Sample records for fluid dynamics cfd

  1. V European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berning, Torsten

    V European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2010 J. C. F. Pereira and A, increase the mixing of fuel and oxidant, control formation of harmful emissions, and increase the life

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling for High Rate Pulverized Coal Injection (PCI) into the Blast Furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Chenn Zhou

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulverized coal injection (PCI) into the blast furnace (BF) has been recognized as an effective way to decrease the coke and total energy consumption along with minimization of environmental impacts. However, increasing the amount of coal injected into the BF is currently limited by the lack of knowledge of some issues related to the process. It is therefore important to understand the complex physical and chemical phenomena in the PCI process. Due to the difficulty in attaining trus BF measurements, Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling has been identified as a useful technology to provide such knowledge. CFD simulation is powerful for providing detailed information on flow properties and performing parametric studies for process design and optimization. In this project, comprehensive 3-D CFD models have been developed to simulate the PCI process under actual furnace conditions. These models provide raceway size and flow property distributions. The results have provided guidance for optimizing the PCI process.

  3. Designing high power targets with computational fluid dynamics (CFD)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covrig, S. D. [Thomas Jefferson National Laboratory, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    High power liquid hydrogen (LH2) targets, up to 850 W, have been widely used at Jefferson Lab for the 6 GeV physics program. The typical luminosity loss of a 20 cm long LH2 target was 20% for a beam current of 100 ?A rastered on a square of side 2 mm on the target. The 35 cm long, 2500 W LH2 target for the Qweak experiment had a luminosity loss of 0.8% at 180 ?A beam rastered on a square of side 4 mm at the target. The Qweak target was the highest power liquid hydrogen target in the world and with the lowest noise figure. The Qweak target was the first one designed with CFD at Jefferson Lab. A CFD facility is being established at Jefferson Lab to design, build and test a new generation of low noise high power targets.

  4. V European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    for the optimisation of the energy consumption (heating or cooling); it is then necessary to develop accurate LES. Sequeira (Eds) Lisbon, Portugal,14-17 June 2010 IS THE DYNAMIC PROCEDURE APPROPRIATE FOR ALL SGS MODELS ? H, Subgrid- scale model Abstract. The rapid growth of supercomputers will probably make the use of Large eddy

  5. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SCALED HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK MIXING - CFD MODELING SENSITIVITY STUDY RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JACKSON VL

    2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the tank mixing and sampling demonstration program is to mitigate the technical risks associated with the ability of the Hanford tank farm delivery and celtification systems to measure and deliver a uniformly mixed high-level waste (HLW) feed to the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) Uniform feed to the WTP is a requirement of 24590-WTP-ICD-MG-01-019, ICD-19 - Interface Control Document for Waste Feed, although the exact definition of uniform is evolving in this context. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling has been used to assist in evaluating scaleup issues, study operational parameters, and predict mixing performance at full-scale.

  6. CFD [computational fluid dynamics] And Safety Factors. Computer modeling of complex processes needs old-fashioned experiments to stay in touch with reality.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, Robert A.; Lee, Si Y.; Poirier, Michael R.; Steeper, Timothy J.; Ervin, Robert C.; Giddings, Billy J.; Stefanko, David B.; Harp, Keith D.; Fowley, Mark D.; Van Pelt, William B.

    2012-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is recognized as a powerful engineering tool. That is, CFD has advanced over the years to the point where it can now give us deep insight into the analysis of very complex processes. There is a danger, though, that an engineer can place too much confidence in a simulation. If a user is not careful, it is easy to believe that if you plug in the numbers, the answer comes out, and you are done. This assumption can lead to significant errors. As we discovered in the course of a study on behalf of the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site in South Carolina, CFD models fail to capture some of the large variations inherent in complex processes. These variations, or scatter, in experimental data emerge from physical tests and are inadequately captured or expressed by calculated mean values for a process. This anomaly between experiment and theory can lead to serious errors in engineering analysis and design unless a correction factor, or safety factor, is experimentally validated. For this study, blending times for the mixing of salt solutions in large storage tanks were the process of concern under investigation. This study focused on the blending processes needed to mix salt solutions to ensure homogeneity within waste tanks, where homogeneity is required to control radioactivity levels during subsequent processing. Two of the requirements for this task were to determine the minimum number of submerged, centrifugal pumps required to blend the salt mixtures in a full-scale tank in half a day or less, and to recommend reasonable blending times to achieve nearly homogeneous salt mixtures. A full-scale, low-flow pump with a total discharge flow rate of 500 to 800 gpm was recommended with two opposing 2.27-inch diameter nozzles. To make this recommendation, both experimental and CFD modeling were performed. Lab researchers found that, although CFD provided good estimates of an average blending time, experimental blending times varied significantly from the average.

  7. Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 -rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz Introduction to Computational Fluid Dynamics (iCFD) 424512.0 E, 5 sp / 3 sw 1. Introduction; Fluid dynamics (lecture 1 of 5) Ron Zevenhoven Ã?bo to Computational Fluid Dynamics 424512 E #1 - rz april 2013 Ã?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering

  8. Computational fluid dynamic applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, S.-L.; Lottes, S. A.; Zhou, C. Q.

    2000-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The rapid advancement of computational capability including speed and memory size has prompted the wide use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes to simulate complex flow systems. CFD simulations are used to study the operating problems encountered in system, to evaluate the impacts of operation/design parameters on the performance of a system, and to investigate novel design concepts. CFD codes are generally developed based on the conservation laws of mass, momentum, and energy that govern the characteristics of a flow. The governing equations are simplified and discretized for a selected computational grid system. Numerical methods are selected to simplify and calculate approximate flow properties. For turbulent, reacting, and multiphase flow systems the complex processes relating to these aspects of the flow, i.e., turbulent diffusion, combustion kinetics, interfacial drag and heat and mass transfer, etc., are described in mathematical models, based on a combination of fundamental physics and empirical data, that are incorporated into the code. CFD simulation has been applied to a large variety of practical and industrial scale flow systems.

  9. Computational Fluid Dynamics Study of Aerosol Transport and Deposition Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Yingjie

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, various aerosol particle transport and deposition mechanisms were studied through the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, including inertial impaction, gravitational effect, lift force, interception, and turbophoresis, within...

  10. Application of computational fluid dynamics to aerosol sampling and concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Shishan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An understanding of gas-liquid two-phase interactions, aerosol particle deposition, and heat transfer is needed. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is becoming a powerful tool to predict aerosol behavior for related design work. In this study...

  11. Numerical simulation of the air flow field in a laboratory fume hood using the CFD-ACE(TM) computational fluid dynamics code

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Sousa, Cedric Benedict

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    realized information on the hood entry losses and other design parameters that are of interest to the users, designers and owners of fume hoods. After the specification of the problem and generation of the mesh, the modeled hood was simulated using CFD...

  12. Computational fluid dynamics for the CFBR : challenges that lie ahead /

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B. A.; Yang, Wen-ching,

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of Computational Fluid Dynamics as a tool for design and analysis of the Circulating Fluidized Bed Reactor is considered. The ruminations are largely philosophical in nature, and are based mainly on experience. An assessment of where CFD may, or may not, be a helpful tool for developing the needed understanding, is furnished. To motivate this assessment, a clarification of what composes a CFD analysis is provided. Status of CFD usage in CFBR problems is summarized briefly. Some successes and failures of CFD in CFBR analysis are also discussed; this suggests a practical way to proceed toward the goal of adding CFD as a useful tool, to be used in combination with well-defined experiments, for CFBR needs. The conclusion is that there remains substantial hope that CFD could be very useful in this application. In order to make the hope a reality, nontrivial, and achievable, advances in multiphase flow theory must be made.

  13. Elimination of Adverse Leakage Flow in a Miniature Pediatric Centrifugal Blood Pump by Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paden, Brad

    levitated centrifugal blood pump intended to deliver 0.3­1.5 l/min of support to neo- nates and infants computational fluid dy- namics (CFD) analysis of impeller refinements, we found that sec- ondary blades located by exten- sive in vitro model testing. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been widely used

  14. Formal Calibration Methodology for CFD Model Development to Support the Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajdukiewicz, M.; Keane, M.; O'Flynn, B.; O'Grady, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is a robust tool for modeling interactions within and between fluids and solids. CFD can help understand and predict phenomena that are difficult to test experimentally leading to cleaner, ...

  15. Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a rib grit roughened surface solar air heater using CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karmare, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Government College Engineering, Karad 415 124, Maharashtra (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India); Tikekar, A.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Walchand College of Engineering, Sangli (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India)

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the study of fluid flow and heat transfer in a solar air heater by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which reduces time and cost. Lower side of collector plate is made rough with metal ribs of circular, square and triangular cross-section, having 60 inclinations to the air flow. The grit rib elements are fixed on the surface in staggered manner to form defined grid. The system and operating parameters studied are: e/D{sub h} = 0.044, p/e = 17.5 and l/s = 1.72, for the Reynolds number range 3600-17,000. To validate CFD results, experimental investigations were carried out in the laboratory. It is found that experimental and CFD analysis results give the good agreement. The optimization of rib geometry and its angle of attack is also done. The square cross-section ribs with 58 angle of attack give maximum heat transfer. The percentage enhancement in the heat transfer for square plate over smooth surface is 30%. (author)

  16. Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Yang, 1974-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

  17. Developing an integrated building design tool by coupling building energy simulation and computational fluid dynamics programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, Zhiqiang, 1971-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building energy simulation (ES) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can play important roles in building design by providing essential information to help design energy-efficient, thermally comfortable and healthy ...

  18. Using the FLUENT computational fluid dynamics code to model the NACOK corrosion test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parks, Benjamin T

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of advancing nuclear technology, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis offers safer and lower-cost results relative to experimental work. Its use as a safety analysis tool is gaining much broader acceptance ...

  19. National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

  20. CSE Master Specialization Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Annika

    CSE Master Specialization Fluid Dynamics Course Semester Fluid Dynamics II HS Quantitative Flow Energie- und Verfahrenstechnik FS Biofluiddynamics FS #12;CSE in Fluid Dynamics: Very large high in Fluid Dynamics: Physiology of the inner ear MicroCT imaging Multilayer MFS for Stokes flow simulations

  1. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of coal gasification in a pressurized spout-fluid bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhongyi Deng; Rui Xiao; Baosheng Jin; He Huang; Laihong Shen; Qilei Song; Qianjun Li [Southeast University, Nanjing (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling, which has recently proven to be an effective means of analysis and optimization of energy-conversion processes, has been extended to coal gasification in this paper. A 3D mathematical model has been developed to simulate the coal gasification process in a pressurized spout-fluid bed. This CFD model is composed of gas-solid hydrodynamics, coal pyrolysis, char gasification, and gas phase reaction submodels. The rates of heterogeneous reactions are determined by combining Arrhenius rate and diffusion rate. The homogeneous reactions of gas phase can be treated as secondary reactions. A comparison of the calculated and experimental data shows that most gasification performance parameters can be predicted accurately. This good agreement indicates that CFD modeling can be used for complex fluidized beds coal gasification processes. 37 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Ship hull resistance calculations using CFD methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voxakis, Petros

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In past years, the computational power and run-time required by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes restricted their use in ship design space exploration. Increases in computational power available to designers, in ...

  3. 6. Fluid mechanics: fluid statics; fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Figure Pressure (a scalar!) is defined as surface force / area, for example pb = Fb / (d·w) = p @ z = z1 Picture: KJ05 Fluid volume h·d·w with density and mass m = h·d·w· z = z1 In engineering forces Fn+ Fs = 0 or - py·h·w + py·h·w = 0 py = 0 Similarly Fw+ Fe= 0 gives px = 0, There are three

  4. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    France) 8th Nov. Future Trends in Condition Monitoring of Rotating Machines Using System Identification Simulation of the Cooling of a Simplified Brake Disc Dr. Thorsten J. Möller, (Institute for Fluid Mechanics

  5. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Peter J.

    France) 8 th Nov. Future Trends in Condition Monitoring of Rotating Machines Using System Identification Simulation of the Cooling of a Simplified Brake Disc Dr. Thorsten J. Möller, (Institute for Fluid Mechanics

  6. MR-driven Computational Fluid Dynamics J-F. Nielsen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    MR-driven Computational Fluid Dynamics J-F. Nielsen1 , and K. S. Nayak2 1 Biomedical Engineering-encoding gradient pulse (VENC=1.6 m/s) was placed on the x, y, or z-gradient axis, or was turned off. MR-driven CFD component (vertical in Fig. 1) was incorporated into the MR-driven CFD solver. Hence, vx and vy were

  7. Solution characters of iterative coupling between energy simulation and CFD programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Solution characters of iterative coupling between energy simulation and CFD programs Zhiqiang Energy simulation (ES) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) provide important and complementary information for building energy and indoor environment designs. A coupled ES and CFD simulation can eliminate

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics of rising droplets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Matthew [Lake Superior State University; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of this study is to perform simulations of droplet dynamics using Truchas, a LANL-developed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, and compare them to a computational study of Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259]. Understanding droplet dynamics is of fundamental importance in liquid-liquid extraction, a process used in the nuclear fuel cycle to separate various components. Simulations of a single droplet rising by buoyancy are conducted in two-dimensions. Multiple parametric studies are carried out to ensure the problem set-up is optimized. An Interface Smoothing Length (ISL) study and mesh resolution study are performed to verify convergence of the calculations. ISL is a parameter for the interface curvature calculation. Further, wall effects are investigated and checked against existing correlations. The ISL study found that the optimal ISL value is 2.5{Delta}x, with {Delta}x being the mesh cell spacing. The mesh resolution study found that the optimal mesh resolution is d/h=40, for d=drop diameter and h={Delta}x. In order for wall effects on terminal velocity to be insignificant, a conservative wall width of 9d or a nonconservative wall width of 7d can be used. The percentage difference between Hysing et al.[IJNMF, 2009, 60:1259] and Truchas for the velocity profiles vary from 7.9% to 9.9%. The computed droplet velocity and interface profiles are found in agreement with the study. The CFD calculations are performed on multiple cores, using LANL's Institutional High Performance Computing.

  9. Viscous fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2007-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We briefly discuss the phenomenological theory of dissipative fluid. We also present some numerical results for hydrodynamic evolution of QGP fluid with dissipation due to shear viscosity only. Its effect on particle production is also studied.

  10. View dependent fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barran, Brian Arthur

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    , are modified to support a nonuniform simulation grid. In addition, infinite fluid boundary conditions are introduced that allow fluid to flow freely into or out of the simulation domain to achieve the effect of large, boundary free bodies of fluid. Finally, a...

  11. Computational fluid dynamic modeling of fluidized-bed polymerization reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokkam, Ram [Ames Laboratory

    2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyethylene is one of the most widely used plastics, and over 60 million tons are produced worldwide every year. Polyethylene is obtained by the catalytic polymerization of ethylene in gas and liquid phase reactors. The gas phase processes are more advantageous, and use fluidized-bed reactors for production of polyethylene. Since they operate so close to the melting point of the polymer, agglomeration is an operational concern in all slurry and gas polymerization processes. Electrostatics and hot spot formation are the main factors that contribute to agglomeration in gas-phase processes. Electrostatic charges in gas phase polymerization fluidized bed reactors are known to influence the bed hydrodynamics, particle elutriation, bubble size, bubble shape etc. Accumulation of electrostatic charges in the fluidized-bed can lead to operational issues. In this work a first-principles electrostatic model is developed and coupled with a multi-fluid computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model to understand the effect of electrostatics on the dynamics of a fluidized-bed. The multi-fluid CFD model for gas-particle flow is based on the kinetic theory of granular flows closures. The electrostatic model is developed based on a fixed, size-dependent charge for each type of particle (catalyst, polymer, polymer fines) phase. The combined CFD model is first verified using simple test cases, validated with experiments and applied to a pilot-scale polymerization fluidized-bed reactor. The CFD model reproduced qualitative trends in particle segregation and entrainment due to electrostatic charges observed in experiments. For the scale up of fluidized bed reactor, filtered models are developed and implemented on pilot scale reactor.

  12. CFD Simulation of Dynamic Thrust and Radial Forces on a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    CFD Simulation of Dynamic Thrust and Radial Forces on a Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Blade K. Mc vibration source of a small scale vertical axis wind turbine. The dynamic loading on the blades of the turbine, as they rotate about the central shaft and travel through a range of relative angles of attack

  13. Development of a Laboratory Verified Single-Duct VAV System Model with Fan Powered Terminal Units Optimized Using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Michael A.

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    the static pressure drop as air passed through the unit over the full operating range of the FPTU. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of typical a FPTU were developed and used to investigate opportunities for optimizing the design of FPTUs. The CFD...

  14. Computational fluid dynamic simulations of chemical looping fuel reactors utilizing gaseous fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahalatkar, K.; Kuhlman, J.; Huckaby, E.D.; O'Brien, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamic(CFD) model for the fuel reactor of chemical looping combustion technology has been developed,withspecialfocusonaccuratelyrepresentingtheheterogeneous chemicalreactions.Acontinuumtwo-fluidmodelwasusedtodescribeboththegasandsolidphases. Detailedsub-modelstoaccountforfluid–particleandparticle–particleinteractionforceswerealso incorporated.Twoexperimentalcaseswereanalyzedinthisstudy(Son andKim,2006; Mattisonetal., 2001). SimulationswerecarriedouttotestthecapabilityoftheCFDmodeltocapturechangesinoutletgas concentrationswithchangesinnumberofparameterssuchassuperficialvelocity,metaloxide concentration,reactortemperature,etc.Fortheexperimentsof Mattissonetal.(2001), detailedtime varyingoutletconcentrationvalueswerecompared,anditwasfoundthatCFDsimulationsprovideda reasonablematchwiththisdata.

  15. Optimization of a high-efficiency jet ejector by computational fluid dynamic software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanawanavet, Somsak

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. A conventional finite-volume scheme was utilized to solve two-dimensional transport equations with the standard k-?? turbulence model (Kim et. al., 1999). In this study of a constant-area jet ejector, all parameters...

  16. Ultrarelativistic fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David W. Neilsen; Matthew W. Choptuik

    1999-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first of two papers examining the critical collapse of spherically symmetric perfect fluids with the equation of state P = (Gamma -1)rho. Here we present the equations of motion and describe a computer code capable of simulating the extremely relativistic flows encountered in critical solutions for Gamma <= 2. The fluid equations are solved using a high-resolution shock-capturing scheme based on a linearized Riemann solver.

  17. Technical Review of the CENWP Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of the John Day Dam Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers Portland District (CENWP) has developed a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the John Day forebay on the Columbia River to aid in the development and design of alternatives to improve juvenile salmon passage at the John Day Project. At the request of CENWP, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Hydrology Group has conducted a technical review of CENWP's CFD model run in CFD solver software, STAR-CD. PNNL has extensive experience developing and applying 3D CFD models run in STAR-CD for Columbia River hydroelectric projects. The John Day forebay model developed by CENWP is adequately configured and validated. The model is ready for use simulating forebay hydraulics for structural and operational alternatives. The approach and method are sound, however CENWP has identified some improvements that need to be made for future models and for modifications to this existing model.

  18. Validation of a Fast-Fluid-Dynamics Model for Predicting Distribution of Particles with Low Stokes Number

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuo, Wangda; Chen, Qingyan

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To design a healthy indoor environment, it is important to study airborne particle distribution indoors. As an intermediate model between multizone models and computational fluid dynamics (CFD), a fast fluid dynamics (FFD) model can be used to provide temporal and spatial information of particle dispersion in real time. This study evaluated the accuracy of the FFD for predicting transportation of particles with low Stokes number in a duct and in a room with mixed convection. The evaluation was to compare the numerical results calculated by the FFD with the corresponding experimental data and the results obtained by the CFD. The comparison showed that the FFD could capture major pattern of particle dispersion, which is missed in models with well-mixed assumptions. Although the FFD was less accurate than the CFD partially due to its simplification in numeric schemes, it was 53 times faster than the CFD.

  19. Multi-phasing CFD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics for multiphase flows is an emerging field. Due to the complexity and divergence of multiphase thermal and hydraulic problems, further development of multiphase flow modelling, closure laws and numerical methods is needed in order to achieve the general purpose and optimised CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) methods, which will be applicable to the wide variety of multiphase flow problems. In the paper, an original approach to the various aspects of multiphase CFD modelling is presented. It is based on the multi-fluid modelling approach, development of necessary closure laws and derivation of appropriate numerical methods for efficient governing equations solution. Velocity and pressure fields are solved with the SIMPLE (Semi-Implicit Method for Pressure-Linked Equations) type pressure-corrector method developed for the multiphase flow conditions. For the solution of scalar parameters transport equations both implicit and explicit methods are presented. The implicit method is suitable for steady state, slow transients and problems without the sharp fronts propagation. Explicit method is developed in order to predict scalar parameters fronts propagation, as well as phase interface tracking problems. The challenge towards the multiphase flow solution on both the macro and micro level is presented in order to perform multiphase CFD simulations and analyses of multiphase flows in complex geometry of nuclear power plant components, such as nuclear fuel rod bundles thermal-hydraulics. Presented methodology and obtained CFD results comprise micro-scale phenomena of phases' separation, interface tracking, heated surfaces dry-out and critical heat flux occurrence, as well as macro-scale transport and distributions of phase volumes. (authors)

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics Simulation of Fluidized Bed Polymerization Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rong Fan

    2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluidized beds (FB) reactors are widely used in the polymerization industry due to their superior heat- and mass-transfer characteristics. Nevertheless, problems associated with local overheating of polymer particles and excessive agglomeration leading to FB reactors defluidization still persist and limit the range of operating temperatures that can be safely achieved in plant-scale reactors. Many people have been worked on the modeling of FB polymerization reactors, and quite a few models are available in the open literature, such as the well-mixed model developed by McAuley, Talbot, and Harris (1994), the constant bubble size model (Choi and Ray, 1985) and the heterogeneous three phase model (Fernandes and Lona, 2002). Most these research works focus on the kinetic aspects, but from industrial viewpoint, the behavior of FB reactors should be modeled by considering the particle and fluid dynamics in the reactor. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is a powerful tool for understanding the effect of fluid dynamics on chemical reactor performance. For single-phase flows, CFD models for turbulent reacting flows are now well understood and routinely applied to investigate complex flows with detailed chemistry. For multiphase flows, the state-of-the-art in CFD models is changing rapidly and it is now possible to predict reasonably well the flow characteristics of gas-solid FB reactors with mono-dispersed, non-cohesive solids. This thesis is organized into seven chapters. In Chapter 2, an overview of fluidized bed polymerization reactors is given, and a simplified two-site kinetic mechanism are discussed. Some basic theories used in our work are given in detail in Chapter 3. First, the governing equations and other constitutive equations for the multi-fluid model are summarized, and the kinetic theory for describing the solid stress tensor is discussed. The detailed derivation of DQMOM for the population balance equation is given as the second section. In this section, monovariate population balance, bivariate population balance, aggregation and breakage equation and DQMOM-Multi-Fluid model are described. In the last section of Chapter 3, numerical methods involved in the multi-fluid model and time-splitting method are presented. Chapter 4 is based on a paper about application of DQMOM to polydisperse gas-solid fluidized beds. Results for a constant aggregation and breakage kernel and a kernel developed from kinetic theory are shown. The effect of the aggregation success factor and the fragment distribution function are investigated. Chapter 5 shows the work on validation of mixing and segregation phenomena in gas-solid fluidized beds with a binary mixture or a continuous size distribution. The simulation results are compared with available experiment data and discrete-particle simulation. Chapter 6 presents the project with Univation Technologies on CFD simulation of a Polyethylene pilot-scale FB reactor, The fluid dynamics, mass/heat transfer and particle size distribution are investigated through CFD simulation and validated with available experimental data. The conclusions of this study and future work are discussed in Chapter 7.

  1. Validation of a Coupled Multizone and CFD Program for Building Airflow and Contaminant Transport Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) have been widely used in simulations of building airflow distribution takes several minutes to perform an hour-by-hour dynamic simulation of a whole building for one year. "Validation of a coupled multizone and CFD program for building airflow and contaminant transport simulations

  2. On the application of computational fluid dynamics codes for liquefied natural gas dispersion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine; Koopman, Ronald P. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA); Ermak, Donald (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA)

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are increasingly being used in the liquefied natural gas (LNG) industry to predict natural gas dispersion distances. This paper addresses several issues regarding the use of CFD for LNG dispersion such as specification of the domain, grid, boundary and initial conditions. A description of the k-{var_epsilon} model is presented, along with modifications required for atmospheric flows. Validation issues pertaining to the experimental data from the Burro, Coyote, and Falcon series of LNG dispersion experiments are also discussed. A description of the atmosphere is provided as well as discussion on the inclusion of the Coriolis force to model very large LNG spills.

  3. V European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abgrall, Rémi

    QUANTIFICATION OF SHOCKED FLOWS, COMPARISON WITH A NON-INTRUSIVE POLYNOMIAL CHAOS METHOD R. Abgrall , P) in the context of compressible inviscid flows. More specifically, we aim at comparing a well documented non-intrusive in some details the method recently proposed in [1]; Section 3 reviews the non-intrusive Polynomial Chaos

  4. V European Conference on Computational Fluid Dynamics ECCOMAS CFD 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    QUANTIFICATION OF SHOCKED FLOWS, COMPARISON WITH A NON-INTRUSIVE POLYNOMIAL CHAOS METHOD R. Abgrall , P) in the context of compressible inviscid flows. More specifically, we aim at comparing a well documented non-intrusive proposed in [?]; Section 3 reviews the non-intrusive Polynomial Chaos approach also employed in this study

  5. Continuum limit of lattice gas fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, C.M.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The general theory for multiple-speed lattice gas algorithm (LGAs) is developed where previously only a single-speed theory existed. A series of microdynamical multiple-speed models are developed that effectively erase the underlying lattice from the macroscopic dynamics allowing the LGA to reproduce the results of continuum hydrodynamics exactly. The underlying lattice is the 4D FCHC lattice. This lattice: (1) Permits all integral energies, (2) Has sufficient symmetry to allow for an isotropic stress tensor for each energy individually, (3) Allows interaction amongst all energies, and (4) Has discrete microscopic Galilean invariance, all of which allows the extension of the model to higher-speeds. This lattice is the only regular lattice with these remarkable properties, all of which are required to show that the discreteness artifacts completely disappear from the LGA in the limit of infinite speeds, so that correct continuum hydrodynamic behavior results. The author verifies the removal of the discreteness artifacts from the momentum equation using a decaying shear wave experiment and shows they are still invisible for Mach numbers up to M [approximately].4 beyond the theoretical limit. Flow between flat plates replicated the expected parabolic profile of Poiseuille flow in the mean when started from rest. Two separate measurements of the kinematic viscosity of the fluid (normal pressure drop and the microscopic particle force at the wall) agreed with each other and with the shear wave viscosity to better than 1%. Cylinder flow simulations accurately reproduced drag coefficients and eddy-length to diameter ratios for Re[le]45 to within the error of experimental observation. At higher Reynolds number, Re [approx equal] 65, vortex shedding was observed to occur. CFD results for flow past cylinders at similar Reynolds numbers produce either erroneous results or rely on artificially perturbing the flow to cause phenomena that does not occur naturally in the method.

  6. Development and Verification of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model of a Horizontal-Axis Tidal Current Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lawson, M. J.; Li, Y.; Sale, D. C.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the development of a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methodology to simulate the hydrodynamics of horizontal-axis tidal current turbines. Qualitative measures of the CFD solutions were independent of the grid resolution. Conversely, quantitative comparisons of the results indicated that the use of coarse computational grids results in an under prediction of the hydrodynamic forces on the turbine blade in comparison to the forces predicted using more resolved grids. For the turbine operating conditions considered in this study, the effect of the computational timestep on the CFD solution was found to be minimal, and the results from steady and transient simulations were in good agreement. Additionally, the CFD results were compared to corresponding blade element momentum method calculations and reasonable agreement was shown. Nevertheless, we expect that for other turbine operating conditions, where the flow over the blade is separated, transient simulations will be required.

  7. CFD Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Bundles and Spacer Grids for PWR Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capone, Luigi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of the turbulent flows in nuclear fuel bundles is a very interesting task to optimize the efficiency of modern nuclear power plants. The proposed study utilizes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to characterize the flow pattern...

  8. CFD Analysis of Nuclear Fuel Bundles and Spacer Grids for PWR Reactors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capone, Luigi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of the turbulent flows in nuclear fuel bundles is a very interesting task to optimize the efficiency of modern nuclear power plants. The proposed study utilizes Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to characterize the flow pattern...

  9. A simplified approach to describe complex diffusers in displacement ventilation for CFD simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    A simplified approach to describe complex diffusers in displacement ventilation for CFD simulations to improve indoor air quality while simultaneously reduce energy demand, displacement ventilation is becom ent ventilation usin g com putational fluid dynamics (CFD) is challenging due to the com plexity

  10. Complete CFD analysis of a Velocity XL-5 RG with flight-test verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schouten, Shane Michael

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of the canard wake and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) were used to provide a clear picture of the flowfield around the aircraft. The first step of the project consisted of making a 3-D CAD model of the aircraft. This model was then used for the CFD...

  11. CFD evaluation of pipeline gas stratification at low fluid flow due to temperature effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brar, Pardeep Singh

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    *A*?T On simplifying the above equation, applying forward difference and integrating both sides from west (W) to east (E), we get the following form of equation: ()() 2*( )* WW P WEE E P P EW kA T TkA T T rh T T x xx ? ?? ? ?? ? =?? 18 This is the general equation... and how much it differs from the CFD Analysis results. 41 0 2040608010 Z/D -1 0 1 2 P e rcen t D i fferen c e Single Elbow Upstream Simulated USM Compared To CFD Results, ?T Constant 5.5 o K (10 o F), 0.15 m/s (0.5 ft/s) 13.8 o K (25 o F), 0.15 m/s (0...

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Framework for Turbine Biological Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Sick, Mirjam; Cada, G. F.

    2011-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a method for turbine biological performance assessment is introduced to bridge the gap between field and laboratory studies on fish injury and turbine design. Using this method, a suite of biological performance indicators is computed based on simulated data from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of a proposed turbine design. Each performance indicator is a measure of the probability of exposure to a certain dose of an injury mechanism. If the relationship between the dose of an injury mechanism and frequency of injury (dose-response) is known from laboratory or field studies, the likelihood of fish injury for a turbine design can be computed from the performance indicator. By comparing the values of the indicators from various turbine designs, the engineer can identify the more-promising designs. Discussion here is focused on Kaplan-type turbines, although the method could be extended to other designs. Following the description of the general methodology, we will present sample risk assessment calculations based on CFD data from a model of the John Day Dam on the Columbia River in the USA.

  13. Metaphoric optical computing of fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, M; Tsang, Mankei; Psaltis, Demetri

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present theoretical and numerical evidence to show that self-defocusing nonlinear optical propagation can be used to compute Euler fluid dynamics and possibly Navier-Stokes fluid dynamics. In particular, the formation of twin vortices and the K\\'arm\\'an vortex street behind an obstacle, two well-known viscous fluid phenomena, is numerically demonstrated using the nonlinear Schr\\"odinger equation.

  14. Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the VHTR Lower Plenum Standard Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 ºC to perhaps 1000 ºC. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is being considered for safety analysis for existing and future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present report presents results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made.

  15. ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 ITP Chemicals: Technology Roadmap for Computational Fluid Dynamics, January 1999 cfdroadmap.pdf More Documents & Publications A Workshop to Identify...

  16. Dynamical instability of collapsing radiating fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharif, M., E-mail: msharif.math@pu.edu.pk; Azam, M., E-mail: azammath@gmail.com [University of the Punjab, Department of Mathematics (Pakistan)

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We take the collapsing radiative fluid to investigate the dynamical instability with cylindrical symmetry. We match the interior and exterior cylindrical geometries. Dynamical instability is explored at radiative and non-radiative perturbations. We conclude that the dynamical instability of the collapsing cylinder depends on the critical value {gamma} < 1 for both radiative and nonradiative perturbations.

  17. Simulation of Complex Fluids using Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Simulation of Complex Fluids using Dissipative Particle Dynamics Abstract: Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is a relatively new mesoscopic method ...

  18. Robust processing of optical flow of fluids Ashish Doshi and Adrian G. Bors, Senior Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bors, Adrian

    the computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Navier-Stokes equations have been extensively studied in fluid mechanics Terms--Optical flow of fluids, computational fluid dy- namics, diffusion, vortex detection I displaying fluid movement. Velocity fields, characterizing the motion of fluids can be modelled using

  19. CCM Continuity Constraint Method: A finite-element computational fluid dynamics algorithm for incompressible Navier-Stokes fluid flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, P.T.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As the field of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) continues to mature, algorithms are required to exploit the most recent advances in approximation theory, numerical mathematics, computing architectures, and hardware. Meeting this requirement is particularly challenging in incompressible fluid mechanics, where primitive-variable CFD formulations that are robust, while also accurate and efficient in three dimensions, remain an elusive goal. This dissertation asserts that one key to accomplishing this goal is recognition of the dual role assumed by the pressure, i.e., a mechanism for instantaneously enforcing conservation of mass and a force in the mechanical balance law for conservation of momentum. Proving this assertion has motivated the development of a new, primitive-variable, incompressible, CFD algorithm called the Continuity Constraint Method (CCM). The theoretical basis for the CCM consists of a finite-element spatial semi-discretization of a Galerkin weak statement, equal-order interpolation for all state-variables, a 0-implicit time-integration scheme, and a quasi-Newton iterative procedure extended by a Taylor Weak Statement (TWS) formulation for dispersion error control. Original contributions to algorithmic theory include: (a) formulation of the unsteady evolution of the divergence error, (b) investigation of the role of non-smoothness in the discretized continuity-constraint function, (c) development of a uniformly H{sup 1} Galerkin weak statement for the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes pressure Poisson equation, (d) derivation of physically and numerically well-posed boundary conditions, and (e) investigation of sparse data structures and iterative methods for solving the matrix algebra statements generated by the algorithm.

  20. Swing Check Valve Design Criteria and CFD Validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallstream, Brian E.; Fricke, Brian A.; Becker, Bryan R. [University of Missouri-Kansas City (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides information on swing check valve selection criteria suitable for nuclear power plant applications. In this project, four swing check valves were analyzed to demonstrate the implementation and application of this information. In this example, swing check valves were selected according to 'ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III' and 'ASME B16.34, Valves Flanged, Threaded, and Welding End'. This paper also discusses the utilization of Computational Fluid Dynamics Software (CFD) as a means to analyze valve design. The use of CFD is a relatively new approach for validation of valve design that is becoming invaluable due to the high cost of physical bench testing. The Instrument Society of America (ISA) Analysis Division and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Computational Fluid Dynamics Technical Committee have taken a proactive approach in setting standards and practices for the use of CFD in design and validation. (authors)

  1. Fluid Dynamics in Sucker Rod Pumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cutler, R.P.; Mansure, A.J.

    1999-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Sucker rod pumps are installed in approximately 90% of all oil wells in the U.S. Although they have been widely used for decades, there are many issues regarding the fluid dynamics of the pump that have not been fully investigated. A project was conducted at Sandia National Laboratories to develop unimproved understanding of the fluid dynamics inside a sucker rod pump. A mathematical flow model was developed to predict pressures in any pump component or an entire pump under single-phase fluid and pumping conditions. Laboratory flow tests were conducted on instrumented individual pump components and on a complete pump to verify and refine the model. The mathematical model was then converted to a Visual Basic program to allow easy input of fluid, geometry and pump parameters and to generate output plots. Examples of issues affecting pump performance investigated with the model include the effects of viscosity, surface roughness, valve design details, plunger and valve pressure differentials, and pumping rate.

  2. Fluid dynamics on sieve trays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hag, M.A.

    1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted to investigate the effects of fluid properties on the hydrodynamics of sieve tray columns. The study showed that changes in liquid viscosity influenced froth height, while changes in liquid surface tension and density influenced total pressure drop across the trays. Liquid holdup was independent of these solution properties. The liquid systems used for the study were: water/glycerol for viscosity, water/ethanol for surface tension and methanol/chloroform for density.

