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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

THE APPLICATION OF THE SXF LATTICE DESCRIPTION AND THE UAL SOFTWARE ENVIRONMENT TO THE ANALYSIS OF THE LHC.  

SciTech Connect

A software environment for accelerator modeling has been developed which includes the UAL (Unified Accelerator Library), a collection of accelerator physics libraries with a Per1 interface for scripting, and the SXF (Standard eXchange Format), a format for accelerator description which extends the MAD sequence by including deviations from design values. SXF interfaces have been written for several programs, including MAD9 and MAD8 via the doom database, Cosy, TevLat and UAL itself, which includes Teapot++. After an overview of the software we describe the application of the tools to the analysis of the LHC lattice stability, in the presence of alignment and coupling errors, and to the correction of the first turn and closed orbit in the machine.

FISCHER,W.; PILAT,F.; PTITSON,V.

1999-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

2

A laser-excited synchronous fluorescence spectrometer for benzo(a)pyrene  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laser-based synchronous scanning fluorimeter was developed for detecting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Although extensive sample cleanup and separation are usually required, fluorescence has long been used for determination of PAHs. Amount of sample pretreatment can often be reduced when synchronous fluorescence (SF) is used, and the sensitivity of SF can be increased by the high power and narrow profile of a laser source. A small, portable, pulsed dye laser was used in this study. The instrument and its application to the determination of the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene are described.

Huebedr, D.M.; Iruela Del Olmo, M.; Stevenson, C.L.; Vo-Dinh, T.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Note: A portable, light-emitting diode-based ruby fluorescence spectrometer for high-pressure calibration  

SciTech Connect

Ruby (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, with {approx}0.5 wt. % Cr doping) is one of the most widely used manometers at the giga-Pascal scale. Traditionally, its fluorescence is excited with intense laser sources. Here, I present a simple, robust, and portable design that employs light-emitting diodes (LEDs) instead. This LED-based system is safer in comparison with laser-based ones.

Feng Yejun [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

4

Monolithic spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Kahl, William K. (Knoxville, TN); Snyder, Jr., William B. (Knoxville, TN); Evans, III, Boyd M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Marlar, Troy A. (Knoxville, TN); Cunningham, Joseph P. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Multidimensional spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

Zanni, Martin Thomas (Madison, WI); Damrauer, Niels H. (Boulder, CO)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

6

Spectrometer gun  

SciTech Connect

A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM); Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Spectrometer gun  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

1981-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

8

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 0.1 Beamline 8.0.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:51 Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE)

9

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 0.1 Beamline 8.0.1 Print Tuesday, 20 October 2009 08:51 Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE)

10

HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer (HELIOS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

kinematics The HELIOS Spectrometer concept The Argonne implementation of HELIOS Commissioning experiment Planned upgrades Helios elsewhere B.B.Back, Argonne National Laboratory...

11

Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

12

SNS backscattering spectrometer, BASIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 {mu}eV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Imaging Fourier transform spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer having a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer providing a series of images to a focal plane array camera. The focal plane array camera is clocked to a multiple of zero crossing occurrences as caused by a moving mirror of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer and as detected by a laser detector such that the frame capture rate of the focal plane array camera corresponds to a multiple of the zero crossing rate of the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The images are transmitted to a computer for processing such that representations of the images as viewed in the light of an arbitrary spectral ``fingerprint`` pattern can be displayed on a monitor or otherwise stored and manipulated by the computer.

Bennett, C.L.

1993-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

14

Real time Faraday spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a charged particle spectrometer that contains a detection system which embodies the benefits of both foil-light emissions and faraday cups, yet it does not interfere with the particle beam. 5 Figs. (GHH)

Smith, T.E. Jr.; Struve, K.W.; Colella, N.J.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

An Instantaneous CCN Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A thermal gradient diffusion cloud chamber with a supersaturation field that increases along the path of the flow of sample is used as a cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) spectrometer. The CCN spectrum is derived from the final droplet size ...

James G. Hudson

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Broad band waveguide spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrometer for analyzing a sample of material utilizing a broad band source of electromagnetic radiation and a detector. The spectrometer employs a waveguide possessing an entry and an exit for the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source. The waveguide further includes a surface between the entry and exit portions which permits interaction between the electromagnetic radiation passing through the wave guide and a sample material. A tapered portion forms a part of the entry of the wave guide and couples the electromagnetic radiation emanating from the source to the waveguide. The electromagnetic radiation passing from the exit of the waveguide is captured and directed to a detector for analysis.

Goldman, Don S. (Folsom, CA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

An Improved Raindrop Chemistry Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A spectrometer allowing size-fractional chemical analysis of raindrops has been described previously by the authors. Modifications to this raindrop chemistry spectrometer now allow improved performance in windy conditions. Instrument ...

Stuart G. Bradley; Stephen J. Adams; C. David Stow; Stephen J. de Mora

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fluorescent refrigeration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluorescent refrigeration is based on selective radiative pumping, using substantially monochromatic radiation, of quantum excitations which are then endothermically redistributed to higher energies. Ultimately, the populated energy levels radiatively deexcite emitting, on the average, more radiant energy than was initially absorbed. The material utilized to accomplish the cooling must have dimensions such that the exciting radiation is strongly absorbed, but the fluorescence may exit the material through a significantly smaller optical pathlength. Optical fibers and mirrored glasses and crystals provide this requirement. 6 figs.

Epstein, R.I.; Edwards, B.C.; Buchwald, M.I.; Gosnell, T.R.

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

Fluorescent Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of 30-110 lumens per watt). They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours).

20

MASS SPECTROMETER LEAK  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved valve is described for precisely regulating the flow of a sample fluid to be analyzed, such as in a mass spectrometer, where a gas sample is allowed to "leak" into an evacuated region at a very low, controlled rate. The flow regulating valve controls minute flow of gases by allowing the gas to diffuse between two mating surfaces. The structure of the valve is such as to prevent the corrosive feed gas from contacting the bellows which is employed in the operation of the valve, thus preventing deterioration of the bellows.

Shields, W.R.

1960-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Neutron range spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are colliminated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. 1 fig.

Manglos, S.H.

1988-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

22

Method for calibrating mass spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method whereby a mass spectra generated by a mass spectrometer is calibrated by shifting the parameters used by the spectrometer to assign masses to the spectra in a manner which reconciles the signal of ions within the spectra having equal mass but differing charge states, or by reconciling ions having known differences in mass to relative values consistent with those known differences. In this manner, the mass spectrometer is calibrated without the need for standards while allowing the generation of a highly accurate mass spectra by the instrument.

Anderson, Gordon A [Benton City, WA; Brands, Michael D [Richland, WA; Bruce, James E [Schwenksville, PA; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

2002-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

23

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

& Cooling Water Heating Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of...

24

Time of flight mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time-of-flight mass spectrometer is described in which ions are desorbed from a sample by nuclear fission fragments, such that desorption occurs at the surface of the sample impinged upon by the fission fragments. This configuration allows for the sample to be of any thickness, and eliminates the need for complicated sample preparation.

Ulbricht, Jr., William H. (Arvada, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Spin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

5 Spin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS-NIM/SRI07 Figure 3 Ancollected on Beamline 7 at the ALS is shown here. The photonSpin Spectrometer at the ALS and APS-NIM/SRI07 Spin

Tobin, James G; Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; University of Missouri-Rolla; Boyd Technologies

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

Sandia National Laboratories has created a method and apparatus for measuring the position of an object. It relies on the attenuation of fluorescence light carried inside a fluorescent optical fiber to determine the position of an object.

27

Energy Basics: Fluorescent Lighting  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent lamps to provide the same amount of illumination (efficacy of 30-110 lumens per watt). They...

28

THE NCNR NEUTRON SPIN ECHO SPECTROMETER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The NSE spectrometer, developed in partnership with Exxon Research and Engineering and the Forschungszentrum Jlich in Germany [3], is ...

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

29

Advanced Mass Spectrometers for Hydrogen Isotope Analyses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the results of a joint Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) - Savannah River Plant (SRP) ''Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program''. The program was undertaken to evaluate two prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometers and obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometers to replace obsolete instruments.

Chastagner, P.

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

TAX: Backscattering Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Triple-Axis Spectrometer at HFIR Triple-Axis Spectrometer (HB-3) Triple-Axis Spectrometer (HB-3). HB-3 is a colossal flux thermal neutron three-axis spectrometer designed for...

31

Commissioning of the HELIOS spectrometer.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the implementation and commissioning of a device based on a new concept for measurements of nuclear reactions in inverse kinematics. The HELIcal Orbit Spectrometer, HELIOS, was commissioned at Argonne National Laboratory by studying the {sup 28}Si(d,p){sup 29}Si reaction in inverse kinematics. This experiment served as a proof of principle for this previously untested concept, and was used to verify the response and performance characteristics of HELIOS.

Lighthall, J. C.; Back, B. B.; Baker, S. I.; Freeman, S. J.; Lee, H. Y.; Kay, B. P.; Marley, S. T.; Rehm, K. E.; Rohrer, J. E.; Schiffer, J. P.; Shetty, D. V.; Vann, A. W.; Winkelbauer, J. R.; Wuosmaa, A. H.; Physics; Western Michigan Univ.; Univ. of Manchester

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

33

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8.0.1 Print 8.0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

34

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

35

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

36

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8.0.1 Print 8.0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

37

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

38

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

39

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

40

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

42

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

43

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8.0.1 Print 8.0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

44

Beamline 8.0.1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0.1 Print 0.1 Print Surface and materials science, soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF), open port Scientific disciplines: Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system Endstations: 8.0.1.1: Soft x-ray fluorescence (SXF) spectrometer 8.0.1.2: Open port 8.0.1.3: Wet-RIXS 8.0.1.4: Nano-NEXAFS 8.0.1.5: Bio-NEXAFS GENERAL BEAMLINE INFORMATION Operational Yes Proposal cycle Proposals for General Sciences Beamlines (6-month cycle) Source characteristics 5-cm period undulator (U5) (first, third, and fifth harmonics) Energy range 80-1250 eV Monochromator SGM (gratings: 150, 380, 925 lines/mm) Flux (1.9 GeV, 400 mA) 1011 to 6 x 1015 photons/s (resolution and energy dependent) Resolving power (E/ΔE) 7000 Scientific disciplines Green energy sciences, material sciences, nanosciences, surfaces sciences, correlated electron system.

45

Portable neutron spectrometer and dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The disclosure relates to a battery operated neutron spectrometer/dosimeter utilizing a microprocessor, a built-in tissue equivalent LET neutron detector, and a 128-channel pulse height analyzer with integral liquid crystal display. The apparatus calculates doses and dose rates from neutrons incident on the detector and displays a spectrum of rad or rem as a function of keV per micron of equivalent tissue and also calculates and displays accumulated dose in millirads and millirem as well as neutron dose rates in millirads per hour and millirem per hour.

Waechter, David A. (Los Alamos, NM); Erkkila, Bruce H. (Los Alamos, NM); Vasilik, Dennis G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA)

2006-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

47

Miniaturized Mass Spectrometer - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary Sandia's invention relates to a miniaturized mass spectrometer using a silicon chip field emitter array as the source of ...

48

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer | Brookhaven and the LHC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ATLAS Muon Spectrometer small wheels Brookhaven National Laboratory led the development of the 32 muon detectors in the inner ring of the ATLAS detector's "small wheels." (A small...

49

Pulsed Ionization Source for Ion Mobility Spectrometers  

Mobility Spectrometers Potential Advantages ... ORNLs new wave of detection devices based on ion mobility spectrometry offer enhanced sensitivity and

50

A Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compact Lightweight Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CLASP) is an optical particle spectrometer capable of measuring size-resolved particle concentrations in 16 user-defined size bins spanning diameters in the range 0.24 < D < 18.5 ?m at a rate of ...

Martin K. Hill; Barbara J. Brooks; Sarah J. Norris; Michael H. Smith; Ian M. Brooks; Gerrit de Leeuw

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Compact time-of-flight mass spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a time-of-flight mass spectrometer developed for measuring the parameters of a pulsed hydrogen beam. The duration of an electron-beam current pulse in the ionizer of the mass spectrometer can be varied within 2-20 usec, the pulse electron current is 0.6 mA, and the electron energy is 250 eV. The time resolution of the mass spectrometer is determined by the repetition period of the electron-beam current pulses and is 40 usec. The mass spectrometer has 100% transmission in the direction of motion of molecular-beam particles. The dimension of the mass spectrometer is 7 cm in this direction. The mass resolution is sufficient for determination of the composition of the hydrogen beam.

Belov, A.S.; Kubalov, S.A.; Kuzik, V.F.; Yakushev, V.P.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Highly thermostable fluorescent proteins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermostable fluorescent proteins (TSFPs), methods for generating these and other stability-enhanced proteins, polynucleotides encoding such proteins, and assays and method for using the TSFPs and TSFP-encoding nucleic acid molecules are provided. The TSFPs of the invention show extremely enhanced levels of stability and thermotolerance. In one case, for example, a TSFP of the invention is so stable it can be heated to 99.degree. C. for short periods of time without denaturing, and retains 85% of its fluorescence when heated to 80.degree. C. for several minutes. The invention also provides a method for generating stability-enhanced variants of a protein, including but not limited to fluorescent proteins.

Bradbury, Andrew M. (Santa Fe, NM); Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Kiss, Csaba (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift...

54

Fiber bundle fluorescence endomicroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An improved design for fiber bundle fluorescence endomicroscopy is demonstrated. Scanned illumination and detection using coherent fiber bundles with 30,000 elements with 3 ?m resolution enables high speed imaging with ...

Tsai, Tsung-Han

55

Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

Forrest, Stephen (Ann Arbor, MI); Sun, Yiru (Princeton, NJ); Giebink, Noel (Ann Arbor, MI); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2010-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

56

Fluorescent filtered electrophosphorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), and more specifically to OLEDS that emit light using a combination of fluorescent emitters and phosphorescent emitters for the efficient utilization of all of the electrically generated excitons.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Princeton, NJ); Sun, Yiru (Princeton, NJ); Giebink, Noel (Princeton, NJ); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2009-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

57

Recombinant fluorescent protein microsphere calibration standard  

SciTech Connect

A method for making recombinant fluorescent protein standard particles for calibration of fluorescence instruments.

Nolan, John P. (Santa Fe, NM); Nolan, Rhiannon L. (Santa Fe, NM); Ruscetti, Teresa (Los Alamos, NM); Lehnert, Bruce E. (Los Alamos, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

The Vibrational Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vibrational Spectrometer at SNS VISION VISION is best thought of as the neutron analogue of an infrared-Raman spectrometer. It is optimized to characterize molecular vibrations in...

59

HYSPEC: the Hybrid Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Spectrometer at SNS Hybrid Spectrometer Schematic of the HYSPEC instrument Developed by a team from leading U.S. universities and national laboratories and an international...

60

Gas sampling system for a mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates generally to a gas sampling system, and specifically to a gas sampling system for transporting a hazardous process gas to a remotely located mass spectrometer. The gas sampling system includes a capillary tube having a predetermined capillary length and capillary diameter in communication with the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a flexible tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube intermediate the supply of process gas and the mass spectrometer, a heat transfer tube surrounding and coaxial with the capillary tube, and a heating device in communication the heat transfer tube for substantially preventing condensation of the process gas within the capillary tube.

Taylor, Charles E; Ladner, Edward P

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting October 17, 2013 - 5:44pm Addthis Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent Lighting Fluorescent lamps use 25%-35% of the energy used by incandescent products to provide a similar amount of light. They also last about 10 times longer (7,000-24,000 hours). The two general types of fluorescent lamps are: Compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) -- commonly found with integral ballasts and screw bases, these are popular lamps often used in household fixtures Fluorescent tube and circline lamps -- typically used for task lighting such as garages and under cabinet fixtures, and for lighting large areas in commercial buildings. CFLs CFLs combine the energy efficiency of fluorescent lighting with the convenience and popularity of incandescent fixtures. CFLs fit most fixtures

62

Development of an Inexpensive Raindrop Size Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deployment of weather radar, notably in mountainous terrain with many microclimates, requires the use of several or even many drop size spectrometers to provide confidence in the quantitative relation between radar reflectivity and rainfall. ...

William Henson; Geoff Austin; Harry Oudenhoven

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

LCLS Injector Straight-Ahead Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spectrometer design was modified to allow the measurement of uncorrelated energy spread for the nominal lattice. One bunch from every 120 each second would be sent to the straight ahead spectrometer while the transverse cavity is on. The implementation of this 'stealing mode' will not be available for the LCLS commissioning and the early stage of operation. However, the spectrometer was redesigned to retain that option. The energy feedback relies independently on the beam position of the beam in the dispersive section of dogleg 1 (DL1). The main modification of the spectrometer design is the Pole face rotation of 7.5 degrees on both entrance and exit faces. The location and range of operation of the 3 quadrupoles remains unchanged relative to those of the earlier design.

Limborg-Deprey , C.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

64

Multidetector calibration for mass spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The International Atomic Energy Agency`s Safeguards Analytical Laboratory has performed calibration experiments to measure the different efficiencies among multi-Faraday detectors for a Finnigan-MAT 261 mass spectrometer. Two types of calibration experiments were performed: (1) peak-shift experiments and (2) peak-jump experiments. For peak-shift experiments, the ion intensities were measured for all isotopes of an element in different Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by shifting the isotopes to various Faraday detectors. Two different peak-shifting schemes were used to measure plutonium (UK Pu5/92138) samples. For peak-jump experiments, ion intensities were measured in a reference Faraday detector for a single isotope and compared with those measured in the other Faraday detectors. Repeated measurements were made by switching back-and-forth between the reference Faraday detector and a selected Faraday detector. This switching procedure is repeated for all Faraday detectors. Peak-jump experiments were performed with replicate measurements of {sup 239}Pu, {sup 187}Re, and {sup 238}U. Detector efficiency factors were estimated for both peak-jump and peak-shift experiments using a flexible calibration model to statistically analyze both types of multidetector calibration experiments. Calculated detector efficiency factors were shown to depend on both the material analyzed and the experimental conditions. A single detector efficiency factor is not recommended for each detector that would be used to correct routine sample analyses. An alternative three-run peak-shift sample analysis should be considered. A statistical analysis of the data from this peak-shift experiment can adjust the isotopic ratio estimates for detector differences due to each sample analysis.

Bayne, C.K. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Donohue, D.L.; Fiedler, R. [IAEA, Seibersdorf (Austria). Safeguards Analytical Lab.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

1987 calibration of the TFTR neutron spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 3}He neutron spectrometer used for measuring ion temperatures and the NE213 proton recoil spectrometer used for triton burnup measurements were absolutely calibrated with DT and DD neutron generators placed inside the TFTR vacuum vessel. The details of the detector response and calibration are presented. Comparisons are made to the neutron source strengths measured from other calibrated systems. 23 refs., 19 figs., 6 tabs.

Barnes, C.W.; Strachan, J.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA); Princeton Univ., NJ (USA). Plasma Physics Lab.)

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Partial pressure measurements with an active spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Partial pressure neutral ga measurements have been made using a commercial Penning gauge in conjunction with an active spectrometer. In prior work utilizing bandpass filters and conventional spectrometers, trace concentrations of the hydrogen isotopes H, D, T and of the noble gases He, Ne and Ar were determined from characteristic spectral lines in the light emitted by the neutral species of these elements. For all the elements mentioned, the sensitivity was limited by spectral contamination from a pervasive background of molecular hydrogen radiation. The active spectrometer overcomes this limitations by means of a digital lock-in method and correlation with reference spectra. Preliminary measurements of an admixture containing a trace amount of neon in deuterium show better than a factor of 20 improvement in sensitivity over conventional techniques. This can be further improved by correlating the relative intensities of multiple lines to sets of reference spectra.

Brooks, N.H.; Jensen, T.H. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Colchin, R.J.; Maingi, R.; Wade, M.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Finkenthal, D.F. [Palomar Coll. (United States); Naumenko, N. [Inst. for Atomic and Molecular Physics (Japan); Tugarinov, S. [TRINITI (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A compact multichannel spectrometer for Thomson scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The availability of high-efficiency volume phase holographic (VPH) gratings and intensified CCD (ICCD) cameras have motivated a simplified, compact spectrometer for Thomson scattering detection. Measurements of T{sub e} 100 eV by a 2072 l/mm VPH grating. The spectrometer uses a fast-gated ({approx}2 ns) ICCD camera for detection. A Gen III image intensifier provides {approx}45% quantum efficiency in the visible region. The total read noise of the image is reduced by on-chip binning of the CCD to match the 8 spatial channels and the 10 spectral bins on the camera. Three spectrometers provide a minimum of 12 spatial channels and 12 channels for background subtraction.

Schoenbeck, N. L.; Schlossberg, D. J.; Dowd, A. S.; Fonck, R. J.; Winz, G. R. [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Compact hydrogen/helium isotope mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compact hydrogen and helium isotope mass spectrometer of the present invention combines low mass-resolution ion mass spectrometry and beam-foil interaction technology to unambiguously detect and quantify deuterium (D), tritium (T), hydrogen molecule (H.sub.2, HD, D.sub.2, HT, DT, and T.sub.2), .sup.3 He, and .sup.4 He concentrations and concentration variations. The spectrometer provides real-time, high sensitivity, and high accuracy measurements. Currently, no fieldable D or molecular speciation detectors exist. Furthermore, the present spectrometer has a significant advantage over traditional T detectors: no confusion of the measurements by other beta-emitters, and complete separation of atomic and molecular species of equivalent atomic mass (e.g., HD and .sup.3 He).

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM); McComas, David J. (Los Alamos, NM); Scime, Earl E. (Morgantown, WV)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Integrated fluorescence analysis system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An integrated fluorescence analysis system enables a component part of a sample to be virtually sorted within a sample volume after a spectrum of the component part has been identified from a fluorescence spectrum of the entire sample in a flow cytometer. Birefringent optics enables the entire spectrum to be resolved into a set of numbers representing the intensity of spectral components of the spectrum. One or more spectral components are selected to program a scanning laser microscope, preferably a confocal microscope, whereby the spectrum from individual pixels or voxels in the sample can be compared. Individual pixels or voxels containing the selected spectral components are identified and an image may be formed to show the morphology of the sample with respect to only those components having the selected spectral components. There is no need for any physical sorting of the sample components to obtain the morphological information.

Buican, Tudor N. (Los Alamos, NM); Yoshida, Thomas M. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Fluorescent fixtures and ballasts  

SciTech Connect

The basic parameters of a fluorescent lighting system that affect the illumination level are discussed. The parameters include the thermal performance of the fixture and the ballast factor, voltage regulation, and thermal regulation of the ballast/lamp system. Fixtures determine the minimum lamp-wall temperature of the lamps and are described as hot or cold. That is, the lamp-wall temperatures can vary from 39 to 61/sup 0/C. In general, cool fixtures tend to provide higher light levels and are more efficacious for a given ballast/lamp system. Solid-state fluorescent ballast/lamp systems have been measured and show a variation in light output from 6170 to 3780 lumens for the two-lamp, F-40, T-12, rapid-start lamps. Lighting designers must obtain this information in order to accurately predict illumination levels in a space.

Verderber, R.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes an electronic ballast unit for a fluorescent lamp comprising: a circuit assembly having a pair of voltage input terminal and a first inductor and a capacitor in series relationship with each other to form a series resonant circuit. The circuit is adapted to be coupled to a fluorescent lamp to provide a starting voltage for the lamp; and a second inductor connected in shunt relationship to the first inductor and connected to the other input terminal. There is a core on which the first inductor and the second inductor are mounted. The core inductively couples the inductors with each other and are shaped to reduce core losses to minimize the increase of temperature of the core; the core is of a generally H-shaped configuration, and means of opposite ends of the H-shaped core to complete the magnetic flux path for each inductor, respectively.

Boyd, G.D.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Magnetic fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

Electronic Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses the fastest growing energy efficient light source the electronic compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) explain the past and future growth of the CFL market while emphasizing future technical improvements along with discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers make the switch from incandescent lamps to CFLs. The basic CFL technology is covered in Chapter 3 including test results for selected ...

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

74

Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric lighting constitutes approximately 21-23 % of the electric grid load in the United States. The higher energy and maintenance costs of incandescent lamps, combined with the favorable economics of high-efficiency compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), are making CFLs the increasingly popular choice for both residential and commercial lighting. Utility incentive and rebate programs to stimulate CFL use and the beginnings of a ban on incandescent lamps are enhancing CFL penetration levels in these enviro...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Development and performance of a miniature, low cost mass spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A miniature, low cost mass spectrometer has been developed that is capable of unit resolution over a mass range of 10 to 50 AMU. The design of the mass spectrometer incorporates several new features that enhance the ...

Hemond, Brian D. (Brian David Thomson)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

DISK CHOPPER TIME-OF-FLIGHT SPECTROMETER (DCS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The Primary Spectrometer High energy neutrons and gammas ... steradians and arranged in three banks: The middle bank detector scattering ...

77

Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection Multimedia Nuclear Systems Analysis Engineering Analysis Nonproliferation and National Security Detection &...

78

Fluorescence analyzer for lignin  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus for measuring lignin concentration in a sample of wood pulp or black liquor comprises a light emitting arrangement for emitting an excitation light through optical fiber bundles into a probe which has an undiluted sensing end facing the sample. The excitation light causes the lignin concentration to produce fluorescent emission light which is then conveyed through the probe to analyzing equipment which measures the intensity of the emission light. Measures a This invention was made with Government support under Contract Number DOE: DE-FC05-90CE40905 awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE). The Government has certain rights in this invention.

Berthold, John W. (Salem, OH); Malito, Michael L. (Hubbard, OH); Jeffers, Larry (Alliance, OH)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Fluorescent temperature sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

80

Flash Lighting with Fluorescent Lamp.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A flash lighting circuit with the fluorescent lamp is designed to produce lighting flicker by means of controlling the operating frequency and the duty-ratio of (more)

Hsieh, Horng

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Compact imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact imaging spectrometer with an immersive diffraction grating that compensates optical distortions. The imaging spectrometer comprises an entrance slit for transmitting light, means for receiving the light and directing the light, an immersion grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit, the means for receiving the light, the immersion grating, and the detector array are positioned wherein the entrance slit transmits light to the means for receiving the light and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the immersion grating and the immersion grating receives the light and directs the light to the means for receiving the light, and the means for receiving the light directs the light to the detector array.

Chrisp, Michael P. (Danville, CA); Lerner, Scott A. (Corvallis, OR); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the alpha-particle spectrometer concept, and outlines challenges involved in the magnetic field design. Tagged photon interrogation: We investigated a method for discriminating fissile from benign cargo-material response to an energy-tagged photon beam. The method relies upon coincident detection of the tagged photon and a photoneutron or photofission neutron produced in the target material. The method exploits differences in the shape of the neutron production cross section as a function of incident photon energy in order to discriminate photofission yield from photoneutrons emitted by non-fissile materials. Computational tests of the interrogation method as applied to material composition assay of a simple, multi-layer target suggest that the tagged-photon information facilitates precise (order 1% thickness uncertainty) reconstruction of the constituent thicknesses of fissile (uranium) and high-Z (Pb) constituents of the test targets in a few minutes of photon-beam exposure. We assumed an 18-MeV endpoint tagged photon beam for these simulations. The report addresses several candidate design and data analysis issues for beamline infrastructure required to produce a tagged photon beam in a notional AI-dedicated facility, including the accelerator and tagging spectrometer.

Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

83

Quench anaylsis of MICE spectrometer superconducting solenoid  

SciTech Connect

MICE superconducting spectrometer solenoids fabrication and tests are in progress now. First tests of the Spectrometer Solenoid discovered some issues which could be related to the chosen passive quench protection system. Both solenoids do not have heaters and quench propagation relied on the 'quench back' effect, cold diodes, and shunt resistors. The solenoids have very large inductances and stored energy which is 100% dissipated in the cold mass during a quench. This makes their protection a challenging task. The paper presents the quench analysis of these solenoids based on 3D FEA solution of coupled transient electromagnetic and thermal problems. The simulations used the Vector Fields QUENCH code. It is shown that in some quench scenarios, the quench propagation is relatively slow and some areas can be overheated. They describe ways of improving the solenoids quench protection in order to reduce the risk of possible failure.

Kashikhin, Vladimir; Bross, Alan; /Fermilab; Prestemon, Soren; / /LBL, Berkeley

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Portable gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS) for use as a field portable organic chemical analysis instrument. The GC-MS is designed to be contained in a standard size suitcase, weighs less than 70 pounds, and requires less than 600 watts of electrical power at peak power (all systems on). The GC-MS includes: a conduction heated, forced air cooled small bore capillary gas chromatograph, a small injector assembly, a self-contained ion/sorption pump vacuum system, a hydrogen supply, a dual computer system used to control the hardware and acquire spectrum data, and operational software used to control the pumping system and the gas chromatograph. This instrument incorporates a modified commercial quadrupole mass spectrometer to achieve the instrument sensitivity and mass resolution characteristic of laboratory bench top units.

Andresen, B.D.; Eckels, J.D.; Kimmins, J.F.; Myers, D.W.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

Time Dispersive Spectrometer Using Digital Switching Means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are described for time dispersive spectroscopy. In particular, a modulated flow of ionized molecules of a sample are introduced into a drift region of an ion spectrometer. The ions are subsequently detected by an ion detector to produce an ion detection signal. The ion detection signal can be modulated to obtain a signal useful in assaying the chemical constituents of the sample.

Tarver, III, Edward E. (Livermore, CA); Siems, William F. (Spokane, WA)

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

86

Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

Filby, Evan E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Rankin, Richard A. (Ammon, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Expert overseer for mass spectrometer system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An expert overseer for the operation and real-time management of a mass spectrometer and associated laboratory equipment. The overseer is a computer-based expert diagnostic system implemented on a computer separate from the dedicated computer used to control the mass spectrometer and produce the analysis results. An interface links the overseer to components of the mass spectrometer, components of the laboratory support system, and the dedicated control computer. Periodically, the overseer polls these devices and as well as itself. These data are fed into an expert portion of the system for real-time evaluation. A knowledge base used for the evaluation includes both heuristic rules and precise operation parameters. The overseer also compares current readings to a long-term database to detect any developing trends using a combination of statistical and heuristic rules to evaluate the results. The overseer has the capability to alert lab personnel whenever questionable readings or trends are observed and provide a background review of the problem and suggest root causes and potential solutions, or appropriate additional tests that could be performed. The overseer can change the sequence or frequency of the polling to respond to an observation in the current data.

Filby, E.E.; Rankin, R.A.

1989-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

88

Fluorescent lamp ballast  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ballast is described having at least a first and second terminal for engaging the filaments of at least one fluorescent lamp which requires a breakdown voltage to ignite the lamp and a maintaining voltage for maintaining ionization therewithin, the electronic ballast comprising: a direct current voltage source; a transistor; a transformer having a primary winding separated into a first winding, a second winding, a third winding, and a fourth winding; the first winding connected between the voltage source and the first terminal; the second winding connected between the two terminals; the third winding connected between the second terminal and to both the transistor and to ground; the fourth winding connected between ground and the transistor; the lamp being parallel to the second winding when the lamp filaments engages the ballast terminals.

Ureche, A.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

89

Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

Pfeifer, Kent B. (Los Lunas, NM); Rumpf, Arthur N. (Albuquerque, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

91

Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence.E. Norman, UC Berkeley Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, privatepp. 349. G. Warren et al. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence of

Quiter, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Linear Electric Field Time-Of-Flight Ion Mass Spectrometers Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent

94

Electro-optic Phase Grating Streak Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

The electro-optic phase grating streak spectrometer (EOPGSS) generates a time-resolved spectra equivalent to that obtained with a conventional spectrometer/streak camera combination, but without using a streak camera (by far the more expensive and problematic component of the conventional system). The EOPGSS is based on a phase, rather than an amplitude grating. Further, this grating is fabricated of electro-optic material such as, for example, KD*P, by either etching grooves into an E-O slab, or by depositing lines of the E-O material onto an optical flat. An electric field normal to the grating alters the materials index of refraction and thus affects a shift (in angle) of the output spectrum. Ramping the voltage streaks the spectrum correspondingly. The streak and dispersion directions are the same, so a second (static, conventional) grating disperses the spectrum in the orthogonal direction to prevent different wavelengths from overwriting each other. Because the streaking is done by the grating, the streaked output spectrum is recorded with a time-integrating device, such as a CCD. System model, typical design, and performance expectations will be presented.

Goldin, F. J.

2012-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

95

Nanograting-based compact vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer and ...  

Nanograting-based compact vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer and beam pro?ler for in situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources

96

The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The triple axis spectrometer at the new research reactor OPAL in Australia. ... The TAS will be based on a thermal beam at the reactor face. ...

97

SEQUOIA: the Fine-Resolution Fermi Chopper Spectrometer at SNS...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of novel systems and materials that are currently unknown and complements the other main SNS chopper spectrometer, ARCS. In general, SEQUOIA is the instrument of choice for...

98

Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Media format Windows Media Format - Low Bandwidth Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection shown in this movie clip. :: Please wait until video loads...

99

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence . . . . . . . .2.9.1 Nuclear ThomsonSections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Nuclear Resonance

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure  

SciTech Connect

A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166{degrees}C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen.

Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Markey, J.K. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). School of Medicine

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Fluorescent lamp dimming adaptor kit  

SciTech Connect

An add-on fluorescent lamp dimming adaptor is described for connecting to a conventional nondimming ballast in a fluorescent lighting system, the system including a source of ac voltage. The ballast has terminals for connecting to a fluorescent lamp, the adaptor comprising: a switching module adapted to be coupled to the terminals for switching current from the lamp, the switching module being connected in parallel with the lamp to divert current from the lamp when the switching module conducts; and a level control coupled to the switching module, the level control controlling the conductive state of the switching module to vary the current in the lamp according to a dimming control signal supplied to the level control, the level control causing the switching module to switch at a frequency in the range of 300 hertz and higher during times that the lamp current is being varied.

Alley, R.P.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

102

PTAX: the Polarized Triple-Axis Spectrometer at HFIR | ORNL Neutron...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Polarized Triple-Axis Spectrometer at HFIR HB-1 photo Polarized Triple-Axis Spectrometer (HB-1). Of the four triple-axis spectrometers installed at HFIR, the HB-1 instrument is...

103

Cerenkov emission induced by external beam radiation stimulates molecular fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cerenkov emission is induced when a charged particle moves faster than the speed of light in a given medium. Both x-ray photons and electrons produce optical Cerenkov photons in everyday radiation therapy of tissue; yet, this phenomenon has never been fully documented. This study quantifies the emissions and also demonstrates that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Methods: In this study, Cerenkov emission induced by radiation from a clinical linear accelerator is investigated. Biological mimicking phantoms were irradiated with x-ray photons, with energies of 6 or 18 MV, or electrons at energies 6, 9, 12, 15, or 18 MeV. The Cerenkov emission and the induced molecular fluorescence were detected by a camera or a spectrometer equipped with a fiber optic cable. Results: It is shown that both x-ray photons and electrons, at MeV energies, produce optical Cerenkov photons in tissue mimicking media. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the Cerenkov emission can excite a fluorophore, protoporphyrin IX (PpIX), embedded in biological phantoms. Conclusions: The results here indicate that molecular fluorescence monitoring during external beam radiotherapy is possible.

Axelsson, Johan; Davis, Scott C.; Gladstone, David J.; Pogue, Brian W. [Thayer School of Engineering, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States); Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire 03766 (United States); Thayer School of Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mercury reduction studies to facilitate the thermal decontamination of phosphor powder residues from spent fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

This work investigates the thermal release of mercury from phosphor powder of spent fluorescent lamps. The treatment conditions and the ability of various reducing agents (primarily sodium borohydride) to lower the overall heating temperature required to improve the release of Hg have been evaluated. Hg species in samples were monitored in a thermal desorption atomic absorption spectrometer system, and total mercury was analyzed in a cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometer. Sodium borohydride was the best reducing agent among the ones studied. However, citric acid presented a high capacity to weaken mercury bonds with the matrix. When the sample was crushed with sodium borohydride for 40 min in a mass ratio of 10:1 (sample:reducing agent) and submitted to thermal treatment at 300 deg. C for 2 h, the concentration of mercury in a phosphor powder sample with 103 mg kg{sup -1} of mercury reached 6.6 mg kg{sup -1}.

Alves Durao, Walter [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Cidade Universitaria 30.123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Andreva de Castro, Camila [Chemistry Engineering Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG) (Brazil); Carvalhinho Windmoeller, Claudia [Chemistry Department, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG), Cidade Universitaria 30.123-970 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: claucw@netuno.lcc.ufmg.br

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

105

The High-Acceptance Dielectron Spectrometer HADES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HADES is a versatile magnetic spectrometer aimed at studying dielectron production in pion, proton and heavy-ion induced collisions. Its main features include a ring imaging gas Cherenkov detector for electron-hadron discrimination, a tracking system consisting of a set of 6 superconducting coils producing a toroidal field and drift chambers and a multiplicity and electron trigger array for additional electron-hadron discrimination and event characterization. A two-stage trigger system enhances events containing electrons. The physics program is focused on the investigation of hadron properties in nuclei and in the hot and dense hadronic matter. The detector system is characterized by an 85% azimuthal coverage over a polar angle interval from 18 to 85 degree, a single electron efficiency of 50% and a vector meson mass resolution of 2.5%. Identification of pions, kaons and protons is achieved combining time-of-flight and energy loss measurements over a large momentum range. This paper describes the main features and the performance of the detector system.

