser radiations with two different spectral linewidths. In the first-stage frequency locking, a compact home-built intracavity electro-optic modulator is adopted for suppressing fast frequency noise. With an acquisition time of 0.1 s the 670-kHz linewidth of the free-running dye laser is reduced to 2 kHz when locked to a pre-stabilization optical cavity with a finesse of 1170. When the pre-stabilized laser is locked to a high-finesse optical cavity, a linewidth of 1.4 Hz (2 s) is observed and the frequency stability is 3.7 10{sup ?15} (3 s). We also measure and analyze the individual noise contributions such as those from residual amplitude modulation and electronic noise. The ongoing upgrades include improving long-term frequency stability at time scales from 10 to 100 s and implementing continuous frequency scan across 10 GHz with radio-frequency precision.

  14. Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer Operational Performance Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matthew Watrous; Anthony Appelhans; Robert Hague; John Olson; Tracy Houghton

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL made an assessment of the commercially available inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometers (ICPMS) for actinide analysis; emphasizing low detection limits for plutonium. INL scientists subsequently determined if plutonium was present on a swipe, at a 10 million atom decision level. This report describes the evaluation of ICPMS instruments and the operational testing of a new process for the dissolution, separation and analysis via ICPMS of swipes for plutonium and uranium. The swipe dissolution, plutonium and uranium isolation, separation and purification are wet chemistry methods following established procedures. The ICPMS is a commercially available multi-collector magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes five ion counting detectors operating simultaneously. The instrument includes a sample introduction system allowing for sample volumes of < 1 mL to be reproducibly injected into the instrument with minimal waste of the sample solution, while maximizing the useable signal. The performance of the instrument was measured using SRM 996 (244Pu spike) at concentrations of 12 parts per quadrillion (ppq, fg/mL) and with SRM 4350B Columbia River Sediment samples spiked onto swipes at the 10 million atom level. The measured limit of detection (LOD, defined as 3s) for 239Pu is 310,000 atoms based upon the instrument blank data. The limit of quantification (LOQ defined as 10 s) for 239Pu is 105,000 atoms. The measured limit of detection for 239Pu from the SRM 4350B spiked onto a swipe was 2.7 million atoms with the limit of quantification being 9.0 million atoms.

  15. Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

  16. A light diet for a giant appetite: An assessment of China's proposed fluorescent lamp standard

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Jiang

    2002-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Lighting has been one of the fastest growing electric end-uses in China over the last twenty years, with an average annual growth rate of 14%. Fluorescent lighting provides a significant portion of China's lighting need. In 1998, China produced 680 million fluorescent lamps, of which 420 million were linear fluorescent lamps of various diameters (T8 to T12). There are substantial variations both in energy efficiency and lighting performance among locally produced fluorescent lamps. Such variations present a perfect opportunity for policy intervention through efficiency standards to promote the adoption of more efficient fluorescent lamps in China. This paper analyzes China's proposed minimum efficiency standard for fluorescent lamps and presents an assessment of its likely impacts on China's lighting energy consumption and GHG emissions.

  17. HIGH PURITY GE GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER ON JAPANESE LUNAR POLAR ORBITER , M.-N. Kobayashi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berezhnoi, Aleksei A.

    of three parts; gamma-ray detector (GRD), compressor driver unit (CDU) and gamma- ray and particle purified Ge detector is employed as a main detector, by which gamma-rays can be detected in the energyHIGH PURITY GE GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER ON JAPANESE LUNAR POLAR ORBITER SELENE. N. Hasebe1 , M

  18. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 522526 A gamma-ray spectrometer system for fusion applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín-Solís, José Ramón

    Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 476 (2002) 522­526 A gamma-ray spectrometer electrons hitting the inconel poloidal limiter and/or the vessel; and (b) neutron capture gamma the bremsstrahlung spectra is in agreement with the runaway energy predicted by a test particle model of runaway

  19. A digitizer based compact digital spectrometer for ion beam analysis using field programmable gate arrays and various energy algorithms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jger, Markus [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Leipzig, PF 100920, 04009 Leipzig (Germany)] [Faculty of Mathematics and Computer Science, University of Leipzig, PF 100920, 04009 Leipzig (Germany); Reinert, Tilo [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of North Texas, 1155 Union Circle, Denton, Texas 76203 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the implementation of a compact multi-detector fully digital spectrometer and data acquisition system at a nuclear microprobe for ion beam analysis and imaging. The spectrometer design allows for system scalability with no restriction on the number of detectors. It consists of four-channel high-speed digitizer modules for detector signal acquisition and one low-speed digital-to-analog converter (DAC) module with two DAC channels and additional general purpose inputs/outputs to control ion beam scanning and data acquisition. Each digitizer module of the spectrometer provides its own Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) as digital signal processing unit to analyze detector signals as well as to synchronize the ion beam position in hard real-time. With the customized FPGA designs for all modules, all calculation intensive tasks are executed inside the modules, which reduces significantly the data stream to and CPU load on the control computer. To achieve an optimal energy resolution for all detector/preamplifier pulse shape characteristics, a user-definable infinite impulse response filter with high throughput for energy determination was implemented. The new spectrometer has an online data analysis feature, a compact size, and is able to process any type of detector signals such as particle induced x-ray emission, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, or scanning transmission ion microscopy.

  20. Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro Salandrino, and Nader Engheta*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jingjing

    Optical spectrometer at the nanoscale using optical Yagi-Uda nanoantennas Jingjing Li, Alessandro; published 5 May 2009 Here we present and analyze an optical spectrum analyzer at the nanometer scale that is able to distribute different frequency contents of the radiation of an optical dipole source