National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for fluid dynamics laboratory

  1. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code. Marine Hydrokinetic Module User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, Scott Carlton; Roberts, Jesse D.

    2014-03-01

    This document describes the marine hydrokinetic (MHK) input file and subroutines for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC), which is a combined hydrodynamic, sediment transport, and water quality model based on the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC) developed by John Hamrick [1], formerly sponsored by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and now maintained by Tetra Tech, Inc. SNL-EFDC has been previously enhanced with the incorporation of the SEDZLJ sediment dynamics model developed by Ziegler, Lick, and Jones [2-4]. SNL-EFDC has also been upgraded to more accurately simulate algae growth with specific application to optimizing biomass in an open-channel raceway for biofuels production [5]. A detailed description of the input file containing data describing the MHK device/array is provided, along with a description of the MHK FORTRAN routine. Both a theoretical description of the MHK dynamics as incorporated into SNL-EFDC and an explanation of the source code are provided. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the original EFDC [6] and sediment dynamics SNL-EFDC manuals [7]. Through this document, the authors provide information for users who wish to model the effects of an MHK device (or array of devices) on a flow system with EFDC and who also seek a clear understanding of the source code, which is available from staff in the Water Power Technologies Department at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  2. Sandia National Laboratories environmental fluid dynamics code : sediment transport user manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grace, Matthew D.; Thanh, Phi Hung X.; James, Scott Carlton

    2008-09-01

    This document describes the sediment transport subroutines and input files for the Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (SNL-EFDC). Detailed descriptions of the input files containing data from Sediment Erosion at Depth flume (SEDflume) measurements are provided along with the description of the source code implementing sediment transport. Both the theoretical description of sediment transport employed in SNL-EFDC and the source code are described. This user manual is meant to be used in conjunction with the EFDC manual (Hamrick 1996) because there will be no reference to the hydrodynamics in EFDC. Through this document, the authors aim to provide the necessary information for new users who wish to implement sediment transport in EFDC and obtain a clear understanding of the source code.

  3. Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code V. 1 0.0 (Beta)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-10-20

    The DOE has funded Sandia National Labs (SNL) to develop an open-source modeling tool to guide the design and layout of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) arrays to maximize power production while minimizing environmental effects. This modeling framework simulates flows through and around MHK arrays while quantifying environmental responses. As an augmented version of US EPA's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), SNL-EFDC includes: (1) a new module that simulates energy conversion (momentum withdrawal) by MHK devices with commensurate changes in the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, (2) new, advanced sediment dynamics routines, and (3) augmented water quality modules.

  4. Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code V. 1 0.0 (Beta)

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-10-20

    The DOE has funded Sandia National Labs (SNL) to develop an open-source modeling tool to guide the design and layout of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) arrays to maximize power production while minimizing environmental effects. This modeling framework simulates flows through and around MHK arrays while quantifying environmental responses. As an augmented version of US EPA's Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC), SNL-EFDC includes: (1) a new module that simulates energy conversion (momentum withdrawal) by MHK devices withmore » commensurate changes in the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate, (2) new, advanced sediment dynamics routines, and (3) augmented water quality modules.« less

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scour-tracc-cfd TRACC RESEARCH Computational Fluid Dynamics Computational Structural Mechanics Transportation Systems Modeling Computational Fluid Dynamics Overview of CFD: Video Clip with Audio Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research uses mathematical and computational models of flowing fluids to describe and predict fluid response in problems of interest, such as the flow of air around a moving vehicle or the flow of water and sediment in a river. Coupled with appropriate and prototypical

  6. Computational Fluid Dynamics Library

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-04

    CFDLib05 is the Los Alamos Computational Fluid Dynamics LIBrary. This is a collection of hydrocodes using a common data structure and a common numerical method, for problems ranging from single-field, incompressible flow, to multi-species, multi-field, compressible flow. The data structure is multi-block, with a so-called structured grid in each block. The numerical method is a Finite-Volume scheme employing a state vector that is fully cell-centered. This means that the integral form of the conservation lawsmore » is solved on the physical domain that is represented by a mesh of control volumes. The typical control volume is an arbitrary quadrilateral in 2D and an arbitrary hexahedron in 3D. The Finite-Volume scheme is for time-unsteady flow and remains well coupled by means of time and space centered fluxes; if a steady state solution is required, the problem is integrated forward in time until the user is satisfied that the state is stationary.« less

  7. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  8. The handbook of fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.W.

    1998-07-01

    This book provides professionals in the field of fluid dynamics with a comprehensive guide and resource. The book balances three traditional areas of fluid mechanics--theoretical, computational, and experimental--and expounds on basic science and engineering techniques. Each chapter introduces a topic, discusses the primary issues related to this subject, outlines approaches taken by experts, and supplies references for further information. Topics discussed include: (1) basic engineering fluid dynamics; (2) classical fluid dynamics; (3) turbulence modeling; (4) reacting flows; (5) multiphase flows; (6) flow and porous media; (7) high Reynolds number asymptotic theories; (8) finite difference method; (9) finite volume method; (10) finite element methods; (11) spectral element methods for incompressible flows; (12) experimental methods, such as hot-wire anemometry, laser-Doppler velocimetry, and flow visualization; and (13) applications, such as axial-flow compressor and fan aerodynamics, turbomachinery, airfoils and wings, atmospheric flows, and mesoscale oceanic flows.

  9. Incompressible Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-13

    NACHOS2 is a finite element program designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, incompressible viscous fluid flow problems. The basic flows considered may be isothermal, nonisothermal, or may involve other physical processes, such as mass transport. Both steady and transient flows may be analyzed. The class of problems treated are those described by the two-dimensional (plane or axisymmetric) incompressible form of the Navier-Stokes equations. An energy transport equation is included in the formulation for problems inmore » which heat transfer effects are important. Two auxiliary transport equations can be added to describe other physical processes,e.g. mass transfer, chemical reactions. Among the specific types of flow problems treated are: isothermal flow; forced, free, or mixed convection; conjugate heat transfer; flow in saturated porous media with or without heat transfer; and inelastic, non-Newtonian flows with or without heat transfer. Other problem classes are possible depending on the specific definitions applied to the auxiliary transport equations.« less

  10. Incompressible Viscous Fluid Dynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-13

    NACHOS2 is a finite element program designed for the analysis of two-dimensional, incompressible viscous fluid flow problems. The basic flows considered may be isothermal, nonisothermal, or may involve other physical processes, such as mass transport. Both steady and transient flows may be analyzed. The class of problems treated are those described by the two-dimensional (plane or axisymmetric) incompressible form of the Navier-Stokes equations. An energy transport equation is included in the formulation for problems inmore »which heat transfer effects are important. Two auxiliary transport equations can be added to describe other physical processes,e.g. mass transfer, chemical reactions. Among the specific types of flow problems treated are: isothermal flow; forced, free, or mixed convection; conjugate heat transfer; flow in saturated porous media with or without heat transfer; and inelastic, non-Newtonian flows with or without heat transfer. Other problem classes are possible depending on the specific definitions applied to the auxiliary transport equations.« less

  11. Nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of confined fluids...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    A nonequilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) ... in a single simulation upon compression, whereas fluid molecules in the bulk ... for weak fluid -- wall interactions. ...

  12. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a ``Berty`` autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  13. Effects of fluid dynamics on cleaning efficacy of supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Willcox, W.A.; Silva, L.J.; Butner, R.S.

    1993-03-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and Boeing Aerospace Company are developing a process to clean metal parts using a supercritical solvent. This work is part of an effort to address issues inhibiting the rapid commercialization of Supercritical Fluid Parts Cleaning (SFPC). PNL assembled a SFPC test stand to observe the relationship between the fluid dynamics of the system and the mass transfer of a contaminant from the surface of a contaminated metal coupon into the bulk fluid. The bench-scale test stand consists of a Berty'' autoclave modified for these tests and supporting hardware to achieve supercritical fluids parts cleaning. Three separate sets of tests were conducted using supercritical carbon dioxide. For the first two tests, a single stainless steel coupon was cleaned with organic solvents to remove surface residue, doped with a single contaminant, and then cleaned in the SFPC test stand. Contaminants studied were Dow Corning 200 fluid (dimethylpolysiloxane) and Castle/Sybron X-448 High-temperature Oil (a polybutane/mineral oil mixture). A set of 5-minute cleaning runs was conducted for each dopant at various autoclave impeller speeds. Test results from the first two sets of experiments indicate that precision cleaning for difficult-to-remove contaminants can be dramatically improved by introducing and increasing turbulence within the system. Metal coupons that had been previously doped with aircraft oil were used in a third set of tests. The coupons were placed in the SFPC test stand and subjected to different temperatures, pressures, and run times at a constant impeller speed. The cleanliness of each part was measured by Optically Stimulated Electron Emission. The third set of tests show that levels of cleanliness attained with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with solvent and aqueous cleaning levels.

  14. Final Report: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Combustion Dynamics, February 15, 1995 - February 14, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colella, Phillip

    1998-09-22

    The HPCC Grand Challenge Project on Computational Fluid Dynamics and Combustion Dynamics focuses on the development of advanced numerical methodologies for modeling realistic engineering problems in combustion and other areas of fluid dynamics. The project was a collaboration between two DOE Laboratories (LBNL and LANL) and two universities (University of California, Berkeley, and New York University). In this document, we report on the work done under the UC Berkeley portion of the grant.

  15. Fluid dynamic effects on precision cleaning with supercritical fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phelps, M.R.; Hogan, M.O.; Silva, L.J.

    1994-06-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory staff have assembled a small supercritical fluids parts cleaning test stand to characterize how system dynamics affect the efficacy of precision cleaning with supercritical carbon dioxide. A soiled stainless steel coupon, loaded into a ``Berty`` autoclave, was used to investigate how changes in system turbulence and solvent temperature influenced the removal of test dopants. A pulsed laser beam through a fiber optic was used to investigate real-time contaminant removal. Test data show that cleaning efficiency is a function of system agitation, solvent density, and temperature. These data also show that high levels of cleaning efficiency can generally be achieved with high levels of system agitation at relatively low solvent densities and temperatures. Agitation levels, temperatures, and densities needed for optimal cleaning are largely contaminant dependent. Using proper system conditions, the levels of cleanliness achieved with supercritical carbon dioxide compare favorably with conventional precision cleaning methods. Additional research is currently being conducted to generalize the relationship between cleaning performance and parameters such as contaminant solubilities, mass transfer rates, and solvent agitation. These correlations can be used to optimize cleaning performance, system design, and time and energy consumption for particular parts cleaning applications.

  16. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine ...

  17. ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 cfdroadmap.pdf (323.09 KB) More Documents & Publications 3-D ...

  18. computational-fluid-dynamics-student-thesis

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluid Dynamics Student Thesis Abstract DEVELOPMENT OF A THREE-DIMENSIONAL SCOURING METHODOLOGY AND ITS IMPLEMENTATION IN A COMMERCIAL CFD CODE FOR OPEN CHANNEL FLOW OVER A FLOODED BRIDGE DECK The Computational Fluid Dynamics staff at TRACC is supporting three students from Northern Illinois University who are working for a Masters degree. The CFD staff is directing the thesis research and working with them on three projects: (1) a three-dimensional scour computation methodology for pressure flow

  19. Fluid Dynamics and Solid Mechanics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Solid Mechanics Basic and applied research in theoretical continuum dynamics, modern hydrodynamic theory, materials modeling, global climate modeling, numerical...

  20. Computational fluid dynamics improves liner cementing operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barton, N.A.; Archer, G.L. ); Seymour, D.A. )

    1994-09-26

    The use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), an analytical tool for studying fluid mechanics, helped plan the successful cementing of a critical liner in a North Sea extended reach well. The results from CFD analysis increased the confidence in the primary cementing of the liner. CFD modeling was used to quantify the effects of increasing the displacement rate and of rotating the liner on the mud flow distribution in the annulus around the liner.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics in oil burner design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butcher, T.A.

    1997-09-01

    In Computational Fluid Dynamics, the differential equations which describe flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer are approximately solved using a very laborious numerical procedure. Flows of practical interest to burner designs are always turbulent, adding to the complexity of requiring a turbulence model. This paper presents a model for burner design.

  2. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J. 02 PETROLEUM; FLOW MODELS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; OIL WELLS; PETROLEUM; ROD PUMPS; SANDIA NATIONAL LABORATORIES Sucker...

  3. Large-Scale Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Large-Scale Computational Fluid Dynamics - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Dynamic Materials

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dynamic Materials Compressing materials under extreme conditions Pushing forward the frontiers of high-energy-density science Sandia Physicist, Marcus Knudson Sandia scientists are investigating the behavior of a wide-range of materials under the extreme conditions of very high pressures and densities. They seek the answers to such questions as: When do insulators become a metal? How strong do materials become when they are compressed? How and when do materials change their phase at very high

  5. Adjoints and Large Data Sets in Computational Fluid Dynamics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oana Marin Speaker(s) Title: Postdoctoral Appointee, MCS Optimal flow control and stability analysis are some of the fields within Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) that...

  6. Chombo-Crunch Sinks Its Teeth into Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Their work has yielded a high-performance computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and reactive ... Using CFD tools based on embedded boundary technology, Trebotich found that he could ...

  7. Molecular dynamics simulations of microscale fluid transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.C.; Lopez, A.R.; Stevens, M.J.; Plimpton, S.J.

    1998-02-01

    Recent advances in micro-science and technology, like Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), have generated a group of unique liquid flow problems that involve characteristic length scales of a Micron. Also, in manufacturing processes such as coatings, current continuum models are unable to predict microscale physical phenomena that appear in these non-equilibrium systems. It is suspected that in these systems, molecular-level processes can control the interfacial energy and viscoelastic properties at the liquid/solid boundary. A massively parallel molecular dynamics (MD) code has been developed to better understand microscale transport mechanisms, fluid-structure interactions, and scale effects in micro-domains. Specifically, this MD code has been used to analyze liquid channel flow problems for a variety of channel widths, e.g. 0.005-0.05 microns. This report presents results from MD simulations of Poiseuille flow and Couette flow problems and addresses both scaling and modeling issues. For Poiseuille flow, the numerical predictions are compared with existing data to investigate the variation of the friction factor with channel width. For Couette flow, the numerical predictions are used to determine the degree of slip at the liquid/solid boundary. Finally, the results also indicate that shear direction with respect to the wall lattice orientation can be very important. Simulation results of microscale Couette flow and microscale Poiseuille flow for two different surface structures and two different shear directions will be presented.

  8. State-of-the-art review of computational fluid dynamics modeling for fluid-solids systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyczkowski, R.W.; Bouillard, J.X.; Ding, J.; Chang, S.L.; Burge, S.W.

    1994-05-12

    As the result of 15 years of research (50 staff years of effort) Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), through its involvement in fluidized-bed combustion, magnetohydrodynamics, and a variety of environmental programs, has produced extensive computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software and models to predict the multiphase hydrodynamic and reactive behavior of fluid-solids motions and interactions in complex fluidized-bed reactors (FBRS) and slurry systems. This has resulted in the FLUFIX, IRF, and SLUFIX computer programs. These programs are based on fluid-solids hydrodynamic models and can predict information important to the designer of atmospheric or pressurized bubbling and circulating FBR, fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) and slurry units to guarantee optimum efficiency with minimum release of pollutants into the environment. This latter issue will become of paramount importance with the enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1995. Solids motion is also the key to understanding erosion processes. Erosion rates in FBRs and pneumatic and slurry components are computed by ANL`s EROSION code to predict the potential metal wastage of FBR walls, intervals, feed distributors, and cyclones. Only the FLUFIX and IRF codes will be reviewed in the paper together with highlights of the validations because of length limitations. It is envisioned that one day, these codes with user-friendly pre and post-processor software and tailored for massively parallel multiprocessor shared memory computational platforms will be used by industry and researchers to assist in reducing and/or eliminating the environmental and economic barriers which limit full consideration of coal, shale and biomass as energy sources, to retain energy security, and to remediate waste and ecological problems.

  9. Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar...

  10. Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar ...

  11. Fluid dynamic studies of blood splatter mechanisms | The Ames...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fluid dynamic studies of blood splatter mechanisms Blood is a common type of evidence found in violent crime scenes. The location and patterns of bloodstains are often used to...

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Emissions | Department of Energy Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of Diesel Engine Combustion and Emissions 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentations and Posters 2005_deer_reitz.pdf (682.47 KB) More Documents & Publications Experiments and Modeling of Two-Stage Combustion in Low-Emissions Diesel Engines Comparison of Conventional Diesel and Reactivity Controlled Compression

  13. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buren, Kendra L.; Canfield, Jesse M.; Hemez, Francois M.; Sauer, Jeremy A.

    2012-05-04

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  14. National laboratories` capabilities summaries for the DOE Virtual Center for Multiphase Dynamics (VCMD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joyce, E.L.

    1997-03-01

    The Virtual Center For Multiphase Dynamics (VCMD) integrates and develops the resources of industry, government, academia, and professional societies to enable reliable analysis in multiphase computational fluid dynamics. The primary means of the VCMD focus will be by the creation, support, and validation of a computerized simulation capability for multiphase flow and multiphase flow applications. This paper briefly describes the capabilities of the National Laboratories in this effort.

  15. Chombo-Crunch Sinks Its Teeth into Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chombo-Crunch Sinks Its Teeth into Fluid Dynamics Chombo-Crunch Sinks Its Teeth into Fluid Dynamics Decade of Development Yields Novel Code for Energy, Oil & Gas, Aerospace May 11, 2015 Contact: Kathy Kincade, +1 510 495 2124, kkincade@lbl.gov chombocrunch1 Using Chombo-Crunch to study turbulent flow past a sphere could help aerospace engineers optimize takeoff and landing patterns through more accurate prediction of aircraft wakes. Simulation: David Trebotich; VisIt For more than a decade,

  16. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Binary Fluid in a Nanochannel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullick, Shanta; Ahluwalia, P. K. [Department of Physics, Himachal Pradesh University, SummerHill, Shimla - 171005 (India); Pathania, Y. [Chitkara University, Atal Shiksha Kunj, Atal Nagar, Barotiwala, Dist Solan, Himachal Pradesh - 174103 (India)

    2011-12-12

    This paper presents the results from a molecular dynamics simulation of binary fluid (mixture of argon and krypton) in the nanochannel flow. The computational software LAMMPS is used for carrying out the molecular dynamics simulations. Binary fluids of argon and krypton with varying concentration of atom species were taken for two densities 0.65 and 0.45. The fluid flow takes place between two parallel plates and is bounded by horizontal walls in one direction and periodic boundary conditions are imposed in the other two directions. To drive the flow, a constant force is applied in one direction. Each fluid atom interacts with other fluid atoms and wall atoms through Week-Chandler-Anderson (WCA) potential. The velocity profile has been looked at for three nanochannel widths i.e for 12{sigma}, 14{sigma} and 16{sigma} and also for the different concentration of two species. The velocity profile of the binary fluid predicted by the simulations agrees with the quadratic shape of the analytical solution of a Poiseuille flow in continuum theory.