  3. Formulation, Implementation and Validation of a Two-Fluid model in a Fuel Cell CFD Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kunal Jain, Vernon Cole, Sanjiv Kumar and N. Vaidya

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water management is one of the main challenges in PEM Fuel Cells. While water is essential for membrane electrical conductivity, excess liquid water leads to ooding of catalyst layers. Despite the fact that accurate prediction of two-phase transport is key for optimal water management, understanding of the two-phase transport in fuel cells is relatively poor. Wang et. al. [1], [2] have studied the two-phase transport in the channel and diffusion layer separately using a multiphase mixture model. The model fails to accurately predict saturation values for high humidity inlet streams. Nguyen et. al. [3] developed a two-dimensional, two-phase, isothermal, isobaric, steady state model of the catalyst and gas diffusion layers. The model neglects any liquid in the channel. Djilali et. al. [4] developed a three-dimensional two-phase multicomponent model. The model is an improvement over previous models, but neglects drag between the liquid and the gas phases in the channel. In this work, we present a comprehensive two- fluid model relevant to fuel cells. Models for two-phase transport through Channel, Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) and Channel-GDL interface, are discussed. In the channel, the gas and liquid pressures are assumed to be same. The surface tension effects in the channel are incorporated using the continuum surface force (CSF) model. The force at the surface is expressed as a volumetric body force and added as a source to the momentum equation. In the GDL, the gas and liquid are assumed to be at different pressures. The difference in the pressures (capillary pressure) is calculated using an empirical correlations. At the Channel-GDL interface, the wall adhesion affects need to be taken into account. SIMPLE-type methods recast the continuity equation into a pressure-correction equation, the solution of which then provides corrections for velocities and pressures. However, in the two-fluid model, the presence of two phasic continuity equations gives more freedom and more complications. A general approach would be to form a mixture continuity equation by linearly combining the phasic continuity equations using appropriate weighting factors. Analogous to mixture equation for pressure correction, a difference equation is used for the volume/phase fraction by taking the difference between the phasic continuity equations. The relative advantages of the above mentioned algorithmic variants for computing pressure correction and volume fractions are discussed and quantitatively assessed. Preliminary model validation is done for each component of the fuel cell. The two-phase transport in the channel is validated using empirical correlations. Transport in the GDL is validated against results obtained from LBM and VOF simulation techniques. The Channel-GDL interface transport will be validated against experiment and empirical correlation of droplet detachment at the interface. References [1] Y. Wang S. Basu and C.Y. Wang. Modeling two-phase flow in pem fuel cell channels. J. Power Sources, 179:603{617, 2008. [2] P. K. Sinha and C. Y. Wang. Liquid water transport in a mixed-wet gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell. Chem. Eng. Sci., 63:1081-1091, 2008. [3] Guangyu Lin and Trung Van Nguyen. A two-dimensional two-phase model of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 153(2):A372{A382, 2006. [4] T. Berning and N. Djilali. A 3d, multiphase, multicomponent model of the cathode and anode of a pem fuel cell. J. Electrochem. Soc., 150(12):A1589{A1598, 2003.

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Flexible Duct Junction Box Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beach, R.; Prahl, D.; Lange, R.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance. Current Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) guidance (Group 11, Appendix 3, ACCA Manual D, Rutkowski 2009) allows for unconstrained variation in the number of takeoffs, box sizes, and takeoff locations. The only variables currently used in selecting an equivalent length (EL) are velocity of air in the duct and friction rate, given the first takeoff is located at least twice its diameter away from the inlet. This condition does not account for other factors impacting pressure loss across these types of fittings. For each simulation, the IBACOS team converted pressure loss within a box to an EL to compare variation in ACCA Manual D guidance to the simulated variation. IBACOS chose cases to represent flows reasonably correlating to flows typically encountered in the field and analyzed differences in total pressure due to increases in number and location of takeoffs, box dimensions, and velocity of air, and whether an entrance fitting is included. The team also calculated additional balancing losses for all cases due to discrepancies between intended outlet flows and natural flow splits created by the fitting. In certain asymmetrical cases, the balancing losses were significantly higher than symmetrical cases where the natural splits were close to the targets. Thus, IBACOS has shown additional design constraints that can ensure better system performance.

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses on Very High Temperature Reactor Air Ingress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang H Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to understand density-gradient-induced stratified flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) air-ingress accident. Various parameters were taken into consideration, including turbulence model, core temperature, initial air mole-fraction, and flow resistance in the core. The gas turbine modular helium reactor (GT-MHR) 600 MWt was selected as the reference reactor and it was simplified to be 2-D geometry in modeling. The core and the lower plenum were assumed to be porous bodies. Following the preliminary CFD results, the analysis of the air-ingress accident has been performed by two different codes: GAMMA code (system analysis code, Oh et al. 2006) and FLUENT CFD code (Fluent 2007). Eventually, the analysis results showed that the actual onset time of natural convection (~160 sec) would be significantly earlier than the previous predictions (~150 hours) calculated based on the molecular diffusion air-ingress mechanism. This leads to the conclusion that the consequences of this accident will be much more serious than previously expected.

  6. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Vortex Suppress Device Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was used in an investigation into the suppression of a surface vortex that forms and the south-most spilling bay at The Dalles Project. The CFD work complemented work at the prototype and the reduced-scale physical models. The CFD model was based on a model developed for other work in the forebay but had additional resolution added near the spillway. Vortex suppression devices (VSDs) were to placed between pier noses and/or in the bulkhead slot of the spillway bays. The simulations in this study showed that placing VSD structures or a combination of structures to suppress the vortex would still result in near-surface flows to be entrained in a vortex near the downstream spillwall. These results were supported by physical model and prototype studies. However, there was a consensus of the fish biologists at the physical model that the fish would most likely move north and if the fish went under the VSD it would immediately exit the forebay through the tainter gate and not get trapped between VSDs or the VSDs and the tainter gate if the VSDs were deep enough.

  7. Code Verification of the HIGRAD Computational Fluid Dynamics Solver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Buren, Kendra L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Canfield, Jesse M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sauer, Jeremy A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to outline code and solution verification activities applied to HIGRAD, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver of the compressible Navier-Stokes equations developed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and used to simulate various phenomena such as the propagation of wildfires and atmospheric hydrodynamics. Code verification efforts, as described in this report, are an important first step to establish the credibility of numerical simulations. They provide evidence that the mathematical formulation is properly implemented without significant mistakes that would adversely impact the application of interest. Highly accurate analytical solutions are derived for four code verification test problems that exercise different aspects of the code. These test problems are referred to as: (i) the quiet start, (ii) the passive advection, (iii) the passive diffusion, and (iv) the piston-like problem. These problems are simulated using HIGRAD with different levels of mesh discretization and the numerical solutions are compared to their analytical counterparts. In addition, the rates of convergence are estimated to verify the numerical performance of the solver. The first three test problems produce numerical approximations as expected. The fourth test problem (piston-like) indicates the extent to which the code is able to simulate a 'mild' discontinuity, which is a condition that would typically be better handled by a Lagrangian formulation. The current investigation concludes that the numerical implementation of the solver performs as expected. The quality of solutions is sufficient to provide credible simulations of fluid flows around wind turbines. The main caveat associated to these findings is the low coverage provided by these four problems, and somewhat limited verification activities. A more comprehensive evaluation of HIGRAD may be beneficial for future studies.

  8. Two-Dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics and Conduction Simulations of Heat Transfer in Horizontal Window Frames with Internal Cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gustavsen, Arlid; Kohler, Christian; Dalehaug, Arvid; Arasteh, Dariush

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper assesses the accuracy of the simplified frame cavity conduction/convection and radiation models presented in ISO 15099 and used in software for rating and labeling window products. Temperatures and U-factors for typical horizontal window frames with internal cavities are compared; results from Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulations with detailed radiation modeling are used as a reference. Four different frames were studied. Two were made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and two of aluminum. For each frame, six different simulations were performed, two with a CFD code and four with a building-component thermal-simulation tool using the Finite Element Method (FEM). This FEM tool addresses convection using correlations from ISO 15099; it addressed radiation with either correlations from ISO 15099 or with a detailed, view-factor-based radiation model. Calculations were performed using the CFD code with and without fluid flow in the window frame cavities; the calculations without fluid flow were performed to verify that the CFD code and the building-component thermal-simulation tool produced consistent results. With the FEM-code, the practice of subdividing small frame cavities was examined, in some cases not subdividing, in some cases subdividing cavities with interconnections smaller than five millimeters (mm) (ISO 15099) and in some cases subdividing cavities with interconnections smaller than seven mm (a breakpoint that has been suggested in other studies). For the various frames, the calculated U-factors were found to be quite comparable (the maximum difference between the reference CFD simulation and the other simulations was found to be 13.2 percent). A maximum difference of 8.5 percent was found between the CFD simulation and the FEM simulation using ISO 15099 procedures. The ISO 15099 correlation works best for frames with high U-factors. For more efficient frames, the relative differences among various simulations are larger. Temperature was also compared, at selected locations on the frames. Small differences was found in the results from model to model. Finally, the effectiveness of the ISO cavity radiation algorithms was examined by comparing results from these algorithms to detailed radiation calculations (from both programs). Our results suggest that improvements in cavity heat transfer calculations can be obtained by using detailed radiation modeling (i.e. view-factor or ray-tracing models), and that incorporation of these strategies may be more important for improving the accuracy of results than the use of CFD modeling for horizontal cavities.

  9. Forebay Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling for The Dalles Dam to Support Behavior Guidance System Siting Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.; Johnson, Gary E.

    2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed to support the siting and design of a behavioral guidance system (BGS) structure in The Dalles Dam (TDA) forebay on the Columbia River. The work was conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP). The CFD results were an invaluable tool for the analysis, both from a Regional and Agency perspective (for the fish passage evaluation) and a CENWP perspective (supporting the BGS design and location). The new CFD model (TDA forebay model) included the latest bathymetry (surveyed in 1999) and a detailed representation of the engineered structures (spillway, powerhouse main, fish, and service units). The TDA forebay model was designed and developed in a way that future studies could easily modify or, to a large extent, reuse large portions of the existing mesh. This study resulted in these key findings: (1) The TDA forebay model matched well with field-measured velocity data. (2) The TDA forebay model matched observations made at the 1:80 general physical model of the TDA forebay. (3) During the course of this study, the methodology typically used by CENWP to contour topographic data was shown to be inaccurate when applied to widely-spaced transect data. Contouring methodologies need to be revisited--especially before such things as modifying the bathymetry in the 1:80 general physical model are undertaken. Future alignments can be evaluated with the model staying largely intact. The next round of analysis will need to address fish passage demands and navigation concerns. CFD models can be used to identify the most promising locations and to provide quantified metrics for biological, hydraulic, and navigation criteria. The most promising locations should then be further evaluated in the 1:80 general physical model.

  10. Computational Fluid Dynamics Best Practice Guidelines in the Analysis of Storage Dry Cask

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigh, A.; Solis, J. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Rockville, MD MS (United States)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods are used to evaluate the thermal performance of a dry cask under long term storage conditions in accordance with NUREG-1536 [NUREG-1536, 1997]. A three-dimensional CFD model was developed and validated using data for a ventilated storage cask (VSC-17) collected by Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The developed Fluent CFD model was validated to minimize the modeling and application uncertainties. To address modeling uncertainties, the paper focused on turbulence modeling of buoyancy driven air flow. Similarly, in the application uncertainties, the pressure boundary conditions used to model the air inlet and outlet vents were investigated and validated. Different turbulence models were used to reduce the modeling uncertainty in the CFD simulation of the air flow through the annular gap between the overpack and the multi-assembly sealed basket (MSB). Among the chosen turbulence models, the validation showed that the low Reynolds k-{epsilon} and the transitional k-{omega} turbulence models predicted the measured temperatures closely. To assess the impact of pressure boundary conditions used at the air inlet and outlet channels on the application uncertainties, a sensitivity analysis of operating density was undertaken. For convergence purposes, all available commercial CFD codes include the operating density in the pressure gradient term of the momentum equation. The validation showed that the correct operating density corresponds to the density evaluated at the air inlet condition of pressure and temperature. Next, the validated CFD method was used to predict the thermal performance of an existing dry cask storage system. The evaluation uses two distinct models: a three-dimensional and an axisymmetrical representation of the cask. In the 3-D model, porous media was used to model only the volume occupied by the rodded region that is surrounded by the BWR channel box. In the axisymmetric model, porous media was used to model the entire region that encompasses the fuel assemblies as well as the gaps in between. Consequently, a larger volume is represented by porous media in the second model; hence, a higher frictional flow resistance is introduced in the momentum equations. The conservatism and the safety margins of these models were compared to assess the applicability and the realism of these two models. The three-dimensional model included fewer geometry simplifications and is recommended as it predicted less conservative fuel cladding temperature values, while still assuring the existence of adequate safety margins. (authors)

  11. Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Flash Atomizing Sprays and Single Droplet Impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vu, Henry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Thermo-fluid Dynamics of FlashABSTRACT OF THE DISSERTATION Thermo-fluid Dynamics of Flash

  12. Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis of Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Cavity Cooling System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Angelo Frisani; Yassin A. Hassan; Victor M. Ugaz

    2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of passive heat removal systems is one of the main concerns for the modular very high temperature gas-cooled reactors (VHTR) vessel cavity. The reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) is a key heat removal system during normal and off-normal conditions. The design and validation of the RCCS is necessary to demonstrate that VHTRs can survive to the postulated accidents. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) STAR-CCM+/V3.06.006 code was used for three-dimensional system modeling and analysis of the RCCS. A CFD model was developed to analyze heat exchange in the RCCS. The model incorporates a 180-deg section resembling the VHTR RCCS experimentally reproduced in a laboratory-scale test facility at Texas A&M University. All the key features of the experimental facility were taken into account during the numerical simulations. The objective of the present work was to benchmark CFD tools against experimental data addressing the behavior of the RCCS following accident conditions. Two cooling fluids (i.e., water and air) were considered to test the capability of maintaining the RCCS concrete walls' temperature below design limits. Different temperature profiles at the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) wall obtained from the experimental facility were used as boundary conditions in the numerical analyses to simulate VHTR transient evolution during accident scenarios. Mesh convergence was achieved with an intensive parametric study of the two different cooling configurations and selected boundary conditions. To test the effect of turbulence modeling on the RCCS heat exchange, predictions using several different turbulence models and near-wall treatments were evaluated and compared. The comparison among the different turbulence models analyzed showed satisfactory agreement for the temperature distribution inside the RCCS cavity medium and at the standpipes walls. For such a complicated geometry and flow conditions, the tested turbulence models demonstrated that the realizable k-epsilon model with two-layer all y+ wall treatment performs better than the other k-epsilon and k-omega turbulence models when compared to the experimental results and the Reynolds stress transport turbulence model results. A scaling analysis was developed to address the distortions introduced by the CFD model in simulating the physical phenomena inside the RCCS system with respect to the full plant configuration. The scaling analysis demonstrated that both the experimental facility and the CFD model achieve a satisfactory resemblance of the main flow characteristics inside the RCCS cavity region, and convection and radiation heat exchange phenomena are properly scaled from the actual plant.

  13. Preliminary studies of coolant by-pass flows in a prismatic very high temperature reactor using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiroyuki Sato; Richard Johnson; Richard Schultz

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three dimensional computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations of a typical prismatic very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) were conducted to investigate the influence of gap geometry on flow and temperature distributions in the reactor core using commercial CFD code FLUENT. Parametric calculations changing the gap width in a whole core length model of fuel and reflector columns were performed. The simulations show the effects of core by-pass flows in the heated core region by comparing results for several gap widths including zero gap width. The calculation results underline the importance of considering inter-column gap width for the evaluation of maximum fuel temperatures and temperature gradients in fuel blocks. In addition, it is shown that temperatures of core outlet flow from gaps and channels are strongly affected by the gap width of by-pass flow in the reactor core.

  14. March 30, 2009 16:44 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics gafdbo09 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    March 30, 2009 16:44 Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics gafdbo09 Geophysical (geophysical) fluid models: two-dimensional vortical systems in a generalized streamfunction-vorticity rep

  15. Sandia Energy - Computational Fluid Dynamics & Large-Scale Uncertainty...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Large-Scale Uncertainty Quantification for Wind Energy Home Highlights - HPC Computational Fluid Dynamics & Large-Scale Uncertainty Quantification for Wind Energy Previous Next...

  16. Distributed computational fluid dynamics Karl Jenkins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Gispert, Adrià

    of large and complex datasets. Thus, remote access to this information is an integral part of the CFD turbulent combustion pro- cesses is a strong coupling between turbulence, chemical kinetics and heat release provides a route around the departmental firewalls. The clusters run Globus and Condor for remote job

  17. ASTROPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS VIA DIRECT STATISTICAL SIMULATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tobias, S. M. [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Dagon, K.; Marston, J. B., E-mail: smt@maths.leeds.ac.uk [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912-1843 (United States)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we introduce the concept of direct statistical simulation for astrophysical flows. This technique may be appropriate for problems in astrophysical fluids where the instantaneous dynamics of the flows are of secondary importance to their statistical properties. We give examples of such problems including mixing and transport in planets, stars, and disks. The method is described for a general set of evolution equations, before we consider the specific case of a spectral method optimized for problems on a spherical surface. The method is illustrated for the simplest non-trivial example of hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics on a rotating spherical surface. We then discuss possible extensions of the method both in terms of computational methods and the range of astrophysical problems that are of interest.

  18. antonio fluid dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    antonio fluid dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 39th AIAA Fluid Dynamics...

  19. Ris-P.-715(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-P.-715(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 1993 Edited by S Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department is performed within the following two programme areas: optics and continuum physics. In optics the activities are within (a) optical materials, (b) quasi

  20. Ris-R-1314(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1314(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 2001 Edited by H March 2002 #12;Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  1. Optics and Fluid Dynamics ^>*myft Annual Progress Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics ^>*myft Department Annual Progress Report 1 January - 31 December 1991;Abstract Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department covers quasi-elas.ic light scattering, optic association. A ? .mmary of activities in 1991 ii presented. Optical diagnostic methods based on quasi

  2. Ris-R-1453(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1453(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 2003 Edited by H May 2004 #12;Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  3. Ris-R-1399(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1399(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 2002 Edited by H May 2003 #12;Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) laser systems and optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  4. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Intellectual Capital Accounts 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Intellectual Capital Accounts 1998 Resources, production and results RISØ-R-1108(EN) Risø National Laboratory Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Building 128 P for optical information storage, · novel schemes for spatial cryptography, and · new models for surface

  5. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect radiative effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, Lynn

    Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model investigation of the indirect Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey, USA V. Ramaswamy, Paul A. Ginoux, and Larry W. Horowitz Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New

  6. Fluid dynamic issues in continuous wave short wavelength chemical lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mikatarian, R.R.; Jumper, E.J.; Woolhiser, C.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper addresses fluid dynamic issues of concern in the design and development of Continuous Wave (CW) Short Wavelength Chemical Lasers (SWCLs). Short Wavelength Chemical Laser technology is in its research stage and SWCL concepts are in their evolving mode. Researchers are presently addressing candidate chemical systems and activation concepts. Since these lasers will be flowing systems, it is necessary to discuss both the probable fluid dynamics issues, because of the inherent complexities fluid dynamicist can support this activity. In addition to addressing the SWCL fluid dynamic issues, this paper will review past fluid dynamic activities in high energy lasers and discuss additional research still required. This paper will also address the various levels of fluid dynamic modeling and how these models can be applied in studying the fluid dynamics of Short Wavelength Chemical Lasers. Where it is felt that specific fluid methodologies are not available, but are required in order to conduct specific analyses, they will be defined. 34 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Title of dissertation: MODELING, SIMULATING, AND CONTROLLING THE FLUID DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: MODELING, SIMULATING, AND CONTROLLING THE FLUID DYNAMICS OF ELECTRO an algorithm to steer indi- vidual particles inside the EWOD system by control of actuators already present number of actuators available in the EWOD system. #12;MODELING, SIMULATING, AND CONTROLLING THE FLUID

  8. Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veatch, Michael H.

    of approximating functions for the differential cost. The first contribution of this paper is identifying new or piece-wise quadratic. Fluid cost has been used to initialize the value iteration algorithm [5Approximate Dynamic Programming for Networks: Fluid Models and Constraint Reduction Michael H

  9. The Dalles Dam, Columbia River: Spillway Improvement CFD Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cook, Chris B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents development of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that were applied to The Dalles spillway for the US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District. The models have been successfully validated against physical models and prototype data, and are suitable to support biological research and operations management. The CFD models have been proven to provide reliable information in the turbulent high-velocity flow field downstream of the spillway face that is typically difficult to monitor in the prototype. In addition, CFD data provides hydraulic information throughout the solution domain that can be easily extracted from archived simulations for later use if necessary. This project is part of an ongoing program at the Portland District to improve spillway survival conditions for juvenile salmon at The Dalles. Biological data collected at The Dalles spillway have shown that for the original spillway configuration juvenile salmon passage survival is lower than desired. Therefore, the Portland District is seeking to identify operational and/or structural changes that might be implemented to improve fish passage survival. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) went through a sequence of steps to develop a CFD model of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The first step was to identify a preferred CFD modeling package. In the case of The Dalles spillway, Flow-3D was as selected because of its ability to simulate the turbulent free-surface flows that occur downstream of each spilling bay. The second step in development of The Dalles CFD model was to assemble bathymetric datasets and structural drawings sufficient to describe the dam (powerhouse, non-overflow dam, spillway, fish ladder entrances, etc.) and tailrace. These datasets are documented in this report as are various 3-D graphical representations of The Dalles spillway and tailrace. The performance of the CFD model was then validated for several cases as the third step. The validated model was then applied to address specific SIS design questions. Specifically, the CFD models were used to evaluate flow deflectors, baffle block removal and the effects of spillwalls. The CFD models were also used to evaluate downstream differences at other locations, such as at the Highway 197 bridge piers and Oregon shore islands, due to alterations in spill pattern. CFD model results were analyzed to quantitatively compare impacts of the spillwall that has subsequently been constructed between bays 6 and 7. CFD model results provided detailed information about how the spillwall would impact downstream flow patterns that complemented results from the 1:80 scale physical model. The CFD model was also used to examine relative differences between the juvenile spill pattern used in previous years and the anticipated spill pattern that will be applied once the wall is complete. In addition, the CFD model examined velocity magnitudes over the downstream basalt shelf to investigate potential for erosion under high flow conditions (e.g., 21 kcfs/bay for bays 1 through 6) with the spillwall in place. Several appendices follow the results and discussion sections of this report. These appendices document the large number of CFD simulations that have been performed by PNNL; both spillway improvement study (SIS) related and those performed for related biological tests.

  10. Automatic Generation of Quadrilateral Multi-Block Topology for FEA/CFD Applications Samuel H. Huang, J. Shi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Samuel H.

    . Huang, J. Shi Intelligent CAM Systems Laboratory Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear and Erlandur Steinthorsson Gas Turbine Fuel Systems Division Parker Hannifin Corporation 9200 Tyler Boulevard Finite Element Analysis (FEA) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are used extensively in almost every

  11. Automatic Generation of Quadrilateral Multi-Block Topology for FEA/CFD Applications Samuel H. Huang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Samuel H.

    Department of Mechanical, Industrial and Nuclear Engineering, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 2 Hauenstein & Burmeister, Inc., 2629 30th Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55406 3 Gas Turbine Fuel) and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) are used extensively in almost every industry imaginable, including aerospace

  12. PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL AND HIGHLY DEVIATED WELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ullmer, Brygg

    PREDICTION OF CUTTINGS BED HEIGHT WITH COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS IN DRILLING HORIZONTAL parameters such as wellbore geometry, pump rate, drilling fluid rheology and density, and maximum drilling Computational Fluid Dynamics methods. Movement, concentration and accumulation of drilled cuttings in non

  13. Hard Sphere Dynamics for Normal and Granular Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James W. Dufty; Aparna Baskaran

    2005-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid of N smooth, hard spheres is considered as a model for normal (elastic collisions) and granular (inelastic collisions) fluids. The potential energy is discontinuous for hard spheres so the pairwise forces are singular and the usual forms of Newtonian and Hamiltonian mechanics do not apply. Nevertheless, particle trajectories in the N particle phase space are well defined and the generators for these trajectories can be identified. The first part of this presentation is a review of the generators for the dynamics of observables and probability densities. The new results presented in the second part refer to applications of these generators to the Liouville dynamics for granular fluids. A set of eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the generator for this Liouville dynamics is identified in a special "stationary representation". This provides a class of exact solutions to the Liouville equation that are closely related to hydrodynamics for granular fluids.

  14. Variational Methods for Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alouges, François

    .2.1 Generalities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21 2.2.2 Going back-structure interactions 35 4.1 A non deformable solid in a fluid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 velocity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 6 Stokes equations 49 6.1 Mixed finite

  15. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of aerosol in a u-shaped steam generator tube 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longmire, Pamela

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    To quantify primary side aerosol retention, an Eulerian/Lagrangian approach was used to investigate aerosol transport in a compressible, turbulent, adiabatic, internal, wall-bounded flow. The ARTIST experimental project ...

  16. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations of aerosol in a u-shaped steam generator tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longmire, Pamela

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Department) for all the support I received while researching and writing this dissertation and to the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, Division of Systems Analysis and Regulatory Effectiveness, Safety Margins... in PWRs. Table 1 list NPPs where SGTR events have occurred, the date, leakage rate of radioactive material and the cause of the SGTR. NUREG/CR-6365 reports the first SGTR event occurred in 1975 at Point Beach Unit 1, while the most recent event...

  17. Optimization of a high-efficiency jet ejector by using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in a desalination process High-Pressure Motive Steam Heat Exchanger # 1 # 2 Brine Distillate Sea Water # 3 # n-1 # n (1940) - - - 5 DT - 16 Steam-Jet Air Pumps DuPerow and Bossart (1927) - - 6 DT 1.2 DT - 7 Royds-stage ejectors (DeFrate and Hoerl, 1959). source: Perry's chemical engineering handbook; 7th edition, pg. 10

  18. Dynamics of fluid-conveying Timoshenko pipes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrus, Ryan Curtis

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    that satisfy the ?non-fluid? essential and natural boundary conditions, and determine the non-dimensional critical velocities at which the system goes unstable. Once the critical velocities are ascertained, the second half will begin with a time... and polynomial functions. The trigonometric\\hyperbolic functions are exact solutions to (4.16) subject to cantilevered boundary conditions (4.17)-(4.20). The th non dimensional natural frequency of the non-fluid beam is given by 2 sinh sin cosh cos 0...

  19. Gasification CFD Modeling for Advanced Power Plant Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.E.; Guenther, C.P.

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we have described recent progress on developing CFD models for two commercial-scale gasifiers, including a two-stage, coal slurry-fed, oxygen-blown, pressurized, entrained-flow gasifier and a scaled-up design of the PSDF transport gasifier. Also highlighted was NETL’s Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator for coupling high-fidelity equipment models with process simulation for the design, analysis, and optimization of advanced power plants. Using APECS, we have coupled the entrained-flow gasifier CFD model into a coal-fired, gasification-based FutureGen power and hydrogen production plant. The results for the FutureGen co-simulation illustrate how the APECS technology can help engineers better understand and optimize gasifier fluid dynamics and related phenomena that impact overall power plant performance.

  20. Viscous fluid dynamics in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. K. Chaudhuri

    2008-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the space-time evolution of minimally viscous ($\\frac{\\eta}{s}$=0.08) QGP fluid, undergoing boost-invariant longitudinal motion and arbitrary transverse expansion. Relaxation equations for the shear stress tensor components, derived from the phenomenological Israel-Stewart's theory of dissipative relativistic fluid, are solved simultaneously with the energy-momentum conservation equations. Comparison of evolution of ideal and viscous fluid, both initialized under the similar conditions, e.g. same equilibration time, energy density and velocity profile, indicate that in viscous fluid, energy density or temperature of the fluid evolve slowly than in an ideal fluid. Transverse expansion is also more in viscous evolution. We have also studied particle production in viscous dynamics. Compared to ideal dynamics, in viscous dynamics, particle yield at high $p_T$ is increased. Elliptic flow on the other hand decreases. Minimally viscous QGP fluid, initialized at entropy density $s_{ini}$=110 $fm^{-3}$ at the initial time $\\tau_i$=0.6 fm, if freeze-out at temperature $T_F$=130 MeV, explains the centrality dependence of $p_T$ spectra of identified particles. Experimental $p_T$ spectra of $\\pi^-$, $K^+$ and protons in 0-5%, 5-10%, 10-20%, 20-30%, 30-40% and 40-50% Au+Au collisions are well reproduced through out the experimental $p_T$ range. This is in contrast to ideal dynamics, where, the spectra are reproduced only up to $p_T\\approx$1.5 GeV. Minimally viscous QGP fluid, also explain the elliptic flow in mid-central (10-20%, 16-23%, 20-30%) collisions. The minimum bias elliptic flow is also explained. However, the model under-predict/over-predict the elliptic flow in very central/peripheral collisions.

  1. Local structure and dynamics in colloidal fluids and gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takehiro Ohtsuka; C. Patrick Royall; Hajime Tanaka

    2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Gels in soft-matter systems are an important nonergodic state of matter. We study a colloid-polymer mixture which is quenched by increasing the polymer concentration, from a fluid to a gel. Using confocal microscopy, we study both the static structure and dynamics in three dimensions (3D). Between the dynamically arrested gel and ergodic fluid comprised of isolated particles we find an intermediate 'cluster fluid' state, where the 'bonds' between the colloidal particles have a finite lifetime. The local dynamics are reminiscent of a fluid, while the local structure is almost identical to that of the gel. Simultaneous real-time local structural analysis and particle tracking in 3D at the single-particle level yields the following interesting information. Particles in the clusters move in a highly correlated manner, but, at the same time, exhibit significant dynamical heterogeneity, reflecting the enhanced mobility near the free surface. Deeper quenching eventually leads to a gel state where the 'bond' lifetime exceeds that of the experiment, although the local structure is almost identical to that of the 'cluster fluid'.

  2. Frost Growth CFD Model of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop Unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geoghegan, Patrick J [ORNL; Petrov, Andrei Y [ORNL; Vineyard, Edward Allan [ORNL; Zaltash, Abdolreza [ORNL; Linkous, Randall Lee [ORNL

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A frost growth model is incorporated into a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of a heat pump by means of a user-defined function in FLUENT, a commercial CFD code. The transient model is applied to the outdoor section of an Integrated Active Desiccant Rooftop (IADR) unit in heating mode. IADR is a hybrid vapor compression and active desiccant unit capable of handling 100% outdoor air (dedicated outdoor air system) or as a total conditioning system, handling both outdoor air and space cooling or heating loads. The predicted increase in flow resistance and loss in heat transfer capacity due to frost build-up are compared to experimental pressure drop readings and thermal imaging. The purpose of this work is to develop a CFD model that is capable of predicting frost growth, an invaluable tool in evaluating the effectiveness of defrost-on-demand cycles.

  3. CFD analysis of laminar oscillating flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booten, C. W. Charles W.); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Smith, B. L. (Barton L.); Martin, R. A. (Richard A.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a numerical simulations of oscillating flow in a constricted duct and compares the results with experimental and theoretical data. The numerical simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX4.2. The numerical model simulates an experimental oscillating flow facility that was designed to test the properties and characteristics of oscillating flow in tapered ducts, also known as jet pumps. Jet pumps are useful devices in thermoacoustic machinery because they produce a secondary pressure that can counteract an unwanted effect called streaming, and significantly enhance engine efficiency. The simulations revealed that CFX could accurately model velocity, shear stress and pressure variations in laminar oscillating flow. The numerical results were compared to experimental data and theoretical predictions with varying success. The least accurate numerical results were obtained when laminar flow approached transition to turbulent flow.

  4. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, Raymond E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these re...

  5. Green Algae as Model Organisms for Biological Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raymond E. Goldstein

    2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decade the volvocine green algae, spanning from the unicellular $Chlamydomonas$ to multicellular $Volvox$, have emerged as model organisms for a number of problems in biological fluid dynamics. These include flagellar propulsion, nutrient uptake by swimming organisms, hydrodynamic interactions mediated by walls, collective dynamics and transport within suspensions of microswimmers, the mechanism of phototaxis, and the stochastic dynamics of flagellar synchronization. Green algae are well suited to the study of such problems because of their range of sizes (from 10 $\\mu$m to several millimetres), their geometric regularity, the ease with which they can be cultured and the availability of many mutants that allow for connections between molecular details and organism-level behavior. This review summarizes these recent developments and highlights promising future directions in the study of biological fluid dynamics, especially in the context of evolutionary biology, that can take advantage of these remarkable organisms.

  6. Recycling Krylov subspaces for CFD applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amritkar, Amit; ?wirydowicz, Katarzyna; Tafti, Danesh; Ahuja, Kapil

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most popular iterative linear solvers in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) calculations are restarted GMRES and BiCGStab. At the beginning of most incompressible flow calculations, the computation time and the number of iterations to converge for the pressure Poisson equation are quite high. In this case, the BiCGStab algorithm, with relatively cheap but non-optimal iterations, may fail to converge for stiff problems. Thus, a more robust algorithm like GMRES, which guarantees monotonic convergence, is preferred. To reduce the large storage requirements of GMRES, a restarted version - GMRES(m) or its variants - is used in CFD applications. However, GMRES(m) can suffer from stagnation or very slow convergence. For this reason, we use the rGCROT method. rGCROT is an algorithm that improves restarted GMRES by recycling a selected subspace of the search space from one restart of GMRES(m) to the next as well as building and recycling this outer vector space from one problem to the next (subsequent time steps i...

  7. Surface accumulation of spermatozoa: a fluid dynamic phenomenon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David J. Smith; John R. Blake

    2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent mathematical fluid dynamics models have shed light into an outstanding problem in reproductive biology: why do spermatozoa cells show a 'preference' for swimming near to surfaces? In this paper we review quantitative approaches to the problem, originating with the classic paper of Lord Rothschild in 1963. A recent 'boundary integral/slender body theory' mathematical model for the fluid dynamics is described, and we discuss how it gives insight into the mechanisms that may be responsible for the surface accumulation behaviour. We use the simulation model to explore these mechanisms in more detail, and discuss whether simplified models can capture the behaviour of sperm cells. The far-field decay of the fluid flow around the cell is calculated, and compared with a stresslet model. Finally we present some new findings showing how, despite having a relatively small hydrodynamic drag, the sperm cell 'head' has very significant effects on surface accumulation and trajectory.

  8. Simulation of spray drying in superheated steam using computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frydman, A.; Vasseur, J.; Ducept, F.; Sionneau, M.; Moureh, J.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a numerical simulation and experimental validation of a spray dryer using superheated steam instead of air as drying medium, modeled with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The model describes momentum, heat and mass transfer between two phases--a discrete phase of droplets, and a continuous gas phase--through a finite volume method. For the simulation, droplet size distribution is represented by 6 discrete classes of diameter, fitting to the experimental distribution injected from the nozzle orifice, taking into account their peculiar shrinkage during drying. This model is able to predict the most important features of the dryer: fields of gas temperature and gas velocity inside the chamber, droplets trajectories and eventual deposits on to the wall. The results of simulation are compared to a pilot scale dryer, using water. In the absence of risk of power ignition in steam, the authors have tested rather high steam inlet temperature (973K), thus obtaining a high volumic efficiency. The model is validated by comparison between experimental and predicted values of temperature inside the chamber, verifying the coupling between the 3 different types of transfer without adjustment. This type of model can be used for chamber design, or scale up. Using superheated steam instead of air in a spray dryer can allow a high volumic evaporation rate (20 k.h.m{sup 3}), high energy recovery and better environment control.

  9. aiaa fluid dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aiaa fluid dynamics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 AIAA Plasmadynamics and Lasers...

  10. Long-wave models of thin film fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Roberts

    1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Centre manifold techniques are used to derive rationally a description of the dynamics of thin films of fluid. The derived model is based on the free-surface $\\eta(x,t)$ and the vertically averaged horizontal velocity $\\avu(x,t)$. The approach appears to converge well and has significant differences from conventional depth-averaged models.