The HADES Collaboration; G. Agakishiev; A. Balanda; B. Bannier; R. Bassini; D. Belver; A. V. Belyaev; A. Blanco; M. Boehmer; J. L. Boyard; P. Braun-Munzinger; P. Cabanelas; E. Castro; S. Chernenko; T. Christ; M. Destefanis; J. Diaz; F. Dohrmann; A. Dybczak; T. Eberl; W. Enghardt; L. Fabbietti; O. V. Fateev; P. Finocchiaro; P. Fonte; J. Friese; I. Froehlich; T. Galatyuk; J. A. Garzon; R. Gernhaeuser; A. Gil; C. Gilardi; M. Golubeva; D. Gonzalez-Diaz; F. Guber; M. Heilmann; T. Heinz; T. Hennino; R. Holzmann; A. Ierusalimov; I. Iori; A. Ivashkin; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaempfer; K. Kanaki; T. Karavicheva; D. Kirschner; I. Koenig; W. Koenig; B. W. Kolb; R. Kotte; F. Krizek; R. Kruecken; W. Kuehn; A. Kugler; A. Kurepin; S. Lang; J. S. Lange; K. Lapidus; T. Liu; L. Lopes; M. Lorenz; L. Maier; A. Mangiarotti; J. Markert; V. Metag; B. Michalska; J. Michel; D. Mishra; E. Moriniere; J. Mousa; C. Muentz; L. Naumann; J. Otwinowski; Y. C. Pachmayer; M. Palka; Y. Parpottas; V. Pechenov; O. Pechenova; T. PerezCavalcanti; J. Pietraszko; W. Przygoda; B. Ramstein; A. Reshetin; M. Roy-Stephan; A. Rustamov; A. Sadovsky; B. Sailer; P. Salabura; A. Schmah; E. Schwab; Yu. G. Sobolev; S. Spataro; B. Spruck; H. Stroebele; J. Stroth; C. Sturm; M. Sudol; A. Tarantola; K. Teilab; P. Tlusty; M. Traxler; R. Trebac; H. Tsertos; V. Wagner; M. Weber; M. Wisniowski; T. Wojcik; J. Wuestenfel; S. Yurevich; Y. V. Zanevsky; P. Zhou; P. Zumbruch

2009-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Al(26) Studies with INTEGRAL's Spectrometer SPI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Al(26) radioactivity traces recent nucleosynthesis throughout the Galaxy, and is known to be produced in massive stars and novae. The map from its decay gamma-ray line suggests massive stars to dominate, but high-resolution line spectroscopy is expected to supplement imaging of Al(26) source regions and thus to help decide about the Al(26) injection process and interstellar environment, hence about the specific massive-star subgroup and phase which produces interstellar Al(26). The INTEGRAL Spectrometer SPI has observed Galactic Al(26) radioactivity in its 1809 keV gamma-ray line during its first inner-Galaxy survey. Instrumental background lines make analysis difficult; yet, a clear signal from the inner Galaxy agrees with expectations. In particular, SPI has constrained the line width to exclude previously-reported line broadenings corresponding to velocities >500 km/s. The signal-to-background ratio of percent implies that detector response and background modeling need to be fine-tuned to eventually enable line shape deconvolution in order to extract source location information along the line of sight.

R. Diehl; K. Kretschmer; G. Lichti; V. Schnfelder; A. W. Strong; A. von Kienlin; J. Kndlseder; P. Jean; V. Lonjou; G. Weidenspointner; J. -P. Roques; G. Vedrenne; S. Schanne; N. Mowlavi; C. Winkler; C. Wunderer

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

107

Comparison of a transmission grating spectrometer to a reflective grating spectrometer for standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We evaluate a new transmission grating spectrometer for standoff laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) measurements. LIBS spectra collected from standoff distances are often weak, with smaller peaks blending into the background and noise. Scattered light inside the spectrometer can also contribute to poor signal-to-background and signal-to-noise ratios for smaller emission peaks. Further, collecting standoff spectra can be difficult because most spectrometers are designed for laboratory environments and not for measurements in the field. To address these issues, a custom-designed small, lightweight transmission grating spectrometer with no moving parts was built that is well suited for standoff LIBS field measurements. The performance of the spectrometer was quantified through 10 m standoff LIBS measurements collected from aluminum alloy samples and measurements from spectra of a Hg-Ar lamp. The measurements were compared to those collected using a Czerny-Turner reflective grating spectrometer that covered a similar spectral range and used the same ICCD camera. Measurements using the transmission grating spectrometer had a 363% improved signal-to-noise ratio when measured using the 669 nm aluminum emission peak.

Weisberg, Arel; Craparo, Joseph; De Saro, Robert; Pawluczyk, Romuald

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs Replacing Fluorescent Lightbulbs July 29, 2012 - 6:37pm Addthis Although fluorescent lightbulbs are generally energy efficient, you can replace them with new, even more efficient bulbs that use better electrodes and coatings than older ones. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/JoLin. Although fluorescent lightbulbs are generally energy efficient, you can replace them with new, even more efficient bulbs that use better electrodes and coatings than older ones. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto.com/JoLin. What does this mean for me? Today's fluorescent light fixtures and bulbs are far more efficient than older ones. You can replace fluorescent bulbs and ballasts with more efficient ones to save money and energy. All fluorescent bulbs contain a very small amount of mercury:

109

Measuring the Natural Fluorescence of Phytoplankton Cultures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory instrument, the Natural Fluorescence Chemostat, was developed to measure the natural fluorescence of phytoplankton cultures. With this instrument, the physical and chemical environment of a culture can be manipulated with respect to ...

S. R. Laney; R. M. Letelier; R. A. Desiderio; M. R. Abbott; D. A. Kiefer; C. R. Booth

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Quantum Dot Fluorescence Lifetime Engineering with DNA ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quantum Dot Fluorescence Lifetime Engineering with DNA Origami ... such as metal nanoparticles and semiconductor quantum dots is challenging ...

111

BASIS: Backscattering Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Backscattering Spectrometer Backscattering Spectrometer View inside the BAIS tank View inside the BASIS tank. BASIS is a near-backscattering, crystal-analyzer spectrometer that provides very fine energy resolution, as low as 3.0 to 3.5 µeV at the elastic peak (depending on sample size). This requires a long initial guide section of 84 m from moderator to sample in order to achieve the timing resolution necessary for obtaining the desired energy resolution. BASIS provides an excellent dynamic range near the elastic peak of about plus and minus 100 µeV in the standard high-intensity operation regime, which, if needed, could be extended to plus and minus 200 µeV and beyond. The spectrometer is optimized for quasielastic scattering but provides about 0.1% resolution in energy transfers up to ~40 meV; the inelastic excitations need to be

112

The FIRE infrared spectrometer at Magellan: construction and commissioning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the construction and commissioning of FIRE, a new 0.8-2.5?m echelle spectrometer for the Magellan/ Baade 6.5 meter telescope. FIRE delivers continuous spectra over its full bandpass with nominal spectral ...

Simcoe, Robert A.

113

Study of electromagnetic processes with the dielectron spectrometer HADES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dielectron production in pp and dp reactions at 1.25 A.GeV has been studied with the High Acceptance DiElectron Spectrometer (HADES) at GSI. Results obtained in inclusive and exclusive channels are shown

B. Ramstein; The HADES collaboration

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

An acousto-optical correlation spectrometer for radio astronomy.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The objective of this thesis research is to develop and construct a wide-band, high resolution, two-channel prototype acousto-optic correlation spectrometer (AOCS) to analyze signals received (more)

Cheung, Kwok-wai

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Hydrogen-Isotope Mass-Spectrometer Evaluation Program. Bimonthly progress report, July/September 1982  

SciTech Connect

The joint SRL-SRP Hydrogen Isotope Mass Spectrometer Evaluation Program was undertaken to: (1) evaluate a prototype hydrogen isotope mass spectrometer that was developed for the Mass Spectrometer Technical Group by VG-Isotopes, Ltd., and (2) obtain sufficient data to permit SRP personnel to specify the mass spectrometes that will be purchased under Schedule 44 Budget Project 81-SR-010 to replace obsolete mass spectrometers in Buildings 232-H and 224-H.

Chastagner, P.; Daves, H.L.; Hess, W.B.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Three-dimensional fluorescence lifetime tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Near-infrared fluorescence tomography using molecularly targeted lifetime-sensitive, fluorescent contrast agents have applications for early-stage cancer diagnostics. Yet, although the measurement of fluorescent lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) is extensively used in microscopy and spectroscopy applications, demonstration of fluorescence lifetime tomography for medical imaging is limited to two-dimensional studies. Herein, the feasibility of three-dimensional fluorescence-lifetime tomography on clinically relevant phantom volumes is established, using (i) a gain-modulated intensified charge coupled device (CCD) and modulated laser diode imaging system, (ii) two fluorescent contrast agents, e.g., Indocyanine green and 3-3'-Diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide differing in their fluorescence lifetime by 0.62 ns, and (iii) a two stage approximate extended Kalman filter reconstruction algorithm. Fluorescence measurements of phase and amplitude were acquired on the phantom surface under different target to background fluorescence absorption (70:1, 100:1) and fluorescence lifetime (1:1, 2.1:1) contrasts at target depths of 1.4-2 cm. The Bayesian tomography algorithm was employed to obtain three-dimensional images of lifetime and absorption owing to the fluorophores.

Godavarty, Anuradha; Sevick-Muraca, Eva M.; Eppstein, Margaret J. [327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States); 1011 Richardson Building, Photon Migration Laboratories, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); 327 Votey Building, Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont 05405 (United States)

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Flat Quartz-Crystal X-ray Spectrometer for Nuclear Forensics Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to quickly and accurately quantify the plutonium (Pu) content in pressurized water reactor (PWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is critical for nuclear forensics purposes. One non-destructive assay (NDA) technique being investigated to detect bulk Pu in SNF is measuring the self-induced x-ray fluorescence (XRF). Previous XRF measurements of Three Mile Island (TMI) PWR SNF taken in July 2008 and January 2009 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) successfully illustrated the ability to detect the 103.7 keV x ray from Pu using a planar high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. This allows for a direct measurement of Pu in SNF. Additional gamma ray and XRF measurements were performed on TMI SNF at ORNL in October 2011 to measure the signal-to-noise ratio for the 103.7 keV peak. Previous work had shown that the Pu/U peak ratio was directly proportional to the Pu/U content and increased linearly with burnup. However, the underlying Compton background significantly reduced the signal-to-noise ratio for the x-ray peaks of interest thereby requiring a prolonged count time. Comprehensive SNF simulations by Stafford et al showed the contributions to the Compton continuum were due to high-energy gamma rays scattering in the fuel, shipping tube, cladding, collimator and detector1. The background radiation was primarily due to the incoherent scattering of the 137Cs 661.7 keV gamma. In this work methods to reduce the Compton background and thereby increase the signal-to-noise ratio were investigated. To reduce the debilitating effects of the Compton background, a crystal x-ray spectrometer system was designed. This wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy technique isolated the Pu and U x rays according to Bragg's law by x-ray diffraction through a crystal structure. The higher energy background radiation was blocked from reaching the detector using a customized collimator and shielding system. A flat quartz-crystal x-ray spectrometer system was designed specifically to fit the constraints and requirements of detecting XRF from SNF. Simulations were performed to design and optimize the collimator design and to quantify the improved signal-to-noise ratio of the Pu and U x-ray peaks. The proposed crystal spectrometer system successfully diffracted the photon energies of interest while blocking the high-energy radiation from reaching the detector and contributing to background counts. The spectrometer system provided a higher signal-to-noise ratio and lower percent error for the XRF peaks of interest from Pu and U. Using the flat quartz-crystal x-ray spectrometer and customized collimation system, the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) simulations showed the 103.7 keV Pu x-ray peak signal-to-noise ratio improved by a factor of 13 and decreased the percent error by a factor of 3.3.

Goodsell, Alison

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

ARM - Field Campaign - ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared govCampaignsASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : ASSIST: Atmospheric Sounder Spectrometer for Infrared Spectral Technology 2008.07.08 - 2008.07.18 Lead Scientist : Michael Howard For data sets, see below. Description Goals of assist were to intercompare radiance spectra and profile retrievals from a new AERI-like instrument, called "ASSIST" with the SGP site AERI(s) and calculations from Radiosondes measurements. * To bring the ASSIST instrument to the SGP ACRF and perform simultaneous measurements of the sky radiation with those from the AERI. * On relatively cloud-free days, release a special radiosonde at the

119

CORELLI: the Elastic Diffuse Scattering Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Elastic Diffuse Scattering Spectrometer The Elastic Diffuse Scattering Spectrometer CORELLI The CORELLI instrument. CORELLI is a statistical chopper spectrometer with energy discrimination. It's designed and optimized to probe complex disorder in crystalline materials through diffuse scattering of single-crystal samples. The momentum transfer ranges from 0.5 to 12 Å-1, and the energy of incident neutrons ranges from 10 to 200 meV. This instrument combines the high efficiency of white-beam Laue diffraction with energy discrimination by modulating the beam with a statistical chopper. A cross-correlation method is used to reconstruct the elastic signal from the modulated data. Accurate modeling of the short-range order associated with the diffuse scattering requires measurements over large volumes of three-dimensional reciprocal space, with sufficient momentum

120

Electron source for a mini ion trap mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion trap is described which operates in the regime between research ion traps which can detect ions with a mass resolution of better than 1:10{sup 9} and commercial mass spectrometers requiring 10{sup 4} ions with resolutions of a few hundred. The power consumption is kept to a minimum by the use of permanent magnets and a novel electron gun design. By Fourier analyzing the ion cyclotron resonance signals induced in the trap electrodes, a complete mass spectra in a single combined structure can be detected. An attribute of the ion trap mass spectrometer is that overall system size is drastically reduced due to combining a unique electron source and mass analyzer/detector in a single device. This enables portable low power mass spectrometers for the detection of environmental pollutants or illicit substances, as well as sensors for on board diagnostics to monitor engine performance or for active feedback in any process involving exhausting waste products. 10 figs.

Dietrich, D.D.; Keville, R.F.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Ultracold-neutron infrastructure for the gravitational spectrometer GRANIT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The gravitational spectrometer GRANIT will be set up at the Institut Laue Langevin. It will profit from the high ultracold neutron density produced by a dedicated source. A monochromator made of crystals from graphite intercalated with potassium will provide a neutron beam with 0.89 nm incident on the source. The source employs superthermal conversion of cold neutrons in superfluid helium, in a vessel made from BeO ceramics with Be windows. A special extraction technique has been tested which feeds the spectrometer only with neutrons with a vertical velocity component v < 20 cm/s, thus keeping the density in the source high. This new source is expected to provide a density of up to 800 1/cm3 for the spectrometer.

P. Schmidt-Wellenburg; K. H. Andersen; P. Courtois; M. Kreuz; S. Mironov; V. V. Nesvizhevsky; G. Pignol; K. V. Protasov; T. Soldner; F. Vezzu; O. Zimmer

2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

122

Photo-Spectrometer Realized In A Standard Cmos Ic Process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrometer, comprises: a semiconductor having a silicon substrate, the substrate having integrally formed thereon a plurality of layers forming photo diodes, each of the photo diodes having an independent spectral response to an input spectra within a spectral range of the semiconductor and each of the photo diodes formed only from at least one of the plurality of layers of the semiconductor above the substrate; and, a signal processing circuit for modifying signals from the photo diodes with respective weights, the weighted signals being representative of a specific spectral response. The photo diodes have different junction depths and different polycrystalline silicon and oxide coverings. The signal processing circuit applies the respective weights and sums the weighted signals. In a corresponding method, a spectrometer is manufactured by manipulating only the standard masks, materials and fabrication steps of standard semiconductor processing, and integrating the spectrometer with a signal processing circuit.

Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); Ericson, M. Nance (Knoxville, TN); Dress, William B. (Knoxville, TN); Jellison, Gerald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Sitter, Jr., David N. (Tucson, AZ); Wintenberg, Alan L. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fluorescent Lighting Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics Fluorescent Lighting Basics October 17, 2013 - 5:39pm Addthis Light from a fluorescent lamp is first created by an electric current conducted through an inert gas producing ultraviolet light that is invisible to the human eye. The ultraviolet light in turn interacts with special blends of phosphors coating the interior surface of the fluorescent lamp tube that efficiently converts the invisible light into useful white light. Fluorescent lamps require a special power supply called a ballast that is needed to regulate lamp operating current and provide a compatible start-up voltage. Electronic ballasts perform the same function as a magnetic ballast but outperform the outdated magnetic products by operating at a very high frequency that eliminates flicker and noise while

124

Bremsstrahlung-induced K fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Bremsstrahlung radiation can be used to excite nearly monoenergetic x rays in secondary targets, which are then used to study the energy response of radiation detectors if the intensity and purity are known. A method is suggested for calculating the spectral intensity of the secondary target radiation, including K-fluorescent x rays, and the bremsstrahlung and characteristic line radiation scattered from the target. Coherent and incoherent scatter are included in the calculation. To test the theory, bremsstrahlung radiation from an x-ray unit operating in the 100- to 300-kV potential range was used to excite K-fluorescent radiation in secondary targets that range in atomic number from 29 to 90. The primary and secondary spectra were measured with NaI, silicon, and germanium detectors. The measured primary spectral intensities were used as input to the secondary spectral intensity calculation. Calculated secondary spectra were within 20 percent agreement with measurement. Optimization of the secondary target intensity and purity is discussed as a function of target thickness, potential, and selective filtration.

Storm, E.

1976-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Bragg x-ray survey spectrometer for ITER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several potential impurity ions in the ITER plasmas will lead to loss of confined energy through line and continuum emission. For real time monitoring of impurities, a seven channel Bragg x-ray spectrometer (XRCS survey) is considered. This paper presents design and analysis of the spectrometer, including x-ray tracing by the Shadow-XOP code, sensitivity calculations for reference H-mode plasma and neutronics assessment. The XRCS survey performance analysis shows that the ITER measurement requirements of impurity monitoring in 10 ms integration time at the minimum levels for low-Z to high-Z impurity ions can largely be met.

Varshney, S. K.; Jakhar, S. [ITER-India, Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar, Gujarat 382428 (India); Barnsley, R. [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon, 13115 Saint Paul Lez Durance (France); O'Mullane, M. G. [Department of Physics, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Portable spotter for fluorescent contaminants on surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable fluorescence-based spotter for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon contamination on personnel and work area surfaces under ambient lighting conditions is provided. This instrument employs beam modulation and phase sensitive detection for discriminating between fluorescence from organic materials from reflected background light and inorganic fluorescent material. The device uses excitation and emission filters to provide differentiation between classes of aromatic organic compounds. Certain inorganic fluorescent materials, including heavy metal compounds, may also be distinguished from the organic compounds, despite both having similar optical properties.

Schuresko, Daniel D. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Sandia National Laboratories Fluorescent Optical Position Sensor  

As shown in the figure, a small excitation source, such as a laser or LED, excites a localized area of fluorescence at an unknown position along the

128

Energy saving controller for fluorescent lamps.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although fluorescent lamp is a very efficient lighting device in daily life, still the high harmonic distortion and low power factor cause unnecessary energy consumption. (more)

Cheong, Zhi Xiong

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. M. Pashkevich, Antarctic Ice Sheet as a model in Searchmethods for discovery of ice-entrapped microorganisms inV. M. Pashkevich, Antarctic Ice Sheet as Object for Solving

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

High energy resolution five-crystal spectrometer for high quality fluorescence and absorption measurements on an X-ray Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE). It will be unique among nuclear fuel irradiation at Idaho National Laboratory for fabrication of metallic nuclear fuels rods. A small bench scale caster and emission applications, and study their optical properties. Colloidal nanomaterials for light harvesting

131

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so even though drilling fluid is a common contaminant, itdrill fluid at high pressure during the mechanical drillingfluid, designed to match the density of ice, will be used to continue drilling

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Integration and commissioning of the ATLAS Muon spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN is currently waiting to record the first collision data in spring 2009. Its muon spectrometer is designed to achieve a momentum resolution of 10% pT(mu) = 1 TeV/c. The spectrometer consists of a system of three superconducting air-core toroid magnets and is instrumented with three layers of Monitored Drift Tube chambers (Cathode Strip Chambers in the extreme forward region) as precision detectors. Resistive Plate Chambers in the barrel and Thin Gap Chambers in the endcap regions provide a fast trigger system. The spectrometer passed important milestones in the last year. The most notable milestone was the installation of the inner layer of endcap muon chambers, which constituted the last big piece of the ATLAS detector to be lowered in the ATLAS cavern. In addition, during the last two years most of the muon detectors were commissioned with cosmic rays while being assembled in the underground experimental cavern. We will report on our experience with the precision and trigger chambers, the optical spectrometer alignment system, the level-1 trigger, and the ATLAS data acquisition system. Results of the global performance of the muon system from data with magnetic field will also be presented.

Alberto Belloni; for the ATLAS collaboration

2008-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Acousto-optical correlation spectrometer for radio astronomy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this thesis is to develop and construct a wide-band, high-resolution, two-channel prototype acousto-optic correlation spectrometer (AOCS) to analyze signals received by the three-element millimeter-wave interferometer at Caltech's Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO), which may be used to study the distribution of carbon monoxide and other molecules in galaxies. The proposed correlation spectrometer has the main advantage of large time-bandwidth products and hence of low cost per frequency channel. Thus, it is suitable for many scientific objectives that require both large bandwidth and high resolution, such as mapping the distribution and temperature of the interstellar gases of galactic sources and extragalactic sources or studying the atmospheric conditions of planets in the solar system. Phase switching has been used to reduce the zero level variation of this instrument, and is found to be more effective than other schemes used by the single dish acousto-optical spectrometers. Both the frequency resolution and the frequency coverage of this instrument can be changed easily, and give it a flexibility not attainable by the filter-bank spectrometers.

Cheung, K.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optical system for high resolution spectrometer/monochromator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An optical system for use in a spectrometer or monochromator employing a mirror which reflects electromagnetic radiation from a source to converge with same in a plane. A straight grooved, varied-spaced diffraction grating receives the converging electromagnetic radiation from the mirror and produces a spectral image for capture by a detector, target or like receiver.

Hettrick, Michael C. (Berkeley, CA); Underwood, James H. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Applications of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) has the potential of addressing a wide variety of applications, which require isotopic and/or elemental information about a sample. We have investigated a variety of non-proliferation applications that may be addressed by NRF. From these applications, we have selected two, measuring uranium enrichment in UF6 cylinders and material verification in dismantlement, to investigate in more detail. Analytical models have been developed to evaluate these applications, and test measurements have been conducted to validate those models. We found that it is unlikely with current technology to address the requirements for UF6 cylinder enrichment measurements. In contrast, NRF is a very promising approach for material verification for dismantlement.

Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.; Peplowski, Patrick N.

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

136

PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

4 4 PEVELOPMENT OF FLUORESCENCE LIFETIME DIAGNOSTIC w I Project Accomplishments Summary (Attachment I) CRADA NO. TSB-1449-97 Date: U 1 8 1 9 8 Revision: 1 A . Parties The project is a relationship between the Lawrence Livennore National Laboratoq (LLNL) and Optiphase, Inc. University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 7000 East Avenue, L-399 Livermore, CA 94550 Optiphase, h c 7652 Haskell Ave. Van Nuys, CA 91406 Technical Contact - D r . Pepe Davis (8 18)782-0997ext 1 12 B . Background Fiber-optic-based sensors are excellent candidates for detecting the presence and monitoring the levels of degradation products in stockpiled weapons. Specifically, fl uorescence-based sensors are extremely sensitive, can have high specificity for compounds of interest, and are "e~ectrically

137

Fiber optical assembly for fluorescence spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for analyzing a sample for the presence of an analyte in a sample. The system includes a sample holder for containing the sample; an excitation source, such as a laser, and at least one linear array radially disposed about the sample holder. Radiation from the excitation source is directed to the sample, and the radiation induces fluorescent light in the sample. Each linear array includes a plurality of fused silica optical fibers that receive the fluorescent light and transmits a fluorescent light signal from the first end to an optical end port of the linear array. An end port assembly having a photo-detector is optically coupled to the optical end port. The photo-detector detects the fluorescent light signal and converts the fluorescent light signal into an electrical signal.

Carpenter, II, Robert W. (Pagosa Springs, CO); Rubenstein, Richard (Staten Island, NY); Piltch, Martin (Los Alamos, NM); Gray, Perry (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

138

Evaluation of plant seedling water stress using dynamic fluorescence index with blue LED-based fluorescence imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamic fluorescence image index system capable of non-destructive assessment of water stress in cabbage seedlings was developed. The quenching curves of chlorophyll fluorescence characteristic to the plant's water stress status under reduced excitation ... Keywords: Chlorophyll fluorescence, Fluorescence image, Fluorescence index, Water stress

Shih-Chieh Hsiao; Suming Chen; I-Chang Yang; Chia-Tseng Chen; Chao-Yin Tsai; Yung-Kun Chuang; Feng-Jehng Wang; Yu-Liang Chen; Tzong-Shyan Lin; Y. Martin Lo

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Improvements of Droplet Size Distribution Measurements with the Fast-FSSP (Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basics of single particle measurements are discussed and illustrated with measurements of the droplet size distribution with an optical spectrometer, the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP), and its improved version, the Fast-FSSP. ...

Jean-Louis Brenguier; Thierry Bourrianne; Afraniode Araujo Coelho; Jacques Isbert; Robert Peytavi; Dominique Trevarin; Perry Weschler

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

A Microdrop Generator for the Calibration of a Water Vapor Isotope Ratio Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microdrop generator is described that produces water vapor with a known isotopic composition and volume mixing ratio for the calibration of a near-infrared diode laser water isotope ratio spectrometer. The spectrometer is designed to measure in ...

Rosario Q. Iannone; Daniele Romanini; Samir Kassi; Harro A. J. Meijer; Erik R. Th Kerstel

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fluorescent and Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Fluorescent and Incandescent Lamps Public Meeting on AddThis.com... About Standards & Test Procedures Implementation, Certification & Enforcement

142

Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nondestructive Isotopic Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7, (1959) pp. 54. [12] B.J. Quiter, ``Nuclear ResonanceFluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay,'' University ofclandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence,"

Ludewigt, Bernhard A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Compact Fluorescent Lamps : Technologies : From the Lab to the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

process. (Left) Compact Fluorescent Lamp; (Right) Cover of the 'Lighting Retrofit Workbook' (Left) Compact Fluorescent Lamp (CFL) (Right) Retrofitting national parks...

144

Mercury-free fluorescent lighting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief comparative review of possible mercury free fluorescent lighting technologies is presented, including rare-gas positive column discharges, molecular discharges, and dielectric barrier discharges. Detailed experimental results on xenon positive column discharges will then be considered. In order to judge whether xenon-based discharges are a viable UV source it is necessary to measure the radiant emittance (power per unit area) for the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) resonance xenon emission at 147 nm. Two techniques to determine the VUV radiant emittance have been developed and applied to xenon discharges. One method combines the measured resonance level density using absorption spectroscopy and a calculation of the trapped decay rate for the resonance radiation to arrive at the radiant emittance at 147 nm. A second method utilizes a direct measurement of the radiance (power per unit area per unit solid angle) at 147 nm using a calibrated VUV photodiode, and a calculation of the relative angular distribution of the resonance radiation to determine the radiant emittance. In both techniques a simulation of the transport of resonance radiation is key to determining the radiant emittance.

Doughty, D.A. [General Electric Corporate Research and Development, Schenectady, NY (United States)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Reflector-coupled fluorescent solar collector  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides a system for the collection of electromagnetic radiation and the transmission of that radiation to a point of use. In its simplest sense, an apparatus for the collection and transmission of electromagnetic radiation comprises a cylindrical fluorescent fiber, at least one end of which is optically coupled to an optical wave guide, and means for reflecting solar radiation impinging over a relatively wide area onto said cylindrical fluorescent fiber. Preferably, a compound parabolic mirror is employed for reflecting incident solar radiation onto the optical fluorescent fiber.

Younghouse, L.B.

1984-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

ARM - Evaluation Product - Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging ProductsAirborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Evaluation Product : Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) 1997.08.01 - 1997.08.01 Site(s) SGP General Description AVIRIS is an optical sensor that delivers calibrated images of the upwelling spectral radiance in 224 contiguous spectral channels (bands) with wavelengths from 400 to 2500 nanometers. AVIRIS has been flown on two aircraft platforms: a NASA ER-2 jet and the Twin Otter turboprop. The main objective of the AVIRIS project is to identify, measure, and monitor constituents of the Earth's surface and atmosphere based on molecular absorption and particle scattering signatures. Research with

147

Analysis and System Design Framework for Infrared Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

The authors present a preliminary analysis and design framework developed for the evaluation and optimization of infrared, Imaging Spatial Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) electro-optic systems. Commensurate with conventional interferometric spectrometers, SHS modeling requires an integrated analysis environment for rigorous evaluation of system error propagation due to detection process, detection noise, system motion, retrieval algorithm and calibration algorithm. The analysis tools provide for optimization of critical system parameters and components including : (1) optical aperture, f-number, and spectral transmission, (2) SHS interferometer grating and Littrow parameters, and (3) image plane requirements as well as cold shield, optical filtering, and focal-plane dimensions, pixel dimensions and quantum efficiency, (4) SHS spatial and temporal sampling parameters, and (5) retrieval and calibration algorithm issues.

Cooke, B.J.; Smith, B.W.; Laubscher, B.E.; Villeneuve, P.V.; Briles, S.D.

1999-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

148

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods are disclosed for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector. 7 figs.

Tuszewski, M.G.

1997-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

149

Compact mass spectrometer for plasma discharge ion analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mass spectrometer and methods for mass spectrometry which are useful in characterizing a plasma. This mass spectrometer for determining type and quantity of ions present in a plasma is simple, compact, and inexpensive. It accomplishes mass analysis in a single step, rather than the usual two-step process comprised of ion extraction followed by mass filtering. Ions are captured by a measuring element placed in a plasma and accelerated by a known applied voltage. Captured ions are bent into near-circular orbits by a magnetic field such that they strike a collector, producing an electric current. Ion orbits vary with applied voltage and proton mass ratio of the ions, so that ion species may be identified. Current flow provides an indication of quantity of ions striking the collector.

Tuszewski, Michel G. (Los Alamos, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Continuous sampling ion mobility spectrometers and methods therefor  

SciTech Connect

An ion mobility spectrometer may include a flow channel having an inlet end and an outlet end. A deflection electrode is positioned within the flow channel so that a non-linear electric field is created between at least a portion of the flow channel and at least a portion of the deflection electrode when an electrostatic potential is placed across the deflection electrode and the flow channel. The ion mobility spectrometer also includes means for producing ions at a position upstream from the leading edge of the deflection electrode, so that ions produced thereby are deflected by the deflection electrode into the non-linear electric field. A detector positioned within the flow channel for detects ions from the non-linear electric field.

Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Appelhans, Anthony D. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Olson, John E. (Rigby, ID)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Ion mobility spectrometers and methods for ion mobility spectrometry  

SciTech Connect

An ion mobility spectrometer may include an inner electrode and an outer electrode arranged so that at least a portion of the outer electrode surrounds at least a portion of the inner electrode and defines a drift space therebetween. The inner and outer electrodes are electrically insulated from one another so that a non-linear electric field is created in the drift space when an electric potential is placed on the inner and outer electrodes. An ion source operatively associated with the ion mobility spectrometer releases ions to the drift space defined between the inner and outer electrodes. A detector operatively associated with at least a portion of the outer electrode detects ions from the drift space.

Dahl, David A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Scott, Jill R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Appelhans, Anthony D. (Idaho Falls, ID); McJunkin, Timothy R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Olson, John E. (Rigby, ID)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Commissioning of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer with Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider has collected several hundred million cosmic ray events during 2008 and 2009. These data were used to commission the Muon Spectrometer and to study the performance of the trigger and tracking chambers, their alignment, the detector control system, the data acquisition and the analysis programs. We present the performance in the relevant parameters that determine the quality of the muon measurement. We discuss the single element efficiency, resolution and noise rates, the calibration method of the detector response and of the alignment system, the track reconstruction efficiency and the momentum measurement. The results show that the detector is close to the design performance and that the Muon Spectrometer is ready to detect muons produced in high energy proton-proton collisions.

The ATLAS Collaboration

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

Performance of a short 'magnetic bottle' electron spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, a newly constructed electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is described. The instrument is part of an apparatus for measuring the electron spectra of free clusters using synchrotron radiation. Argon and helium outer valence photoelectron spectra have been recorded in order to investigate the characteristic features of the spectrometer. The energy resolution (E/{Delta}E) has been found to be {approx}30. Using electrostatic retardation of the electrons, it can be increased to at least 110. The transmission as a function of kinetic energy is flat, and is not impaired much by retardation with up to 80% of the initial kinetic energy. We have measured a detection efficiency of most probably 0.6{sub -0.1}{sup +0.05}, but at least of 0.4. Results from testing the alignment of the magnet, and from trajectory simulations, are also discussed.

Mucke, M.; Lischke, T.; Arion, T. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Foerstel, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Max-Planck-Institut fuer Kernphysik, Saupfercheckweg 1, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Bradshaw, A. M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Fritz-Haber-Institut der Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, Faradayweg 4-6, 14195 Berlin (Germany); Hergenhahn, U. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Teilinstitut Greifswald, Wendelsteinstr. 1, 17491 Greifswald (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Time-of-flight direct recoil ion scattering spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A time of flight direct recoil and ion scattering spectrometer beam line (10). The beam line (10) includes an ion source (12) which injects ions into pulse deflection regions (14) and (16) separated by a drift space (18). A final optics stage includes an ion lens and deflection plate assembly (22). The ion pulse length and pulse interval are determined by computerized adjustment of the timing between the voltage pulses applied to the pulsed deflection regions (14) and (16).

Krauss, Alan R. (Naperville, IL); Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL); Lamich, George J. (Orland Park, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Polarization Measurements in Photoproduction with CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A significant part of the experimental program in Hall-B of the Jefferson Lab is dedicated to the studies of the structure of baryons. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), availability of circularly and linearly polarized photon beams and recent addition of polarized targets provides remarkable opportunity for single, double and in some cases triple polarization measurements in photoproduction. An overview of the experiments will be presented.

E. Pasyuk

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Characterization of a New Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is considerable interest in developing direct measurement methods to determine the plutonium content of spent nuclear fuel within a fuel assembly. One technique that may prove successful is lead slowing-down spectroscopy. Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) has been used for decades to make cross-section measurements on relatively small isotopic samples of well know masses. For spent fuel assembly measurements, LSDS will be applied in reverse; unknown masses will be determined using well-know cross-sections. In the LSDS, a pulse of neutrons (on the order of 10-100 MeV) is injected into a large lead stack (~ 1m3). The neutrons quickly down-scatter but exhibit little spread in energy about the average, continually-decreasing neutron energy making for a strong correlation between the elapsed time from the initial pulse and the average energy of the neutron. By measuring this elapsed time, it is possible to measure interactions of the neutrons with the fuel in the 0.1 to 1,000 eV range. Many of the actinides have strong resonances in this region, making it possible, through careful measurements and analysis, to extract isotopic masses from LSDS measurements. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is actively conducting research on both LSDS measurement and data analysis techniques. This paper will present results of the effort to construct and characterize a new lead slowing down spectrometer. The spectrometer was designed to begin testing both experimental measurement and data analysis techniques for determining the plutonium content of spent fuel. To characterize the spectrometer, a series of (n,?) experiments were conducted to measure the correlation between the time after the neutrons enter the lead and the energy of the interaction. Results from these measurements as well as plans for future development of the spectrometer will be discussed.

Casella, Andrew M.; Warren, Glen A.; Cantaloub, Michael G.; Mace, Emily K.; McDonald, Benjamin S.; Overman, Cory T.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Smith, Leon E.; Stave, Sean C.; Wittman, Richard S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Compact Refractive Imaging Spectrometer Designs Utilizing Immersed Gratings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first means for receiving the light and focusing the light, an immersed diffraction grating that receives the light from the first means and defracts the light, a second means for receiving the light from the immersed diffraction grating and focusing the light, and an image plane that receives the light from the second means

Lerner, Scott A. (Livermore, CA); Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA); Bixler, Jay V. (Oakland, CA); Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Lewis, Isabella T. (San Jose, CA)

2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

158

Design of a Moderated Multidetector Neutron Spectrometer for Optimal Specificity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Neutron spectrometry can play an important role in the detection and identification of neutron-emitting sources in various security applications. In the present work, a portable filtered array neutron spectrometer, consisting of twelve 6LiF-based thermal neutron detectors embedded within a single heterogeneous volume was designed and its expected performance compared to that of a commercially available 12-sphere Bonner spheres spectrometer. Each detector within the volume was designed to optimally respond to a unique portion of the neutron spectrum by varying the type and thickness of materials used to filter the spectrum as well as the thickness of the moderator in front of the detector. The available design space was permuted and performance metrics developed to identify the optimal geometries. The top performing detector geometries were then combinatorially explored to identify the best array of geometries that yielded the most information about a neutron spectrum. The best performing filtered array was found to provide as much spectral information as, or more than, the commercially available 12-sphere Bonner spheres spectrometer to which it was compared.