  17. Nonequilibrium chiral fluid dynamics including dissipation and noise

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nahrgang, Marlene; Herold, Christoph; Bleicher, Marcus; Leupold, Stefan

    2011-08-15

    We present a consistent theoretical approach for the study of nonequilibrium effects in chiral fluid dynamics within the framework of the linear {sigma} model with constituent quarks. Treating the quarks as an equilibrated heat bath, we use the influence functional formalism to obtain a Langevin equation for the {sigma} field. This allows us to calculate the explicit form of the damping coefficient and the noise correlators. For a self-consistent derivation of both the dynamics of the {sigma} field and the quark fluid, we have to employ the 2PI (two-particle irreducible) effective action formalism. The energy dissipation from the field to the fluid is treated in the exact formalism of the 2PI effective action where a conserved energy-momentum tensor can be constructed. We derive its form and comment on approximations generating additional terms in the energy-momentum balance of the entire system.

  18. Laboratory and Field Experimental Studies of CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) | Department of Energy Laboratory and Field Experimental Studies of CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Laboratory and Field Experimental Studies of CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Project objectives: obtain basic information on the performance of CO2-based EGS; and enhance and calibrate modeling capabilities for such systems. reservoir_pruess_co2_transmission.pdf (634.11 KB) More

  19. Channelized fluid flow through shear zones during fluid-enhanced dynamic recrystallization, Northern Apennines, Italy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, K.E.; Dworkin, S.I. )

    1990-08-01

    Geochemical and petrographic studies of the Triassic Portoro limestone of the Tuscan nappe in Liguria, Italy, indicate that fluid flow was channeled through interlayered bedding-parallel shear zones during Miocene shearing and low-grade metamorphism. Carbon, oxygen, and strontium isotopic compositions and trace element concentrations in the Portoro indicate that it was precipitated from normal marine waters. In sheared and unsheared layers these isotopic compositions are indistinguishable, yet sheared layers of microspar contain less than half the amount of strontium preserved in undeformed layers. Wavy grain boundaries and a dimensional preferred orientation of elongated grains indicate that calcite within sheared zones was dynamically recrystallized. On the basis of these observations we suggest that during burial, extraformational fluids were buffered into oxygen isotopic, but not strontium-concentration, equilibrium with the Portoro. These syndeformational fluids were channeled through discrete 1- to 15-cm-thick shear zones in which strontium was expelled from calcite and incorporated into grain-boundary fluids during dynamic recrystallization.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics & Large-Scale Uncertainty Quantification for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind Energy Fluid Dynamics & Large-Scale Uncertainty Quantification for Wind Energy - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li

    2008-05-15

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong Fan

    2006-08-09

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section

  3. Dynamic Studies of Lung Fluid Clearance with Phase Contrast Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitchen, Marcus J.; Williams, Ivan; Irvine, Sarah C.; Morgan, Michael J.; Paganin, David M.; Lewis, Rob A.; Pavlov, Konstantin; Hooper, Stuart B.; Wallace, Megan J.; Siu, Karen K. W.; Yagi, Naoto; Uesugi, Kentaro

    2007-01-19

    Clearance of liquid from the airways at birth is a poorly understood process, partly due to the difficulties of observing and measuring the distribution of air within the lung. Imaging dynamic processes within the lung in vivo with high contrast and spatial resolution is therefore a major challenge. However, phase contrast X-ray imaging is able to exploit inhaled air as a contrast agent, rendering the lungs of small animals visible due to the large changes in the refractive index at air/tissue interfaces. In concert with the high spatial resolution afforded by X-ray imaging systems (<100 {mu}m), propagation-based phase contrast imaging is ideal for studying lung development. To this end we have utilized intense, monochromatic synchrotron radiation, together with a fast readout CCD camera, to study fluid clearance from the lungs of rabbit pups at birth. Local rates of fluid clearance have been measured from the dynamic sequences using a single image phase retrieval algorithm.

  4. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokkam, Ram

    2012-01-01

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  5. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.

    1999-02-01

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  6. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  7. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L.

    2007-12-25

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  8. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous

  9. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  10. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    UM,SUKKEE; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

    2000-02-11

    A transient, multi-dimensional model has been developed to simulate proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells. The model accounts simultaneously for electrochemical kinetics, current distribution, hydrodynamics and multi-component transport. A single set of conservation equations valid for flow channels, gas-diffusion electrodes, catalyst layers and the membrane region are developed and numerically solved using a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique. The numerical model is validated against published experimental data with good agreement. Subsequently, the model is applied to explore hydrogen dilution effects in the anode feed. The predicted polarization cubes under hydrogen dilution conditions are found to be in qualitative agreement with recent experiments reported in the literature. The detailed two-dimensional electrochemical and flow/transport simulations further reveal that in the presence of hydrogen dilution in the fuel stream, hydrogen is depleted at the reaction surface resulting in substantial kinetic polarization and hence a lower current density that is limited by hydrogen transport from the fuel stream to the reaction site.

  11. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, Robert; Prahl, Duncan; Lange, Rich

    2013-12-01

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  12. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Because it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.

  13. PArallel Reacting Multiphase FLOw Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2002-06-01

    PARMFLO is a parallel multiphase reacting flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. It can perform steady or unsteady simulations in three space dimensions. It is intended for use in engineering CFD analysis of industrial flow system components. Its parallel processing capabilities allow it to be applied to problems that use at least an order of magnitude more computational cells than the number that can be used on a typical single processor workstation (about 106 cellsmore » in parallel processing mode versus about io cells in serial processing mode). Alternately, by spreading the work of a CFD problem that could be run on a single workstation over a group of computers on a network, it can bring the runtime down by an order of magnitude or more (typically from many days to less than one day). The software was implemented using the industry standard Message-Passing Interface (MPI) and domain decomposition in one spatial direction. The phases of a flow problem may include an ideal gas mixture with an arbitrary number of chemical species, and dispersed droplet and particle phases. Regions of porous media may also be included within the domain. The porous media may be packed beds, foams, or monolith catalyst supports. With these features, the code is especially suited to analysis of mixing of reactants in the inlet chamber of catalytic reactors coupled to computation of product yields that result from the flow of the mixture through the catalyst coaled support structure.« less

  14. A hybrid numerical fluid dynamics code for resistive magnetohydrodynamics

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-04-01

    Spasmos is a computational fluid dynamics code that uses two numerical methods to solve the equations of resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flows in compressible, inviscid, conducting media[1]. The code is implemented as a set of libraries for the Python programming language[2]. It represents conducting and non-conducting gases and materials with uncomplicated (analytic) equations of state. It supports calculations in 1D, 2D, and 3D geometry, though only the 1D configuation has received significant testing to date. Becausemore » it uses the Python interpreter as a front end, users can easily write test programs to model systems with a variety of different numerical and physical parameters. Currently, the code includes 1D test programs for hydrodynamics (linear acoustic waves, the Sod weak shock[3], the Noh strong shock[4], the Sedov explosion[5], magnetic diffusion (decay of a magnetic pulse[6], a driven oscillatory "wine-cellar" problem[7], magnetic equilibrium), and magnetohydrodynamics (an advected magnetic pulse[8], linear MHD waves, a magnetized shock tube[9]). Spasmos current runs only in a serial configuration. In the future, it will use MPI for parallel computation.« less

  15. Technical Review of the CENWP Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of the John Day Dam Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) has developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the John Day forebay on the Columbia River to aid in the development and design of alternatives to improve juvenile salmon passage at the John Day Project. At the request of CENWP, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrology Group has conducted a technical review of CENWP's CFD model run in CFD solver software, STAR-CD. PNNL has extensive experience developing and applying 3D CFD models run in STAR-CD for Columbia River hydroelectric projects. The John Day forebay model developed by CENWP is adequately configured and validated. The model is ready for use simulating forebay hydraulics for structural and operational alternatives. The approach and method are sound, however CENWP has identified some improvements that need to be made for future models and for modifications to this existing model.

  16. A Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi Flegrei Caldera Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Mechanical...

  17. Tracking interface and common curve dynamics for two-fluid flow...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Tracking interface and common curve dynamics for two-fluid flow in porous media This content will become publicly available on April 29, 2017 Title: Tracking interface and common ...

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics-Aided Analysis of a Hydride Vapor...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Research Org: NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)) Sponsoring Org: USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Solar ...

  19. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics for the Spallation Neutron Source liquid mercury target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, M.W.; Siman-Tov, M.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high-power accelerator-based pulsed spallation source being designed by a multilaboratory team led by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to achieve high fluxes of neutrons for scientific experiments. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is being used to analyze the SNS design. The liquid-mercury target is subjected to the neutronic (internal) heat generation that results from the proton collisions with the mercury nuclei. The liquid mercury simultaneously serves as the neutronic target medium, transports away the heat generated within itself, and cools the metallic target structure. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots. These zones exist because the most feasible target designs include a complete U-turn flow redirection. Although the primary concern is that the target is adequately cooled, the pressure drop from inlet to outlet must also be considered because pressure drop directly affects structural loading and required pumping power. Based on the current design, a three-dimensional CFD model has been developed that includes the stainless steel target structure, the liquid-mercury target flow, and the liquid-mercury cooling jacket that wraps around the nose of the target.

  20. Thrust 1: Structure and Dynamics of Simple Fluid-Solid Interfaces (Peter T. Cumm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thrust 1: Structure and Dynamics of Simple Fluid-Solid Interfaces (Peter T. Cummings, Vanderbilt University, Thrust Leader). This thrust integrate multiscale computational modeling and novel experimental probes of interfacial fluid properties at 'simple' interfaces, such as planar, cylindrical, and spherical surfaces, parallel slit and cylindrical pores, etc. which can be rigorously modeled with the minimum incorporation of simplifying approximations and assumptions. Such simple interfaces are

  1. Dynamic stability of a spinning tube conveying a fluid through a symmetrical noncircular cross-section

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benedetti, G.A.

    1990-11-01

    When a fluid flows inside a tube, the deformations of the tube can interact with the fluid flowing within it and these dynamic interactions can result in significant lateral motions of the tube and the flowing fluid. The purpose of this report is to examine the dynamic stability of a spinning tube through which an incompressible frictionless fluid is flowing. The tube can be considered as either a hollow beam or a hollow cable. The analytical results can be applied to spinning or stationary tubes through which fluids are transferred; e.g., liquid coolants, fuels and lubricants, slurry solutions, and high explosives in paste form. The coupled partial differential equations are determined for the lateral motion of a spinning Bernoulli-Euler beam or a spinning cable carrying an incompressible flowing fluid. The beam, which spins about an axis parallel to its longitudinal axis and which can also be loaded by a constant axial force, is straight, uniform, simply supported, and rests on a massless, uniform elastic foundation that spins with the beam. Damping for the beam and foundation is considered by using a combined uniform viscous damping coefficient. The fluid, in addition to being incompressible, is frictionless, has a constant density, and flows at a constant speed relative to the longitudinal beam axis. The Galerkin method is used to reduce the coupled partial differential equations for the lateral motion of the spinning beam to a coupled set of 2N, second order, ordinary differential equations for the generalized beam coordinates. By simplifying these equations and examining the roots of the characteristic equation, an analytical solution is obtained for the lateral dynamic instability of the beam (or cable). The analytical solutions determined the minimum critical fluid speed and the critical spin speeds, for a specified fluid speed, in terms of the physical parameters of the system.

  2. Nevada Work Instruction Laboratory Dynamic Rock/Soil Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Schweppe; T.R. Scotese

    2005-08-29

    This procedure defines processes for performance and reporting of geotechnical laboratory tests supporting geotechnical investigations.

  3. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. D. Nichols; C. Mller; G. A. Necker; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; K. L. Lam; P. Royl; T. L. Wilson

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III

  4. Code System for Two-Dinensional Sn-Neutronics and Fluid Dynamics.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-07-28

    Version 00 SIMMERII is designed to predict the neutronic and fluid-dynamic behavior of an LMFBR during a hypothetical core-disruptive accident. Cross sections depend on temperature and background cross sections. The structure, liquid, and vapor fields are modeled to predict the fluid-dynamic behavior of the reactor. Each field consists of density components to follow the material motion and energy components to predict the material temperatures. For typical accident calculations, the materials are fertile fuel, fissile fuel,more » stainless steel, sodium, control material, and fission gas. Heat, mass, and momentum transfer among the three fields and their components are calculated.« less

  5. SNL-EFDC (Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code) v. 0.0 beta

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-06-16

    formulations (Hamrick and Moustafa, 1995a). The model provides output formatted to yield transport fields for water quality models, including WASP5 and CE-QUAL-ICM. Unique features of EFDC are its ability to simulate wetting and drying cycles, it includes a near field mixing zone model that is fully coupled with a far field transport of salinity, temperature, sediment, contaminant, and eutrophication variables. It also contains hydraulic structure representation, vegetative resistance, and Lagrangian particle tracking. EFDC accepts radiation stress fields from wave refraction-diffraction models, thus allowing the simulation of longshore currents and sediment transport.” The following describes Sandia’s contribution to EFDC, which is called SNL-EFDC, the software considered in this document: Sandia National Laboratories Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code is a modified version of the EPA’s code described above. It has been updated to include dynamic memory, bug fixes, improved current- and wave-induced shear stress calculations, and greatly improved sediment dynamics and water quality routines.« less

  6. Computational Methods for Analyzing Fluid Flow Dynamics from Digital Imagery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luttman, A.

    2012-03-30

    The main goal (long term) of this work is to perform computational dynamics analysis and quantify uncertainty from vector fields computed directly from measured data. Global analysis based on observed spatiotemporal evolution is performed by objective function based on expected physics and informed scientific priors, variational optimization to compute vector fields from measured data, and transport analysis proceeding with observations and priors. A mathematical formulation for computing flow fields is set up for computing the minimizer for the problem. An application to oceanic flow based on sea surface temperature is presented.

  7. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei, E-mail: jwchu@nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K. [Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Richland, Washington 99372 (United States)

    2014-11-07

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ? in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ?-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ?-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ?-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 , the ?-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  8. Dynamics of a confined dusty fluid in a sheared ion flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laishram, Modhuchandra; Sharma, Devendra; Kaw, Predhiman K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-07-15

    Dynamics of an isothermally driven dust fluid is analyzed which is confined in an azimuthally symmetric cylindrical setup by an effective potential and is in equilibrium with an unconfined sheared flow of a streaming plasma. Cases are analyzed where the confining potential constitutes a barrier for the driven fluid, limiting its spatial extension and boundary velocity. The boundary effects entering the formulation are characterized by applying the appropriate boundary conditions and a range of solutions exhibiting single and multiple vortex are obtained. The equilibrium solutions considered in the cylindrical setup feature a transition from single to multiple vortex state of the driven flow. Effects of (i) the variation in dust viscosity, (ii) coupling between the driving and the driven fluid, and (iii) a friction determining the equilibrium dynamics of the driven system are characterized.

  9. Fluid dynamic modeling of nano-thermite reactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martirosyan, Karen S.; Zyskin, Maxim; Jenkins, Charles M.; Horie, Yasuyuki

    2014-03-14

    This paper presents a direct numerical method based on gas dynamic equations to predict pressure evolution during the discharge of nanoenergetic materials. The direct numerical method provides for modeling reflections of the shock waves from the reactor walls that generates pressure-time fluctuations. The results of gas pressure prediction are consistent with the experimental evidence and estimates based on the self-similar solution. Artificial viscosity provides sufficient smoothing of shock wave discontinuity for the numerical procedure. The direct numerical method is more computationally demanding and flexible than self-similar solution, in particular it allows study of a shock wave in its early stage of reaction and allows the investigation of “slower” reactions, which may produce weaker shock waves. Moreover, numerical results indicate that peak pressure is not very sensitive to initial density and reaction time, providing that all the material reacts well before the shock wave arrives at the end of the reactor.

  10. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; Griffith, C.; Hedges, S.; Dilmore, R.; Goodman, A.; Black, J.; Haese, R.; Deusner, C.; Bigalke, N.; Haeckel, M.; Fischer, S.; Liebscher, A.; Icenhower, J. P.; Daval, D.; Saldi, G. D.; Knauss, K. G.; Schmidt, M.; Mito, S.; Sorai, M.; Truche, L.

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in composition of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.

  11. Tracking interface and common curve dynamics for two-fluid flow in porous media

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mcclure, James E.; Miller, Cass T.; Gray, W. G.; Berrill, Mark A.

    2016-04-29

    Pore-scale studies of multiphase flow in porous medium systems can be used to understand transport mechanisms and quantitatively determine closure relations that better incorporate microscale physics into macroscale models. Multiphase flow simulators constructed using the lattice Boltzmann method provide a means to conduct such studies, including both the equilibrium and dynamic aspects. Moving, storing, and analyzing the large state space presents a computational challenge when highly-resolved models are applied. We present an approach to simulate multiphase flow processes in which in-situ analysis is applied to track multiphase flow dynamics at high temporal resolution. We compute a comprehensive set of measuresmore » of the phase distributions and the system dynamics, which can be used to aid fundamental understanding and inform closure relations for macroscale models. The measures computed include microscale point representations and macroscale averages of fluid saturations, the pressure and velocity of the fluid phases, interfacial areas, interfacial curvatures, interface and common curve velocities, interfacial orientation tensors, phase velocities and the contact angle between the fluid-fluid interface and the solid surface. Test cases are studied to validate the approach and illustrate how measures of system state can be obtained and used to inform macroscopic theory.« less

  12. LANL Shock Tube Kathy Prestridge Extreme Fluids Team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Header image FLUID DYNAMICS at Los Alamos Extreme Fluids Team in Physics Division home the team research publications pictures diversity contact The Extreme Fluids Team On the P-23 Extreme Fluids Team at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we apply high-resolution diagnostics to study fluid dynamics problems in extreme environments, such as shock-driven mixing, multiphase flows, and variable-density turbulence. The team is composed of Los Alamos staff, postdocs, and students. EXPERIMENTAL FACILITIES

  13. Liquid phase fluid dynamic (methanol) run in the LaPorte alternative fuels development unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharat L. Bhatt

    1997-05-01

    A fluid dynamic study was successfully completed in a bubble column at DOE's Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU) in LaPorte, Texas. Significant fluid dynamic information was gathered at pilot scale during three weeks of Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOJP) operations in June 1995. In addition to the usual nuclear density and temperature measurements, unique differential pressure data were collected using Sandia's high-speed data acquisition system to gain insight on flow regime characteristics and bubble size distribution. Statistical analysis of the fluctuations in the pressure data suggests that the column was being operated in the churn turbulent regime at most of the velocities considered. Dynamic gas disengagement experiments showed a different behavior than seen in low-pressure, cold-flow work. Operation with a superficial gas velocity of 1.2 ft/sec was achieved during this run, with stable fluid dynamics and catalyst performance. Improvements included for catalyst activation in the design of the Clean Coal III LPMEOH{trademark} plant at Kingsport, Tennessee, were also confirmed. In addition, an alternate catalyst was demonstrated for LPMEOH{trademark}.