  11. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING OF SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS Ugur Pasaogullari and Chao-dimensional model has been developed to simulate solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The model fully couples current density operation. INTRODUCTION Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are among possible candidates

  12. Texas Fluid Dynamics Meeting, 2013 STABILITY OF ROTOR WAKES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tinney, Charles E.

    to the presence of multiple helical fila- ments. Wakes of helicopter rotors, wind turbines and ma- rine propellers% confidence interval at wake ages, : 10 - 80. Dashed lines are separated by r /r = 3 in the wake of windTexas Fluid Dynamics Meeting, 2013 STABILITY OF ROTOR WAKES. Swathi M. Mula & Charles. E. Tinney

  13. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Steering Panel, NASA GRM mission University Corporation of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  14. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B of California, Berkeley (1980) Assistant Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics, Johns Hopkins University

  15. Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Tieliang Zhai Professor by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission #12;2 Air Ingress Accident Objectives and Overall Strategy: Depresurization Pure Diffusion Natural Convection Challenging: Natural convection Multi-component Diffusion (air

  16. Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Air Ingress Benchmarking with Computational Fluid Dynamics Analysis Andrew C. Kadak Department District Beijing, China September 22-24, 2004 Abstract Air ingress accident is a complicated accident scenario is compounded by multiple physical phenomena that are involved in the air ingress event

  17. Dynamic Phase Boundaries for Compressible Fluids , Z. L. Xu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    discontinuity. The emphasis here is on the coupling of the phase transition process to acoustic waves, whichDynamic Phase Boundaries for Compressible Fluids T. Lu § , Z. L. Xu § , R. Samulyak§ , J. Glimm algorithm is verified by application to various physical regimes. 1 Introduction The coupling

  18. ARBITRARY LAGRANGIAN-EULERIAN (ALE) METHODS IN COMPRESSIBLE FLUID DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurien, Susan

    · . Scalar quantities (density , pressure p, specific internal energy and temperature T) are approximated Lagrangian system is numerically treated by compatible method [8, 9] conserving total energy. Several types Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE [1]) code for simulation of problems in compressible fluid dynamics and plasma

  19. Dynamic Particle Coupling for GPU-based Fluid Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanz, Volker

    -vi ¯j 2 W( Pi -Pj ,h). Here pj = k( ¯j - 0) is the pressure with gas constant k and rest density 0 for modeling dynamic particle coupling solely based on individual particle contributions. This technique does and µ is the fluid viscosity constant. To model the surface tension, M¨uller et.al. [MCG03] use the so

  20. TANK48 CFD MODELING ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.

    2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of recovering the waste in storage tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) typically requires mixing the contents of the tank to ensure uniformity of the discharge stream. Mixing is accomplished with one to four dual-nozzle slurry pumps located within the tank liquid. For the work, a Tank 48 simulation model with a maximum of four slurry pumps in operation has been developed to estimate flow patterns for efficient solid mixing. The modeling calculations were performed by using two modeling approaches. One approach is a single-phase Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model to evaluate the flow patterns and qualitative mixing behaviors for a range of different modeling conditions since the model was previously benchmarked against the test results. The other is a two-phase CFD model to estimate solid concentrations in a quantitative way by solving the Eulerian governing equations for the continuous fluid and discrete solid phases over the entire fluid domain of Tank 48. The two-phase results should be considered as the preliminary scoping calculations since the model was not validated against the test results yet. A series of sensitivity calculations for different numbers of pumps and operating conditions has been performed to provide operational guidance for solids suspension and mixing in the tank. In the analysis, the pump was assumed to be stationary. Major solid obstructions including the pump housing, the pump columns, and the 82 inch central support column were included. The steady state and three-dimensional analyses with a two-equation turbulence model were performed with FLUENT{trademark} for the single-phase approach and CFX for the two-phase approach. Recommended operational guidance was developed assuming that local fluid velocity can be used as a measure of sludge suspension and spatial mixing under single-phase tank model. For quantitative analysis, a two-phase fluid-solid model was developed for the same modeling conditions as the single-phase model. The modeling results show that the flow patterns driven by four pump operation satisfy the solid suspension requirement, and the average solid concentration at the plane of the transfer pump inlet is about 12% higher than the tank average concentrations for the 70 inch tank level and about the same as the tank average value for the 29 inch liquid level. When one of the four pumps is not operated, the flow patterns are satisfied with the minimum suspension velocity criterion. However, the solid concentration near the tank bottom is increased by about 30%, although the average solid concentrations near the transfer pump inlet have about the same value as the four-pump baseline results. The flow pattern results show that although the two-pump case satisfies the minimum velocity requirement to suspend the sludge particles, it provides the marginal mixing results for the heavier or larger insoluble materials such as MST and KTPB particles. The results demonstrated that when more than one jet are aiming at the same position of the mixing tank domain, inefficient flow patterns are provided due to the highly localized momentum dissipation, resulting in inactive suspension zone. Thus, after completion of the indexed solids suspension, pump rotations are recommended to avoid producing the nonuniform flow patterns. It is noted that when tank liquid level is reduced from the highest level of 70 inches to the minimum level of 29 inches for a given number of operating pumps, the solid mixing efficiency becomes better since the ratio of the pump power to the mixing volume becomes larger. These results are consistent with the literature results.

  1. Simulations of Particle Dynamics in Magnetorheological Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Reitich 2 , M.R. Jolly 3 , H.T. Banks 1 , Kazi Ito 1 Abstract We present particle dynamics simulations transformed from a liquid state to that of a Bingham solid upon application of a magnetic (resp., electric as these present a number of advantages over their electric counterparts. These include higher achievable yield

  2. Proceedings of ASME-FED 2006 2006 ASME Fluids Engineering Summer Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Barton L.

    Proceedings of ASME-FED 2006 2006 ASME Fluids Engineering Summer Conference Miami, USA, July 17 of the INL model and to develop benchmark databases for CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) code assessment by ASME #12;through two perforated plates placed in line to suppress separa- tion and any pulsations

  3. Mesoscale Structures at Complex Fluid-Fluid Interfaces: a Novel Lattice Boltzmann / Molecular Dynamics Coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcello Sega; Mauro Sbragaglia; Sofia Sergeevna Kantorovich; Alexey Olegovich Ivanov

    2014-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Complex fluid-fluid interfaces featuring mesoscale structures with adsorbed particles are key components of newly designed materials which are continuously enriching the field of soft matter. Simulation tools which are able to cope with the different scales characterizing these systems are fundamental requirements for efficient theoretical investigations. In this paper we present a novel simulation method, based on the approach of Ahlrichs and D\\"unweg [Ahlrichs and D\\"unweg, Int. J. Mod. Phys. C, 1998, 9, 1429], that couples the "Shan-Chen" multicomponent Lattice Boltzmann technique to off-lattice molecular dynamics to simulate efficiently complex fluid-fluid interfaces. We demonstrate how this approach can be used to study a wide class of challenging problems. Several examples are given, with an accent on bicontinuous phases formation in polyelectrolyte solutions and ferrofluid emulsions. We also show that the introduction of solvation free energies in the particle-fluid interaction unveils the hidden, multiscale nature of the particle-fluid coupling, allowing to treat symmetrically (and interchangeably) the on-lattice and off-lattice components of the system.

  4. fjYTiYTvl/f^ Ris-R-674(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    fjYTiYTvl/f^ Risø-R-674(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 1992 #12;Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department AnnualProgressReport for1992 Edited by L. Lading, JJ. Lynov in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department is performed within two sections- The Optics Section has activities

  5. Some Mathematical and Numerical Issues in Geophysical Fluid Dynamics and Climate Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jianping Li; Shouhong Wang

    2007-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we address both recent advances and open questions in some mathematical and computational issues in geophysical fluid dynamics (GFD) and climate dynamics. The main focus is on 1) the primitive equations (PEs) models and their related mathematical and computational issues, 2) climate variability, predictability and successive bifurcation, and 3) a new dynamical systems theory and its applications to GFD and climate dynamics.

  6. Fast-Track Design Efforts Using CFD: Bonneville Second Powerhouse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Ebner, Laurie L.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of three-dimensional, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were developed and used for the Bonneville Project tailrace to study the impact of a proposed outfall structure on the tailrace hydraulics; these structures were designed to improve the survival of downstream migrant (juvenile) salmon. Flows were simulated by solving the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes equations together with a two-equation k-epsilon turbulences model in a commercial CFD code. The numerical model was validated using field-measured velocity data. The model results identified undesirable combinations of outfall location and operational scenarios and helped to identify the location in which the outfall structure was built. The numerical model provided a relatively low-cost tool to rapidly simulate and visualize the flow field for multiple proposed outfall locations for a large number of operational scenarios. The visualizations of the results from the CFD model provided insights to hydraulic engineers and fisheries biologists working on the design and placement of the outfall structure.

  7. Recent progress and challenges in exploiting graphics processors in computational fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Kyle E

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progress made in accelerating simulations of fluid flow using GPUs, and the challenges that remain, are surveyed. The review first provides an introduction to GPU computing and programming, and discusses various considerations for improved performance. Case studies comparing the performance of CPU- and GPU- based solvers for the Laplace and incompressible Navier-Stokes equations are performed in order to demonstrate the potential improvement even with simple codes. Recent efforts to accelerate CFD simulations using GPUs are reviewed for laminar, turbulent, and reactive flow solvers. Also, GPU implementations of the lattice Boltzmann method are reviewed. Finally, recommendations for implementing CFD codes on GPUs are given and remaining challenges are discussed, such as the need to develop new strategies and redesign algorithms to enable GPU acceleration.

  8. DRILL-STRING NONLINEAR DYNAMICS ACCOUNTING FOR DRILLING FLUID T. G. Ritto

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DRILL-STRING NONLINEAR DYNAMICS ACCOUNTING FOR DRILLING FLUID T. G. Ritto R. Sampaio thiagoritto Descartes, 77454 Marne-la-Vallée, France Abstract. The influence of the drilling fluid (or mud) on the drill in the analysis of the nonlinear dynamics of a drill-string. The aim of this paper is to investigate how the fluid

  9. Experimental and CFD Analysis of Advanced Convective Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Yassin A; Ugaz, Victor M

    2012-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to study the fundamental physical phenomena in the reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS) of very high-temperature reactors (VHTRs). One of the primary design objectives is to assure that RCCS acts as an ultimate heat sink capable of maintaining thermal integrity of the fuel, vessel, and equipment within the reactor cavity for the entire spectrum of postulated accident scenarios. Since construction of full-scale experimental test facilities to study these phenomena is impractical, it is logical to expect that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations will play a key role in the RCCS design process. An important question then arises: To what extent are conventional CFD codes able to accurately capture the most important flow phenomena, and how can they be modified to improve their quantitative predictions? Researchers are working to tackle this problem in two ways. First, in the experimental phase, the research team plans to design and construct an innovative platform that will provide a standard test setting for validating CFD codes proposed for the RCCS design. This capability will significantly advance the state of knowledge in both liquid-cooled and gas-cooled (e.g., sodium fast reactor) reactor technology. This work will also extend flow measurements to micro-scale levels not obtainable in large-scale test facilities, thereby revealing previously undetectable phenomena that will complement the existing infrastructure. Second, in the computational phase of this work, numerical simulation of the flow and temperature profiles will be performed using advanced turbulence models to simulate the complex conditions of flows in critical zones of the cavity. These models will be validated and verified so that they can be implemented into commercially available CFD codes. Ultimately, the results of these validation studies can then be used to enable a more accurate design and safety evaluation of systems in actual nuclear power applications (both during normal operation and accident scenarios).

  10. The stochastic dynamics of tethered microcantilevers in a viscous fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robbins, Brian A.; Paul, Mark R. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Radiom, Milad; Ducker, William A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, Virginia 24061 (United States); Walz, John Y. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506 (United States)

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore and quantify the coupled dynamics of a pair of micron scale cantilevers immersed in a viscous fluid that are also directly tethered to one another at their tips by a spring force. The spring force, for example, could represent the molecular stiffness or elasticity of a biomolecule or material tethered between the cantilevers. We use deterministic numerical simulations with the fluctuation-dissipation theorem to compute the stochastic dynamics of the cantilever pair for the conditions of experiment when driven only by Brownian motion. We validate our approach by comparing directly with experimental measurements in the absence of the tether which shows excellent agreement. Using numerical simulations, we quantify the correlated dynamics of the cantilever pair over a range of tether stiffness. Our results quantify the sensitivity of the auto- and cross-correlations of equilibrium fluctuations in cantilever displacement to the stiffness of the tether. We show that the tether affects the magnitude of the correlations which can be used in a measurement to probe the properties of an attached tethering substance. For the configurations of current interest using micron scale cantilevers in water, we show that the magnitude of the fluid coupling between the cantilevers is sufficiently small such that the influence of the tether can be significant. Our results show that the cross-correlation is more sensitive to tether stiffness than the auto-correlation indicating that a two-cantilever measurement has improved sensitivity when compared with a measurement using a single cantilever.

  11. CFD modeling of entrained-flow coal gasifiers with improved physical and chemical sub-models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. While the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside entrained-flow gasifiers has been modeled through computational fluid dynamic (CFD), the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented here include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate, a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and heating rate effect on volatile yield, and careful selection of global gas phase reaction kinetics. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for systemwide design and optimization.

  12. On preparation of viscous pore fluids for dynamic centrifuge modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamidis, O.; Madabhushi, S. P. G.

    2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    dynamic cen- trifuge tests, the use of water as pore fluid can limit the generation of excess pore pressures in sand formations below gravel embankments, lowering the recorded crest settlement signif- icantly. Chian and Madabhushi [2010] exam- ined... with changing 4 1.2 1.6 2 2.4 2.8 3.2 0 40 80 120 160 200 Concentration [%] V is co si ty [m P a · s] measurements at 20?C best fit (8th order) best fit (power law) Stewart et al. [1998] Figure 2: Viscosity change with concentration 1.2 1.6 2 2.4 2.8 3.2 1...

  13. CFD Validation of Gas Injection into Stagnant Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations in the area of two-phase flow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility are progressing. It is expected that the target vessel lifetime could be extended by introducing gas into the liquid mercury target. As part of an effort to validate the two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, simulations and experiments of gas injection in stagnant water have been completed. The volume of fluid (VOF) method as implemented in ANSYS-CFX was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection into stagnant water. Flow visualization data were obtained with a high-speed camera for the comparison of predicted and measured bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth, detachment, and gravitational rise. The CFD model is validated with these experimental measurements at different gas flow rates. The acoustic waves emitted at the time of detachment and during subsequent oscillations of the bubble were recorded with a microphone. The acoustic signature aspect of this validation is particularly interesting since it has applicability to the injection of gas into liquid mercury, which is opaque.

  14. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into th emold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with a fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a termperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into th emold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  15. Apparatus for characterizing the temporo-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front and method thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Battiste, Richard L. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of a dynamic fluid front within a mold space while the mold space is being filled with fluid. A method includes providing a mold defining a mold space and having one or more openings into the mold space; heating a plurality of temperature sensors that extend into the mold space; injecting a fluid into the mold space through the openings, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space with the fluid; and characterizing temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front by monitoring a temperature of each of the plurality of heated temperature sensors while the mold space is being filled with the fluid. An apparatus includes a mold defining a mold space; one or more openings for introducing a fluid into the mold space and filling the mold space with the fluid, the fluid experiencing a dynamic fluid front while filling the mold space; a plurality of heated temperature sensors extending into the mold space; and a computer coupled to the plurality of heated temperature sensors for characterizing the temporal-spatial properties of the dynamic fluid front.

  16. Bonneville Project: CFD of the Spillway Tailrace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP) operates the Bonneville Lock and Dam Project on the Columbia River. High spill flows that occurred during 2011 moved a large volume of rock from downstream of the spillway apron to the stilling basin and apron. Although 400 cubic yards of rocks were removed from the stilling basin, there are still large volumes of rock downstream of the apron that could, under certain flow conditions, move upstream into the stilling basin. CENWP is investigating operational changes that could be implemented to minimize future movement of rock into the stilling basin. A key analysis tool to develop these operational changes is a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model of the spillway. A free-surface CFD model of the Bonneville spillway tailrace was developed and applied for four flow scenarios. These scenarios looked at the impact of flow volume and flow distribution on tailrace hydraulics. The simulation results showed that areas of upstream flow existed near the river bed downstream of the apron, on the apron, and within the stilling basin for all flows. For spill flows of 300 kcfs, the cross-stream and downstream extent of the recirculation zones along Cascade and Bradford Island was very dependent on the spill pattern. The center-loaded pattern had much larger recirculation zones than the flat or bi-modal pattern. The lower flow (200 kcfs) with a flat pattern had a very large recirculation zone that extended half way across the channel near the river bed. A single flow scenario (300 kcfs of flow in a relatively flat spill pattern) was further interrogated using Lagrangian particle tracking. The tracked particles (with size and mass) showed the upstream movement of sediments onto the concrete apron and against the vertical wall between the apron and the stilling basin from seed locations downstream of the apron and on the apron.

  17. CFD Simulations of a Flow Mixing and Heat Transfer Enhancement in an Advanced LWR Nuclear Fuel Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    In, Wang-Kee; Chun, Tae-Hyun; Shin, Chang-Hwan; Oh, Dong-Seok [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1045 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon, Korea 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis has been performed to investigate a flow-mixing and heat-transfer enhancement caused by a mixing-vane spacer in a LWR fuel assembly which is a rod bundle. This paper presents the CFD simulations of a flow mixing and heat transfer in a fully heated 5x5 array of a rod bundle with a split-vane and hybrid-vane spacer. The CFD prediction at a low Reynolds number of 42,000 showed a reasonably good agreement of the initial heat transfer enhancement with the measured one for a partially heated experiment using a similar spacer structure. The CFD simulation also predicted the decay rate of a normalized Nusselt number downstream of the split-vane spacer which agrees fairly well with those of the experiment and the correlation. The CFD calculations for the split vane and hybrid vane at the LWR operating conditions(Re = 500,000) predicted hot fuel spots in a streaky structure downstream of the spacer, which occurs due to the secondary flow occurring in an opposite direction near the fuel rod. However, the split-vane and hybrid-vane spacers are predicted to significantly enhance the overall heat transfer of a LWR nuclear fuel assembly. (authors)

  18. Applying uncertainty quantification to multiphase flow computational fluid dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gel, A.; Garg, R.; Tong, C.; Shahnam, M.; Guenther, C.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase computational fluid dynamics plays a major role in design and optimization of fossil fuel based reactors. There is a growing interest in accounting for the influence of uncertainties associated with physical systems to increase the reliability of computational simulation based engineering analysis. The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has recently undertaken an initiative to characterize uncertainties associated with computer simulation of reacting multiphase flows encountered in energy producing systems such as a coal gasifier. The current work presents the preliminary results in applying non-intrusive parametric uncertainty quantification and propagation techniques with NETL's open-source multiphase computational fluid dynamics software MFIX. For this purpose an open-source uncertainty quantification toolkit, PSUADE developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has been interfaced with MFIX software. In this study, the sources of uncertainty associated with numerical approximation and model form have been neglected, and only the model input parametric uncertainty with forward propagation has been investigated by constructing a surrogate model based on data-fitted response surface for a multiphase flow demonstration problem. Monte Carlo simulation was employed for forward propagation of the aleatory type input uncertainties. Several insights gained based on the outcome of these simulations are presented such as how inadequate characterization of uncertainties can affect the reliability of the prediction results. Also a global sensitivity study using Sobol' indices was performed to better understand the contribution of input parameters to the variability observed in response variable.

  19. Head Loss Evaluation in a PWR Reactor Vessel Using CFD Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji Hwan Jeong; Jong Pil Park [School of Mechanical Engineering, Pusan National University, Enesys Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Byoung-Sub Han [Jangdae-dong, Yusong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear vendors and utilities perform lots of simulations and analyses in order to ensure the safe operation of nuclear power plants (NPPs). In general, the simulations are carried out using vendor-specific design codes and best-estimate system analysis codes and most of them were developed based on 1-dimensional lumped parameter models. During the past decade, however, computers, parallel computation methods, and 3-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes have been dramatically enhanced. It is believed to be beneficial to take advantage of advanced commercial CFD codes in safety analysis and design of NPPs. The present work aims to analyze the flow distribution in downcomer and lower plenum of Korean standard nuclear power plants (KSNPs) using STAR-CD. The lower plenum geometry of a PWR is very complicated since there are so many reactor internals, which hinders in CFD analysis for real reactor geometry up to now. The present work takes advantage of 3D CAD model so that real geometry of lower plenum is used. The results give a clear figure about flow fields in the reactor vessel, which is one of major safety concerns. The calculated pressure drop across downcomer and lower plenum appears to be in good agreement with the data in engineering calculation note. A algorithm which can evaluate head loss coefficient which is necessary for thermal-hydraulic system code running was suggested based on this CFD analysis results. (authors)

  20. A Mechanical Fluid-Dynamical Model For Ground Movements At Campi...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to increasing pressure within a shallow magma chamber; the second involves the fluid-dynamics of shallow aquifers in response to increasing pressure andor temperature at depth....

  1. COMPARISON OF EXPERIMENTS TO CFD MODELS FOR MIXING USING DUAL OPPOSING JETS IN TANKS WITH AND WITHOUT INTERNAL OBSTRUCTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leishear, R.; Poirier, M.; Lee, S.; Fowley, M.

    2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper documents testing methods, statistical data analysis, and a comparison of experimental results to CFD models for blending of fluids, which were blended using a single pump designed with dual opposing nozzles in an eight foot diameter tank. Overall, this research presents new findings in the field of mixing research. Specifically, blending processes were clearly shown to have random, chaotic effects, where possible causal factors such as turbulence, pump fluctuations, and eddies required future evaluation. CFD models were shown to provide reasonable estimates for the average blending times, but large variations -- or scatter -- occurred for blending times during similar tests. Using this experimental blending time data, the chaotic nature of blending was demonstrated and the variability of blending times with respect to average blending times were shown to increase with system complexity. Prior to this research, the variation in blending times caused discrepancies between CFD models and experiments. This research addressed this discrepancy, and determined statistical correction factors that can be applied to CFD models, and thereby quantified techniques to permit the application of CFD models to complex systems, such as blending. These blending time correction factors for CFD models are comparable to safety factors used in structural design, and compensate variability that cannot be theoretically calculated. To determine these correction factors, research was performed to investigate blending, using a pump with dual opposing jets which re-circulate fluids in the tank to promote blending when fluids are added to the tank. In all, eighty-five tests were performed both in a tank without internal obstructions and a tank with vertical obstructions similar to a tube bank in a heat exchanger. These obstructions provided scale models of vertical cooling coils below the liquid surface for a full scale, liquid radioactive waste storage tank. Also, different jet diameters and different horizontal orientations of the jets were investigated with respect to blending. Two types of blending tests were performed. The first set of eighty-one tests blended small quantities of tracer fluids into solution. Data from these tests were statistically evaluated to determine blending times for the addition of tracer solution to tanks, and blending times were successfully compared to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. The second set of four tests blended bulk quantities of solutions of different density and viscosity. For example, in one test a quarter tank of water was added to a three quarters of a tank of a more viscous salt solution. In this case, the blending process was noted to significantly change due to stratification of fluids, and blending times increased substantially. However, CFD models for stratification and the variability of blending times for different density fluids was not pursued, and further research is recommended in the area of blending bulk quantities of fluids. All in all, testing showed that CFD models can be effectively applied if statistically validated through experimental testing, but in the absence of experimental validation CFD model scan be extremely misleading as a basis for design and operation decisions.

  2. Processes and Procedures for Application of CFD to Nuclear Reactor Safety Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz; Patrick J. Roache; Ismail B. Celik; William D. Pointer; Yassin A. Hassan

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, nuclear reactor safety analysis has been performed using systems analysis codes such as RELAP5, which was developed at the INL. However, goals established by the Generation IV program, especially the desire to increase efficiency, has lead to an increase in operating temperatures for the reactors. This increase pushes reactor materials to operate towards their upper temperature limits relative to structural integrity. Because there will be some finite variation of the power density in the reactor core, there will be a potential for local hot spots to occur in the reactor vessel. Hence, it has become apparent that detailed analysis will be required to ensure that local ‘hot spots’ do not exceed safety limits. It is generally accepted that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes are intrinsically capable of simulating fluid dynamics and heat transport locally because they are based on ‘first principles.’ Indeed, CFD analysis has reached a fairly mature level of development, including the commercial level. However, CFD experts are aware that even though commercial codes are capable of simulating local fluid and thermal physics, great care must be taken in their application to avoid errors caused by such things as inappropriate grid meshing, low-order discretization schemes, lack of iterative convergence and inaccurate time-stepping. Just as important is the choice of a turbulence model for turbulent flow simulation. Turbulence models model the effects of turbulent transport of mass, momentum and energy, but are not necessarily applicable for wide ranges of flow types. Therefore, there is a well-recognized need to establish practices and procedures for the proper application of CFD to simulate flow physics accurately and establish the level of uncertainty of such computations. The present document represents contributions of CFD experts on what the basic practices, procedures and guidelines should be to aid CFD analysts to obtain accurate estimates of the flow and energy transport as applied to nuclear reactor safety. However, it is expected that these practices and procedures will require updating from time to time as research and development affect them or replace them with better procedures. The practices and procedures are categorized into five groups. These are: 1.Code Verification 2.Code and Calculation Documentation 3.Reduction of Numerical Error 4.Quantification of Numerical Uncertainty (Calculation Verification) 5.Calculation Validation. These five categories have been identified from procedures currently required of CFD simulations such as those required for publication of a paper in the ASME Journal of Fluids Engineering and from the literature such as Roache [1998]. Code verification refers to the demonstration that the equations of fluid and energy transport have been correctly coded in the CFD code. Code and calculation documentation simply means that the equations and their discretizations, etc., and boundary and initial conditions used to pose the fluid flow problem are fully described in available documentation. Reduction of numerical error refers to practices and procedures to lower numerical errors to negligible or very low levels as is reasonably possible (such as avoiding use of first-order discretizations). The quantification of numerical uncertainty is also known as calculation verification. This means that estimates are made of numerical error to allow the characterization of the numerical

  3. Coupled computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer analysis of the VHTR lower plenum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Genk, Mohamed S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Salvador B.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The very high temperature reactor (VHTR) concept is being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other groups around the world for the future generation of electricity at high thermal efficiency (> 48%) and co-generation of hydrogen and process heat. This Generation-IV reactor would operate at elevated exit temperatures of 1,000-1,273 K, and the fueled core would be cooled by forced convection helium gas. For the prismatic-core VHTR, which is the focus of this analysis, the velocity of the hot helium flow exiting the core into the lower plenum (LP) could be 35-70 m/s. The impingement of the resulting gas jets onto the adiabatic plate at the bottom of the LP could develop hot spots and thermal stratification and inadequate mixing of the gas exiting the vessel to the turbo-machinery for energy conversion. The complex flow field in the LP is further complicated by the presence of large cylindrical graphite posts that support the massive core and inner and outer graphite reflectors. Because there are approximately 276 channels in the VHTR core from which helium exits into the LP and a total of 155 support posts, the flow field in the LP includes cross flow, multiple jet flow interaction, flow stagnation zones, vortex interaction, vortex shedding, entrainment, large variation in Reynolds number (Re), recirculation, and mixing enhancement and suppression regions. For such a complex flow field, experimental results at operating conditions are not currently available. Instead, the objective of this paper is to numerically simulate the flow field in the LP of a prismatic core VHTR using the Sandia National Laboratories Fuego, which is a 3D, massively parallel generalized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with numerous turbulence and buoyancy models and simulation capabilities for complex gas flow fields, with and without thermal effects. The code predictions for simpler flow fields of single and swirling gas jets, with and without a cross flow, are validated using reported experimental data and theory. The key processes in the LP are identified using phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT). It may be argued that a CFD code that accurately simulates simplified, single-effect flow fields with increasing complexity is likely to adequately model the complex flow field in the VHTR LP, subject to a future experimental validation. The PIRT process and spatial and temporal discretizations implemented in the present analysis using Fuego established confidence in the validation and verification (V and V) calculations and in the conclusions reached based on the simulation results. The performed calculations included the helicoid vortex swirl model, the dynamic Smagorinsky large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model, participating media radiation (PMR), and 1D conjugate heat transfer (CHT). The full-scale, half-symmetry LP mesh used in the LP simulation included unstructured hexahedral elements and accounted for the graphite posts, the helium jets, the exterior walls, and the bottom plate with an adiabatic outer surface. Results indicated significant enhancements in heat transfer, flow mixing, and entrainment in the VHTR LP when using swirling inserts at the exit of the helium flow channels into the LP. The impact of using various swirl angles on the flow mixing and heat transfer in the LP is qualified, including the formation of the central recirculation zone (CRZ), and the effect of LP height. Results also showed that in addition to the enhanced mixing, the swirling inserts result in negligible additional pressure losses and are likely to eliminate the formation of hot spots.

  4. Fluid Dynamics of Carbon Dioxide Disposal into Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, Julio Enrique

    2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) into saline aquifers has been proposed as a means to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (geological carbon sequestration). Large-scale injection of CO{sub 2} will induce a variety of coupled physical and chemical processes, including multiphase fluid flow, fluid pressurization and changes in effective stress, solute transport, and chemical reactions between fluids and formation minerals. This work addresses some of these issues with special emphasis given to the physics of fluid flow in brine formations. An investigation of the thermophysical properties of pure carbon dioxide, water and aqueous solutions of CO{sub 2} and NaCl has been conducted. As a result, accurate representations and models for predicting the overall thermophysical behavior of the system CO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O-NaCl are proposed and incorporated into the numerical simulator TOUGH2/ECO{sub 2}. The basic problem of CO{sub 2} injection into a radially symmetric brine aquifer is used to validate the results of TOUGH2/ECO2. The numerical simulator has been applied to more complex flow problem including the CO{sub 2} injection project at the Sleipner Vest Field in the Norwegian sector of the North Sea and the evaluation of fluid flow dynamics effects of CO{sub 2} injection into aquifers. Numerical simulation results show that the transport at Sleipner is dominated by buoyancy effects and that shale layers control vertical migration of CO{sub 2}. These results are in good qualitative agreement with time lapse surveys performed at the site. High-resolution numerical simulation experiments have been conducted to study the onset of instabilities (viscous fingering) during injection of CO{sub 2} into saline aquifers. The injection process can be classified as immiscible displacement of an aqueous phase by a less dense and less viscous gas phase. Under disposal conditions (supercritical CO{sub 2}) the viscosity of carbon dioxide can be less than the viscosity of the aqueous phase by a factor of 15. Because of the lower viscosity, the CO{sub 2} displacement front will have a tendency towards instability. Preliminary simulation results show good agreement between classical instability solutions and numerical predictions of finger growth and spacing obtained using different gas/liquid viscosity ratios, relative permeability and capillary pressure models. Further studies are recommended to validate these results over a broader range of conditions.

  5. Climate dynamics and fluid mechanics: Natural variability and related uncertainties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Ghil; Mickaël D. Chekroun; Eric Simonnet

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this review-and-research paper is twofold: (i) to review the role played in climate dynamics by fluid-dynamical models; and (ii) to contribute to the understanding and reduction of the uncertainties in future climate-change projections. To illustrate the first point, we focus on the large-scale, wind-driven flow of the mid-latitude oceans which contribute in a crucial way to Earth's climate, and to changes therein. We study the low-frequency variability (LFV) of the wind-driven, double-gyre circulation in mid-latitude ocean basins, via the bifurcation sequence that leads from steady states through periodic solutions and on to the chaotic, irregular flows documented in the observations. This sequence involves local, pitchfork and Hopf bifurcations, as well as global, homoclinic ones. The natural climate variability induced by the LFV of the ocean circulation is but one of the causes of uncertainties in climate projections. Another major cause of such uncertainties could reside in the structural instability in the topological sense, of the equations governing climate dynamics, including but not restricted to those of atmospheric and ocean dynamics. We propose a novel approach to understand, and possibly reduce, these uncertainties, based on the concepts and methods of random dynamical systems theory. As a very first step, we study the effect of noise on the topological classes of the Arnol'd family of circle maps, a paradigmatic model of frequency locking as occurring in the nonlinear interactions between the El Nino-Southern Oscillations (ENSO) and the seasonal cycle. It is shown that the maps' fine-grained resonant landscape is smoothed by the noise, thus permitting their coarse-grained classification. This result is consistent with stabilizing effects of stochastic parametrization obtained in modeling of ENSO phenomenon via some general circulation models.

  6. CFD Simulations of Joint Urban Atmospheric Dispersion Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R; Humphreys III, T; Chan, S

    2004-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) to the understanding of urban wind flow and dispersion processes has gained increasing attention over recent years. While many of the simpler dispersion models are based on a set of prescribed meteorology to calculate dispersion, the CFD approach has the ability of coupling the wind field to dispersion processes. This has distinct advantages when very detailed results are required, such as for the case where the releases occur around buildings and within urban areas. CFD also has great flexibility as a testbed for turbulence models, which has important implications for atmospheric dispersion problems. In the spring of 2003, a series of dispersion field experiments (Joint Urban 2003) were conducted at Oklahoma City (Allwine, et. al, 2004). These experiments were complimentary to the URBAN 2000 field studies at Salt Lake City (Shinn, et. al, 2000) in that they will provide a second set of comprehensive field data for evaluation of CFD as well as for other dispersion models. In contrast to the URBAN 2000 experiments that were conducted entirely at night, these new field studies took place during both daytime and nighttime thus including the possibility of convective as well as stable atmospheric conditions. Initially several CFD modeling studies were performed to provide guidance for the experimental team in the selection of release sites and in the deployment of wind and concentration sensors. Also, while meteorological and concentration measurements were taken over the greater Oklahoma City urban area, our CFD calculations were focused on the near field of the release point. The proximity of the source to a large commercial building and to the neighboring buildings several of which have multistories, present a significant challenge even for CFD calculations involving grid resolutions as fine as 1 meter. A total of 10 Intensive Observations Periods (IOP's) were conducted within the 2003 field experiments. SF6 releases in the form of puffs or continuous sources were disseminated over 6 daytime and 4 nighttime episodes. Many wind and concentration sensors were used to provide wind and SF6 data over both long and short time-averaging periods. In addition to the usual near surface measurements, data depicting vertical profiles of wind and concentrations adjacent to the outside walls of several buildings were also taken. Also of interest were observations of the trajectory of balloons that were deployed close to the tracer release area. Many of the balloons released exhibit extremely quick ascents up from ground level to the top of buildings, thus implying highly convective conditions. In this paper we will present some simulations that were performed during the planning of the field experiments. The calculations were based on two possible release sites at the intersections of Sheridan and Robinson, and Broadway and Sheridan. These results provided initial information on flow and dispersion patterns, which could be used to guide optimal placement of sensors at appropriate locations. We will also discuss results of more recent simulations for several releases in which reliable data is available. These simulations will be compared with the near field data taken from the wind sensors as well as the time-averaged data from the concentration sensors. Among the other topics discussed are initial and boundary conditions used in the simulations, adaptation of building GIS data for CFD modeling and analysis of field data.

  7. A Simple Interface to Computational Fluid Dynamics Programs for Building Environment Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    A Simple Interface to Computational Fluid Dynamics Programs for Building Environment Simulations for architects and HVAC engineers to simulate airflows in and around buildings by Computational Fluid Dynamics Charles R. Broderick III Qingyan Chen Building Technology Program Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  8. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Ris-R-1157(EN) Annual Progress Report for 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Risø-R-1157(EN) Department Annual Progress Report for 1999 Edited by S;2 Risø-R-1157(EN) Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within the three programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information processing

  9. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Ris-R-1227(EN) Annual Progress Report for 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Risø-R-1227(EN) Department Annual Progress Report for 2000 Edited by S;2 Risø-R-1227(EN) Abstract The Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department performs basic and applied research within three scientific programmes: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics and information

  10. Optics and Fluid Dynamics Ris-R-1100(EN) Annual Progress Report for 1998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optics and Fluid Dynamics Risø-R-1100(EN) Department Annual Progress Report for 1998 Edited by S May 1999 #12;2 Risø-R-1100(EN) Abstract Research in the Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department has been performed within the following three programme areas: (1) optical materials, (2) optical diagnostics

  11. Computational fluid dynamics modeling of chemical looping combustion process with calcium sulphate oxygen carrier - article no. A19

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baosheng Jin; Rui Xiao; Zhongyi Deng; Qilei Song [Southeast University (China). Key Laboratory of Clean Coal Power Generation and Combustion Technology of Ministry of Education

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To concentrate CO{sub 2} in combustion processes by efficient and energy-saving ways is a first and very important step for its sequestration. Chemical looping combustion (CLC) could easily achieve this goal. A chemical-looping combustion system consists of a fuel reactor and an air reactor. Two reactors in the form of interconnected fluidized beds are used in the process: (1) a fuel reactor where the oxygen carrier is reduced by reaction with the fuel, and (2) an air reactor where the reduced oxygen carrier from the fuel reactor is oxidized with air. The outlet gas from the fuel reactor consists of CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O, while the outlet gas stream from the air reactor contains only N{sub 2} and some unused O{sub 2}. The water in combustion products can be easily removed by condensation and pure carbon dioxide is obtained without any loss of energy for separation. Until now, there is little literature about mathematical modeling of chemical-looping combustion using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. In this work, the reaction kinetic model of the fuel reactor (CaSO{sub 4}+ H{sub 2}) is developed by means of the commercial code FLUENT and the effects of partial pressure of H{sub 2} (concentration of H{sub 2}) on chemical looping combustion performance are also studied. The results show that the concentration of H{sub 2} could enhance the CLC performance.

  12. Scaling studies and conceptual experiment designs for NGNP CFD assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; G. E. McCreery

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to document scaling studies and conceptual designs for flow and heat transfer experiments intended to assess CFD codes and their turbulence models proposed for application to prismatic NGNP concepts. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. Two aspects of the complex flow in an NGNP are being addressed: (1) flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue) and (2) turbulence and resulting temperature distributions in reactor cooling channels ("hot channel" issue). Current prismatic NGNP concepts are being examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses have been applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. For normal operation, the flow in the coolant channels can be considered to be dominant turbulent forced convection with slight transverse property variation. In a pressurized cooldown (LOFA) simulation, the flow quickly becomes laminar with some possible buoyancy influences. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple hot jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentumdominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other. Two types of heat transfer experiments are being considered. One addresses the "hot channel" problem, if necessary. The second type will treat heated jets entering a model plenum. Unheated MIR (Matched-Index-of-Refraction) experiments are first steps when the geometry is complicated. One does not want to use a computational technique which will not even handle constant properties properly. The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of CFD solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing and turbulence models for typical NGNP plenum geometries in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. As indicated by the scaling studies, in normal full power operation of a typical NGNP conceptual design, buoyancy influences should be negligible in the lower plenum. The MIR experiment will simulate flow features of the paths of jets as they mix in flowing through the array of posts in a lower plenum en route to the single exit duct. Conceptual designs for such experiments are described.