Harrison, Mark J [ORNL; Cherel, Quentin [University of Florida, Gainesville; Monterial, Mateusz [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive x-ray spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-crystal wavelength dispersive hard x-ray spectrometer with high-energy resolution and large solid angle collection is described. The instrument is specifically designed for time-resolved applications of x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) and x-ray Raman scattering (XRS) at X-ray Free Electron Lasers (XFEL) and synchrotron radiation facilities. It also simplifies resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) studies of the whole 2d RIXS plane. The spectrometer is based on the Von Hamos geometry. This dispersive setup enables an XES or XRS spectrum to be measured in a single-shot mode, overcoming the scanning needs of the Rowland circle spectrometers. In conjunction with the XFEL temporal profile and high-flux, it is a powerful tool for studying the dynamics of time-dependent systems. Photo-induced processes and fast catalytic reaction kinetics, ranging from femtoseconds to milliseconds, will be resolvable in a wide array of systems circumventing radiation damage.

Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Montanez, Paul; Delor, James; Bergmann, Uwe [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Kern, Jan [LCLS, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States); Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Nordlund, Dennis [SSRL, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tran, Rosalie; Yachandra, Vittal K.; Yano, Junko [Physical Biosciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720-8099 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

Green fluorescent protein as a mechanical sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inquiry into intracellular and cytoskeletal mechanics requires an intracellular mechanical sensor to verify models of sub-cellular structure dynamics. To this end, the green fluorescent protein (GFP) is considered as a ...

Muso, Taro M. (Taro Michael)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Nuclear Materials Assay.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation examines the measurement of nuclear resonance fluorescence gamma-rays as a technique to non-destructively determine isotopic compositions of target materials that are of interest (more)

Quiter, Brian Joseph

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

LASER INDUCED FLUORESCENCE OF TRAPPED MOLECULAR IONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Laser Power Measurement Wavelength Calibration SystemLaser Power Measurement Wavelength Calibration PAGE Fluorescence Detection Systemmeasurement system. The actual time for initiation of the detection gate with respect to the laser

Grieman, Frederick Joseph.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Application guidance for fluorescent lighting projects  

SciTech Connect

This application guides is intended to help activity personnel retrofit fluorescent lighting. With this guide, an energy manager can determine if replacing T-12 lamp and magnetic ballast fixtures is cost effective.

Rocha, M.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Multiplexed fluorescence detector system for capillary electrophoresis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescence detection system for capillary electrophoresis is provided wherein the detection system can simultaneously excite fluorescence and substantially simultaneously monitor separations in multiple capillaries. This multiplexing approach involves laser irradiation of a sample in a plurality of capillaries through optical fibers that are coupled individually with the capillaries. The array is imaged orthogonally through a microscope onto a charge-coupled device camera for signal analysis. 14 figs.

Yeung, E.S.; Taylor, J.A.

1996-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescent scanner for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier including a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from said volume to provide a display of the separated sample.

Mathies, Richard A. (Contra Costa, CA); Peck, Konan (Contra Costa, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Ultratrace analysis of transuranic actinides by laser-induced fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ultratrace quantities of transuranic actinides are detected indirectly by their effect on the fluorescent emissions of a preselected fluorescent species. Transuranic actinides in a sample are coprecipitated with a host lattice material containing at least one preselected fluorescent species. The actinide either quenches or enhances the laser-induced fluorescence of the preselected fluorescent species. The degree of enhancement or quenching is quantitatively related to the concentration of actinide in the sample.

Miller, Steven M. (Chelmsford, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

FTIR spectrometer with solid-state drive system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An FTIR spectrometer (10) and method using a solid-state drive system with thermally responsive members (27) that are subject to expansion upon heating and to contraction upon cooling. Such members (27) are assembled in the device (10) so as to move an angled, reflective surface (22) a small distance. The sample light beam (13) is received at a detector (24) along with a reference light beam (13) and there it is combined into a resulting signal. This allows the "interference" between the two beams to occur for spectral analysis by a processor (29).

Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Seals, Roland D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Egert, Charles M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Bent solenoids for spectrometers and emittance exchange sections.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bent solenoids can be used to transport low energy beams as they provide both confinement and dispersion of particle orbits. Solenoids are being considered both as emittance exchange sections and spectrometers in the muon cooling system as part of the study of the muon collider. They present the results of a study of bent solenoids which considers the design of coupling sections between bent solenoids to straight solenoids, drift compensation fields, aberrations, and factors relating to the construction, such as field ripple, stored energy, coil forces and field errors.

Norem, J.

1999-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Calibrating the DARHT Electron Spectrometer with Negative Ions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Negative ions of hydrogen and oxygen have been used to calibrate the DARHT electron spectrometer over the momentum range of 2 to 20 MeV/c. The calibration was performed on September 1, 3, and 8, 2004, and it is good to 0.5% absolute, provided that instrument alignment is carefully controlled. The momentum in MeV/c as a function of magnetic field (B in Gauss) and position in the detector plane (X in mm) is: P = (B-6.28)/(108.404-0.1935*X)

R. Trainham (STL), A. P. Tipton (LAO), and R. R. Bartech (LANL)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Light Baryon Spectroscopy using the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baryons are complex systems of confined quarks and gluons and exhibit the characteristic spectra of excited states. The systematics of the baryon excitation spectrum is important to our understanding of the effective degrees of freedom underlying nucleon matter. High-energy electrons and photons are a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing a microscope for examining the nucleon and the strong nuclear force. Current experimental efforts with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory utilize highly-polarized frozen-spin targets in combination with polarized photon beams. The status of the recent double-polarization experiments and some preliminary results are discussed in this contribution.

Volker Crede

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Chemical detection using the airborne thermal infrared imaging spectrometer (TIRIS)  

SciTech Connect

A methodology is described for an airborne, downlooking, longwave infrared imaging spectrometer based technique for the detection and tracking of plumes of toxic gases. Plumes can be observed in emission or absorption, depending on the thermal contrast between the vapor and the background terrain. While the sensor is currently undergoing laboratory calibration and characterization, a radiative exchange phenomenology model has been developed to predict sensor response and to facilitate the sensor design. An inverse problem model has also been developed to obtain plume parameters based on sensor measurements. These models, the sensors, and ongoing activities are described.

Gat, N.; Subramanian, S.; Sheffield, M.; Erives, H. [Opto-Knowledge Systems, Inc. (United States); Barhen, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A 4. pi. tracking TPC magnetic spectrometer for RHIC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary physics objective of the 4{pi} TPC magnetic spectrometer proposal is to search for the Quark-Gluon Plasma. In previous workshops we have discussed what the possible hadronic signatures of such a state of matter would be. Succinctly, the QGP is a direct prediction of non-perturbative QCD. Therefore the question of the existence of this new state of matter bears directly on the validity of non-perturbative QCD. However, since non-perturbative QCD has never been established, it is apparent that what may await us is a host of new phenomena that will go beyond the standard model.

Danby, G.; Eiseman, S.E.; Etkin, A.; Foley, K.J.; Hackenburg, R.W.; Longacre, R.S.; Love, W.A.; Morris, T.W.; Platner, E.D.; Saulys, A.C.; Van Dijk, J.H. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Lindenbaum, S.J. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA) City Coll., New York, NY (USA)); Chan, C.S.; Kramer, M.A.; Zhao, K. (City Coll., New York, NY (USA)); Biswas, N.; Kenney, P.; Piekarz, J. (Notre Dame Univ

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Test of an LED Monitoring System for the PHOS Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preprint submitted to Elsevier Print on 26th January 2000A prototype monitoring system for the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is described in detail. The prototype consists of Control and Master modules. The first one is 8x8 matrix of Light Emitting Diodes coupled with stable generators of current pulses. The system provides an individual control for each of the 64 channels of PHOS prototype based on lead-tungstate crystals. A long term stability of order of 10-3 has been achieved in integral beam tests of the monitoring system and PHOS prototypes.

Blick, A M; Erin, S V; Kharlov, Yu V; Lobanov, M O; Mikhailov, Yu V; Minaev, N G; Petrov, V A; Sadovsky, S A; Samoylenko, V D; Suzdalev, V I; Senko, V A; Tikhonov, V V

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Time dependence of liquid-helium fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

The time dependence of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) fluorescence following an ionizing radiation event in liquid helium is observed and studied in the temperature range from 250 mK to 1.8 K. The fluorescence exhibits significant structure including a short ({approx}10 ns) strong initial pulse followed by single photons whose emission rate decays exponentially with a 1.6-{mu}s time constant. At an even longer time scale, the emission rate varies as '1/time' (inversely proportional to the time after the initial pulse). The intensity of the '1/time' component from {beta} particles is significantly weaker than those from {alpha} particles or neutron capture on {sup 3}He. It is also found that for {alpha} particles, the intensity of this component depends on the temperature of the superfluid helium. Proposed models describing the observed fluorescence are discussed.

McKinsey, D.N.; Brome, C.R.; Dzhosyuk, S.N.; Mattoni, C.E.H.; Yang, L.; Doyle, J.M. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golub, R.; Habicht, K.; Korobkina, E. [Hahn-Meitner Institut, Berlin-Wannsee (Germany); Huffman, P.R.; Thompson, A.K. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Lamoreaux, S.K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Design, Syntheses and Applications of Fluorescent Dyes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New methodologies for the efficient syntheses of 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4adiaza- s-indacenes (BODIPYs) and rosamines were developed. A serendipitous discovery led to a new reaction which afforded BODIPYs in high yields. Systematic studies of the kinetics and mechanisms of the new reaction were performed. A series of BODIPYs were successfully prepared using the new approach. A simple and efficient synthesis of rosamines with cyclic-amine substituents was devised. These new rosamines showed interesting anti-tumor activities. Several types of novel fluorescent compounds were prepared. Highly fluorescent GFP-chromophore analogs were designed and synthesized. The correlation between the optical properties and the structures was investigated. New pyronin dyes with mesoheteroatom substituents were efficiently prepared. The fluorescence properties of these compounds were highly dependent on the nature of the meso-substituents. A set of BODIPY dyes that fluoresce brightly above 600 nm were made. They were then used as acceptors to prepare water-soluble through-bond energy transfer cassettes. All the cassettes had complete energy transfer and high quantum yields in MeOH. A few also had good fluorescence properties in aqueous media and even on proteins. The through-bond energy transfer cassettes were used to monitor protein-protein interactions. In order to test our hypothesis, an artificial protein interaction system was built by utilizing the biotin/(strept)avidin interactions. Thus Atto425-BSA-biotin, streptavidin-cassette1 and avidin-cassette2 were prepared. The interactions between Atto425-BSA-biotin and cassette labeled (strept)avidin were successfully detected in vitro and in living cells by fluorescence techniques.

Wu, Liangxing

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Optical apparatus for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Optical apparatus is disclosed for forming correlation spectrometers and optical processors. The optical apparatus comprises one or more diffractive optical elements formed on a substrate for receiving light from a source and processing the incident light. The optical apparatus includes an addressing element for alternately addressing each diffractive optical element thereof to produce for one unit of time a first correlation with the incident light, and to produce for a different unit of time a second correlation with the incident light that is different from the first correlation. In preferred embodiments of the invention, the optical apparatus is in the form of a correlation spectrometer; and in other embodiments, the apparatus is in the form of an optical processor. In some embodiments, the optical apparatus comprises a plurality of diffractive optical elements on a common substrate for forming first and second gratings that alternately intercept the incident light for different units of time. In other embodiments, the optical apparatus includes an electrically-programmable diffraction grating that may be alternately switched between a plurality of grating states thereof for processing the incident light. The optical apparatus may be formed, at least in part, by a micromachining process. 24 figs.

Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J.; Sinclair, M.B.; Senturia, S.D.

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

177

Ultrabright fluorescent OLEDS using triplet sinks  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A first device is provided. The first device further comprises an organic light emitting device. The organic light emitting device further comprises an anode, a cathode, and an emissive layer disposed between the anode and the cathode. The emissive layer further comprises an organic host compound, an organic emitting compound capable of fluorescent emission at room temperature, and an organic dopant compound. The triplet energy of the dopant compound is lower than the triplet energy of the host compound. The dopant compound does not strongly absorb the fluorescent emission of the emitting compound.

Zhang, Yifan; Forrest, Stephen R; Thompson, Mark

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

178

Comparison between Standard and Modified Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probes during the Small Cumulus Microphysics Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical measurements performed during the Small Cumulus Microphysics Study (SCMS) experiment are analyzed in order to examine the instrumental limitations of forward scattering spectrometer probes (FSSPs). Complementary information ...

Frdric Burnet; Jean-Louis Brenguier

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer at the Spallation Neutron Source, BASIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the design and current performance of the backscattering silicon spectrometer (BASIS), a time-of-flight backscattering spectrometer built at the spallation neutron source (SNS) of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). BASIS is the first silicon-based backscattering spectrometer installed at a spallation neutron source. In addition to high intensity, it offers a high-energy resolution of about 3.5 {mu}eV and a large and variable energy transfer range. These ensure an excellent overlap with the dynamic ranges accessible at other inelastic spectrometers at the SNS.

Mamontov, E.; Herwig, K. W. [Neutron Scattering Science Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

Caldwell, Karin D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chu, Tun-Jen (Salt Lake City, UT); Pitt, William G. (Orem, UT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Energy Performance of Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents the results of tests performed at the Worcester Polytechnic Institute, in contract with the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC), to determine the light output, power consumption, efficiency, and power factor of off-the-shelf electronic and magnetic compact fluorescent lamps.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications  

SciTech Connect

Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Radiation DetectionFluorescent Nanoparticles for Radiation Detection  

Researchers at ORNL invented a promising material for more efficient nanoscalescintillators, or radiation detectors. The new material, which can detect most kindsof radiation, consists of fluorescent nanoparticles embedded in a transparent matrix.The ...

185

Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Closed Captioning Transcript Closed Captioning Transcript Welcome to a demonstration of the Passive Millimeter-Wave Spectrometer for Remote Chemical Detection. The ultimate goal of the project was to detect a hot target gas in front of a cooler background. This setup was eventually tested at the Nevada Test Site. Prior to field test we tested the concept in a laboratory. We simulated the field conditions by simultaneously reducing the two relative temperatures. In this demonstration we will show a room temperature gas (CH3CN) with a cold background (liquid nitrogen). To understand the experiment we will be showing, the first subplot here represents all data channels plotted on a single plot, the second plot represents a two-dimensional representation of the same data, the X axis represents time, the Y axis represents frequency. As the plot is animated later the first and second subplots will have a cross section marker sweep across them.

186

Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

Cheng, Meng-Dawn (Oak Ridge, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Linear electronic field time-of-flight ion mass spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Time-of-flight mass spectrometer comprising a first drift region and a second drift region enclosed within an evacuation chamber; a means of introducing an analyte of interest into the first drift region; a pulsed ionization source which produces molecular ions from said analyte of interest; a first foil positioned between the first drift region and the second drift region, which dissociates said molecular ions into constituent atomic ions and emits secondary electrons; an electrode which produces secondary electrons upon contact with a constituent atomic ion in second drift region; a stop detector comprising a first ion detection region and a second ion detection region; and a timing means connected to the pulsed ionization source, to the first ion detection region, and to the second ion detection region.

Funsten, Herbert O. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

188

Neutron beam imaging at neutron spectrometers at Dhruva  

SciTech Connect

A low efficiency, 2-Dimensional Position Sensitive Neutron Detector based on delay line position encoding is developed. It is designed to handle beam flux of 10{sup 6}-10{sup 7} n/cm{sup 2}/s and for monitoring intensity profiles of neutron beams. The present detector can be mounted in transmission mode, as the hardware allows maximum neutron transmission in sensitive region. Position resolution of 1.2 mm in X and Y directions, is obtained. Online monitoring of beam images and intensity profile of various neutron scattering spectrometers at Dhruva are presented. It shows better dynamic range of intensity over commercial neutron camera and is also time effective over the traditionally used photographic method.

Desai, Shraddha S.; Rao, Mala N. [Solid State Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

189

Report on Second Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

Summary On August 18 and 19 2011, five items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS). After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials. As during the first activation run, we observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation of the samples was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours to days, except for 60Co which has a half-life of 5.3 y.

Stave, Sean C.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Warren, Glen A.

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

190

An omegatron mass spectrometer for plasma ion species analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An omegatron mass spectrometer which can be used to measure the ion species and charge state distribution in a magnetized plasma is described. In the conventional omegatron, ions are formed as the result of gas ionization by a fine electron beam passing through the center of the analyzer along the magnetic field. In the plasma omegatron, the plasma ions are entering the analyzer through a small floating aperture. We employ a biasing technique to reduce the ion velocity along the magnetic field and, thus, achieve improved ion collection and sensitivity. Experiments have been performed to demonstrate the instrument's operation in the PISCES-A linear plasma device, at a magnetic field {ital B}=1.3 kG. Mass spectra have been obtained in hydrogen, helium, and nitrogen plasmas, and typical results are presented.

Wang, E.Y.; Schmitz, L.; Ra, Y.; LaBombard, B.; Conn, R.W. (Institute of Plasma and Fusion Research, (USA) Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Los Angeles, CA (USA) University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (USA))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

E parallel B canted detector neutral-particle spectrometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multichannel, mass-discriminating, neutral-particle spectrometer using parallel E and B analyzer fields has been operational on the Doublet III tokamak. The device records 60 energy channels each of hydrogen and deuterium, simultaneously, during a shot with a dynamic range in energy of greater than 20. Its unique feature is a microchannel plate detector plane set at an angle to the exit face of the magnet. This angled detector plane linearizes the columns of each mass which simplifies the detector design, and permits the magnet gap to be very small. The narrow gap minimizes figure field effects on particle trajectories and simplifies power supply and cooling design. Details are given on the design, calibration, and instrumentation of the device, as well as on its operation and experimental results.

Armentrout, C.J.; Bramson, G.; Evanko, R.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Imaging X-ray Thomson Scattering Spectrometer Design and Demonstration  

SciTech Connect

In many laboratory astrophysics experiments, intense laser irradiation creates novel material conditions with large, one-dimensional gradients in the temperature, density, and ionization state. X-ray Thomson scattering is a powerful technique for measuring these plasma parameters. However, the scattered signal has previously been measured with little or no spatial resolution, which limits the ability to diagnose inhomogeneous plasmas. We report on the development of a new imaging x-ray Thomson spectrometer (IXTS) for the Omega laser facility. The diffraction of x-rays from a toroidally-curved crystal creates high-resolution images that are spatially resolved along a one-dimensional profile while spectrally dispersing the radiation. This focusing geometry allows for high brightness while localizing noise sources and improving the linearity of the dispersion. Preliminary results are presented from a scattering experiment that used the IXTS to measure the temperature profile of a shocked carbon foam.

Gamboa, E.J. [University of Michigan; Huntington, C.M. [University of Michigan; Trantham, M.R. [University of Michigan; Keiter, P.A [University of Michigan; Drake, R.P. [University of Michigan; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

193

Dynamic multiplexed analysis method using ion mobility spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for multiplexed analysis using ion mobility spectrometer in which the effectiveness and efficiency of the multiplexed method is optimized by automatically adjusting rates of passage of analyte materials through an IMS drift tube during operation of the system. This automatic adjustment is performed by the IMS instrument itself after determining the appropriate levels of adjustment according to the method of the present invention. In one example, the adjustment of the rates of passage for these materials is determined by quantifying the total number of analyte molecules delivered to the ion trap in a preselected period of time, comparing this number to the charge capacity of the ion trap, selecting a gate opening sequence; and implementing the selected gate opening sequence to obtain a preselected rate of analytes within said IMS drift tube.

Belov, Mikhail E [Richland, WA

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

194

Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine). 6 figs.

Martin, S.J.; Butler, M.A.; Frye, G.C.; Schubert, W.K.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

195

Ion mobility spectrometer using frequency-domain separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method is provided for separating and analyzing chemical species in an ion mobility spectrometer using a frequency-domain technique wherein the ions generated from the chemical species are selectively transported through an ion flow channel having a moving electrical potential therein. The moving electrical potential allows the ions to be selected according to ion mobility, with certain of the ions being transported to an ion detector and other of the ions being effectively discriminated against. The apparatus and method have applications for sensitive chemical detection and analysis for monitoring of exhaust gases, hazardous waste sites, industrial processes, aerospace systems, non-proliferation, and treaty verification. The apparatus can be formed as a microelectromechanical device (i.e. a micromachine).

Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM); Butler, Michael A. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Schubert, W. Kent (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Seven Channel Multi-collector Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new magnetic sector mass spectrometer that utilizes seven full-sized discrete dynode electron multipliers operating simultaneously has been designed, constructed and is in preliminary testing. The instrument utilizes a newly developed ion dispersion lens that enables the mass dispersed individual isotope beams to be separated sufficiently (35 mm) to allow a full-sized discrete dynode pulse counting multiplier to be used for each beam. The ion dispersion lens is a two element electrostatic 90 degree sector device that causes the beam-to-beam dispersion to increase faster than the intra-beam dispersion. Each multiplier is contained in an isolated case with a deflector/condenser lens at the entrance. A 9-sample filament cartridge is mounted on a micro-manipulator two-axis stage that enables adjustment of the filament position with 10 micron resolution within the ion lens. Results of initial testing with actinides will be presented.

Anthony D. Appelhans

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

New and Underutilized Technology: Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting New and Underutilized Technology: Efficient High Bay Fluorescent Lighting October 7, 2013 - 8:54am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for efficient high bay fluorescent lighting within the Federal sector. Benefits Efficient high bay fluorescent lighting can include either T5 or T8 fluorescent lighting systems for high-bay applications currently using metal halide fixtures. Fluorescent fixtures offer better light distribution, better light maintenance over the life of the lamp, improved color quality, and on-off control (re-strike time) with lower energy consumption. Application Efficient high bay fluorescent lighting is applicable for facilities containing high bay areas. Key Factors for Deployment

198

Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast on Facebook Tweet about...

199

Calibration of the Spectrometer aboard the INTEGRAL satellite  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SPI, the Spectrometer on board the ESA INTEGRAL satellite, to be launched in October 2002, will study the gamma-ray sky in the 20 keV to 8 MeV energy band with a spectral resolution of 2 keV for photons of 1 MeV, thanks to its 19 germanium detectors spanning an active area of 500 cm2. A coded mask imaging technique provides a 2 deg angular resolution. The 16 deg field of view is defined by an active BGO veto shield, furthermore used for background rejection. In April 2001 the flight model of SPI underwent a one-month calibration campaign at CEA in Bruy\\`eres le Ch\\^atel using low intensity radioactive sources and the CEA accelerator for homogeneity measurements and high intensity radioactive sources for imaging performance measurements. After integration of all scientific payloads (the spectrometer SPI, the imager IBIS and the monitors JEM-X and OMC) on the INTEGRAL satellite, a cross-calibration campaign has been performed at the ESA center in Noordwijk. A set of sources has been placed in the field of view of the different instruments in order to compare their performances and determine their mutual influence. Some of those sources had already been used in Bruy\\`eres during the SPI standalone test. For the lowest energy band calibration an X-ray generator has been used. We report on the scientific goals of this calibration activity, and present the measurements performed as well as some preliminary results.

Stphane Schanne; B. Cordier; M. Gros; D. Atti; P. v. Ballmoos; L. Bouchet; R. Carli; P. Connell; R. Diehl; P. Jean; J. Kiener; A. v. Kienlin; J. Kndlseder; P. Laurent; G. Lichti; P. Mandrou; J. Paul; P. Paul; J. -P. Roques; F. Sanchez; V. Schnfelder; C. Shrader; G. Skinner; A. Strong; S. Sturner; V. Tatischeff; B. Teegarden; G. Vedrenne; G. Weidenspointner; C. Wunderer

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of Segmentation Algorithms For Fluorescence Microscopy Images of Cells Alden A. Dima,1 Mary C. Brady,1 Hai C. Tang,1 Anne L. Plant2 * Abstract The analysis of fluorescence microscopy fluorescence microscopy; k-means cluster; image segmentation; cell edge; bivariate simi- larity index NUMEROUS

Bernal, Javier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CTAX: the US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectromete at HFIR | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CTAX-US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer CTAX-US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer CTAX US/Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer (CG-4C). (larger image) The U.S.-Japan Cold Neutron Triple-Axis Spectrometer (CTAX) is a conventional triple-axis spectrometer with variable incident energy and variable monochromator-sample and sample-analyzer distances. The cold guide 4 bender and guide hall shielding reduce background levels at CG-4C, and the 15-cm-tall guide profile is well exploited by CG-4C's vertically focusing monochromator (PG 002). To enhance accommodation of strong magnetic fields at the sample position and to simplify future polarization analysis, the amount of ferromagnetic material has been minimized in the construction of this instrument. CG-4C is a collaboration of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Neutron

202

Modification of fluorescent luminaries for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Reducing energy consumption in existing buildings by reducing the number of lamps presents technical problems when more than one fluorescent lamp operates from a single ballast. A preliminary investigation was made whereby capacitors were substituted for one fluorescent lamp in a two-lamp luminaire which operated with a single ballast. Under optimum conditions, lighting efficiency (foot-candles per watt) was nearly as high at reduced power input as it was with two lamps operating normally. No failures in lighting equipment or capacitors occurred and no fire hazards, other safety hazards, or other unsatisfactory occurrences were observed. A more thorough investigation involving a number of parameters is needed to ascertain the feasibility of this modification.

Beausoliel, R.W.; Meese, W.J.; Yonemura, G.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Modification of fluorescent luminaires for energy conservation  

SciTech Connect

Reducing energy consumption in existing buildings by reducing the number of lamps presents technical problems when more than one fluorescent lamp operates from a single ballast. A preliminary investigation was made whereby capacitors were substituted for one fluorescent lamp in a two-lamp luminaire which operated with a single ballast. Under optimum conditions, lighting efficiency (foot-candles per watt) was nearly as high at reduced power input as it was with two lamps operating normally. No failures in lighting equipment or capacitors occurred and no fire hazards, other safety hazards, or other unsatisfactory occurrences were observed. A more thorough investigation involving a number of parameters is needed to ascertain the feasibility of this modification. (auth)

Beausoliel, R.W.; Meese, W.J.; Yonemura, G.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Product Standards for Fluorescent Lighting (Japan) Focus Area: Appliances & Equipment Topics: Policy Impacts Website: www.eccj.or.jp/top_runner/pdf/tr_fluorescent_lights_jul.2009.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/product-standards-fluorescent-lightin Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Industry Codes & Standards Regulations: Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling This Energy Conservation Center Japan (ECCJ) document was created as a

205

An Intercomparison of Two Tunable Diode Laser Spectrometers Used for Eddy Correlation Measurements of Methane Flux in a Prairie Wetland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intercomparison was made between two tunable diode laser spectrometers used to measure methane fluxes by the eddy correlation technique at a prairie wetland site. The spectrometers were built by Unisearch Associates Inc. of Concord, Ontario, ...

D. P. Billesbach; Joon Kim; R. J. Clement; S. B. Verma; F. G. Ullman

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A HIGH-RESOLUTION HIGH-LUMINOSITY BETA-RAY SPECTROMETER DESIGN EMPLOYING AZIMUTHALLY VARYING MAGNETIC FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

BETA-RAY SPECTROMETER DESIGN EMPLOYING AZIMUTHALLY VARYING MAGNETIC FIELDSBETA-RAY SPECTROMETER DESIGN EMPLOYING AZIMUTHALLY VARYING MAGNETIC FIELDSfield of the present type. UCRL-16802 Introduction In attempting to find an efficient magnetic beta-

Bergkvist, Karl-Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

In-situ droplet monitoring for self-tuning spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser scattering based imaging technique is utilized in order to visualize the aerosol droplets in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) torch from an aerosol source to the site of analytical measurements. The resulting snapshots provide key information about the spatial distribution of the aerosol introduced by direct and indirect injection devices: 1) a direct injection high efficiency nebulizer (DIHEN); 2) a large-bore DIHEN (LB-DIHEN); and 3) a PFA microflow nebulizer with a PFA Scott-type spray chamber. Moreover, particle image velocimetry (PIV) is used to study the in-situ behavior of the aerosol before interaction with, for example, plasma, while the individual surviving droplets are explored by particle tracking velocimetry (PTV). Further, the velocity distribution of the surviving droplets demonstrates the importance of the initial droplet velocities in complete desolvation of the aerosol for optimum analytical performance in ICP spectrometries. These new observations are important in the design of the next-generation direct injection devices for lower sample consumption, higher sensitivity, lower noise levels, suppressed matrix effects, and for developing smart spectrometers. For example, a controller can be provided to control the output of the aerosol source by controlling the configuration of the source or the gas flow rate via feedback information concerning the aerosol.

Montaser, Akbar (Potomac, MD); Jorabchi, Kaveh (Arlington, VA); Kahen, Kaveh (Kleinburg, CA)

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced.

Fan, Non Q. (San Diego, CA); Clarke, John (Berkeley, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

DC superconducting quantum interference device usable in nuclear quadrupole resonance and zero field nuclear magnetic spectrometers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A spectrometer for measuring the nuclear quadrupole resonance spectra or the zero-field nuclear magnetic resonance spectra generated by a sample is disclosed. The spectrometer uses an amplifier having a dc SQUID operating in a flux-locked loop for generating an amplified output as a function of the intensity of the signal generated by the sample. The flux-locked loop circuit includes an integrator. The amplifier also includes means for preventing the integrator from being driven into saturation. As a result, the time for the flux-locked loop to recover from the excitation pulses generated by the spectrometer is reduced. 7 figures.

Fan, N.Q.; Clarke, J.

1993-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

210

Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps  

SciTech Connect

This is the Final Report of the Novel Nanophosphors for High Efficiency Fluorescent Lamps, Department of Energy (DOE). The overall goal of this three-year program is to develop novel hybrid phosphors by coating commercially available lamp phosphors with highly stable wide band-gap nanocrystalline phosphors (NCP). The prime technical approach is the development of NCP quantum-splitting phosphor (QSP) and ultra-violet (UV) emitting phosphors with quantum efficiencies exceeding that of the conventional phosphors at 185 nm. The novel hybrid phosphors will increase the efficiency of the fluorescent lamps by up to 32%, enabling total energy savings of 0.26 quads, the reduction in the U.S. energy bill by $6.5 billion and the reduction of the annual carbon emission by 4.1 billion kilogram. Our work started by investigating through modeling calculations the requirement for the particle size of the NCP. Our work to develop suitable nanocrystalline phosphors started with the known oxide quantum splitting and UV emitting phosphors. We demonstrated several synthesis techniques for the production of high quality nanocrystalline materials that crystallizes in the desired phase and with the desired particle size. In collaboration with our subcontractor we demonstrated the feasibility for the manufacture of NC phosphors. We also demonstrated novel techniques of coating the NCP on the surface of micron sized phosphors. Our chief achievement pertains to the successful testing of the coated hybrid phosphor systems in linear fluorescent lamps. In linear fluorescent lamp tests, we have demonstrated up to 7% increase in the efficacy of hybrid phosphors over the conventional (uncoated) phosphors. We have also demonstrated the improvement in the lumen maintenance of the coated phosphors. A hybrid phosphor system based on the commercial red emitting phosphor, Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Eu{sup 3+} did not show the anticipated improvement in lamp efficacy. We explored the reasons for this observation, which are detailed in this report. Within the program we have carried out fundamental investigations into the physical processes that determine the quantum splitting behavior of the Pr{sup 3+} ion in solids. Specifically, we have investigated the quantum splitting luminescence of this ion in the LaPO{sub 4}, SrAl{sub 12}O{sub 19} and LiLaP{sub 4}O{sub 12} host lattices. In this final report we summarize the technical work completed under the Program, summarize our findings about the performance limits of the various technologies we investigated, and outline promising paths for future work.

Alok Srivatava

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Survivability of Electronic Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Report addresses the fastest growing energy efficient light source8212the electronic compact fluorescent lamp (CFL). Because some of the failure modes for screw-in CFLs are different than those for plug-in CFLs, a cursory review of the difference between the two types of CFLs is provided in the first part of Chapter 2. A broad definition of shortened-life CFLs is also provided in Chapter 2 with an emphasis on revisiting mortality curves, the 10-minute lamp start, other relevant defini...

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

212

Upgrade of the PNNL TEPC and Multisphere Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has used two types of instruments, the tissue equivalent proportional counter (TEPC) and the multisphere spectrometer for characterizing neutron radiation fields in support of neutron dosimetry at the Hanford site. The US Department of Energy recently issued new requirements for radiation protection standards in 10 CFR 835 which affect the way that neutron dose equivalent rates are evaluated. In response to the new requirements, PNNL has upgraded the analyses used in conjunction with the TEPC and multisphere. The analysis software for the TEPC was modified for this effort, and a new analysis code was selected for the multisphere. These new analysis techniques were implemented and tested with measurement data that had been collected in previous measurements. In order to test the effectiveness of the changes, measurements were taken in PNNLs Low Scatter Room using 252Cf sources in both unmoderated and D2O-moderated configurations that generate well-characterized neutron fields. The instruments were also used at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), in their Neutron Free-in-Air calibration room, also using neutron sources that generate well-characterized neutron fields. The results of the software modifications and the measurements are documented in this report. The TEPC measurements performed at PNNL agreed well with accepted dose equivalent rates using the traditional analysis, agreeing with the accepted value to within 13% for both unmoderated and moderated 252Cf sources. When the new analysis was applied to the TEPC measurement data, the results were high compared to the new accepted value. A similar pattern was seen for TEPC measurements at LANL. Using the traditional analysis method, results for all neutron sources showed good agreement with accepted values, nearly always less than 10%. For the new method of analysis, however, the TEPC responded with higher dose equivalent rates than accepted, by as much as 25%. The reason for the overresponse is that there is very little attenuation of the neutrons by tissue, so it cannot match the effect of attenuation by 1 cm of tissue called for in the new standards. This could be corrected with a modified instrument with a thicker wall, or by analytical means that would need to be developed. The multisphere spectrometer performed reasonably well both at PNNL and at LANL. It could produce a neutron spectrum that was similar to the accepted spectrum, and total flux values were usually within 15% of the accepted values. Dose equivalent rates were usually within 18% of the accepted values. The average energies, however, were usually lower than the accepted values. The performance of this instrument could be much better than seen in this study. If PNNL were to add some moderating spheres to its measurement set and calculate a new set of instrument response functions, performance could be improved. The multisphere could then be a more useful instrument for assessing the dose equivalent rate in the workplace.

Scherpelz, Robert I.; Conrady, Matthew M.

2008-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Airborne Scanning Spectrometer for Remote Sensing of Cloud, Aerosol, Water Vapor, and Surface Properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne scanning spectrometer was developed for measuring reflected solar and emitted thermal radiation in 50 narrowband channels between 0.55 and 14.2 m. The instrument provides multispectral images of outgoing radiation for purposes of ...

Michael D. King; W. Paul Menzel; Patrick S. Grant; Jeffrey S. Myers; G. Thomas Arnold; Steven E. Platnick; Liam E. Gumley; Si-Chee Tsay; Christopher C. Moeller; Michael Fitzgerald; Kenneth S. Brown; Fred G. Osterwisch

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Chemical Reaction of Cobalt Clusters with Ethanol by Using FT-ICR Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectrometer Shuhei Inoue*3 and Shigeo Maruyama*4 *3 Dept. of Mech. Sys. Eng., Hiroshima Univ., 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima-shi, Hiroshima, 739-8527, Japan *4 Dept. of Mech. Eng., The Univ. of Tokyo, 7

Maruyama, Shigeo

215

Real-Time Detection of Performance Degradation of the Forward-scattering Spectrometer Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method for detecting malfunctions during collection of data with the forward-scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) is discussed. Droplet spectra measured with the probe are not sufficient to alert operators of probe failures, such as those ...

Jean-Louis Brenguier; A. R. Rodi; G. Gordon; P. Wechsler

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Testing and Final Construction of the Superconducting Magnet for the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) is a particle physics experiment based on the International Space Station (ISS). At the heart of the detector is a large superconducting magnet, cooled to a temperature of 1.8 K by ...

Harrison, Stephen

217

Advances in field-portable mass spectrometers for on-site analytics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Learn how the combination of ambient ionization with portable mass spectroscopy can speed chemical analysis by streamlining sample preparation and throughput requirements. Advances in field-portable mass spectrometers for on-site analytics inform M

218

Theoretical Simulation and Experimental Characterization of an Expansion-Type Kelvin Spectrometer with Intrinsic Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An expansion-type Kelvin spectrometer has been designed and its performance has been shown to agree with the theoretical simulation within experimental uncertainty. In the intrinsically calibrated mode, number concentration as well as ...