  14. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  15. Structures and Dynamics in Condensed Systems | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Structures and Dynamics in Condensed Systems Research Personnel Updates Publications The (Solidification) Path of Least Resistance Read More Finding the Hidden Order in Disordered Materials Read More Finding Order Amid the Chaos Read More Previous Pause Next Synthesis The research effort proposed here entails bringing simulation methods together with theory and critical experiments to investigate structural selection dynamics in highly driven systems. Building on our past efforts aimed at

  16. Nanoscopic dynamics of phospholipid in unilamellar vesicles: Effect of gel to fluid phase transition

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sharma, V. K.; Mamontov, E.; Anunciado, D. B.; O’Neill, H.; Urban, V.

    2015-03-04

    Dynamics of phospholipids in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) is of interest in biology, medical, and food sciences since these molecules are widely used as biocompatible agents and a mimic of cell membrane systems. We have investigated the nanoscopic dynamics of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid in ULV as a function of temperature using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer, which is a critical advantage of neutron scattering techniques, allows the detailed analysis of the lipid motions that cannot be carried out by other means. In agreement with a differential scanning calorimetry measurement, amore » sharp rise in the elastic scattering intensity below ca. 296 K indicates a phase transition from the high-temperature fluid phase to the low-temperature solid gel phase. The microscopic lipid dynamics exhibits qualitative differences between the solid gel phase (in a measurement at 280 K) and the fluid phase (in a measurement at a physiological temperature of 310 K). The data analysis invariably shows the presence of two distinct motions: the whole lipid molecule motion within a monolayer, or lateral diffusion, and the relatively faster internal motion of the DMPC molecule. The lateral diffusion of the whole lipid molecule is found to be Fickian in character, whereas the internal lipid motions are of localized character, consistent with the structure of the vesicles. The lateral motion slows down by an order of magnitude in the solid gel phase, whereas for the internal motion not only the time scale, but also the character of the motion changes upon the phase transition. In the solid gel phase, the lipids are more ordered and undergo uniaxial rotational motion. However, in the fluid phase, the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails undergo confined translation diffusion rather than uniaxial rotational diffusion. The localized translational diffusion of the hydrogen

  17. Nanoscopic Dynamics of Phospholipid in Unilamellar Vesicles: Effect of Gel to Fluid Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Veerendra K [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Anunciado, Divina B [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Dynamics of phospholipids in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) is of interest in biology, medical, and food sciences since these molecules are widely used as biocompatible agents and a mimic of cell membrane systems. We have investigated the nanoscopic dynamics of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid in ULV as a function of temperature using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer, which is a critical advantage of neutron scattering techniques, allows the detailed analysis of the lipid motions that cannot be carried out by other means. In agreement with a differential scanning calorimetry measurement, a sharp rise in the elastic scattering intensity below ca. 296 K indicates a phase transition from the high-temperature fluid phase to the low-temperature solid gel phase. The microscopic lipid dynamics exhibits qualitative differences between the solid gel phase (in a measurement at 280 K) and the fluid phase (in a measurement at a physiological temperature of 310 K). The data analysis invariably shows the presence of two distinct motions: the whole lipid molecule motion within a monolayer, or lateral diffusion, and the relatively faster internal motion of the DMPC molecule. The lateral diffusion of the whole lipid molecule is found to be Fickian in character, whereas the internal lipid motions are of localized character, consistent with the structure of the vesicles. The lateral motion slows down by an order of magnitude in the solid gel phase, whereas for the internal motion not only the time scale, but also the character of the motion changes upon the phase transition. In the solid gel phase, the lipids are more ordered and undergo uniaxial rotational motion. However, in the fluid phase, the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails undergo confined translation diffusion rather than uniaxial rotational diffusion. The localized translational diffusion of the hydrogen atoms of

  18. Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Methods for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Fractured and Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Meakin; Zhijie Xu

    2008-06-01

    Particle methods are much less computationally efficient than grid based numerical solution of the Navier Stokes equation, and they have been used much less extensively, particularly for engineering applications. However, they have important advantages for some applications. These advantages include rigorous mast conservation, momentum conservation and isotropy. In addition, there is no need for explicit interface tracking/capturing. Code development effort is relatively low, and it is relatively simple to simulate flows with moving boundaries. In addition, it is often quite easy to include coupling of fluid flow with other physical phenomena such a phase separation. Here we describe the application of three particle methods: molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. While these methods were developed to simulate fluids and other materials on three quite different scales the molecular, meso and continuum scales, they are very closely related from a computational point of view. The mesoscale (between the molecular and continuum scales) dissipative particle dynamics method can be used to simulate systems that are too large to simulate using molecular dynamics but small enough for thermal fluctuations to play an important role. Important examples include polymer solutions, gels, small particle suspensions and membranes. In these applications inter particle and intra molecular hydrodynamic interactions are automatically included

  19. Energy dynamics and current sheet structure in fluid and kinetic simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makwana, K. D. Cattaneo, F.; Zhdankin, V.; Li, H.; Daughton, W.

    2015-04-15

    Simulations of decaying magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are performed with a fluid and a kinetic code. The initial condition is an ensemble of long-wavelength, counter-propagating, shear-Alfvén waves, which interact and rapidly generate strong MHD turbulence. The total energy is conserved and the rate of turbulent energy decay is very similar in both codes, although the fluid code has numerical dissipation, whereas the kinetic code has kinetic dissipation. The inertial range power spectrum index is similar in both the codes. The fluid code shows a perpendicular wavenumber spectral slope of k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.3}. The kinetic code shows a spectral slope of k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.5} for smaller simulation domain, and k{sub ⊥}{sup −1.3} for larger domain. We estimate that collisionless damping mechanisms in the kinetic code can account for the dissipation of the observed nonlinear energy cascade. Current sheets are geometrically characterized. Their lengths and widths are in good agreement between the two codes. The length scales linearly with the driving scale of the turbulence. In the fluid code, their thickness is determined by the grid resolution as there is no explicit diffusivity. In the kinetic code, their thickness is very close to the skin-depth, irrespective of the grid resolution. This work shows that kinetic codes can reproduce the MHD inertial range dynamics at large scales, while at the same time capturing important kinetic physics at small scales.

  20. Application of computational fluid dynamics to regional dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract of the rat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimbell, J.S.; Gross, E.A.; Joyner, D.R.; Godo, M.N.; Morgan, K.T. (Chemical Industry Institute of Toxicology, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1993-08-01

    For certain inhaled air pollutants, such as reactive, water soluble gases, the distribution of nasal lesions observed in F344 rats may be closely related to regional gas uptake patterns in the nose. These uptake patterns can be influenced by the currents of air flowing through the upper respiratory tract during the breathing cycle. Since data on respiratory tract lesions in F344 rats are extrapolated to humans to make predictions of risk to human health, a better understanding of the factors affecting these responses is needed. To assess potential effects of nasal airflow on lesion location and severity, a methodology was developed for creation of computer simulations of steady-state airflow and gas transport using a three-dimensional finite element grid reconstructed from serial step-sections of the nasal passages of a male F344 rat. Simulations on a supercomputer used the computational fluid dynamics package FIDAP (FDI, Evanston, IL). Distinct streams of bulk flow evident in the simulations matched inspiratory streams reported for the F344 rat. Moreover, simulated regional flow velocities matched measured velocities in concurrent laboratory experiments with a hollow nasal mold. Computer-predicted flows were used in simulations of gas transport to nasal passage walls, with formaldehyde as a test case. Results from the uptake simulations were compared with the reported distribution of formaldehyde-induced nasal lesions observed in the F344 rat, and indicated that airflow-driven uptake patterns probably play an important role in determining the location of certain nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde. This work demonstrated the feasibility of applying computational fluid dynamics to airflow-driven dosimetry of inhaled chemicals in the upper respiratory tract.

  1. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO₂ - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; et al

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO₂-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO₂ a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in compositionmore » of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.« less

  2. DARK FLUID: A UNIFIED FRAMEWORK FOR MODIFIED NEWTONIAN DYNAMICS, DARK MATTER, AND DARK ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Hongsheng; Li Baojiu E-mail: b.li@damtp.cam.ac.u

    2010-03-20

    Empirical theories of dark matter (DM) like modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) gravity and of dark energy (DE) like f(R) gravity were motivated by astronomical data. But could these theories be branches rooted from a more general and hence generic framework? Here we propose a very generic Lagrangian of such a framework based on simple dimensional analysis and covariant symmetry requirements, and explore various outcomes in a top-down fashion. The desired effects of quintessence plus cold DM particle fields or MOND-like scalar field(s) are shown to be largely achievable by one vector field only. Our framework preserves the covariant formulation of general relativity, but allows the expanding physical metric to be bent by a single new species of dark fluid flowing in spacetime. Its non-uniform stress tensor and current vector are simple functions of a vector field with variable norm, not coupled with the baryonic fluid and the four-vector potential of the photon fluid. The dark fluid framework generically branches into a continuous spectrum of theories with DE and DM effects, including the f(R) gravity, tensor-vector-scalar-like theories, Einstein-Aether, and nuLAMBDA theories as limiting cases. When the vector field degenerates into a pure scalar field, we obtain the physics for quintessence. Choices of parameters can be made to pass Big Bang nucleosynthesis, parameterized post-Newtonian, and causality constraints. In this broad setting we emphasize the non-constant dynamical field behind the cosmological constant effect, and highlight plausible corrections beyond the classical MOND predictions.

  3. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the VHTR Lower Plenum Standard Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 ºC to perhaps 1000 ºC. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is being considered for safety analysis for existing and future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present report presents results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made.

  4. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    performance computer system installed at Los Alamos National Laboratory June 17, 2014 Unclassified 'Wolf' system to advance many fields of science LOS ALAMOS, N.M., June 17, 2014-Los Alamos National Laboratory recently installed a new high-performance computer system, called Wolf, which will be used for unclassified research. "This machine modernizes our mid-tier resources available to Laboratory scientists," said Bob Tomlinson, of the Laboratory's High Performance Computing group.

  5. Application of biological design criteria and computational fluid dynamics to investigate fish survival in Kaplan turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, Laura A.; Fisher, Jr., Richard K.; Sale, Michael J.; Cada, Glenn

    2002-07-01

    One of the contributing factors to fish injury in a turbine environment is shear stress. This paper presents the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to display and quantify areas of elevated shear stress in the Wanapum Kaplan turbine operating at four different flow conditions over its operating range. CFD observations will be compared to field test observations at the same four flow conditions. Methods developed here could be used to facilitate the design of turbines and related water passages with lower risks of fish injury.

  6. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  7. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P.; Ermak, Donald

    2006-02-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

  8. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  9. Experimental Validation Data for Computational Fluid Dynamics of Forced Convection on a Vertical Flat Plate

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Harris, Jeff R.; Lance, Blake W.; Smith, Barton L.

    2015-08-10

    We present computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation dataset for turbulent forced convection on a vertical plate. The design of the apparatus is based on recent validation literature and provides a means to simultaneously measure boundary conditions (BCs) and system response quantities (SRQs). Important inflow quantities for Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS). CFD are also measured. Data are acquired at two heating conditions and cover the range 40,000 < Rex < 300,000, 357 < Reδ2 < 813, and 0.02 < Gr/Re2 < 0.232.

  10. Erosion Evaluation of a Slurry Mixer Tank with Computational Fluid Dynamics Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S

    2006-03-22

    This paper discusses the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods to understand and characterize erosion of the floor and internal structures in the slurry mixing vessels in the Defense Waste Processing Facility. An initial literature survey helped identify the principal drivers of erosion for a solids laden fluid: the solids content of the working fluid, the regions of recirculation and particle impact with the walls, and the regions of high wall shear. A series of CFD analyses was performed to characterize slurry-flow profiles, wall shear, and particle impingement distributions in key components such as coil restraints and the vessel floor. The calculations showed that the primary locations of high erosion resulting from abrasion were at the leading edge of the coil guide, the tank floor below the insert plate of the coil guide support, and the upstream lead-in plate. These modeling results based on the calculated high shear regions were in excellent agreement with the observed erosion sites in both location and the degree of erosion. Loss of the leading edge of the coil guide due to the erosion damage during the slurry mixing operation did not affect the erosion patterns on the tank floor. Calculations for a lower impeller speed showed similar erosion patterns but significantly reduced wall shear stresses.

  11. Internal air flow analysis of a bladeless micro aerial vehicle hemisphere body using computational fluid dynamic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Othman, M. N. K. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Zuradzman, M. Razlan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Hazry, D. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Khairunizam, Wan E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Shahriman, A. B. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Yaacob, S. E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; Ahmed, S. Faiz E-mail: zuradzman@unimap.edu.my E-mail: khairunizam@unimap.edu.my E-mail: s.yaacob@unimap.edu.my E-mail: abadal@unimap.edu.my; and others

    2014-12-04

    This paper explain the analysis of internal air flow velocity of a bladeless vertical takeoff and landing (VTOL) Micro Aerial Vehicle (MAV) hemisphere body. In mechanical design, before produce a prototype model, several analyses should be done to ensure the product's effectiveness and efficiency. There are two types of analysis method can be done in mechanical design; mathematical modeling and computational fluid dynamic. In this analysis, I used computational fluid dynamic (CFD) by using SolidWorks Flow Simulation software. The idea came through to overcome the problem of ordinary quadrotor UAV which has larger size due to using four rotors and the propellers are exposed to environment. The bladeless MAV body is designed to protect all electronic parts, which means it can be used in rainy condition. It also has been made to increase the thrust produced by the ducted propeller compare to exposed propeller. From the analysis result, the air flow velocity at the ducted area increased to twice the inlet air. This means that the duct contribute to the increasing of air velocity.

  12. The fluid dynamics of a miniature dilution tunnel for internal-combustion engine aerosol measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kommer, Eric M.; Puzinauskas, Paulius V.; Buckley, Steven G.

    2007-11-15

    This paper investigates the fluid dynamics of a particular mini-dilution tunnel using LDV, flow visualization, a tracer sample technique and CFD. The mini-dilution tunnel studied had a 3.175 mm inside diameter tube discharging on the centerline of the tunnel where the diameter increases in a single step to 7.62 cm. The large diameter portion of the tunnel was 75 cm long. Most of the testing was performed at a flow rate of 15 l/min. The experimental investigation indicates that the flow field in the particular dilution tunnel tested has a persistent jet throughout its length, and this confined jet creates eddy recirculation zones which may cause the temperature and dilution histories of particles trapped in these eddies to be significantly different than particles which remain in the jet until extracted by the sample probe. Similarly, the location of the sample probe could also affect measured size distribution profiles, particularly if it were moved in or out of the path of the persistent jet. In addition to the simple tunnel geometry with a single abrupt expansion, a conical diffuser and a perforated plate were separately tested to investigate their effects on the tunnel fluid dynamics. The particular diffuser tested appeared to cause the jet to stall and therefore led to an even more unpredictable path for the fluid within. Limited testing with the perforated plate indicated that it increased the jet deceleration and laminarization, and therefore could lead to a more predictable flow path for aerosol sampled from the tunnel. (author)

  13. Reactor physics simulations with coupled Monte Carlo calculation and computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seker, V.; Thomas, J. W.; Downar, T. J.; Purdue Univ.

    2007-01-01

    A computational code system based on coupling the Monte Carlo code MCNP5 and the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code STAR-CD was developed as an audit tool for lower order nuclear reactor calculations. This paper presents the methodology of the developed computer program 'McSTAR'. McSTAR is written in FORTRAN90 programming language and couples MCNP5 and the commercial CFD code STAR-CD. MCNP uses a continuous energy cross section library produced by the NJOY code system from the raw ENDF/B data. A major part of the work was to develop and implement methods to update the cross section library with the temperature distribution calculated by STARCD for every region. Three different methods were investigated and implemented in McSTAR. The user subroutines in STAR-CD are modified to read the power density data and assign them to the appropriate variables in the program and to write an output data file containing the temperature, density and indexing information to perform the mapping between MCNP and STAR-CD cells. Preliminary testing of the code was performed using a 3x3 PWR pin-cell problem. The preliminary results are compared with those obtained from a STAR-CD coupled calculation with the deterministic transport code DeCART. Good agreement in the k{sub eff} and the power profile was observed. Increased computational capabilities and improvements in computational methods have accelerated interest in high fidelity modeling of nuclear reactor cores during the last several years. High-fidelity has been achieved by utilizing full core neutron transport solutions for the neutronics calculation and computational fluid dynamics solutions for the thermal-hydraulics calculation. Previous researchers have reported the coupling of 3D deterministic neutron transport method to CFD and their application to practical reactor analysis problems. One of the principal motivations of the work here was to utilize Monte Carlo methods to validate the coupled deterministic neutron

  14. Wanapum Dam Advanced Hydro Turbine Upgrade Project: Part 2 - Evaluation of Fish Passage Test Results Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dresser, Thomas J.; Dotson, Curtis L.; Fisher, Richard K.; Graf, Michael J.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Mathur, Dilip; Heisey, Paul G.

    2007-10-10

    This paper, the second part of a 2 part paper, discusses the use of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to gain further insight into the results of fish release testing conducted to evaluate the modifications made to upgrade Unit 8 at Wanapum Dam. Part 1 discusses the testing procedures and fish passage survival. Grant PUD is working with Voith Siemens Hydro (VSH) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) of DOE and Normandeau Associates in this evaluation. VSH has prepared the geometry for the CFD analysis corresponding to the four operating conditions tested with Unit 9, and the 5 operating conditions tested with Unit 8. Both VSH and PNNL have conducting CFD simulations of the turbine intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, turbine blades and draft tube of the units. Primary objectives of the analyses were: determine estimates of where the inserted fish passed the turbine components determine the characteristics of the flow field along the paths calculated for pressure, velocity gradients and acceleration associated with fish sized bodies determine the velocity gradients at the structures where fish to structure interaction is predicted. correlate the estimated fish location of passage with observed injuries correlate the calculated pressure and acceleration with the information recorded with the sensor fish utilize the results of the analysis to further interpret the results of the testing. This paper discusses the results of the CFD analyses made to assist the interpretation of the fish test results.