  13. HYDRA, A finite element computational fluid dynamics code: User manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christon, M.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HYDRA is a finite element code which has been developed specifically to attack the class of transient, incompressible, viscous, computational fluid dynamics problems which are predominant in the world which surrounds us. The goal for HYDRA has been to achieve high performance across a spectrum of supercomputer architectures without sacrificing any of the aspects of the finite element method which make it so flexible and permit application to a broad class of problems. As supercomputer algorithms evolve, the continuing development of HYDRA will strive to achieve optimal mappings of the most advanced flow solution algorithms onto supercomputer architectures. HYDRA has drawn upon the many years of finite element expertise constituted by DYNA3D and NIKE3D Certain key architectural ideas from both DYNA3D and NIKE3D have been adopted and further improved to fit the advanced dynamic memory management and data structures implemented in HYDRA. The philosophy for HYDRA is to focus on mapping flow algorithms to computer architectures to try and achieve a high level of performance, rather than just performing a port.

  14. Structure and dynamics of mangetorheological fluids confined in microfluidic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghgooie, Ramin

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microfluidic devices and magnetorheological (MR) fluids have been two areas of intense research for several years. Traditionally, these two fields have remained separated from one another by scale. MR fluids are best known ...

  15. Using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to improve the bi-directional nasal drug delivery concept M Kleven1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reimers, Martin

    M Kleven1,2 , MC Melaaen2 , M Reimers3 , JS Røtnes4,5 , L Aurdal5,6 , PG Djupesland7 ABSTRACT Nasal

  16. Fluid Dynamics Research 33 (2003) 333356 Leapfrogging vortex rings: Hamiltonian structure, geometric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid Dynamics Research 33 (2003) 333­356 Leapfrogging vortex rings: Hamiltonian structure that if the rings are modeled as coaxial circular ÿlaments, their dynamics and Hamil- tonian structure is derivable of Mechanical Engineering, New Mexico State University, Las Cruces, NM 88003, USA b Control and Dynamical

  17. Computational Fluids Dynamics and its Application to Multiphase Flows (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zheng

    Computational Fluids Dynamics and its Application to Multiphase Flows (3 credits) Instructor Eric CLIMENT, Dept. of Fluids Mechanics, INP-ENSEEIHT / IMFT (eric.climent@imft.fr) Synopsis Multiphase flows will be introduced, together with their applications to multiphase flows (dispersion, two-way coupling, modelling

  18. AN INVESTIGATION OF THE FLUID DYNAMICS ASPECTS OF THIN LIQUID FILM PROTECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    AN INVESTIGATION OF THE FLUID DYNAMICS ASPECTS OF THIN LIQUID FILM PROTECTION SCHEMES FOR INERTIAL Accepted for Publication October 7, 2003 Experimental and numerical studies of the fluid dy- namics of thin- ploding fuel pellets consists of energetic neutrons, pho- tons, and charged particles that eventually

  19. FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Prabir Daripa developed flows in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In a recent exhaustive study [Transport in Porous Media, 93 fluid flows that occur in porous media during tertiary dis- placement process of chemical enhanced oil

  20. Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics Investigations Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-51324 Infiltration Heat Recovery in Building Walls: Computational Fluid Dynamics leading to partial recovery of heat conducted through the wall. The Infiltration Heat Recovery (IHR) factor was introduced to quantify the heat recovery and correct the conventional calculations

  1. Investigation into the discrepancies between computational fluid dynamics lift predictions and experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fairman, Randall S. (Randall Scott), 1967-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of current computational fluid dynamics capabilities in predicting mean lift forces for two dimensional foils is conducted. It is shown that both integral boundary layer theory and Reynolds Averaged Navier ...

  2. Vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid and Nambu Goto dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Boisseau

    1999-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    By a weak deformation of the cylindrical symmetry of the potential vortex in a relativistic perfect isentropic fluid, we study the possible dynamics of the central line of this vortex. In "stiff" material the Nanbu-Goto equations are obtained

  3. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowardhan, Akshay A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pardyjak, Eric R [UNIV OF UTAH; Senocak, Inanc [BOISE STATE UNIV

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  4. Isomorphic classical molecular dynamics model for an excess electronin a supercritical fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller III, Thomas F.

    2008-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring polymer molecular dynamics (RPMD) is used to directly simulate the dynamics of an excess electron in a supercritical fluid over a broad range of densities. The accuracy of the RPMD model is tested against numerically exact path integral statistics through the use of analytical continuation techniques. At low fluid densities, the RPMD model substantially underestimates the contribution of delocalized states to the dynamics of the excess electron. However, with increasing solvent density, the RPMD model improves, nearly satisfying analytical continuation constraints at densities approaching those of typical liquids. In the high density regime, quantum dispersion substantially decreases the self-diffusion of the solvated electron. In this regime where the dynamics of the electron is strongly coupled to the dynamics of the atoms in the fluid, trajectories that can reveal diffusive motion of the electron are long in comparison to {beta}{h_bar}.

  5. Improvements of Fast Fluid Dynamics for Simulating Airflow in Mingang Jin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    in buildings," Numerical Heat Transfer, Part B: Fundamentals, 62(6), 419-438. #12;2 density kinetic viscosity-765-494-0539 Abstract Fast Fluid Dynamics (FFD) could be potentially used for real-time indoor airflow simulations Dynamics (3D FFD).The implementation of boundary conditions at outlet was improved with local mass

  6. CFD modeling of commercial-scale entrained-flow coal gasifiers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, J.; Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optimization of an advanced coal-fired integrated gasification combined cycle system requires an accurate numerical prediction of gasifier performance. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been used to model the turbulent multiphase reacting flow inside commercial-scale entrained-flow coal gasifiers. Due to the complexity of the physical and chemical processes involved, the accuracy of sub-models requires further improvement. Built upon a previously developed CFD model for entrained-flow gasification, the advanced physical and chemical sub-models presented in this paper include a moisture vaporization model with consideration of high mass transfer rate and a coal devolatilization model with more species to represent coal volatiles and the heating rate effect on volatile yield. The global gas phase reaction kinetics is also carefully selected. To predict a reasonable peak temperature of the coal/O{sub 2} flame inside an entrained-flow gasifier, the reserve reaction of H{sub 2} oxidation is included in the gas phase reaction model. The enhanced CFD model is applied to simulate two typical commercial-scale oxygen-blown entrained-flow configurations including a single-stage down-fired gasifier and a two-stage up-fired gasifier. The CFD results are reasonable in terms of predicted carbon conversion, syngas exit temperature, and syngas exit composition. The predicted profiles of velocity, temperature, and species mole fractions inside the entrained-flow gasifier models show trends similar to those observed in a diffusion-type flame. The predicted distributions of mole fractions of major species inside both gasifiers can be explained by the heterogeneous combustion and gasification reactions and the homogeneous gas phase reactions. It was also found that the syngas compositions at the CFD model exits are not in chemical equilibrium, indicating the kinetics for both heterogeneous and gas phase homogeneous reactions are important. Overall, the results achieved here indicate that the gasifier models reported in this paper are reliable and accurate enough to be incorporated into process/CFD co-simulations of IGCC power plants for system-wide design and optimization.

  7. D)TT(^!rf5\\\\ "bKtSOOO&i. Ris-R-793(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D)TT(^!rf5\\\\ "bKtSOOO&i. Risø-R-793(EN) Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report, Denmark January 1995 #12;Optics and Fluid Dynamics Department Annual Progress Report for 1994 Edited by S;Abstract Research in the Optics and Fiuid Dynamics Department is performed within the following two

  8. Dynamics of filaments and membranes in a viscous fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas R. Powers

    2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by the motion of biopolymers and membranes in solution, this article presents a formulation of the equations of motion for curves and surfaces in a viscous fluid. We focus on geometrical aspects and simple variational methods for calculating internal stresses and forces, and we derive the full nonlinear equations of motion. In the case of membranes, we pay particular attention to the formulation of the equations of hydrodynamics on a curved, deforming surface. The formalism is illustrated by two simple case studies: (1) the twirling instability of straight elastic rod rotating in a viscous fluid, and (2) the pearling and buckling instabilities of a tubular liposome or polymersome.

  9. Parcel EulerianLagrangian fluid dynamics of rotating geophysical flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Marcel

    , Gottwald, and Reich (2002) and Frank and Reich (2003, 2004) introduced a Hamiltonian Particle Mesh (HPM integra- tion scheme is used. The HPM method is a parcel Eulerian­Lagrangian method: the fluid particles on the advection time scale. The conservation of mass and circulation in the HPM numerical model is shown

  10. Experimental investigation and CFD analysis on cross flow in the core of PMR200

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Jeong-Hun; Yoon, Su-Jong; Cho, Hyoung-Kyu; Jae, Moosung; Park, Goon-Cherl

    2015-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the major Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) concepts, which consists of hexagonal prismatic fuel blocks and reflector blocks made of nuclear gradegraphite. However, the shape of the graphite blocks could be easily changed by neutron damage duringthe reactor operation and the shape change can create gaps between the blocks inducing the bypass flow.In the VHTR core, two types of gaps, a vertical gap and a horizontal gap which are called bypass gap and cross gap, respectively, can be formed. The cross gap complicates the flow field in the reactor core by connectingmore »the coolant channel to the bypass gap and it could lead to a loss of effective coolant flow in the fuel blocks. Thus, a cross flow experimental facility was constructed to investigate the cross flow phenomena in the core of the VHTR and a series of experiments were carried out under varying flow rates and gap sizes. The results of the experiments were compared with CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) analysis results in order to verify its prediction capability for the cross flow phenomena. Fairly good agreement was seen between experimental results and CFD predictions and the local characteristics of the cross flow was discussed in detail. Based on the calculation results, pressure loss coefficient across the cross gap was evaluated, which is necessary for the thermo-fluid analysis of the VHTR core using a lumped parameter code.« less

  11. Computational and Spectroscopic Investigations of the Molecular Scale Structure and Dynamics of Geologically Important Fluids and Mineral-Fluid Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. James Kirkpatrick; Andrey G. Kalinichev

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Research supported by this grant focuses on molecular scale understanding of central issues related to the structure and dynamics of geochemically important fluids, fluid-mineral interfaces, and confined fluids using computational modeling and experimental methods. Molecular scale knowledge about fluid structure and dynamics, how these are affected by mineral surfaces and molecular-scale (nano-) confinement, and how water molecules and dissolved species interact with surfaces is essential to understanding the fundamental chemistry of a wide range of low-temperature geochemical processes, including sorption and geochemical transport. Our principal efforts are devoted to continued development of relevant computational approaches, application of these approaches to important geochemical questions, relevant NMR and other experimental studies, and application of computational modeling methods to understanding the experimental results. The combination of computational modeling and experimental approaches is proving highly effective in addressing otherwise intractable problems. In 2006-2007 we have significantly advanced in new, highly promising research directions along with completion of on-going projects and final publication of work completed in previous years. New computational directions are focusing on modeling proton exchange reactions in aqueous solutions using ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD), metadynamics (MTD), and empirical valence bond (EVB) approaches. Proton exchange is critical to understanding the structure, dynamics, and reactivity at mineral-water interfaces and for oxy-ions in solution, but has traditionally been difficult to model with molecular dynamics (MD). Our ultimate objective is to develop this capability, because MD is much less computationally demanding than quantum-chemical approaches. We have also extended our previous MD simulations of metal binding to natural organic matter (NOM) to a much longer time scale (up to 10 ns) for significantly larger systems. These calculations have allowed us, for the first time, to study the effects of metal cations with different charges and charge density on the NOM aggregation in aqueous solutions. Other computational work has looked at the longer-time-scale dynamical behavior of aqueous species at mineral-water interfaces investigated simultaneously by NMR spectroscopy. Our experimental NMR studies have focused on understanding the structure and dynamics of water and dissolved species at mineral-water interfaces and in two-dimensional nano-confinement within clay interlayers. Combined NMR and MD study of H2O, Na+, and Cl- interactions with the surface of quartz has direct implications regarding interpretation of sum frequency vibrational spectroscopic experiments for this phase and will be an important reference for future studies. We also used NMR to examine the behavior of K+ and H2O in the interlayer and at the surfaces of the clay minerals hectorite and illite-rich illite-smectite. This the first time K+ dynamics has been characterized spectroscopically in geochemical systems. Preliminary experiments were also performed to evaluate the potential of 75As NMR as a probe of arsenic geochemical behavior. The 75As NMR study used advanced signal enhancement methods, introduced a new data acquisition approach to minimize the time investment in ultra-wide-line NMR experiments, and provides the first evidence of a strong relationship between the chemical shift and structural parameters for this experimentally challenging nucleus. We have also initiated a series of inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements of water dynamics in the interlayers of clays and layered double hydroxides. The objective of these experiments is to probe the correlations of water molecular motions in confined spaces over the scale of times and distances most directly comparable to our MD simulations and on a time scale different than that probed by NMR. This work is being done in collaboration with Drs. C.-K. Loong, N. de Souza, and A.I. Kolesnikov at the Intense Pulsed

  12. 2.13 HEAT TRANSFER & FLUID FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS 2.13.7-1 Molecular dynamics methods in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    2.13 HEAT TRANSFER & FLUID FLOW IN MICROCHANNELS 2.13.7-1 2.13.7 Molecular dynamics methods in microscale heat transfer Shigeo Maruyama A. Introduction In normal heat transfer and fluid flow calculations of molecules. This situation is approached in microscale heat transfer and fluid flow. Molecular level

  13. Multi-Particle Collision Dynamics Algorithm for Nematic Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tyler N. Shendruk; Julia M. Yeomans

    2015-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Research on transport, self-assembly and defect dynamics within confined, flowing liquid crystals requires versatile and computationally efficient mesoscopic algorithms to account for fluctuating nematohydrodynamic interactions. We present a multi-particle collision dynamics (MPCD) based algorithm to simulate liquid-crystal hydrodynamic and director fields in two and three dimensions. The nematic-MPCD method is shown to successfully reproduce the features of a nematic liquid crystal, including a nematic-isotropic phase transition with hysteresis in 3D, defect dynamics, isotropic Frank elastic coefficients, tumbling and shear alignment regimes and boundary condition dependent order parameter fields.

  14. Parcel EulerianLagrangian fluid dynamics of rotating geophysical flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Hanbali, Ahmad

    of dynamics used in Hamiltonian particle mesh method (HPM) of Frank and Reich (2003, 2004): dX dt = U Hs = U;' & $ % · HPM: potential energy calculated on Eulerian mesh; Lagrangian evolution particles. · ODE's per parcel

  15. NUMERICAL DETERMINATION AND TREATMENT OF CONVECTIVE HEAT TRANSFER COEFFICIENT IN THE COUPLED BUILDING ENERGY AND CFD SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    BUILDING ENERGY AND CFD SIMULATION Zhiqiang Zhai* Department of Civil, Environmental and Architectural, IN 47907-2088, USA ABSTRACT The integration of building Energy Simulation (ES) and Computational Fluid, Energy Simulation, CFD, Coupling INTRODUCTION A building energy simulation (ES) program predicts building

  16. Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Volume 2, Nos. 2/3/4, 2002144 A numerical investigation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Tianshou

    Progress in Computational Fluid Dynamics, Volume 2, Nos. 2/3/4, 2002144 A numerical investigation.16 mm, under both cooling and heating conditions, with and without gravity, were obtained. It is shown', Progress in Computational fluid Dynamics, Vol. 2, Nos. 2/3/4, pp. 144­152. NOMENCLATURE A tube cross

  17. Applying one-dimensional fluid thermal elements into a 3D CLIC accelerating strucutre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raatikainen, Riku; Österberg, Kenneth; Riddone, Germana; Samoshkin, Alexander; Gudkov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A finite element modeling method to simplify the analysis of coupled thermal-structural model for the CLIC accelerating structure is presented. In addition, the results of thermal and structural analyses for the accelerating structure are presented. Instead of using a standard 3D computational fluid dynamics (CFD) method for solving problems involving fluid dynamics and heat transfer in 3D environment, one-dimensional fluid thermal elements are used. In one-dimensional flow, the governing equations of fluid dynamics are considerably simplified. Thus, it is expected that the computational time for more complex simulations becomes shorter. The method was first applied to several test models, which demonstrated the suitability of the one-dimensional flow modeling. The results show that one-dimensional fluid flow reduces the computation time considerably allowing the modeling for the future larger assemblies with sufficient accuracy.

  18. Dynamics of a confined dusty fluid in a sheared ion flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laishram, Modhuchandra; Sharma, Devendra; Kaw, Predhiman K. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of an isothermally driven dust fluid is analyzed which is confined in an azimuthally symmetric cylindrical setup by an effective potential and is in equilibrium with an unconfined sheared flow of a streaming plasma. Cases are analyzed where the confining potential constitutes a barrier for the driven fluid, limiting its spatial extension and boundary velocity. The boundary effects entering the formulation are characterized by applying the appropriate boundary conditions and a range of solutions exhibiting single and multiple vortex are obtained. The equilibrium solutions considered in the cylindrical setup feature a transition from single to multiple vortex state of the driven flow. Effects of (i) the variation in dust viscosity, (ii) coupling between the driving and the driven fluid, and (iii) a friction determining the equilibrium dynamics of the driven system are characterized.

  19. Collective dynamics of molecular motors pulling on fluid membranes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Campas; Y. Kafri; K. B. Zeldovich; J. Casademunt; J. -F. Joanny

    2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective dynamics of $N$ weakly coupled processive molecular motors are considered theoretically. We show, using a discrete lattice model, that the velocity-force curves strongly depend on the effective dynamic interactions between motors and differ significantly from a simple mean field prediction. They become essentially independent of $N$ if it is large enough. For strongly biased motors such as kinesin this occurs if $N\\gtrsim 5$. The study of a two-state model shows that the existence of internal states can induce effective interactions.

  20. Simulating Buoyancy-Driven Airflow in Buildings by1 Coarse-Grid Fast Fluid Dynamics2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Simulating Buoyancy-Driven Airflow in Buildings by1 Coarse-Grid Fast Fluid Dynamics2 Mingang Jin1. Introduction33 Whole-building airflow simulations are required in applications such as natural ventilation34 design, coupled building airflow and energy simulation, smoke control, and air quality diagnosis35

  1. On the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy B.E., Electrical and Electronic EngineeringOn the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment

  2. Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    -furnace destruction of pollutants are stated as: good combustion is achieved when 2-second gas residence time at 850 C1 Computational Fluid Dynamics Evaluation of Good Combustion Performance in Waste Incinerators waste incinerators, good combustion practices(GCP or GOP) have been established. These operating (and

  3. Molecular to fluid dynamics: The consequences of stochastic molecular motion Stefan Heinz*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    to derive a hierarchy of algebraic expressions for the molecular stress tensor and heat flux. A scaling of ordinary irreversible thermodynamics [3]) transport equations for the molecular stress tensor and heat flux equations. The stochastic model is used to derive fluid dynamic equations where the molecular stress tensor

  4. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chao-Yang

    Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of a Lithium/Thionyl Chloride Battery with Electrolyte Flow W-dimensional model is developed to simulate discharge of a primary lithium/thionyl chloride battery. The model to the first task with important examples of lead-acid,1-3 nickel-metal hydride,4-8 and lithium-based batteries

  5. SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    SOLAR SUB-SURFACE FLUID DYNAMICS DESCRIPTORS DERIVED FROM GONG AND MDI DATA R. Komm National Solar Observatory 950 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85719 komm@noao.edu ABSTRACT We analyze GONG and MDI observations closer to the surface. GONG and MDI data show the same results. Di#11;erences occur mainly at high

  6. Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 56, OctoberDecember 2007, 469487

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lathrop, Daniel P.

    Geophysical and Astrophysical Fluid Dynamics, Vol. 101, Nos. 5­6, October­December 2007, 469, USA zInstitute of Geophysics, University of Go¨ ttingen, Friedrich-Hund-Platz 1, D-37077 Go¨ ttingen (though later work by Banka and *Corresponding author. Email: dpl@complex.umd.edu Geophysical

  7. Fluxion: An Innovative Fluid Dynamics Game on Multi-Touch Handheld Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    )). For example, players can place a heater to turn water into gas or place a freezer to turn it into ice. hal) (b) (c) Fig. 3. (a) A heater turns water into gas. (b) Water is turned into an ice cube so simulation on iPhone to create an innovative game experience. Using fluid dynamics and water tri

  8. Dynamics of Quasi-Geostrophic Fluid Motions with Rapidly Oscillating Coriolis Force

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is the viscosity, D9QUR is the Ekman dissipation constant, GH¡!£¦¥3§ is the wind forcing, and V¡XWY¥3`IT6 WI5a and time almost periodic wind forcing, respectively. We assume that fluctuating Coriolis force term )1Dynamics of Quasi-Geostrophic Fluid Motions with Rapidly Oscillating Coriolis Force Hongjun Gao

  9. Environmental Fluid Mechanics (2005) 5: 109134 Mass Conservation and Atmospheric Dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental Fluid Mechanics (2005) 5: 109­134 Mass Conservation and Atmospheric Dynamics Divinity Ave, Cambridge, MA 02138-2094, U.S.A.; bDepartment of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Edmund native formulation, RAMS exhibits a significant degree of mass non-conservation. Domain-wide rates of non

  10. Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink Arenas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Experimental Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink, USA, Fax: 617-432-4122, Abstract Many ice rink arenas have ice resurfacing equipment that uses fossil temperature distributions in ice rinks. The numerical results agree reasonably with the corresponding

  11. Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 2. Effects of fluid saturation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 2. Effects of fluid saturation Robert C slip-weakening behavior is specified, and the off-fault material is described using an elastic-plastic poroelastoplastic materials with and without plastic dilation. During nondilatant undrained response near

  12. A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations Characterizing and optimizing overall performance of wind plants composed of large numbers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are coupling physical models of the atmosphere and wind

  13. PETER LEE OLSON Present Position: Professor of Geophysical Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Peter L.

    Union, Tectonophysics Section Scientific Advisory Board, Maryland Power Plant Siting Program Scientific Dynamics EDUCATION: Ph.D. Geophysics, June 1977, University of California, Berkeley, California M.A. Geophysics, June 1974, University of California, Berkeley, California B.A. Geology, June 1972, University

  14. Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 Critical Biogeochemical Parameters Used for In Situ Bioremediation of Solvents in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718, Berkeley, CA February 1999 169 in monitoring wells near the injection point. #12;Proceedings Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks. LBNL-42718

  15. Direct control of the small-scale energy balance in 2D fluid dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Jason; Myerscough, Keith

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the direct modification of the pseudo-spectral truncation of 2D, incompressible fluid dynamics to maintain a prescribed kinetic energy spectrum. The method provides a means of simulating fluid states with defined spectral properties, for the purpose of matching simulation statistics to given information, arising from observations, theoretical prediction or high fidelity simulation. In the scheme outlined here, Nos\\'e-Hoover thermostats, commonly used in molecular dynamics, are introduced as feedback controls applied to energy shells of the Fourier-discretized Navier-Stokes equations. As we demonstrate in numerical experiments, the dynamical properties (quantified using autocorrelation functions) are only modestly perturbed by our device, while ensemble dispersion is significantly enhanced in comparison with simulations of a corresponding truncation incorporating hyperviscosity.

  16. Global dynamics and asymptotics for monomial scalar field potentials and perfect fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alho, Artur; Uggla, Claes

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a minimally coupled scalar field with a monomial potential and a perfect fluid in flat FLRW cosmology. We apply local and global dynamical systems techniques to a new three-dimensional dynamical systems reformulation of the field equations on a compact state space. This leads to a visual global description of the solution space and asymptotic behavior. At late times we employ averaging techniques to prove statements about how the relationship between the equation of state of the fluid and the monomial exponent of the scalar field affects asymptotic source dominance and asymptotic manifest self-similarity breaking. We also situate the `attractor' solution in the three-dimensional state space and show that it corresponds to the one-dimensional unstable center manifold of a de Sitter fixed point, located on an unphysical boundary associated with the dynamics at early times. By deriving a center manifold expansion we obtain approximate expressions for the attractor solution. We subsequently improve th...

  17. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A Thesis by JUAN CARLOS CORREA CASTRO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test Copyright 2011 Juan Carlos Correa Castro EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A...

  18. Advanced CFD Models for High Efficiency Compression Ignition...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CFD Models for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Engines Advanced CFD Models for High Efficiency Compression Ignition Engines Advanced CFD models for high efficiency...

  19. Dynamic mesoscale model of dipolar fluids via fluctuating hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persson, Rasmus A. X.; Chu, Jhih-Wei, E-mail: jwchu@nctu.edu.tw [Institute of Bioinformatics and Systems Biology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30068, Taiwan (China); Voulgarakis, Nikolaos K. [Department of Mathematics, Washington State University, Richland, Washington 99372 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluctuating hydrodynamics (FHD) is a general framework of mesoscopic modeling and simulation based on conservational laws and constitutive equations of linear and nonlinear responses. However, explicit representation of electrical forces in FHD has yet to appear. In this work, we devised an Ansatz for the dynamics of dipole moment densities that is linked with the Poisson equation of the electrical potential ? in coupling to the other equations of FHD. The resulting ?-FHD equations then serve as a platform for integrating the essential forces, including electrostatics in addition to hydrodynamics, pressure-volume equation of state, surface tension, and solvent-particle interactions that govern the emergent behaviors of molecular systems at an intermediate scale. This unique merit of ?-FHD is illustrated by showing that the water dielectric function and ion hydration free energies in homogeneous and heterogenous systems can be captured accurately via the mesoscopic simulation. Furthermore, we show that the field variables of ?-FHD can be mapped from the trajectory of an all-atom molecular dynamics simulation such that model development and parametrization can be based on the information obtained at a finer-grained scale. With the aforementioned multiscale capabilities and a spatial resolution as high as 5 Å, the ?-FHD equations represent a useful semi-explicit solvent model for the modeling and simulation of complex systems, such as biomolecular machines and nanofluidics.

  20. GTRF Calculations Using Hydra-TH (L3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bakosi, Jozsef [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Christon, Mark A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Francois, Marianne M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lowrie, Robert B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nourgaliev, Robert [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the work carried out for completion of the Thermal Hydraulics Methods (THM) Level 3 Milestone THM.CFD.P5.05 for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL). A series of body-fitted computational meshes have been generated by Numeca's Hexpress/Hybrid, a.k.a. 'Spider', meshing technology for the V5H 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 rod bundle geometries and subsequently used to compute the fluid dynamics of grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF). Spider is easy to use, fast, and automatically generates high-quality meshes for extremely complex geometries, required for the GTRF problem. Hydra-TH has been used to carry out large-eddy simulations on both 3 x 3 and 5 x 5 geometries, using different mesh resolutions. The results analyzed show good agreement with Star-CCM+ simulations and experimental data.

  1. PIV Uncertainty Methodologies for CFD Code Validation at the MIR Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Richard Skifton; Carl Stoots; Eung Soo Kim; Thomas Conder

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is widely used in the nuclear thermal hydraulics field for design and safety analyses. To validate CFD codes, high quality multi dimensional flow field data are essential. The Matched Index of Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility at Idaho National Laboratory has a unique capability to contribute to the development of validated CFD codes through the use of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). The significance of the MIR facility is that it permits non intrusive velocity measurement techniques, such as PIV, through complex models without requiring probes and other instrumentation that disturb the flow. At the heart of any PIV calculation is the cross-correlation, which is used to estimate the displacement of particles in some small part of the image over the time span between two images. This image displacement is indicated by the location of the largest peak. In the MIR facility, uncertainty quantification is a challenging task due to the use of optical measurement techniques. Currently, this study is developing a reliable method to analyze uncertainty and sensitivity of the measured data and develop a computer code to automatically analyze the uncertainty/sensitivity of the measured data. The main objective of this study is to develop a well established uncertainty quantification method for the MIR Flow Facility, which consists of many complicated uncertainty factors. In this study, the uncertainty sources are resolved in depth by categorizing them into uncertainties from the MIR flow loop and PIV system (including particle motion, image distortion, and data processing). Then, each uncertainty source is mathematically modeled or adequately defined. Finally, this study will provide a method and procedure to quantify the experimental uncertainty in the MIR Flow Facility with sample test results.

  2. Coupled full core neutron transport/CFD simulations of pressurized water reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kochunas, B.; Stimpson, S.; Collins, B.; Downar, T. [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, Univ. of Michigan, 2200 Bonisteel Blvd, Ann Arbor, MI 48104 (United States); Brewster, R.; Baglietto, E. [CD-adapco, 60 Broadhollow Road, Melville, NY 11747 (United States); Yan, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently as part of the CASL project, a capability to perform 3D whole-core coupled neutron transport and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) calculations was demonstrated. This work uses the 2D/1D transport code DeCART and the commercial CFD code STAR-CCM+. It builds on previous CASL work demonstrating coupling for smaller spatial domains. The coupling methodology is described along with the problem simulated and results are presented for fresh hot full power conditions. An additional comparison is made to an equivalent model that uses lower order T/H feedback to assess the importance and cost of high fidelity feedback to the neutronics problem. A simulation of a quarter core Combustion Engineering (CE) PWR core was performed with the coupled codes using a Fixed Point Gauss-Seidel iteration technique. The total approximate calculation requirements are nearly 10,000 CPU hours and 1 TB of memory. The problem took 6 coupled iterations to converge. The CFD coupled model and low order T/H feedback model compared well for global solution parameters, with a difference in the critical boron concentration and average outlet temperature of 14 ppm B and 0.94 deg. C, respectively. Differences in the power distribution were more significant with maximum relative differences in the core-wide pin peaking factor (Fq) of 5.37% and average relative differences in flat flux region power of 11.54%. Future work will focus on analyzing problems more relevant to CASL using models with less approximations. (authors)

  3. Compilation of CFD Models of Various Solid Oxide Electrolyzers Analyzed at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various three dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of solid oxide electrolyzers have been created and analyzed at the Idaho National Laboratory since the inception of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in 2004. Three models presented herein include: a 60 cell planar cross flow with inlet and outlet plenums, 10 cell integrated planar cross flow, and internally manifolded five cell planar cross flow. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) module adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, endothermic reaction, Ohmic heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using these models in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production is reported herein. Contour plots and discussion show areas of likely cell degradation, flow distribution in inlet plenum, and flow distribution across and along the flow channels of the current collectors

  4. Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 1. Dry materials or neglect of fluid pressure changes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Off-fault plasticity and earthquake rupture dynamics: 1. Dry materials or neglect of fluid pressure an explicit dynamic finite element procedure. A Mohr-Coulomb type elastic-plastic description describes-fault plasticity during dynamic rupture. Those include the angle with the fault of the maximum compressive

  5. Supplemental Simulation Case Studies of Dynamic Evaporator Modeling Paradigms with Variable Fluid Phases 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodriguez, E.; Rasmussen, B.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1Supplemental Simulation Case Studies of Dynamic Evaporator Modeling Paradigms with Variable Fluid Phases Erik Rodriguez1, Bryan Rasmussen2 The purpose of this document is to present a multitude of case studies comparing evaporator modeling... which uses two-phase region density to trigger mass conservative switching. Nine case studies are performed through a combination of three different refrigerants, three different physical system parameters, and three different operating conditions...

  6. Application of Computational Fluid Dynamics in the Forced Dispersion Modeling of LNG Vapor Clouds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Byung-Kyu

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    droplet-LNG vapor system, which will serve in developing guidelines and establishing engineering criteria for a site-specific LNG mitigation system. Finally, the potentials of applying CFD modeling in providing guidance for setting up the design criteria...

  7. Hp-spectral Methods for Structural Mechanics and Fluid Dynamics Problems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ranjan, Rakesh

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    based finite element methods with the Penalty finite element method are presented for modelling porous media flow problems. Finally, we explore applications to some CFD problems namely, the flow past a cylinder and forward facing step....

  8. Approved Module Information for ME4501, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Computational Fluid Dynamics and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neirotti, Juan Pablo

    and Applications Module Code: ME4501 School: Engineering and Applied Science Module Type: Standard Module New-requisites: Thermodynamics and Fluids (ME3011). Engineering Mathematics 2 (AM21EM). Co-requisites: None Specified ModuleApproved Module Information for ME4501, 2014/5 Module Title/Name: Computational Fluid Dynamics

  9. RES.12-001 Topics in Fluid Dynamics: Dimensional Analysis, the Coriolis force, and Lagrangian and Eulerian Representations, Fall 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Price, James F.

    This collection of three essays was developed from the author's experience teaching Fluid Dynamics of the Atmosphere and Ocean, 12.800, offered to graduate students entering the MIT/WHOI Joint Program in Oceanography. The ...

  10. Dynamically orthogonal field equations for stochastic fluid flows and particle dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapsis, Themistoklis P

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past decades an increasing number of problems in continuum theory have been treated using stochastic dynamical theories. This is because dynamical systems governing real processes always contain some elements ...

  11. Nanoscopic Dynamics of Phospholipid in Unilamellar Vesicles: Effect of Gel to Fluid Phase Transition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, Veerendra K [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Anunciado, Divina B [ORNL; O'Neill, Hugh Michael [ORNL; Urban, Volker S [ORNL

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamics of phospholipids in unilamellar vesicles (ULV) is of interest in biology, medical, and food sciences since these molecules are widely used as biocompatible agents and a mimic of cell membrane systems. We have investigated the nanoscopic dynamics of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) phospholipid in ULV as a function of temperature using elastic and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). The dependence of the signal on the scattering momentum transfer, which is a critical advantage of neutron scattering techniques, allows the detailed analysis of the lipid motions that cannot be carried out by other means. In agreement with a differential scanning calorimetry measurement, a sharp rise in the elastic scattering intensity below ca. 296 K indicates a phase transition from the high-temperature fluid phase to the low-temperature solid gel phase. The microscopic lipid dynamics exhibits qualitative differences between the solid gel phase (in a measurement at 280 K) and the fluid phase (in a measurement at a physiological temperature of 310 K). The data analysis invariably shows the presence of two distinct motions: the whole lipid molecule motion within a monolayer, or lateral diffusion, and the relatively faster internal motion of the DMPC molecule. The lateral diffusion of the whole lipid molecule is found to be Fickian in character, whereas the internal lipid motions are of localized character, consistent with the structure of the vesicles. The lateral motion slows down by an order of magnitude in the solid gel phase, whereas for the internal motion not only the time scale, but also the character of the motion changes upon the phase transition. In the solid gel phase, the lipids are more ordered and undergo uniaxial rotational motion. However, in the fluid phase, the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails undergo confined translation diffusion rather than uniaxial rotational diffusion. The localized translational diffusion of the hydrogen atoms of the lipid tails is a manifestation of the flexibility of the chains acquired in the fluid phase. Because of this flexibility, both the local diffusivity and the confinement volume for the hydrogen atoms increase linearly from near the lipid s polar head group to the end of its hydrophobic tail. Our results present a quantitative and detailed picture of the effect of the gel-fluid phase transition on the nanoscopic lipid dynamics in ULV. The data analysis approach developed here has a potential for probing the dynamic response of lipids to the presence of additional cell membrane components.

  12. Some CFD Books Classics and General Purpose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slinn, Donald

    ., M. Y. Hussaini, A. Quarteroni, T. A. Zang, Spectral Methods in Fluid Dynamics, 1987, Springer Verlag, CRC Press, Boca Raton, ISBN 0-8493-9410-4. Shyy, W., H. S. Udaykumar, M. M. Rao, and R. W. Smith

  13. Bonneville Powerhouse 2 Fish Guidance Efficiency Studies: CFD Model of the Forebay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In ongoing work, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP) is seeking to better understand and improve the conditions within the Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2) turbine intakes to improve survival of downstream migrant salmonid smolt. In this study, the existing B2 forebay computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was modified to include a more detailed representation of all B2 turbine intakes. The modified model was validated to existing field-measured forebay ADCP velocities. The initial CFD model scenarios tested a single project operation and the impact of adding the Behavior Guidance System (BGS) or Corner Collector. These structures had impacts on forebay flows. Most notable was that the addition of the BGS and Corner Collector reduced the lateral extent of the recirculation areas on the Washington shore and Cascade Island and reduced the flow velocity parallel to the powerhouse in front of Units 11 and 12. For these same cases, at the turbine intakes across the powerhouse, there was very little difference in the flow volume into the gatewell for the clean forebay, and the forebay with the BGS in place and/or the Corner Collector operating. The largest differences were at Units 11 to 13. The CFD model cases testing the impact of the gatewell slot fillers showed no impact to the forebay flows, but large differences within the gatewells. With the slot fillers, the flow above the standard traveling screen and into the gatewell increased (about 100 cfs at each turbine intake) and the gap flow decreased across the powerhouse for all cases. The increased flow up the gatewell was further enhanced with only half the units operating. The flow into the gatewell slot was increased about 35 cfs for each bay of each intake across the powerhouse; this change was uniform across the powerhouse. The flows in the gatewell of Unit 12, the most impacted unit for the scenarios, was evaluated. In front of the vertical barrier screen, the CFD model with slot fillers showed reduced the maximum velocities (in spite of the increased the flow into the gatewell), and decreased the area of recirculation. The area near the VBS exceeding the normal velocity criteria of 1 ft/s was reduced and the flows were more balanced.