W. Hollnder; W. Dunkhorst; H. Ldding; H. Windt

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Evaluation of the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe. Part III: Time Response and Laser Inhomogeneity Limitations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electronic response time of the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) has been evaluated and is shown to affect the measurement of droplet size. The size of droplets are underestimated when airspeeds exceed 50 m s?1 and size ...

Darrel Baumgardner; Michael Spowart

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for Ground-Based Measurements of Nitric Acid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS) instrument has been developed for high-precision measurements of gaseous nitric acid (HNO3) specifically under high- and variable-humidity conditions in the boundary layer. The instruments ...

Kazuyuki Kita; Yu Morino; Yutaka Kondo; Yuichi Komazaki; Nobuyuki Takegawa; Yuzo Miyazaki; Jun Hirokawa; Shigeru Tanaka; Thomas L. Thompson; Ru-Shan Gao; David W. Fahey

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effects of Coincidence on Measurements with a Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A PMS Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP) may fail to detect a droplet that enters the illuminated volume in coincidence with another droplet, or such a coincident pair may be assigned an erroneous size. This effect is shown to distort ...

William A. Cooper

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Calibration of the Forward-scattering Spectrometer Probe: Modeling Scattering from a Multimode Laser Beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scattering calculations using a more detailed model of the multimode laser beam in the forward-scattering spectrometer probe (FSSP) were carried out by using a recently developed extension to Mie scattering theory. From this model, new ...

Edward A. Hovenac; James A. Lock

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Testing and Performance of Two-Dimensional Optical Array Spectrometers with Greyscale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two laboratory optical array spectrometers with greyscale were evaluated for their sizing, depth of field and timing performance; these three factors are necessary to calculate concentrations and liquid water contents. The probes were of 10 and ...

Paul Joe; Roland List

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

Friedrich, Stephan (San Jose, CA); , Niedermayr, Thomas R. (Oakland, CA); Labov, Simon E. (Berkeley, CA)

2008-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

225

Atomic data for the ITER Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

The parameters of the ITER core plasmas will be measured using the Core Imaging X-ray Spectrometer (CIXS), a high-resolution crystal spectrometer focusing on the L-shell spectra of highly ionized tungsten atoms. In order to correctly infer the plasma properties accurate atomic data are required. Here, some aspects of the underlying physics are discussed using experimental data and theoretical predictions from modeling.

Clementson, J; Beiersdorfer, P; Biedermann, C; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L F; Graf, A; Gu, M F; Hill, K W; Barnsley, R

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

226

Testing of an Echelle Spectrometer as a LIBS Detector at Sandia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some useful information has been obtained regarding the potential use of the echelle spectrometer system for Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) monitoring applications, despite the AOTF-computer operational problems during the Sandia site-test. Currently, the use of the echelle spectrometer with the LIBS system is not suitable for trace-level analyte detection. This is due, in part, to the lower light throughput of the echelle spectrometer system compared to the SpectraPro-275. The low duty cycle of the LIBS system, which results from the use of a low-repetition-rate (but low-cost and portable) laser, also limits the detection sensitivity achievable using a high-resolution spectrometer. At high analyte concentrations, the echelle spectrometer is able to resolve spectral interferences including the Cd-As line pair at 228.8-nm and other LIBS emission features not resolved using the SpectraPro-275. A definite positive result obtained is the determination that at the high resolution of the echelle spectrometer, time-gating of the CCD detector is not necessary to discriminate analyte spectral signals from the LIBS background emission. The cost of the gated CCD and associated electronics is a significant portion of the cost of the Sandia LIBS system. Incorporation of a low-cost version of the echelle spectrometer for process monitoring applications not requiring trace-level detection could make LIBS a more viable technique where cost is a limiting factor. We hope to have the opportunity to perform additional collaborative work using the AOTF-echelle spectrometer for on-line LIBS monitoring applications, in order to demonstrate the advantage of rapid line-switching (using the AOTF) and simultaneous detection of multiple emission features across the spectral range of the echelle.

David P. Baldwin; Daniel S. Zamzow; David K. Ottesen; Howard A. Johnsen

2001-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

227

Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer for use at Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electron Positron Proton Spectrometer (EPPS) is mounted in a TIM (Ten-Inch Manipulator) system on the Omega-60 or Omega-EP laser facilities at the University of Rochester, Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE), when in use, see Fig. 1. The Spectrometer assembly, shown in Fig. 2, is constructed of a steel box containing magnets, surrounded by Lead 6% Antimony shielding with SS threaded insert, sitting on an Aluminum 6061-T6 plate.

Ayers, S L

2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

Prelas, M.A.

1991-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

229

Solid state laser media driven by remote nuclear powered fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is provided for driving a solid state laser by a nuclear powered fluorescence source which is located remote from the fluorescence source. A nuclear reaction produced in a reaction chamber generates fluorescence or photons. The photons are collected from the chamber into a waveguide, such as a fiber optic waveguide. The waveguide transports the photons to the remote laser for exciting the laser.

Prelas, Mark A. (Columbia, MO)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Optical Nanofibers for Manipulating and Probing Single-Atom Fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate how optical nanofibers can be used to manipulate and probe single-atom fluorescence. We show that fluorescence photons from a very small number of atoms, average atom number of less than 0.1, around the nanofiber can readily be observed through single-mode optical fiber under resonant laser irradiation. We show also that optical nanofibers enable us to probe the van der Waals interaction between atoms and surface with high precision by observing the fluorescence excitation spectrum.

K. P. Nayak; P. N. Melentiev; M. Morinaga; Fam Le Kien; V. I. Balykin; K. Hakuta

2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

231

Laser induced fluorescence of trapped molecular ions  

SciTech Connect

Laser induced fluoresence (LIF) spectra (laser excitation spectra) are conceptually among the most simple spectra to obtain. One need only confine a gaseous sample in a suitable container, direct a laser along one axis of the container, and monitor the sample's fluorescence at a right angle to the laser beam. As the laser wavelength is changed, the changes in fluorescence intensity map the absorption spectrum of the sample. (More precisely, only absorption to states which have a significant radiative decay component are monitored.) For ion spectroscopy, one could benefit in many ways by such an experiment. Most optical ion spectra have been observed by emission techniques, and, aside from the problems of spectral analysis, discharge emission methods often produce the spectra of many species, some of which may be unknown or uncertain. Implicit in the description of LIF given above is certainty as to the chemical identity of the carrier of the spectrum. This article describes a method by which the simplifying aspects of LIF can be extended to molecular ions (albeit with a considerable increase in experimental complexity over that necessary for stable neutral molecules).

Winn, J.S.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Improved Performance of a Fluorescent Blue Organic Light Emitting ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Improved Performance of a Fluorescent Blue Organic Light Emitting Diode with Hole Blocking Materials as Dopants for Transport Layers.

233

Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Max Tech and Beyond: Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluorescent lamps are the most widely used artificial light source today, responsible for approximately 70% of the lumens delivered to our living spaces globally. The technology was originally commercialized in the 1930's, and manufacturers have been steadily improving the efficacy of these lamps over the years through modifications to the phosphors, cathodes, fill-gas, operating frequency, tube diameter and other design attributes. The most efficient commercially available fluorescent lamp is the 25 Watt T5 lamp. This lamp operates at 114-116 lumens per watt while also providing good color rendering and more than 20,000 hours of operating life. Industry experts interviewed indicated that while this lamp is the most efficient in the market today, there is still a further 10 to 14% of potential improvements that may be introduced to the market over the next 2 to 5 years. These improvements include further developments in phosphors, fill-gas, cathode coatings and ultraviolet (UV) reflective glass coatings. The commercialization of these technology improvements will combine to bring about efficacy improvements that will push the technology up to a maximum 125 to 130 lumens per watt. One critical issue raised by researchers that may present a barrier to the realization of these improvements is the fact that technology investment in fluorescent lamps is being reduced in order to prioritize research into light emitting diodes (LEDs) and ceramic metal halide high intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Thus, it is uncertain whether these potential efficacy improvements will be developed, patented and commercialized. The emphasis for premium efficacy will continue to focus on T5 lamps, which are expected to continue to be marketed along with the T8 lamp. Industry experts highlighted the fact that an advantage of the T5 lamp is the fact that it is 40% smaller and yet provides an equivalent lumen output to that of a T8 or T12 lamp. Due to its smaller form factor, the T5 lamp contains less material (i.e., glass, fill gas and phosphor), and has a higher luminance, enabling fixtures to take advantage of the smaller lamp size to improve the optics and provide more efficient overall system illuminance. In addition to offering the market a high-quality efficacious light source, another strong value proposition of fluorescent lighting is its long operating life. In today's market, one manufacturer is offering fluorescent lamps that have a rated life of 79,000 hours - which represents 18 years of service at 12 hours per day, 365 days per year. These lamps, operated using a long-life ballast specified by the manufacturer, take advantage of improvements in cathode coatings, fill gas chemistry and pressure to extend service life by a factor of four over conventional fluorescent lamps. It should be noted that this service life is also longer (approximately twice as long) as today's high-quality LED products. The fluorescent market is currently focused on the T5 and T8 lamp diameters, and it is not expected that other diameters would be introduced. Although T8 is a more optimal diameter from an efficacy perspective, the premium efficiency and optimization effort has been focused on T5 lamps because they are 40% smaller than T8, and are designed to operate at a higher temperature using high-frequency electronic ballasts. The T5 lamp offers savings in terms of materials, packaging and shipping, as well as smaller fixtures with improved optical performance. Manufacturers are actively researching improvements in four critical areas that are expected to yield additional efficacy improvements of approximately 10 to 14 percent over the next five years, ultimately achieving approximately 130 lumens per watt by 2015. The active areas of research where these improvements are anticipated include: (1) Improved phosphors which continue to be developed and patented, enabling higher efficacies as well as better color rendering and lumen maintenance; (2) Enhanced fill gas - adjusting proportions of argon, krypton, neon and xenon to optimize performance, while also m

Scholand, Michael

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Dynamic fluorescence imaging with molecular agents for cancer detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-invasive dynamic optical imaging of small animals requires the development of a novel fluorescence imaging modality. Herein, fluorescence imaging is demonstrated with sub-second camera integration times using agents specifically targeted to disease markers, enabling rapid detection of cancerous regions. The continuous-wave fluorescence imaging acquires data with an intensified or an electronmultiplying charge-coupled device. The work presented in this dissertation (i) assessed dose-dependent uptake using dynamic fluorescence imaging and pharmacokinetic (PK) models, (ii) evaluated disease marker availability in two different xenograft tumors, (iii) compared the impact of autofluorescence in fluorescence imaging of near-infrared (NIR) vs. red light excitable fluorescent contrast agents, (iv) demonstrated dual-wavelength fluorescence imaging of angiogenic vessels and lymphatics associated with a xenograft tumor model, and (v) examined dynamic multi-wavelength, whole-body fluorescence imaging with two different fluorescent contrast agents. PK analysis showed that the uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) in xenograft tumor regions linearly increased with doses of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf) up to 1.5 nmol/mouse. Above 1.5 nmol/mouse, the uptake did not increase with doses, suggesting receptor saturation. Target to background ratio (TBR) and PK analysis for two different tumor cell lines showed that while Kaposis sarcoma (KS1767) exhibited early and rapid uptake of Cy5.5-c(KRGDf), human melanoma tumors (M21) had non-significant TBR differences and early uptake rates similar to the contralateral normal tissue regions. The differences may be due to different compartment location of the target. A comparison of fluorescence imaging with NIR vs. red light excitable fluorescent dyes demonstrates that NIR dyes are associated with less background signal, enabling rapid tumor detection. In contrast, animals injected with red light excitable fluorescent dyes showed high autofluorescence. Dual-wavelength fluorescence images were acquired using a targeted 111In- DTPA-K(IRDye800)-c(KRGDf) to selectively detect tumor angiogenesis and an untargeted Cy5.5 to image lymphatics. After acquiring the experimental data, fluorescence image-guided surgery was performed. Dynamic, multi-wavelength fluorescence imaging was accomplished using a liquid crystal tunable filter (LCTF). Excitation light was used for reflectance images with a LCTF transmitting a shorter wavelength than the peak in the excitation light spectrum. Therefore, images can be dynamically acquired alternating frame by frame between emission and excitation light, which should enable image-guided surgery.

Kwon, Sun Kuk

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Development of Ta-based Superconducting Tunnel Junction X-ray Detectors for Fluorescence XAS  

SciTech Connect

We are developing superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) soft X-ray detectors for chemical analysis of dilute samples by fluorescence-detected X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Our 36-pixel Nb-based STJ spectrometer covers a solid angle {Omega}/4{pi} {approx} 10{sup -3}, offers an energy resolution of {approx}10-20 eV FWHM for energies up to {approx}1 keV, and can be operated at total count rates of {approx}10{sup 6} counts/s. For increased quantum efficiency and cleaner response function, we have now started the development of Ta-based STJ detector arrays. Initial devices modeled after our Nb-based STJs have an energy resolution below 10 eV FWHM for X-ray energies below 1 keV, and pulse rise time discrimination can be used to improve their response function for energies up to several keV. We discuss the performance of the Ta-STJs and outline steps towards the next-generation of large STJ detector arrays with higher sensitivity.

Friedrich, S; Drury, O; Hall, J; Cantor, R

2009-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

237

Method and apparatus for dimming fluorescent lights  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a dimmer for fluorescent lights that utilizes the standard ballast associated with the lights, comprising: means for controlling the transmission of the normal line A.C. voltage sine wave to the ballast. This is done so that the A.C. voltage is connected to the ballast for only a selectable period of time during each half cycle of the sine wave and is blocked during the remaining period of each half cycle thereby controlling the power supplied to the discharge portion of the lights to control brightness; and means for applying a high frequency voltage signal to the ballast during at least a portion of the time period when the A.C. signal to the ballast is blocked thereby supplying additional power to the filaments of lights.

Clark, R.

1987-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

Long-Term Performance of Screwbase Compact Fluorescent Lamps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The packaging material for compact fluorescent lamps normally includes some claim regarding expected lamp lifetime. This claimed lifetime is generally not obtained through rigorous testing. This study shows how different operating cycles, components, and lamp and ballast designs affect screwbase compact fluorescent lamp (SCFL) life.

2000-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

239

A transportable fluorescence imagining system for detecting fecal contaminants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feces are the primary source of many pathogenic organisms that can potentially contaminate agricultural commodities. Feces generally contain chlorophyll a and related compounds due to ingestion of plant materials. Fluorescent responses of these compounds ... Keywords: Fecal contamination, Fluorescence, Food safety, Multispectral imaging

Alan M. Lefcourt; Moon S. Kim; Yud-Ren Chen

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Quantum Optics: Colloidal Fluorescent Semiconductor Nanocrystals (Quantum Dots)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U ncorrected Proof Chapter 3 Quantum Optics: Colloidal Fluorescent Semiconductor Nanocrystals (Quantum Dots) in Single-Molecule Detection and Imaging Laurent A. Bentolila, Xavier Michalet, and Shimon quantum dots (QDs), have emerged as new powerful fluorescent probes for in vitro and in vivo biological

Michalet, Xavier

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Rock Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Rock Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF): X-Ray Fluorescence is a lab-based technique used for bulk chemical analysis of rock, mineral, sediment, and fluid samples. The technique depends on the fundamental principles of x-ray interactions with solid materials, similar

242

X-RAY FLUORESCENCE MICROPROBE (XFM) TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RAY FLUORESCENCE MICROPROBE (XFM) RAY FLUORESCENCE MICROPROBE (XFM) TECHNIQUES AND CAPABILITIES APPLICATIONS WORLD-LEADING MICROFOCUSED EXAFS SPECTROSCOPY * XFM is an optimized three-pole wiggler beamline for the characterization of materials in an "as-is" state that are chemically heterogeneous at the micrometer scale via synchrotron induced X-ray fluorescence. * XFM includes instrumentation for microbeam X-ray fluorescence (µXRF), diffraction (µXRD) and fluorescence computed microtomography (FCMT) . However, it is optimized to provide users state-of-the-art microfocused Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (µEXAFS) spectroscopy between 4 to 20 keV. * XFM will trade-off beam size and flux for sample configuration flexibility. This includes more readily achievable stability

243

SIMULTANEOUS MEASUREMENT OF CIRCULAR DICHROISM AND FLUORESCENCE POLARIZATION ANISOTROPY.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy are important tools for characterizing biomolecular systems. Both are used extensively in kinetic experiments involving stopped- or continuous flow systems as well as titrations and steady-state spectroscopy. This paper presents the theory for determining circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy simultaneously, thus insuring the two parameters are recorded under exactly the same conditions and at exactly the same time in kinetic experiments. The approach to measuring circular dichroism is that used in almost all conventional dichrographs. Two arrangements for measuring fluorescence polarization anisotropy are described. One uses a single fluorescence detector and signal processing with a lock-in amplifier that is similar to the measurement of circular dichroism. The second approach uses classic ''T'' format detection optics, and thus can be used with conventional photon-counting detection electronics. Simple extensions permit the simultaneous measurement of the absorption and excitation intensity corrected fluorescence intensity.

SUTHERLAND,J.C.

2002-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

244

Compatibility testing of fluorescent lamp and ballast systems  

SciTech Connect

The rapid growth in the use of electronic ballasts for fluorescent lighting systems, and the corresponding increase in the number of new products and new manufacturers in the market, has raised a number of questions regarding the compatibility of the lamps and ballasts used in fluorescent systems. Because many of the new products start and operate lamps differently than previous products, the relevant American National Standards Institute requirements may no longer be adequate for addressing compatibility concerns. The impacts on system performance of the newer products of a parametric study designed to test key hypotheses regarding the impact of ballast parameters on fluorescent lamp life. In this study, samples of 4-ft T8 fluorescent lamps were operated on duty cycles of 5 min on and 5 min off, using seven different ballast types. The results of the study indicate which parameters seem to have the biggest effect on lamp life, and can be used in establishing new performance standards for fluorescent systems.

Ji, Y.; Davis, R.; O' Rourke, C.; Chui, E.W.M.

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Neutron response of the LAMBDA spectrometer and neutron interaction length in BaF2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the neutron response of the LAMBDA spectrometer developed earlier for high-energy gamma-ray measurement. The energy dependent neutron detection efficiency of the spectrometer has been measured using the time-of-flight (TOF) technique and compared with that of an organic liquid scintillator based neutron detector (BC501A). The extracted efficiencies have also been compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo GEANT4 simulation. We have also measured the average interaction length of neutrons in the BaF2 crystal in a separate experiment, in order to determine the TOF energy resolution. Finally, the LAMBDA spectrometer has been tested in an in-beam-experiment by measuring neutron energy spectra in the 4He + 93Nb reaction to extract nuclear level density parameters. Nuclear level density parameters obtained by the LAMBDA spectrometer were found to be consistent with those obtained by the BC501A neutron detector, indicating that the spectrometer can be efficiently used as a neutron detector to measure the nuclear level density parameter.

Balaram Dey; Debasish Mondal; Deepak Pandit; S. Mukhopadhyay; Surajit Pal; K. Banerjee; Srijit Bhattacharya; A. De; S. R. Banerjee

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

246

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium vapor lamps, ultraviolet and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mercury Lamps Recycling Fluorescent light-tubes, compact fluorescent bulbs, mercury and sodium light tubes are recycled. They are made from aluminum and metal. Aluminum is a silver-white metal and is very light in weight and strong. Because aluminum is ductile, it can be drawn into wires or pressed

Ungerleider, Leslie G.

247

NSE: the Neutron Spin Echo Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spin Echo Spectrometer at SNS Spin Echo Spectrometer at SNS NSE NSE is funded and operated by the Jülich Centre for Neutron Science. The SNS NSE instrument provides ultrahigh resolution spectroscopy with a Fourier time range that covers τ = 1 ps to a nominal 350 ns with a high effective neutron flux, aiming to be the best of its class in both resolution and dynamic range (please refer to the instrument fact sheet for a detailed current status). Researchers use this instrument to investigate soft condensed matter and complex fluids applications in a variety of fields. The planned optional ferromagnetic and intensity-modulated modes will allow for detailed investigation of magnetic samples and phenomena. The design of the NSE spectrometer takes full advantage of recent progress in neutron optics and polarizing supermirror microbenders,1,2 resulting in

248

CNCS: the Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at SNS Cold Neutron Chopper Spectrometer at SNS CNCS detector array Interior of the CNCS detector array. CNCS is a high-resolution, direct-geometry, multi-chopper inelastic spectrometer designed to provide flexibility in the choice of energy resolution and to perform best at low incident energies (2 to 50 meV). Although the detector coverage around the sample is 1.7 sr, a later upgrade to 3 sr is possible. Experiments at CNCS typically use energy resolutions between 10 and 500 µeV. A broad variety of scientific problems, ranging from complex and quantum fluids to magnetism and chemical spectroscopy, are being addressed through experiments at CNCS. Applications Schematic of CNCS (larger image). Complex fluids: dilute protein solutions, biological gels, selective

249

Calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet grazing incident spectrometer at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect

We present the design and calibration of a microchannel plate based extreme ultraviolet spectrometer. Calibration was performed at the Advance Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). This spectrometer will be used to record the single shot spectrum of radiation emitted by the tapered hybrid undulator (THUNDER) undulator installed at the LOASIS GeV-class laser-plasma-accelerator. The spectrometer uses an aberration-corrected concave grating with 1200 lines/mm covering 11-62 nm and a microchannel plate detector with a CsI coated photocathode for increased quantum efficiency in the extreme ultraviolet. A touch screen interface controls the grating angle, aperture size, and placement of the detector in vacuum, allowing for high-resolution measurements over the entire spectral range.

Bakeman, M. S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada Reno, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tilborg, J. van; Sokollik, T.; Baum, D.; Ybarrolaza, N.; Duarte, R.; Toth, C.; Leemans, W. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

Temperature and nonlinearity corrections for a photodiode array spectrometer used in the field  

SciTech Connect

Temperature and nonlinearity effects are two important factors that limit the use of photodiode array spectrometers. Usually the spectrometer is calibrated at a known temperature against a reference source of a particular spectral radiance, and then it is used at different temperatures to measure sources of different spectral radiances. These factors are expected to be problematic for nontemperature-stabilized instruments used for in-the-field experiments, where the radiant power of the site changes continuously with the sun tilt. This paper describes the effect of ambient temperature on a nontemperature-stabilized linear photodiode array spectrometer over the temperature range from 5 deg. C to 40 deg. C. The nonlinearity effects on both signal amplification and different levels of radiant power have also been studied and are presented in this paper.

Salim, Saber G. R.; Fox, Nigel P.; Theocharous, Evangelos; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

2011-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS | ORNL Neutron Sciences  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS The Wide Angular-Range Chopper Spectrometer at SNS and Doug Abernathy at ARCS Materials researcher Judy Pang and instrument scientist Doug Abernathy at ARCS. ARCS is optimized to provide a high neutron flux at the sample and a large solid angle of detector coverage. This spectrometer is capable of selecting incident energies over the full energy spectrum of neutrons, making it useful for studies of excitations from a few to several hundred milli-electron volts. An elliptically shaped supermirror guide in the incident flight path boosts the performance at the lower end of this range. The sample and detector vacuum chambers provide a window-free final flight path and incorporate a large gate valve to allow rapid sample changeout. A T0 neutron chopper not only blocks the prompt radiation from the source

252

Sustainable LED Fluorescent Light Replacement Technology  

SciTech Connect

Ilumisys and the National Center for Manufacturing Sciences (NCMS) partnered on a three-year project awarded by the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), to quantify the impacts of LED lamps, incandescent lamps and fluorescent benchmark lamps over a product lifecycle i.e. to develop a sustainable design and manufacturing strategy that addresses product manufacturing, use, recycling and disposal scenarios for LED-based lighting. Based on the knowledge gained from extensive product tear-down studies of fluorescent and screw-in lighting products, lifecycle assessment tools, and accelerated lifecycle testing protocols, an interactive Sustainable LED Design Guide has been developed to aid architectural and lighting designers and engineers in making design decisions that consider three important environmental impacts (greenhouse gas emissions, energy use and mercury emission) across all phases of the life of an LED lighting product. Critical information developed for the lifecycle analysis and product feature comparisons is the useful life of the lighting product as well as its performance. The Design Guide is available at www.ncms.org, and was developed based on operational and durability testing of a variety of lighting products including power consumption, light output, and useful life of a lamp in order to allow a more realistic comparison of lamp designs. This report describes the main project tasks, results and innovative features of the lifecycle assessment (LCA)-based design tools, and the key considerations driving the sustainable design of LED lighting systems. The Design Guide incorporates the following three novel features for efficiently evaluating LED lighting features in value-chains: Bill-of-Materials (BOM) Builder Designers may import process data for each component and supply functional data for the product, including power, consumption, lumen output and expected useful life. Environmental Impact Review Designs are comparable across lifecycle phases, subsystems, and environmental impact category, and can be normalized to a userdefined functional unit. Drill-down Review These provide an indepth look at individual lamp designs with the ability to review across subsystem or lifecycle phase.

None

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

High-resolution crystal spectrometer for the 10-60 (angstrom) EUV region  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A vacuum crystal spectrometer with nominal resolving power approaching 1000 is described for measuring emission lines with wavelength in the extreme ultraviolet region up to 60 Angstroms. The instrument utilizes a flat octadecyl hydrogen maleate (OHM) crystal and a thin-window 1-D position-sensitive gas proportional detector. This detector employs a 1 {micro}m-thick 100 x8 mm{sup 2} aluminized polyimide window and operates at one atmosphere pressure. The spectrometer has been implemented on the Livermore electron beam ion traps. The performance of the instrument is illustrated in measurements of the newly discovered magnetic field-sensitive line in Ar{sup 8+}.

Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Goddard, R; Wargelin, B J

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

254

Fluorescent lamp unit with magnetic field generating means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescent lamp unit having a magnetic field generating means for improving the performance of the fluorescent lamp is disclosed. In a preferred embodiment the fluorescent lamp comprises four longitudinally extending leg portions disposed in substantially quadrangular columnar array and joined by three generally U-shaped portions disposed in different planes. In another embodiment of the invention the magnetic field generating means comprises a plurality of permanent magnets secured together to form a single columnar structure disposed within a centrally located region defined by the shape of lamp envelope. 4 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

255

History and technical evolution of high frequency fluorescent lighting  

SciTech Connect

This work was performed to accelerate development and commercialization of solid-state, high frequency ballasts for fluorescent lighting systems. The history and development of fluorescent lamps, of ballasts for these fixtures, and of related circuits and equipment are reviewed. The higher lamp efficiency of high-frequency (300 to 3000 Hz) fluorescent lamps as compared with 60 Hz lamps, the development of frequency converter circuits for high-frequency lamps, and uses, electrical characteristics, and economics of these lighting systems are discussed. (LCL)

Campbell, J.H.

1977-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fluorescent Luminaires Fluorescent Luminaires Covered Product Category: Fluorescent Luminaires October 7, 2013 - 10:52am Addthis Did You Know? Lighting Can Help You Accomplish Other Facility Upgrades and Efficiency Improvements Facilities with significant potential savings in lighting may be able to bundle lighting upgrades with heating, ventilation, air conditioning, and other energy conservation measures into a Utility Energy Service Contract (UESC) or Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC). Because of the substantial cost and energy savings potential, replacing lighting can be a key component in financing facility retrofits. The funding portion of the FEMP website offers more information on these and other funding opportunities. FEMP provides acquisition guidance and Federal efficiency requirements

257

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting April 28, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert There is a major push today to get homeowners to adopt compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. They have been on the market for nearly three decades, and many homeowners still do not use them widely. But the tide is definitely turning. Their availability and the percentage of homeowners familiar with the technology and purchasing them for their homes have been steadily rising. The products have improved considerably compared to early products, and their prices have plummeted. The ENERGY STAR® Change a Light, Change the World Campaign has been running now for more than half a dozen years. This campaign is designed to

258

Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps Covered Product Category: Compact Fluorescent Lamps October 7, 2013 - 10:48am Addthis ENERGY STAR Qualified Products Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance across a variety of product categories, including compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs), which are an ENERGY STAR-qualified product category. Federal laws and executive orders mandate that agencies meet these efficiency requirements in all procurement and acquisition actions that are not specifically exempted by law. Most manufacturers display the ENERGY STAR label on complying models. For a model not displaying this label, check the manufacturer's literature to determine if it meets the efficiency requirements outlined by ENERGY STAR.

259

Information Resources: LED Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast Replacements for Linear Fluorescent Lamps Webcast In this June 20, 2011 webcast on LED products marketed as replacements for linear fluorescent lamps, Jason Tuenge of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) discussed current Lighting Facts-listed products as well as products evaluated in the latest CALiPER reports. Eric Richman, also of PNNL, reported on a recently completed GATEWAY demonstration project, in which LED and fluorescent lamps were installed in a variety of recessed troffer luminaires for comparison in an office environment. The presentation concluded with a discussion of specifications listed in a newly updated technology fact sheet. View presentation slides View the text-alternative version View the webcast (WMV 16 MB) Download Windows Media Player

260

" A Heterodyne Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique to Determine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Heterodyne Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique to Determine A Heterodyne Laser-induced Fluorescence Technique to Determine Simultaneously the Bulk and Time Varying Molecule Velocity Distribution." Inventors Ahmed Diallo, Stephane Mazouffre.The method's primary goal is to determine simultaneously the bulk a The method's primary goal is to determine simultaneously the bulk and the time verying part of the molecule velocity distribution using a heterodyne laser induced fluorescence technique. Used in biology, chemistry and plasma physics laser-induced fluorescence is a well known technique to resolve the bulk velocity distribution of probed molecules and atoms in a medium. The novel approach is aimed at determining not only the bulk distribution, but also the time-varying velocity distribution. The two parts of the velocity distribution are key in the characterization of a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting April 28, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis John Lippert There is a major push today to get homeowners to adopt compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) light bulbs. They have been on the market for nearly three decades, and many homeowners still do not use them widely. But the tide is definitely turning. Their availability and the percentage of homeowners familiar with the technology and purchasing them for their homes have been steadily rising. The products have improved considerably compared to early products, and their prices have plummeted. The ENERGY STAR® Change a Light, Change the World Campaign has been running now for more than half a dozen years. This campaign is designed to

262

Exploring the mechanome with optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The combination of optical tweezers and single molecule fluorescence into an instrument capable of making combined, coincident measurements adds an observable dimension that allows for the examination of the localized ...

Brau, Ricardo R. (Ricardo Rafael), 1979-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Calibration of fluorescence resonance energy transfer in microscopy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Imaging hardware, software, calibrants, and methods are provided to visualize and quantitate the amount of Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET) occurring between donor and acceptor molecules in epifluorescence microscopy. The MicroFRET system compensates for overlap among donor, acceptor, and FRET spectra using well characterized fluorescent beads as standards in conjunction with radiometrically calibrated image processing techniques. The MicroFRET system also provides precisely machined epifluorescence cubes to maintain proper image registration as the sample is illuminated at the donor and acceptor excitation wavelengths. Algorithms are described that pseudocolor the image to display pixels exhibiting radiometrically-corrected fluorescence emission from the donor (blue), the acceptor (green) and FRET (red). The method is demonstrated on samples exhibiting FRET between genetically engineered derivatives of the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) bound to the surface of Ni chelating beads by histidine-tags.

Youvan, Douglas C. (San Jose, CA); Silva, Christopher M. (Sunnyvale, CA); Bylina, Edward J. (San Jose, CA); Coleman, William J. (Moutain View, CA); Dilworth, Michael R. (Santa Cruz, CA); Yang, Mary M. (San Jose, CA)

2002-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Fluorescence Enhancement of White-Light Cadmium Selenide Nanocrystals.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advances are being made in lighting technology, as incandescent and fluorescent light bulbs become less efficient compared to solid-state lighting devices, especially light-emitting diodes (LEDs). (more)

Rosson, Teresa Ellen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

THE HISTORY AND TECHNICAL EVOLUTION OF HIGH FREQUENCY FLUORESCENT LIGHTING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec. 1953. "Hi-Volt-Cycle Lighting ~ Launched i n a Hi-Wide2, F e b r u a r y , 19 53. "Lighting Your Plant with Highg h Frequency Fluorescent Lighting John H. Campbell December

Campbell, John H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Altitude dependence of fluorescence light emission by extensive air showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence light is induced by extensive air showers while developing in the Earth's atmosphere. The number of emitted fluorescence photons depends on the conditions of the air and on the energy deposited by the shower particles at every stage of the development. In a previous model calculation, the pressure and temperature dependences of the fluorescence yield have been studied on the basis of kinetic gas theory, assuming temperature-independent molecular collision cross-sections. In this work we investigate the importance of temperature-dependent collision cross-sections and of water vapour quenching on the expected fluorescence yield. The calculations will be applied to simulated air showers while using actual atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence on the reconstructed energy of extensive air showers.

B. Keilhauer; J. Bluemer; R. Engel; H. O. Klages

2008-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

267

Assessment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence for Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay Brian J. Quiter ?of Pu isotopes in spent nuclear fuel (SNF). Given the lowU and 239 Pu in spent nuclear fuel using NRF. II. PERFORMING

Quiter, Brian

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Large core polymer optical backplanes for fluorescence detection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescence based sensors are used for determining environmental parameters such as dissolved oxygen or pH in biological systems without disturbing a biological system's equilibrium. Recently, there has been a drive to ...

Lee, Kevin Shao-Kwan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

A review of indocyanine green fluorescent imaging in surgery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to give an overview of the recent surgical intraoperational applications of indocyanine green fluorescence imaging methods, the basics of the technology, and instrumentation used. Well over 200 papers describing this technique ...

Jarmo T. Alander, Ilkka Kaartinen, Aki Laakso, Tommi Ptil, Thomas Spillmann, Valery V. Tuchin, Maarit Venermo, Petri Vlisuo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lighting the Way with Compact Fluorescent Lighting | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and compact fluorescent lights. And I've already purchased a few of the new light emitting diode (LED) solid-state lighting lights-but that's the topic of a future blog. Stay...

271

The Effects of Table Lamp Shade Shape and Compact Fluorescent...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Effects of Table Lamp Shade Shape and Compact Fluorescent Lamp Burning Position on Visual Comfort Speaker(s): Zaidi Abdullah Date: March 15, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90...

272

Light Flicker in Compact Fluorescent Lamps Caused by Voltage Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This power quality (PQ) case study presents tests performed at the EPRI Power Electronics Applications Center (PEAC) Power Quality Test Facility to characterize the light output of an incandescent lamp and compact fluorescent lamps during voltage fluctuations.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Shanhu Lee, Kent State University (http://www.personal.kent.edu/~slee19/)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer (CIMS) Shanhu Lee, Kent State University (http ionization mass spectrometry (PTR-CIMS). A typical CIMS instrument can be constructed from an ion source, an ion molecular reactor, and a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Shown below is schematic diagram of a CIMS

Lee, Shan-Hu

274

A High-Speed FPGA-Based Lossless Data Compression Design for the X-ray Spectrometer Solar Energy Spectra  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to meet the real-time compression requirements effectively for the solar energy spectrum data of the X-ray spectrometer used as a key payload of Chang'E Mission, the design and implementation of the bit wise OR algorithm based on FPGA is presented ... Keywords: data compression, X-ray spectrometer, bitwise OR algorithm, FPGA

RuiMin Ma; HuanYu Wang

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

High-resolution bent-crystal spectrometer for the ultra-soft x-ray region  

SciTech Connect

A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 /angstrom/. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda/sub 0/ = 8/angstrom/. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic. 43 refs., 23 figs.

Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K.W.; Hulse, R.A.; Walling, R.S.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Sensitivity Upgrades to the Idaho Accelerator Center Neutron Time of Flight Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past experiments have shown that discrimination between between fissionable and non?fissionable materials is possible using an interrogation technique that monitors for high energy prompt fission neutrons. Several recent upgrades have been made to the neutron time of flight spectrometer at the Idaho Accelerator Center with the intent of increasing neutron detection sensitivity

S. J. Thompson; M. T. Kinlaw; J. F. Harmon; D. P. Wells; A. W. Hunt

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

High-resolution Bent-crystal Spectrometer for the Ultra-soft X-ray Region  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A multichannel vacuum Brag-crystal spectrometer has been developed for high-resolution measurements of the line emission from tokamak plasmas in the wavelength region between 4 and 25 angstrom. The spectrometer employs a bent crystal in Johann geometry and a microchannel-plate intensified photodiode array. The instrument is capable of measuring high-resolution spectra (lambda/..delta..lambda approx. 3000) with fast time resolution (4 msec per spectrum) and good spatial resolution (3 cm). The spectral bandwidth is ..delta..lambda/lambda{sub 0} = 8 angstrom. A simple tilt mechanism allows access to different wavelength intervals. In order to illustrate the utility of the new spectrometer, time- and space-resolved measurements of the n = 3 to n = 2 spectrum of selenium from the Princeton Large Torus tokamak plasmas are presented. The data are used to determine the plasma transport parameters and to infer the radial distribution of fluorinelike, neonlike, and sodiumlike ions of selenium in the plasma. The new ultra-soft x-ray spectrometer has thus enabled us to demonstrate the utility of high-resolution L-shell spectroscopy of neonlike ions as a fusion diagnostic.