  15. The effect of nonlinear thermo-fluid-dynamic terms on free-piston Stirling machine stability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benvenuto, G.; Monte, F. de

    1996-12-31

    In this work a new linearization technique of the dynamic balance equations of a free-piston Stirling machine is developed. It takes into account the nonlinear thermo-fluid-dynamic terms inherent in the machine, although keeping the linearity of the differential dynamic equations. This allows the equations of motion to be solved still analytically and, therefore, useful algebraic relations (already established by the authors in past studies) linking together the various machine parameters to be used. The advantages related to the proposed linearization methodology are the following: (1) it gives a right interpretation of the machine working when the operational parameters vary, because the considered nonlinear terms have a stabilizing effect; (2) it can be used to predict the machine performance not only with more accuracy, but especially in a more exhaustive way, allowing to estimate also the piston stroke and, therefore, the delivered power; (3) it enables to design the machine in such a way to enhance its stability, thus eliminating the necessity of power control systems.

  16. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Builders place final beam in first phase of CMRR project at Los Alamos National Laboratory July 22, 2008 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, July 22, 2008- Workers hoisted the final steel beam ...

  17. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forest fire near Los Alamos National Laboratory June 26, 2011 Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 26, 2011, 6:07pm-The Las Conchas fire burning in the Jemez Mountains approximately 12...

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  19. Circulating fluidized bed hydrodynamics experiments for the multiphase fluid dynamics research consortium (MFDRC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oelfke, John Barry; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tortora, Paul Richard; Bhusarapu, Satish; Trujillo, Steven Mathew

    2006-08-01

    An experimental program was conducted to study the multiphase gas-solid flow in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). This report describes the CFB experimental facility assembled for this program, the diagnostics developed and/or applied to make measurements in the riser section of the CFB, and the data acquired for several different flow conditions. Primary data acquired included pressures around the flow loop and solids loadings at selected locations in the riser. Tomographic techniques using gamma radiation and electrical capacitance were used to determine radial profiles of solids volume fraction in the riser, and axial profiles of the integrated solids volume fraction were produced. Computer Aided Radioactive Particle Tracking was used to measure solids velocities, fluxes, and residence time distributions. In addition, a series of computational fluid dynamics simulations was performed using the commercial code Arenaflow{trademark}.

  20. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS BASED INVESTIGATION OF SENSITIVITY OF FURNACE OPERATIONAL CONDITIONS TO BURNER FLOW CONTROLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Cremer; Zumao Chen; Dave Wang; Paul Wolff

    2004-06-01

    This is the extended second Semiannual Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-02NT41580. The goal of this project is to systematically assess the sensitivity of furnace operational conditions to burner air and fuel flows in coal fired utility boilers. Our approach is to utilize existing baseline furnace models that have been constructed using Reaction Engineering International's (REI) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Using CFD analyses provides the ability to carry out a carefully controlled virtual experiment to characterize the sensitivity of NOx emissions, unburned carbon (UBC), furnace exit CO (FECO), furnace exit temperature (FEGT), and waterwall deposition to burner flow controls. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is providing co-funding for this program, and instrument and controls experts from EPRI's Instrument and Controls (I&C) Center are active participants in this project. This program contains multiple tasks and good progress is being made on all fronts.

  1. A complex systems analysis of stick-slip dynamics of a laboratory fault

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, David M.; Tordesillas, Antoinette; Small, Michael; Behringer, Robert P.; Tse, Chi K.

    2014-03-15

    We study the stick-slip behavior of a granular bed of photoelastic disks sheared by a rough slider pulled along the surface. Time series of a proxy for granular friction are examined using complex systems methods to characterize the observed stick-slip dynamics of this laboratory fault. Nonlinear surrogate time series methods show that the stick-slip behavior appears more complex than a periodic dynamics description. Phase space embedding methods show that the dynamics can be locally captured within a four to six dimensional subspace. These slider time series also provide an experimental test for recent complex network methods. Phase space networks, constructed by connecting nearby phase space points, proved useful in capturing the key features of the dynamics. In particular, network communities could be associated to slip events and the ranking of small network subgraphs exhibited a heretofore unreported ordering.

  2. Dynamical theory of strongly coupled two-dimensional Coulomb fluids in the weakly degenerate quantum domain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Mukunda P.; Golden, Kenneth I.; Green, Frederick

    2001-10-01

    We study the problem of dynamical response and plasma mode dispersion in strongly coupled two-dimensional Coulomb fluids (2DCFs) in the weakly degenerate quantum domain. Adapting the nonlinear response function approach of Golden and Kalman [Phys. Rev. A 19, 2112 (1979)] to the 2DCF, we construct a self-consistent approximation scheme for the calculation of the density response functions and plasma mode dispersion at long wavelengths. The basic ingredients in the construction are (i) the first kinetic equation in the Bogoliubov-Born-Green-Kirkwood-Yvon hierarchy, (ii) the velocity-average-approximation (VAA) hypothesis, (iii) the quadratic fluctuation-dissipation theorem, and (iv) the dynamical superposition approximation (DSA) closure hypothesis. The reliability of the VAA-DSA theory can be assessed by observing that the principal coupling correction to the 2D temperature-dependent Lindhard function is identified as being precisely the part of the third-frequency-moment sum-rule coefficient proportional to the potential energy.

  3. The Application of System Dynamics to the Integration of National Laboratory Research and K-12 Education

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, James Ignatius; Zounar Harbour, Elda D

    2001-08-01

    The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) is dedicated to finding solutions to problems related to the environment, energy, economic competitiveness, and national security. In an effort to attract and retain the expertise needed to accomplish these challenges, the INEEL is developing a program of broad educational opportunities that makes continuing education readily available to all laboratory employees, beginning in the K–12 environment and progressing through post-graduate education and beyond. One of the most innovative educational approaches being implemented at the laboratory is the application of STELLA© dynamic learning environments, which facilitate captivating K–12 introductions to the complex energy and environmental challenges faced by global societies. These simulations are integrated into lesson plans developed by teachers in collaboration with INEEL scientists and engineers. This approach results in an enjoyable and involved learning experience, and an especially positive introduction to the application of science to emerging problems of great social and environmental consequence.

  4. Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mexican pueblo preserves cultural history through collaborative tours with Los Alamos National Laboratory August 24, 2015 Students gain new insights into their ancestry LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Aug. 24, 2015-San Ildefonso Pueblo's Summer Education Enhancement Program brought together academic and cultural learning in the form of a recent tour of Cave Kiva Trail in Mortandad Canyon."Opening up this archaeological site and sharing it with the descendants of its first inhabitants is a

  5. Phantom-based experimental validation of computational fluid dynamics simulations on cerebral aneurysms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Qi; Groth, Alexandra; Bertram, Matthias; Waechter, Irina; Bruijns, Tom; Hermans, Roel; Aach, Til

    2010-09-15

    Purpose: Recently, image-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation has been applied to investigate the hemodynamics inside human cerebral aneurysms. The knowledge of the computed three-dimensional flow fields is used for clinical risk assessment and treatment decision making. However, the reliability of the application specific CFD results has not been thoroughly validated yet. Methods: In this work, by exploiting a phantom aneurysm model, the authors therefore aim to prove the reliability of the CFD results obtained from simulations with sufficiently accurate input boundary conditions. To confirm the correlation between the CFD results and the reality, virtual angiograms are generated by the simulation pipeline and are quantitatively compared to the experimentally acquired angiograms. In addition, a parametric study has been carried out to systematically investigate the influence of the input parameters associated with the current measuring techniques on the flow patterns. Results: Qualitative and quantitative evaluations demonstrate good agreement between the simulated and the real flow dynamics. Discrepancies of less than 15% are found for the relative root mean square errors of time intensity curve comparisons from each selected characteristic position. The investigated input parameters show different influences on the simulation results, indicating the desired accuracy in the measurements. Conclusions: This study provides a comprehensive validation method of CFD simulation for reproducing the real flow field in the cerebral aneurysm phantom under well controlled conditions. The reliability of the CFD is well confirmed. Through the parametric study, it is possible to assess the degree of validity of the associated CFD model based on the parameter values and their estimated accuracy range.

  6. Study of ebullated bed fluid dynamics for H-Coal. Quarterly progress report No. 1, July 1-September 30, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, R. J.; Rundell, D. N.

    1980-12-01

    Cold flow experiments were completed with kerosene, nitrogen, and HDS-2A (3/16'' length) catalyst. Percent bed expansion, gas/liquid/catalyst holdups, and drift fluxes were determined for each test. Fluid dynamics data were obtained at HRI during Run PDU-10 (Wyodak coal and Amocat-1A catalyst). Reactor liquid samples were taken for later viscosity determination. A 6'' diameter test stand for bubble coalescence experiments was constructed and delivered to Northwestern University. A search was initiated to select suitable model fluids.

  7. Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

    2013-07-01

    With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

  8. AFDM: An advanced fluid-dynamics model. Volume 6: EOS-AFDM interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henneges, G.; Kleinheins, S.

    1994-01-01

    This volume of the Advanced Fluid-Dynamics Model (AFDM) documents the modeling of the equation of state (EOS) in the code. The authors present an overview of the basic concepts underlying the thermodynamics modeling and resulting EOS, which is a set of relations between the thermodynamic properties of materials. The AFDM code allows for multiphase-multimaterial systems, which they explore in three phase models: two-material solid, two-material liquid, and three-material vapor. They describe and compare two ways of specifying the EOS of materials: (1) as simplified analytic expressions, or (2) as tables that precisely describe the properties of materials and their interactions for mechanical equilibrium. Either of the two EOS models implemented in AFDM can be selected by specifying the option when preprocessing the source code for compilation. Last, the authors determine thermophysical properties such as surface tension, thermal conductivities, and viscosities in the model for the intracell exchanges of AFDM. Specific notations, routines, EOS data, plots, test results, and corrections to the code are available in the appendices.

  9. Simulation of spray drying in superheated steam using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frydman, A.; Vasseur, J.; Ducept, F.; Sionneau, M.; Moureh, J.

    1999-09-01

    This paper presents a numerical simulation and experimental validation of a spray dryer using superheated steam instead of air as drying medium, modeled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The model describes momentum, heat and mass transfer between two phases--a discrete phase of droplets, and a continuous gas phase--through a finite volume method. For the simulation, droplet size distribution is represented by 6 discrete classes of diameter, fitting to the experimental distribution injected from the nozzle orifice, taking into account their peculiar shrinkage during drying. This model is able to predict the most important features of the dryer: fields of gas temperature and gas velocity inside the chamber, droplets trajectories and eventual deposits on to the wall. The results of simulation are compared to a pilot scale dryer, using water. In the absence of risk of power ignition in steam, the authors have tested rather high steam inlet temperature (973K), thus obtaining a high volumic efficiency. The model is validated by comparison between experimental and predicted values of temperature inside the chamber, verifying the coupling between the 3 different types of transfer without adjustment. This type of model can be used for chamber design, or scale up. Using superheated steam instead of air in a spray dryer can allow a high volumic evaporation rate (20 k.h.m{sup 3}), high energy recovery and better environment control.

  10. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 1: Theory and Computational Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nichols, B.D.; Mueller, C.; Necker, G.A.; Travis, J.R.; Spore, J.W.; Lam, K.L.; Royl, P.; Redlinger, R.; Wilson, T.L.

    1998-10-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containments and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior (1) in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and (2) during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included

  11. Prediction of critical heat flux in water-cooled plasma facing components using computational fluid dynamics.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullock, James H.; Youchison, Dennis Lee; Ulrickson, Michael Andrew

    2010-11-01

    Several commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes now have the capability to analyze Eulerian two-phase flow using the Rohsenow nucleate boiling model. Analysis of boiling due to one-sided heating in plasma facing components (pfcs) is now receiving attention during the design of water-cooled first wall panels for ITER that may encounter heat fluxes as high as 5 MW/m2. Empirical thermalhydraulic design correlations developed for long fission reactor channels are not reliable when applied to pfcs because fully developed flow conditions seldom exist. Star-CCM+ is one of the commercial CFD codes that can model two-phase flows. Like others, it implements the RPI model for nucleate boiling, but it also seamlessly transitions to a volume-of-fluid model for film boiling. By benchmarking the results of our 3d models against recent experiments on critical heat flux for both smooth rectangular channels and hypervapotrons, we determined the six unique input parameters that accurately characterize the boiling physics for ITER flow conditions under a wide range of absorbed heat flux. We can now exploit this capability to predict the onset of critical heat flux in these components. In addition, the results clearly illustrate the production and transport of vapor and its effect on heat transfer in pfcs from nucleate boiling through transition to film boiling. This article describes the boiling physics implemented in CCM+ and compares the computational results to the benchmark experiments carried out independently in the United States and Russia. Temperature distributions agreed to within 10 C for a wide range of heat fluxes from 3 MW/m2 to 10 MW/m2 and flow velocities from 1 m/s to 10 m/s in these devices. Although the analysis is incapable of capturing the stochastic nature of critical heat flux (i.e., time and location may depend on a local materials defect or turbulence phenomenon), it is highly reliable in determining the heat flux where boiling instabilities begin

  12. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  13. Consequences of Urban Stability Conditions for Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations of Urban Dispersion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lundquist, J K; Chan, S T

    2005-11-30

    The validity of omitting stability considerations when simulating transport and dispersion in the urban environment is explored using observations from the Joint URBAN 2003 field experiment and computational fluid dynamics simulations of that experiment. Four releases of sulfur hexafluoride, during two daytime and two nighttime intensive observing periods, are simulated using the building-resolving computational fluid dynamics model, FEM3MP to solve the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with two options of turbulence parameterizations. One option omits stability effects but has a superior turbulence parameterization using a non-linear eddy viscosity (NEV) approach, while the other considers buoyancy effects with a simple linear eddy viscosity (LEV) approach for turbulence parameterization. Model performance metrics are calculated by comparison with observed winds and tracer data in the downtown area, and with observed winds and turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) profiles at a location immediately downwind of the central business district (CBD) in the area we label as the urban shadow. Model predictions of winds, concentrations, profiles of wind speed, wind direction, and friction velocity are generally consistent with and compare reasonably well with the field observations. Simulations using the NEV turbulence parameterization generally exhibit better agreement with observations. To further explore this assumption of a neutrally-stable atmosphere within the urban area, TKE budget profiles slightly downwind of the urban wake region in the 'urban shadow' are examined. Dissipation and shear production are the largest terms which may be calculated directly. The advection of TKE is calculated as a residual; as would be expected downwind of an urban area, the advection of TKE produced within the urban area is a very large term. Buoyancy effects may be neglected in favor of advection, shear production, and dissipation. For three of the IOPs, buoyancy production may

  14. Heat Transfer Laboratory | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Heat Transfer Laboratory Materials in solids or fluid forms play an important role in a ... Argonne's Heat Transfer Laboratory enables researchers to: Synthesize and prepare heat ...

  15. Laboratory development and field application of a novel water-based drill-in fluid for geopressured horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, J.W.; Harrison, J.C.; Hale, A.H.

    1996-12-31

    Research has identified a novel water-based drill-in fluid for drilling and completing geopressured horizontal wells. This fluid has a unique combination of properties which make it especially suitable for geopressured applications. They include the use of calcium and/or zinc bromide as a base brine, minimal concentration of calcium carbonate as bridging material, low plastic viscosity, tight fluid loss control, good filter cake properties, and excellent return permeability. This drill-in fluid has been used successfully to drill a 1,200 foot production interval, 4.75 inch diameter wellbore in the Gulf of Mexico with a system weight of 13.2 lbm/gal, bottom hole temperature of 185{degrees} F., and a 1400 to 1700 psi overbalance. The system functioned very well in both the drilling and completion operations. Fluid rheology was easily maintainable and the hole conditions were excellent without torque or drag problems. Initial production data suggests that the well is producing at expected rates with low drawdown pressure.

  16. Large-Scale Condensed Matter and Fluid Dynamics Simulations in Three

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Diverse Areas: Part II: Molecular Dynamics Study of Clay-Polymer Nanocomposites | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility Snapshot from a molecular dynamics simulation of a system containing 16 isolated clay sheets immersed in a polymer melt. , Snapshot from a molecular dynamics simulation of an isolated clay platelet (consisting of two sheets) immersed in water. Top image: Snapshot from a molecular dynamics simulation of a system containing 16 isolated clay sheets immersed in a polymer melt.

  17. validation and Enhancement of Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer Predictive Capabilities for Generation IV Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert E. Spall; Barton Smith; Thomas Hauser

    2008-12-08

    Nationwide, the demand for electricity due to population and industrial growth is on the rise. However, climate change and air quality issues raise serious questions about the wisdom of addressing these shortages through the construction of additional fossil fueled power plants. In 1997, the President's Committee of Advisors on Science and Technology Energy Research and Development Panel determined that restoring a viable nuclear energy option was essential and that the DOE should implement a R&D effort to address principal obstacles to achieving this option. This work has addressed the need for improved thermal/fluid analysis capabilities, through the use of computational fluid dynamics, which are necessary to support the design of generation IV gas-cooled and supercritical water reactors.