  14. Proceedings of the International Symposium on Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B. (ed.)

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication contains extended abstracts of papers presented at the International Symposium ''Dynamics of Fluids in Fractured Rocks: Concepts and Recent Advances'' held at Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on February 10-12, 1999. This Symposium is organized in Honor of the 80th Birthday of Paul A. Witherspoon, who initiated some of the early investigations on flow and transport in fractured rocks at the University of California, Berkeley, and at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He is a key figure in the development of basic concepts, modeling, and field measurements of fluid flow and contaminant transport in fractured rock systems. The technical problems of assessing fluid flow, radionuclide transport, site characterization, modeling, and performance assessment in fractured rocks remain the most challenging aspects of subsurface flow and transport investigations. An understanding of these important aspects of hydrogeology is needed to assess disposal of nu clear wastes, development of geothermal resources, production of oil and gas resources, and remediation of contaminated sites. These Proceedings of more than 100 papers from 12 countries discuss recent scientific and practical developments and the status of our understanding of fluid flow and radionuclide transport in fractured rocks. The main topics of the papers are: Theoretical studies of fluid flow in fractured rocks; Multi-phase flow and reactive chemical transport in fractured rocks; Fracture/matrix interactions; Hydrogeological and transport testing; Fracture flow models; Vadose zone studies; Isotopic studies of flow in fractured systems; Fractures in geothermal systems; Remediation and colloid transport in fractured systems; and Nuclear waste disposal in fractured rocks.

  15. A covariant action principle for dissipative fluid dynamics: From formalism to fundamental physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Andersson; G. L. Comer

    2015-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new variational framework for dissipative general relativistic fluid dynamics. The model extends the convective variational principle for multi-fluid systems to account for a range of dissipation channels. The key ingredients in the construction are i) the use of a lower dimensional matter space for each fluid component, and ii) an extended functional dependence for the associated volume forms. In an effort to make the concepts clear, the formalism is developed in steps with the model example of matter coupled to heat considered at each level. Thus we discuss a model for heat flow, derive the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations and discuss why the individual dissipative stress tensors need not be spacetime symmetric. We argue that the new formalism, which notably does not involve an expansion away from an assumed equilibrium state, provides a conceptual breakthrough in this area of research and provide an ambitious list of directions in which one may want to extend it in the future. This involves an exciting set of problems, relating to both applications and foundational issues.

  16. CFD Validation of Gas Injection in Flowing Mercury over Vertical Smooth and Grooved Wall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).The nuclear spallation reaction occurs when a proton beam hits liquid mercury. This interaction causes thermal expansion of the liquid mercury which produces high pressure waves. When these pressure waves hit the target vessel wall, cavitation can occur and erode the wall. Research and development efforts at SNS include creation of a vertical protective gas layer between the flowing liquid mercury and target vessel wall to mitigate the cavitation damage erosion and extend the life time of the target. Since mercury is opaque, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) can be used as a diagnostic tool to see inside the liquid mercury and guide the experimental efforts. In this study, CFD simulations of three dimensional, unsteady, turbulent, two-phase flow of helium gas injection in flowing liquid mercury over smooth, vertically grooved and horizontally grooved walls are carried out with the commercially available CFD code Fluent-12 from ANSYS. The Volume of Fluid (VOF) model is used to track the helium-mercury interface. V-shaped vertical and horizontal grooves with 0.5 mm pitch and about 0.7 mm depth were machined in the transparent wall of acrylic test sections. Flow visualization data of helium gas coverage through transparent test sections is obtained with a high-speed camera at the ORNL target test facility (TTF). The helium gas mass flow rate is 8 mg/min and introduced through a 0.5 mm diameter port. The local mercury velocity is 0.9 m/s. In this paper, the helium gas flow rate and the local mercury velocity are kept constant for the three cases. Time integration of predicted helium gas volume fraction over time is done to evaluate the gas coverage and calculate the average thickness of the helium gas layer. The predicted time-integrated gas coverage over vertically grooved and horizontally grooved test sections is better than over a smooth wall. The simulations show that the helium gas is trapped inside the grooves. The predicted time-averaged gas coverage is in good qualitative agreement with the measured gas coverage.

  17. Sructure and dynamics of fluids in micropous and mesoporous earth and engineered materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David R [ORNL; Mamontov, Eugene [ORNL; Rother, Gernot [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of liquids in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs, due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometri-cal confinement, from their bulk behavior in many ways. Phase transitions (i.e., freezing and capillary condensation), sorption and wetting, and dy-namical properties, including diffusion and relaxation, may be modified, with the strongest changes observed for pores ranging in size from <2 nm to 50 nm the micro- and mesoporous regimes. Important factors influ-encing the structure and dynamics of confined liquids include the average pore size and pore size distribution, the degree of pore interconnection, and the character of the liquid-surface interaction. While confinement of liq-uids in hydrophobic matrices, such as carbon nanotubes, or near the sur-faces of mixed character, such as many proteins, has also been an area of rapidly growing interest, the confining matrices of interest to earth and ma-terials sciences usually contain oxide structural units and thus are hydro-philic. The pore size distribution and the degree of porosity and inter-connection vary greatly amongst porous matrices. Vycor, xerogels, aerogels, and rocks possess irregular porous structures, whereas mesopor-ous silicas (e.g., SBA-15, MCM-41, MCM-48), zeolites, and layered sys-tems, for instance clays, have high degrees of internal order. The pore type and size may be tailored by means of adjusting the synthesis regimen. In clays, the interlayer distance may depend on the level of hydration. Al-though studied less frequently, matrices such as artificial opals and chry-sotile asbestos represent other interesting examples of ordered porous structures. The properties of neutrons make them an ideal probe for com-paring the properties of bulk fluids with those in confined geometries. In this chapter, we provide a brief review of research performed on liquids confined in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (silicas, aluminas, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those neutron scattering techniques which assess both structural modification and dynamical behav-ior. Quantitative understanding of the complex solid-fluid interactions under different thermodynamic situations will impact both the design of bet-ter substrates for technological applications (e.g., chromatography, fluid capture, storage and release, and heterogeneous catalysis) as well as our fundamental understanding of processes encountered in the environment (i.e., fluid and waste mitigation, carbon sequestration, etc.).

  18. Dynamical instabilities of two-fluid interfaces in a porous medium: A three-dimensional video imaging study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prerna Sharma; P. Aswathi; Anit Sane; Shankar Ghosh; S. Bhattacharya

    2011-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-fluid interfaces in porous media, an example of driven disordered systems, were studied by a real time three-dimensional imaging technique with pore scale resolution for a less viscous fluid displacing a more viscous one. With increasing flow rate the interface transforms from flat to fingers and thence to droplets for both drainage and imbibition. The results compare and contrast the effects of randomness, both physical (geometry of the pore space) and chemical (wettability of the fluids), on the dynamical instability and identify the origin of the pore-scale processes that govern them.

  19. Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.

  20. Inverse patchy colloids with small patches: fluid structure and dynamical slowing down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvano Ferrari; Emanuela Bianchi; Yura V. Kalyuzhnyi; Gerhard Kahl

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverse Patchy Colloids (IPCs) differ from conventional patchy particles because their patches repel (rather than attract) each other and attract (rather than repel) the part of the colloidal surface that is free of patches. These particular features occur, .e.g., in heterogeneously charged colloidal systems. Here we consider overall neutral IPCs carrying two, relatively small, polar patches. Previous studies of the same model under planar confinement have evidenced the formation of branched, disordered aggregates composed of ring-like structures. We investigate here the bulk behavior of the system via molecular dynamics simulations, focusing on both the structure and the dynamics of the fluid phase in a wide region of the phase diagram. Additionally, the simulation results for the static observables are compared to the Associative Percus Yevick solution of an integral equation approach based on the multi-density Ornstein-Zernike theory. A good agreement between theoretical and numerical quantities is observed even in the region of the phase diagram where the slowing down of the dynamics occurs.

  1. A fluid dynamics multidimensional model of biofilm growth: stability, influence of environment and sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrizio Clarelli; Cristiana Di Russo; Roberto Natalini; Magali Ribot

    2014-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article, we study in details the fluid dynamics system proposed in Clarelli et al (2013) to model the formation of cyanobacteria biofilms. After analyzing the linear stability of the unique non trivial equilibrium of the system, we introduce in the model the influence of light and temperature, which are two important factors for the development of cyanobacteria biofilm. Since the values of the coefficients we use for our simulations are estimated through information found in the literature, some sensitivity and robustness analyses on these parameters are performed. All these elements enable us to control and to validate the model we have already derived and to present some numerical simulations in the 2D and the 3D cases.

  2. Circulating fluidized bed hydrodynamics experiments for the multiphase fluid dynamics research consortium (MFDRC).

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oelfke, John Barry; Torczynski, John Robert; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tortora, Paul Richard; Bhusarapu, Satish (; ); Trujillo, Steven Mathew

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental program was conducted to study the multiphase gas-solid flow in a pilot-scale circulating fluidized bed (CFB). This report describes the CFB experimental facility assembled for this program, the diagnostics developed and/or applied to make measurements in the riser section of the CFB, and the data acquired for several different flow conditions. Primary data acquired included pressures around the flow loop and solids loadings at selected locations in the riser. Tomographic techniques using gamma radiation and electrical capacitance were used to determine radial profiles of solids volume fraction in the riser, and axial profiles of the integrated solids volume fraction were produced. Computer Aided Radioactive Particle Tracking was used to measure solids velocities, fluxes, and residence time distributions. In addition, a series of computational fluid dynamics simulations was performed using the commercial code Arenaflow{trademark}.

  3. Notes 10. A thermohydrodynamic bulk-flow model for fluid film bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complete set of bulk-flow equations for the analysis of turbulent flow fluid film bearings. Importance of thermal effects in process fluid applications. A CFD method for solution of the bulk-flow equations....

  4. CFD Simulations and Experiments to Determine the Feasibility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    fuels" "Improving the predictive nature of spray and combustion models for biodiesel fuel" "Incorporating more detailed chemical kinetics into fluid dynamics...

  5. A numerical study of longtime dynamics and ergodic-nonergodic transitions in dense simple fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David D. McCowan

    2014-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    For over 30 years, mode-coupling theory (MCT) has been the de facto theoretic description of dense fluids and the liquid-glass transition. MCT, however, is limited by its ad hoc construction and lacks a mechanism to institute corrections. We use recent results from a new theoretical framework--developed from first principles via a self-consistent perturbation expansion in terms of an effective two-body potential--to numerically explore the kinetics of systems of classical particles, specifically hard spheres obeying Smoluchowski dynamics. We present here a full solution to the kinetic equation governing the density-density time correlation function and show that the function exhibits the characteristic two-step decay of supercooled fluids and an ergodic-nonergodic transition to a dynamically-arrested state. Unlike many previous numerical studies and experiments, we have access to the full time and wavenumber range of the correlation function and can track the solution unprecedentedly close to the transition, covering nearly 15 decades of time. Using asymptotic approximation techniques developed for MCT, we fit the solution to predicted forms and extract critical parameters. Our solution shows a transition at packing fraction $\\eta^*=0.60149761(10)$--consistent with previous static solutions under this theory and with comparable colloidal suspension experiments--and the behavior in the $\\beta$-relaxation regime is fit to power-law decays with critical exponents $a=0.375(3)$ and $b=0.8887(4)$, and with $\\lambda=0.5587(18)$. For the $\\alpha$-relaxation of the ergodic phase, we find a power-law divergence of the time scale $\\tau_{\\alpha}$ as we approach the transition. Through these results, we establish that this new theory is able to reproduce the salient features of MCT, but has the advantages of a first principles derivation and a clear mechanism for making systematic improvements.

  6. 3D CFD ELECTROCHEMICAL AND HEAT TRANSFER MODEL OF AN INTERNALLY MANIFOLDED SOLID OXIDE ELECTROLYSIS CELL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant L. Hawkes; James E. O'Brien; Greg Tao

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in an internally manifolded planar solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC) stack. This design is being evaluated at the Idaho National Laboratory for hydrogen production from nuclear power and process heat. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, operating potential, steam-electrode gas composition, oxygen-electrode gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Single-cell and five-cell results will be presented. Flow distribution through both models is discussed. Flow enters from the bottom, distributes through the inlet plenum, flows across the cells, gathers in the outlet plenum and flows downward making an upside-down ''U'' shaped flow pattern. Flow and concentration variations exist downstream of the inlet holes. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, oxygen-electrode and steam-electrode current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicate the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  7. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Tear Film Dynamics on an Eye-shaped

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bacuta, Constantin

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Tear Film Dynamics on an Eye-shaped Domain of vision and in the health of the eye; when functioning properly, it maintains a critical balance between or deficiency of tear film is recognized to be dry eye syndrome (Lemp (2007)); symptoms of dry eye include

  8. Fast and Informative Flow Simulations in a Building by Using Fast Fluid Dynamics Model on Graphics Processing Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    Fast and Informative Flow Simulations in a Building by Using Fast Fluid Dynamics Model on Graphics solve Navier-Stokes equations and other transportation equations for energy and species at a speed of 50 it in parallel on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). This study validated the FFD on the GPU by simulating

  9. Dynamic Phase Boundaries for Compressible Fluids T. Lu , Z. L. Xu + , R. Samulyak , J. Glimm # and X. M. Ji #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    discontinuity. The emphasis here is on the coupling of the phase transition process to acoustic waves, whichDynamic Phase Boundaries for Compressible Fluids T. Lu § , Z. L. Xu §+ , R. Samulyak § , J. Glimm algorithm is verified by application to various physical regimes. 1 Introduction The coupling

  10. Swimming and flying animals generate fluid-dynamic forces by flapping flexible appendages such as wings or fins. The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Combes, Stacey A.

    Swimming and flying animals generate fluid-dynamic forces by flapping flexible appendages such as wings or fins. The stresses generated by motions of these structures can be resolved into vertical aerial and aquatic animals that propel themselves with wing-like appendages generate these vertical

  11. Eulerian CFD Models to Predict Thermophoretic Deposition of Soot...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Eulerian CFD Models to Predict Thermophoretic Deposition of Soot Particles in EGR Coolers Eulerian CFD Models to Predict Thermophoretic Deposition of Soot Particles in EGR Coolers...

  12. 3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-electrolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James O'Brien; Carl Stoots; Stephen Herring; Joe Hartvigsen

    2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3D CFD Model of High Temperature H2O/CO2 Co-Electrolysis Grant Hawkes1, James O’Brien1, Carl Stoots1, Stephen Herring1 Joe Hartvigsen2 1 Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, grant.hawkes@inl.gov 2 Ceramatec Inc, Salt Lake City, Utah INTRODUCTION A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been created to model high temperature co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide in a planar solid oxide electrolyzer (SOE) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A research program is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to simultaneously address the research and scale-up issues associated with the implementation of planar solid-oxide electrolysis cell technology for syn-gas production from CO2 and steam. Various runs have been performed under different run conditions to help assess the performance of the SOE. This paper presents CFD results of this model compared with experimental results. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in conjunction with Ceramatec Inc. (Salt Lake City, USA) has been researching for several years the use of solid-oxide fuel cell technology to electrolyze steam for large-scale nuclear-powered hydrogen production. Now, an experimental research project is underway at the INL to produce syngas by simultaneously electrolyzing at high-temperature steam and carbon dioxide (CO2) using solid oxide fuel cell technology. A strong interest exists in the large-scale production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam to be reformed into a usable transportation fuel. If biomass is used as the carbon source, the overall process is climate neutral. Consequently, there is a high level of interest in production of syn-gas from CO2 and steam electrolysis. With the price of oil currently around $60 / barrel, synthetically-derived hydrocarbon fuels (synfuels) have become economical. Synfuels are typically produced from syngas – hydrogen (H2) and carbon monoxide (CO) -- using the Fischer-Tropsch process, discovered by Germany before World War II. High-temperature nuclear reactors have the potential for substantially increasing the efficiency of syn-gas production from CO2 and water, with no consumption of fossil fuels, and no production of greenhouse gases. Thermal CO2-splitting and water splitting for syn-gas production can be accomplished via high-temperature electrolysis, using high-temperature nuclear process heat and electricity. A high-temperature advanced nuclear reactor coupled with a high-efficiency high-temperature electrolyzer could achieve a competitive thermal-to-syn-gas conversion efficiency of 45 to 55%.

  13. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL CAPABILITIES AND HYDRODYNAMIC DATA FOR VALIDATION OF CFD-BASED PREDICTIONS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Daniel S. Wendt; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to document the review of several open-literature sources of both experimental capabilities and published hydrodynamic data to aid in the validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based model of a slurry bubble column (SBC). The review included searching the Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, and Inspec databases, internet searches as well as other open literature sources. The goal of this study was to identify available experimental facilities and relevant data. Integral (i.e., pertaining to the SBC system), as well as fundamental (i.e., separate effects are considered), data are included in the scope of this effort. The fundamental data is needed to validate the individual mechanistic models or closure laws used in a Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) simulation of a SBC. The fundamental data is generally focused on simple geometries (i.e., flow between parallel plates or cylindrical pipes) or custom-designed tests to focus on selected interfacial phenomena. Integral data covers the operation of a SBC as a system with coupled effects. This work highlights selected experimental capabilities and data for the purpose of SBC model validation, and is not meant to be an exhaustive summary.

  14. REVIEW OF EXPERIMENTAL CAPABILITIES AND HYDRODYNAMIC DATA FOR VALIDATION OF CFD BASED PREDICTIONS FOR SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen; Daniel S. Wendt

    2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to document the review of several open-literature sources of both experimental capabilities and published hydrodynamic data to aid in the validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) based model of a slurry bubble column (SBC). The review included searching the Web of Science, ISI Proceedings, and Inspec databases, internet searches as well as other open literature sources. The goal of this study was to identify available experimental facilities and relevant data. Integral (i.e., pertaining to the SBC system), as well as fundamental (i.e., separate effects are considered), data are included in the scope of this effort. The fundamental data is needed to validate the individual mechanistic models or closure laws used in a Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) simulation of a SBC. The fundamental data is generally focused on simple geometries (i.e., flow between parallel plates or cylindrical pipes) or custom-designed tests to focus on selected interfacial phenomena. Integral data covers the operation of a SBC as a system with coupled effects. This work highlights selected experimental capabilities and data for the purpose of SBC model validation, and is not meant to be an exhaustive summary.

  15. A transient study on the dynamic coupling of a fluid-tank system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, Pui Chun

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Model for Rolling '. Iotion 16 19 Figure 4 Oscillatory Type of Motion, wfluid/w ank = 1. 11. Figure 5 Oscillatory Type of Motion, fluid tank Figure 6 Free Roll Oscillation of a Ship, 28 Figure 7 Figure 8 T . /T . = 0. 22. fluid ship Free... Roll Oscillation of a Ship, T . /T . = 0. 94. fluid ship Fluid-Tank System Subjected to a Constant Bral'e Force 29 29 30 Figure 9 Forced Roll Oscillation of a Ship, Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 fluid ship I-orced Roll Oscillation...

  16. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 2: User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. D. Nichols; C. Müller; G. A. Necker; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; K. L. Lam; P. Royl; T. L. Wilson

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best-estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III contains some of the assessments performed by LANL and FzK.

  17. GASFLOW: A Computational Fluid Dynamics Code for Gases, Aerosols, and Combustion, Volume 3: Assessment Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C. Müller; E. D. Hughes; G. F. Niederauer; H. Wilkening; J. R. Travis; J. W. Spore; P. Royl; W. Baumann

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (FzK) are developing GASFLOW, a three-dimensional (3D) fluid dynamics field code as a best- estimate tool to characterize local phenomena within a flow field. Examples of 3D phenomena include circulation patterns; flow stratification; hydrogen distribution mixing and stratification; combustion and flame propagation; effects of noncondensable gas distribution on local condensation and evaporation; and aerosol entrainment, transport, and deposition. An analysis with GASFLOW will result in a prediction of the gas composition and discrete particle distribution in space and time throughout the facility and the resulting pressure and temperature loadings on the walls and internal structures with or without combustion. A major application of GASFLOW is for predicting the transport, mixing, and combustion of hydrogen and other gases in nuclear reactor containment and other facilities. It has been applied to situations involving transporting and distributing combustible gas mixtures. It has been used to study gas dynamic behavior in low-speed, buoyancy-driven flows, as well as sonic flows or diffusion dominated flows; and during chemically reacting flows, including deflagrations. The effects of controlling such mixtures by safety systems can be analyzed. The code version described in this manual is designated GASFLOW 2.1, which combines previous versions of the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission code HMS (for Hydrogen Mixing Studies) and the Department of Energy and FzK versions of GASFLOW. The code was written in standard Fortran 90. This manual comprises three volumes. Volume I describes the governing physical equations and computational model. Volume II describes how to use the code to set up a model geometry, specify gas species and material properties, define initial and boundary conditions, and specify different outputs, especially graphical displays. Sample problems are included. Volume III contains some of the assessments performed by LANL and FzK

  18. Wind Turbine Modeling for Computational Fluid Dynamics: December 2010 - December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tossas, L. A. M.; Leonardi, S.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the shortage of fossil fuel and the increasing environmental awareness, wind energy is becoming more and more important. As the market for wind energy grows, wind turbines and wind farms are becoming larger. Current utility-scale turbines extend a significant distance into the atmospheric boundary layer. Therefore, the interaction between the atmospheric boundary layer and the turbines and their wakes needs to be better understood. The turbulent wakes of upstream turbines affect the flow field of the turbines behind them, decreasing power production and increasing mechanical loading. With a better understanding of this type of flow, wind farm developers could plan better-performing, less maintenance-intensive wind farms. Simulating this flow using computational fluid dynamics is one important way to gain a better understanding of wind farm flows. In this study, we compare the performance of actuator disc and actuator line models in producing wind turbine wakes and the wake-turbine interaction between multiple turbines. We also examine parameters that affect the performance of these models, such as grid resolution, the use of a tip-loss correction, and the way in which the turbine force is projected onto the flow field.

  19. Fluid juggling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soto, Enrique

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fluid dynamics video is an entry for the Gallery of Fluid Motion for the 66th Annual Meeting of the Fluid Dynamics Division of the American Physical Society. We show the curious behaviour of a light ball interacting with a liquid jet. For certain conditions, a ball can be suspended into a slightly inclined liquid jet. We studied this phenomenon using a high speed camera. The visualizations show that the object can be `juggled' for a variety of flow conditions. A simple calculation showed that the ball remains at a stable position due to a Bernoulli-like effect. The phenomenon is very stable and easy to reproduce.

  20. From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni, J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser and P. R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni. Press, 1996. 3-Dimensional Wells and Tunnels for Finite Element Grids 1 3-Dimensional Wells and Tunnels for Finite Element Grids Terry A. Cherry1 Carl W. Gable1 Harold Trease2 ABSTRACT Modeling fluid, vapor

  1. Development of CFD models to support LEU Conversion of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL] [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL] [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) is participating in the Global Threat Reduction Initiative to reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological materials located at civilian sites worldwide. As an integral part of one of NNSA s subprograms, Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors, HFIR is being converted from the present HEU core to a low enriched uranium (LEU) core with less than 20% of U-235 by weight. Because of HFIR s importance for condensed matter research in the United States, its conversion to a high-density, U-Mo-based, LEU fuel should not significantly impact its existing performance. Furthermore, cost and availability considerations suggest making only minimal changes to the overall HFIR facility. Therefore, the goal of this conversion program is only to substitute LEU for the fuel type in the existing fuel plate design, retaining the same number of fuel plates, with the same physical dimensions, as in the current HFIR HEU core. Because LEU-specific testing and experiments will be limited, COMSOL Multiphysics was chosen to provide the needed simulation capability to validate against the HEU design data and previous calculations, and predict the performance of the proposed LEU fuel for design and safety analyses. To achieve it, advanced COMSOL-based multiphysics simulations, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD), are being developed to capture the turbulent flows and associated heat transfer in fine detail and to improve predictive accuracy [2].

  2. Multiscale CFD simulations of entrained flow gasification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Mayank, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of entrained flow gasifiers and their operation has largely been an experience based enterprise. Most, if not all, industrial scale gasifiers were designed before it was practical to apply CFD models. Moreover, ...

  3. Numerical schemes for dynamically orthogonal equations of stochastic fluid and ocean flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueckermann, M.P., E-mail: mpuecker@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Lermusiaux, P.F.J., E-mail: pierrel@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Sapsis, T.P., E-mail: sapsis@mit.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Mass. Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantification of uncertainties is critical when systems are nonlinear and have uncertain terms in their governing equations or are constrained by limited knowledge of initial and boundary conditions. Such situations are common in multiscale, intermittent and non-homogeneous fluid and ocean flows. The dynamically orthogonal (DO) field equations provide an adaptive methodology to predict the probability density functions of such flows. The present work derives efficient computational schemes for the DO methodology applied to unsteady stochastic Navier-Stokes and Boussinesq equations, and illustrates and studies the numerical aspects of these schemes. Semi-implicit projection methods are developed for the mean and for the DO modes, and time-marching schemes of first to fourth order are used for the stochastic coefficients. Conservative second-order finite-volumes are employed in physical space with new advection schemes based on total variation diminishing methods. Other results include: (i) the definition of pseudo-stochastic pressures to obtain a number of pressure equations that is linear in the subspace size instead of quadratic; (ii) symmetric advection schemes for the stochastic velocities; (iii) the use of generalized inversion to deal with singular subspace covariances or deterministic modes; and (iv) schemes to maintain orthonormal modes at the numerical level. To verify our implementation and study the properties of our schemes and their variations, a set of stochastic flow benchmarks are defined including asymmetric Dirac and symmetric lock-exchange flows, lid-driven cavity flows, and flows past objects in a confined channel. Different Reynolds number and Grashof number regimes are employed to illustrate robustness. Optimal convergence under both time and space refinements is shown as well as the convergence of the probability density functions with the number of stochastic realizations.

  4. Collapse dynamics and runout of dense granular materials in a fluid V. Topina,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    is another example of the in- tricate grain/fluid mixing process in extreme conditions, which remains a real and enhance the flow by lubrication during spread. Hence, the runout distance in a fluid may be below or equal- port of a powder or a collection of aggregates in a liquid which plays the role of lubricant or binder

  5. Validation of the integration of CFD and SAS4A/SASSYS-1: Analysis of EBR-II shutdown heat removal test 17

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, J. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Vilim, R.; Briggs, L. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439-4842 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent analyses have demonstrated the need to model multidimensional phenomena, particularly thermal stratification in outlet plena, during safety analyses of loss-of-flow transients of certain liquid-metal cooled reactor designs. Therefore, Argonne's reactor systems safety code SAS4A/SASSYS-1 is being enhanced by integrating 3D computational fluid dynamics models of the plena. A validation exercise of the new tool is being performed by analyzing the protected loss-of-flow event demonstrated by the EBR-II Shutdown Heat Removal Test 17. In this analysis, the behavior of the coolant in the cold pool is modeled using the CFD code STAR-CCM+, while the remainder of the cooling system and the reactor core are modeled with SAS4A/SASSYS-1. This paper summarizes the code integration strategy and provides the predicted 3D temperature and velocity distributions inside the cold pool during SHRT-17. The results of the coupled analysis should be considered preliminary at this stage, as the exercise pointed to the need to improve the CFD model of the cold pool tank. (authors)

  6. Measurement Of The Fluid Flow Load On A Globe Valve Stem Under Various Cavitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Measurement Of The Fluid Flow Load On A Globe Valve Stem Under Various Cavitation Conditions)" #12;Measurement Of The Fluid Flow Load On A Globe Valve Stem Under Various Cavitation Conditions, cavitation, fluid flow load, CFD. Abstract: The evaluation of fluid forces on the stem is important for wear

  7. Development of a Prototype Lattice Boltzmann Code for CFD of Fusion Systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pattison, Martin J; Premnath, Kannan N; Banerjee, Sanjoy; Dwivedi, Vinay

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Designs of proposed fusion reactors, such as the ITER project, typically involve the use of liquid metals as coolants in components such as heat exchangers, which are generally subjected to strong magnetic fields. These fields induce electric currents in the fluids, resulting in magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) forces which have important effects on the flow. The objective of this SBIR project was to develop computational techniques based on recently developed lattice Boltzmann techniques for the simulation of these MHD flows and implement them in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code for the study of fluid flow systems encountered in fusion engineering. The code developed during this project, solves the lattice Boltzmann equation, which is a kinetic equation whose behaviour represents fluid motion. This is in contrast to most CFD codes which are based on finite difference/finite volume based solvers. The lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is a relatively new approach which has a number of advantages compared with more conventional methods such as the SIMPLE or projection method algorithms that involve direct solution of the Navier-Stokes equations. These are that the LBM is very well suited to parallel processing, with almost linear scaling even for very large numbers of processors. Unlike other methods, the LBM does not require solution of a Poisson pressure equation leading to a relatively fast execution time. A particularly attractive property of the LBM is that it can handle flows in complex geometries very easily. It can use simple rectangular grids throughout the computational domain -- generation of a body-fitted grid is not required. A recent advance in the LBM is the introduction of the multiple relaxation time (MRT) model; the implementation of this model greatly enhanced the numerical stability when used in lieu of the single relaxation time model, with only a small increase in computer time. Parallel processing was implemented using MPI and demonstrated the ability of the LBM to scale almost linearly. The equation for magnetic induction was also solved using a lattice Boltzmann method. This approach has the advantage that it fits in well to the framework used for the hydrodynamic equations, but more importantly that it preserves the ability of the code to run efficiently on parallel architectures. Since the LBM is a relatively recent model, a number of new developments were needed to solve the magnetic induction equation for practical problems. Existing methods were only suitable for cases where the fluid viscosity and the magnetic resistivity are of the same order, and a preconditioning method was used to allow the simulation of liquid metals, where these properties differ by several orders of magnitude. An extension of this method to the hydrodynamic equations allowed faster convergence to steady state. A new method of imposing boundary conditions using an extrapolation technique was derived, enabling the magnetic field at a boundary to be specified. Also, a technique by which the grid can be stretched was formulated to resolve thin layers at high imposed magnetic fields, allowing flows with Hartmann numbers of several thousand to be quickly and efficiently simulated. In addition, a module has been developed to calculate the temperature field and heat transfer. This uses a total variation diminishing scheme to solve the equations and is again very amenable to parallelisation. Although, the module was developed with thermal modelling in mind, it can also be applied to passive scalar transport. The code is fully three dimensional and has been applied to a wide variety of cases, including both laminar and turbulent flows. Validations against a series of canonical problems involving both MHD effects and turbulence have clearly demonstrated the ability of the LBM to properly model these types of flow. As well as applications to fusion engineering, the resulting code is flexible enough to be applied to a wide range of other flows, in particular those requiring parallel computations with many processors. For example, at

  8. Dynamics and microstructure of colloidal complex fluids: a lattice Boltzmann study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eunhye

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lattice Boltzmann (LB) method is a versatile way to model complex fluids with hydrodynamic interactions through solving the Navier-Stokes equations. It is well-known that the role of hydrodynamic interactions is ...

  9. Transient Temperature Modeling For Wellbore Fluid Under Static and Dynamic Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Muhammad

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    during the test necessitates that effects of unsteady temperature changes are taken into account for accurate calculation of downhole pressure. The single rate injection model predicts transient temperature of wellbore fluids during injection operations...

  10. Characterization of Filter Cake Buildup and Cleanup under Dynamic Fluid Loss Conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yango, Takwe

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    . The fracturing fluid gets dehydrated under pressure leaving behind a highly concentrated unbroken residue called filter cake which causes permeability impairment in the proppant pack, resulting in low fracture conductivity and decreased effective fracture length...

  11. Characterization of Filter Cake Buildup and Cleanup under Dynamic Fluid Loss Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yango, Takwe

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    . The fracturing fluid gets dehydrated under pressure leaving behind a highly concentrated unbroken residue called filter cake which causes permeability impairment in the proppant pack, resulting in low fracture conductivity and decreased effective fracture length...

  12. Fluid Dynamics Models for Low Rank Discriminant Analysis Yung-Kyun Noh1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and velocity flow fields. We show how to apply the Gauss principle of least con- straint in fluids to obtain., 2000). Projection pursuit is a canonical approach to find a low dimen- sional subspace where

  13. 3D CFD Electrochemical and Heat Transfer Model of an Integrated-Planar Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grant Hawkes; James E. O'Brien

    2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) electrochemical model has been created to model high-temperature electrolysis cell performance and steam electrolysis in a new novel integrated planar porous-tube supported solid oxide electrolysis cell (SOEC). The model is of several integrated planar cells attached to a ceramic support tube. This design is being evaluated with modeling at the Idaho National Laboratory. Mass, momentum, energy, and species conservation and transport are provided via the core features of the commercial CFD code FLUENT. A solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) model adds the electrochemical reactions and loss mechanisms and computation of the electric field throughout the cell. The FLUENT SOFC user-defined subroutine was modified for this work to allow for operation in the SOEC mode. Model results provide detailed profiles of temperature, Nernst potential, operating potential, activation over-potential, anode-side gas composition, cathode-side gas composition, current density and hydrogen production over a range of stack operating conditions. Mean per-cell area-specific-resistance (ASR) values decrease with increasing current density. Predicted mean outlet hydrogen and steam concentrations vary linearly with current density, as expected. Effects of variations in operating temperature, gas flow rate, cathode and anode exchange current density, and contact resistance from the base case are presented. Contour plots of local electrolyte temperature, current density, and Nernst potential indicated the effects of heat transfer, reaction cooling/heating, and change in local gas composition. Results are discussed for using this design in the electrolysis mode. Discussion of thermal neutral voltage, enthalpy of reaction, hydrogen production, cell thermal efficiency, cell electrical efficiency, and Gibbs free energy are discussed and reported herein.

  14. CFD Simulation of Riser VIV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Zhiming

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and gas exploration and developments have been moving fast toward increasingly deeper water depth, i.e. 3,000m in Gulf of Mexico. Majority of the subsea wells are tied back to a surface platform through long risers, including steel catenary risers..., flexible risers, free standing risers, bundled risers, or top tensioned risers (ASME B31.4, 2002, ASME B31.8a, 2001, API 1111, 1999). These risers provide fluid conduit for fluid transport between subsea wells and surface platform, and protect...

  15. A 2-D Test Problem for CFD Modeling Heat Transfer in Spent Fuel Transfer Cask Neutron Shields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zigh, Ghani; Solis, Jorge; Fort, James A.

    2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In the United States, commercial spent nuclear fuel is typically moved from spent fuel pools to outdoor dry storage pads within a transfer cask system that provides radiation shielding to protect personnel and the surrounding environment. The transfer casks are cylindrical steel enclosures with integral gamma and neutron radiation shields. Since the transfer cask system must be passively cooled, decay heat removal from spent nuclear fuel canister is limited by the rate of heat transfer through the cask components, and natural convection from the transfer cask surface. The primary mode of heat transfer within the transfer cask system is conduction, but some cask designs incorporate a liquid neutron shield tank surrounding the transfer cask structural shell. In these systems, accurate prediction of natural convection within the neutron shield tank is an important part of assessing the overall thermal performance of the transfer cask system. The large-scale geometry of the neutron shield tank, which is typically an annulus approximately 2 meters in diameter but only 5-10 cm in thickness, and the relatively small scale velocities (typically less than 5 cm/s) represent a wide range of spatial and temporal scales that contribute to making this a challenging problem for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling. Relevant experimental data at these scales are not available in the literature, but some recent modeling studies offer insights into numerical issues and solutions; however, the geometries in these studies, and for the experimental data in the literature at smaller scales, all have large annular gaps that are not prototypic of the transfer cask neutron shield. This paper presents results for a simple 2-D problem that is an effective numerical analog for the neutron shield application. Because it is 2-D, solutions can be obtained relatively quickly allowing a comparison and assessment of sensitivity to model parameter changes. Turbulence models are considered as well as the tradeoff between steady state and transient solutions. Solutions are compared for two commercial CFD codes, FLUENT and STAR-CCM+. The results can be used to provide input to the CFD Best Practices for this application. Following study results for the 2-D test problem, a comparison of simulation results is provided for a high Rayleigh number experiment with large annular gap. Because the geometry of this validation is significantly different from the neutron shield, and due to the critical nature of this application, the argument is made for new experiments at representative scales

  16. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between solvophilic and solvophobic walls: templating, molding and superdiffusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabio Leoni; Giancarlo Franzese

    2014-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a general anomalous liquid, suitable for globular proteins, colloids or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect of a solvophilic structured and a solvophobic unstructured wall on the phases, the crystal nucleation and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the solvophilic wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer ("tempting" effect). In turn, the first layer induces a "molding" effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range effect thanks to a sequence of templating, molding and templating effects through the layers. We find dynamical slowing down of the solvent near the solvophilic wall but with largely heterogeneous dynamics near the wall due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of solvent. Hence, the partial freezing of the first hydration layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel section in terms of transport properties.

  17. Content Dynamics in P2P Networks from Queueing and Fluid Perspectives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paganini Universidad ORT Uruguay, Montevideo, Uruguay Abstract--In this paper we analyze the dynamics of P2

  18. Gasificaton Transport: A Multiphase CFD Approach & Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dimitri Gidaspow; Veeraya Jiradilok; Mayank Kashyap; Benjapon Chalermsinsuwan

    2009-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop predictive theories for the dispersion and mass transfer coefficients and to measure them in the turbulent fluidization regime, using existing facilities. A second objective was to use our multiphase CFD tools to suggest optimized gasifier designs consistent with aims of Future Gen. We have shown that the kinetic theory based CFD codes correctly compute: (1) Dispersion coefficients; and (2) Mass transfer coefficients. Hence, the kinetic theory based CFD codes can be used for fluidized bed reactor design without any such inputs. We have also suggested a new energy efficient method of gasifying coal and producing electricity using a molten carbonate fuel cell. The principal product of this new scheme is carbon dioxide which can be converted into useful products such as marble, as is done very slowly in nature. We believe this scheme is a lot better than the canceled FutureGen, since the carbon dioxide is safely sequestered.