Beiersdorfer, P.; von Goeler, S.; Bitter, M.; Hill, K. W.; Hulse, R. A.; Walling, R. S.

1988-10-00T23:59:59.000Z

279

Gamma-ray energies for calibration of Ge(Li) spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

Gamma-ray energies are compared for bent-crystal measurements, Ge(Li) measurements, and other measurements. 150 gamma-ray energies below 3450 keV from 35 isotopes are being calibrated for calibration of Ge(Li) spectrometers. (WHK)

Helmer, R.G.; Greenwood, R.C.; Gehrke, R.J.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Measuring the absolute deuteriumtritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

neutron spectrometer at ASDEX Upgrade Rev. Sci. Instrum. 82, 123504 (2011) The new cold neutron chopper. Paguio8 1 Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Laboratory confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

An AOTF-LDTOF spectrometer suite for in situ organic detection and characterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the development of a miniature near-infrared point spectrometer, operating in the 1.7 -- 4 mm region, based on acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) technology. This instrument may be used to screen and corroborate analyses of samples containing ...

Nancy J. Chanover; David A. Glenar; David G. Voelz; Xifeng Xiao; Rula Tawalbeh; Penelope J. Boston; William B. Brinckerhoff; Paul R. Mahaffy; Stephanie Getty; Inge ten Kate; Amy McAdam

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Atmospheric Water Content over the Tropical Pacific Derived from the Nimbus-6 Scanning Microwave Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scanning microwave spectrometer (SCAMS) aboard Nimbus-6 contains a 22.23 GHz water vapor channel and 31.65 GHz window channel for deriving integrated water vapor (precipitable water) and cloud liquid water through a column over the oceans. ...

N. C. Grody; A. Gruber; W. C. Shen

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques  

SciTech Connect

Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 ..mu..m and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80.

Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana; Cao, Haishi

2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Interference in the resonance fluorescence of two incoherently coupled transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluorescence light emitted by a 4-level system in $J=1/2$ to $J=1/2$ configuration driven by a monochromatic laser field and in an external magnetic field is studied. We show that the spectrum of resonance fluorescence emitted on the $\\pi$ transitions shows a signature of spontaneously generated interference effects. The degree of interference in the fluorescence spectrum can be controlled by means of the external magnetic field, provided that the Land\\'e g-factors of the excited and the ground state doublet are different. For a suitably chosen magnetic field strength, the relative weight of the Rayleigh line can be completely suppressed, even for low intensities of the coherent driving field. The incoherent fluorescence spectrum emitted on the $\\pi$ transitions exhibits a very narrow peak whose width and weight depends on the magnetic field strength. We demonstrate that the spectrum of resonance fluorescence emitted on the $\\sigma$ transitions show an indirect signature of interference. A measurement of the relative peak heights in the spectrum from the $\\sigma$ transitions allows to determine the branching ratio of the spontaneous decay of each excited state into the $\\sigma$ channel.

Martin Kiffner; Joerg Evers; Christoph H. Keitel

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Safeguards Applications  

SciTech Connect

In nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) measurements, resonances are excited by an external photon beam leading to the emission of {gamma} rays with specific energies that are characteristic of the emitting isotope. The promise of NRF as a non-destructive analysis technique (NDA) in safeguards applications lies in its potential to directly quantify a specific isotope in an assay target without the need for unfolding the combined responses of several fissile isotopes as often required by other NDA methods. The use of NRF for detection of sensitive nuclear materials and other contraband has been researched in the past. In the safeguards applications considered here one has to go beyond mere detection and precisely quantify the isotopic content, a challenge that is discussed throughout this report. Basic NRF measurement methods, instrumentation, and the analytical calculation of NRF signal strengths are described in Section 2. Well understood modeling and simulation tools are needed for assessing the potential of NRF for safeguards and for designing measurement systems. All our simulations were performed with the radiation transport code MCNPX, a code that is widely used in the safeguards community. Our initial studies showed that MCNPX grossly underestimated the elastically scattered background at backwards angles due to an incorrect treatment of Rayleigh scattering. While new, corrected calculations based on ENDF form factors showed much better agreement with experimental data for the elastic scattering of photons on an uranium target, the elastic backscatter is still not rigorously treated. Photonuclear scattering processes (nuclear Thomson, Delbruck and Giant Dipole Resonance scattering), which are expected to play an important role at higher energies, are not yet included. These missing elastic scattering contributions were studied and their importance evaluated evaluated against data found in the literature as discussed in Section 3. A transmission experiment was performed in September 2009 to test and demonstrate the applicability of the method to the quantitative measurement of an isotope of interest embedded in a thick target. The experiment, data analysis, and results are described in Section 4. The broad goal of our NRF studies is to assess the potential of the technique in safeguards applications. Three examples are analyzed in Section 5: the isotopic assay of spent nuclear fuel (SNF), the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment in UF{sub 6} cylinders, and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel. The study of NRF for the assay of SNF assemblies was supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. Department of Energy as part of a large multi-lab/university effort to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. NRF is one of 14 NDA techniques being researched. The methodology for performing and analyzing quantitative NRF measurements was developed for determining Pu mass in SNF and is extensively discussed in this report. The same methodology was applied to the assessment of NRF for the measurement of {sup 235}U enrichment and the determination of {sup 239}Pu in MOX fuel. The analysis centers on determining suitable NRF measurement methods, measurement capabilities that could be realized with currently available instrumentation, and photon source and detector requirements for achieving useful NDA capabilities.

Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J; Ambers, Scott D

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

287

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, NASA Ames: Phil Russell, Jens Redemann, Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Steve Dunagan, Roy Johnson: Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Battelle PND: Connor Flynn, Beat Schmid, Evgueni Kassianov Evgueni Kassianov NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent NASA GSFC: Alexander Sinyuk, Brent Holben Holben , , & AERONET Team & AERONET Team Collaboration involving: Collaboration involving: NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC NASA Ames, Battelle PND, NASA GSFC 4S 4S TAR TAR : : S S pectrometer for pectrometer for S S ky ky - - S S canning, canning, S S un un - - T T racking racking A A tmospheric tmospheric R R esearch esearch 4STAR: 4STAR: Spectrometer Spectrometer for for Sky Sky - - Scanning Scanning , , Sun Sun - - Tracking Tracking Atmospheric Research Atmospheric Research

288

ORISS Isomer and Isobar Spectrometer and Separator for Study of Exotic Decays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORISS Isomer ORISS Isomer and Isobar Spectrometer and Separator for Study of Exotic Decays A. Piechaczek for the 2 EMIS 2007 UNIRIB Consortium * The purpose is to provide a nuclear research facility at ORNL for consortium members * Consortium members: 3 EMIS 2007 * Our Deliverable is Science - Nuclear Physics * We do research * We give scientific reports at meetings * We train students * UNIRIB, with ORISE and ORAU, provides a university atmosphere in a national laboratory 4 Motivation to build ORISS - Oak Ridge Isomer/Isobar Spectrometer and Separator: * Decay studies often possible from yield considerations, but limited by background from isobaric/isomeric contamination * Need high resolution separator for background suppression ORISS predicted performance: * High mass resolving power, M/∆M

289

Results from a Prototype Chicane-Based Energy Spectrometer for a Linear Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The International Linear Collider and other proposed high energy e+ e- machines aim to measure with unprecedented precision Standard Model quantities and new, not yet discovered phenomena. One of the main requirements for achieving this goal is a measurement of the incident beam energy with an uncertainty close to 1e-4. This article presents the analysis of data from a prototype energy spectrometer commissioned in 2006--2007 in SLAC's End Station A beamline. The prototype was a 4-magnet chicane equipped with beam position monitors measuring small changes of the beam orbit through the chicane at different beam energies. A single bunch energy resolution close to 5e-4 was measured, which is satisfactory for most scenarios. We also report on the operational experience with the chicane-based spectrometer and suggest ways of improving its performance.

A. Lyapin; H. J. Schreiber; M. Viti; C. Adolphsen; R. Arnold; S. Boogert; G. Boorman; M. V. Chistiakova; F. Gournaris; V. Duginov; C. Hast; M. D. Hildreth; C. Hlaing; F. Jackson; O. Khainovsky; Yu. G. Kolomensky; S. Kostromin; K. Kumar; B. Maiheu; D. McCormick; D. J. Miller; N. Morozov; T. Orimoto; E. Petigura; M. Sadre-Bazzaz; M. Slater; Z. Szalata; M. Thomson; D. Ward; M. Wendt; M. Wing; M. Woods

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR): Instrument Technology  

SciTech Connect

The Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) combines airborne sun tracking and sky scanning with diffraction spectroscopy, to improve knowledge of atmospheric constituents and their links to air-pollution/climate. Direct beam hyper-spectral measurement of optical depth improves retrievals of gas constituents and determination of aerosol properties. Sky scanning enhances retrievals of aerosol type and size distribution. 4STAR measurements will tighten the closure between satellite and ground-based measurements. 4STAR incorporates a modular sun-tracking/ sky-scanning optical head with fiber optic signal transmission to rack mounted spectrometers, permitting miniaturization of the external optical head, and future detector evolution. Technical challenges include compact optical collector design, radiometric dynamic range and stability, and broad spectral coverage. Test results establishing the performance of the instrument against the full range of operational requirements are presented, along with calibration, engineering flight test, and scientific field campaign data and results.

Dunagan, Stephen; Johnson, Roy; Zavaleta, Jhony; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Flynn, Connor J.; Redemann, Jens; Shinozuka, Yohei; Livingston, J.; Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

291

Spectrometer sensitivity calibration in the extreme uv by means of branching ratios of magnetic dipole lines  

SciTech Connect

Relative intensity measurements of various line pairs resulting from magnetic dipole transitions within the configurations s/sup 2/p/sup 2/ and s/sup 2/p/sup 4/, in conjunction with calculated transition probabilities, have been used to determine the wavelength dependence of the sensitivity of a grazing incidence spectrometer, in the range 400 to 1000 A. Emissions from Cr XIX, Fe XXI, Ni XXI and XXIII, Cu XXIV, and Zr XXVII ions in PLT tokamak discharges were used for this purpose. Absolute sensitivity of the spectrometer at selected wavelengths had been determined by the traditional hydrogen, helium, carbon, and oxygen electric-dipole line pairs from the same discharges. Similar attempts to use transitions in the s/sup 2/p/sup 3/ configurations in Cr XVIII, Zr XXVI, and Mo XXVIII ions resulted in significant discrepancies that are ascribed to uncertainties in the corresponding calculated transition probabilities.

Denne, B.; Hinnov, E.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

X-Ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer for Extended X-Ray Sources  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Spherically or toroidally curved, double focusing crystals are used in a spectrometer for X-ray diagnostics of an extended X-ray source such as a hot plasma produced in a tokamak fusion experiment to provide spatially and temporally resolved data on plasma parameters such as ion temperature, toroidal and poloidal rotation, electron temperature, impurity ion charge-state distributions, and impurity transport. The imaging properties of these spherically or toroidally curved crystals provide both spectrally and spatially resolved X-ray data from the plasma using only one small spherically or toroidally curved crystal, thus eliminating the requirement for a large array of crystal spectrometers and the need to cross-calibrate the various crystals.

Bitter, Manfred L.; Fraekel, Benjamin; Gorman, James L.; Hill, Kenneth W.; Roquemore, Lane A.; Stodiek, Wolfgang; Goeler, Schweickhard von

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

BIOCOMPATIBLE FLUORESCENT MICROSPHERES: SAFE PARTICLES FOR MATERIAL PENETRATION STUDIES  

SciTech Connect

Biocompatible polymers with hydrolyzable chemical bonds have been used to produce safe, non-toxic fluorescent microspheres for material penetration studies. The selection of polymeric materials depends on both biocompatibility and processability, with tailored fluorescent properties depending on specific applications. Microspheres are composed of USFDA-approved biodegradable polymers and non-toxic fluorophores and are therefore suitable for tests where human exposure is possible. Micropheres were produced which contain unique fluorophores to enable discrimination from background aerosol particles. Characteristics that affect dispersion and adhesion can be modified depending on use. Several different microsphere preparation methods are possible, including the use of a vibrating orifice aerosol generator (VOAG), a Sono-Tek atomizer, an emulsion technique, and inkjet printhead. Applications for the fluorescent microspheres include challenges for biodefense system testing, calibrants for biofluorescence sensors, and particles for air dispersion model validation studies.

Farquar, G; Leif, R

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Laser-induced differential normalized fluorescence method for cancer diagnosis  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus and method for cancer diagnosis are disclosed. The diagnostic method includes the steps of irradiating a tissue sample with monochromatic excitation light, producing a laser-induced fluorescence spectrum from emission radiation generated by interaction of the excitation light with the tissue sample, and dividing the intensity at each wavelength of the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum by the integrated area under the laser-induced fluorescence spectrum to produce a normalized spectrum. A mathematical difference between the normalized spectrum and an average value of a reference set of normalized spectra which correspond to normal tissues is calculated, which provides for amplifying small changes in weak signals from malignant tissues for improved analysis. The calculated differential normalized spectrum is correlated to a specific condition of a tissue sample.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN); Panjehpour, Masoud (Knoxville, TN); Overholt, Bergein F. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Fluorescent single walled nanotube/silica composite materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fluorescent composites of surfactant-wrapped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were prepared by exposing suspensions of surfactant-wrapped carbon nanotubes to tetramethylorthosilicate (TMOS) vapor. Sodium deoxycholate (DOC) and sodium dodecylsulphate (SDS) were the surfactants. No loss in emission intensity was observed when the suspension of DOC-wrapped SWNTs were exposed to the TMOS vapors, but about a 50% decrease in the emission signal was observed from the SDS-wrapped SWNTs nanotubes. The decrease in emission was minimal by buffering the SDS/SWNT suspension prior to forming the composite. Fluorescent xerogels were prepared by adding glycerol to the SWNT suspensions prior to TMOS vapor exposure, followed by drying the gels. Fluorescent aerogels were prepared by replacing water in the gels with methanol and then exposing them to supercritical fluid drying conditions. The aerogels can be used for gas sensing.

Dattelbaum, Andrew M.; Gupta, Gautam; Duque, Juan G.; Doorn, Stephen K.; Hamilton, Christopher E.; DeFriend Obrey, Kimberly A.

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

296

Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Compact Fluorescent Lamps Compact Fluorescent Lamps Energy Cost Calculator for Compact Fluorescent Lamps October 8, 2013 - 2:18pm Addthis This tool calculates the payback period for your calc retrofit project. Modify the default values to suit your project requirements. Existing incandescent lamp wattage Watts Incandescent lamp cost dollars Incandescent lamp life 1000 hours calc wattage Watts calc cost dollars calc life (6000 hours for moderate use, 10000 hours for high use) 8000 hours Number of lamps in retrofit project Hours operating per week hours Average cost of electricity 0.06 $/kWh Relamper labor costs $/hr Time taken to retrofit all lamps in this project min Time taken to relamp one lamp min Type of Relamping Practiced: Group Relamping: Calculate Simple Payback Period months

297

A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights A Bright Idea: New Efficiency Standards for Incandescent and Fluorescent Lights July 21, 2009 - 5:18pm Addthis John Lippert Pretty soon, lighting is going to get a lot more efficient. New standards for incandescent reflector bulbs, general purpose fluorescent bulbs, and regular incandescent bulbs are going into effect beginning in approximately three years. You may be curious about how these standards will affect the most popular types of incandescent bulbs we've all used for so long: the common non-reflector 40-watt, 60-watt, 75-watt, and 100-watt bulbs. The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (also known as EISA) requires that these incandescent bulbs use 30% less energy than today's

298

Elimination of ``memory`` from sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This paper describes a method for preparing the sample handling and inlet system of a mass spectrometer for analysis of a subsequent sample following analysis of a previous sample comprising the flushing of the system interior with supercritical CO{sub 2} and venting the interior. The method eliminates the effect of system ``memory`` on the subsequent analysis, especially following persistent samples such as xenon and krypton.

Chastgner, P.

1991-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

299

Methyl quantum tunneling and nitrogen-14 NQR NMR studies using a SQUID magnetic resonance spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Nuclear Quadrupole Resonance (NQR) techniques have been very successful in obtaining molecular conformation and dynamics information. Unfortunately, standard NMR and NQR spectrometers are unable to adequately detect resonances below a few megahertz due to the frequency dependent sensitivity of their Faraday coil detectors. For this reason a new spectrometer with a dc SQUID (Superconducting Quantum Interference Device) detector, which has no such frequency dependence, has been developed. Previously, this spectrometer was used to observe {sup 11}B and {sup 27}Al NQR resonances. The scope of this study was increased to include {sup 23}Na, {sup 51}V, and {sup 55}Mn NQR transitions. Also, a technique was presented to observe {sup 14}N NQR resonances through cross relaxation of the nitrogen polarization to adjacent proton spins. When the proton Zeeman splitting matches one nitrogen quadrupoler transition the remaining two {sup 14}N transitions can be detected by sweeping a saturating rf field through resonance. Additionally, simultaneous excitation of two nitrogen resonances provides signal enhancement which helps to connect transitions from the same site. In this way, nitrogen-14 resonances were observed in several amino acids and polypeptides. This spectrometer has also been useful in the direct detection of methyl quantum tunneling splittings at 4.2 K. Tunneling, frequencies of a homologous series of carboxylic acids were measured and for solids with equivalent crystal structures, an exponential correlation between the tunneling frequency and the enthalpy of fusion is observed. This correlation provides information about the contribution of intermolecular interactions to the energy barrier for methyl rotation.

Black, B.E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Radiation damage control in the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer drift chamber system  

SciTech Connect

A high rate drift chamber system has been in use at the BNL hypernuclear spectrometer system for the past three years. Some of the chambers have accumulated charge doses up to about 0.2 C/cm-wire without showing external signs of aging. The system design and performance will be discussed as well as the results of some laboratory drift chamber aging tests. 5 refs., 9 figs.

Pile, P.H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Compact Reflective Imaging Spectrometer Design Utilizing An Immersed Grating And Anamorphic Mirror  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit, an anamorphic mirror, a grating, and a detector array. The entrance slit directs light to the anamorphic mirror. The anamorphic mirror receives the light and directs the light to the grating. The grating receives the light from the anamorphic mirror and defracts the light back onto the anamorphic mirror. The anamorphic mirror focuses the light onto a detector array.

Lerner, Scott A. (Corvalis, OR)

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

302

Ge(Li) low level in-situ gamma-ray spectrometer applications  

SciTech Connect

Currently a Ge(Li) spectrometer is being employed for in-situ measurements of radionuclides contained in soil. This is being done at nuclear reactor sites and in complex radionuclide fields at the Nevada Test Site. The methodology and precision of the in-situ spectrometric technique was previously established for analysis of radionuclides in soil. Application of the technique to gaseous and liquid effluents containing radionuclides has shown a great deal of promise. (auth)

Phelps, P.L.; Anspaugh, L.R.; Roth, S.J.; Huckabay, G.W.; Sawyer, D.L.

1973-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

303

SPHERES, Juelich's high-flux neutron backscattering spectrometer at FRM II  

SciTech Connect

SPHERES is a third-generation neutron backscattering spectrometer, located at the 20 MW German neutron source FRM II and operated by the Juelich Centre for Neutron Science. It offers an energy resolution (fwhm) better than 0.65 {mu}eV, a dynamic range of {+-} 31 {mu}eV, and a signal-to-noise ratio of up to 1750:1.

Wuttke, Joachim; Budwig, Alfred; Drochner, Matthias; Kaemmerling, Hans; Kayser, Franz-Joseph; Kleines, Harald; Ossovyi, Vladimir; Pardo, Luis Carlos; Prager, Michael; Richter, Dieter; Schneider, Gerald J.; Schneider, Harald; Staringer, Simon [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The results of a high-sensitivity aerial gamma-ray spectrometer survey of the Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota are presented. Instrumentation and methods are described in volume 1 of this report. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic information to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the US. (DMC)

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The use of chopper spectrometers for cold-to-epithermal neutron scattering at IPNS  

SciTech Connect

A multi-detector chopper spectrometer enables measurements of the scattering function S(Q,E) to be made over a wide range of momentum and energy transfer (Q,E). The application of pulsed-source chopper spectrometers for inelastic measurements at thermal and epithermal energies (50 meV < E < 1000 meV) is well known. Recently at IPNS, we have extended the energy-transfer region down to about 0.5 meV with a resolution of the order of 150 {mu}eV. It is made possible by utilizing the cold-neutron incident spectrum of the 100 K methane moderator in conjunction with a dual beryllium-body rotor system. Neutron incident energies can be changed efficiently over the 4 to 1000 meV region while maintaining an undisturbed sample environment. We describe the operation of the IPNS chopper spectrometers (HRMECS and LRMECS), the instrumental resolution and the background-suppression performance. The capability of measuring inelastic features from 0.5 to 100 meV with an energy resolution of {Delta}E/E{sub 0} = 2.5% is demonstrated by experimental results of crystal-field excitation spectra of a high-Tc superconductor ErBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7}. Preliminary data of quasielastic scattering from a room-temperature molten salt AlCl{sub 3}-EMIC are presented.

Loong, C.K.; Donley, L.I.; Ostrowski, G.E.; Kleb, R.; Hammonds, J.P.; Soderholm, L.; Takahashi, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Absolute intensity calibration of the Wendelstein 7-X high efficiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The new high effiency extreme ultraviolet overview spectrometer (HEXOS) system for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X is now mounted for testing and adjustment at the tokamak experiment for technology oriented research (TEXTOR). One part of the testing phase was the intensity calibration of the two double spectrometers which in total cover a spectral range from 2.5 to 160.0 nm with overlap. This work presents the current intensity calibration curves for HEXOS and describes the method of calibration. The calibration was implemented with calibrated lines of a hollow cathode light source and the branching ratio technique. The hollow cathode light source provides calibrated lines from 16 up to 147 nm. We could extend the calibrated region in the spectrometers down to 2.8 nm by using the branching line pairs emitted by an uncalibrated pinch extreme ultraviolet light source as well as emission lines from boron and carbon in TEXTOR plasmas. In total HEXOS is calibrated from 2.8 up to 147 nm, which covers most of the observable wavelength region. The approximate density of carbon in the range of the minor radius from 18 to 35 cm in a TEXTOR plasma determined by simulating calibrated vacuum ultraviolet emission lines with a transport code was 5.5x10{sup 17} m{sup -3} which corresponds to a local carbon concentration of 2%.

Greiche, Albert; Biel, Wolfgang; Marchuk, Oleksandr [Institut fuer Energieforschung-Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany); Burhenn, Rainer [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, D-17491 Greifswald (Germany)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

An Ion Doppler Spectrometer Instrument for Ion Temperature and Flow Measurements on SSPX  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high-resolution ion Doppler spectrometer has been installed on the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment to measure ion temperatures and plasma flow. The system is composed of a 1 meter focal length Czerny-Turner spectrometer with diffraction grating line density of 2400 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra between 300 and 600 nm. A 16-channel photomultiplier tube detection assembly combined with output coupling optics provides a spectral resolution of 0.0126 nm per channel. We calculate in some detail the mapping of curved slit images onto the linear detector array elements. This is important in determining wavelength resolution and setting the optimum vertical extent of the slit. Also, because of the small wavelength window of the IDS, a miniature fiber optic survey spectrometer sensitive to a wavelength range 200 to 1100 nm and having resolution 0.2 nm, is used to obtain a time-integrated spectrum for each shot to verify specific impurity line radiation. Several measurements validate the systems operation. Doppler broadening of C III 464.72 nm line in the plasma shows time-resolved ion temperatures up to 250 eV for hydrogen discharges, which is consistent with neutral particle energy analyzer measurements. Flow measurements show a sub-Alfvenic plasma flow ranging from 5 to 45 km/s for helium discharges.

King, J D; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Romero-Talamas, C A; Moller, J M; Morse, E C

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Superresolution of a compact neutron spectrometer at energies relevant for fusion diagnostics  

SciTech Connect

The ability to achieve resolution that is better than the instrument resolution (i.e., superresolution) is well known in optics, where it has been extensively studied. Unfortunately, there are only a handful of theoretical studies concerning superresolution of particle spectrometers, even though experimentalists are familiar with the enhancement of resolution that is achievable when appropriate methods of data analysis are used, such as maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Knowledge of the superresolution factor is in many cases important. For example, in applications of neutron spectrometry to fusion diagnostics, the temperature of a burning plasma is an important physical parameter which may be inferred from the width of the peak of the neutron energy spectrum, and the ability to determine this width depends on the superresolution factor. Kosarev has derived an absolute limit for resolution enhancement using arguments based on a well known theorem of Shannon. Most calculations of superresolution factors in the literature, however, are based on the assumption of Gaussian, translationally invariant response functions and therefore not directly applicable to neutron spectrometers which typically have response functions not satisfying these requirements. In this work, we develop a procedure that allows us to overcome these difficulties and we derive estimates of superresolution for liquid scintillator spectrometers of a type commonly used for neutron measurements. Theoretical superresolution factors are compared to experimental results.

Reginatto, M.; Zimbal, A. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany)

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

What Caused the Lead burn-out in Spectrometer Magnet 2B  

SciTech Connect

The spectrometer solenoids are supposed to be the first magnets installed in the MICE Cooling Channel. The results of the test of Spectrometer Magnet 2B are reported in a previous MICE Note. Magnet 2B was tested with all five coils connected in series. The magnet failed because a lead to coil M2 failed before it could be trained to its full design current of 275 A. First, this report describes the condition of the magnet when the lead failure occurred. The lead that failed was between the cold mass feed-through and the heavy lead that connected to coil M2 and the quench protection diodes. It is believed that the lead failed because the minimum propagation zone (MPZ) length was too short. The quench was probably triggered by lead motion in the field external to the magnet center coil. The effect of heat transfer on quench propagation and MPZ length is discussed. The MPZ length is compared for a number of cases that apply to the spectrometer solenoid 2B as built and as it has been repaired. The required heat transfer coefficient for cryogenic stability and the quench propagation velocity along the leads are compared for various parts of the Magnet leads inside the cold mass cryostat. The effect of the insulation on leads on heat transfer is and stability is discussed.

Green, Michael A

2010-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

310

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure. 11 figs.

Siminovitch, M.J.; Rubenstein, F.M.; Whitman, R.E.

1992-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Time-resolved Hyperspectral Fluorescence Spectroscopy using Frequency Modulated Excitation  

SciTech Connect

An intensity-modulated excitation light source is used together with a micro channel plate intensified CCD (ICCD) detector gated at a slightly different frequency to generate a beat frequency from a fluorescent sample. The addition of a spectrograph produces a hyperspectral time-resolved data product where the resulting beat frequency is detected with a low frame rate camera. Measuring the beat frequency of the spectrum as a function of time allows separation of the excited fluorescence from ambient constant light sources. The excitation and detector repetition rates are varied over a range of discrete frequencies, and the phase shift of the beat wave maps out the emission decay rate(s).

,; Neill, M

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Digital optical phase conjugation of fluorescence in turbid tissue  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a method for phase conjugating fluorescence. Our method, called reference free digital optical phase conjugation, can conjugate extremely weak, incoherent optical signals. It was used to phase conjugate fluorescent light originating from a bead covered with 0.5 mm of light-scattering tissue. The phase conjugated beam refocuses onto the bead and causes a local increase of over two orders of magnitude in the light intensity. Potential applications are in imaging, optical trapping, and targeted photochemical activation inside turbid tissue.

Vellekoop, Ivo M.; Cui Meng; Yang Changhuei [Department of Electrical Engineering, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California (United States)

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Heat transfer assembly for a fluorescent lamp and fixture  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a lighting fixture including a lamp and a housing, a heat transfer structure is disclosed for reducing the minimum lamp wall temperature of a fluorescent light bulb. The heat transfer structure, constructed of thermally conductive material, extends from inside the housing to outside the housing, transferring heat energy generated from a fluorescent light bulb to outside the housing where the heat energy is dissipated to the ambient air outside the housing. Also disclosed is a method for reducing minimum lamp wall temperatures. Further disclosed is an improved lighting fixture including a lamp, a housing and the aforementioned heat transfer structure.

Siminovitch, Michael J. (Richmond, CA); Rubenstein, Francis M. (Berkeley, CA); Whitman, Richard E. (Richmond, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A versatile detector for total fluorescence and electron yield experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combination of a non-coated silicon photodiode with electron repelling meshes makes a versatile detector for total fluorescence yield and electron yield techniques highly suitable for x-ray absorption spectroscopy. In particular, a copper mesh with a bias voltage allows to suppress or transmit the electron yield signal. The performance of this detection scheme has been characterized by near edge x-ray absorption fine structure studies of thermal oxidized silicon and sapphire. The results show that the new detector probes both electron yield and for a bias voltage exceeding the maximum photon energy the total fluorescence yield.

Thielemann, N. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, Newtonstrasse 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, P. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Foehlisch, A. [Institute for Methods and Instrumentation for Synchrotron Radiation Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH, Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Institut fuer Physik und Astronomie, Universitaet Potsdam, Karl-Liebknecht-Strasse 24-25, 14476 Potsdam (Germany)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Fluorescence Axial Localization with Nanometer Accuracy and Precision  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new technique, standing wave axial nanometry (SWAN), to image the axial location of a single nanoscale fluorescent object with sub-nanometer accuracy and 3.7 nm precision. A standing wave, generated by positioning an atomic force microscope tip over a focused laser beam, is used to excite fluorescence; axial position is determined from the phase of the emission intensity. We use SWAN to measure the orientation of single DNA molecules of different lengths, grafted on surfaces with different functionalities.

Li, Hui; Yen, Chi-Fu; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Next Generation Safeguard Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S Department of Energy is supporting a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies and to detect the diversion of pins with non-destructive assay (NDA) methods. The following 14 NDA techniques are being studied: Delayed Neutrons, Differential Die-Away, Differential Die-Away Self-Interrogation, Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer, Neutron Multiplicity, Passive Neutron Albedo Reactivity, Total Neutron (Gross Neutron), X-Ray Fluorescence, {sup 252}Cf Interrogation with Prompt Neutron Detection, Delayed Gamma, Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence, Passive Prompt Gamma, Self-integration Neutron Resonance Densitometry, and Neutron Resonance Transmission Analysis. Understanding and maturity of the techniques vary greatly, ranging from decades old, well-understood methods to new approaches. Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence (NRF) is a technique that had not previously been studied for SNF assay or similar applications. Since NRF generates isotope-specific signals, the promise and appeal of the technique lies in its potential to directly measure the amount of a specific isotope in an SNF assay target. The objectives of this study were to design and model suitable NRF measurement methods, to quantify capabilities and corresponding instrumentation requirements, and to evaluate prospects and the potential of NRF for SNF assay. The main challenge of the technique is to achieve the sensitivity and precision, i.e., to accumulate sufficient counting statistics, required for quantifying the mass of Pu isotopes in SNF assemblies. Systematic errors, considered a lesser problem for a direct measurement and only briefly discussed in this report, need to be evaluated for specific instrument designs in the future. Also, since the technical capability of using NRF to measure Pu in SNF has not been established, this report does not directly address issues such as cost, size, development time, nor concerns related to the use of Pu in measurement systems. This report discusses basic NRF measurement concepts, i.e., backscatter and transmission methods, and photon source and {gamma}-ray detector options in Section 2. An analytical model for calculating NRF signal strengths is presented in Section 3 together with enhancements to the MCNPX code and descriptions of modeling techniques that were drawn upon in the following sections. Making extensive use of the model and MCNPX simulations, the capabilities of the backscatter and transmission methods based on bremsstrahlung or quasi-monoenergetic photon sources were analyzed as described in Sections 4 and 5. A recent transmission experiment is reported on in Appendix A. While this experiment was not directly part of this project, its results provide an important reference point for our analytical estimates and MCNPX simulations. Used fuel radioactivity calculations, the enhancements to the MCNPX code, and details of the MCNPX simulations are documented in the other appendices.

Ludewigt, Bernhard A; Quiter, Brian J.; Ambers, Scott D.

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

317

Combination of fluorescence imaging and local spectrophotometry in fluorescence diagnostics of early cancer of larynx and bronchi  

SciTech Connect

The results of comparative studies of autofluorescence and 5-ALA-induced fluorescence of protoporphyrin IX, used in the diagnostics of early cancer of larynx and bronchi, are presented. The autofluorescence and 5-ALA-induced fluorescence images of larynx and bronchial tissues are analysed during the endoscopic study. The method of local spectrophotometry is used to verify findings obtained from fluorescence images. It is shown that such a combined approach can be efficiently used to improve the diagnostics of precancer and early cancer, to detect a primary multiple tumours, as well as for the diagnostics of a residual tumour or an early recurrence after the endoscopic, surgery or X-ray treatment. The developed approach allows one to minimise the number of false-positive results and to reduce the number of biopsies, which are commonly used in the white-light bronchoscopy search for occult cancerous loci. (laser biology and medicine)

Sokolov, Vladimir V; Filonenko, E V; Telegina, L V [P.A. Hertsen Moscow Research Oncological Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Boulgakova, N N; Smirnov, V V [A.M. Prokhorov General Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

A Near-Infrared Diode Laser Spectrometer for the In Situ Measurement of Methane and Water Vapor from Stratospheric Balloons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spectromtre Diodes Laser Accordables (SDLA), a balloonborne near-infrared diode laser spectrometer, was developed to provide simultaneous in situ measurements of methane and water vapor in the troposphere and the lower stratosphere. The ...

Georges Durry; Ivan Pouchet

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A Diode Laser Spectrometer for the In Situ Measurement of the HNO3 Content of Polar Stratospheric Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new instrument realized for measuring the HNO3 concentration in air is described. The device is a midinfrared absorption spectrometer based on a tunable diode laser and a multipass absorption cell. The instrument is specifically designed for ...

G. Toci; P. Mazzinghi; M. Vannini

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, the enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots. 9 figs.

Weiss, R.B.; Kimball, A.W.; Gesteland, R.F.; Ferguson, F.M.; Dunn, D.M.; Di Sera, L.J.; Cherry, J.L.

1995-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Automated hybridization/imaging device for fluorescent multiplex DNA sequencing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for automated multiplex sequencing of DNA with an integrated automated imaging hybridization chamber system. This system comprises an hybridization chamber device for mounting a membrane containing size-fractionated multiplex sequencing reaction products, apparatus for fluid delivery to the chamber device, imaging apparatus for light delivery to the membrane and image recording of fluorescence emanating from the membrane while in the chamber device, and programmable controller apparatus for controlling operation of the system. The multiplex reaction products are hybridized with a probe, then an enzyme (such as alkaline phosphatase) is bound to a binding moiety on the probe, and a fluorogenic substrate (such as a benzothiazole derivative) is introduced into the chamber device by the fluid delivery apparatus. The enzyme converts the fluorogenic substrate into a fluorescent product which, when illuminated in the chamber device with a beam of light from the imaging apparatus, excites fluorescence of the fluorescent product to produce a pattern of hybridization. The pattern of hybridization is imaged by a CCD camera component of the imaging apparatus to obtain a series of digital signals. These signals are converted by the controller apparatus into a string of nucleotides corresponding to the nucleotide sequence an automated sequence reader. The method and apparatus are also applicable to other membrane-based applications such as colony and plaque hybridization and Southern, Northern, and Western blots.

Weiss, Robert B. (Salt Lake City, UT); Kimball, Alvin W. (Salt Lake City, UT); Gesteland, Raymond F. (Salt Lake City, UT); Ferguson, F. Mark (Salt Lake City, UT); Dunn, Diane M. (West Valley City, UT); Di Sera, Leonard J. (Salt Lake City, UT); Cherry, Joshua L. (Salt Lake City, UT)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Restoration of X-ray fluorescence images of hidden paintings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes our methods for repairing and restoring images of hidden paintings (paintings that have been painted over and are now covered by a new surface painting) that have been obtained via noninvasive X-ray fluorescence imaging of their ... Keywords: Art restoration, Artifact correction, Image restoration, Underdetermined source separation

Anila Anitha; Andrei Brasoveanu; Marco Duarte; Shannon Hughes; Ingrid Daubechies; Joris Dik; Koen Janssens; Matthias Alfeld

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed. 2 figs.

Moskowitz, P.E.; Maya, J.

1987-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

324

Distinguishability of Biological Material Using Ultraviolet Multi-Spectral Fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

Recent interest in the detection and analysis of biological samples by spectroscopic methods has led to questions concerning the degree of distinguishability and biological variability of the ultraviolet (W) fluorescent spectra from such complex samples. We show that the degree of distinguishability of such spectra is readily determined numerically.

Gray, P.C.; Heinen, R.J.; Rigdon, L.D.; Rosenthal, S.E.; Shokair, I.R.; Siragusa, G.R.; Tisone, G.C.; Wagner, J.S.

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

325

Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures. 12 figs.

Pelton, B.A.; Siminovitch, M.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fluorescent lamp with static magnetic field generating means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluorescent lamp wherein magnetic field generating means (e.g., permanent magnets) are utilized to generate a static magnetic field across the respective electrode structures of the lamp such that maximum field strength is located at the electrode's filament. An increase in efficacy during operation has been observed.