  18. Computational Fluid Dynamics Based Investigation of Sensitivity of Furnace Operational Conditions to Burner Flow Controls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marc Cremer; Dave Wang; Connie Senior; Andrew Chiodo; Steven Hardy; Paul Wolff

    2005-07-01

    This is the Final Technical Report for DOE Cooperative Agreement No: DE-FC26-02NT41580. The goal of this project was to systematically assess the sensitivity of furnace operational conditions to burner air and fuel flows in coal fired utility boilers. The focus of this project was to quantify the potential impacts of ''fine level'' controls rather than that of ''coarse level'' controls (i.e. combustion tuning). Although it is well accepted that combustion tuning will generally improve efficiency and emissions of an ''out of tune'' boiler, it is not as well understood what benefits can be derived through active multiburner measurement and control systems in boiler that has coarse level controls. The approach used here was to utilize existing baseline furnace models that have been constructed using Reaction Engineering International's (REI) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. Using CFD analyses provides the ability to carry out a carefully controlled virtual experiment to characterize the sensitivity of NOx emissions, unburned carbon (UBC), furnace exit CO (FECO), furnace exit temperature (FEGT), and waterwall deposition to burner air and fuel flow rates. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) provided co-funding for this program, and instrument and controls experts from EPRI's Instrument and Controls (I&C) Center have been active participants in this project. CFD simulations were completed for five coal fired boilers as planned: (1) 150 MW wall fired, (2) 500 MW opposed wall fired, (3) 600 MW T-Fired, (4) 330 MW cyclone-fired, and (5) 200 MW T-Fired Twin Furnace. In all cases, the unit selections were made in order to represent units that were descriptive of the utility industry as a whole. For each unit, between 25 and 44 furnace simulations were completed in order to evaluate impacts of burner to burner variations in: (1) coal and primary air flow rate, and (2) secondary air flow rate. The parametric matrices of cases that were completed were

  19. Dissipative Particle Dynamics and Other Particle Methods for Multiphase Fluid Flow in Fractured and Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Meakin; Zhijie Xu

    2009-08-01

    Particle methods are less computationally efficient than grid based numerical solution of the Navier Stokes equation. However, they have important advantages including rigorous mass conservation, momentum conservation and isotropy. In addition, there is no need for explicit interface tracking/capturing and code development effort is relatively low. We describe applications of three particle methods: molecular dynamics, dissipative particle dynamics and smoothed particle hydrodynamics. The mesoscale (between the molecular and continuum scales) dissipative particle dynamics method can be used to simulate systems that are too large to simulate using molecular dynamics but small enough for thermal fluctuations to play an important role.

  20. Code System to Calculate Transient 2-Dimensional 2-Fluid Flow Dynamics.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-07-19

    Version 00 The transient dynamics of two-dimensional, two-phase flow with interfacial exchange are calculated at all flow speeds. Each phase is described in terms of its own density, velocity, and temperature. Separate sets of field equations govern the gas and liquid phase dynamics. The six field equations for the two phases couple through mass, momentum, and energy exchange.

  1. Computational fluid dynamics analysis of a wire-feed, high-velocity oxygen-fuel (HVOF) thermal spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Hassan, B.; Oberkampf, W.L.; Neiser, R.A.; Roemer, T.J.

    1996-09-01

    The fluid and particle dynamics of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch are analyzed using computational and experimental techniques. Three-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire (DJRW) torch. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Premixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled using a single-step finite-rate chemistry model with a total of 9 gas species which includes dissociation of combustion products. A continually-fed steel wire passes through the center of the nozzle and melting occurs at a conical tip near the exit of the aircap. Wire melting is simulated computationally by injecting liquid steel particles into the flow field near the tip of the wire. Experimental particle velocity measurements during wire feed were also taken using a Laser Two-Focus (L2F) velocimeter system. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and particle velocity predictions are compared with experimental measurements outside of the aircap.

  2. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-07-06

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  3. Environmentally safe fluid extractor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sungaila, Zenon F.

    1993-01-01

    An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

  4. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study

  5. Fully-Implicit Orthogonal Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin for Fluid Dynamics with Phase Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nourgaliev, R.; Luo, H.; Weston, B.; Anderson, A.; Schofield, S.; Dunn, T.; Delplanque, J. -P.

    2015-11-11

    A new reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin (rDG) method, based on orthogonal basis/test functions, is developed for fluid flows on unstructured meshes. Orthogonality of basis functions is essential for enabling robust and efficient fully-implicit Newton-Krylov based time integration. The method is designed for generic partial differential equations, including transient, hyperbolic, parabolic or elliptic operators, which are attributed to many multiphysics problems. We demonstrate the method’s capabilities for solving compressible fluid-solid systems (in the low Mach number limit), with phase change (melting/solidification), as motivated by applications in Additive Manufacturing (AM). We focus on the method’s accuracy (in both space and time), as well as robustness and solvability of the system of linear equations involved in the linearization steps of Newton-based methods. The performance of the developed method is investigated for highly-stiff problems with melting/solidification, emphasizing the advantages from tight coupling of mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, as well as orthogonality of basis functions, which leads to better conditioning of the underlying (approximate) Jacobian matrices, and rapid convergence of the Krylov-based linear solver.

  6. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2013-12-21

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-? equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-? approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  7. Fully-Implicit Orthogonal Reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin for Fluid Dynamics with Phase Change

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nourgaliev, R.; Luo, H.; Weston, B.; Anderson, A.; Schofield, S.; Dunn, T.; Delplanque, J. -P.

    2015-11-11

    A new reconstructed Discontinuous Galerkin (rDG) method, based on orthogonal basis/test functions, is developed for fluid flows on unstructured meshes. Orthogonality of basis functions is essential for enabling robust and efficient fully-implicit Newton-Krylov based time integration. The method is designed for generic partial differential equations, including transient, hyperbolic, parabolic or elliptic operators, which are attributed to many multiphysics problems. We demonstrate the method’s capabilities for solving compressible fluid-solid systems (in the low Mach number limit), with phase change (melting/solidification), as motivated by applications in Additive Manufacturing (AM). We focus on the method’s accuracy (in both space and time), as wellmore » as robustness and solvability of the system of linear equations involved in the linearization steps of Newton-based methods. The performance of the developed method is investigated for highly-stiff problems with melting/solidification, emphasizing the advantages from tight coupling of mass, momentum and energy conservation equations, as well as orthogonality of basis functions, which leads to better conditioning of the underlying (approximate) Jacobian matrices, and rapid convergence of the Krylov-based linear solver.« less

  8. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo

    2014-11-07

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (templating effect). In turn, the first layer induces a molding effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  9. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-10-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  10. Laboratory evaluation of dynamic traffic assignment systems: Requirements, framework, and system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miaou, S.-P.; Pillai, R.S.; Summers, M.S.; Rathi, A.K.; Lieu, H.C.

    1997-01-01

    The success of Advanced Traveler Information 5ystems (ATIS) and Advanced Traffic Management Systems (ATMS) depends on the availability and dissemination of timely and accurate estimates of current and emerging traffic network conditions. Real-time Dynamic Traffic Assignment (DTA) systems are being developed to provide the required timely information. The DTA systems will provide faithful and coherent real-time, pre-trip, and en-route guidance/information which includes routing, mode, and departure time suggestions for use by travelers, ATIS, and ATMS. To ensure the credibility and deployment potential of such DTA systems, an evaluation system supporting all phases of DTA system development has been designed and presented in this paper. This evaluation system is called the DTA System Laboratory (DSL). A major component of the DSL is a ground- truth simulator, the DTA Evaluation System (DES). The DES is envisioned to be a virtual representation of a transportation system in which ATMS and ATIS technologies are deployed. It simulates the driving and decision-making behavior of travelers in response to ATIS and ATMS guidance, information, and control. This paper presents the major evaluation requirements for a DTA Systems, a modular modeling framework for the DES, and a distributed DES design. The modeling framework for the DES is modular, meets the requirements, can be assembled using both legacy and independently developed modules, and can be implemented as a either a single process or a distributed system. The distributed design is extendible, provides for the optimization of distributed performance, and object-oriented design within each distributed component. A status report on the development of the DES and other research applications is also provided.

  11. Exploring the effect of fluid dynamics and kinetic mechanisms on n-heptane autoignition in transient jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viggiano, Annarita [Department of Environmental Engineering and Physics, University of Basilicata, viale dell'Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza (Italy)

    2010-02-15

    The influence of physical parameters and of flow patterns on the prediction of n-heptane ignition dynamic in transient reacting n-heptane jets, in high pressure environment under laminar conditions, has been explored by using different kinetic mechanisms. Some preliminary transient laminar flamelet computations have been performed, thus showing that the sensitivity of the ignition time to strain rate depends on the kinetic mechanism used. Therefore, the structure of the reacting jet, in particular the localization of ignition spots, is investigated. The results show that, if the initial temperature of the reacting mixture is out of the intermediate range (800-1000 K) towards lower values, the fluid dynamics has an essential role. In this case, the ignition delay time is almost insensitive to the specific kinetic mechanism adopted, conversely it is severely shortened by increasing the streamwise velocity. The burning spot is located in the core of fuel roll-up, where low values of scalar dissipation rate occur. Nevertheless, the most reactive mixture fraction conditions are well predicted by chemical kinetics, as they are in good agreement with those computed for the one-dimensional diffusion layer. When the initial temperature of fuel and air is increased in the intermediate range, ignition is strongly dependent on the kinetic mechanism used. In these cases, the choice of an accurate chemical scheme is fundamental in order to obtain reliable results. (author)

  12. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of chemical looping combustion process with calcium sulphate oxygen carrier - article no. A19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhongyi Deng; Qilei Song

    2009-07-01

    To concentrate CO{sub 2} in combustion processes by efficient and energy-saving ways is a first and very important step for its sequestration. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) could easily achieve this goal. A chemical-looping combustion system consists of a fuel reactor and an air reactor. Two reactors in the form of interconnected fluidized beds are used in the process: (1) a fuel reactor where the oxygen carrier is reduced by reaction with the fuel, and (2) an air reactor where the reduced oxygen carrier from the fuel reactor is oxidized with air. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the outlet gas stream from the air reactor contains only N{sub 2} and some unused O{sub 2}. The water in combustion products can be easily removed by condensation and pure carbon dioxide is obtained without any loss of energy for separation. Until now, there is little literature about mathematical modeling of chemical-looping combustion using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. In this work, the reaction kinetic model of the fuel reactor (CaSO{sub 4}+ H{sub 2}) is developed by means of the commercial code FLUENT and the effects of partial pressure of H{sub 2} (concentration of H{sub 2}) on chemical looping combustion performance are also studied. The results show that the concentration of H{sub 2} could enhance the CLC performance.

  13. Computational fluid dynamics simulation of the air/suppressant flow in an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, A.R.; Gritzo, L.A.; Hassan, B.

    1997-06-01

    For the purposes of designing improved Halon-alternative fire suppression strategies for aircraft applications, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations of the air flow, suppressant transport, and air-suppressant mixing within an uncluttered F18 engine nacelle were performed. The release of inert gases from a Solid Propellant Gas Generator (SPGG) was analyzed at two different injection locations in order to understand the effect of injection position on the flow patterns and the mixing of air and suppression agent. An uncluttered engine nacelle was simulated to provide insight into the global flow features as well as to promote comparisons with previous nacelle fire tests and recent water tunnel tests which included little or no clutter. Oxygen concentration levels, fuel/air residence times that would exist if a small fuel leak were present, velocity contours, and streamline patterns are presented inside the engine nacelle. The numerical results show the influence of the gent release location on regions of potential flame extinction due to oxygen inerting and high flame strain. The occurrence of inflow through the exhaust ducts on the aft end of the nacelle is also predicted. As expected, the predicted oxygen concentration levels were consistently higher than the measured levels since a fire was not modeled in this analysis. Despite differences in the conditions of these simulations and the experiments, good agreement was obtained between the CFD predictions and the experimental measurements.

  14. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of two-phase flow in a BWR fuel assembly. Final CRADA Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tentner, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-10-13

    A direct numerical simulation capability for two-phase flows with heat transfer in complex geometries can considerably reduce the hardware development cycle, facilitate the optimization and reduce the costs of testing of various industrial facilities, such as nuclear power plants, steam generators, steam condensers, liquid cooling systems, heat exchangers, distillers, and boilers. Specifically, the phenomena occurring in a two-phase coolant flow in a BWR (Boiling Water Reactor) fuel assembly include coolant phase changes and multiple flow regimes which directly influence the coolant interaction with fuel assembly and, ultimately, the reactor performance. Traditionally, the best analysis tools for this purpose of two-phase flow phenomena inside the BWR fuel assembly have been the sub-channel codes. However, the resolution of these codes is too coarse for analyzing the detailed intra-assembly flow patterns, such as flow around a spacer element. Advanced CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) codes provide a potential for detailed 3D simulations of coolant flow inside a fuel assembly, including flow around a spacer element using more fundamental physical models of flow regimes and phase interactions than sub-channel codes. Such models can extend the code applicability to a wider range of situations, which is highly important for increasing the efficiency and to prevent accidents.

  15. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, Mi. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines (HATTs). First, an HATT blade was designed using the blade element momentum method in conjunction with a genetic optimization algorithm. Several unstructured computational grids were generated using this blade geometry and steady CFD simulations were used to perform a grid resolution study. Transient simulations were then performed to determine the effect of time-dependent flow phenomena and the size of the computational timestep on the numerical solution. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  16. Thermo-fluid dynamic design study of single and double-inflow radial and single-stage axial steam turbines for open-cycle thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment facility in Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schlbeiri, T. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-03-01

    The results of the study of the optimum thermo-fluid dynamic design concept are presented for turbine units operating within the open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) systems. The concept is applied to the first OC-OTEC net power producing experiment (NPPE) facility to be installed at Hawaii's natural energy laboratory. Detailed efficiency and performance calculations were performed for the radial turbine design concept with single and double-inflow arrangements. To complete the study, the calculation results for a single-stage axial steam turbine design are also presented. In contrast to the axial flow design with a relatively low unit efficiency, higher efficiency was achieved for single-inflow turbines. Highest efficiency was calculated for a double-inflow radial design, which opens new perspectives for energy generation from OC-OTEC systems.

  17. Understanding the dynamics and energetics of magnetic reconnection in a laboratory plasma: Review of recent progress on selected fronts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yamada, Masaaki; Yoo, Jongsoo; Myers, Clayton E.

    2016-05-11

    Here, magnetic reconnection is a fundamental process at work in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas, in which magnetic field lines change their topology and convert magnetic energy to plasma particles by acceleration and heating. One of the most important problems in reconnection research has been to understand why reconnection occurs so much faster than predicted by magnetohydrodynamics theory. Following the recent pedagogical review of this subject [Yamada et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 82, 603 (2010)], this paper presents a review of more recent discoveries and findings in the research of fast magnetic reconnection in laboratory, space, and astrophysical plasmas. Inmore » spite of the huge difference in physical scales, we find remarkable commonality between the characteristics of the magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas. In this paper, we will focus especially on the energy flow, a key feature of the reconnection process. In particular, the experimental results on the energy conversion and partitioning in a laboratory reconnection layer [Yamada et al., Nat. Commun. 5, 4474 (2014)] are discussed and compared with quantitative estimates based on two-fluid analysis. In the Magnetic ReconnectionExperiment, we find that energy deposition to electrons is localized near the X-point and is mostly from the electric field component perpendicular to the magnetic field. The mechanisms of ion acceleration and heating are also identified, and a systematic and quantitative study on the inventory of converted energy within a reconnection layer with a well-defined but variable boundary. The measured energy partition in a reconnection region of similar effective size (L ≈ 3 ion skin depths) of the Earth's magneto-tail [Eastwood et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 225001 (2013)] is notably consistent with our laboratory results. Finally, to study the global aspects of magnetic reconnection, we have carried out a laboratory experiment on the stability criteria for

  18. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  19. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  20. computational fluid dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering ...

  1. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01

    In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that streamlines from the corner collector did not approach the shoreline at the downstream end of Bradford Island. For the cases with much larger spill percentages, the streamlines from the corner collector were mid-channel or closer to the Washington shore as they moved downstream. Although at 25% spill at 75 kcfs total river, the total spill volume was sufficient to "cushion" the flow from the corner collector from the Bradford Island shore, areas of recirculation were modeled in the spillway tailrace. However, at the lowest flows and spill percentages, the streamlines from the B2 corner collector pass very close to the Bradford Island shore. In addition, the very flow velocity flows and large areas of recirculation greatly increase potential predator exposure of the spillway passed smolt. If there is

  2. Ananias Tomboulides | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    numerical simulation to study combustion problems. Research Interests Computational fluid dynamics Numerical solution flows with chemical reactions Parallel processing...

  3. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the

  4. Discoveries | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... first-principles, reactive flow fluid dynamic simulations of deflagration-to-detonation ... tools to accurately and reliably measure its viscosity and load bearing characteristics. ...

  5. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. II. Confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard

    2014-07-14

    In this work, a new classical density functional theory is developed for group-contribution equations of state (EOS). Details of implementation are demonstrated for the recently-developed SAFT-? WCA EOS and selective applications are studied for confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces. The acronym WCA (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen) refers to the characterization of the reference part of the third-order thermodynamic perturbation theory applied in formulating the EOS. SAFT-? refers to the particular form of statistical associating fluid theory that is applied to the fused-sphere, heteronuclear, united-atom molecular models of interest. For the monomer term, the modified fundamental measure theory is extended to WCA-spheres. A new chain functional is also introduced for fused and soft heteronuclear chains. The attractive interactions are taken into account by considering the structure of the fluid, thus elevating the theory beyond the mean field approximation. The fluctuations of energy are also included via a non-local third-order perturbation theory. The theory includes resolution of the density profiles of individual groups such as CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} and satisfies stoichiometric constraints for the density profiles. New molecular simulations are conducted to demonstrate the accuracy of each Helmholtz free energy contribution in reproducing the microstructure of inhomogeneous systems at the united-atom level of coarse graining. At each stage, comparisons are made to assess where the present theory stands relative to the current state of the art for studying inhomogeneous fluids. Overall, it is shown that the characteristic features of real molecular fluids are captured both qualitatively and quantitatively. For example, the average pore density deviates ?2% from simulation data for attractive pentadecane in a 2-nm slit pore. Another example is the surface tension of ethane/heptane mixture, which deviates ?1% from simulation data while the theory reproduces

  6. COMPOUNDING EFFECTS OF FLUID CONFINEMENT AND SURFACE STRAIN ON THE WET-DRY TRANSITION AND DYNAMICS OF GRAPHENE-WATER SYSTEMS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We studied the link between the water-mediated (tensile or compressive) strain-driven hydration free energy changes in the association process involving finite-size graphene surfaces, the resulting water-graphene interfacial behavior, and the combined effect of surface strain and fluid confinement on the thermodynamic response functions and the dynamics of water. We found that either small surface corrugation (compressive strain) or surface stretching (tensile strain) is able to enhance significantly the water-graphene hydrophobicity relative to that of the unstrained surface, an effect that exacerbates the confinement impact on the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity of confined water, as well as on themoreslowing down of its dynamics that gives rise to anomalous diffusivity.less

  7. COMPOUNDING EFFECTS OF FLUID CONFINEMENT AND SURFACE STRAIN ON THE WET-DRY TRANSITION AND DYNAMICS OF GRAPHENE-WATER SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We studied the link between the water-mediated (tensile or compressive) strain-driven hydration free energy changes in the association process involving finite-size graphene surfaces, the resulting water-graphene interfacial behavior, and the combined effect of surface strain and fluid confinement on the thermodynamic response functions and the dynamics of water. We found that either small surface corrugation (compressive strain) or surface stretching (tensile strain) is able to enhance significantly the water-graphene hydrophobicity relative to that of the unstrained surface, an effect that exacerbates the confinement impact on the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity of confined water, as well as on the slowing down of its dynamics that gives rise to anomalous diffusivity.