  19. Real-time POD-CFD Wind-Load Calculator for PV Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huayamave, Victor [Centecorp; Divo, Eduardo [Centecorp; Ceballos, Andres [Centecorp; Barriento, Carolina [Centecorp; Stephen, Barkaszi [FSEC; Hubert, Seigneur [FSEC

    2014-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective of this project is to create an accurate web-based real-time wind-load calculator. This is of paramount importance for (1) the rapid and accurate assessments of the uplift and downforce loads on a PV mounting system, (2) identifying viable solutions from available mounting systems, and therefore helping reduce the cost of mounting hardware and installation. Wind loading calculations for structures are currently performed according to the American Society of Civil Engineers/ Structural Engineering Institute Standard ASCE/SEI 7; the values in this standard were calculated from simplified models that do not necessarily take into account relevant characteristics such as those from full 3D effects, end effects, turbulence generation and dissipation, as well as minor effects derived from shear forces on installation brackets and other accessories. This standard does not include provisions that address the special requirements of rooftop PV systems, and attempts to apply this standard may lead to significant design errors as wind loads are incorrectly estimated. Therefore, an accurate calculator would be of paramount importance for the preliminary assessments of the uplift and downforce loads on a PV mounting system, identifying viable solutions from available mounting systems, and therefore helping reduce the cost of the mounting system and installation. The challenge is that although a full-fledged three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis would properly and accurately capture the complete physical effects of air flow over PV systems, it would be impractical for this tool, which is intended to be a real-time web-based calculator. CFD routinely requires enormous computation times to arrive at solutions that can be deemed accurate and grid-independent even in powerful and massively parallel computer platforms. This work is expected not only to accelerate solar deployment nationwide, but also help reach the SunShot Initiative goals of reducing the total installed cost of solar energy systems by 75%. The largest percentage of the total installed cost of solar energy system is associated with balance of system cost, with up to 40% going to “soft” costs; which include customer acquisition, financing, contracting, permitting, interconnection, inspection, installation, performance, operations, and maintenance. The calculator that is being developed will provide wind loads in real-time for any solar system designs and suggest the proper installation configuration and hardware; and therefore, it is anticipated to reduce system design, installation and permitting costs.

  20. Z .Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans 28 1998 93105 Fluid transport by dipolar vortices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flór, Jan-Bert

    with a model based on characterising the flow around the dipole as irrotational flow past a rigid cylinder on hydrodynamics. Proc. Cambridge Philos. Soc., 49, 342­354 , namely that the vortex will displace a volume C VV experience a drag force essentially because they Ztransport fluid forward as they rise, distorting isopycnal

  1. Breaking the Tension: Development and Investigation of a Centrifugal Tensioned Metastable Fluid Detector System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solom, Matthew 1985-

    2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    of laser-induced cavitation in a seeded fluid, and demonstrated some of the associated limitations as well. In addition, the CFD framework developed here can be used to cross-compare experimental results with computer simulations as well...

  2. Low Speed Virtual Wind Tunnel Simulation For Educational Studies In Introducing Computational Fluid Dynamics And Flow Visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Cher-Chiang

    2008-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ............................................................................................................... 25 3.2.4. Starting FlowLab ...................................................................................................................... 26 3.2.5. Geometry Settings... OF THE PROGRAMMING....................................................................... 52 v List of Figures FIGURE 2.1 ? COST AND TIME RELATIONSHIP WITH RESPECT TO CFD AND WIND TUNNELS............................. 5 FIGURE 2.2 - BOEING 777 DESIGN...

  3. Analysis of the Reactor Cavity Cooling System for Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors Using Computational Fluid Dynamics Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frisani, Angelo

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    the VHTR performance and safety analysis, one-dimensional (1-D) system type codes, like RELAP5 or MELCOR, and multi-dimensional CFD codes can be used. The choice of 1-D over multi-dimensional codes first involves identifying the main phenomena, and from...

  4. Supercomputing for Industry in the West of Scotland Using ARCHIE-WeSt for Industrial Computational Fluid Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    ://www.archie-west.ac.uk/for-industry/workshop-registration Recent government reports have concluded that High Performance Computing has the potential to add 3 needs. Programme 13:00 Lunch 14:00 Welcome, Dr Paul Mulheran High Performance Computing & CFD at Expro

  5. CFD-based Optimization for Automotive Aerodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumas, Laurent

    Chapter 1 CFD-based Optimization for Automotive Aerodynamics Laurent Dumas Abstract The car drag- ments. An overview of the main characteristics of automotive aerodynamics and a detailed presentation.dumas@upmc.fr) 1 #12;2 Laurent Dumas 1.1 Introducing Automotive Aerodynamics 1.1.1 A Major Concern for Car

  6. Effects of drilling fluid properties and shear rate on dynamic filtration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarty, Robert Andrew

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    be used to eliminate the residual fines left behind from the previous mud run. 2. Synthetic cores should be used to increase reproducibility and homogeneity. This will further separate core properties from mud filter cake properties allowing a more... are subjected to a differential pressure across porous and permeable formations. Differential pressure causes solids in drilling fluids to be filtered out and deposited as a cake on the wellbore wall as the liquid phase (mud filtrate) invades the formation...

  7. Structural behavior and dynamics of an anomalous fluid between attractive and repulsive walls: Templating, molding, and superdiffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leoni, Fabio; Franzese, Giancarlo [Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Confinement can modify the dynamics, the thermodynamics, and the structural properties of liquid water, the prototypical anomalous liquid. By considering a generic model for anomalous liquids, suitable for describing solutions of globular proteins, colloids, or liquid metals, we study by molecular dynamics simulations the effect that an attractive wall with structure and a repulsive wall without structure have on the phases, the crystal nucleation, and the dynamics of the fluid. We find that at low temperatures the large density of the attractive wall induces a high-density, high-energy structure in the first layer (“templating” effect). In turn, the first layer induces a “molding” effect on the second layer determining a structure with reduced energy and density, closer to the average density of the system. This low-density, low-energy structure propagates further through the layers by templating effect and can involve all the existing layers at the lowest temperatures investigated. Therefore, although the high-density, high-energy structure does not self-reproduce further than the first layer, the structured wall can have a long-range influence thanks to a sequence of templating, molding, and templating effects through the layers. We find that the walls also have an influence on the dynamics of the liquid, with a stronger effect near the attractive wall. In particular, we observe that the dynamics is largely heterogeneous (i) among the layers, as a consequence of the sequence of structures caused by the walls presence, and (ii) within the same layer, due to superdiffusive liquid veins within a frozen matrix of particles near the walls at low temperature and high density. Hence, the partial freezing of the first layer does not correspond necessarily to an effective reduction of the channel's section in terms of transport properties, as suggested by other authors.

  8. Analogies of Ocean/Atmosphere Rotating Fluid Dynamics with Gyroscopes: Teaching Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    The dynamics of the rotating shallow-water (RSW) system include geostrophic f low and inertial oscillation. These classes of motion are ubiquitous in the ocean and atmosphere. They are often surprising to people at first ...

  9. Stokesian dynamic simulations and analyses of interfacial and bulk colloidal fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anekal, Samartha Guha

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    , and hydrodynamic forces to model dynamics of colloidal dispersions. In addition, we develop theoretical expressions for quantifying self-diffusion in colloids interacting via different particle-particle and particle-wall potentials. Specifically, we have used...

  10. Bonneville Powerhouse 2 3D CFD for the Behavioral Guidance System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Serkowski, John A.

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2008 and 2009, a 700 ft long, 10-ft deep floating forebay guidance wall called a behavioral guidance structure (BGS) was deployed in the Bonneville Powerhouse 2 forebay. The US Army Corps of Engineers, Portland District (CENWP) contracted with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop computational tools to assess the impact of the BGS on forebay hydraulics (this study). The tools developed here to provide a characterization of forebay hydraulics to be integrated with acoustic telemetry studies designed to measure the impact on juvenile salmon guidance and survival through Bonneville Powerhouse 2. In previous work, PNNL performed computational fluid dynamics (CFD) studies for the Bonneville forebay for CENWP. In this study, the existing model was modified to include the BGS. The model included a bay-by-bay spillway, a truncated Powerhouse 1 forebay, Powerhouse 2 turbine intakes and corner collector, and the forebay bathymetry extending approximately 1.5km upstream from the tip of Cascade Island. Model validation outcomes were similar to that of past studies. Additional checks were included on the impact of the differencing scheme to flow solution. It was found that using upwind differencing was adequate and it was possible to use a truncated computational mesh of this model that included a BGS upstream of Powerhouse 2 and increased spatial resolution in the vicinity of the BGS. This model has been validated, run, and provided to CENWP to use for additional analysis of the Powerhouse 2 forebay hydraulics. The PNNL particle tracking software (PT6) was used to assess the impacts of mass and relative buoyancy on particle fate. The particle tracker was run for the Half Load case for the clean forebay and for the forebay with the BGS in place and the Corner Collector on. All tracker cases showed that the BGS moved the particles across the forebay increasing the number of particles exiting the model through the Corner Collector and (for streamlines and neutrally-buoyant particles) the lower numbered turbine units.

  11. A transient study on the dynamic coupling of a fluid-tank system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lui, Pui Chun

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the liquid has an alarming propensity to undergo relatively large excursions for even very small motions of the container. This is particularly true for tank trucks on highways, tank cars on railroads, and sloshing of liquid cargo in ocean-going vessels... system and the equivalent non-shifting cargo system. Figures 4 and 5 show the responses of the fluid-tank system and the equivalent rigid-cargo system which undergo an oscilla- tory type of motion. It is noticed from the response curves tha...

  12. Development of one-dimensional computational fluid dynamics code 'GFLOW' for groundwater flow and contaminant transport analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahatgaonkar, P. S.; Datta, D.; Malhotra, P. K.; Ghadge, S. G. [Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd., R-2, Ent. Block, Nabhikiya Urja Bhavan, Anushakti Nagar, Mumbai - 400 094 (India)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of groundwater movement and contaminant transport in soil is an important problem in many branches of science and engineering. This includes groundwater hydrology, environmental engineering, soil science, agricultural engineering and also nuclear engineering. Specifically, in nuclear engineering it is applicable in the design of spent fuel storage pools and waste management sites in the nuclear power plants. Ground water modeling involves the simulation of flow and contaminant transport by groundwater flow. In the context of contaminated soil and groundwater system, numerical simulations are typically used to demonstrate compliance with regulatory standard. A one-dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics code GFLOW had been developed based on the Finite Difference Method for simulating groundwater flow and contaminant transport through saturated and unsaturated soil. The code is validated with the analytical model and the benchmarking cases available in the literature. (authors)

  13. An evaluation of the neutron radiography facility at the Nuclear Science Center for dynamic imaging of two-phase hydrogenous fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlisle, Bruce Scott

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN EVAI. UATION OF THE NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY FACILITY AT THE NUCLEAR SCIENCF- CENTER FOR DYNAMIC IMAGING OF TWO-PHASE HYDROGENOUS FLUIDS A Thesis By BRUCE SCOTT CARLlSLE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas Ag-M University... in partiat fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCPENCF. August 1994 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering AN EVALUATION OF THE NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHY FACILITY AT THE NUCLEAR SCIENCE CENTFR FOR THE DYNAMIC IMAGING OF TWO...

  14. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. I. Homogeneous fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard, E-mail: elliot1@uakron.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325 (United States)

    2013-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we aim to develop a version of the Statistical Associating Fluid Theory (SAFT)-? equation of state (EOS) that is compatible with united-atom force fields, rather than experimental data. We rely on the accuracy of the force fields to provide the relation to experimental data. Although, our objective is a transferable theory of interfacial properties for soft and fused heteronuclear chains, we first clarify the details of the SAFT-? approach in terms of site-based simulations for homogeneous fluids. We show that a direct comparison of Helmholtz free energy to molecular simulation, in the framework of a third order Weeks-Chandler-Andersen perturbation theory, leads to an EOS that takes force field parameters as input and reproduces simulation results for Vapor-Liquid Equilibria (VLE) calculations. For example, saturated liquid density and vapor pressure of n-alkanes ranging from methane to dodecane deviate from those of the Transferable Potential for Phase Equilibria (TraPPE) force field by about 0.8% and 4%, respectively. Similar agreement between simulation and theory is obtained for critical properties and second virial coefficient. The EOS also reproduces simulation data of mixtures with about 5% deviation in bubble point pressure. Extension to inhomogeneous systems and united-atom site types beyond those used in description of n-alkanes will be addressed in succeeding papers.

  15. Relaxation dynamics in a transient network fluid with competing gel and glass phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinaki Chaudhuri; Pablo I. Hurtado; Ludovic Berthier; Walter Kob

    2015-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use computer simulations to study the relaxation dynamics of a model for oil-in-water microemulsion droplets linked with telechelic polymers. This system exhibits both gel and glass phases and we show that the competition between these two arrest mechanisms can result in a complex, three-step decay of the time correlation functions, controlled by two different localization lengthscales. For certain combinations of the parameters, this competition gives rise to an anomalous logarithmic decay of the correlation functions and a subdiffusive particle motion, which can be understood as a simple crossover effect between the two relaxation processes. We establish a simple criterion for this logarithmic decay to be observed. We also find a further logarithmically slow relaxation related to the relaxation of floppy clusters of particles in a crowded environment, in agreement with recent findings in other models for dense chemical gels. Finally, we characterize how the competition of gel and glass arrest mechanisms affects the dynamical heterogeneities and show that for certain combination of parameters these heterogeneities can be unusually large. By measuring the four-point dynamical susceptibility, we probe the cooperativity of the motion and find that with increasing coupling this cooperativity shows a maximum before it decreases again, indicating the change in the nature of the relaxation dynamics. Our results suggest that compressing gels to large densities produces novel arrested phases that have a new and complex dynamics.

  16. THIESEL 2010 Conference on Thermo-and Fluid Dynamic Processes in Diesel Engines Influence of Nozzle Geometry on Spray Shape, Particle Size, Spray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    THIESEL 2010 Conference on Thermo- and Fluid Dynamic Processes in Diesel Engines Influence of Nozzle Geometry on Spray Shape, Particle Size, Spray Velocity and Air Entrainment of High Pressure Diesel Abstract. Air/fuel mixing process in the combustion chamber of Diesel engines plays an important role

  17. From: Numerical Grid Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni, J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser and P. R.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gable, Carl W.

    , J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser and P. R. Eiseman, Engineering Research Center, Mississippi State Univ. K. Soni, J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser and P. R. Eiseman, Engineering Research Center, Mississippi Generation in Computational Fluid Dynamics and Related Fields, ed. B. K. Soni, J. F. Thompson, H. Hausser

  18. A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Contribution to the Encyclopedia of Climate and Weather Yi Ming NOAA/Geophysical Fluid Dynamics eruptions) and from human activities involving burning of fossil fuels and vegetation. Visible forms, the concerns over public health prompted researchers to study the fallout (radioactive dust) from nuclear

  19. CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandvik, Tobias

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    cores with 4 · 106 transistors each gives 10 times the performance as 1 big core 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.5 3 3.5 4 x 108Number of transistors P e r f o r m a n c e CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.8/36 Everyone is going parallel Every major chip vendor... on Many-core Processors – p.22/36 Stencil operations Evaluate ?2u?x2 on a regular grid: DO K=2,NK-1 DO J=2,NJ-1 DO I=2,NI-1 D2UDX2(I,J,K) = (U(I+1,J,K) - 2.0*U(I,J,K) + & U(I-1,J,K))/(DX*DX) END DO END DO END DO CFD Solvers on Many-core Processors – p.23...

  20. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    (Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool) 24 th May Cavitation, a Possible Cause of Damage to Three Gorge Turbines? Prof. Shengcai C. Li. (Professor of Hydraulic Machinery, based at the School

  1. Fluid Dynamics Seminar Fluid Dynamics Research Centre

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davies, Christopher

    (Department of Engineering, University of Liverpool) 24th May Cavitation, a Possible Cause of Damage to Three Gorge Turbines? Prof. Shengcai C. Li. (Professor of Hydraulic Machinery, based at the School

  2. Physics-Based Low Order Galerkin Models in Fluid Dynamics & Flow Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorban, Alexander N.

    (Berlin Institute of Technology MB1, Germany) Marek Morzynski (Poznan University of Technology, Poland models of energy supply and consumption. Yet a third principle is the realization that governing flow to time-averaged energy dynamics of Galerkin modes, and gives rise to physically based, nonlinear sub

  3. L-H transition dynamics in fluid turbulence simulations with neoclassical force balance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chôné, L. [Aix–Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Beyer, P.; Fuhr, G.; Benkadda, S. [Aix–Marseille Université, CNRS, PIIM UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille Cedex 20 (France); Sarazin, Y.; Bourdelle, C. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spontaneous transport barrier generation at the edge of a magnetically confined plasma is reproduced in flux-driven three-dimensional fluid simulations of electrostatic turbulence. Here, the role on the radial electric field of collisional friction between trapped and passing particles is shown to be the key ingredient. Especially, accounting for the self-consistent and precise dependence of the friction term on the actual plasma temperature allows for the triggering of a transport barrier, provided that the input power exceeds some threshold. In addition, the barrier is found to experience quasi-periodic relaxation events, reminiscent of edge localised modes. These results put forward a possible key player, namely, neoclassical physics via radial force balance, for the low- to high-confinement regime transition observed in most of controlled fusion devices.

  4. THE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDSTHE DYNAMICS AND SIGNIFICANCE OF FLUIDS WITHIN THE SEAFLOORWITHIN THE SEAFLOORWITHIN THE SEAFLOORWI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    records of formation properties The addition of logging while drilling technology where logging tools to exciting scientific discoveries through ocean drilling Essentially all studies of fluid flow within for new approaches or techniques The following highlights selected from recent studies of seafloor fluids

  5. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Three-dimensional vortex dynamics in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlak, Geno

    , the boundary layer can become centrifugally unstable (Honji 1981), leading to well-developed G¨ortler vortices dissipation and boundary layer dynamics. It is widely accepted that vortex shedding is a dominant pr in oscillatory flow separation M I G U E L C A N A L S AND G E N O P A W L A K Department of Ocean and Resources

  6. Lecture Notes on Fluid Dynamics (1.63J/2.21J)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Entekhabi, Dara

    Dynamics of Coastal Region [Ref]: Joan Brown and six others (Open Univeristy course team on oceanography.2.1) In particular, let A = ei, i = 1, 2, 3 be a base vector of unit length in the rotating frame of reference, A = ei then dei dt I = × ei. (7.2.2) #12;3 7.2.2 A vector of variable magnitude Let B = Bi ei be any non

  7. The potential energy landscape and inherent dynamics of a hard-sphere fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qingqing Ma; Richard M. Stratt

    2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hard-sphere models exhibit many of the same kinds of supercooled-liquid behavior as more realistic models of liquids, but the highly non-analytic character of their potentials makes it a challenge to think of that behavior in potential-energy-landscape terms. We show here that it is possible to calculate an important topological property of hard-sphere landscapes, the geodesic pathways through those landscapes, and to do so without artificially coarse-graining or softening the potential. We show, moreover, that the rapid growth of the lengths of those pathways with increasing packing fraction quantitatively predicts the precipitous decline in diffusion constants in a glass-forming hard-sphere mixture model. The geodesic paths themselves can be considered as defining the intrinsic dynamics of hard spheres, so it is also revealing to find that they (and therefore the features of the underlying potential-energy landscape) correctly predict the occurrence of dynamic heterogeneity and non-zero values of the non-Gaussian parameter. The success of these landscape predictions for the dynamics of such a singular model emphasizes that there is more to potential energy landscapes than is revealed by looking at the minima and saddle points.

  8. CFD Combustion Modeling with Conditional Moment Closure using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Modeling with Conditional Moment Closure using Tabulated Chemistry CFD Combustion Modeling with Conditional Moment Closure using Tabulated Chemistry A method is...

  9. HFIR Plant Maintenance - August

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Multiple DeCART pin-resolved transport Neutronics + CFD Multiple LIME-coupled Star- CCM+ & DeCART pin-resolved transport + commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD)...

  10. Thrust 1: Structure and Dynamics of Simple Fluid-Solid Interfaces (Peter T. Cumm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItemResearch >Internship Program The NIF andPointsThrust 1: Structure and Dynamics of

  11. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics I: Theory and numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, W; Niemeyer, J C

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-equation subgrid scale model that evolves the turbulence energy corresponding to unresolved velocity fluctuations in large eddy simulations. The model is derived in the context of the Germano consistent decomposition of the hydrodynamical equations. The eddy-viscosity closure for the rate of energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales is localised by means of a dynamical procedure for the computation of the closure parameter. Therefore, the subgrid scale model applies to arbitrary flow geometry and evolution. For the treatment of microscopic viscous dissipation a semi-statistical approach is used, and the gradient-diffusion hypothesis is adopted for turbulent transport. A priori tests of the localised eddy-viscosity closure and the gradient-diffusion closure are made by analysing data from direct numerical simulations. As an a posteriori testing case, the large eddy simulation of thermonuclear combustion in forced isotropic turbulence is discussed. We intend the formulation of the sub...

  12. IOP PUBLISHING FLUID DYNAMICS RESEARCH Fluid Dyn. Res. 42 (2010) 025504 (12pp) doi:10.1088/0169-5983/42/2/025504

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    three-dimensional (3D) boundary-layer flows has been focused on the disk; very little had been published © 2010 The Japan Society of Fluid Mechanics and IOP Publishing Ltd Printed in the UK 0169 implications for the fuel efficiency through increased noise and energy dissipation, and for projectile

  13. Validation of CFD Simulations for Natural Ventilation , Camille Allocca1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 Validation of CFD Simulations for Natural Ventilation Yi Jiang1 , Camille Allocca1 , and Qingyan ventilation, which may provide occupants with good indoor air quality and a high level of thermal comfort-driven and buoyancy-drive natural ventilation. The validation of the CFD models used the experimental data of wind

  14. 3457, Page, 1 Coupled CFD/Building Envelope Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gugercin, Serkan

    ) for the building thermal network. The final form of the state-space building envelope system is: x(t) = A x(t) + Bw3457, Page, 1 Coupled CFD/Building Envelope Model for the Purdue Living Lab Donghun KIM (kim1077 features. In the present case we develop a procedure for coupling a building envelope model to a CFD

  15. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics I: Theory and numerical tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a one-equation subgrid scale model that evolves the turbulence energy corresponding to unresolved velocity fluctuations in large eddy simulations. The model is derived in the context of the Germano consistent decomposition of the hydrodynamical equations. The eddy-viscosity closure for the rate of energy transfer from resolved toward subgrid scales is localised by means of a dynamical procedure for the computation of the closure parameter. Therefore, the subgrid scale model applies to arbitrary flow geometry and evolution. For the treatment of microscopic viscous dissipation a semi-statistical approach is used, and the gradient-diffusion hypothesis is adopted for turbulent transport. A priori tests of the localised eddy-viscosity closure and the gradient-diffusion closure are made by analysing data from direct numerical simulations. As an a posteriori testing case, the large eddy simulation of thermonuclear combustion in forced isotropic turbulence is discussed. We intend the formulation of the subgrid scale model in this paper as a basis for more advanced applications in numerical simulations of complex astrophysical phenomena involving turbulence.

  16. GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS-I OC512/AS509 2011 P.Rhines 19-21 Jan 2011 LECTUREs 7-8: Dynamics of a single-layer fluid: waves, inertial oscillations, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -water' balance in a homogeneous fluid. The MASS conservation equation for a constant density fluid implies.1-7.6 (began last week), 10.4 (Kelvin waves) (similar material in Vallis §§ 2.8, 3.1, 3.6-3.8 Bretherton than a fraction of a wavelength. This is implicit in a scale analysis of the governing equation

  17. Open Journal of Fluid Dynamics, 2012, 2, 35-43 doi:10.4236/ojfd.2012.22004 Published Online June 2012 (http://www.SciRP.org/journal/ojfd)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Sourabh V.

    Open Journal of Fluid Dynamics, 2012, 2, 35-43 doi:10.4236/ojfd.2012.22004 Published Online June; accepted May 25, 2012 ABSTRACT In many applications, a moving fluid carries a suspension of droplets of a second phase which may change in size due to evaporation or condensation. Examples include liquid fuel

  18. Fluid dynamics of rivulet flow between plates W. Drenckhan, H. Ritacco, A. Saint-Jalmes, A. Saugey, P. McGuinness, A. van der Net, D. Langevin, and D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    spaced, vertical glass plates. Such a "rivulet" is bounded by two liquid/solid and two mobile liquid/gas interfaces, posing fluid dynamic problems of direct relevance to local fluid flow in liquid foams/liquid or liquid/gas interfaces, as found in foams and emulsions, which respond to flow by adjusting their shape

  19. CFD MODELING AND ANALYSIS FOR A-AREA AND H-AREA COOLING TOWERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Garrett, A.; Bollinger, J.

    2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Mechanical draft cooling towers are designed to cool process water via sensible and latent heat transfer to air. Heat and mass transfer take place simultaneously. Heat is transferred as sensible heat due to the temperature difference between liquid and gas phases, and as the latent heat of the water as it evaporates. Mass of water vapor is transferred due to the difference between the vapor pressure at the air-liquid interface and the partial pressure of water vapor in the bulk of the air. Equations to govern these phenomena are discussed here. The governing equations are solved by taking a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) approach. The purpose of the work is to develop a three-dimensional CFD model to evaluate the flow patterns inside the cooling tower cell driven by cooling fan and wind, considering the cooling fans to be on or off. Two types of the cooling towers are considered here. One is cross-flow type cooling tower located in A-Area, and the other is counterflow type cooling tower located in H-Area. The cooling tower located in A-Area is mechanical draft cooling tower (MDCT) consisting of four compartment cells as shown in Fig. 1. It is 13.7m wide, 36.8m long, and 9.4m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud without any flow communications between two adjacent cells. There are water distribution decks on both sides of the fan shroud. The deck floor has an array of about 25mm size holes through which water droplet falls into the cell region cooled by the ambient air driven by fan and wind, and it is eventually collected in basin area. As shown in Fig. 1, about 0.15-m thick drift eliminator allows ambient air to be humidified through the evaporative cooling process without entrainment of water droplets into the shroud exit. The H-Area cooling tower is about 7.3 m wide, 29.3 m long, and 9.0 m high. Each cell has its own cooling fan and shroud, but each of two corner cells has two panels to shield wind at the bottom of the cells. There is some degree of flow communications between adjacent cells through the 9-in gap at the bottom of the tower cells as shown in Fig. 2. Detailed geometrical dimensions for the H-Area tower configurations are presented in the figure. The model was benchmarked and verified against off-site and on-site test results. The verified model was applied to the investigation of cooling fan and wind effects on water cooling in cells when fans are off and on. This report will discuss the modeling and test results.

  20. APPLICATIONS OF CFD METHOD TO GAS MIXING ANALYSIS IN A LARGE-SCALED TANK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S; Richard Dimenna, R

    2007-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling technique was applied to the estimation of maximum benzene concentration for the vapor space inside a large-scaled and high-level radioactive waste tank at Savannah River site (SRS). The objective of the work was to perform the calculations for the benzene mixing behavior in the vapor space of Tank 48 and its impact on the local concentration of benzene. The calculations were used to evaluate the degree to which purge air mixes with benzene evolving from the liquid surface and its ability to prevent an unacceptable concentration of benzene from forming. The analysis was focused on changing the tank operating conditions to establish internal recirculation and changing the benzene evolution rate from the liquid surface. The model used a three-dimensional momentum coupled with multi-species transport. The calculations included potential operating conditions for air inlet and exhaust flows, recirculation flow rate, and benzene evolution rate with prototypic tank geometry. The flow conditions are assumed to be fully turbulent since Reynolds numbers for typical operating conditions are in the range of 20,000 to 70,000 based on the inlet conditions of the air purge system. A standard two-equation turbulence model was used. The modeling results for the typical gas mixing problems available in the literature were compared and verified through comparisons with the test results. The benchmarking results showed that the predictions are in good agreement with the analytical solutions and literature data. Additional sensitivity calculations included a reduced benzene evolution rate, reduced air inlet and exhaust flow, and forced internal recirculation. The modeling results showed that the vapor space was fairly well mixed and that benzene concentrations were relatively low when forced recirculation and 72 cfm ventilation air through the tank boundary were imposed. For the same 72 cfm air inlet flow but without forced recirculation, the heavier benzene gas was stratified. The results demonstrated that benzene concentrations were relatively low for typical operating configurations and conditions. Detailed results and the cases considered in the calculations will be discussed here.

  1. CFD Modeling of Methane Production from Hydrate-Bearing Reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamwo, I.K.; Myshakin, E.M.; Warzinski, R.P.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane hydrate is being examined as a next-generation energy resource to replace oil and natural gas. The U.S. Geological Survey estimates that methane hydrate may contain more organic carbon the the world's coal, oil, and natural gas combined. To assist in developing this unfamiliar resource, the National Energy Technology Laboratory has undertaken intensive research in understanding the fate of methane hydrate in geological reservoirs. This presentation reports preliminary computational fluid dynamics predictions of methane production from a subsurface reservoir.

  2. The Effects of Fluid Flow On Shear Localization and Frictional Strength From Dynamic Models Of Fault Gouge During Earthquakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianco, Ronald

    2013-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    have an increased localization toward the boundaries of the gouge layer (type III), and no occurrence of distributed (type I) shear. Systems with lower N and k show liquefaction events. Liquefaction events originate from increases in fluid pressure...

  3. A Robust Four-Fluid Transient Flow Simulator as an Analysis and Decision Making Tool for Dynamic Kill Operation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghshenas, Arash

    2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The worst scenario of drilling operation is blowout which is uncontrolled flow of formation fluid into the wellbore. Blowouts result in environmental damage with potential risk of injuries and fatalities. Although not all ...

  4. CFD optimization study of high-efficiency jet ejectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanawanavet, Somsak

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    CFD OPTIMIZATION STUDY OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY JET EJECTORS A Dissertation by SOMSAK WATANAWANAVET Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2008 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering CFD OPTIMIZATION STUDY OF HIGH-EFFICIENCY JET EJECTORS A Dissertation by SOMSAK WATANAWANAVET Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  5. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that streamlines from the corner collector did not approach the shoreline at the downstream end of Bradford Island. For the cases with much larger spill percentages, the streamlines from the corner collector were mid-channel or closer to the Washington shore as they moved downstream. Although at 25% spill at 75 kcfs total river, the total spill volume was sufficient to "cushion" the flow from the corner collector from the Bradford Island shore, areas of recirculation were modeled in the spillway tailrace. However, at the lowest flows and spill percentages, the streamlines from the B2 corner collector pass very close to the Bradford Island shore. In addition, the very flow velocity flows and large areas of recirculation greatly increase potential predator exposure of the spillway passed smolt. If there is concern for egress issues for smolt passing through the spillway, the spill pattern and volume need to be revisited.

  6. Dynamic mean field theory for lattice gas models of fluids confined in porous materials: Higher order theory based on the Bethe-Peierls and path probability method approximations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edison, John R.; Monson, Peter A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003-9303 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently we have developed a dynamic mean field theory (DMFT) for lattice gas models of fluids in porous materials [P. A. Monson, J. Chem. Phys. 128(8), 084701 (2008)]. The theory can be used to describe the relaxation processes in the approach to equilibrium or metastable states for fluids in pores and is especially useful for studying system exhibiting adsorption/desorption hysteresis. In this paper we discuss the extension of the theory to higher order by means of the path probability method (PPM) of Kikuchi and co-workers. We show that this leads to a treatment of the dynamics that is consistent with thermodynamics coming from the Bethe-Peierls or Quasi-Chemical approximation for the equilibrium or metastable equilibrium states of the lattice model. We compare the results from the PPM with those from DMFT and from dynamic Monte Carlo simulations. We find that the predictions from PPM are qualitatively similar to those from DMFT but give somewhat improved quantitative accuracy, in part due to the superior treatment of the underlying thermodynamics. This comes at the cost of greater computational expense associated with the larger number of equations that must be solved.

  7. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a simulant fluid to match the dynamics of fuel pebbles andfuel pebbles through reactor cores with and without coupled fluid

  8. CFD in support of development and optimization of the MIT LEU fuel element design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diaconeasa, Mihai Aurelian

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of lateral power distribution of the MITR LEU fuel design was analyzed using Computational Fluid Dynamics. Coupled conduction and convective heat transfer were modeled for uniform and non-uniform lateral power ...

  9. Adapting SAFT-? perturbation theory to site-based molecular dynamics simulation. II. Confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghobadi, Ahmadreza F.; Elliott, J. Richard, E-mail: elliot1@uakron.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The University of Akron, Akron, Ohio 44325 (United States)

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a new classical density functional theory is developed for group-contribution equations of state (EOS). Details of implementation are demonstrated for the recently-developed SAFT-? WCA EOS and selective applications are studied for confined fluids and vapor-liquid interfaces. The acronym WCA (Weeks-Chandler-Andersen) refers to the characterization of the reference part of the third-order thermodynamic perturbation theory applied in formulating the EOS. SAFT-? refers to the particular form of “statistical associating fluid theory” that is applied to the fused-sphere, heteronuclear, united-atom molecular models of interest. For the monomer term, the modified fundamental measure theory is extended to WCA-spheres. A new chain functional is also introduced for fused and soft heteronuclear chains. The attractive interactions are taken into account by considering the structure of the fluid, thus elevating the theory beyond the mean field approximation. The fluctuations of energy are also included via a non-local third-order perturbation theory. The theory includes resolution of the density profiles of individual groups such as CH{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} and satisfies stoichiometric constraints for the density profiles. New molecular simulations are conducted to demonstrate the accuracy of each Helmholtz free energy contribution in reproducing the microstructure of inhomogeneous systems at the united-atom level of coarse graining. At each stage, comparisons are made to assess where the present theory stands relative to the current state of the art for studying inhomogeneous fluids. Overall, it is shown that the characteristic features of real molecular fluids are captured both qualitatively and quantitatively. For example, the average pore density deviates ?2% from simulation data for attractive pentadecane in a 2-nm slit pore. Another example is the surface tension of ethane/heptane mixture, which deviates ?1% from simulation data while the theory reproduces the excess accumulation of ethane at the interface.

  10. Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    cake solids mass/m2, w 3. Ruth equation using dw = (1-)solid dx fluidL p Ku solidK )1( 1 resistance, , with cake porosity : velocity, u layer thickness, L pressure drop, p dynamic viscosity, fluid Finland februari 2014 Unit w: kg/m2 Fluid&ParticulateSystems 424514/2010 Fluid&ParticulateSystems ÅA424514

  11. Gnie mcanique Using the NSMB CFD solver to Compute Dynamic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lausanne, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de

    Sylvain Gallay Supervisors Dr. Mark Sawley Acknowledgements Dr. Mark Sawley Dr Jan B. Vos Dr. Mark Sawley

  12. Petascale, Adaptive CFD | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    demonstrated to restore and maintain flow attachment and reduce vibrations in wind turbine blades during dynamic pitch, thereby reducing unsteady loads on gearboxes that are...

  13. How to use CFD for Wind in Terrain ... real-life experience!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · Turbulence modelling / numerical methods · Inclusion of wind turbine wake · Temperature stratification 2 study 3. Construction and operation 4. Wind turbine breakdown! 5. Wind measurements / CFD simulations1 How to use CFD for Wind in Terrain ... real-life experience! CFD day at Suzlon, October 2007 A

  14. Quantifying the stimuli of photorheological fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Sarah Woodring

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop a model to predict the dynamics of photorheological fluids and, more generally, photoresponsive fluids for monochromatic and polychromatic light sources. Derived from first principles, the model relates the ...

  15. An Investigation of Surface and Crown Fire Dynamics in Shrub Fuels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lozano, Jesse Sandoval

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fluid dynamic environment between two adjacent crown fuels andadjacent crown fuel matrices and to study any fluid dynamicbetween crown fuel matrices, and to study any fluid dynamic

  16. The Dynamic Compressive Response of an Open-Cell Foam Impregnated With a Non-Newtonian Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawson, Matthew A.

    The response of a reticulated, elastomeric foam filled with colloidal silica under dynamic compression is studied. Under compression beyond local strain rates on the order of 1 s[superscript ?1], the non-Newtonian, colloidal ...