Moskowitz, Philip E. (Peabody, MA); Maya, Jakob (Brookline, MA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fluorescence photon migration by the boundary element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of the boundary element method (BEM) is explored as an alternative to the finite element method (FEM) solution methodology for the elliptic equations used to model the generation and transport of fluorescent light in highly scattering media, without the need for an internal volume mesh. The method is appropriate for domains where it is reasonable to assume the fluorescent properties are regionally homogeneous, such as when using highly specific molecularly targeted fluorescent contrast agents in biological tissues. In comparison to analytical results on a homogeneous sphere, BEM predictions of complex emission fluence are shown to be more accurate and stable than those of the FEM. Emission fluence predictions made with the BEM using a 708-node mesh, with roughly double the inter-node spacing of boundary nodes as in a 6956-node FEM mesh, match experimental frequency-domain fluorescence emission measurements acquired on a 1087 cm{sup 3} breast-mimicking phantom at least as well as those of the FEM, but require only 1/8 to 1/2 the computation time.

Fedele, Francesco [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Eppstein, Margaret J. [Department of Computer Science, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States)]. E-mail: maggie.eppstein@uvm.edu; Laible, Jeffrey P. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT 05405 (United States); Godavarty, Anuradha [Photon Migration Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States); Sevick-Muraca, Eva M. [Photon Migration Laboratories, Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77842-3012 (United States)

2005-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

328

Convection venting lensed reflector-type compact fluorescent lamp system  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a fluorescent lamp housing assembly capable of providing convection cooling to the lamp and the ballast. The lens of the present invention includes two distinct portions, a central portion and an apertured portion. The housing assembly further includes apertures so that air mass is able to freely move up through the assembly and out ventilation apertures.

Pelton, Bruce A. (825 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803); Siminovitch, Michael (829 Manor Rd., El Sobrante, CA 94803)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

PGAA Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... of the peaks at these energies reveal their ... resulting in higher counting efficiency and better sensitivity, especially in the energy region below ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

resonance fluorescence in 240 Pu, Submitted to Phys. Rev.near 2 MeV in 235 U and 239 Pu, Phys. Rev. C 041601(R) (Examining Pu and Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Have You Switched to Compact Fluorescent Lights? Why or Why Not...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Switched to Compact Fluorescent Lights? Why or Why Not? Have You Switched to Compact Fluorescent Lights? Why or Why Not? May 1, 2009 - 1:52pm Addthis On Tuesday, John wrote about...

332

DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

Glazer, A.N.; Benson, S.C.

1997-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

DNA complexes with dyes designed for energy transfer as fluorescent markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heteromultimeric fluorophores are provided for binding to DNA, which allow for the detection of DNA in electrical separations and preparation of probes having high-fluorescent efficiencies and large Stokes shifts. In addition, by appropriate choice of fluorescent molecules, one can use a single narrow wavelength band excitation light source, while obtaining fluorescent emissions having sufficient separation to be readily discriminated. 4 figs.

Glazer, A.M.; Benson, S.C.

1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

334

A small diameter, flexible, all attitude, self-contained germanium spectrometer. Operator`s manual  

SciTech Connect

The end of the Cold War has brought about tremendous changes in the nuclear complex of the Department of Energy. One of the many changes has been the shutdown or decommissioning of many facilities that performed nuclear work. One of the steps in the process of decommissioning a facility involves the decontamination or removal of drain lines or pipes that may have carried radioactive materials at one time. The removal of all these pipes and drain lines to a nuclear disposal facility could be quite costly. It was suggested by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that a germanium spectrometer could be built that could fit through straight pipes with a diameter as small as 5.08 cm (2 inches) and pass through curved pipes with a diameter as small as 7.6 cm (3 inches) such as that of a 3-inch p-trap in a drain line. The germanium spectrometer could then be used to simultaneously determine all gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in or surrounding the pipe. By showing the absence of any gamma-ray emitting radionuclides, the pipes could then be reused in place or disposed of as non-radioactive material, thus saving significantly in disposal costs. A germanium spectrometer system has been designed by PNNL and fabricated by Princeton Gamma Tech (PGT) that consists of three segments, each 4.84 cm in diameter and about 10 cm in length. Flexible stainless steel bellows were used to connect the segments. Segment 1 is a small liquid nitrogen reservoir. The reservoir is filled with a sponge-like material which enables the detector to be used in any orientation. A Stirling cycle refrigerator is under development which can replace the liquid nitrogen reservoir to provide continuous cooling and operation.

Bordzindki, R.L.; Lepel, E.A.; Reeves, J.H. [Battelle, Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Kohli, R. [Battelle, Columbus Lab., OH (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

High-resolution x-ray spectroscopy with the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) is a production-class 36 pixel x-ray calorimeter spectrometer that has been continuously operating at the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for almost 2 years. The ECS was designed to be a long-lifetime, turn-key spectrometer that couples high performance with ease of operation and minimal operator intervention. To this end, a variant of the Suzaku/XRS spaceflight detector system has been coupled to a low-maintenance cryogenic system consisting of a long-lifetime liquid He cryostat, and a closed cycle, {sup 3}He pre-cooled adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator. The ECS operates for almost 3 weeks between cryogenic servicing and the ADR operates at 0.05 K for more than 60 hours between automatic recycles under software control. Half of the ECS semiconductor detector array is populated with mid-band pixels that have a resolution of 4.5 eV FWHM, a bandpass from 0.05-12 keV, and a quantum efficiency of 95% at 6 keV. The other half of the array has thick HgTe absorbers that have a bandpass from 0.3 to over 100 keV, an energy resolution of 33 eV FWHM, and a quantum efficiency of 32% at 60 keV. In addition, the ECS uses a real-time, autonomous, data collection and analysis system developed for the Suzaku/XRS instrument and implemented in off-the-shelf hardware for the ECS. Here we will discuss the performance of the ECS instrument and its implementation as a turnkey cryogenic detector system.

Porter, F S; Adams, J S; Beiersdorfer, P; Brown, G V; Clementson, J; Frankel, M; Kahn, S M; Kelley, R L; Kilbourne, C A

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

High Energy Photoemission: Development of a New Electrostatic Lens for a Novel High Resolution Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

In recent years growing interest has been dedicated to photoemission experiments at high energy because a significant bulk sensitivity in photoemission measurements can be achieved only by increasing the kinetic energy of the analysed photoelectrons. Within the 5th European framework, a RTD project named VOLPE (VOLume PhotoEmission from solids) has been funded. Aim of the project is to measure bulk electronic properties on solids by the Photoemission Spectroscopy with Synchrotron Radiation preserving an energy resolution comparable to modern surface sensitive photoemission spectra. This will be possible by performing photoemission experiments in a photolectron Kinetic Energy range of 6-10 keV, keeping the overall energy resolution at 20-30 meV. Presently, the beamline ID16 at ESRF posses the necessary characteristics (1011 photons/sec and 15-100 meV resolution at photon energies between 6 keV and 15 keV) to perform these class of experiments, while a new spectrometer is being developed in the framework of VOLPE project. This spectrometer is an hemispherical deflector analyser with electrostatic input lens and 2D position sensitive detector. The spectrometer will be characterised by an ultimate resolving power of 3 105 at 10 keV. We will report on the particular lens system developed for this project which is optimised to guarantee very high retarding ratio, between 50 and 600, with constant linear magnification. A prototype of this lens has been realised and we will report on the first measurements performed at INFM, Unita Roma Tre.

Paolicelli, G.; Fondacaro, A.; Offi, F. [INFM, Unita Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84 -I 00146 Rome (Italy); Stefani, G. [INFM, Unita Roma Tre, Via della Vasca Navale 84 -I 00146 Rome (Italy); Dip. di Fisica 'E. Amaldi', Universita Roma Tre Via della Vasca Navale 84-I 00146 Rome (Italy)

2004-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

A new method of alpha ray measurement using a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a new method of alpha($\\alpha$)-ray measurement that detects helium atoms with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer(QMS). A demonstration is undertaken with a plastic-covered $^{241}$Am $\\alpha$-emitting source to detect $\\alpha$-rays stopped in the capsule. We successfully detect helium atoms that diffuse out of the capsule by accumulating them for one to 20 hours in a closed chamber. The detected amount is found to be proportional to the accumulation time. Our method is applicable to probe $\\alpha$-emitting radioactivity in bulk material.

Y. Iwata; Y. Inoue; M. Minowa

2007-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

338

Spectroscopic Investigations of Highly Charged Ions using X-Ray Calorimeter Spectrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spectroscopy of K-shell transitions in highly charged heavy ions, like hydrogen-like uranium, has the potential to yield information about quantum electrodynamics (QED) in extremely strong nuclear fields as well as tests of the standard model, specifically parity violation in atomic systems. These measurements would represent the 'holy grail' in high-Z atomic spectroscopy. However, the current state-of-the-art detection schemes used for recording the K-shell spectra from highly charged heavy ions does not yet have the resolving power to be able to attain this goal. As such, to push the field of high-Z spectroscopy forward, new detectors must be found. Recently, x-ray calorimeter spectrometers have been developed that promise to make such measurements. In an effort to make the first steps towards attaining the 'holy grail', measurements have been performed with two x-ray calorimeter spectrometers (the XRS/EBIT and the ECS) designed and built at Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, MD. The calorimeter spectrometers have been used to record the K-shell spectra of highly charged ions produced in the SuperEBIT electron beam ion trap at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, CA. Measurements performed with the XRS/EBIT calorimeter array found that the theoretical description of well-above threshold electron-impact excitation cross sections for hydrogen-like iron and nickel ions are correct. Furthermore, the first high-resolution spectrum of hydrogen-like through carbon-like praseodymium ions was recorded with a calorimeter. In addition, the new high-energy array on the EBIT Calorimeter Spectrometer (ECS) was used to resolve the K-shell x-ray emission spectrum of highly charged xenon ions, where a 40 ppm measurement of the energy of the K-shell resonance transition in helium-like xenon was achieved. This is the highest precision result, ever, for an element with such high atomic number. In addition, a first-of-its-kind measurement of the effect of the generalized Breit interaction (GBI) on electron-impact excitation cross sections was performed. This measurement found that for theoretical electron-impact excitation cross sections to fit with experimental data the GBI needs to be taken into account.

Thorn, D B

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

339

Temperature Profile of IR Blocking Windows Used in Cryogenic X-Ray Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect

Cryogenic high-resolution X-ray spectrometers are typically operated with thin IR blocking windows to reduce radiative heating of the detector while allowing good x-ray transmission. We have estimated the temperature profile of these IR blocking windows under typical operating conditions. We show that the temperature in the center of the window is raised due to radiation from the higher temperature stages. This can increase the infrared photon flux onto the detector, thereby increasing the IR noise and decreasing the cryostat hold time. The increased window temperature constrains the maximum window size and the number of windows required. We discuss the consequences for IR blocking window design.

Friedrich, S.; Funk, T.; Drury, O.; Labov, S.E.

2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Atomic hydrogen density measurements in an ion source plasma using a vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectrometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A system to determine the density and temperature of ground state hydrogen atoms in a plasma by vacuum ultraviolet laser absorption spectroscopy is described. The continuous tunability of the spectrometer allows for analysis at any of the Lyman transitions. The narrow bandwidth of the laser system allows for the accurate determination of the absorption lineshape and hence the translational temperature. The utility of the system is exemplified by data obtained on an ion-source plasma. The measurements demonstrate the quality of the data as well as illustrating the behavior of this ion source under varying discharge conditions. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Stutzin, G.C.; Young, A.T.; Schlachter, A.S.; Stearns, J.W.; Leung, K.N.; Kunkel, W.B.; Worth, G.T.; Stevens, R.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Indranil Das

2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

The development of high performance online tracker for High Level Trigger of Muon Spectrometer of ALICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Muon Spectrometer (MS) of the ALICE experiment at LHC is equipped with a HLT (High Level Trigger), whose aim is to improve the accuracy of the trigger cuts delivered at the L0 stage. A computational challenge of real-time event reconstruction is satisfied to achieve this software trigger cut of the HLT. After the description of the online algorithms, the performance of the online tracker is compared with that of the offline tracker using the measured pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV.

Das, Indranil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

A co-axially configured submillimeter spectrometer and investigations of hydrogen bound molecular complexes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of a co-axially configured submillimeter spectrometer is reported. The spectrometer has been constructed to observe molecular complexes that exhibit non-covalent interactions with energies much less than that of a traditional covalent bond. The structure of molecular complexes such as those formed between a rare gas and a hydrogen halide, Rg:HX where Rg is a rare gas (Rg=Ne, Ar and Kr) and HX (X=F, Cl, Br and I) can be determined directly and accurately. The center of mass interaction distance, RCM, as well as the angle of the hydrogen halide is determined, along with direct evaluation of the intermolecular vibrations as well as accurate isomerization energies between the hydrogen bound and van der Waals forms. The accuracy of the frequency determination of rovibrational transitions using the submillimeter spectrometer is also evaluated by direct comparison with the state-of-theart pulsed nozzle Fourier transform microwave spectrometer, and this accuracy is estimated to be less than 1 kHz at 300 GHz. The tunneling or geared bending vibration of a dimer of hydrogen bromide or hydrogen iodide has been investigated. The selection rules, nuclear statistics and intensity alternation for transitions observed in these dimmers, which is a consequence of interchanging two identical nuclei in the low frequency geared bending vibration of the molecular complex, are reported. Furthermore, the rotation and quadrupole coupling constants are used to determine a vibrationally averaged structure of the complex. The energy of the low frequency bending vibration can then be compared with ab initio based potential energy surfaces. A study of the multiple isomeric forms of the molecular complex OC:HI is also presented. Multiple isotopic substitutions are used to determine the relevant ground state structures and data reported evidence for an anomalous isotope effect supporting a ground state isotopic isomerization effect. All spectroscopic data that has been reported here has been additionally used to subsequently model and generate vibrationally complete morphed potential energy surfaces that are capable or reproducing the experimentally observed data. The utility of this procedure is evaluated on a predicative basis and comparisons made with newly observed data.

McElmurry, Blake Anthony

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Biological detection and tagging using tailorable, reactive, highly fluorescent chemosensors.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This program was focused on the development of a fluorogenic chemosensor family that could tuned for reaction with electrophilic (e.g. chemical species, toxins) and nucleophilic (e.g. proteins and other biological molecules) species. Our chemosensor approach utilized the fluorescent properties of well-known berberine-type alkaloids. In situ chemosensor reaction with a target species transformed two out-of-plane, weakly conjugated, short-wavelength chromophores into one rigid, planar, conjugated, chromophore with strong long wavelength fluorescence (530-560 nm,) and large Stokes shift (100-180 nm). The chemosensor was activated with an isourea group which allowed for reaction with carboxylic acid moieties found in amino acids.

Shepodd, Timothy J.; Zifer, Thomas; McElhanon, James Ross; Rahn, Larry A.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

COMBINED FLUORESCENT AND GOLD PROBES FOR MICROSCOPIC AND MORPHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS.  

SciTech Connect

Nanogold{reg_sign}, a gold cluster with a core of gold atoms 1.4 nm in diameter, has proven to be a superior probe label for electron microscopy (EM), giving both higher labeling density and improved access to previously hindered or restricted antigens. It may be visualized by autometallography (AMG) for use in light microscopy (LM): silver-and gold-amplified Nanogold detection has proven to be one of the most sensitive methods available for the detection of low copy number targets such as viral DNA in cells and tissue specimens. AMG enhancement has also made Nanogold an effective detection label in blots and gels. The following protocols will be described: Labeling of nuclear components in cells. Protocol for in situ hybridization and detection with fluorescein-Nanogold--or Cy3{trademark}-Nanogold-labeled streptavidin. Nanogold is an inert molecule, and generally does not interact with biological molecules unless a specific chemical reactivity is introduced into the molecule. Conjugates are prepared using site-specific chemical conjugation through reactive chemical functionalities introduced during Nanogold preparation, which allows the gold label to be attached to a specific site on the conjugate biomolecule. For example, a maleimido-Nanogold derivative, which is specific for thiol binding, is frequently attached to the hinge region of an antibody at a unique thiol site generated by selective reduction of a hinge disulfide. This site is remote from the antigen combining region, and the Nanogold, therefore, does not compromise target binding. Nanogold may also be prepared with specific reactivity towards amines or other unique chemical groups. This mode of attachment enables the preparation of probes labeled with both Nanogold and fluorescent labels. Different chemical reactivities are used to attach the Nanogold and the fluorescent groups to different sites in the conjugate biomolecule, as shown in Figure 7.1. In this manner, the two labels are spaced sufficiently far apart that fluorescent resonance energy transfer does not quench the fluorescent signal, and the probes may be used to label specimens for fluorescent and EM observation in a single staining procedure. This reduces the complexity of the staining procedure, allowing less specimen perturbation, and also enables a higher degree of correlation between the fluorescence and EM localization of the target, thus increasing the usefulness of the complementary data sets. Since gold and fluorescent-labeled probes are often used at different concentrations under different conditions, optimum procedures for the use of fluorescent and gold probes may entail some degree of compromise between the most appropriate conditions for the two types of probes. However, the chemical stability of the Nanogold label means that it is generally stable to a wide range of use conditions, and the following protocols have been found to be effective for labeling specimens with combined fluorescein and Nanogold-labeled antibody Fab' probes and with combined Cy3 and Nanogold-labeled streptavidin.

POWELL,R.D.HAINFELD,J.F.

2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

346

Studying DNA translocation in nanocapillaries using single molecule fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate simultaneous measurements of DNA translocation into glass nanopores using ionic current detection and fluorescent imaging. We verify the correspondence between the passage of a single DNA molecule through the nanopore and the accompanying characteristic ionic current blockage. By tracking the motion of individual DNA molecules in the nanocapillary perpendicular to the optical axis and using a model, we can extract an effective mobility constant for DNA in our geometry under high electric fields.

Thacker, Vivek V; Hernndez-Ainsa, Silvia; Bell, Nicholas A W; Keyser, Ulrich F; 10.1063/1.4768929

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Electronic Radio-Frequency (Electrodeless) Induction Lamps: A Fluorescent Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This EPRI Technical Update addresses an expanding energy efficient light source electronic radio-frequency (electrodeless) induction lamps. Business and technical market factors (Chapter 2) use the past and future growth of the CFL market to illustrate the potential for the induction lighting market while emphasizing future technical improvements. Discussion of the importance of utility involvement in helping their customers consider induction lamps for high-efficiency fluorescent applications with long-...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

348

Application of a trochoidal electron monochromator/mass spectrometer system to the study of environmental chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A trochoidal electron monochromator has been interfaced to a mass spectrometer to perform electron capture negative ion mass spectrometric (ECNIMS) analyses of environmentally relevant chemicals. The kinetic energy of the electron beam can be varied from 0.025 to 30 eV under computer control. No reagent gas is used to moderate the electron energies. An electron energy spread of +/- 0.1 to +/- 0.4 eV full width at half-maximum (fwhm) can readily be obtained at a transmitted current of 2 x 10(-6) A, improving to +/- 0.07 eV at 5 x 10(-7) A. Comparisons of ECNI results from the electron monochromator/mass spectrometer system with those from a standard instrument that uses a moderating gas show similar spectra for heptachlor but not for the s-triazine herbicides, as for example, atrazine. This compound shows numerous adduct ions by standard ECNIMS that are eliminated by using the electron monochromator to generate the mass spectra. Isomeric tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxins show distinct differences in the electron energies needed to produce the maximum amount of parent and fragment anions. Multiple resonance states resulting in stable radical anions (M.-) are easily observed for nitrobenzene and for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. Ionic products of dissociative electron capture invariably occur from several resonance states.

Laramee, J.A.; Kocher, C.A.; Deinzer, M.L. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis (United States))

1992-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

349

Evaluation of dead time and gain shift correction for a liquid scintillation spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Nuclear Engineering at Texas A and M University purchased a new generation liquid scintillation spectrometer--the LKB-Wallac Spectral Model 1219 in 1986. The Model 1219 features an auto sample changer with a capacity for 300 samples, and energy range of 1 to 2000 keV beta subdivided into 1024 channels, a Ra-226 external quench-correction standard, automatic dead time correction, and LED display of the beta energy spectrum. Gain stabilization is based on the use of a precision pulsed light-emitting diode (LED). The instrument's circuitry monitors the pulse height of the light emitted by the LED and adjusted the system gain as necessary to keep the LED-induced pulses constant, thus compensating for gain shifts. This paper reports that a simple test was devised to evaluate this liquid scintillation spectrometer's dead time correction and gain stabilization features. At the same time, the effectiveness of the counting chamber shielding was also tested for a specific situation.

McLain, M.E.; Grimes, M.J.; Lee, P.J.T. (Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (US))

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Detection Efficiency of a ToF Spectrometer from Heavy-Ion Elastic Recoil Detection  

SciTech Connect

The detection efficiency of a time-of-flight system based on two micro-channel plates (MCP) time zero detectors plus a conventional silicon surface barrier detector was obtained from heavy ion elastic recoil measurements (this ToF spectrometer is mainly devoted to measurements of total fusion cross section of weakly bound projectiles on different mass-targets systems). In this work we have used beams of {sup 7}Li, {sup 16}O, {sup 32}S and {sup 35}Cl to study the mass region of interest for its application to measurements fusion cross sections in the {sup 6,7}Li+{sup 27}Al systems at energies around and above the Coulomb barrier (0.8V{sub B{<=}}E{<=}2.0V{sub B}). As the efficiency of a ToF spectrometer is strongly dependent on the energy and mass of the detected particles, we have covered a wide range of the scattered particle energies with a high degree of accuracy at the lowest energies. The different experimental efficiency curves obtained in that way were compared with theoretical electronic stopping power curves on carbon foils and were applied.

Barbara, E. de; Marti, G. V.; Capurro, O. A.; Fimiani, L.; Mingolla, M. G. [Laboratorio ANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Negri, A. E.; Arazi, A.; Figueira, J. M.; Pacheco, A. J.; Martinez Heimann, D.; Carnelli, P. F. F. [Laboratorio ANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Fernandez Niello, J. O. [Laboratorio ANDAR, Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, B1650KNA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); CONICET, Av. Rivadavia 1917, C1033AAJ Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Universidad Nacional de General San Martin, Ayacucho 2197, B1650BWA Partido de San Martin, Provincia de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

2010-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

A high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer based on superconducting microcalorimeters  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in superconductor device fabrication, detector hybridization techniques, and superconducting quantum interference device readout have made square-centimeter-sized arrays of gamma-ray microcalorimeters, based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), possible. At these collecting areas, gamma microcalorimeters can utilize their unprecedented energy resolution to perform spectroscopy in a number of applications that are limited by closely-spaced spectral peaks, for example, the nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials. We have built a 256 pixel spectrometer with an average full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 53 eV at 97 keV, a useable dynamic range above 400 keV, and a collecting area of 5 cm{sup 2}. We have demonstrated multiplexed readout of the full 256 pixel array with 236 of the pixels (91%) giving spectroscopic data. This is the largest multiplexed array of TES microcalorimeters to date. This paper will review the spectrometer, highlighting the instrument design, detector fabrication, readout, operation of the instrument, and data processing. Further, we describe the characterization and performance of the newest 256 pixel array.

Bennett, D. A.; Horansky, R. D. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); University of Denver, Denver, Colorado 80208 (United States); Schmidt, D. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Kotsubo, V.; Mates, J. A. B. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309 (United States); Hoover, A. S.; Winkler, R.; Rabin, M. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Alpert, B. K.; Beall, J. A.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schima, F. J.; Swetz, D. S.; Vale, L. R. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado 80305 (United States); and others

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

A New Control System Software for SANS BATAN Spectrometer in Serpong, Indonesia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The original main control system of the 36 meter small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) BATAN Spectrometer (SMARTer) has been replaced with the new ones due to the malfunction of the main computer. For that reason, a new control system software for handling all the control systems was also developed in order to put the spectrometer back in operation. The developed software is able to control the system such as rotation movement of six pinholes system, vertical movement of four neutron guide system with the total length of 16.5 m, two-directional movement of a neutron beam stopper, forward-backward movement of a 2D position sensitive detector (2D-PSD) along 16.7 m, etc. A Visual Basic language program running on Windows operating system was employed to develop the software and it can be operated by other remote computers in the local area network. All device positions and command menu are displayed graphically in the main monitor or window and each device control can be executed by clicking the control button. Those advantages are necessary required for developing a new user-friendly control system software. Finally, the new software has been tested for handling a complete SANS experiment and it works properly.

Bharoto; Putra, Edy Giri Rachman [Neutron Scattering Laboratory, Center for Technology of Nuclear Industrial Materials, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (BATAN) Gedung 40, Kawasan Puspiptek Serpong, Tangerang 15314 (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

353

Glovebox characterization and barrier integrity testing using fluorescent powder  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents a method for characterizing the spread of contamination and testing the barrier integrity of a new glovebox during material transfer operations and glove change-outs using fluorescent powder. Argonne National Laboratory-West has performed this test on several new gloveboxes prior to putting them into service. The test is performed after the glovebox has been leak tested and all systems have been verified to be operational. The purpose of the test is to show that bag-in/bag-out operations and glove change-outs can be accomplished without spreading the actual contaminated material to non-contaminated areas. The characterization test also provides information as to where contamination might be expected to build-up during actual operations. The fluorescent powder is used because it is easily detectable using an ultra-violet light and disperses in a similar fashion to radioactive material. The characterization and barrier integrity test of a glovebox using fluorescent powder provides a visual method of determining areas of potential contamination accumulation and helps evaluate the ability to perform clean transfer operations and glove change-outs.

Wahlquist, D.R. [Argonne National Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Technology Development Div.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Impurity studies in fusion devices using laser-fluorescence spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Resonance fluorescence excitation of neutral atoms using tunable radiation from dye lasers offers a number of unique advantages for impurity studies in fusion devices. Using this technique, it is possible to perform local time-resolved measurements of the densities and velocity distributions of metallic impurities in fusion devices without disturbing the plasma. Velocities are measured by monitoring the fluorescence intensity while tuning narrow bandwidth laser radiation through the Doppler-broadened absorption spectrum of the transition. The knowledge of the velocity distribution of neutral impurities is particularly useful for the determination of impurity introduction mechanisms. The laser fluorescence technique will be described in terms of its application to metallic impurities in fusion devices and related laboratory experiments. Particular attention will be given to recent results from the ISX-B tokamak using pulsed dye lasers where detection sensitivities for neutral Fe of 10/sup 6/ atoms/cm/sup 3/ with a velocity resolution of 600 m/s (0.1 eV) have been achieved.

Husinsky, W.R.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Remediation plan for fluorescent light fixtures containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the remedial action to achieve compliance with 29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requirements of fluorescent light fixtures containing PCBs at K-25 site. This remedial action is called the Remediation Plan for Fluorescent Light Fixtures Containing PCBs at the K-25 Site (The Plan). The Plan specifically discusses (1) conditions of non-compliance, (2) alternative solutions, (3) recommended solution, (4) remediation plan costs, (5) corrective action, (6) disposal of PCB waste, (7) training, and (8) plan conclusions. The results from inspections by Energy Systems personnel in 2 buildings at K-25 site and statistical extension of this data to 91 selected buildings at the K-25 site indicates that there are approximately 28,000 fluorescent light fixtures containing 47,036 ballasts. Approximately 38,531 contain PCBs and 2,799 of the 38,531 ballasts are leaking PCBs. Review of reportable occurrences at K-25 for the 12 month period of September 1990 through August 1991 shows that Energy Systems personnel reported 69 ballasts leaking PCBs. Each leaking ballast is in non-compliance with 29 CFR 1910 - Table Z-1-A. The age of the K-25 facilities indicate a continued and potential increase in ballasts leaking PCBs. This report considers 4 alternative solutions for dealing with the ballasts leaking PCBs. The advantages and disadvantages of each alternative solution are discussed and ranked using cost of remediation, reduction of health risks, and compliance with OSHA as criteria.

1992-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

356

Developing small vacuum spark as an x-ray source for calibration of an x-ray focusing crystal spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

A new technique of x-ray focusing crystal spectrometers' calibration is the desired result. For this purpose the spectrometer is designed to register radiated copper K{alpha} and K{beta} lines by using a flat {alpha}-quartz crystal. This experiment uses pre-breakdown x-ray emissions in low vacuum of about 2.5-3 mbar. At this pressure the pinch will not form so the plasma will not radiate. The anode material is copper and the capacity of the capacitor bank is 22.6 nF. This experiment designed and mounted a repetitive triggering system to save the operator time making hundreds of shots. This emission amount is good for calibration and geometrical adjustment of an optical crystal x-ray focusing spectrometer.

Ghomeishi, Mostafa; Adikan, Faisal Rafiq Mahamd [Photonic Research Group, Department of Electrical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Karami, Mohammad [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Five-element Johann-type x-ray emission spectrometer with a single-photon-counting pixel detector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Johann-type spectrometer with five spherically bent crystals and a pixel detector was constructed for a range of hard x-ray photon-in photon-out synchrotron techniques, covering a Bragg-angle range of 60 deg. - 88 deg. The spectrometer provides a sub emission line width energy resolution from sub-eV to a few eV and precise energy calibration, better than 1.5 eV for the full range of Bragg angles. The use of a pixel detector allows fast and easy optimization of the signal-to-background ratio. A concentration detection limit below 0.4 wt% was reached at the Cu K{alpha}{sub 1} line. The spectrometer is designed as a modular mobile device for easy integration in a multi-purpose hard x-ray synchrotron beamline, such as the SuperXAS beamline at the Swiss Light Source.

Kleymenov, Evgeny; Bokhoven, Jeroen A. van [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); ETH Zurich, Institute for Chemical and Bioengineering, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland); David, Christian; Janousch, Markus; Studer, Marco; Willimann, Markus; Bergamaschi, Anna; Henrich, Beat; Nachtegaal, Maarten [Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Glatzel, Pieter [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 Rue Jules Horowitz, 38043 Grenoble (France); Alonso-Mori, Roberto [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency | December 1, 2010 What to Do if a Compact Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fluorescent Light (CFL) Bulb or Fluorescent Tube Light Bulb Breaks in Your Home1 Fluorescent light bulbs contain a small amount of mercury sealed within the glass tubing. When a fluorescent bulb breaks in your home, some of this mercury is released as mercury vapor. The broken bulb can continue to release

McConnell, Terry

359

The Road to Ultrahigh-Resolution X-ray Spectrometers | Advanced Photon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Atoms Behave: Characteristics of Microstructural Avalanches How Atoms Behave: Characteristics of Microstructural Avalanches Iodate Refuses to Intimidate Creating the Heart of a Planet in the Heart of a Gem How a Powerful Antibody Neutralizes HIV Taking a Page from Nature to Build Better Nanomaterials Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed The Road to Ultrahigh-Resolution X-ray Spectrometers NOVEMBER 22, 2011 Bookmark and Share Basic phenomena underlying the AD&AT x-ray optics. In x-ray Bragg diffraction from atomic planes composing nonzero angle η to the crystal entrance face, the crystal acts (a) like an optical prism dispersing the photons into a divergent x-ray fan with photons of different energies E

360

Manifold and method of batch measurement of Hg-196 concentration using a mass spectrometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample manifold and method of its use has been developed so that milligram quantities of mercury can be analyzed mass spectroscopically to determine the [sup 196]Hg concentration to less than 0.02 atomic percent. Using natural mercury as a standard, accuracy of [+-]0.002 atomic percent can be obtained. The mass spectrometer preferably used is a commercially available GC/MS manufactured by Hewlett Packard. A novel sample manifold is contained within an oven allowing flow rate control of Hg into the MS. Another part of the manifold connects to an auxiliary pumping system which facilitates rapid clean up of residual Hg in the manifold. Sample cycle time is about 1 hour. 8 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Evans, R.

1991-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) Derived Data, Global Earth Coverage (GEC) from NASA's Earth Probe Satellite  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

This is data from an external datastream processed through the ARM External Data Center (XDC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The XDC identifies sources and acquires data, called "external data", to augment the data being generated within the ARM program. The external data acquired are usually converted from native format to either netCDF or HDF formats. The GEC collection contains global data derived from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument on the Earth Probe satellite, consisting of daily values of aerosol index, ozone and reflectivity remapped into a regular 1x1.25 deg grid. Data are available from July 25, 1996 - December 31, 2005, but have been updated or replaced as of September 2007. See the explanation on the ARM web site at http://www.arm.gov/xds/static/toms.stm and the information at the NASA/TOMS web site: http://toms.gsfc.nasa.gov/ (Registration required)

362

Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

363

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Grazing incidence extreme ultraviolet spectrometer fielded with time resolution in a hostile Z-pinch environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This recently developed diagnostic was designed to allow for time-gated spectroscopic study of the EUV radiation (4 nm power generator (1 MA, 100 ns risetime) at University of Nevada, Reno on a series of wire array z-pinch loads. Within this harsh z-pinch environment, radiation yields routinely exceed 20 kJ in the EUV and soft x-ray. There are also strong mechanical shocks, high velocity debris, sudden vacuum changes during operation, energic ion beams, and hard x-ray radiation in excess of 50 keV. The spectra obtained from the precursor plasma of an Al double planar wire array contained lines of Al IX and AlX ions indicating a temperature near 60 eV during precursor formation. Detailed results will be presented showing the fielding specifications and the techniques used to extract important plasma parameters using this spectrometer.

Williamson, K. M.; Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Wilcox, P. G.; Cline, W.; Batie, S.; LeGalloudec, B.; Nalajala, V.; Astanovitsky, A. [Plasma Physics and Diagnostics Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

IBIS: An inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic neutron spectrometer for the SNS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high power target station at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) currently has about 20 completed neutron scattering instruments. With a broad coverage of the momentum transfer (Q)-energy (E) space, these instruments serve an extensive user community. In an effort to further expand the scientific capabilities of the SNS instrument suites, we propose a low background, inverse geometry Brillouin inelastic spectrometer for the SNS which will expand the Q-E coverage of the current instrument suite and facilitate the study of inelastic and quasi-elastic scatterings at low Q values. The possible location for the proposed instrument is either beamline 8 which views the decoupled water moderator, or beamline 14A, which views a cold, coupled super critical hydrogen moderator. The instrument parameters, optimizations, and performances at these two beamline locations are discussed.

Zhao, Jinkui [ORNL; Wildgruber, Christoph U [ORNL; Robertson, Lee [ORNL; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

A Dual Channel X-ray Spectrometer for Fast Ignition Research  

SciTech Connect

A new Dual Channel Highly Ordered Pyrolytic Graphite (DC-HOPG) x-ray spectrometer was developed to study laser-generated electron beam transport. The instrument uses a pair of graphite crystals and has the advantage of simultaneously detecting self emission from low-Z materials in first diffraction order and high-Z materials in second order. The emissions from the target are detected using a pair of parallel imaging plates positioned in a such way that the noise from background is minimized and the mosaic focusing is achieved. Initial tests of the diagnostic on Titan laser (I {approx} 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}, {tau} = 0.7 ps) show excellent signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) > 1000 for the low energy channel and SNR > 400 for the high energy channel.

Akli, K U; Patel, P K; Van Maren, R; Stephens, R B; Key, M H; Higginson, D P; Westover, B; Chen, C D; Mackinnon, A J; Bartal, T; Beg, F N; Chawla, S; Fedosejevs, R; Freeman, R R; Hey, D S; Kemp, G E; LePape, S; Link, A; Ma, T; MacPhee, A G; McLean, H S; Ping, Y; Tsui, Y Y; Van Woerkom, L D; Wei, M S; Yabuuchi, T

2010-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

368

System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high (n,f) reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

369

System for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu.

Fries, David P. (St. Petersburg, FL); Browning, James F. (Palm Harbour, FL)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Method for studying a sample of material using a heavy ion induced mass spectrometer source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heavy ion generator is used with a plasma desorption mass spectrometer to provide an appropriate neutron flux in the direction of a fissionable material in order to desorb and ionize large molecules from the material for mass analysis. The heavy ion generator comprises a fissionable material having a high n,f reaction cross section. The heavy ion generator also comprises a pulsed neutron generator that is used to bombard the fissionable material with pulses of neutrons, thereby causing heavy ions to be emitted from the fissionable material. These heavy ions impinge on a material, thereby causing ions to desorb off that material. The ions desorbed off the material pass through a time-of-flight mass analyzer, wherein ions can be measured with masses greater than 25,000 amu. 3 figs.

Fries, D.P.; Browning, J.F.

1999-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) on the New Horizons Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) comprises the hardware and accompanying science investigation on the New Horizons spacecraft to measure pick-up ions from Pluto's outgassing atmosphere. To the extent that Pluto retains its characteristics similar to those of a "heavy comet" as detected in stellar occultations since the early 1980s, these measurements will characterize the neutral atmosphere of Pluto while providing a consistency check on the atmospheric escape rate at the encounter epoch with that deduced from the atmospheric structure at lower altitudes by the ALICE, REX, and SWAP experiments on New Horizons. In addition, PEPSSI will characterize any extended ionosphere and solar wind interaction while also characterizing the energetic particle environment of Pluto, Charon, and their associated system. First proposed for development for the Pluto Express mission in September 1993, what became the PEPSSI instrument went through a number of development stages to meet the...