  8. Compounding effects of fluid confinement and surface strain on the wet–dry transition, thermodynamic response, and dynamics of water–graphene systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Vlcek, Lukas; Cummings, Peter T.

    2015-01-01

    We studied the link between the water-mediated (tensile or compressive) strain-driven hydration free energy changes in the association process involving finite-size graphene surfaces, the resulting water-graphene interfacial behavior, and the combined effect of surface strain and fluid confinement on the thermodynamic response functions and the dynamics of water. In this study, we found that either small surface corrugation (compressive strain) or surface stretching (tensile strain) is able to enhance significantly the water-graphene hydrophobicity relative to that of the unstrained surface, an effect that exacerbates the confinement impact on the isothermal compressibility and isobaric thermal expansivity of confined water, as wellmore » as on the slowing down of its dynamics that gives rise to anomalous diffusivity.« less

  9. FORGE is an EGS laboratory

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    FORGE is an EGS laboratory where the subsurface scientific community can test and improve ... The injection of fluid into the hot rocks enhances the size and connectivity of fluid ...

  10. Beam Dynamics Laboratory

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-06-22

    Simple model of an accelerator as it is running can be interactively manipulated to observe the effects of the manipulations of particle motion. The system can be used to demonstrte effects such as decoherence, slow-extraction, resonance islands, coupling resonance and synchro-betatron coupling.

  11. Fluid dynamics, particulate segregation, chemical processes, and natural ore analog discussions that relate to the potential for criticality in Hanford tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, G.S.

    1996-09-27

    This report presents an in-depth review of the potential for nuclear criticality to occur in Hanford defense waste tanks during past, current and future safe storage and maintenance operations. The report also briefly discusses the potential impacts of proposed retrieval activities, although retrieval was not a main focus of scope. After thorough review of fluid dynamic aspects that focus on particle segregation, chemical aspects that focus on solubility and adsorption processes that might concentrate plutonium and/or separate plutonium from the neutron absorbers in the tank waste, and ore-body formation and mining operations, the interdisciplinary team has come to the conclusion that there is negligible risk of nuclear critically under existing storage conditions in Hanford site underground waste storage tanks. Further, for the accident scenarios considered an accidental criticality is incredible.

  12. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  13. Fascinating Fluids

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fascinating Fluids Fascinating Fluids From liquids to gases, we take on this most fascinating compound with hands-on activities for children and adults alike. We are made of fluids, mostly water, arguably the most interesting compound in the universe. Think About This Liquids Fluids are amazing. Fluids flow. Liquids have variable shapes but almost constant volumes. Gases Gases take the shape of their containers and can be squeezed and stretched relatively easily. Sand What is fine sand? It is a

  14. Soft-spring wall based non-periodic boundary conditions for non-equilibrium molecular dynamics of dense fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghatage, Dhairyashil; Tomar, Gaurav Shukla, Ratnesh K.

    2015-03-28

    Non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations require imposition of non-periodic boundary conditions (NPBCs) that seamlessly account for the effect of the truncated bulk region on the simulated MD region. Standard implementation of specular boundary conditions in such simulations results in spurious density and force fluctuations near the domain boundary and is therefore inappropriate for coupled atomistic-continuum calculations. In this work, we present a novel NPBC model that relies on boundary atoms attached to a simple cubic lattice with soft springs to account for interactions from particles which would have been present in an untruncated full domain treatment. We show that the proposed model suppresses the unphysical fluctuations in the density to less than 1% of the mean while simultaneously eliminating spurious oscillations in both mean and boundary forces. The model allows for an effective coupling of atomistic and continuum solvers as demonstrated through multiscale simulation of boundary driven singular flow in a cavity. The geometric flexibility of the model enables straightforward extension to nonplanar complex domains without any adverse effects on dynamic properties such as the diffusion coefficient.

  15. Charged nanoparticle attraction in multivalent salt solution: A classical-fluids density functional theory and molecular dynamics study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Salerno, K. Michael; Frischknecht, Amalie L.; Stevens, Mark J.

    2016-04-08

    Here, negatively charged nanoparticles (NPs) in 1:1, 1:2, and 1:3 electrolyte solutions are studied in a primitive ion model using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and classical density functional theory (DFT). We determine the conditions for attractive interactions between the like-charged NPs. Ion density profiles and NP–NP interaction free energies are compared between the two methods and are found to be in qualitative agreement. The NP interaction free energy is purely repulsive for monovalent counterions, but can be attractive for divalent and trivalent counterions. Using DFT, the NP interaction free energy for different NP diameters and charges is calculated. The depthmore » and location of the minimum in the interaction depend strongly on the NPs’ charge. For certain parameters, the depth of the attractive well can reach 8–10 kBT, indicating that kinetic arrest and aggregation of the NPs due to electrostatic interactions is possible. Rich behavior arises from the geometric constraints of counterion packing at the NP surface. Layering of counterions around the NPs is observed and, as secondary counterion layers form the minimum of the NP–NP interaction free energy shifts to larger separation, and the depth of the free energy minimum varies dramatically. We find that attractive interactions occur with and without NP overcharging.« less

  16. Hydrologic transport of depleted uranium associated with open air dynamic range testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico, and Eglin Air Force Base, Florida

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, N.M.; Vanta, E.B.

    1995-05-01

    Hydrologic investigations on depleted uranium fate and transport associated with dynamic testing activities were instituted in the 1980`s at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Eglin Air Force Base. At Los Alamos, extensive field watershed investigations of soil, sediment, and especially runoff water were conducted. Eglin conducted field investigations and runoff studies similar to those at Los Alamos at former and active test ranges. Laboratory experiments complemented the field investigations at both installations. Mass balance calculations were performed to quantify the mass of expended uranium which had transported away from firing sites. At Los Alamos, it is estimated that more than 90 percent of the uranium still remains in close proximity to firing sites, which has been corroborated by independent calculations. At Eglin, we estimate that 90 to 95 percent of the uranium remains at test ranges. These data demonstrate that uranium moves slowly via surface water, in both semi-arid (Los Alamos) and humid (Eglin) environments.

  17. Application of computational fluid dynamics for the simulation of cryogenic molecular sieve bed absorber of hydrogen isotopes recovery system for Indian LLCB-TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gayathri Devi, V.; Sircar, A.; Sarkar, B.

    2015-03-15

    One of the most challenging tasks in the design of the fuel cycle system lies in the effective design of Tritium Extraction System (TES) which involves proper extraction and purification of tritium in the fuel cycle of the fusion reactor. Indian Lead Lithium cooled Ceramic Breeder Test Blanket Module (LLCB-TBM) would extract hydrogen isotopes through Cryogenic Molecular Sieve Bed (CMSB) adsorber system. A prototype Hydrogen Isotopes Recovery System (HIRS) is being developed to validate the concepts for tritium extraction by adsorption mass transfer mechanism. In this study, a design model has been developed and analyzed to simulate the adsorption mass transfer kinetics in a fixed bed adsorption column. The simulation leads primarily to effective design of HIRS, which is a state-of-the-art technology. The paper describes the process simulation approach and the results of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis. The effects of different operating conditions are studied to investigate their influence on the hydrogen isotopes adsorption capacity. The results of the present simulation study would be used to understand the best optimized transport phenomenon before realizing the TES as a system for LLCB-TBM. (authors)

  18. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest

  19. Dynamic Wireless Charging of Electric Vehicle Demonstrated at Oak Ridge National Laboratory: Benefit of Electrochemical Capacitor Smoothing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, John M; Onar, Omer C; White, Cliff P; Campbell, Steven L; Coomer, Chester; Seiber, Larry Eugene

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Wireless charging of an electric vehicle while in motion presents challenges in terms of low latency communications for roadway coil excitation sequencing, and maintenance of lateral alignment, plus the need for power flow smoothing. This paper summarizes the experimental results on power smoothing of in-motion wireless EV charging performed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory using various combinations of electrochemical capacitors at the grid-side and in-vehicle. Electrochemical capacitors of the symmetric carbon-carbon type from Maxwell Technologies comprised the in-vehicle smoothing of wireless charging current to the EV battery pack. Electro Standards Laboratories fabricated the passive and active parallel lithium-capacitor unit used to smooth grid-side power. Power pulsation reduction was 81% on grid by LiC, and 84% on vehicle for both lithium-capacitor and the carbon ultracapacitors.

  20. CFD [computational fluid dynamics] And Safety Factors. Computer modeling of complex processes needs old-fashioned experiments to stay in touch with reality.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Poirier, Michael R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Ervin, Robert C.; Giddings, Billy J.; Stefanko, David B.; Harp, Keith D.; Fowley, Mark D.; Van Pelt, William B.

    2012-10-07

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is recognized as a powerful engineering tool. That is, CFD has advanced over the years to the point where it can now give us deep insight into the analysis of very complex processes. There is a danger, though, that an engineer can place too much confidence in a simulation. If a user is not careful, it is easy to believe that if you plug in the numbers, the answer comes out, and you are done. This assumption can lead to significant errors. As we discovered in the course of a study on behalf of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, CFD models fail to capture some of the large variations inherent in complex processes. These variations, or scatter, in experimental data emerge from physical tests and are inadequately captured or expressed by calculated mean values for a process. This anomaly between experiment and theory can lead to serious errors in engineering analysis and design unless a correction factor, or safety factor, is experimentally validated. For this study, blending times for the mixing of salt solutions in large storage tanks were the process of concern under investigation. This study focused on the blending processes needed to mix salt solutions to ensure homogeneity within waste tanks, where homogeneity is required to control radioactivity levels during subsequent processing. Two of the requirements for this task were to determine the minimum number of submerged, centrifugal pumps required to blend the salt mixtures in a full-scale tank in half a day or less, and to recommend reasonable blending times to achieve nearly homogeneous salt mixtures. A full-scale, low-flow pump with a total discharge flow rate of 500 to 800 gpm was recommended with two opposing 2.27-inch diameter nozzles. To make this recommendation, both experimental and CFD modeling were performed. Lab researchers found that, although CFD provided good estimates of an average blending time, experimental blending times varied

  1. computational-fluid-dynamics-training

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Table of Contents Date Location Advanced Hydraulic and Aerodynamic Analysis Using CFD March 27-28, 2013 Argonne TRACC Argonne, IL Computational Hydraulics and Aerodynamics using STAR-CCM+ for CFD Analysis March 21-22, 2012 Argonne TRACC Argonne, IL Computational Hydraulics and Aerodynamics using STAR-CCM+ for CFD Analysis March 30-31, 2011 Argonne TRACC Argonne, IL Computational Hydraulics for Transportation Workshop September 23-24, 2009 Argonne TRACC West Chicago, IL

  2. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  3. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  4. Effective perfect fluids in cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ballesteros, Guillermo; Bellazzini, Brando E-mail: brando.bellazzini@pd.infn.it

    2013-04-01

    We describe the cosmological dynamics of perfect fluids within the framework of effective field theories. The effective action is a derivative expansion whose terms are selected by the symmetry requirements on the relevant long-distance degrees of freedom, which are identified with comoving coordinates. The perfect fluid is defined by requiring invariance of the action under internal volume-preserving diffeomorphisms and general covariance. At lowest order in derivatives, the dynamics is encoded in a single function of the entropy density that characterizes the properties of the fluid, such as the equation of state and the speed of sound. This framework allows a neat simultaneous description of fluid and metric perturbations. Longitudinal fluid perturbations are closely related to the adiabatic modes, while the transverse modes mix with vector metric perturbations as a consequence of vorticity conservation. This formalism features a large flexibility which can be of practical use for higher order perturbation theory and cosmological parameter estimation.

  5. HIGH-RESOLUTION LABORATORY SPECTRA ON THE λ131 CHANNEL OF THE AIA INSTRUMENT ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Träbert, Elmar; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Golub, Leon

    2014-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of C, O, F, Ne, Si, S, Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni have been excited in an electron beam ion trap and studied with much higher resolution than available on Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in order to ascertain the spectral composition of the SDO observations. We presently show our findings in the wavelength range 124-134 Å, which encompasses the λ131 observation channel of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). While the general interpretation of the spectral composition of the λ131 Fe channel is being corroborated, a number of new lines have been observed that might help to improve the diagnostic value of the SDO/AIA data.

  6. Fluid Interface Reactions, Structures and Transport

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Perspectives Nonlinear optical approaches for elucidating interfacial fluid and sorbed species structures and dynamics pdf Structural and Dynamic Properties of Room Temperature Ionic Liquids Confined within Hierarchical Porous Materials pdf Structure and Dynamics of Electrical Double Layer Using Integrated Scanning Probe Microscopy and Molecular Simulations pdf Effects of Nano-Confinement on the Fluid Interfacial Structure, Dynamics and Thermodynamic behavior pdf Molecular Insights into

  7. Reservoir compartmentalization assessed with fluid compositional data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalley, P.C.; England, W.A. . Alliance R D Centre)

    1994-08-01

    Fluid composition is a valuable addition to the battery of static'' data available during reservoir appraisal that can be used to predict the dynamic behavior of the reservoir later in field life. This is because fluid data are not truly static; natural fluid mixing is a dynamic process that occurs over a long (geologic) time scale. Oil compositional differences, especially those that parallel changes in density, should be mixed rapidly by convection; their preservation indicates barriers to fluid flow. Water variations, now measurable on conventional core samples by use of residual salt analysis (RSA), help identify barriers to vertical fluid flow in oil and water legs.

  8. Dynamic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Dynamic , and Static , Res.ponse of the Government Oil Shale Mine at ' , . , Rifle, ... AND STATIC RESPONSE 'OF THE GOVERNMENT OIL SHALE MINE A T RIFLE, COLORADO, T O THE, ...

  9. Dynamic compression of dense oxide (Gd3Ga5O12) from 0.4 to 2.6 TPa: Universal Hugoniot of fluid metals

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ozaki, N.; Nellis, W. J.; Mashimo, T.; Ramzan, M.; Ahuja, R.; Kaewmaraya, T.; Kimura, T.; Knudson, M.; Miyanishi, K.; Sakawa, Y.; et al

    2016-05-19

    Materials at high pressures and temperatures are of great current interest for warm dense matter physics, planetary sciences, and inertial fusion energy research. Shock-compression equation-of-state data and optical reflectivities of the fluid dense oxide, Gd3Ga5O12 (GGG), were measured at extremely high pressures up to 2.6 TPa (26 Mbar) generated by high-power laser irradiation and magnetically-driven hypervelocity impacts. Above 0.75 TPa, the GGG Hugoniot data approach/reach a universal linear line of fluid metals, and the optical reflectivity most likely reaches a constant value indicating that GGG undergoes a crossover from fluid semiconductor to poor metal with minimum metallic conductivity (MMC). Thesemore » results suggest that most fluid compounds, e.g., strong planetary oxides, reach a common state on the universal Hugoniot of fluid metals (UHFM) with MMC at sufficiently extreme pressures and temperatures. Lastly, the systematic behaviors of warm dense fluid would be useful benchmarks for developing theoretical equation-of-state and transport models in the warm dense matter regime in determining computational predictions.« less

  10. Live Cells as Dynamic Laboratories: Time Lapse Raman Spectral Microscopy of Nanoparticles with Both IgE Targeting and pH-Sensing Functions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nowak-Lovato, Kristy L.; Rector, Kirk D.

    2012-01-01

    Tmore » his review captures the use of live cells as dynamic microlaboratories through implementation of labeled nanoparticles (nanosensors) that have both sensing and targeting functions.he addition of 2,4-ε-dinitrophenol-L-lysine (DNP) as a FcεRI targeting ligand and 4-mercaptopyridine (4-MPy) as a pH-sensing ligand enables spatial and temporal monitoring of FcεRI receptors and their pH environment within the endocytic pathway.o ensure reliability, the sensor is calibrated in vivo using the ionophore nigericin and standard buffer solutions to equilibrate the external [ H + ] concentration with that of the cell compartments.his review highlights the nanosensors, ability to traffic and respond to pH of receptor-bound nanosensors (1) at physiological temperature ( 37 ° C ) versus room temperature ( 25 ° C ) , (2) after pharmacological treatment with bafilomycin, an H + ATPase pump inhibitor, or amiloride, an inhibitor of Na + / H + exchange, and (3) in response to both temperature and pharmacological treatment. Whole-cell, time lapse images are demonstrated to show the ability to transform live cells into dynamic laboratories to monitor temporal and spatial endosomal pH.he versatility of these probes shows promise for future applications relevant to intracellular trafficking and intelligent drug design.« less

  11. Sandia National Laboratories: Research: Research Foundations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to none Foundational knowledge across multiple disciplines, including solid mechanics, fluid mechanics of reacting and nonreacting systems, structural dynamics, thermal and...

  12. Project Profile: Dual-Purpose Heat Transfer Fluids for CSP |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Argonne logo Argonne National Laboratory, under an ARRA CSP Award, is developing advanced heat transfer fluids (HTFs) by incorporating multifunctional engineered nanoparticles in ...

  13. Fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M.; Laintz, Kenneth E.

    1999-01-01

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  14. Dynamic Modeling of Learning in Emerging Energy Industries: The Example of Advanced Biofuels in the United States; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Steve; Bush, Brian; Vimmerstedt, Laura

    2015-07-19

    This paper (and its supplemental model) presents novel approaches to modeling interactions and related policies among investment, production, and learning in an emerging competitive industry. New biomass-to-biofuels pathways are being developed and commercialized to support goals for U.S. advanced biofuel use, such as those in the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007. We explore the impact of learning rates and techno-economics in a learning model excerpted from the Biomass Scenario Model (BSM), developed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to explore the impact of biofuel policy on the evolution of the biofuels industry. The BSM integrates investment, production, and learning among competing biofuel conversion options that are at different stages of industrial development. We explain the novel methods used to simulate the impact of differing assumptions about mature industry techno-economics and about learning rates while accounting for the different maturity levels of various conversion pathways. A sensitivity study shows that the parameters studied (fixed capital investment, process yield, progress ratios, and pre-commercial investment) exhibit highly interactive effects, and the system, as modeled, tends toward market dominance of a single pathway due to competition and learning dynamics.