  17. Comparison of Hydrodynamic Load Predictions Between Engineering Models and Computational Fluid Dynamics for the OC4-DeepCwind Semi-Submersible: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benitz, M. A.; Schmidt, D. P.; Lackner, M. A.; Stewart, G. M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrodynamic loads on the platforms of floating offshore wind turbines are often predicted with computer-aided engineering tools that employ Morison's equation and/or potential-flow theory. This work compares results from one such tool, FAST, NREL's wind turbine computer-aided engineering tool, and the computational fluid dynamics package, OpenFOAM, for the OC4-DeepCwind semi-submersible analyzed in the International Energy Agency Wind Task 30 project. Load predictions from HydroDyn, the offshore hydrodynamics module of FAST, are compared with high-fidelity results from OpenFOAM. HydroDyn uses a combination of Morison's equations and potential flow to predict the hydrodynamic forces on the structure. The implications of the assumptions in HydroDyn are evaluated based on this code-to-code comparison.

  18. Fluid dynamics, particulate segregation, chemical processes, and natural ore analog discussions that relate to the potential for criticality in Hanford tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barney, G.S.

    1996-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents an in-depth review of the potential for nuclear criticality to occur in Hanford defense waste tanks during past, current and future safe storage and maintenance operations. The report also briefly discusses the potential impacts of proposed retrieval activities, although retrieval was not a main focus of scope. After thorough review of fluid dynamic aspects that focus on particle segregation, chemical aspects that focus on solubility and adsorption processes that might concentrate plutonium and/or separate plutonium from the neutron absorbers in the tank waste, and ore-body formation and mining operations, the interdisciplinary team has come to the conclusion that there is negligible risk of nuclear critically under existing storage conditions in Hanford site underground waste storage tanks. Further, for the accident scenarios considered an accidental criticality is incredible.

  19. advanced cfd codes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    cfd codes First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 The AIAA Code Verification Project -Test...

  20. Ris-R-1465(EN) CFD Computations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1465(EN) CFD Computations of Wind Turbine Blade Loads During Standstill Operation KNOW-BLADE on parked wind turbine blades. Investigation of loads during parked conditions, was done by other authors] investigated parking loads on a 2.4 meter wind turbine blade in a wind tunnel, and the recent large scale

  1. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  2. A localised subgrid scale model for fluid dynamical simulations in astrophysics II: Application to type Ia supernovae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Schmidt; J. C. Niemeyer; W. Hillebrandt; F. K. Roepke

    2006-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of the explosive burning process is highly sensitive to the flame speed model in numerical simulations of type Ia supernovae. Based upon the hypothesis that the effective flame speed is determined by the unresolved turbulent velocity fluctuations, we employ a new subgrid scale model which includes a localised treatment of the energy transfer through the turbulence cascade in combination with semi-statistical closures for the dissipation and non-local transport of turbulence energy. In addition, subgrid scale buoyancy effects are included. In the limit of negligible energy transfer and transport, the dynamical model reduces to the Sharp-Wheeler relation. According to our findings, the Sharp-Wheeler relation is insuffcient to account for the complicated turbulent dynamics of flames in thermonuclear supernovae. The application of a co-moving grid technique enables us to achieve very high spatial resolution in the burning region. Turbulence is produced mostly at the flame surface and in the interior ash regions. Consequently, there is a pronounced anisotropy in the vicinity of the flame fronts. The localised subgrid scale model predicts significantly enhanced energy generation and less unburnt carbon and oxygen at low velocities compared to earlier simulations.

  3. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at...

  4. Stochastic Dynamic Programming and Stochastic Fluid-Flow Models in the Design and Analysis of Web-Server Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goel, Piyush

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    tra c shares all of the leftover bandwidth from Class-1 tra c. Hence, for example, if there are n1 Class-1 and n2 Class-2 requests being served by the system, all of the Class-1 requests would be allocated bandwidth b each, whereas the Class-2 request... of Technology, Bombay Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Natarajan Gautam A Web-server farm is a specialized facility designed speci cally for housing Web servers catering to one or more Internet facing Web sites. In this dissertation, sto- chastic dynamic...

  5. Considering value of information when using CFD in design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Misra, John Satprim

    2009-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents an approach to find lower resolution CFD models that can accurately lead a designer to a correct decision at a lower computational cost. High-fidelity CFD models often contain too much information and come at a higher computational cost, limiting the designs a designer can test and how much optimization can be performed on the design. Lower model resolution is commonly used to reduce computational time. However there are no clear guidelines on how much model accuracy is required. Instead experience and intuition are used to select an appropriate lower resolution model. This thesis presents an alternative to this ad hoc method by considering the added value of the addition information provided by increasing accurate and more computationally expensive models.

  6. The identification of inflow fluid dynamics parameters that can be used to scale fatigue loading spectra of wind turbine structural components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelley, N.D.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have recently shown that the alternating load fatigue distributions measured at several locations on a wind turbine operating in a turbulent flow can be described by a mixture of at least three parametric statistical models. The rainflow cycle counting of the horizontal and vertical inflow components results in a similar mixture describing the cyclic content of the wind. We believe such a description highlights the degree of non-Gaussian characteristics of the flow. We present evidence that the severity of the low-cycle, high-amplitude alternating stress loads seen by wind turbine components are a direct consequence of the degree of departure from normality in the inflow. We have examined the details of the turbulent inflow associated with series large loading events that took place on two adjacent wind turbines installed in a large wind park in San Gorgonio Pass, California. In this paper, we describe what we believe to be the agents in the flow that induced such events. We also discuss the atmospheric mechanisms that influence the low-cycle, high-amplitude range loading seen by a number of critical wind turbine components. We further present results that can be used to scale the specific distribution shape as functions of measured inflow fluid dynamics parameters.

  7. Sandia Energy - High-Fidelity Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (ORPC's) TidGen turbine using the computational fluids dynamics (CFD) tool Star CCM+ and the structural-dynamics modeling capability in the Abaqus finite-element...

  8. E-Print Network 3.0 - air contamination due Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink Arenas Summary: dynamics (CFD) model has been used to predict the contaminant...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - air contaminants standard Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink Arenas Summary: dynamics (CFD) model has been used to predict the contaminant...

  10. Numerical simulation of flow distribution for pebble bed high temperature gas cooled reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yesilyurt, Gokhan

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ?....................................................................................26 V CFD MODELLING ...................................................................................28 V.1 Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) ..........................................28 V.2 The History.... Hassan The premise of the work presented here is to use a common analytical tool, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), along with different turbulence models. Eddy viscosity models as well as state-of-the-art Large Eddy Simulation (LES) were...

  11. Formal Calibration Methodology for CFD Model Development to Support the Operation of Energy Efficient Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hajdukiewicz, M.; Keane, M.; O'Flynn, B.; O'Grady, W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    controlled internal environments. In this research a CFD model of the internal environment of an office space will be developed. The CFD model will then be calibrated using real data taken from a well-positioned wireless sensor network and weather station...

  12. Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangisetti, Kavita

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    With the ever-increasing availability of high performance computing facilities, numerical simulation through Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is increasingly used to predict the room air distribution. CFD is becoming an important design...

  13. Optimal dimensionless design and analysis of jet ejectors as compressors and thrust augmenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohan, Ganesh

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and mesh generation) and FLUENT (Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solver kit). Scripting languages PYTHON and SCHEME were used to automate this process. The CFD model employed 2D axis symmetric, steady-state flow using the ??k method (including wall...

  14. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;4 · When internal diffusion is low, winds end up being dominant source of energy Toggweiler et al, 1993 #12;5 · When internal diffusion is low, winds end up being dominant source of energy · Shifts in winds in Brazil BasinWhile ocean is turbulent both horizontally and vertically.... Diffusivities associated

  15. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ice from continent out to open ocean to melt ­ Avoids coldfresh bias around Antarctica (led to excess seaice) · Lagrangian model of icebergs · Exporting fresh cap beyond shelf edge increases is most useful for ocean climate? ­ Some issues affecting zcoords also affect hybrid coords if coordinate

  16. KINETIC MODELING OF A FISCHER-TROPSCH REACTION OVER A COBALT CATALYST IN A SLURRY BUBBLE COLUMN REACTOR FOR INCORPORATION INTO A COMPUTATIONAL MULTIPHASE FLUID DYNAMICS MODEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anastasia Gribik; Doona Guillen, PhD; Daniel Ginosar, PhD

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently multi-tubular fixed bed reactors, fluidized bed reactors, and slurry bubble column reactors (SBCRs) are used in commercial Fischer Tropsch (FT) synthesis. There are a number of advantages of the SBCR compared to fixed and fluidized bed reactors. The main advantage of the SBCR is that temperature control and heat recovery are more easily achieved. The SBCR is a multiphase chemical reactor where a synthesis gas, comprised mainly of H2 and CO, is bubbled through a liquid hydrocarbon wax containing solid catalyst particles to produce specialty chemicals, lubricants, or fuels. The FT synthesis reaction is the polymerization of methylene groups [-(CH2)-] forming mainly linear alkanes and alkenes, ranging from methane to high molecular weight waxes. The Idaho National Laboratory is developing a computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) model of the FT process in a SBCR. This paper discusses the incorporation of absorption and reaction kinetics into the current hydrodynamic model. A phased approach for incorporation of the reaction kinetics into a CMFD model is presented here. Initially, a simple kinetic model is coupled to the hydrodynamic model, with increasing levels of complexity added in stages. The first phase of the model includes incorporation of the absorption of gas species from both large and small bubbles into the bulk liquid phase. The driving force for the gas across the gas liquid interface into the bulk liquid is dependent upon the interfacial gas concentration in both small and large bubbles. However, because it is difficult to measure the concentration at the gas-liquid interface, coefficients for convective mass transfer have been developed for the overall driving force between the bulk concentrations in the gas and liquid phases. It is assumed that there are no temperature effects from mass transfer of the gas phases to the bulk liquid phase, since there are only small amounts of dissolved gas in the liquid phase. The product from the incorporation of absorption is the steady state concentration profile of the absorbed gas species in the bulk liquid phase. The second phase of the model incorporates a simplified macrokinetic model to the mass balance equation in the CMFD code. Initially, the model assumes that the catalyst particles are sufficiently small such that external and internal mass and heat transfer are not rate limiting. The model is developed utilizing the macrokinetic rate expression developed by Yates and Satterfield (1991). Initially, the model assumes that the only species formed other than water in the FT reaction is C27H56. Change in moles of the reacting species and the resulting temperature of the catalyst and fluid phases is solved simultaneously. The macrokinetic model is solved in conjunction with the species transport equations in a separate module which is incorporated into the CMFD code.

  17. Simulating Fluids Exhibiting Microstructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Simulating Fluids Exhibiting Microstructure Speaker: Noel J. Walkington, ... fluids containing elastic particles, and polymer fluids, all exhibit non-trivial ...

  18. DECOUPLED TIME STEPPING METHODS FOR FLUID-FLUID INTERACTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kasman, Alex

    -fluid interaction, atmosphere-ocean, implicit-explicit method. 1. Introduction. The dynamic core in atmosphere-ocean to the coupled system using only (uncoupled) atmosphere and ocean solves, (see e.g. [4, 6, 17, 18, 19 their shared interface I by a rigid-lid coupling condition, i.e. no penetration and a slip with friction

  19. amniotic fluid levels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Validation of a Computational Fluid Dynamics Model for IAQ applications in Ice Rink Arenas Engineering Websites Summary: . A major source of air pollution is the...

  20. Mechanical Engineering ME 3720 FLUID MECHANICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    . Fundamentals of fluid flow; fluid statics; systems, and control volumes; continuity, momentum and energy physical model results to prototype 10. Use Moody chart to calculate friction losses in pipe flows 11 equations; dynamic similitude; One-dimensional compressible flow. The objective(s) of this course is (are

  1. CFD Simulation and Analysis of the Combined Evaporative Cooling and Radiant Ceiling Air-conditioning System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang, H.; Yinming, L.; Junmei, W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    consumption analysis of the building is carried out using the energy consumption code. Velocity and temperature distribution in the air-conditioned zone is computed using CFD. According to the results, the energy consumption and indoor human thermal comfort...

  2. Comparative Analysis of CFD ?P vs. Measured ?P for Compressed Flexible Ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugursal, A.; Culp, C.H.

    Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Comparative Analysis of CFD [Delta]P vs. Measured [Delta]P for Compressed Flexible Ducts Ugursal, Ahmet;Culp, Charles ASHRAE Transactions; 2007...

  3. CFD based rotordynamic coefficients for labyrinth seals and impeller leakage paths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Avijit

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    accurately using simple flow model like bulk flow. CFD approach is employed since it can accurately predict and capture recirculating zones using proper mesh distribution. The Impeller Leakage paths and Labyrinth Seals, typically, have a recirculation zone...

  4. CFD Simulation and Measurement Validation of Air Distribution at the Hunan International Exhibition Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, T.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, G.; Yuan, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hunan International Exhibition Center (HIEC) is a large space building. A stratified air-conditioning system on the second floor of the building has been adopted. Due to some problems with the air supply jet diffuser, CFD simulations were...

  5. CFD Simulation and Measurement Validation of Air Distribution at the Hunan International Exhibition Center 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, T.; Zhang, Q.; Zhang, G.; Yuan, H.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hunan International Exhibition Center (HIEC) is a large space building. A stratified air-conditioning system on the second floor of the building has been adopted. Due to some problems with the air supply jet diffuser, CFD simulations were...

  6. Fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  7. A chaotic-dynamical conceptual model to describe fluid flow and contaminant transport in a fractured vadose zone. 1997 progress report and presentations at the annual meeting, Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, December 3--4, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faybishenko, B.; Doughty, C.; Geller, J. [and others

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding subsurface flow and transport processes is critical for effective assessment, decision-making, and remediation activities for contaminated sites. However, for fluid flow and contaminant transport through fractured vadose zones, traditional hydrogeological approaches are often found to be inadequate. In this project, the authors examine flow and transport through a fractured vadose zone as a deterministic chaotic dynamical process, and develop a model of it in these terms. Initially, the authors examine separately the geometric model of fractured rock and the flow dynamics model needed to describe chaotic behavior. Ultimately they will put the geometry and flow dynamics together to develop a chaotic-dynamical model of flow and transport in a fractured vadose zone. They investigate water flow and contaminant transport on several scales, ranging from small-scale laboratory experiments in fracture replicas and fractured cores, to field experiments conducted in a single exposed fracture at a basalt outcrop, and finally to a ponded infiltration test using a pond of 7 by 8 m. In the field experiments, they measure the time-variation of water flux, moisture content, and hydraulic head at various locations, as well as the total inflow rate to the subsurface. Such variations reflect the changes in the geometry and physics of water flow that display chaotic behavior, which they try to reconstruct using the data obtained. In the analysis of experimental data, a chaotic model can be used to predict the long-term bounds on fluid flow and transport behavior, known as the attractor of the system, and to examine the limits of short-term predictability within these bounds. This approach is especially well suited to the need for short-term predictions to support remediation decisions and long-term bounding studies. View-graphs from ten presentations made at the annual meeting held December 3--4, 1997 are included in an appendix to this report.

  8. Comparative Study: CFD ?P Versus Measured ?P for 30% Flexible Ducts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugursal, A.; Culp, C.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    very close comparison with measured results. Flexible ducts can be installed in a variety of configurations with different compression. A configuration was specified for this study which focused on 30% compressed 5 foot-long flexible duct and 2... foot-long circular ducts placed on both ends. A CFD model was built and simulations were run under different volumetric air flows. The static pressure drop for those conditions were analyzed and displayed. The final CFD model is tuned until...

  9. Economic and Performance Benefits Resulting From the Use of Large...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    were implemented to offset theseadditional capital costs. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)was used to show that the large fan design virtually eliminateshot air...

  10. Advanced Liquid Cooling R&D

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    September 2011 Completed finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling to design the first prototype heat exchanger. GoNo-Go Decision:...

  11. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    code (modeling at the reservoir scale) - CFD: NETL's computational fluid dynamics code (modeling at the fracture scale) * Develop fat-ray double-difference tomography...

  12. Compact, Light-Weight, Single-Phase, Liquid-Cooled Cold Plate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    based on jets. Initiated finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling for design of heat exchanger. July 2011 Initiated investigation of...

  13. Sandia Energy - EC Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by applying advanced turbulence modeling simulation techniques within Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods that resolve the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS)...

  14. Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

  15. The following paper was published in ASHRAE Transactions Vol. #107, Part 2, Page nos. 527-537. 2001 American

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) thermography experiments, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations, and calculations with traditional software for simulating two-dimensional heat conduction were conducted.The IR thermography

  16. Prof. Dr.-Ing. Heinz Pitsch Templergraben 64

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) Simulationen unterstützen. Im Rahmen des Exzellenzclusters ,,Tailor-made Fuels from Biomass" wird am Institut für Technische Verbrennung die chemische Kinetik von alternativen

  17. MIDDLE ATMOSPHERE DYNAMICS AT707 (3 credits)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ., Holton, J. R., Leovy, C. B., Academic Press, 489 pp. · Atmospheric and Oceanic Fluid Dynamics, 2006 Review Articles: · Haynes, P. H., 2005: Stratospheric Dynamics. Annu. Rev. Fluid Mech., 37, 263­ 293

  18. The Effects of Geometry on Flexible Duct CFD Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugursal, A.; Culp, C.

    Flexible ducts have been widely used in the building industry due to low cost and ease of installation. These ducts can be installed in a wide range of configurations, which creates a challenge for pressure loss calculations. Computational fluid...

  19. National Aeronautics and Space Administration www.nasa.gov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that could accurately predict the flow of fluids, such as the flow of air over an aircraft's wing, fuel 9 5 0 s -- 1 9 9 0 s AEROELASTIC STABILITY NOISE DATABASECOMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) H v F H;1. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Starting in the 1970s, NASA began developing sophisticated computer codes

  20. Measuring the voidage of a CFB through image analysis D.K. Casleton a,b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ross, Arun Abraham

    used in industry for catalytic reactions, solid fuel combustion and gasification, as well as many other cost of computers, computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is widely being used to help design the next generation of fluid beds. CFD utilizes computers in solving the equations governing fluid- dynamics

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration N A S A A E R O N A U T I C S R E S E A R C H O N B O A R D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that could accurately predict the flow of fluids, such as the flow of air over an aircraft's wing, fuel 9 0 s AEROELASTIC STABILITY NOISE DATABASECOMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS (CFD) H v F H Applies also;1. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Starting in the 1970s, NASA began developing sophisticated computer codes

  2. Spinning Fluids: A Group Theoretical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dario Capasso; Debajyoti Sarkar

    2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend the Lagrangian formulation of relativistic non-abelian fluids in group theory language. We propose a Mathisson-Papapetrou equation for spinning fluids in terms of the reduction limit of de Sitter group. The equation we find correctly boils down to the one for non-spinning fluids. We study the application of our results for an FRW cosmological background for fluids with no vorticity and for dusts in the vicinity of a Kerr black hole. We also explore two alternative approaches based on a group theoretical formulation of particles dynamics.

  3. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Franke, Rudiger; Casella, Francesco; Sielemann, Michael; Proelss, Katrin; Otter, Martin; Wetter, Michael

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

  4. Euler's fluid equations: Optimal Control vs Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Darryl D. Holm

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An optimization method used in image-processing (metamorphosis) is found to imply Euler's equations for incompressible flow of an inviscid fluid, without requiring that the Lagrangian particle labels exactly follow the flow lines of the Eulerian velocity vector field. Thus, an optimal control problem and an optimization problem for incompressible ideal fluid flow both yield the \\emph {same} Euler fluid equations, although their Lagrangian parcel dynamics are \\emph{different}. This is a result of the \\emph{gauge freedom} in the definition of the fluid pressure for an incompressible flow, in combination with the symmetry of fluid dynamics under relabeling of their Lagrangian coordinates. Similar ideas are also illustrated for SO(N) rigid body motion.

  5. Viscosity of a nucleonic fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aram Z. Mekjian

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The viscosity of nucleonic matter is studied both classically and in a quantum mechanical description. The collisions between particles are modeled as hard sphere scattering as a baseline for comparison and as scattering from an attractive square well potential. Properties associated with the unitary limit are developed which are shown to be approximately realized for a system of neutrons. The issue of near perfect fluid behavior of neutron matter is remarked on. Using some results from hard sphere molecular dynamics studies near perfect fluid behavior is discussed further.

  6. INVESTIGATION OF A DYNAMIC POWER LINE RATING CONCEPT FOR IMPROVED WIND ENERGY INTEGRATION OVER COMPLEX TERRAIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jake P. Gentle; Kurt S Myers; Tyler B Phillips; Inanc Senocak; Phil Anderson

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic Line Rating (DLR) is a smart grid technology that allows the rating of power line to be based on real-time conductor temperature dependent on local weather conditions. In current practice overhead power lines are generally given a conservative rating based on worst case weather conditions. Using historical weather data collected over a test bed area, we demonstrate there is often additional transmission capacity not being utilized with the current static rating practice. We investigate a new dynamic line rating methodology using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to determine wind conditions along transmission lines at dense intervals. Simulated results are used to determine conductor temperature by calculating the transient thermal response of the conductor under variable environmental conditions. In calculating the conductor temperature, we use both a calculation with steady-state assumption and a transient calculation. Under low wind conditions, steady-state assumption predicts higher conductor temperatures that could lead to curtailments, whereas transient calculations produce conductor temperatures that are significantly lower, implying the availability of additional transmission capacity.

  7. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Dilley, Lorie

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  8. Fluid Inclusion Gas Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dilley, Lorie

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid inclusion gas analysis for wells in various geothermal areas. Analyses used in developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy for wells and defining fluids across the geothermal fields. Each sample has mass spectrum counts for 180 chemical species.

  9. A procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of CFD calculations based on grid refinement studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eça, L. [Instituto Superior Técnico, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisbon (Portugal); Hoekstra, M. [Maritime Research Institute Netherlands, PO Box 28 6700 AA, Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper offers a procedure for the estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity as a result of a fluid flow computation; the procedure requires solutions on systematically refined grids. The error is estimated with power series expansions as a function of the typical cell size. These expansions, of which four types are used, are fitted to the data in the least-squares sense. The selection of the best error estimate is based on the standard deviation of the fits. The error estimate is converted into an uncertainty with a safety factor that depends on the observed order of grid convergence and on the standard deviation of the fit. For well-behaved data sets, i.e. monotonic convergence with the expected observed order of grid convergence and no scatter in the data, the method reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index. Examples of application of the procedure are included. - Highlights: • Estimation of the numerical uncertainty of any integral or local flow quantity. • Least squares fits to power series expansions to handle noisy data. • Excellent results obtained for manufactured solutions. • Consistent results obtained for practical CFD calculations. • Reduces to the well known Grid Convergence Index for well-behaved data sets.

  10. Dynamic

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA group currentBradleyTableSelling7111AWell: Gas productionDynamic , and Static ,

  11. CFD analyses of natural circulation in the air-cooled reactor cavity cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, R. [Nuclear Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne IL (United States); Pointer, W. D. [Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Natural Convection Shutdown Heat Removal Test Facility (NSTF) is currently being built at Argonne National Laboratory, to evaluate the feasibility of the passive Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). CFD simulations have been applied to evaluate the NSTF and NGNP RCCS designs. However, previous simulations found that convergence was very difficult to achieve in simulating the complex natural circulation. To resolve the convergence issue and increase the confidence of the CFD simulation results, additional CFD simulations were conducted using a more detailed mesh and a different solution scheme. It is found that, with the use of coupled flow and coupled energy models, the convergence can be greatly improved. Furthermore, the effects of convection in the cavity and the effects of the uncertainty in solid surface emissivity are also investigated. (authors)

  12. aerosol cfd model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere. The approach taken represents the particle size distribution as the superposition of three lognormal subdistributions, called modes....

  13. Theory of locomotion through complex fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwynn Elfring; Eric Lauga

    2014-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Microorganisms such as bacteria often swim in fluid environments that cannot be classified as Newtonian. Many biological fluids contain polymers or other heterogeneities which may yield complex rheology. For a given set of boundary conditions on a moving organism, flows can be substantially different in complex fluids, while non-Newtonian stresses can alter the gait of the microorganisms themselves. Heterogeneities in the fluid may also be characterized by length scales on the order of the organism itself leading to additional dynamic complexity. In this chapter we present a theoretical overview of small-scale locomotion in complex fluids with a focus on recent efforts quantifying the impact of non-Newtonian rheology on swimming microorganisms.

  14. CFD Analyses of Damaged Fuel Inside a Cleaning Vessel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Legradi, Gabor; Boros, Ildiko; Aszodi, Attila [Budapest University of Technology and Economics, Muegyetem rkp. 3-9. H-1111 Budapest (Hungary)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On 10-11 of April, 2003, a serious incident occurred in a special fuel assembly cleaning tank, which was installed into the service shaft of the 2. unit of the Paks NPP in Hungary. During this incident, most of the 30 fuel assemblies put into the cleaning tank have seriously damaged. In the Institute of Nuclear Techniques of the Budapest University of Technology and Economics several CFD investigations were performed concerning the course of the incident, the post incidental conditions and the recovery work. The main reason of the incident can be originated from the defective design of the cleaning tank which resulted in the insufficient cooling of the system in a special operational mode. Our investigation performed with a complex 3D CFX model clearly showed how could as strong temperature stratification develop inside the cleaning tank that it was able to block the coolant flow through the fuel assemblies. After the blocking of the flow, the coolant turned into boiling and the assemblies became uncovered. The temperature of the surfaces of the fuel assemblies went above 1000 deg. C. With the aid of the radiative heat transfer model of the CFX-5.6 code, the surface temperatures were analyzed. When the cleaning instrument got opened the fuel assemblies suffered a serious thermal shock and the assemblies highly damaged. The post-incident thermo-hydraulic state inside the cleaning vessel was investigated with a rather complex CFX model. The uncertainties were decreased by a wide parameter study. The recovery work is planned to be started in the close future. The operators of the damaged fuel removing equipments will work standing on a platform which will be placed into the service shaft just above the surface of the coolant of decreased level. Protecting the workers against unnecessary personal doses is a very important task. In this situation, while the coolant is important part of the biological shielding, it is also a source of radiation due to the considerable amount of radioactive contamination dispersed into it. Therefore, the 3D distribution of the contamination in the service shaft was estimated for different operational and incidental scenarios with a wide parameter study made by a 3D CFX model. This comprehensive work performed with several models and calculations is tersely outlined according to the limited extent of the paper. (authors)

  15. SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION GUIDES FOR INTEGRATED BUILDING ENERGY AND CFD SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    1 SENSITIVITY ANALYSIS AND APPLICATION GUIDES FOR INTEGRATED BUILDING ENERGY AND CFD SIMULATION Engineering Purdue University 585 Purdue Mall, West Lafayette, IN 47907-2088, USA Abstract Building energy suggestions on appropriate usage of the coupling simulation are provided. 1. Introduction Building energy

  16. Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments: MIT campus case-study using CFD of Technology, 2Meteodyn Objectives Conclusions References [1] TopoWind software, User Manual [2] Wind Resource Assessment Handbook: Fundamentals for Conducting a Successful Wind Monitoring Program, AWS Scientific, Inc

  17. Dual-level parallelism for high-order CFD methods q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Suchuan "Steven"

    MP shared-memory parallelization and employ a work- load-splitting scheme that reduces the OpenDual-level parallelism for high-order CFD methods q Suchuan Dong, George Em Karniadakis * Division-order methods and implemented in the spectral/hp element framework to take advantage of the hierarchical

  18. Numerical Analysis of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using CFD Jeppe Johansen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical Analysis of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using CFD Jeppe Johansen and Niels N of adding a winglet to a wind turbine rotor is to decrease the total drag from the blades and thereby increase. The resulting pressure difference on an operating wind turbine blade causes inward spanwise flow

  19. Post-Doc and Staff Engineer Positions in CFD and Mesh Generation July 10, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of large-scale computations for fuel cell and battery devices. We are looking for talented, ambitious and fuel cells for vehicle electrification, renewable energy storage, and power grid management. The group in electrochemistry, materials, manufacturing, diagnostics, CFD modeling, and system engineering. The center has

  20. Volume 0 (1981), Number 0 pp. 1000 Practical CFD Simulations on Programmable Graphics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Volume 0 (1981), Number 0 pp. 1­000 Practical CFD Simulations on Programmable Graphics Hardware-based graphics APIs changed the panorama of consumer-level graphics: today, GPUs are cheap, fast and ubiquitous of boundary conditions and incorporates energy trans- port through the traditional Boussinesq approximation

  1. SMOKE AND CFD VISUALIZATION OF THE FLOW AFTER AN EMC SCREEN IN A SUBRACK MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SMOKE AND CFD VISUALIZATION OF THE FLOW AFTER AN EMC SCREEN IN A SUBRACK MODEL Raúl Antón1, 2, 3 analysed are the velocity, the EMC screen porosity and the subrack geometry. The technique used pattern after the screen. KEYWORDS: RNG k-, perforated plate, porosity, EMC screen, subrack, flow pattern

  2. Solution characters of iterative coupling between energy simulation and CFD programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhai, John Z.

    States, building services consume more than one third of the primary energy consumption and twoSolution characters of iterative coupling between energy simulation and CFD programs Zhiqiang Zhaia Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307, USA b School of Mechanical Engineering, Purdue University, 1288

  3. http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Advanced CFD Models for Next-Generation Combustion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Advanced CFD Models for Next-Generation Combustion Systems S: Requirements for next-generation combustion systems include: Increased performance, Reduced fuel consumption, and for direct-injection diesel engines Models carried intact from simulations of laboratory flames give good

  4. Unsteady, high Reynolds number validation cases for a multi-phase CFD analysis tool have been

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Robert Francis

    and constituent volume fraction transport/generation for liquid, condensable vapor and non-condensable gas fields1 Abstract Unsteady, high Reynolds number validation cases for a multi-phase CFD analysis tool have of the effect of cavitation number, Reynolds number and turbulence model has been made. Analysis of the modeled

  5. 1 Copyright 1999 by ASME MULTI-PHASE CFD ANALYSIS OF NATURAL AND VENTILATED CAVITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunz, Robert Francis

    volume fraction transport/generation for liquid, condensable vapor and non-con- densable gas fields between condensable vapor and non-condensable gas, a requirement of our current applica- tion. By solving1 Copyright © 1999 by ASME MULTI-PHASE CFD ANALYSIS OF NATURAL AND VENTILATED CAVITATION ABOUT

  6. The use of dynamic adaptive chemistry in combustion simulation of gasoline surrogate fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liang, Long; Raman, Sumathy; Farrell, John T. [Corporate Strategic Research Laboratories, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, 1545 Route 22 East, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Stevens, John G. [Corporate Strategic Research Laboratories, ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, 1545 Route 22 East, Annandale, NJ 08801 (United States); Department of Mathematical Sciences, Montclair State University, Montclair, NJ 07043 (United States)

    2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A computationally efficient dynamic adaptive chemistry (DAC) scheme is described that permits on-the-fly mechanism reduction during reactive flow calculations. The scheme reduces a globally valid full mechanism to a locally, instantaneously applicable smaller mechanism. Previously we demonstrated its applicability to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) problems with n-heptane [L. Liang, J.G. Stevens, J.T. Farrell, Proc. Combust. Inst. 32 (2009) 527-534]. In this work we demonstrate the broader utility of the DAC scheme through the simulation of HCCI and shock tube ignition delay times (IDT) for three gasoline surrogates, including two- and three-component blends of primary reference fuels (PRF) and toluene reference fuels (TRF). Both a detailed 1099-species mechanism and a skeletal 150-species mechanism are investigated as the full mechanism to explore the impact of fuel complexity on the DAC scheme. For all conditions studied, pressure and key species profiles calculated using the DAC scheme are in excellent agreement with the results obtained using the full mechanisms. For the HCCI calculations using the 1099- and 150-species mechanisms, the DAC scheme achieves 70- and 15-fold CPU time reductions, respectively. For the IDT problems, corresponding speed-up factors of 10 and two are obtained. Practical guidance is provided for choosing the search-initiating species set, selecting the threshold, and implementing the DAC scheme in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) framework. (author)

  7. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelica 2003 Conference, Linköping,H. Tummescheit: The Modelica Fluid and Media Library forThermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, Modelica 2006 Conference, Vi-

  8. Fluid sampling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnston, Roger G. (Los Alamos, NM); Garcia, Anthony R. E. (Espanola, NM); Martinez, Ronald K. (Santa Cruz, NM)

    2001-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes a rotatable tool for collecting fluid through the wall of a container. The tool includes a fluid collection section with a cylindrical shank having an end portion for drilling a hole in the container wall when the tool is rotated, and a threaded portion for tapping the hole in the container wall. A passageway in the shank in communication with at least one radial inlet hole in the drilling end and an opening at the end of the shank is adapted to receive fluid from the container. The tool also includes a cylindrical chamber affixed to the end of the shank opposite to the drilling portion thereof for receiving and storing fluid passing through the passageway. The tool also includes a flexible, deformable gasket that provides a fluid-tight chamber to confine kerf generated during the drilling and tapping of the hole. The invention also includes a fluid extractor section for extracting fluid samples from the fluid collecting section.

  9. HEAT TRANSFER FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenert, Andrej

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The choice of heat transfer fluids has significant effects on the performance, cost, and reliability of solar thermal systems. In this chapter, we evaluate existing heat transfer fluids such as oils and molten salts based ...

  10. Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franke, Rudiger

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ob- ject-Oriented Modeling of Thermo-Fluid Systems, Modelicable and Compressible Thermo-Fluid Pipe Networks, ModelicaStandardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid

  11. Engineering Fluid Dynamics Research of the Group Engineering Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twente, Universiteit

    are conducted. Thin-film flows The flow in narrow domains under extreme conditions between deforming surfaces is studied theoretically and experimentally. A typical example is the lubricant film in roller bearings (Elasto- Hydrodynamic Lubrication). The theoretical research involves modelling, development of efficient

  12. Entropy production at freeze-out from dissipative fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Molnar

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Entropy production due to shear viscosity during the continuous freeze-out of a longitudinally expanding dissipative fluid is addressed. Assuming the validity of the fluid dynamical description during the continuous removal of interacting matter we estimated a small entropy production as function of the freeze-out duration and the ratio of dissipative to non-dissipative quantities in case of a relativistic massless pion fluid.

  13. A thin film model for corotational Jeffreys fluids under strong slip

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Münch; B. Wagner; M. Rauscher; R. Blossey

    2006-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive a thin film model for viscoelastic liquids under strong slip which obey the stress tensor dynamics of corotational Jeffreys fluids.

  14. Carbon-bearing fluids at nanoscale interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, David [Ohio State University; Ok, Salim [Ohio State University, Columbus; Phan, A [Ohio State University, Columbus; Rother, Gernot [ORNL; Striolo, Alberto [Oklahoma University; Vlcek, Lukas [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behaviour of fluids at mineral surfaces or in confined geometries (pores, fractures) typically differs from their bulk behaviour in many ways due to the effects of large internal surfaces and geometrical confinement. We summarize research performed on C-O-H fluids at nanoscale interfaces in materials of interest to the earth and material sciences (e.g., silica, alumina, zeolites, clays, rocks, etc.), emphasizing those techniques that assess microstructural modification and/or dynamical behaviour such as gravimetric analysis, small-angle (SANS) neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations will be described that provide atomistic characterization of interfacial and confined fluid behaviour as well as aid in the interpretation of the neutron scattering results.

  15. 2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonin, A. A.

    Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. ...

  16. Spinning fluids reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

  17. Viscous dark fluid universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hipolito-Ricaldi, W. S. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Ciencias Matematicas e Naturais, CEUNES, Rodovia BR 101 Norte, km. 60, CEP 29932-540, Sao Mateus, Espirito Santo (Brazil); Velten, H. E. S.; Zimdahl, W. [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo, Departamento de Fisica, Av. Fernando Ferrari, 514, Campus de Goiabeiras, CEP 29075-910, Vitoria, Espirito Santo (Brazil)

    2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the cosmological perturbation dynamics for a universe consisting of pressureless baryonic matter and a viscous fluid, the latter representing a unified model of the dark sector. In the homogeneous and isotropic background the total energy density of this mixture behaves as a generalized Chaplygin gas. The perturbations of this energy density are intrinsically nonadiabatic and source relative entropy perturbations. The resulting baryonic matter power spectrum is shown to be compatible with the 2dFGRS and SDSS (DR7) data. A joint statistical analysis, using also Hubble-function and supernovae Ia data, shows that, different from other studies, there exists a maximum in the probability distribution for a negative present value q{sub 0{approx_equal}}-0.53 of the deceleration parameter. Moreover, while previous descriptions on the basis of generalized Chaplygin-gas models were incompatible with the matter power-spectrum data since they required a much too large amount of pressureless matter, the unified model presented here favors a matter content that is of the order of the baryonic matter abundance suggested by big-bang nucleosynthesis.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: CFD Simulations and Experiments to Determine the Feasibility of Various Alternate Fuels for Compression Ignition Engine Applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Argonne National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about CFD simulations...