McNutt, Ralph L; Gurnee, Reid S; Hill, Matthew E; Cooper, Kim A; Andrews, G Bruce; Keath, Edwin P; Krimigis, Stamatios M; Mitchell, Donald G; Tossman, Barry; Bagenal, Fran; Boldt, John D; Bradley, Walter; Devereux, William S; Ho, George C; Jaskulek, Stephen E; LeFevere, Thomas W; Malcom, Horace; Marcus, Geoffrey A; Hayes, John R; Moore, G Ty; Williams, Bruce D; Wilson, Paul; Brown, L E; Kusterer, M; Vandegriff, J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dual mode ion mobility spectrometer and method for ion mobility spectrometry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion mobility spectrometer apparatus may include an ion interface that is operable to hold positive and negative ions and to simultaneously release positive and negative ions through respective positive and negative ion ports. A first drift chamber is operatively associated with the positive ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A first ion detector operatively associated with the first drift chamber detects positive ions from the first drift chamber. A second drift chamber is operatively associated with the negative ion port of the ion interface and encloses an electric field therein. A second ion detector operatively associated with the second drift chamber detects negative ions from said second drift chamber.

Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Miller, Carla J [Idaho Falls, ID; Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

2007-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

375

A New Bruker IFS 125HR FTIR Spectrometer for the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada: Measurements and Comparison with the Existing Bomem DA8 Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new Bruker IFS 125HR Fourier transform spectrometer has been installed at the Polar Environment Atmospheric Research Laboratory at Eureka, Nunavut, Canada (80.05N, 86.42W). This instrument will become the Network for the Detection of ...

Rebecca L. Batchelor; Kimberly Strong; Rodica Lindenmaier; Richard L. Mittermeier; Hans Fast; James R. Drummond; Pierre F. Fogal

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Streaked x-ray spectrometer having a discrete selection of Bragg geometries for Omega  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The streaked x-ray spectrometer (SXS) is used with streak cameras [D. H. Kalantar, P. M. Bell, R. L. Costa, B. A. Hammel, O. L. Landen, T. J. Orzechowski, J. D. Hares, and A. K. L. Dymoke-Bradshaw, in 22nd International Congress on High-Speed Photography and Photonics, edited by D. L. Paisley and A. M. Frank (SPIE, Bellingham, WA, 1997), Vol. 2869, p. 680] positioned with a ten-inch manipulator on OMEGA [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] and OMEGA EP [L. J. Waxer et al., Presented at CLEO/QELS 2008, San Jose, CA, 4-9 May 2008 (Paper JThB1)] for time-resolved, x-ray spectroscopy of laser-produced plasmas in the 1.4- to 20-keV photon-energy range. These experiments require measuring a portion of this photon-energy range to monitor a particular emission or absorption feature of interest. The SXS relies on a pinned mechanical reference system to create a discrete set of Bragg reflection geometries for a variety of crystals. A wide selection of spectral windows is achieved accurately and efficiently using this technique. It replaces the previous spectrometer designs that had a continuous Bragg angle adjustment and required a tedious alignment calibration procedure. The number of spectral windows needed for the SXS was determined by studying the spectral ranges selected by OMEGA users over the last decade. These selections are easily configured in the SXS using one of the 25 discrete Bragg reflection geometries and one of the six types of Bragg crystals, including two curved crystals.

Millecchia, M.; Regan, S. P.; Bahr, R. E.; Romanofsky, M.; Sorce, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

Assaying protein import into mitochondria using fluorescence spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most proteins residing in the mitochondrial matrix are synthesized in the cytosol and post-translationally imported into the mitochondrial matrix. The matrix-targeted preproteins traverse the outer mitochondrial membrane (OM) via the Translocase of the Outer Membrane (TOM) complex, and the inner mitochondrial membrane (IM) via the Translocase of the Inner Membrane 23 (TIM23) complex. A novel system was set up to examine the import of matrix-targeted preproteins into mitochondria using fluorescence spectroscopy. The fluorescent probe 6-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4- yl)aminohexanoic acid (NBD) was site-specifically incorporated into different positions along the model matrix protein Su9-DHFR. The fluorescent-labeled polypeptides were either fully imported into isolated mitochondria or were arrested along the translocation pathway by the binding of methotrexate (MTX) to the DHFR moiety, creating NBDSu9- DHFR?MTX import intermediates. The NBD-Su9-DHFR polypeptides were able to be fully imported into the mitochondrial matrix in the absence of MTX, and were inaccessible to externally-added iodide ion quenchers. Treatment of the mitochondria with the pore-forming antibiotic alamethicin allowed the iodide ion quenchers access to the matrix through pores in the inner membrane (IM). After Alamethicin treatment the fully-imported NBD-Su9-DHFR polypeptides were accessible to the externally-added iodide ions. The extent of collisional quenching of the NBD fluorophores by the iodide ions was measured as the Stern-Volmer quenching constant, Ksv. Ksv values were obtained for the NBD-Su9-DHFR polypeptides in the presence of MTX (import intermediates) or in the absence of MTX (fully-imported). The Ksv values for NBD-Su9- DHFR import intermediates were similar, despite the location of the NBD probe along the translocation pathway. These Ksv values were similar to those obtained for the fullyimported NBD-Su9-DHFR polypeptides (-MTX). The locations of the varying probe positions along the import pathway were addressed using chemical crosslinking of Su9- DHFR Cys mutants. The use of fluorescence spectroscopy, in association with chemical crosslinking, to analyze the mitochondrial protein import pathways will prove a useful tool to probe the environment of the nascent chain as it is crossing the import pathway (the TOM, TIM23 complexes).

Cargill, Holly Beth

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry The Energy Efficiency of the U.S Fluorescent Lamp Ballast Industry Speaker(s): Francis Rubinstein Date: February 14, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Fluorescent lamp ballasts are subject to DOE appliance standards and rulemaking. But currently, only ballasts for older fluorescent lamp types, such as T-12 lamps are subject to minimum efficacy limits. The majority of fluorescent lamps now being shipped (T-8 and T-5 types) type are operated by ballasts that will not be subject to DOE rule until 2011. The metric used by DOE for characterizing the electrical efficiency of the fluorescent lamp-ballast system is called Ballast Efficacy Factor (BEF). Because BEF is not normalized, it is of limited utility for rulemaking and is useless for procurement. But by normalizing BEF to the total lamp power, I have

379

Fluorescence emission induced by extensive air showers in dependence on atmospheric conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged particles of extensive air showers (EAS), mainly electrons and positrons, initiate the emission of fluorescence light in the Earth's atmosphere. This light provides a calorimetric measurement of the energy of cosmic rays. For reconstructing the primary energy from an observed light track of an EAS, the fluorescence yield in air has to be known in dependence on atmospheric conditions, like air temperature, pressure, and humidity. Several experiments on fluorescence emission have published various sets of data covering different parts of the dependence of the fluorescence yield on atmospheric conditions. Using a compilation of published measurements, a calculation of the fluorescence yield in dependence on altitude is presented. The fluorescence calculation is applied to simulated air showers and different atmospheric profiles to estimate the influence of the atmospheric conditions on the reconstructed shower parameters.

Keilhauer, Bianca

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

In situ multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for monitoring nanoparticle generation in a high-pressure fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a multipurpose time-resolved spectrometer for studying the dynamics of nanoparticles generated by pulsed-laser ablation (PLA) in a high-pressure fluid. The apparatus consists of a high-pressure optical cell and three spectrometers for in situ measurements. The optical cell was designed for experiments at temperatures up to 400 K and pressures up to 30 MPa with fluctuations within {+-}0.1% h{sup -1}. The three spectrometers were used for the following in situ measurements at high pressures: (i) transient absorption spectrum measurements from 350 to 850 nm to investigate the dynamics of nanoparticle generation from nanoseconds to milliseconds after laser irradiation, (ii) absorption spectrum measurements from 220 to 900 nm to observe the time evolution of nanoparticles from seconds to hours after laser ablation, and (iii) dynamic light scattering measurements to track nanoparticles with sizes from 10 nm to 10 {mu}m in the time range from seconds to hours after laser ablation. By combining these three spectrometers, we demonstrate in situ measurements of gold nanoparticles generated by PLA in supercritical fluids. This is the first report of in situ time-resolved measurements of the dynamics of nanoparticles generated in a supercritical fluid.

Wei, Shaoyu [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, 739-8526 Higashi-hiroshima (Japan); Saitow, Ken-ichi [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, 739-8526 Higashi-hiroshima (Japan); Natural Science Center for Basic Research and Development (N-BARD), 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, 739-8526 Higashi-hiroshima (Japan)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DNA fragment sizing and sorting by laser-induced fluorescence  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for obtaining DNA fingerprints using high speed detection systems, such as flow cytometry to determine unique characteristics of DNA pieces from a selected sample. In one characterization the DNA piece is fragmented at preselected sites to produce a plurality of DNA fragments. The DNA piece or the resulting DNA fragments are treated with a dye effective to stain stoichiometrically the DNA fragments. The fluorescence from the dye in the stained fragments is then examined to generate an output functionally related to the number of nucleotides in each one of the DNA fragments. In one embodiment, the intensity of the fluorescence emissions from each fragment is directly proportional to the fragment length. Additional dyes can be bound to the DNA piece and DNA fragments to provide information additional to length information. Oligonucleotide specific dyes and/or hybridization probes can be bound to the DNA fragments to provide information on oligonucleotide distribution or probe hybridization to DNA fragments of different sizes.

Jett, J.H.; Hammond, M.L.; Keller, R.A.; Marrone, B.L.; Martin, J.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Electrokinetic Delivery of Single Fluorescent Biomolecules in Fluidic Nanochannels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe the fabrication of sub-100-nanometer-sized channels in a fused silica lab-on-a-chip device and experiments that demonstrate detection of single fluorescently labeled proteins in buffer solution within the device with high signal and low background. The fluorescent biomolecules are transported along the length of the nanochannels by electrophoresis and/or electro-osmosis until they pass into a two-focus laser irradiation zone. Pulse-interleaved excitation and time-resolved single-photon detection with maximum-likelihood analysis enables the location of the biomolecule to be determined. Diffusional transport of the molecules is found to be slowed within the nanochannel, and this facilitates fluidic trapping and/or prolonged measurements on individual biomolecules. Our goal is to actively control the fluidic transport to achieve rapid delivery of each new biomolecule to the sensing zone, following the completion of measurements, or the photobleaching of the prior molecule. We have used computer simulations that include photophysical effects such as triplet crossing and photobleaching of the labels to design control algorithms, which are being implemented in a custom field-programmable-gate-array circuit for the active fluidic control.

Davis, Lloyd M [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Canfield, Brian K [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Li, Xiaoxuan [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Hofmeister, William [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Shen, Guoqing [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Lescano, Isaac [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Bomar, Bruce W [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Wikswo, John P [Vanderbilt University; Markov, Dmitry P [Vanderbilt University; Samson, Philip C [Vanderbilt University; Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Sikorski, Zbigniew [University of Tennessee Space Institute; Robinson, William N [University of Tennessee Space Institute

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Energy efficient fluorescent ballasts. Phase I, final report  

SciTech Connect

The development of a high-frequency electronic (Stevens) ballast for fluorescent lamps is described. It is claimed that use of this ballast could reduce use energy consumption by 1.2 to 2.5 percent. The Stevens ballast has a basic efficiency of 29 percent when used with conventional lamps. With the more efficient lamps, the efficiency increases drastically. The conventional ballast and lamp has an efficiacy of approximately 60 to 63 lumens per watt (LPW). With the Stevens ballast the efficiacy raises to between 75 and 80 lumens per watt. When the Stevens ballast is utilized with the newer high efficiency lamps the efficiacy increases to 90 to 95 lumens per watt or a full 51 percent improvement over conventional coil and core ballasts and 25 percent over the best high efficiency premium coil and core ballasts. In addition to its energy savings capabilities, this high frequency fluorescent lamp ballast has the advantages that it is a true retrofit device that is directly interchangeable with the conventional coil core ballast, and it is dimmable over a wide and continuous range. (LCLC)

Stevens Luminoptics Corporation

1978-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

X-Ray Emission Spectrometer Design with Single-Shot Pump-Probe and Resonant Excitation Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core-level spectroscopy in the soft X-ray regime is a powerful tool for the study of chemical bonding processes. The ultrafast, ultrabright X-ray pulses generated by the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) allow these reactions to be studied in greater detail than ever before. In this study, we investigated a conceptual design of a spectrometer for the LCLS with imaging in the non-dispersive direction. This would allow single-shot collection of X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) measurements with varying laser pump X-ray probe delay or a variation of incoming X-ray energy over the illuminated area of the sample. Ray-tracing simulations were used to demonstrate how the components of the spectrometer affect its performance, allowing a determination of the optimal final design. These simulations showed that the spectrometer's non-dispersive focusing is extremely sensitive to the size of the sample footprint; the spectrometer is not able to image a footprint width larger than one millimeter with the required resolution. This is compatible with a single shot scheme that maps out the laser pump X-ray probe delay in the non-dispersive direction as well as resonant XES applications at normal incidence. However, the current capabilities of the Soft X-Ray (SXR) beamline at the LCLS do not produce the required energy range in a small enough sample footprint, hindering the single shot resonant XES application at SXR for chemical dynamics studies at surfaces. If an upgraded or future beamline at LCLS is developed with lower monochromator energy dispersion the width can be made small enough at the required energy range to be imaged by this spectrometer design.

Spoth, Katherine; /SUNY, Buffalo /SLAC

2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

385

Transmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of 238U in Thick Targets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

G. Rusev, and A.P. Tonchev, Transmission-based detection ofas it traverses the transmission detection sheet. The secondTransmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements of

Quiter, Brian J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Optical Imaging of Bacterial Infection in Living Mice Using a Fluorescent Near-Infrared Molecular Probe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080, China, NIST Center for Theoretical and Computational Nanosciences substrates,9 and antibiotic drugs.10 Recently, we discovered that fluorescent molecular probes containing syn

Smith, Bradley D.

387

Dimming of Compact Fluorescent Lamps Caused By Cold-Air Drafts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Case Study documents the investigation performed by the New York Port Authority (PA) of the dimming of compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) in the World Trade Center.

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Anatomy-Based Algorithms for Detecting Oral Cancer Using Reflectance and Fluorescence Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OBJECTIVES: We used reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy to noninvasively and quantitatively distinguish benign from dysplastic/malignant oral lesions. We designed diagnostic algorithms to account for differences in ...

McGee, Sasha

389

Fluorescence-based detection methodologies for nitric oxide using transition metal scaffolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Fluorescence-Based Detection Methodologies for Nitric Oxide: A Review. Chapter 2. Cobalt Chemistry with Mixed Aminotroponimine Salicylaldimine Ligands: Synthesis, Characterization, and Nitric Oxide Reactivity. ...

Hilderbrand, Scott A. (Scott Alan), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Examining 239Pu and 240Pu Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Measurements on Spent Fuel for Nuclear Safeguards  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S.D. Ambers, Assesment of Nuclear Resonance Fluorescencefor Spent Nuclear Fuel Assay, Inst. of Nucl. Mat. Man. ,clandestine material with nuclear resonance fluorescence,

Quiter, Brian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence to Measure Plutonium Mass in Spent Nuclear Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Nuclear Recoil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Quantitative Measurements using NRF 2.1 Nuclear ResonanceFuture Work A Transmission Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High power light emitting diode based setup for photobleaching fluorescent impurities Tobias K be photobleached before final sample preparation. The instrument consists of high power light emitting diodes

Kaufman, Laura

393

Power control architectures for cold cathode fluorescent lamp and light emitting diode based light sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? In this dissertation, two different energy efficient power supply topologies are introduced for controlling cold cathode fluorescent lamp (CCFL) and high-brightness light emitting diode (more)

Doshi, Montu V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Shelf life of five meat products displayed under light emitting diode or fluorescent lighting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Light emitting diode (LED) and fluorescent (FLS) lighting effects on enhanced pork loin chops, beef longissimus dorsi and semimembranosus steaks, ground beef, and ground turkey (more)

Steele, Kyle Stover

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fluorescence spectrum analysis using Fourier series modeling for Fluorescein solution in Ethanol  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the fluorescence spectrum for fluorescein solution in ethanol with concentration 1 {\\times} 10-3 mol/liter at different temperatures from room temperature to freezing point of solvent, (T = 153, 183, 223, 253, and 303 K) using liquid nitrogen. Table curve 2D version 5.01 program has been used to determine the fitting curve and fitting equation for each fluorescence spectrum. Fourier series (3 {\\times} 2) was the most suitable fitting equation for all spectra. Theoretical fluorescence spectrum of fluorescein in ethanol at T = 183K was calculated and compared with experimental fluorescence spectrum at the same temperature. There is a good similarity between them.

Hadi, Mahasin F

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Diagnosing breast cancer using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy and intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy, we have developed an algorithm that successfully classifies normal breast tissue, fibrocystic change, fibroadenoma, and infiltrating ductal ...

Fitzmaurice, Maryann

398

Free Volume Related Fluorescence Properties of Electron Irradiated Chalcone Doped PMMA Films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Effect of electron irradiation on free volume related fluorescence properties of chalcone doped Poly(methyl methacrylate)(PMMA) composite films have been studied using Positron Annihilation and Fluorescence spectroscopic techniques. In this polymer composite, enhancement of fluorescence at lower doses and reduction at higher doses has been observed under electron irradiation. From Positron annihilation studies suggests that at lower doses of irradiation induced crosslinking which affect the free volume properties and inturn hinders the chalcone molecular rotation. At higher doses chain scission process affect matrix relaxation. Under the restricted condition the chromophore molecules likely to emit enhanced fluorescence and its mobility is directly related to the free volume around it.

Ravindrachary, Ismayil V.; Bhajantri, R. F.; Harisha, A. [Department of Physics, Mangalore University, Mangalagangotri - 574 199 (India); Praveena, S. D. [Department of Physics, K.V.G College of Engineering, Kurunjibhag, Sullia, Karnataka - 574 327 (India)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

Section 5.4.1 Linear Fluorescent Lighting: Greening Federal Facilities...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and color temperature. When specifying a lighting sys- tem, be sure that the lamp and ballast are electrically matched and the lamp and fixture optically matched. Fluorescent lamp...

400

Capillary electrophoresis-fluorescence line narrowing system (CE-FLNS) for on-line structural characterization  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is interfaced with low temperature fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) spectroscopy for on-line structural characterization of separated molecular analytes.

Jankowiak, Ryszard J. (Ames, IA); Small, Gerald J. (Ames, IA); Shields, Peter A. (Reading, MA)

1999-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Measurement and model assessment of fluorescence lifetime sensing in multiply scattering media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The generation and propagation of fluorescence light within biological tissue offers the potential for biomedical diagnostics and analyte sensing. Arising from an exogenous fluorescent dye injected as a contrast agent or immobilized in a polymer implant, the fluorescent decay kinetics can be sensitive to the tissue??s biochemical environment, providing quantitative in vivo information of the confined tissue site. The impact of light propagation and decay kinetics upon the measured signals is important for consideration, simply because tissue scatters light, giving rise to nanosecond photon time-of-flights that are comparable to fluorescence relaxation kinetics. The goal of this study is to develop a time-dependent model describing (i) the generation of fluorescence from dyes exhibiting multi-exponential or more complex kinetics and (ii) its propagation in scattering media. In the preliminary study, fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy is investigated in tissue-like scattering solution. Two fluorescent dyes, 3,3-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) and Indocynanine Green (ICG), which exhibit distinctly different lifetimes and each exhibits single-exponential decay kinetics, were employed. Measurements of phase-modulation as a function of modulation frequency were made at varying concentration ratios of the two dyes to experimentally simulate fluorescence multi-exponential decay kinetics in non-scattering and scattering solutions. The results suggest that frequency-domain measurements of fluorescent decay kinetics along with models of light propagation may be enhanced by scatter in order to probe kinetics more sensitively than in non-scattering solutions. The next study involved fluorescence lifetime sensing in scattering and non-scattering solutions with a pH sensitive dye, Carboxy Seminaphthofluorescein-1 (C-SNAFL-1), which is known to exhibit multi-exponential decay kinetics. The results demonstrate accurate pH sensing in scattering solution via fluorescence kinetics using a simplified propagation model incorporating an average lifetime. Finally, fluorescence lifetime sensing in immobilized systems were investigated. C-SNAFL-1 was immobilized in poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) microparticles that were immersed in buffered polystyrene solutions. The results demonstrate the ability to perform pH sensing with fluorescence lifetime without the confounding effect of fluorophore loading or the use of 'reference' measurement within multiply scattering systems. In addition, the stability of the immobilized fluorescence sensor and the reliability of fluorescence lifetime measurement verify the prospect of this technology for implantable purposes.

Kuwana, Eddy

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Evaluation of field-portable X-ray fluorescence spectrometry for the determination of lead contamination on small-arms firing ranges  

SciTech Connect

Field analytical methods for the characterization of lead contamination in soil are being developed. In this study, the usefulness of a commercially available, field-portable energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometer (XRF) is evaluated for determining the extent of lead contamination in soils on small-arms firing ranges at a military installation. This field screening technique provides significant time and cost savings for the study of sites with lead-contaminated soil. Data obtained with the XRF unit in the field are compared with data obtained from soil samples analyzed in an analytical laboratory by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Results indicate that the field-portable XRF unit evaluated in this study provides data that are useful in determining the extent and relative magnitude of lead contamination. For the commercial unit used in this study, improvements in the spectral resolution and in the limit of detection would be required to make the unit more than just a screening tool.

Schneider, J.F.; Taylor, J.D.; Bass, D.A.; Zellmer, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Rieck, M. [U.S. Army, Grafenwoehr Training Area (Germany)

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Proton induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams for soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and selective x-ray fluorescence analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the analytical features and performance of an x-ray spectroscopy end station of moderate energy resolution operating with proton-induced quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams. The apparatus was designed, installed and operated at the 5.5 MV Tandem VdG Accelerator Laboratory of the Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. 'Demokritos,' Athens. The setup includes a two-level ultrahigh vacuum chamber that hosts in the lower level up to six primary targets in a rotatable holder; there, the irradiation of pure element materials-used as primary targets-with few-MeV high current ({approx}{mu}A) proton beams produces intense quasi-monochromatic x-ray beams of selectable energy. In the chamber's upper level, a six-position rotatable sample holder hosts the targets considered for x-ray spectroscopy studies. The proton-induced x-ray beam, after proper collimation, is guided to the sample position whereas various filters can be also inserted along the beam's path to eliminate the backscattered protons or/and to absorb selectively components of the x-ray beam. The apparatus incorporates an ultrathin window Si(Li) spectrometer (FWHM 136 eV at 5.89 keV) coupled with low-noise electronics capable of efficiently detecting photons down to carbon K{alpha}. Exemplary soft x-ray spectroscopy studies and results of selective x-ray fluorescence analysis are presented.

Sokaras, D. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Zarkadas, Ch. [PANalytical B.V., 7600 AA Almelo (Netherlands); Fliegauf, R.; Beckhoff, B. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Abbestrasse 2-12, 10587 Berlin (Germany); Karydas, A. G. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, N.C.S.R. Demokritos, Aghia Paraskevi, 15310 Athens (Greece); Nuclear Spectrometry and Applications Laboratory, IAEA Laboratories, A-2444 Seibersdorf (Austria)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

Counting constituents in molecular complexes by fluorescence photon antibunching  

SciTech Connect

Modern single molecule fluorescence microscopy offers new, highly quantitative ways of studying the systems biology of cells while keeping the cells healthy and alive in their natural environment. In this context, a quantum optical technique, photon antibunching, has found a small niche in the continuously growing applications of single molecule techniques to small molecular complexes. Here, we review some of the most recent applications of photon antibunching in biophotonics, and we provide a guide for how to conduct photon antibunching experiments at the single molecule level by applying techniques borrowed from time-correlated single photon counting. We provide a number of new examples for applications of photon antibunching to the study of multichromophoric molecules and small molecular complexes.

Fore, S; Laurence, T; Hollars, C; Huser, T

2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

405

Rapid determination of uranium by x-ray fluorescence  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a method for rapidly determining the amount of uranium using x-ray fluorescence. We add an aliquot of sample solution plus the internal standard element, yttrium, to a 10-ml volumetric flask. We transfer this solution to an x-ray cell and read the L..cap alpha..1 line of uranium and the K..cap alpha..1 line of yttrium. We then compare the ratio of uranium to yttrium for the sample with the ratios obtained from standards. This rapid, highly accurate procedure has a relative standard deviation of 0.69% for samples containing 1 to 5 mg U/ml. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Martell, C.J.; Hansel, J.M.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Fluorescent Functionalized Mesoporous Silica for Radioactive Material Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mesoporous silica with covalently bound salicylic acid molecules incorporated in the structure was synthesized with a one-pot, co-condensation reaction at room temperature. The as-synthesized material has a large surface area, uniform particle size, and an ordered pore structure as determined by characterization with transmission electron microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis, and infrared spectra, etc. Using the strong fluorescence and metal coordination capability of salicylic acid, functionalized mesoporous silica (FMS) was developed to track and extract radionuclide contaminants, such as uranyl [U(VI)] ions encountered in subsurface environments. Adsorption measurements showed a strong affinity of the FMS toward U(VI) with a Kd value of 105 mL/g, which is four orders of magnitude higher than the adsorption of U(VI) onto most of the sediments in natural environments. The new materials have a potential for synergistic environmental monitoring and remediation of the radionuclide U(VI) from contaminated subsurface environments.

Li, Juan; Zhu, Kake; Shang, Jianying; Wang, Donghai; Nie, Zimin; Guo, Ruisong; Liu, Chongxuan; Wang, Zheming; Li, Xiaolin; Liu, Jun

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Fluorescence and Hybrid Detection Aperture of the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aperture of the Fluorescence Detector (FD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory is evaluated from simulated events using different detector configurations: mono, stereo, 3-FD and 4-FD. The trigger efficiency has been modeled using shower profiles with ground impacts in the field of view of a single telescope and studying the trigger response (at the different levels) by that telescope and by its neighbours. In addition, analysis cuts imposed by event reconstruction have been applied. The hybrid aperture is then derived for the Auger final extension. Taking into account the actual Surface Detector (SD) array configuration and its trigger response, the aperture is also calculated for a typical configuration of the present phase.

J. A. Bellido; D. D'Urso; H. Geenen; F. Guarino; L. Perrone; S. Petrera; L. Prado Jr.; F. Salamida

2005-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

408

Effect of filament power removal on a fluorescent lamp system  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques are used to measure the effects of removing the filament power from a two-lamp, F-40, rapid-start fluorescent lamp system. The changes are measured for a standard CBM core-coil ballast and for a solid-state ballast operating the lamp at high frequency. There is a 4 tp 6% increase in system efficacy when the filament power is removed. Removal of filament power also decreases filament temperature from 1000/sup 0/C to below 700/sup 0/C in lamps operated at 60 Hz, and from above 600/sup 0/C to 300/sup 0/C in lamps operated at high frequency. The study shows that the arc current and anode fall also determine filament temperature.

Verderber, R.R.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F.M.

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

A high etendue spectrometer suitable for core charge eXchange recombination spectroscopy on ITER  

SciTech Connect

A feasibility study for the use of core charge exchange recombination spectroscopy on ITER has shown that accurate measurements on the helium ash require a spectrometer with a high etendue of 1mm{sup 2}sr to comply with the measurement requirements [S. Tugarinov et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 74, 2075 (2003)]. To this purpose such an instrument has been developed consisting of three separate wavelength channels (to measure simultaneously He/Be, C/Ne, and H/D/T together with the Doppler shifted direct emission of the diagnostic neutral beam, the beam emission (BES) signal), combining high dispersion (0.02 nm/pixel), sufficient resolution (0.2 nm), high efficiency (55%), and extended wavelength range (14 nm) at high etendue. The combined measurement of the BES along the same sightline within a third wavelength range provides the possibility for in situ calibration of the charge eXchange recombination spectroscopy signals. In addition, the option is included to use the same instrument for measurements of the fast fluctuations of the beam emission intensity up to 2 MHz, with the aim to study MHD activity.

Jaspers, R. J. E.; Scheffer, M. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, Eindhoven (Netherlands); Kappatou, A. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Valk, N. C. J. van der; Durkut, M.; Snijders, B. [TNO Science and Industry, P.O. Box 155, 2600 AD Delft (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institut fuer Energie und Klimaforschung-IEK-4 Forschungszentrum, Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Pokol, G. I. [Institute of Nuclear Techniques, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, P. O. Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Erdei, G. [Department of Atomic Physics, Budapest University of Technology and Economics, EURATOM Association, P. O. Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary); Zoletnik, S.; Dunai, D. [WIGNER RCP, RMKI, EURATOM Association, P. O. Box 91, H-1521 Budapest (Hungary)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Gamma-Ray Bursts Observed with the Spectrometer SPI Onboard INTEGRAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The spectrometer SPI is one of the main detectors of ESA's INTEGRAL mission. The instrument offers two interesting and valuable capabilities for the detection of the prompt emission of Gamma-ray bursts. Within a field of view of 16 degrees, SPI is able to localize Gamma-ray bursts with an accuracy of 10 arcmin. The large anticoincidence shield, ACS, consisting of 512 kg of BGO crystals, detects Gamma-ray bursts quasi omnidirectionally above ~70 keV. Burst alerts from SPI/ACS are distributed to the interested community via the INTEGRAL Burst Alert System. The ACS data have been implemented into the 3rd Interplanetary Network and have proven valuable for the localization of bursts using the triangulation method. During the first 8 months of the mission approximately one Gamma-ray burst per month was localized within the field of fiew of SPI and 145 Gamma-ray burst candidates were detected by the ACS from which 40 % have been confirmed by other instruments.

A. von Kienlin; A. Rau; V. Beckmann; S. Deluit

2004-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

411

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, New Rockford Quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the New Rockford map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1397 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Mitchell map area. The purpose of this program is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1479 line miles are in this quadrangle.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Huron quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Huron map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1459 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Search for macroscopic CP violating forces using a neutron EDM spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The search for CP violating forces between nucleons in the so-called axion window of force ranges lam between 2x10^-5 m and 0.02 m is interesting because only little experimental information is available there. Axion-like particles would induce a pseudo-magnetic field for neutrons close to bulk matter. A laboratory search investigates neutron spin precession close to a heavy mirror using ultracold neutrons in a magnetic resonance spectrometer. From the absence of a shift of the magnetic resonance we established new constraints on the coupling strength of axion-like particles in terms of the product gs x gp of scalar and pseudo-scalar dimensionless constants, as a function of the force range lam, gs x gp x lam^2 <= 2x10-21 [cm^2] (C.L.95%) for 10^-4 cm < lam < 1 cm. For 0.1 cm < lam < 1 cm previous limits are improved by 4 to 5 orders of magnitude.

A. P. Serebrov; O. Zimmer; P. Geltenbort; A. K. Fomin; S. N. Ivanov; E. A. Kolomensky; I. A. Krasnoshekova; M. S. Lasakov; V. M. Lobashev; A. N. Pirozhkov; V. E. Varlamov; A. V. Vasiliev; O. M. Zherebtsov; E. B. Aleksandrov; S. P. Dmitriev; N. A. Dovator

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

415

Conditioning the gamma spectrometer for activity measurement at very high background  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The application of a high purity germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer in determining the fuel element burnup in a future reactor is studied. The HPGe detector is exposed by a Co60 source with varying irradiation rate from 10 kcps to 150 kcps to simulate the input counting rate in real reactor environment. A Cs137 and a Eu152 source are positioned at given distances to generate certain event rate in the detector with the former being proposed as a labeling nuclide to measure the burnup of fuel element. It is shown that both the energy resolution slightly increasing with the irradiation rate and the passthrough rate at high irradiation level match the requirement of the real application. The influence of the background is studied in different parameter sets used in the particularly developed procedure of the background subtraction. It is demonstrated that with the typical input irradiation rate and Cs137 intensity relevant to deep burnup situation, the precision of the Cs137 counting rate in the current experiment is consistently below 2.8%, indicating a promising feasibility of utilizing an HPGe detector in the burnup measurement in future bed-like reactor.

Weihua Yan; Liguo Zhang; Zhao Zhang; Zhigang Xiao

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hinode/Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer Observations of the Temperature Structure of the Quiet Corona  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a Differential Emission Measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6 to 6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of Iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1" pixels...

Brooks, David H; Williams, David R; Watanabe, Tetsuya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Study of gas evolution during oil shale pyrolysis by TQMS (triple quadrupole mass spectrometer)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Real-time gas evolution during pyrolysis of two Green River Formation (Colorado) oil shales, one eastern US Devonian shale, and two Chinese shales was monitored using a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer (TQMS). We calculated kinetic parameters for hydrocarbon generation. For water, carbon oxides, and sulfur gases, we compared evolution profiles and identified the organicinorganic precursors of each species. We also monitored nitrogen- and sulfur-containing naphtha components. Hydrocarbon gas profiles, except for CH/sub 4/, are similar for all shales, and their rates of evolution reach a maximum at around the temperatures of maximum oil evolutions. The evolution profiles for H/sub 2/, CH/sub 2/, CO, and CO/sub 2/, at high temperatures are affected by the amount of char remaining in shale, carbonate minerals, and the water-gas shift reaction. The water profile, in general, consists of waters from surface dehydration, kerogen pyrolysis, and mineral dehydration. Mineral dehydration was the dominant water source for all shales, but the temperature ranges for the major water peak varied because of widely different mineral composition. Chinese shales evolved much more water than U.S. shales. Major differences between shales were seen in the sulfur gases. 17 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Oh, M.S.; Coburn, T.T.; Crawford, R.W.; Burnham, A.K.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A technical review of the SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The SWEPP Gamma-ray Spectrometer (SGRS) was developed by INEL researchers as a nonintrusive method of determining the isotopic ratios of TRU and U materials in a 208-liter waste drums. The SGRS has been in use at SWEPP since mid-1994. Enough questions have been raised regarding the system reliability and technical capabilities, that, coupled with a desire to procure an additional gamma-ray spectroscopy system in order to increase the drum throughput of SWEPP, have prompted an independent technical review of the SGRS. The author was chosen as the reviewer, and this report documents the results of the review. While the SGRS is accurate in its isotopic ratio results, the system is not calculationally robust. The primary reason for this lack of calculational reliability is the implementation of the attenuation corrections. Suggested changes may improve the system reliability dramatically. The SGRS is a multiple detector spectrometry system. Tests were conducted on various methods for combining the four detector results into a single drum representative value. No clear solution was reached for the cases in which the isotopic ratios are vertically segregated; however, some methods showed promise. These should be investigated further. 14 refs. , 15 figs., 23 tabs.

Hartwell, J.K.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Determining plasma-fueling sources with an end-loss ion spectrometer  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To help identify the major sources of fueling gas in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), we mounted a mass-sensitive, EVertical BarVertical BarB, end-loss ion spectrometer (ELIS) near the machine's centerline. We set the electric field in the ELIS to simultaneously measure the axial loss currents of both hydrogen and deuterium. We then initiated plasma discharges, where we injected either hydrogen or deuterium gas into the central cell. We also selected and deselected the central-cell neutral beams that were fueled with hydrogen gas. The end-cell neutral beams were always selected and fueled with deuterium. By taking the ratio of the hydrogen end-loss current to the deuterium end-loss current (with a known deuterium-gas feed rate), we were able to infer the effective fueling rates that were due to wall reflux, central-cell beams, and end-cell beams. The results were the following: wall reflux, 6 Torr l/s; central-cell beams, 15 Torr l/s; and end-cell beams 1 Torr l/s.

Grubb, D.P.; Foote, J.H.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey Coos Bay, Oregon. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the months of August, September, and October of 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Coos Bay, Oregon, map area. Line spacing was generally six miles for east/west traverses and eighteen miles for north/south tie lines over the northern one-half of the area. Traverses and tie lines were flown at three miles and twelve miles respectively over the southern one-half of the area. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 863.8 line miles are in this quadrangle.