  15. Sensing of fluid viscoelasticity from piezoelectric actuation of cantilever flexural vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Jeongwon; Jeong, Seongbin; Kim, Seung Joon; Park, Junhong

    2015-01-15

    An experimental method is proposed to measure the rheological properties of fluids. The effects of fluids on the vibration actuated by piezoelectric patches were analyzed and used in measuring viscoelastic properties. Fluid-structure interactions induced changes in the beam vibration properties and frequency-dependent variations of the complex wavenumber of the beam structure were used in monitoring these changes. To account for the effects of fluid-structure interaction, fluids were modelled as a simple viscoelastic support at one end of the beam. The measured properties were the fluid’s dynamic shear modulus and loss tangent. Using the proposed method, the rheological properties of various non-Newtonian fluids were measured. The frequency range for which reliable viscoelasticity results could be obtained was 10–400 Hz. Viscosity standard fluids were tested to verify the accuracy of the proposed method, and the results agreed well with the manufacturer’s reported values. The simple proposed laboratory setup for measurements was flexible so that the frequency ranges of data acquisition were adjustable by changing the beam’s mechanical properties.

  16. Two LANL laboratory astrophysics experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Intrator, Thomas P.

    2014-01-24

    Two laboratory experiments are described that have been built at Los Alamos (LANL) to gain access to a wide range of fundamental plasma physics issues germane to astro, space, and fusion plasmas. The overarching theme is magnetized plasma dynamics which includes significant currents, MHD forces and instabilities, magnetic field creation and annihilation, sheared flows and shocks. The Relaxation Scaling Experiment (RSX) creates current sheets and flux ropes that exhibit fully 3D dynamics, and can kink, bounce, merge and reconnect, shred, and reform in complicated ways. Recent movies from a large data set describe the 3D magnetic structure of a driven and dissipative single flux rope that spontaneously self-saturates a kink instability. Examples of a coherent shear flow dynamo driven by colliding flux ropes will also be shown. The Magnetized Shock Experiment (MSX) uses Field reversed configuration (FRC) experimental hardware that forms and ejects FRCs at 150km/sec. This is sufficient to drive a collision less magnetized shock when stagnated into a mirror stopping field region with Alfven Mach number MA=3 so that super critical shocks can be studied. We are building a plasmoid accelerator to drive Mach numbers MA >> 3 to access solar wind and more exotic astrophysical regimes. Unique features of this experiment include access to parallel, oblique and perpendicular shocks, shock region much larger than ion gyro radii and ion inertial length, room for turbulence, and large magnetic and fluid Reynolds numbers.

  17. LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 24, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    computer simulation improves offshore drill rig safety March 24, 2015 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., March 24, 2015-Los Alamos National Laboratory mechanical and thermal engineering researchers' efforts to solve the complex problem of how ocean currents affect the infrastructure of floating oilrigs and their computational fluid dynamics (CFD) numerical simulations received recognition from ANSYS Inc., a company that provides computer-based engineering simulation capabilities."Because energy resources

  18. ALFVEN WAVES IN A PARTIALLY IONIZED TWO-FLUID PLASMA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soler, R.; Ballester, J. L.; Terradas, J.; Carbonell, M. E-mail: joseluis.ballester@uib.es E-mail: marc.carbonell@uib.es

    2013-04-20

    Alfven waves are a particular class of magnetohydrodynamic waves relevant in many astrophysical and laboratory plasmas. In partially ionized plasmas the dynamics of Alfven waves is affected by the interaction between ionized and neutral species. Here we study Alfven waves in a partially ionized plasma from the theoretical point of view using the two-fluid description. We consider that the plasma is composed of an ion-electron fluid and a neutral fluid, which interact by means of particle collisions. To keep our investigation as general as possible, we take the neutral-ion collision frequency and the ionization degree as free parameters. First, we perform a normal mode analysis. We find the modification due to neutral-ion collisions of the wave frequencies and study the temporal and spatial attenuation of the waves. In addition, we discuss the presence of cutoff values of the wavelength that constrain the existence of oscillatory standing waves in weakly ionized plasmas. Later, we go beyond the normal mode approach and solve the initial-value problem in order to study the time-dependent evolution of the wave perturbations in the two fluids. An application to Alfven waves in the low solar atmospheric plasma is performed and the implication of partial ionization for the energy flux is discussed.

  19. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  20. Fluid Flow Phenomena during Welding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei

    2011-01-01

    MOLTEN WELD POOLS are dynamic. Liquid in the weld pool in acted on by several strong forces, which can result in high-velocity fluid motion. Fluid flow velocities exceeding 1 m/s (3.3 ft/s) have been observed in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welds under ordinary welding conditions, and higher velocities have been measured in submerged arc welds. Fluid flow is important because it affects weld shape and is related to the formation of a variety of weld defects. Moving liquid transports heat and often dominates heat transport in the weld pool. Because heat transport by mass flow depends on the direction and speed of fluid motion, weld pool shape can differ dramatically from that predicted by conductive heat flow. Temperature gradients are also altered by fluid flow, which can affect weld microstructure. A number of defects in GTA welds have been attributed to fluid flow or changes in fluid flow, including lack of penetration, top bead roughness, humped beads, finger penetration, and undercutting. Instabilities in the liquid film around the keyhole in electron beam and laser welds are responsible for the uneven penetration (spiking) characteristic of these types of welds.

  1. Earth materials and earth dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, K; Shankland, T.

    2000-11-01

    In the project ''Earth Materials and Earth Dynamics'' we linked fundamental and exploratory, experimental, theoretical, and computational research programs to shed light on the current and past states of the dynamic Earth. Our objective was to combine different geological, geochemical, geophysical, and materials science analyses with numerical techniques to illuminate active processes in the Earth. These processes include fluid-rock interactions that form and modify the lithosphere, non-linear wave attenuations in rocks that drive plate tectonics and perturb the earth's surface, dynamic recrystallization of olivine that deforms the upper mantle, development of texture in high-pressure olivine polymorphs that create anisotropic velocity regions in the convecting upper mantle and transition zone, and the intense chemical reactions between the mantle and core. We measured physical properties such as texture and nonlinear elasticity, equation of states at simultaneous pressures and temperatures, magnetic spins and bonding, chemical permeability, and thermal-chemical feedback to better characterize earth materials. We artificially generated seismic waves, numerically modeled fluid flow and transport in rock systems and modified polycrystal plasticity theory to interpret measured physical properties and integrate them into our understanding of the Earth. This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  2. Final Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Consolidation of Certain Dynamic Experimentation Activities at the Two-Mile Mesa Complex Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N /A

    2003-11-03

    The National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) requires Federal agency officials to consider the environmental consequences of their proposed actions before decisions are made. In complying with NEPA, the United States (U.S.) Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), follows the Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR 1500-1508) and DOE's NEPA implementing procedures (10 CFR 1021). The purpose of an environmental assessment (EA) is to provide Federal decision makers with sufficient evidence and analysis to determine whether to prepare an environmental impact statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a national security laboratory located at Los Alamos, New Mexico, that comprises about 40 square miles (mi{sup 2}) (103.6 square kilometers [km{sup 2}]) of buildings, structures, and forested land (Figure 1). It is administered by NNSA for the Federal government and is managed and operated under contract by the University of California (UC). The NNSA must make a decision whether to consolidate and construct new facilities for the Dynamic Experimentation Division (DX) to create a central core area of facilities, including offices, laboratories, and other support structures, at LANL's Two-Mile Mesa Complex, which comprises portions of Technical Area (TA) 6, TA-22, and TA-40. This Proposed Action would involve constructing new buildings; consolidating existing operations and offices; enhancing utilities, roads, and security infrastructure; and demolishing or removing older buildings, structures, and transportables at various technical areas used by DX (Figure 2). This EA has been prepared to assess the potential environmental consequences of this proposed construction, operational consolidation, and demolition project. The objectives of this EA are to (1) describe the underlying purpose and need for NNSA action; (2) describe the Proposed Action and identify and

  3. kmh | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    kmh Ames Laboratory Profile Kai-ming Ho Distinguished Professor Division of Materials Science & Engineering A502 Zaffarano Phone Number: 515-294-1960 Email Address: kmh@ameslab.gov Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Exploratory Development of Theoretical Methods Photonic Systems Structures and Dynamics in Condensed Systems Surface Structures Far-from-Equilibrium Education: Ph.D. Physics, University of California, Berkeley (thesis advisor: Marvin Cohen), 1978 B.Sc., B.Sc(Sp) University of

  4. mjkramer | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mjkramer Ames Laboratory Profile Matthew Kramer Director III Division of Materials Science & Engineering 125 Metals Development Phone Number: 515-294-0276 Email Address: mjkramer@ameslab.gov Ames Laboratory Research Projects: Structures and Dynamics in Condensed Systems Competition & Correlation Among Length Scales: Mesostructure & Mechanical Properties Education: Ph.D. Geology, Iowa State University, 1988 M.S. Geology, University of Rochester, 1983 B.S. Geomechanics, University of

  5. Laboratory Directors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Directors Laboratory Directors A gallery of Laboratory leadership, 1943 to the present. Laboratory historian Alan B. Carr Email Laboratory directors Charles McMillan (2011-present) Michael R. Anastasio (2006-2011) Robert Kuckuck (2005-2006) G. Peter Nanos (2003-2005) John C. Browne (1997-2003) Siegfried S. Hecker (1985-1997) Donald M. Kerr (1979-1985) Harold M. Agnew (1970-1979) Norris Bradbury (1945-1970) J. Robert Oppenheimer (1943-1945) Laboratory Directors Harold M. Agnew

  6. Cluster Analysis of Cloud Regimes and Characteristic Dynamics of Mid-Latitude Synoptic Systems

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cluster Analysis of Cloud Regimes and Characteristic Dynamics of Mid-Latitude Synoptic Systems N. D. Gordon and J. R. Norris Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California C. P. Weaver Center for Environmental Prediction Rutgers University New Brunswick, New Jersey S. A. Klein Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Princeton University Princeton, New Jersey Introduction This study uses a clustering algorithm to group meteorological regimes by cloud

  7. Nuclear Energy -- Knowledge Base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) Code Verification and Validation Data Standards and Requirements: Fluid Dynamics Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Weirs; Hyung Lee

    2011-09-01

    V&V and UQ are the primary means to assess the accuracy and reliability of M&S and, hence, to establish confidence in M&S. Though other industries are establishing standards and requirements for the performance of V&V and UQ, at present, the nuclear industry has not established such standards or requirements. However, the nuclear industry is beginning to recognize that such standards are needed and that the resources needed to support V&V and UQ will be very significant. In fact, no single organization has sufficient resources or expertise required to organize, conduct and maintain a comprehensive V&V and UQ program. What is needed is a systematic and standardized approach to establish and provide V&V and UQ resources at a national or even international level, with a consortium of partners from government, academia and industry. Specifically, what is needed is a structured and cost-effective knowledge base that collects, evaluates and stores verification and validation data, and shows how it can be used to perform V&V and UQ, leveraging collaboration and sharing of resources to support existing engineering and licensing procedures as well as science-based V&V and UQ processes. The Nuclear Energy Knowledge base for Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NE-KAMS) is being developed at the Idaho National Laboratory in conjunction with Bettis Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Argonne National Laboratory, Utah State University and others with the objective of establishing a comprehensive and web-accessible knowledge base to provide V&V and UQ resources for M&S for nuclear reactor design, analysis and licensing. The knowledge base will serve as an important resource for technical exchange and collaboration that will enable credible and reliable computational models and simulations for application to nuclear power. NE-KAMS will serve as a valuable resource for the nuclear industry, academia, the national laboratories, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and

  8. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  9. Laboratories | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratories Our laboratories are available to industry and other organizations for researching, developing, and evaluating energy technologies. We have experienced lab technicians, scientists and engineers ready to design and run tests for you. Some labs are available for conducting your own research. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z A Accelerated Exposure Testing Laboratory Advanced Optical Materials Laboratory Advanced

  10. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Anthony R.; Johnston, Roger G.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2000-01-01

    A fluid-sampling tool for obtaining a fluid sample from a container. When used in combination with a rotatable drill, the tool bores a hole into a container wall, withdraws a fluid sample from the container, and seals the borehole. The tool collects fluid sample without exposing the operator or the environment to the fluid or to wall shavings from the container.

  11. Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants Below are the project presentations and respective peer review results for Specialized Materials and Fluids and Power Plants. Evaluate Thermal Spray Coatings as a Pressure Seal, Joseph A. Henfling, Sandia National Laboratories Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids, Dr. Stephen Harrison, Simbol Mining Corp. Chemical Energy Carriers (CEC) for the

  12. Geoscience Laboratory | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    preparation and other relatively straight-forward laboratory manipulations. These include buffer preparations, solid sample grinding, solution concentration, filtration, and...

  13. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  14. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  15. Main Bearing Dynamics in Three-Point Suspension Drivetrains for Wind Turbines; National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sethuraman, Latha; Guo, Yi; Sheng, Shuangwen

    2015-05-18

    This work discusses the dynamics of main bearing behavior in three-point suspension drivetrains for wind turbines. Three failure mitigation approaches and preliminary results are presented.

  16. NREL Software Models Performance of Wind Plants (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Simulator fOr Wind Farm Applications helps optimize layouts and controls of wind plant arrays. In 2014, researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) launched the Simulator fOr Wind Farm Applications (SOWFA), a coupled open-source software package and framework that allows users to inves- tigate effects of weather patterns, turbulence, and complex terrain on the performance of wind turbines and plants. SOWFA simulates fluid dynam- ics on scales from regional weather to turbine

  17. Laboratory Fellows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    selected as Los Alamos National Laboratory Fellows November 16, 2010 Scientific disciplines range from fundamental and applied physics to geology LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, NOVEMBER 16, 2010-Five Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists from diverse fields of research have been named Laboratory Fellows. The five researchers are Brenda Dingus of the Neutron Science and Technology group; William (Bill) Louis of the Subatomic Physics group; John Sarrao, director of Los Alamos's Office of Science

  18. Laboratory Director

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Director Laboratory Director Charles F. McMillan has demonstrated success at balancing mission performance with security and safety. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 McMillan has nearly 30 years of scientific and management experience in weapons science and stockpile certification, hands-on experience in both experimental physics and computational science, and demonstrated success at balancing mission performance with security and safety. Charles F.

  19. Laboratory Operations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Operations Laboratory Operations Latest announcements from the Lab on its operations. News Releases Science Briefs Photos Picture of the Week Publications Social Media Videos Fact Sheets The Laboratory began the Hazmat Challenge in 1996 to hone the skills of its own hazmat team members. 20th Hazmat Challenge tests skills of hazardous materials response teams Ten hazardous materials response teams from New Mexico, Missouri, Oklahoma and Nebraska test their skills in a series of graded,

  20. Laboratory Building.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrera, Joshua M.

    2015-03-01

    This report is an analysis of the means of egress and life safety requirements for the laboratory building. The building is located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in Albuquerque, NM. The report includes a prescriptive-based analysis as well as a performance-based analysis. Following the analysis are appendices which contain maps of the laboratory building used throughout the analysis. The top of all the maps is assumed to be north.

  1. The Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    existing programs in climate change science and infrastructure. The Laboratory has a 15- year history in climate change science. The Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) ...

  2. Borehole Fluid Conductivity Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-03-15

    Dynamic wellbore electrical conductivity logs provide a valuable means to determine the flow characteristics of fractures intersectin a wellbore, in order to study the hydrologic behavior of fractured rocks. To expedite the analysis of log data, a computer program called BORE II has been deveoloped that considers multiple inflow or outflow points along the wellbore, including the case of horizontal flow across the wellbore, BORE II calculates the evolution of fluid electrical conducivity (FEC) profilesmorein a wellbore or wellbore section, which may be pumped at a low rate, and compares model results to log data in a variety of ways. FEC variations may arise from inflow under natural-state conditions or due to tracer injected in a neighboring well (interference tests). BORE II has an interactive, graphical user interface and runs on a personal computer under the Windows operating system. BORE II is a modification and extension of older codes called BORE and BOREXT, which considered inflow points only. Finite difference solution of the one-dimensional advection-diffusion equation with explicit time stepping; feed points treated as prescribed-mass sources or sinks; assume quadratic relationship between fluid electrical conductivity and ion consentration. Graphical user interface; interactive modification of model parameters and graphical display of model results and filed data in a variety of ways. Can examine horizontal flow or arbitarily complicated combination of upflow, downflow, and horizontal flow. Feed point flow rate and/or concentration may vary in time.less

  3. High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids High-Energy-Density Plasmas, Fluids National security depends on science and technology. The United States relies on Los Alamos National Laboratory for the best of both. No place on Earth pursues a broader array of world-class scientific endeavors. TRIDENT target chamber Sasi Palaniyappan, right, and Rahul Shah left inside a target chamber where the TRIDENT short pulse laser is aimed at a very thin diamond- foil target, a fraction of a micrometer thick. The

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: Electromagnetics: Main Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LABORATORIES Electromagnetics (EM) is the study of the nature and interaction of static and dynamic electric and magnetic fields. Telecommunications, navigational guidance,...

  5. Apparatus and method for fluid analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bary W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Shepard, Chester L.; Reeves, James H.

    2004-11-02

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for analyzing a fluid used in a machine or in an industrial process line. The apparatus has at least one meter placed proximate the machine or process line and in contact with the machine or process fluid for measuring at least one parameter related to the fluid. The at least one parameter is a standard laboratory analysis parameter. The at least one meter includes but is not limited to viscometer, element meter, optical meter, particulate meter, and combinations thereof.

  6. Apparatus And Method For Fluid Analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilson, Bary W.; Peters, Timothy J.; Shepard, Chester L.; Reeves, James H.

    2003-05-13

    The present invention is an apparatus and method for analyzing a fluid used in a machine or in an industrial process line. The apparatus has at least one meter placed proximate the machine or process line and in contact with the machine or process fluid for measuring at least one parameter related to the fluid. The at least one parameter is a standard laboratory analysis parameter. The at least one meter includes but is not limited to viscometer, element meter, optical meter, particulate meter, and combinations thereof.

  7. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, Bradley G.; Downing, Jr., John P.; Neal, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

  8. Fluid transport container

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

    1995-11-14

    An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of rabbit nasal airflows for the development of hybrid CFD/PBPK models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corley, Richard A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Kabilan, Senthil; Einstein, Daniel R.; Kuprat, Andrew P.; harkema, J. R.; Kimbell, Julia; Gargas, M. L.; Kinzell, John H.

    2009-06-01

    The percentages of total air?ows over the nasal respiratory and olfactory epithelium of female rabbits were cal-culated from computational ?uid dynamics (CFD) simulations of steady-state inhalation. These air?ow calcula-tions, along with nasal airway geometry determinations, are critical parameters for hybrid CFD/physiologically based pharmacokinetic models that describe the nasal dosimetry of water-soluble or reactive gases and vapors in rabbits. CFD simulations were based upon three-dimensional computational meshes derived from magnetic resonance images of three adult female New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. In the anterior portion of the nose, the maxillary turbinates of rabbits are considerably more complex than comparable regions in rats, mice, mon-keys, or humans. This leads to a greater surface area to volume ratio in this region and thus the potential for increased extraction of water soluble or reactive gases and vapors in the anterior portion of the nose compared to many other species. Although there was considerable interanimal variability in the ?ne structures of the nasal turbinates and air?ows in the anterior portions of the nose, there was remarkable consistency between rabbits in the percentage of total inspired air?ows that reached the ethmoid turbinate region (~50%) that is presumably lined with olfactory epithelium. These latter results (air?ows reaching the ethmoid turbinate region) were higher than previous published estimates for the male F344 rat (19%) and human (7%). These di?erences in regional air?ows can have signi?cant implications in interspecies extrapolations of nasal dosimetry.

  10. Friction-Induced Fluid Heating in Nanoscale Helium Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Zhigang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-05-21

    We investigate the mechanism of friction-induced fluid heating in nanoconfinements. Molecular dynamics simulations are used to study the temperature variations of liquid helium in nanoscale Poiseuille flows. It is found that the fluid heating is dominated by different sources of friction as the external driving force is changed. For small external force, the fluid heating is mainly caused by the internal viscous friction in the fluid. When the external force is large and causes fluid slip at the surfaces of channel walls, the friction at the fluid-solid interface dominates over the internal friction in the fluid and is the major contribution to fluid heating. An asymmetric temperature gradient in the fluid is developed in the case of nonidentical walls and the general temperature gradient may change sign as the dominant heating factor changes from internal to interfacial friction with increasing external force.

  11. Dynamic underground stripping to remediate a deep hydrocarbon spill

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yow, J.L. Jr.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.

    1995-09-01

    Dynamic Underground Stripping is a combination of in situ steam injection, electrical resistance heating, and fluid extraction for rapid removal and recovery of subsurface contaminants such as solvents or fuels. Underground imaging and other measurement techniques monitor the system in situ for process control. Field tests at a deep gasoline spill at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory recovered over 26,500 liters (7000 gallons) of gasoline during several months of field operations. Preliminary analysis of system cost and performance indicate that Dynamic Underground Stripping compares favorably with conventional pump-and-treat methods and vacuum extraction schemes for removing non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) such as gasoline from deep subsurface plumes.

  12. Stimuli Responsive/Rheoreversible Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids for Enhanced Geothermal Energy Production (Part II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonneville, Alain; Jung, Hun Bok; Shao, Hongbo; Kabilan, Senthil; Um, Wooyong; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Varga, Tamas; Suresh, Niraj; Stephens, Sean A.; Fernandez, Carlos A.

    2014-12-14

    We have used an environmentally friendly and recyclable hydraulic fracturing fluid - diluted aqueous solutions of polyallylamine or PAA – for reservoir stimulation in Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS). This fluid undergoes a controlled and large volume expansion with a simultaneous increase in viscosity triggered by CO2 at EGS temperatures. We are presenting here the results of laboratory-scale hydraulic fracturing experiment using the fluid on small cylindrical rock cores (1.59 cm in diameter and 5.08 cm in length) from the Coso geothermal field in California. Rock samples consisted of Mesozoic diorite metamorphosed to greenschist facies. The experiments were conducted on 5 samples for realistic ranges of pressures (up to 275 bar) and temperatures (up to 210 °C) for both the rock samples and the injected fluid. After fracturing, cores were subjected to a CO2 leakage test, injection of KI solution, and X-ray microtomography (XMT) scanning to examine the formation and distribution of fractures. The design and conduct of these experiments will be presented and discussed in details. Based on the obtained XMT images, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations were then performed to visualize hydraulic fractures and compute the bulk permeability. OpenFOAM (OpenCFD Ltd., Reading, UK), was used to solve the steady state simulation. The flow predictions, based upon the laminar, 3-D, incompressible Navier-Stokes equations for fluid mass and momentum, show the remarkable stimulation of the permeability in the core samples and demonstrate the efficiency of such a CO2 triggered fluid in EGS.

  13. Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrison, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    Fluid mechanics is examined from a Hamiltonian perspective. The Hamiltonian point of view provides a unifying framework; by understanding the Hamiltonian perspective, one knows in advance (within bounds) what answers to expect and what kinds of procedures can be performed. The material is organized into five lectures, on the following topics: rudiments of few-degree-of-freedom Hamiltonian systems illustrated by passive advection in two-dimensional fluids; functional differentiation, two action principles of mechanics, and the action principle and canonical Hamiltonian description of the ideal fluid; noncanonical Hamiltonian dynamics with examples; tutorial on Lie groups and algebras, reduction-realization, and Clebsch variables; and stability and Hamiltonian systems.

  14. Laboratory Access | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Access Planning Ahead Planning Ahead Please complete the Beam Time Request (BTR) and Support Request forms thourgh the User Portal. Thorough chemical and sample information must be included in your BTR. Support Request forms include a list of collaborators that require laboratory access and your group's laboratory equipment requests. Researcher safety is taken seriously at SLAC. Please remember that radioactive materials, nanomaterials, and biohazardous materials have additional safety

  15. GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE:...

  16. Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles (08-066) - Energy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Return to Search Heat Transfer Fluids Containing Nanoparticles (08-066) Argonne National Laboratory Contact ANL About This Technology

     

    Caption: Heat transfer ...

  17. Electric fluid pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van Dam, Jeremy Daniel; Turnquist, Norman Arnold; Raminosoa, Tsarafidy; Shah, Manoj Ramprasad; Shen, Xiaochun

    2015-09-29

    An electric machine is presented. The electric machine includes a hollow rotor; and a stator disposed within the hollow rotor, the stator defining a flow channel. The hollow rotor includes a first end portion defining a fluid inlet, a second end portion defining a fluid outlet; the fluid inlet, the fluid outlet, and the flow channel of the stator being configured to allow passage of a fluid from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet via the flow channel; and wherein the hollow rotor is characterized by a largest cross-sectional area of hollow rotor, and wherein the flow channel is characterized by a smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel, wherein the smallest cross-sectional area of the flow channel is at least about 25% of the largest cross-sectional area of the hollow rotor. An electric fluid pump and a power generation system are also presented.

  18. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G.; Garcia, Anthony R. E.; Martinez, Ronald K.

    2001-09-25

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  19. Fluid force transducer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jendrzejczyk, Joseph A.

    1982-01-01

    An electrical fluid force transducer for measuring the magnitude and direction of fluid forces caused by lateral fluid flow, includes a movable sleeve which is deflectable in response to the movement of fluid, and a rod fixed to the sleeve to translate forces applied to the sleeve to strain gauges attached to the rod, the strain gauges being connected in a bridge circuit arrangement enabling generation of a signal output indicative of the magnitude and direction of the force applied to the sleeve.

  20. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Supercomputing Challenge draws more than 200 students to Los Alamos National Laboratory April 16, 2015 NOTE TO EDITORS: Media are welcome to attend the awards ceremony from 9 a.m. to noon a.m., April 21 at the Church of Christ, 2323 Diamond Drive, Los Alamos. Student teams from around New Mexico showcase year-long research projects April 20-21 LOS ALAMOS, N.M., April 16, 2015-More than 200 New Mexico students and their teachers are at Los Alamos National Laboratory April 20-21 for the 25th

  1. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Community invited to learn about emerging technologies July 6, 2016 DisrupTech showcases innovation from Los Alamos National Laboratory LOS ALAMOS, N.M., July 6, 2016-New technologies emerging from Los Alamos National Laboratory that address everything from fusion energy to medical testing will be on display for members of the community, investors and business leaders at the DisrupTech showcase, Thursday, July 14, starting at 1:00 p.m. at the Los Alamos Golf Course Event Center. "We call it

  2. Solid Catalyzed Isoparaffin Alkylation at Supercritical Fluid and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Near-Supercritical Fluid Conditions - Energy Innovation Portal Startup America Startup America Find More Like This Return to Search Solid Catalyzed Isoparaffin Alkylation at Supercritical Fluid and Near-Supercritical Fluid Conditions Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL has developed a solid catalyst process for the alkylation reaction of isoparaffins with olefins over solid catalysts. The process includes contacting a mixture of an

  3. Project Profile: Chemically Reactive Working Fluids | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chemically Reactive Working Fluids Project Profile: Chemically Reactive Working Fluids ANL logo -- This project is inactive -- Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), under the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) R&D funding opportunity announcement (FOA), is working to identify and test new heat-transfer fluids (HTFs) that store energy chemically for more efficient energy transfer in CSP applications. Approach Chart with an upward curve with ideal power generation efficiency on the

  4. Using supercritical carbon dioxide as a fracturing fluid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using supercritical carbon dioxide as a fracturing fluid Using supercritical carbon dioxide as a fracturing fluid The Laboratory team used a combination of experiments and modeling for the investigation. June 25, 2015 Simulation of a selection of the particle trajectories toward the well. Simulation of a selection of the particle trajectories toward the well. Communications Office (505) 667-7000 The Laboratory research is part of an ongoing project to make the necessary measurements and develop

  5. Geomechanics Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geomechanics Laboratory - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Energy Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced

  6. HIGH-RESOLUTION LABORATORY SPECTRA OF THE λ193 CHANNEL OF THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY INSTRUMENT ON BOARD SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Träbert, Elmar; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Brickhouse, Nancy S.; Golub, Leon

    2014-11-01

    Extreme ultraviolet spectra of C, O, F, Ne, S, Ar, Fe, and Ni have been excited in an electron beam ion trap and studied with much higher resolution than available on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) in order to ascertain the spectral composition of the SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) observations. We present our findings in the wavelength range 182-200 Å, which, overall, corroborate the working models of how to interpret the SDO/AIA data. We find, however, that the inclusion of a number of additional lines might improve the data interpretation.

  7. Sandia Energy - Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulations Provide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from a VWiS large-eddy simulation. One of the primary roles of Sandia's Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility will be to conduct detailed experiments on turbine wakes and...

  8. OpenFOAM: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vectorization Effectiveness for GaussSeidel Total % vectoriza.on gain Total vectoriza.on intensity Number of vectorized loops Total T ime ( s) Original w orkload baseline 1 X 4.1 1 707 Original w orkload baseline w ith d isabled auto---vectoriza=on 1.62 X NA 0 436 Tuned w orkload (vectorized u sing intrinsics) 2.25 X 4.2 2 314 Issues with GaussSeidelSmoother Loop Indirect Referencing : - Inefficient use of cacheline - Scatter/Gather overhead Low trip count, on average ~4, not good for

  9. OpenFOAM: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    pages (2MB) are oSen necessary for memory alloca

  10. Large-Scale Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing ... Heavy Duty Fuels DISI Combustion HCCISCCI Fundamentals Spray Combustion Modeling ...

  11. LBE Natural Circulation Fluid Dynamics Validation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voit, Regan; Prince, Robert; Cacuci, Dan G.

    2015-12-20

    Conceptual design of a scaled Natural Circulation Experimental Facility (NCEF) for providing data in support of validating reactor design codes.

  12. Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E [Kennewick, WA; Stenkamp, Victoria S [Richland, WA

    2006-05-30

    Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

  13. Methods for fluid separations, and devices capable of separating fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    TeGrotenhuis, Ward E.; Stenkamp, Victoria S.

    2007-09-25

    Wick-Containing apparatus capable of separating fluids and methods of separating fluids using wicks are disclosed.

  14. Fluid cooled electrical assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rinehart, Lawrence E.; Romero, Guillermo L.

    2007-02-06

    A heat producing, fluid cooled assembly that includes a housing made of liquid-impermeable material, which defines a fluid inlet and a fluid outlet and an opening. Also included is an electrical package having a set of semiconductor electrical devices supported on a substrate and the second major surface is a heat sink adapted to express heat generated from the electrical apparatus and wherein the second major surface defines a rim that is fit to the opening. Further, the housing is constructed so that as fluid travels from the fluid inlet to the fluid outlet it is constrained to flow past the opening thereby placing the fluid in contact with the heat sink.

  15. Spinning fluids reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  16. Lab Plan | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab Plan Ames Laboratory

  17. National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ignition Facility Former Army Ranger wins Sandia-sponsored student of the year award Former Army Ranger Damon Alcorn recently received the Sandia National Laboratories-Livermore Chamber of Commerce Student of the Year Award. Presented at the Chamber's State of the City Luncheon last month, the annual award highlights a Las Positas College student with exemplary academic... NNSA makers and hackers engage innovation and partnerships NNSA's labs change the world everyday through cutting-edge

  18. On the fluid mechanics of fires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    TIESZEN,SHELDON R.

    2000-02-29

    Fluid mechanics research related to fire is reviewed with focus on canonical flows, multiphysics coupling aspects, experimental and numerical techniques. Fire is a low-speed, chemically-reacting, flow in which buoyancy plans an important role. Fire research has focused on two canonical flows, the reacting boundary-layer and the reacting free plume. There is rich, multi-lateral, bi-directional, coupling among fluid mechanics and scalar transport, combustion, and radiation. There is only a limited experimental fluid-mechanics database for fire due to measurement difficulties in the harsh environment, and the focus within the fire community on thermal/chemical consequences. Increasingly, computational fluid dynamics techniques are being used to provide engineering guidance on thermal/chemical consequences and to study fire phenomenology.

  19. Nonlinear stability of ideal fluid equilibria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holm, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The Lyapunov method for establishing stability is related to well- known energy principles for nondissipative dynamical systems. A development of the Lyapunov method for Hamiltonian systems due to Arnold establishes sufficient conditions for Lyapunov stability by using the energy plus other conserved quantities, together with second variations and convexity estimates. When treating the stability of ideal fluid dynamics within the Hamiltonian framework, a useful class of these conserved quantities consists of the Casimir functionals, which Poisson-commute with all functionals of the dynamical fluid variables. Such conserved quantities, when added to the energy, help to provide convexity estimates that bound the growth of perturbations. These convexity estimates, in turn, provide norms necessary for establishing Lyapunov stability under the nonlinear evolution. In contrast, the commonly used second variation or spectral stability arguments only prove linearized stability. As ideal fluid examples, in these lectures we discuss planar barotropic compressible fluid dynamics, the three-dimensional hydrostatic Boussinesq model, and a new set of shallow water equations with nonlinear dispersion due to Basdenkov, Morosov, and Pogutse(1985). Remarkably, all three of these samples have the same Hamiltonian structure and, thus, possess the same Casimir functionals upon which their stability analyses are based. We also treat stability of modified quasigeostrophic flow, a problem whose Hamiltonian structure and Casimirs closely resemble Arnold's original example. Finally, we discuss some aspects of conditional stability and the applicability of Arnold's development of the Lyapunov technique. 100 refs.

  20. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  1. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  2. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  3. Laboratory Waste | Sample Preparation Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Laboratory Waste Sharps Broken Glass Containment Hazardous Waste All waste produced in the Sample Prep Labs should be appropriately disposed of at SLAC. You are prohibited to transport waste back to your home institution. Designated areas exist in the labs for sharps, broken glass, and hazardous waste. Sharps, broken glass, and hazardous waste must never be disposed of in the trash cans or sink drains. Containment Bottles, jars, and plastic bags are available for containing chemical waste. Place

  4. Geomechanical Simulation of Fluid-Driven Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhnenko, R.; Nikolskiy, D.; Mogilevskaya, S.; Labuz, J.

    2012-11-30

    The project supported graduate students working on experimental and numerical modeling of rock fracture, with the following objectives: (a) perform laboratory testing of fluid-saturated rock; (b) develop predictive models for simulation of fracture; and (c) establish educational frameworks for geologic sequestration issues related to rock fracture. These objectives were achieved through (i) using a novel apparatus to produce faulting in a fluid-saturated rock; (ii) modeling fracture with a boundary element method; and (iii) developing curricula for training geoengineers in experimental mechanics, numerical modeling of fracture, and poroelasticity.

  5. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali; Sykora, Frank; Dorbeck, Mark

    2010-10-12

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  6. Laboratory Applications

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Laboratory Applications What are contaminants normally found in hydrogen from fueling nozzle? JP Hsu SmartChemistry.com Particulates are most common found in Hydrogen - 96% hydrogen fuel contains particulates in 108 Particulate Samplings. Typical Particulate filter - 0.035mg/kg SmartChemistry.com H 2 Station X Particulate Sample Particulate Concentration at 700 Bar: 2.0 mg/kg Particulate filter after sampling, in which 4.001mg particulates are found in 2 kilogram hydrogen SmartChemistry.com H 2

  7. Electrorheological fluids and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Green, Peter F.; McIntyre, Ernest C.

    2015-06-02

    Electrorheological fluids and methods include changes in liquid-like materials that can flow like milk and subsequently form solid-like structures under applied electric fields; e.g., about 1 kV/mm. Such fluids can be used in various ways as smart suspensions, including uses in automotive, defense, and civil engineering applications. Electrorheological fluids and methods include one or more polar molecule substituted polyhedral silsesquioxanes (e.g., sulfonated polyhedral silsesquioxanes) and one or more oils (e.g., silicone oil), where the fluid can be subjected to an electric field.

  8. A review of the use of nonionic surfactants and derivatives to improve fluid injection rates in waterflooding and enhanced oil recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borchardt, J.K.

    1993-12-31

    In waterflooding and enhanced oil recovery, raising the aqueous fluid injection rate can increase the oil production rate, shorten project life, and increase profitability. However, one cannot increase injection pressures above rock fracturing or parting pressure. Acidizing has been used to increase injection rates. Another technique is to reduce oil saturation near the injection well. This alters one`s position on the oil-water relative permeability curve thereby increasing rock permeability to water. Thus aqueous fluid injection rates can be increased without raising injection pressures. Nonionic surfactants such as alcohol ethoxylates can be used to reduce the oil saturation near the injection wellbore. The surfactant is perhaps best chosen on the basis of dynamic interfacial tension (IFT) rather than equilibrium IFT data obtained under downhole conditions. The reason for preferring dynamic IFT values is the short residence time of the surfactant solutions in the rock near the wellbore. Other applicable laboratory techniques will be discussed.

  9. Fluid delivery control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  10. FLUID CONTROLLING MEANS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pouliot, H.N.

    1960-11-01

    A device is described for releasing fluid from a container and delivering it to an outlet conduit. An explosive squib moves a piston so as to cut a wall section from the conduit and to punch a hole in the container, whereby a fluid may pass from the container into the conduit. A deformable sleeve retains the piston in its final position.