Not Available

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

Not Available

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) on New Horizons. Space Sci. Rev., this volume  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) comprises the hardware and accompanying science investigation on the New Horizons spacecraft to measure pick-up ions from Plutos outgassing atmosphere. To the extent that Pluto retains its characteristics similar to those of a heavy comet as detected in stellar occultations since the early 1980s, these measurements will characterize the neutral atmosphere of Pluto while providing a consistency check on the atmospheric escape rate at the encounter epoch with that deduced from the atmospheric structure at lower altitudes by the ALICE, REX, and SWAP experiments on New Horizons. In addition, PEPSSI will characterize any extended ionosphere and solar wind interaction while also characterizing the energetic particle environment of Pluto, Charon, and their associated system. First proposed for development for the Pluto Express mission in September 1993, what became the PEPSSI instrument went through a number of development stages to meet the requirements of such an instrument for a mission to Pluto while minimizing the required spacecraft resources. The PEPSSI instrument provides for measurements of ions (with compositional information) and electrons from 10s of keV to ~1 MeV in a 120 x 12 fan-shaped beam in six sectors for 1.5 kg and ~2.5

Ralph L. Mcnutt; Stefano A. Livi; Reid S. Gurnee; Matthew E. Hill; Kim A; G. Bruce Andrews; Edwin P. Keath; Stamatios M. Krimigis; Donald G; Barry Tossman; Fran Bagenal; John D. Boldt; Walter Bradley; William S; George C. Ho; Stephen E. Jaskulek; Thomas W. Lefevere; Geoffrey A. Marcus; John R. Hayes; G. Ty Moore; Bruce D. Williams; Wilson Iv; L. E. Brown; M. Kusterer

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) on the New Horizons Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Pluto Energetic Particle Spectrometer Science Investigation (PEPSSI) comprises the hardware and accompanying science investigation on the New Horizons spacecraft to measure pick-up ions from Pluto's outgassing atmosphere. To the extent that Pluto retains its characteristics similar to those of a "heavy comet" as detected in stellar occultations since the early 1980s, these measurements will characterize the neutral atmosphere of Pluto while providing a consistency check on the atmospheric escape rate at the encounter epoch with that deduced from the atmospheric structure at lower altitudes by the ALICE, REX, and SWAP experiments on New Horizons. In addition, PEPSSI will characterize any extended ionosphere and solar wind interaction while also characterizing the energetic particle environment of Pluto, Charon, and their associated system. First proposed for development for the Pluto Express mission in September 1993, what became the PEPSSI instrument went through a number of development stages to meet the requirements of such an instrument for a mission to Pluto while minimizing the required spacecraft resources. The PEPSSI instrument provides for measurements of ions (with compositional information) and electrons from 10s of keV to ~1 MeV in a 120 deg x 12 deg fan-shaped beam in six sectors for 1.5 kg and ~2.5 W.

Ralph L. McNutt, Jr.; Stefano A. Livi; Reid S. Gurnee; Matthew E. Hill; Kim A. Cooper; G. Bruce Andrews; Edwin P. Keath; Stamatios M. Krimigis; Donald G. Mitchell; Barry Tossman; Fran Bagenal; John D. Boldt; Walter Bradley; William S. Devereux; George C. Ho; Stephen E. Jaskulek; Thomas W. LeFevere; Horace Malcom; Geoffrey A. Marcus; John R. Hayes; G. Ty Moore; Bruce D. Williams; Paul Wilson IV; L. E. Brown; M. Kusterer; J. Vandegriff

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

424

AN ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICLE SIZERTM SPECTROMETER FOR TRANSIENT EMISSION PARTICLE MEASUREMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been increased interest in obtaining size distribution data during transient engine operation where both particle size and total number concentrations can change dramatically. Traditionally, the measurement of particle emissions from vehicles has been a compromise based on choosing between the conflicting needs of high time resolution or high particle size resolution for a particular measurement. Currently the most common technique for measuring submicrometer particle sizes is the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPSTM) system. The SMPS system gives high size resolution but requires an aerosol to be stable over a long time period to make a particle size distribution measurement. A Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) is commonly used for fast time response measurements but is limited to measuring total concentration only. This paper describes a new instrument, the Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM (EEPSTM) spectrometer, which has high time resolution and a reasonable size resolution. The EEPS was designed specifically for measuring engine exhaust and, like the SMPS system, uses a measurement based on electrical mobility. Particles entering the instrument are charged to a predictable level, then passed through an annular space where they are repelled outward by the voltage from a central column. When the particles reach electrodes on the outer cylindrical (a column of rings), they create a current that is measured by an electrometer on one or more of the rings. The electrometer currents are measured multiple times per second to give high time resolution. A sophisticated realtime inversion algorithm converts the currents to particle size and concentration for immediate display.

Johnson, T; Caldow, R; Pucher, A; Mirme, A; Kittelson, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

425

AN ENGINE EXHAUST PARTICLE SIZER{trademark} SPECTROMETER FOR TRANSIENT EMISSION PARTICLE MEASUREMENTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been increased interest in obtaining size distribution data during transient engine operation where both particle size and total number concentrations can change dramatically. Traditionally, the measurement of particle emissions from vehicles has been a compromise based on choosing between the conflicting needs of high time resolution or high particle size resolution for a particular measurement. Currently the most common technique for measuring submicrometer particle sizes is the Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPSTM) system. The SMPS system gives high size resolution but requires an aerosol to be stable over a long time period to make a particle size distribution measurement. A Condensation Particle Counter (CPC) is commonly used for fast time response measurements but is limited to measuring total concentration only. This paper describes a new instrument, the Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM (EEPSTM) spectrometer, which has high time resolution and a reasonable size resolution. The EEPS was designed specifically for measuring engine exhaust and, like the SMPS system, uses a measurement based on electrical mobility. Particles entering the instrument are charged to a predictable level, then passed through an annular space where they are repelled outward by the voltage from a central column. When the particles reach electrodes on the outer cylindrical (a column of rings), they create a current that is measured by an electrometer on one or more of the rings. The electrometer currents are measured multiple times per second to give high time resolution. A sophisticated realtime inversion algorithm converts the currents to particle size and concentration for immediate display.

Johnson, T: Caldow, R; Pucher, A Mirme, A Kittelson, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

426

Design of the superconducting 45 degree dipole for the CEBAF high resolution spectrometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 460-ton dipole for the Hall A 4-GeV/c High Resolution Spectrometer has a bend angle of 45{sup o}, with an 8.4-m radius of curvature and an effective length of 6.6 m. It has a useful width of 100 cm and a 25-cm gap at the central radius of curvature. The dipole provides focusing in the dispersive plane by means of rotated (by 30 degrees) entrance and exit pole faces as well as a field index of -1.25. The end contour geometries have been designed to eliminate higher-order aberrations. The maximum central field is 1.6 T at 4 GeV/c. A field quality of 2 x 10{sup -4} (maximum deviation from the design value) is required over an excitation range from 0.16 T to 1.6 T. The 1.8-kA conductor is a 36-wire flattened cable. It has been designed to have limited cryostability at 4.5 K and 1.3 atm. Each coil is wound as one double pancake against the outer wall of the helium vessel in order to react the in-plane (hoop) loads. The bath-cooled, planar coil features negative curvature on its inner radius and at the exit. The coil produces 400 KAT at full excitation. The stored energy of this magnet is 3.5 MJ.

Alan Gavalya; John Alcorn; Walter Tuzel

1990-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

427

Nucleic acid encoding a self-assembling split-fluorescent protein system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a protein labeling and detection system based on self-complementing fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins. The system of the invention is exemplified with various combinations of self-complementing fragments derived from Aequorea victoria Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), which are used to detect and quantify protein solubility in multiple assay formats, both in vitro and in vivo.

Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM); Cabantous, Stephanie (Los Alamos, NM)

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

Studies of the laser-induced fluorescence of explosives and explosive compositions.  

SciTech Connect

Continuing use of explosives by terrorists throughout the world has led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially in technologies that have potential for standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken in order to investigate the possible detection of explosive particulates at safe standoff distances in an attempt to identify vehicles that might contain large vehicle bombs (LVBs). The explosives investigated have included the common homogeneous or molecular explosives, 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), pentaerythritol tetranitrate (PETN), cyclonite or hexogen (RDX), octogen (HMX), and the heterogeneous explosive, ammonium nitrate/fuel oil (ANFO), and its components. We have investigated standard excited/dispersed fluorescence, laser-excited prompt and delayed dispersed fluorescence using excitation wavelengths of 266 and 355 nm, the effects of polarization of the laser excitation light, and fluorescence imaging microscopy using 365- and 470-nm excitation. The four nitro-based, homogeneous explosives (TNT, PETN, RDX, and HMX) exhibit virtually no native fluorescence, but do exhibit quenching effects of varying magnitude when adsorbed on fluorescing surfaces. Ammonium nitrate and fuel oil mixtures fluoresce primarily due to the fuel oil, and, in some cases, due to the presence of hydrophobic coatings on ammonium nitrate prill or impurities in the ammonium nitrate itself. Pure ammonium nitrate shows no detectable fluorescence. These results are of scientific interest, but they provide little hope for the use of UV-excited fluorescence as a technique to perform safe standoff detection of adsorbed explosive particulates under real-world conditions with a useful degree of reliability.

Hargis, Philip Joseph, Jr. (,; .); Thorne, Lawrence R.; Phifer, Carol Celeste; Parmeter, John Ethan; Schmitt, Randal L.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Directed evolution methods for improving polypeptide folding and solubility and superfolder fluorescent proteins generated thereby  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The current invention provides methods of improving folding of polypeptides using a poorly folding domain as a component of a fusion protein comprising the poorly folding domain and a polypeptide of interest to be improved. The invention also provides novel green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) and red fluorescent proteins that have enhanced folding properties.

Waldo, Geoffrey S. (Santa Fe, NM)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

430

Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Collection and Mapping Parent Exploration Technique: Data Collection and Mapping Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Bulk and trace element analysis of rocks, minerals, and sediments. Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF): Hand-held X-Ray Fluorescence is a portable analytical technique derived from the instrumentation used in traditional lab-based XRF analysis. The technique is used for bulk chemical analysis of rock, mineral, and sediment

431

DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs DOE Withdraws the Energy Star Label from 34 Compact Fluorescent Light Bulbs January 26, 2010 - 11:41am Addthis Washington, DC - On January 25th, the General Counsel notified 25 manufacturers that the Department of Energy has withdrawn their right to use the Energy Star label on 34 different models of compact fluorescent light bulbs (CFLs). The Department took this action after its off-the-shelf testing revealed that the affected models do not last as long in regular use as Energy Star certification would require. As a result, these manufacturers have been informed that they can no longer ship or sell any of the 34 models of CFLs bearing the Energy Star label on the bulb or its packaging. All compact fluorescent light bulbs use about 75 percent less energy and

432

Selecting effective fluorescent lamp and ballast for retrofit in the continental United States. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Electrical lighting is a major contributor to daytime peak energy demand, accounting for about 30 percent of total electricity consumption in most Army facilities. Some of this energy may be wasted because many existing lighting systems at Army Installations use outmoded technologies. While recent technology has improved the energy efficiency of all lighting systems, fluorescent lighting-the most widely used interior building lighting-has shown the greatest efficiency gains. Retrofits using high-efficiency fluorescent lamps and ballasts can yield significant operating cost savings. High-efficiency fluorescent lighting systems are widely available, but current information on their performance characteristics is highly technical and not easily accessible to Army facility managers considering retrofit options. This report provides a single, accessible source that summarizes fluorescent lamp and ballast performance characteristics and outlines selection procedures. Fluorescent lamp, Retrofit, Ballast, Lighting. Energy conservation.

Taylor, W.R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

HyperCP: A high-rate spectrometer for the study of charged hyperon and kaon decays  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The HyperCP experiment (Fermilab E871) was designed to search for rare phenomena in the decays of charged strange particles, in particular CP violation in $\\Xi$ and $\\Lambda$ hyperon decays with a sensitivity of $10^{-4}$. Intense charged secondary beams were produced by 800 GeV/c protons and momentum-selected by a magnetic channel. Decay products were detected in a large-acceptance, high-rate magnetic spectrometer using multiwire proportional chambers, trigger hodoscopes, a hadronic calorimeter, and a muon-detection system. Nearly identical acceptances and efficiencies for hyperons and antihyperons decaying within an evacuated volume were achieved by reversing the polarities of the channel and spectrometer magnets. A high-rate data-acquisition system enabled 231 billion events to be recorded in twelve months of data-taking.

HyperCP collaboration; R. A. Burnstein; A. Chakravorty; A. Chan; Y. C. Chen; W. -S. Choong; K. Clark; E. C. Dukes; C. Durandet; J. Felix; R. Fuzesy; G. Gidal; P. Gu; H. R. Gustafson; C. Ho; T. Holmstrom; M. Huang; C. James; C. M. Jenkins; T. D. Jones; D. M. Kaplan; L. M. Lederman; N. Leros; M. J. Longo; F. Lopez; L. C. Lu; W. Luebke; K. -B. Luk; K. S. Nelson; H. K. Park; J. -P. Perroud; D. Rajaram; H. A. Rubin; P. K. Teng; B. Turko; J. Volk; C. G. White; S. L. White; P. Zyla

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

434

Atmospheric pressure flow reactor / aerosol mass spectrometer studies of tropospheric aerosol nucleat and growth kinetics. Final report, June, 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this program was to determine the mechanisms and rates of growth and transformation and growth processes that control secondary aerosol particles in both the clear and polluted troposphere. The experimental plan coupled an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a chemical ionization mass spectrometer to provide simultaneous measurement of condensed and particle phases. The first task investigated the kinetics of tropospheric particle growth and transformation by measuring vapor accretion to particles (uptake coefficients, including mass accommodation coefficients and heterogeneous reaction rate coefficients). Other work initiated investigation of aerosol nucleation processes by monitoring the appearance of submicron particles with the AMS as a function of precursor gas concentrations. Three projects were investigated during the program: (1) Ozonolysis of oleic acid aerosols as model of chemical reactivity of secondary organic aerosol; (2) Activation of soot particles by measurement deliquescence in the presence of sulfuric acid and water vapor; (3) Controlled nucleation and growth of sulfuric acid aerosols.

Worsnop, Douglas R.

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cyanine-based probe\\tag-peptide pair for fluorescence protein imaging and fluorescence protein imaging methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A molecular probe comprises two arsenic atoms and at least one cyanine based moiety. A method of producing a molecular probe includes providing a molecule having a first formula, treating the molecule with HgOAc, and subsequently transmetallizing with AsCl.sub.3. The As is liganded to ethanedithiol to produce a probe having a second formula. A method of labeling a peptide includes providing a peptide comprising a tag sequence and contacting the peptide with a biarsenical molecular probe. A complex is formed comprising the tag sequence and the molecular probe. A method of studying a peptide includes providing a mixture containing a peptide comprising a peptide tag sequence, adding a biarsenical probe to the mixture, and monitoring the fluorescence of the mixture.

Mayer-Cumblidge, M. Uljana (Richland, WA); Cao, Haishi (Richland, WA)

2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

In Situ Measurement of Tropospheric OH Radicals by Laser-Induced FluorescenceA Description of the KFA Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrument for the measurement of tropospheric OH radical concentrations by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy has been developed. Ambient air is expanded through a nozzle into a low-pressure fluorescence cell and is irradiated by a ...

F. Holland; M. Hessling; A. Hofzumahaus

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Comparison of Raindrop Size Distribution Measurements by a Joss-Waldvogel Disdrometer, a PMS 2DG Spectrometer, and a POSS Doppler Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three techniques for the measurement of raindrop size distributions are compared using data from a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer (JWD), a Particle Measuring Systems 2DG spectrometer (PMS), and an Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) Precipitation ...

B. E. Sheppard; P. I. Joe

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

X-ray grating spectrometer for opacity measurements in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range at the LULI 2000 laser facility  

SciTech Connect

An x-ray grating spectrometer was built in order to measure opacities in the 50 eV to 250 eV spectral range with an average spectral resolution {approx} 50. It has been used at the LULI-2000 laser facility at Ecole Polytechnique (France) to measure the {Delta}n = 0, n = 3 transitions of several elements with neighboring atomic number: Cr, Fe, Ni, and Cu in the same experimental conditions. Hence a spectrometer with a wide spectral range is required. This spectrometer features one line of sight looking through a heated sample at backlighter emission. It is outfitted with one toroidal condensing mirror and several flat mirrors cutting off higher energy photons. The spectral dispersion is obtained with a flatfield grating. Detection consists of a streak camera sensitive to soft x-ray radiation. Some experimental results showing the performance of this spectrometer are presented.

Reverdin, Charles; Caillaud, T.; Gilleron, F.; Pain, J. C.; Silvert, V.; Soullie, G.; Villette, B. [CEA, DAM, DIF, 91297 Arpajon (France); Thais, Frederic; Loisel, Guillaume; Blenski, T.; Poirier, M. [CEA, DSM, IRAMIS, Service Photons, Atomes et Molecules, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Busquet, M. [ARTEP Inc, Ellicott City, Maryland 21042 (United States); Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Serres, F. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, CEA, UPMC, route de Saclay, 91128 Palaiseau (France); Ducret, J. E. [CELIA, UMR5107, CEA, CNRS, Universite de Bordeaux, 33400 Talence (France); Foelsner, W. [Max Planck Instituet fuer Quantum Optik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Gilles, D.; Turck-Chieze, S. [CEA, DSM, IRFU, Service d'astrophysique, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Comparison of Total Column Ozone Values Derived from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), the Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison of total column ozone data retrieved from the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), the Tiros Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS), and the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) for the years 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 is ...

Gary K. Corlett; Paul S. Monks

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Development of Soft Ionization for Particulate Organic Detection with the Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

During this DOE SBIR Phase II project, we have successfully developed several soft ionization techniques, i.e., ionization schemes which involve less fragmentation of the ions, for use with the Aerodyne time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (ToF-AMS). Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization was demonstrated in the laboratory and deployed in field campaigns. Vacuum ultraviolet single photon ionization allows better identification of organic species in aerosol particles as shown in laboratory experiments on single component particles, and in field measurements on complex multi-component particles. Dissociative electron attachment with lower energy electrons (less than 30 eV) was demonstrated in the measurement of particulate organics in chamber experiments in Switzerland, and is now a routine approach with AMS systems configured for bipolar, negative ion detection. This technique is particularly powerful for detection of acidic and other highly oxygenated secondary organic aerosol (SOA) chemical functionality. Low energy electron ionization (10 to 12 eV) is also a softer ionization approach routinely available to AMS users. Finally, Lithium ion attachment has been shown to be sensitive to more alkyl-like chemical functionality in SOA. Results from Mexico City are particularly exciting in observing changes in SOA molecular composition under different photochemical/meteorological conditions. More recent results detecting biomass burns at the Montana fire lab have demonstrated quantitative and selective detection of levoglucosan. These soft ionization techniques provide the ToF-AMS with better capability for identifying organic species in ambient atmospheric aerosol particles. This, in turn, will allow more detailed study of the sources, transformations and fate of organic-containing aerosol.

Trimborn, A; Williams, L R; Jayne, J T; Worsnop, D R

2008-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "fluorescence sxf spectrometer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Design and development of an ultrafine particle reflection-time-of-flight mass spectrometer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary motivation for the research is to study the effect of small particles on global climate. The study can also help to understand the dynamics involved with gas to particle conversion, which is being debated to be a rich source for atmospheric aerosol. However, the most important use would be to study health effects, since small particles easily diffuse into the lungs, with seemingly little physiological filtration mechanism. The research work involves the design, development and characterization of a single-ultrafine-particle mass spectrometer. The instrument aerodynamically size selects fine and ultrafine aerosol particles (size range 20 nm-1 []m), with a constant Stokes number, and focuses them into a vacuum chamber. This is achieved by changing the upstream pressure of the inlet, which changes aerodynamic drag experienced by the particle. After its entry into the chamber, the particle is ablated by a high power excimer laser, which produces ions from the original molecular constituents. Reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometry is utilized to analyze the ions, and thus the chemical composition of the particle that was hit. The present work is aimed to overcome the shortcomings of previous instruments, while allowing for increased portability. The instrument is designed, fabricated and experimentally characterized. The first phase involves analysis of the particle beam generated by the inlet. An atomizer generates aerosols from a solution of 5% oleic acid and ethanol. The polydisperse aerosol is passed through a differential mobility analyzer to make a monodisperse mixture, which is transmitted through the inlet. The monodisperse particle beam is intercepted by glass slides, and the spot sizes are indicative of the beam shape and width at the slide positions. A theoretical analysis of the fluid flow field and particle trajectory is developed to correlate with the experimental results. The second phase involves calibration of the mass spectra, and measuring some particulate composition from the laboratory room air.

Das, Rishiraj

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

ACTIVE REGION MOSS: DOPPLER SHIFTS FROM HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Studying the Doppler shifts and the temperature dependence of Doppler shifts in moss regions can help us understand the heating processes in the core of the active regions. In this paper, we have used an active region observation recorded by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode on 2007 December 12 to measure the Doppler shifts in the moss regions. We have distinguished the moss regions from the rest of the active region by defining a low-density cutoff as derived by Tripathi et al. in 2010. We have carried out a very careful analysis of the EIS wavelength calibration based on the method described by Young et al. in 2012. For spectral lines having maximum sensitivity between log T = 5.85 and log T = 6.25 K, we find that the velocity distribution peaks at around 0 km s{sup -1} with an estimated error of 4-5 km s{sup -1}. The width of the distribution decreases with temperature. The mean of the distribution shows a blueshift which increases with increasing temperature and the distribution also shows asymmetries toward blueshift. Comparing these results with observables predicted from different coronal heating models, we find that these results are consistent with both steady and impulsive heating scenarios. However, the fact that there are a significant number of pixels showing velocity amplitudes that exceed the uncertainty of 5 km s{sup -1} is suggestive of impulsive heating. Clearly, further observational constraints are needed to distinguish between these two heating scenarios.

Tripathi, Durgesh [Inter-University Centre for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pune University Campus, Pune 411007 (India); Mason, Helen E. [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Klimchuk, James A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

VELOCITY CHARACTERISTICS OF EVAPORATED PLASMA USING HINODE/EUV IMAGING SPECTROMETER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a detailed study of chromospheric evaporation using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) onboard Hinode in conjunction with hard X-ray (HXR) observations from Reuven Ramaty High-Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). The advanced capabilities of EIS were used to measure Doppler shifts in 15 emission lines covering the temperature range T = 0.05-16 MK during the impulsive phase of a C-class flare on 2007 December 14. Blueshifts indicative of the evaporated material were observed in six emission lines from Fe XIV-XXIV (2-16 MK). Upflow velocity (v{sub up}) was found to scale with temperature as v{sub up} (km s{sup -1}) {approx} 8-18T(MK). Although the hottest emission lines, Fe XXIII and Fe XXIV, exhibited upflows of >200 km s{sup -1}, their line profiles were found to be dominated by a stationary component in contrast to the predictions of the standard flare model. Emission from O VI-Fe XIII lines (0.5-1.5 MK) was found to be redshifted by v{sub down} (km s{sup -1}) {approx} 60-17T (MK) and was interpreted as the downward-moving 'plug' characteristic of explosive evaporation. These downflows occur at temperatures significantly higher than previously expected. Both upflows and downflows were spatially and temporally correlated with HXR emission observed by RHESSI that provided the properties of the electron beam deemed to be the driver of the evaporation. The energy flux of the electron beam was found to be {approx}>5 x 10{sup 10} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, consistent with the value required to drive explosive chromospheric evaporation from hydrodynamic simulations.

Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R. [Solar Physics Laboratory (Code 671), Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Fieldable Fourier Transform Spectrometer: System Construction, Background Variability Measurements, and Chemical Attack Warning Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The infrared sensors task at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is focused on the science and technology of remote and in-situ chemical sensors for detecting proliferation and countering terrorism. Missions to be addressed by remote chemical sensor development will include detecting proliferation of nuclear or chemical weapons, and providing warning of terrorist use of chemical weapons. Missions to be addressed by in-situ chemical sensor development include countering terrorism by screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons, or chemical weapons residues, and mapping contaminated areas. The science and technology relevant to these primary missions is also likely to be useful for battlefield chemical weapons defense, air operations support, monitoring emissions from chemical weapons destruction facilities or industrial chemical plants, and law enforcement applications. PNNL will seek to serve organizations with direct interest in these missions through collaborative research and development efforts approved by NA-22. During FY02, PNNL began assembling a remote IR detection capability that would allow field experiments to be conducted. The capability consists of a commercially available FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared) emission spectrometer and a frequency-modulation differential-absorption LIDAR (FM-DIAL) system being developed at PNNL. To provide environmental protection for these systems, a large, well insulated, temperature controlled trailer was specified and procured. While the FTIR system was field-ready, the FM-DIAL system required many modifications to prepare for field deployment. This document provides an overview of the FTIR system, summarizes the modifications made to the FM-DIAL system, and describes the salient features of the remote systems trailer.

Hatchell, Brian K.; Harper, Warren W.; Batishko, Charles R.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Sheen, David M.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Schultz, John F.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Intensity-Frontier Antiproton Physics with The Antiproton Annihilation Spectrometer (TAPAS) at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect

The Fermilab Antiproton Source is the world's most intense source of antimatter. With the Tevatron program now behind us, this unique facility can help make the case for Fermilab's continued accelerator operations. The Antiproton Source can be used for unique, dedicated antimatter studies, including medium-energy {bar p}-annihilation experiments. We propose to assemble a powerful, yet cost-effective, solenoidal magnetic spectrometer for antiproton-annihilation events, and to use it at the Fermilab Antiproton Accumulator to measure the charm production cross section, study rare hyperon decays, search for hyperon CP asymmetry, precisely measure the properties of several charmonium and nearby states, and make the first measurements of the Drell-Yan continuum in medium-energy antiproton annihilation. Should the charm production cross section be as large as some have proposed, we will also be able to measure D{sup 0}-{bar D}{sup 0} mixing with high precision and discover (or sensitively limit) charm CP violation. The observation of charm or hyperon CP violation would be evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model, with possible implications for the origin of the baryon asymmetry of the universe - the question of what happened to all the antimatter that must have been produced in the Big Bang. The experiment will be carried out by an international collaboration and will require some four years of running time. As possibly the sole hadron experiment in progress at Fermilab during that time, it will play an important role in maintaining a broad particle physics program at Fermilab and in the U.S. It will thus help us to continue attracting creative and capable young people into science and technology, and introducing them to the important technologies of accelerators, detectors, and data acquisition and analysis - key roles in society that accelerator-based particle physics has historically played.

Apollinari, Giorgio; /Fermilab; Asner, David M.; /PNL, Richland; Baldini, Wander; /INFN, Ferrara; Bartoszek, Larry; Broemmelsiek, Daniel R.; Brown, Charles N.; /Fermilab; Chakravorty, Alak; /St. Xavier U., Chicago; Colas, Paul; /Saclay; Derwent, Paul; /Fermilab; Drutskoy, Alexey; /Moscow, ITEP; Fortner, Michael; /Northern Illinois U. /Saclay /Indian Inst. Tech., Hyderabad

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

BRAHMS: Conceptual design report. Forward angle and midrapidity hadron spectrometers at RHIC  

SciTech Connect

The Broad RAnge Hadron Magnetic Spectrometers experiment (BRAHMS) is designed to measure charged hadrons over a wide range of rapidity and transverse momentum for all available beams and energies. This conceptual design report describes the BRAHMS detector and how it will be installed and operated at RHIC. Chapter 2 presents an overview of the physics program to be achieved with the BRAHMS Experiment. This is followed in Chapter 3 by an overview of the detector systems, a description which is close to earlier designs but changed to reflect updates. The magnet design is reviewed in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 describes the requirements that the BRAHMS Experiment sets for the intersection region. The arguments for the proposed positioning of the two magnet arms are presented. The needed support buildings and their possible placements are discussed. Chapter 6 examines the requirements on the elements of the forward arm, and demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed combination of magnets and tracking detectors. Most of the detectors are small TPC`s, and several features of a prototoye TPC and the testing thereof are describes. The particle identification in BRAHMS is achieved by time-of-flight techniques and Cerenkov counters. This is describes in Chapter 7. The global detectors, i.e., the beam-beam counters and the multiplicity detector, are described next in Chapter 8. The concept for a centrality detector based on silicon strips is presented; a backup scheme employs an array of proportional gas counters. Considerations on data aquisition and triggers, as given next in Chapter 9, are fairly conventional and shoud not pose any major problems for development. The cost estimate for the experiment is given last; the total budget for BRAHMS is within the original goal.

BRAHMS Collaboration

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Magnetic fluorescent ballasts: Market data, market imperfections, and policy success  

SciTech Connect

Many economists have strongly questioned engineering-economic studies aimed at demonstrating anomalously slow diffusion of energy-efficient technology and the benefits of regulations to promote such technology. One argument against such studies is that standard techniques of engineering-economics are either inappropriate for or are routinely misapplied in assessing the performance of the market for energy efficiency. This paper presents engineering-economic evidence on the diffusion of energy efficiency improvements that takes account of such critiques. The authors examine the engineering and economic characteristics of standard and energy-efficient magnetic ballasts for fluorescent lighting. Efficient magnetic ballasts represented an excellent investment for 99% of the commercial building floor stock, and a moderately good investment for 0.7% of the commercial floor stock. Still, these ballasts were only being adopted in the 1980s at a rate commensurate with the enactment of appliance efficiency standards in various states. In this case, there is solid empirical evidence for skepticism about the effectiveness of the market mechanism in promoting cost-effective energy efficiency improvements as well as evidence of the benefits of regulation to counteract this shortcoming.

Koomey, J.G.; Sanstad, A.H.; Shown, L.J.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence for Material Verification in Dismantlement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is a well-established physical process that provides an isotope-specific signature that can be exploited for isotopic detection and characterization of samples. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has been investigating possible applications of NRF for national security. Of the investigated applications, the verification of material in the dismantlement process is the most promising. Through a combination of benchmarking measurements and radiation transport modeling, we have shown that NRF techniques with existing bremsstrahlung photon sources and a modest detection system can be used to detect highly enriched uranium in the quantities and time limits relevant to the dismantlement process. Issues such as orientation, placement and material geometry do not significantly impact the sensitivity of the technique. We have also investigated how shielding of the uranium would be observed through non-NRF processes to enable the accurate assay of the material. This paper will discuss our findings on how NRF and photon-interrogation techniques may be applied to the material verification in the dismantlement process.

Warren, Glen A.; Detwiler, Rebecca S.

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

Sick, V; Westbrook, C

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

On-site demonstration procedure for solid-state fluorescent ballast  

SciTech Connect

The report was presented to plant engineers and managers who were involved in an on-site demonstration of EETech solid-state ballasts for two 40-watt T12 fluorescent lamps. The report includes a brief review of the operating principles of solid-state fluorescent ballasts and the status of development achieved during the LBL program. The remainder of the test describes the techniques of managing and instrumenting a test area for assessing the performance of solid-state fluorescent ballasts at an occupied site.

Verderber, R.; Morse, O.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The effects of supply harmonics on the performance of compact fluorescent lamps  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a performance evaluation of ten compact fluorescent lighting systems operated with sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform conditions. The lamps were either provided with an electronic ballast, a magnetic core ballast or a magnetic core ballast with a power factor correction circuit. The test results show that the electrical performance of the compact fluorescent lamps for both sinusoidal and distorted voltage waveform operation is related to the different types of ballast used. The cost of operation of these compact fluorescent lamps was calculated and compared to the cost of a conventional 60 W incandescent lamp.

Arseneau, R.; Ouellette, M.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Scanning Lidar Based Atmospheric Monitoring for Fluorescent Detectors of Cosmic Showers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurements of the cosmic-ray air-shower fluorescence at extreme energies require precise knowledge of atmospheric conditions. The absolute calibration of the cosmic-ray energy depends on the absorption of fluorescence light between its origin and point of its detection. To reconstruct basic atmospheric parameters we review a novel analysis method based on two- and multi-angle measurements performed by the scanning backscatter lidar system. Applied inversion methods, optical depth, absorption and backscatter coefficient, as well as other parameters that enter the lidar equation are discussed in connection to the attenuation of the light traveling from shower to fluorescence detector.

A. Filipcic; M. Horvat; D. Veberic; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

453

HINODE/EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET IMAGING SPECTROMETER OBSERVATIONS OF THE TEMPERATURE STRUCTURE OF THE QUIET CORONA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a differential emission measure (DEM) analysis of the quiet solar corona on disk using data obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode. We show that the expected quiet-Sun DEM distribution can be recovered from judiciously selected lines, and that their average intensities can be reproduced to within 30%. We present a subset of these selected lines spanning the temperature range log T = 5.6-6.4 K that can be used to derive the DEM distribution reliably, including a subset of iron lines that can be used to derive the DEM distribution free of the possibility of uncertainties in the elemental abundances. The subset can be used without the need for extensive measurements, and the observed intensities can be reproduced to within the estimated uncertainty in the pre-launch calibration of EIS. Furthermore, using this subset, we also demonstrate that the quiet coronal DEM distribution can be recovered on size scales down to the spatial resolution of the instrument (1'' pixels). The subset will therefore be useful for studies of small-scale spatial inhomogeneities in the coronal temperature structure, for example, in addition to studies requiring multiple DEM derivations in space or time. We apply the subset to 45 quiet-Sun data sets taken in the period 2007 January to April, and show that although the absolute magnitude of the coronal DEM may scale with the amount of released energy, the shape of the distribution is very similar up to at least log T approx 6.2 K in all cases. This result is consistent with the view that the shape of the quiet-Sun DEM is mainly a function of the radiating and conducting properties of the plasma and is fairly insensitive to the location and rate of energy deposition. This universal DEM may be sensitive to other factors such as loop geometry, flows, and the heating mechanism, but if so they cannot vary significantly from quiet-Sun region to region.

Brooks, David H.; Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Code 7673, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Williams, David R. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Watanabe, Tetsuya, E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

454

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

455

ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds - Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer(tomlinson-uhsas)  

SciTech Connect

Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSASA) A major component of the Mid-latitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) field campaign was the deployment of an enhanced radiosonde array designed to capture the vertical profile of atmospheric state variables (pressure, temperature, humidity wind speed and wind direction) for the purpose of deriving the large-scale forcing for use in modeling studies. The radiosonde array included six sites (enhanced Central Facility [CF-1] plus five new sites) launching radiosondes at 3-6 hour sampling intervals. The network will cover an area of approximately (300)2 km2 with five outer sounding launch sites and one central launch location. The five outer sounding launch sites are: S01 Pratt, KS [ 37.7oN, 98.75oW]; S02 Chanute, KS [37.674, 95.488]; S03 Vici, Oklahoma [36.071, -99.204]; S04 Morris, Oklahoma [35.687, -95.856]; and S05 Purcell, Oklahoma [34.985, -97.522]. Soundings from the SGP Central Facility during MC3E can be retrieved from the regular ARM archive. During routine MC3E operations 4 radiosondes were launched from each of these sites (approx. 0130, 0730, 1330 and 1930 UTC). On days that were forecast to be convective up to four additional launches were launched at each site (approx. 0430, 1030, 1630, 2230 UTC). There were a total of approximately 14 of these high frequency launch days over the course of the experiment. These files contain brightness temperatures observed at Purcell during MC3E. The measurements were made with a 5 channel (22.235, 23.035, 23.835, 26.235, 30.000GHz) microwave radiometer at one minute intervals. The results have been separated into daily files and the day of observations is indicated in the file name. All observations were zenith pointing. Included in the files are the time variables base_time and time_offset. These follow the ARM time conventions. Base_time is the number seconds since January 1, 1970 at 00:00:00 for the first data point of the file and time_offset is the offset in seconds from base_time.

Jason Tomlinson; Mike Jensen

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence at MIT | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Spinoff Applications Spinoff Archives SBIR/STTR Applications of Nuclear Science and Technology Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » Spinoff Archives Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence at MIT Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Application/instrumentation: Material Identification and Object Imaging Using Nuclear Resonance Fluorescence Developed at: Massachusetts Institute of Technology

457

Turn-on fluorescent probes for detecting nitric oxide in biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Investigating the Biological Roles of Nitric Oxide and Other Reactive Nitrogen Species Using Fluorescent Probes: This chapter presents an overview of recent progress in the field of reactive nitrogen species ...

McQuade, Lindsey Elizabeth, 1981-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Metal-based turn-on fluorescent probes for nitric oxide sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chapter 1. Metal-Based Turn-On Fluorescent Probes for Sensing Nitric Oxide. Nitric oxide, a reactive free radical, regulates a variety of biological processes. The absence of tools to detect NO directly, rapidly, specifically ...

Lim, Mi Hee

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Antibody-Antigen assay design for combined optical tweezers and fluorescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recent development in combined optical trapping and fluorescence technology promises to enable unbindinig force studies of receptor-ligand interactions, whose specificity play a crucial role in the function of many ...

Ta, Jenny, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

High-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus helicase inhibitors using fluorescence-quenching phenomenon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a novel high-throughput screening assay of hepatitis C virus (HCV) nonstructural protein 3 (NS3) helicase inhibitors using the fluorescence-quenching phenomenon via photoinduced electron transfer between fluorescent dyes and guanine bases. We prepared double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) with a 5'-fluorescent-dye (BODIPY FL)-labeled strand hybridized with a complementary strand, the 3'-end of which has guanine bases. When dsDNA is unwound by helicase, the dye emits fluorescence owing to its release from the guanine bases. Our results demonstrate that this assay is suitable for quantitative assay of HCV NS3 helicase activity and useful for high-throughput screening for inhibitors. Furthermore, we applied this assay to the screening for NS3 helicase inhibitors from cell extracts of microorganisms, and found several cell extracts containing potential inhibitors.

Tani, Hidenori [Department of Life Science and Medical Bio-Science, Waseda University, 2-2 Wakamatsu-cho, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 162-8480 (Japan); Institute for Biological Resources and Functions, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 1-1-1