  19. Gas/slurry flow in coal-liquefaction processes (fluid dynamics in a three-phase-flow column). Final technical progress report, 1 October 1979-31 March 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ying, D.H.S.; Sivasubramanian, R.; Moujaes, S.F.; Givens, E.N.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A commercial coal liquefaction plant will employ vertical tubular reactors feeding slurry and gas concurrently upward through these vessels. In the SRC-I plant design the reactor is essentially an empty vessel with only a distributor plate located near the inlet. Because the commercial plant represents a considerable scale-up over Wilsonville or any pilot plant, this program addressed the need for additional data on behavior of three phase systems in large vessels. Parameters that were investigated in this program were studied at conditions that relate directly to projected plant operating conditions. The fluid dynamic behavior of the three-phase upflow system was studied by measuring gas and slurry holdup, liquid dispersion, solids suspension and solids accumulation. The dependent parameters are gas and liquid velocities, solid particle size, solids concentration, liquid viscosity, liquid surface tension and inlet distributor. Within the range of liquid superficial velocity from 0.0 to 0.5 ft/sec, gas holdup is found to be independent of liquid flow which agrees with other investigators. The results also confirm our previous finding that gas holdup is independent of column diameter when the column diameter is 5 inches or larger. The gas holdup depends strongly on gas flow rate; gas holdup increases with increasing gas velocity. The effect of solids particles on gas holdup depends on the gas flow rate. Increasing liquid viscosity and surface tension reduce gas holdup which agrees with other investigators. Because of the complexity of the system, we could not find a single correlation to best fit all the data. The degree of liquid backmixing markedly affects chemical changes occurring in the dissolver, such as sulfur removal, and oil and distillate formation.

  20. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Coupled Level-Set/Volume-of-Fluid Method for the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Mark

    utilizing a coupled level-set/volume-of-fluid method to simulate liquid fuel atomization. The coupledAmerican Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Coupled Level-Set/Volume-of-Fluid Method, Canoga Park, Calif. 91309 This paper presents results of a multiphase computational fluid dynamics code

  1. Disposal of drilling fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryson, W.R.

    1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to 1974 the disposal of drilling fluids was not considered to be much of an environmental problem. In the past, disposal of drilling fluids was accomplished in various ways such as spreading on oil field lease roads to stabilize the road surface and control dust, spreading in the base of depressions of sandy land areas to increase water retention, and leaving the fluid in the reserve pit to be covered on closure of the pit. In recent years, some states have become concerned over the indescriminate dumping of drilling fluids into pits or unauthorized locations and have developed specific regulations to alleviate the perceived deterioration of environmental and groundwater quality from uncontrolled disposal practices. The disposal of drilling fluids in Kansas is discussed along with a newer method or treatment in drilling fluid disposal.

  2. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  3. Flow networks: A characterization of geophysical fluid transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enrico Ser-Giacomi; Vincent Rossi; Cristobal Lopez; Emilio Hernandez-Garcia

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We represent transport between different regions of a fluid domain by flow networks, constructed from the discrete representation of the Perron-Frobenius or transfer operator associated to the fluid advection dynamics. The procedure is useful to analyze fluid dynamics in geophysical contexts, as illustrated by the construction of a flow network associated to the surface circulation in the Mediterranean sea. We use network-theory tools to analyze the flow network and gain insights into transport processes. In particular we quantitatively relate dispersion and mixing characteristics, classically quantified by Lyapunov exponents, to the degree of the network nodes. A family of network entropies is defined from the network adjacency matrix, and related to the statistics of stretching in the fluid, in particular to the Lyapunov exponent field. Finally we use a network community detection algorithm, Infomap, to partition the Mediterranean network into coherent regions, i.e. areas internally well mixed, but with little fluid interchange between them.

  4. Open Archive TOULOUSE Archive Ouverte (OATAO) OATAO is an open access repository that collects the work of Toulouse researchers and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mailhes, Corinne

    , and biomass gasi- fication. Since few years, the development of computational ability and Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) allows 3-dimensional realistic simulations of industrial configura- tions by using eulerian multi-fluid approach. In the application of CFD models, careful validation with experimental

  5. Metalworking and machining fluids

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Erdemir, Ali (Naperville, IL); Sykora, Frank (Caledon, ON, CA); Dorbeck, Mark (Brighton, MI)

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved boron-based metal working and machining fluids. Boric acid and boron-based additives that, when mixed with certain carrier fluids, such as water, cellulose and/or cellulose derivatives, polyhydric alcohol, polyalkylene glycol, polyvinyl alcohol, starch, dextrin, in solid and/or solvated forms result in improved metalworking and machining of metallic work pieces. Fluids manufactured with boric acid or boron-based additives effectively reduce friction, prevent galling and severe wear problems on cutting and forming tools.

  6. Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andelman, David

    Adsorption Kinetics of Surfactants at Fluid-Fluid Interfaces Haim Diamant and David Andelman School-Fluid Interfaces, Adsorption, Adsorption Kinetics, Interfacial Tension. 1 #12;Abstract We review a new theoretical approach to the kinetics of surfactant adsorption at fluid-fluid interfaces. It yields a more complete

  7. Fees are subject to change. See studyguide.au.dk *PLACE OF STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as fluid dynamics (CFD), structural dynamics and modal analysis, and fracture mechanics and fatigue Wind Power #12; include: How do you design the blades of a wind turbine? How do you calculate the lifetime of a computer

  8. Numerical Simulation of Flow Field Inside a Squeeze Film Damper and the Study of the Effect of Cavitation on the Pressure Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khandare, Milind Nandkumar

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    of SFDs can be expensive and time consuming. The current work simulates the flow field inside the dynamically deforming annular gap of a SFD using the commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code Fluent and compares the results to the experimental...

  9. Yield stresses in electrorheological fluids R. T. Bonnecazea) and J. F. Brady

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    previously for the dynamic simulation of an ER fluid. The static yield stress is determined from nonlinear;Gast & Zukoski, 1989; Klingenberg, 1990) and dynamic simulations (Klingenberg, 1990; Bonnecaze & Brady, dominates the rheology of the ER fluid at large electric field strengths. At the sametime the electrostatic

  10. Fluid delivery control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoff, Brian D.; Johnson, Kris William; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Akasam, Sivaprasad

    2006-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of controlling the delivery of fluid to an engine includes receiving a fuel flow rate signal. An electric pump is arranged to deliver fluid to the engine. The speed of the electric pump is controlled based on the fuel flow rate signal.

  11. SUMMER PROGRAM IN GEOPHYSICAL FLUID DYNAMICS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrison, Philip J.,

    JUNE 20-AUGUST 26, 2011 Norman Lebovitz and Phil Morrison, codirectors #12;ii Preface The theme, Keiji Kimura, Norman Lebovitz (standing) Third row (left to right): Ed Spiegel (standing), Karl Helfrich, Unknown, Stefan LlewellynSmith, Philip Hall, Greg Chini, Jan Feys, Andrew Crosby, John Gibson

  12. Fluid Dynamics IB Dr Natalia Berloff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , say, w = where the dot denotes the time derivative, and likewise in the second tube, where w = 2 2 of the jet problem.) §3.4.4 Bubbles and cavities: oscillations and collapse This is another

  13. Fluid Dynamics 4 J. G. Eggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggers, Jens

    to the large scale distribution of matter in the universe. For most of the 20th century, it has been of propane coming out of a gold nozzle 6 nm in diameter, from Moseler and Landman, Science 289, 1165 (2000). There are about 2 × 105 propane molecules in this simulation. On the left, one sees the formation of the jet

  14. OpenFOAM: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ global → local andOpenEI

  15. OpenFOAM: Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeeding accessSpeedingOctoberResearchOpen→ global → local

  16. Fluid blade disablement tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jakaboski, Juan-Carlos (Albuquerque, NM); Hughs, Chance G. (Albuquerque, NM); Todd, Steven N. (Rio Rancho, NM)

    2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid blade disablement (FBD) tool that forms both a focused fluid projectile that resembles a blade, which can provide precision penetration of a barrier wall, and a broad fluid projectile that functions substantially like a hammer, which can produce general disruption of structures behind the barrier wall. Embodiments of the FBD tool comprise a container capable of holding fluid, an explosive assembly which is positioned within the container and which comprises an explosive holder and explosive, and a means for detonating. The container has a concavity on the side adjacent to the exposed surface of the explosive. The position of the concavity relative to the explosive and its construction of materials with thicknesses that facilitate inversion and/or rupture of the concavity wall enable the formation of a sharp and coherent blade of fluid advancing ahead of the detonation gases.

  17. A two-fluid model for relativistic heat conduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Monsalvo, César S. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (Mexico)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago it was presented in these proceedings the relativistic dynamics of a multi-fluid system together with various applications to a set of topical problems [1]. In this talk, I will start from such dynamics and present a covariant formulation of relativistic thermodynamics which provides us with a causal constitutive equation for the propagation of heat in a relativistic setting.

  18. Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

  19. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL FOR NUMERICAL METHODS IN FLUIDS Int. J. Numer. Meth. Fluids 2000; 00:16 Prepared using fldauth.cls [Version: 2002/09/18 v1.01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iske, Armin

    in Computational Fluid Dynamic Models L. Bonaventura , A. Iske, E. Miglio MOX ­ Modellistica e Calcolo Scientifico challenging problems of high- dimensional approximation. Correspondence to: MOX ­ Modellistica e Calcolo

  20. Multiphase fluid characterization system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement system and method for permitting multiple independent measurements of several physical parameters of multiphase fluids flowing through pipes are described. Multiple acoustic transducers are placed in acoustic communication with or attached to the outside surface of a section of existing spool (metal pipe), typically less than 3 feet in length, for noninvasive measurements. Sound speed, sound attenuation, fluid density, fluid flow, container wall resonance characteristics, and Doppler measurements for gas volume fraction may be measured simultaneously by the system. Temperature measurements are made using a temperature sensor for oil-cut correction.

  1. Supercritical fluid extraction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

  2. General purpose steam table library : CASL L3:THM.CFD.P7.04 milestone report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, John H.; Belcourt, Noel; Nourgaliev, Robert

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Completion of the CASL L3 milestone THM.CFD.P7.04 provides a general purpose tabular interpolation library for material properties to support, in particular, standardized models for steam properties. The software consists of three parts, implementations of analytic steam models, a code to generate tables from those models, and an interpolation package to interface the tables to CFD codes such as Hydra-TH. Verification of the standard model is maintained through the entire train of routines. The performance of interpolation package exceeds that of freely available analytic implementation of the steam properties by over an order of magnitude.

  3. Basic fluid system trainer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Semans, Joseph P. (Uniontown, PA); Johnson, Peter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F. (Clairton, PA); Kromka, Joseph A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goron, Ronald H. (Connellsville, PA); Hay, George D. (Venetia, PA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  4. Basic fluid system trainer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Semans, J.P.; Johnson, P.G.; LeBoeuf, R.F. Jr.; Kromka, J.A.; Goron, R.H.; Hay, G.D.

    1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention, a trainer mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

  5. Circulating Fluid Bed Combustor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraley, L. D.; Do, L. N.; Hsiao, K. H.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The circulating bed combustor represents an alternative concept of burning coal in fluid bed technology, which offers distinct advantages over both the current conventional fluidized bed combustion system and the pulverized coal boilers equipped...

  6. Phoresis in fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, Howard

    This paper presents a unified theory of phoretic phenomena in single-component fluids. Simple formulas are given for the phoretic velocities of small inert force-free non-Brownian particles migrating through otherwise ...

  7. Fluid pumping apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus suitable for coupling seismic or other downhole sensors to a borehole wall in high temperature and pressure environments. In one embodiment, one or more metal bellows mounted to a sensor module are inflated to clamp the sensor module within the borehole and couple an associated seismic sensor to a borehole wall. Once the sensing operation is complete, the bellows are deflated and the sensor module is unclamped by deflation of the metal bellows. In a further embodiment, a magnetic drive pump in a pump module is used to supply fluid pressure for inflating the metal bellows using borehole fluid or fluid from a reservoir. The pump includes a magnetic drive motor configured with a rotor assembly to be exposed to borehole fluid pressure including a rotatable armature for driving an impeller and an associated coil under control of electronics isolated from borehole pressure.

  8. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Heat Transfer In Nanoscale Liquid Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Bo Hung

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of nano-scale flows typically utilize fixed lattice crystal interactions between the fluid and stationary wall molecules. This approach cannot properly model thermal interactions at the wall-fluid interface...

  9. 13.811 Advanced Structural Dynamics and Acoustics, Spring 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Henrik

    Foundations of 3D elasticity. Fluid and elastic wave equations. Elastic and plastic waves in rods and beams. Waves in plates. Interaction with an acoustic fluid. Dynamics and acoustics of cylindrical shells. Radiation and ...

  10. CFD Simulation of 3D Flow field in a Gas Centrifuge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongjun Jiang; Shi Zeng [Tsinghua University, Beijing, 100084 (China)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CFD method was used to study the whole flow field in a gas centrifuge. In this paper, the VSM (Vector Splitting Method) of the FVM (Finite Volume Method) was used to solve the 3D Navier-Stokes equations. An implicit second-order upwind scheme was adopted. The numerical simulation was successfully performed on a parallel cluster computer and a convergence result was obtained. The simulation shows that: in the withdrawal chamber, a strong detached shock wave is formed in front of the scoop; as the radial position increases, the shock becomes stronger and the distance to scoop front surface is smaller. An oblique shock forms in the clearance between the scoop and the centrifuge wall; behind the shock-wave, the radially-inward motion of gas is induced because of the imbalance of the pressure gradient and the centrifugal force. In the separation chamber, a countercurrent is introduced. This indicates that CFD method can be used to study the complex three-dimensional flow field of gas centrifuges. (authors)

  11. A CFD M&S PROCESS FOR FAST REACTOR FUEL ASSEMBLIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurt D. Hamman; Ray A. Berry

    2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A CFD modeling and simulation process for large-scale problems using an arbitrary fast reactor fuel assembly design was evaluated. Three dimensional flow distributions of sodium for several fast reactor fuel assembly pin spacing configurations were simulated on high performance computers using commercial CFD software. This research focused on 19-pin fuel assembly “benchmark” geometry, similar in design to the Advanced Burner Test Reactor, where each pin is separated by helical wire-wrap spacers. Several two-equation turbulence models including the k-e and SST (Menter) k-? were evaluated. Considerable effort was taken to resolve the momentum boundary layer, so as to eliminate the need for wall functions and reduce computational uncertainty. High performance computers were required to generate the hybrid meshes needed to predict secondary flows created by the wire-wrap spacers; computational meshes ranging from 65 to 85 million elements were common. A general validation methodology was followed, including mesh refinement and comparison of numerical results with empirical correlations. Predictions for velocity, temperature, and pressure distribution are shown. The uncertainty of numerical models, importance of high fidelity experimental data, and the challenges associated with simulating and validating large production-type problems are presented.

  12. Valve for fluid control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Oborny, Michael C. (Albuquerque, NM); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve for controlling fluid flows. This valve, which includes both an actuation device and a valve body provides: the ability to incorporate both the actuation device and valve into a unitary structure that can be placed onto a microchip, the ability to generate higher actuation pressures and thus control higher fluid pressures than conventional microvalves, and a device that draws only microwatts of power. An electrokinetic pump that converts electric potential to hydraulic force is used to operate, or actuate, the valve.

  13. Tactic behaviors in bacterial dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekora, Michael David

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The locomotion of a wide class of motile bacteria can be mathematically described as a biased random walk in three-dimensional space. Fluid mechanics and probability theory are invoked to model the dynamics of bacteria ...

  14. Fluorescent fluid interface position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2004-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A new fluid interface position sensor has been developed, which is capable of optically determining the location of an interface between an upper fluid and a lower fluid, the upper fluid having a larger refractive index than a lower fluid. The sensor functions by measurement, of fluorescence excited by an optical pump beam which is confined within a fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the lower fluid, but escapes from the fluorescent waveguide where that waveguide is in optical contact with the upper fluid.

  15. Using CFD Capabilities of CONTAM 3.0 for Simulating Airflow and Contaminant Transport In and Around Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    .0 for simulating airflow and contaminant transport in and around buildings," Accepted by HVAC&R Research. #121 Using CFD Capabilities of CONTAM 3.0 for Simulating Airflow and Contaminant Transport In and Around Buildings Liangzhu (Leon) Wang, W. Stuart Dols1 Qingyan Chen2 1 Indoor Air Quality and Ventilation

  16. 6th International Conference on CFD in Oil & Gas, Metallurgical and Process Industries SINTEF/NTNU, Trondheim NORWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bothe, Dieter

    INTRODUCTION The efficiency of gas-liquid rectors like bubble columns, air-lift or agitated stirred reactors. Especially in case of fast reactions the effi- ciency of chemical reactors significantly depends on the mass6th International Conference on CFD in Oil & Gas, Metallurgical and Process Industries SINTEF

  17. CFD Analysis of a Novel High Speed Rotary On/Off Valve 283 Proc. of 6th

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    section, and outlet turbine. A CFD model is created for each section, and then verified. The equations that predict the valve performance has been validated for the inlet rail with nozzles and the outlet turbine, valve design, throttle-less control 1 INTRODUCTION Hydraulic actuation systems have been widely used due

  18. CFD Analysis of Core Bypass Flow and Crossflow in the Prismatic Very High Temperature Gas-cooled Nuclear Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Huhu 1985-

    2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    if the large portion of the coolant flows into bypass gaps instead of coolant channels in which the cooling efficiency is much higher. A preliminary three dimensional steady-state CFD analysis was performed with commercial code STARCCM+ 6.04 to investigate...

  19. Inverse Design Methods for Indoor Ventilation Systems Using1 CFD-Based Multi-Objective Genetic Algorithm2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    use efficiency are three important29 indices for heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC1 Inverse Design Methods for Indoor Ventilation Systems Using1 CFD-Based Multi equilibrium and require ventilation rates of12 a space to design ventilation systems for the space

  20. 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 2D Axisymmetric Coupled CFD-kinetics Modeling of a Nonthermal Arc Plasma Torch for Diesel Fuel-assisted diesel fuel reformer developed for two different applications: (i) onboard H2 production for fuel cell. In the first case, diesel fuel reacts with air while in the second case it reacts with diesel engine exhaust

  1. 16th Int Symp on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 912 July, 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    16th Int Symp on Applications of Laser Techniques to Fluid Mechanics Lisbon, Portugal, 9­12 July we compare state-of-the-art fluid motion estimation algorithms with respect to the application information to retrieve the motion. 1. Introduction Todays image motion algorithms in fluid dynamics

  2. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

  3. Fluid driven reciprocating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, J.C.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus is described comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached. 13 figs.

  4. Fluid driven recipricating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Whitehead, John C. (Davis, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus comprising a pair of fluid driven pump assemblies in a back-to-back configuration to yield a bi-directional pump. Each of the pump assemblies includes a piston or diaphragm which divides a chamber therein to define a power section and a pumping section. An intake-exhaust valve is connected to each of the power sections of the pump chambers, and function to direct fluid, such as compressed air, into the power section and exhaust fluid therefrom. At least one of the pistons or diaphragms is connected by a rod assembly which is constructed to define a signal valve, whereby the intake-exhaust valve of one pump assembly is controlled by the position or location of the piston or diaphragm in the other pump assembly through the operation of the rod assembly signal valve. Each of the pumping sections of the pump assemblies are provided with intake and exhaust valves to enable filling of the pumping section with fluid and discharging fluid therefrom when a desired pressure has been reached.

  5. Hazardous fluid leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gray, Harold E. (Las Vegas, NV); McLaurin, Felder M. (Las Vegas, NV); Ortiz, Monico (Las Vegas, NV); Huth, William A. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device or system for monitoring for the presence of leaks from a hazardous fluid is disclosed which uses two electrodes immersed in deionized water. A gas is passed through an enclosed space in which a hazardous fluid is contained. Any fumes, vapors, etc. escaping from the containment of the hazardous fluid in the enclosed space are entrained in the gas passing through the enclosed space and transported to a closed vessel containing deionized water and two electrodes partially immersed in the deionized water. The electrodes are connected in series with a power source and a signal, whereby when a sufficient number of ions enter the water from the gas being bubbled through it (indicative of a leak), the water will begin to conduct, thereby allowing current to flow through the water from one electrode to the other electrode to complete the circuit and activate the signal.

  6. Development of an analytical model for organic-fluid fouling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Panchal, C.B.; Watkinson, A.P.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research goal of this project is to determine ways to effectively mitigate fouling in organic fluids: hydrocarbons and derived fluids. The fouling research focuses on the development of methodology for determining threshold conditions for fouling. Initially, fluid containing chemicals known to produce foulant is analyzed; subsequently, fouling of industrial fluids is investigated. The fouling model developed for determining the effects of physical parameters is the subject of this report. The fouling model is developed on the premise that the chemical reaction for generation of precursor can take place in the bulk fluid, in the thermal-boundary layer, or at the fluid/wall interface, depending upon the interactive effects of fluid dynamics, heat and mass transfer, and the controlling chemical reaction. In the analysis, the experimental data are examined for fouling deposition of polyperoxide produced by autoxidation of indene in kerosene. The effects of fluid and wall temperatures for two flow geometries are analyzed. The results show that the relative effects of physical parameters on the fouling rate differ for the three fouling mechanisms. Therefore, to apply the closed-flow-loop data to industrial conditions, the controlling mechanism must be identified.

  7. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING...

  8. assessing dynamic magnetic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Assessment of Carotid Flow Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computational Fluid Dynamics) direct, model-independent velocity mapping using flow-encoded magnetic resonance...

  9. annual carbon dynamics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fluid animation. Keywords: Natural phenomena, physically Frey, Pascal 28 Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Geosciences...

  10. MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS J. Drelich Ch. Fang C.L. White Michigan been used to measure interfacial tensions between immisci- ble fluid phases. A recent monograph sources of information on the in- terfacial tension measurement methods include selected chapters in Refs

  11. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  12. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  13. Geophysical Fluid Dynamics What does the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory do for the Nation?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) 2015 President's budget request for modeling system for predictions and projections on time scales from days to decades. The Fiscal Year (FY

  14. Method and apparatus for controlling fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, J.R.

    1980-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for precisely controlling the rate (and hence amount) of fluid flow are given. The controlled flow rate is finely adjustable, can be extremely small (on the order of microliter-atmospheres per second), can be adjusted to zero (flow stopped), and is stable to better than 1% with time. The dead volume of the valve can be made arbitrarily small, in fact essentially zero. The valve employs no wearing mechanical parts (including springs, stems, or seals). The valve is finely adjustable, has a flow rate dynamic range of many decades, can be made compatible with any fluid, and is suitable for incorporation into an open or closed loop servo-control system.

  15. Unsteady adjoint analysis for output sensitivity and mesh adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krakos, Joshua Ambre

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adjoint analysis in computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has been applied to design optimization and mesh adaptation, but due to the relative expense of unsteady analysis these applications have predominantly been for steady ...

  16. Assessment and Prediction of the Thermal Performance of a Centralized Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage Utilizing Artificial Neural Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    El-Sawi, A.; Haghighat, F.; Akbari, H.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation tool is developed to analyze the thermal performance of a centralized latent heat thermal energy storage system (LHTES) using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The LHTES system is integrated with a mechanical ventilation system...

  17. Calculation of unsteady turbulent flow around obstacles using the large eddy simulation turbulence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, Donald McLean

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The premise of the work presented here is to use a common analytical tool, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), along with a prevalent turbulence model, Large Eddy Simulation (LES), to study the flow past rectangular cylinders. In an attempt to use...

  18. Study of Impact of Orbit Path, Whirl Ratio and Clearance on the Flow Field and Rotordynamic Coefficients for a Smooth Annular Seal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekaran, Aarthi

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of the effect of different orbit paths and whirl ratios on the rotordynamic coefficients of a smooth eccentric annular seal, using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) was performed. The flow was simulated for two different orbits - linear...

  19. CX-004511: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Displacement and Mixing in Subsea Jumpers Experimental Data and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD)CX(s) Applied: A9, A11Date: 11/22/2010Location(s): Tulsa, OklahomaOffice(s): Fossil Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. Numerical Investigation of Thermal Hydraulic Behavior of Supercritical Carbon Dioxide in Compact Heat Exchangers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fatima, Roma

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    volume method using a commercial software FLUENT. Three dimensional Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models were developed to simulate the flow and heat transfer for three different geometries – a single semi-circular channel, a series of nine parallel...

  1. Design of high efficiency blowers for future aerosol applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chadha, Raman

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    (1000 PA). Commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software, FLUENT 6.1.22, was used extensively throughout the entire design cycle. The machine, Reynolds number (Re) , was around 10^5 suggesting a turbulent flow field. Renormalization Group (RNG...

  2. Numerical Simulation of the Flow Field in 3D Eccentric Annular and 2D Centered Labyrinth Seals for Comparison with Experimental LDA Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijaykumar, Anand

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow field in an annular seal is simulated for synchronous circular whirl orbits with 60Hz whirl frequency and a clearance/radius ratio of 0.0154 using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code. Fluent's Moving ...

  3. Numerical Analysis of Water Temperature Distribution in the Tank of ASHPWH it ha Cylindrical Condenser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, D.; Shan, S.; Wang, R.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    presented a mathematic model for a cylindrical water tank with a cylindrical condenser as its heat source. The computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software package, FLUENT, was used to study hot water temperature distribution in the tank of the ASHPWH...

  4. Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Tidal Current Energy Extraction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Xiaojing

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical and experimental investigations of tidal current energy extraction have been conducted in this study. A laboratory-scale water flume was simulated using commercial computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code FLUENT. ...

  5. Shock Capturing with PDE-Based Artificial Viscosity for an Adaptive, Higher-Order Discontinuous Galerkin Finite Element Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barter, Garrett Ehud

    The accurate simulation of supersonic and hypersonic flows is well suited to higher-order (p > 1), adaptive computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Since these cases involve flow velocities greater than the speed of sound, an ...

  6. Shock capturing with PDE-based artificial viscosity for an adaptive, higher-order discontinuous Galerkin finite element method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barter, Garrett E. (Garrett Ehud), 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The accurate simulation of supersonic and hypersonic flows is well suited to higher-order (p > 1), adaptive computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Since these cases involve flow velocities greater than the speed of sound, an ...

  7. Determination of Intrinsic Material Flammability Properties from Material Tests assisted by Numerical Modelling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhaus, Thomas

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes are being increasingly used in the field of fire safety engineering. They provide, amongst other things, velocity, species and heat flux distributions throughout the computational ...

  8. The inline virtual impactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshadri, Satyanarayanan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A circumferential slot In-line Virtual Impactor (IVI) has been designed using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation tools and experimentally characterized using monodispersed liquid aerosols to validate simulation results. The base design...

  9. Domain decomposition preconditioners for higher-order discontinuous Galerkin discretizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diosady, Laslo Tibor

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic flows involve features with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales which need to be resolved in order to accurately predict desired engineering quantities. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has ...

  10. 3510r 2010 American Chemical Society pubs.acs.org/EF Energy Fuels 2010, 24, 35103516 : DOI:10.1021/ef100249w

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    and gaseousfuels derivedfrom biomass arebeing researchedfor use in the transportation sector.3 These fuels include time when incor- porated into computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models. The multi-step model presented

  11. Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Numerical modeling of heat transfer and fluid flow in rotor-stator cavities with throughflow S modeling of the turbulent flow in a rotor-stator cavity subjected to a superimposed throughflow with heat the dynamical effects from the heat transfer process. The fluid flow in an enclosed disk system with axial

  12. Statistical Estimation of Fluid Flow Fields Johnny Chang David Edwards Yizhou Yu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Yizhou

    their motion fields. 1 Introduction Dynamic fluids, such as rivers, ocean waves, moving clouds, smoke and fires (4) where is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid, is its den- sity and f is an external force scale. A good ex- ample is the changing surface geometry of a water surface. This is because the self

  13. Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids Jacobus A. van Meel*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Posch, Harald A.

    Lyapunov instability of rough hard-disk fluids Jacobus A. van Meel* FOM Institute for Atomic The dynamical instability of rough hard-disk fluids in two dimensions is characterized through the Lyapunov, measured by the maximum Lyapunov exponent, is only enhanced by the rotational degrees of freedom for high

  14. Coalescence of bubbles and drops in an outer fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph D. Paulsen; Rémi Carmigniani; Anerudh Kannan; Justin C. Burton; Sidney R. Nagel

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    When two liquid drops touch, a microscopic connecting liquid bridge forms and rapidly grows as the two drops merge into one. Whereas coalescence has been thoroughly studied when drops coalesce in vacuum or air, many important situations involve coalescence in a dense surrounding fluid, such as oil coalescence in brine. Here we study the merging of gas bubbles and liquid drops in an external fluid. Our data indicate that the flows occur over much larger length scales in the outer fluid than inside the drops themselves. Thus we find that the asymptotic early regime is always dominated by the viscosity of the drops, independent of the external fluid. A phase diagram showing the crossovers into the different possible late-time dynamics identifies a dimensionless number that signifies when the external viscosity can be important.

  15. Ris-R-1543(EN) Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1543(EN) Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using CFD Jeppe Johansen and Niels N. Sørensen Title: Aerodynamic investigation of Winglets on Wind Turbine Blades using of the aerodynamics around a wind turbine blade with a winglet using Computational Fluid Dynamics, CFD. Five winglets

  16. The tangential velocity profile and momentum transfer within a microgravity, vortex separator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis, Michael Clay

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    must be understood. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), in the form of Adapco’s Star-CD, is used, along with laboratory testing, to accomplish this goal. Furthermore, as analysis aids for the laboratory data and CFD results, relationships for radial...

  17. Facility Siting and Layout Optimization Based on Process Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Seungho

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    -computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to compare the difference between the initial layout and the final layout in order to see how obstacles and separation distances affect the dispersion or overpressures of affected facilities. One of the CFD programs, ANSYS...

  18. The effects of obstacle geometry on jet mixing in releases of silane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sposato, Christina F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Releases of silane into air and the effects of obstacles were modeled with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, FLUENT. First the CFD code simulated the release of a free turbulent jet of silane into air to assure that the code agreed...

  19. International Conference on Ocean Energy, 6 October, Bilbao Computational Analysis of Ducted Turbine Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Turbine Performance M. Shives1 and C. Crawford2 Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria turbine designs using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation. Analytical model coefficients is proposed for the base pressure coefficient. Keywords: base-pressure, CFD, diffuser-augmented turbine, tidal

  20. An Application of Graph Based Evolutionary Algorithms for Diversity Preservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashlock, Dan

    to a thermal systems engineering design problem - the design of a biomass cook stove currently in use in Central America. Fitness evaluation involves the use of computational fluid dynamics(CFD) modeling machine yielding a large, fixed per- formance increase. Second, the resolution of the mesh for CFD

  1. Wind power resource assessment in complex urban environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) methods holds potential for the advancement of wind energy resource buildings. CFD simulations have been used to evaluate the wind energy potential on the campus. 2 Objectives The aim of this study is to assess wind energy resource on the MIT campus for potential

  2. Drop Formation and Breakup of Low Viscosity Elastic Fluids: Effects of Molecular Weight and Concentration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tirtaatmadja, Viyada

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamics of drop formation and pinch-off have been investigated for a series of low viscosity elastic fluids possessing similar shear viscosities, but differing substantially in elastic properties. On initial approach ...

  3. Encapsulated Nanoparticle Synthesis and Characterization for Improved Storage Fluids: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glatzmaier, G. C.; Pradhan, S.; Kang, J.; Curtis, C.; Blake, D.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nanoparticles are typically composed of 50--500 atoms and exhibit properties that are significantly different from the properties of larger, macroscale particles that have the same composition. The addition of these particles to traditional fluids may improve the fluids' thermophysical properties. As an example, the addition of a nanoparticle or set of nanoparticles to a storage fluid may double its heat capacity. This increase in heat capacity would allow a sensible thermal energy storage system to store the same amount of thermal energy in half the amount of storage fluid. The benefit is lower costs for the storage fluid and the storage tanks, resulting in lower-cost electricity. The goal of this long-term research is to create a new class of fluids that enable concentrating solar power plants to operate with greater efficiency and lower electricity costs. Initial research on this topic developed molecular dynamic models that predicted the energy states and transition temperatures for these particles. Recent research has extended the modeling work, along with initiating the synthesis and characterization of bare metal nanoparticles and metal nanoparticles that are encapsulated with inert silica coatings. These particles possess properties that make them excellent candidates for enhancing the heat capacity of storage fluids.

  4. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  5. Fluid bed material transfer method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinske, Jr., Edward E. (Akron, OH)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

  6. Viscous dark fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Folomeev; V. Gurovich

    2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The unified dark energy and dark matter model within the framework of a model of a continuous medium with bulk viscosity (dark fluid) is considered. It is supposed that the bulk viscosity coefficient is an arbitrary function of the Hubble parameter. The choice of this function is carried out under the requirement to satisfy the observational data from recombination ($z\\approx 1000$) till present time.

  7. BEE 3310. Bio-Fluid Mechanics Fall Semester 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    /8/08 Ethical behavior statement: Home work assignments are due every Wednesday at the beginning of the class of continuity; conservations of mass, energy and momentum and their applications; laminar and turbulent flows · Hydrostatics, and fluid dynamics -- conservations of mass, energy, and momentum and their applications

  8. FLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER OF ELECTRON FLOW IN SEMICONDUCTORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sen, Mihir

    = heat, f = LO-mode, g = LO, h = LA-mode, i = negligible, j = remote heat sink 7/ 70 #12;Heat conductionFLUID MECHANICS AND HEAT TRANSFER OF ELECTRON FLOW IN SEMICONDUCTORS Mihir Sen Department · Shallow water analogy · Vorticity dynamics · Linear stability analysis · Numerical simulations of heat

  9. PAPER B3: PHYSICS OF FLUID FLOWS Hilary Term 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Read, Peter L.

    ,...) · Aerodynamics ­ important advances in fluid dynamics c. 1900 ­ still active today · Lubrication of mechanical systems · Industry ­ e.g. gases in pipes, polymer flows · Oil extraction ­ liquids flowing through eff n, where `effective diameter' deff 0.3 nm, say. 2 � 10-7 m = 200 nm. In FD, we consider scales

  10. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  11. Fluid flow in the earth's crust plays an important role in a number of geologic processes. In carbonate reservoirs, fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the first order). The dynamic elastic properties of the rock are determined by adding the com- pliance steps, and thus the elastic properties of the rock, for the seismic modeling. The simulation allows us processes--hydraulic frac- turing or induced seismicity--depending on the fluid and rock properties

  12. Vortex dynamics in 4 Banavara N. Shashikanth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shashikanth, Banavara N.

    Vortex dynamics in 4 Banavara N. Shashikanth Citation: J. Math. Phys. 53, 013103 (2012); doi: 10 OF MATHEMATICAL PHYSICS 53, 013103 (2012) Vortex dynamics in R4 Banavara N. Shashikantha) Mechanical and Aerospace dynamics of Euler's equations for a constant density fluid flow in R4 is studied. Most of the paper focuses

  13. A new and effective method for thermostatting confined fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Luca, Sergio; Todd, B. D., E-mail: btodd@swin.edu.au [Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Engineering and Technology, and Centre for Molecular Simulation, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Victoria 3122 (Australia); Hansen, J. S. [DNRF Center “Glass and Time,” IMFUFA, Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)] [DNRF Center “Glass and Time,” IMFUFA, Department of Science, Systems and Models, Roskilde University, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Daivis, Peter J. [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)] [School of Applied Sciences, RMIT University, Melbourne, Victoria 3001 (Australia)

    2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a simple thermostatting method suitable for nanoconfined fluid systems. Two conventional strategies involve thermostatting the fluid directly or employing a thermal wall that couples only the wall atoms with the thermostat. When only a thermal wall is implemented, the temperature control of the fluid is true to the actual experiment and the heat is transferred from the fluid to the walls. However, for large or complex systems it can often be computationally prohibitive to employ thermal walls. To overcome this limitation many researchers choose to freeze wall atoms and instead apply a synthetic thermostat to the fluid directly through the equations of motion. This, however, can have serious consequences for the mechanical, thermodynamic, and dynamical properties of the fluid by introducing unphysical behaviour into the system [Bernardi et al., J. Chem. Phys. 132, 244706 (2010)]. In this paper, we propose a simple scheme which enables working with both frozen walls and naturally thermostatted liquids. This is done by superimposing the walls with oscillating particles, which vibrate on the edge of the fluid control volume. These particles exchange energy with the fluid molecules, but do not interact with wall atoms or each other, thus behaving as virtual particles. Their displacements violate the Lindemann criterion for melting, in such a way that the net effect would not amount to an additional confining surface. One advantage over standard techniques is the reduced computational cost, particularly for large walls, since they can be kept rigid. Another advantage over accepted strategies is the opportunity to freeze complex charged walls such as ?-cristobalite. The method furthermore overcomes the problem with polar fluids such as water, as thermalized charged surfaces require higher spring constants to preserve structural stability, due to the effects of strong Coulomb interactions, thus inevitably degrading the thermostatting efficiency.

  14. Viscous fluid sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Savva, Nikos

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general theory for the dynamics of thin viscous sheets. Employing concepts from differential geometry and tensor calculus we derive the governing equations in terms of a coordinate system that moves with the ...

  15. CO{sub 2} adsorption: Experimental investigation with kinetics verification and CFD reactor model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breault, Ronald W, [U.S. DOE; Huckaby, Ernest D. [U.S. DOE; Shadle, Lawrence J [U.S. DOE; Spenik, James L. [REM Engineering PLLC

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Technology Laboratory is investigating a new process for CO{sub 2} capture from large sources such as utility power generation facilities as an alternative to liquid amine based absorption processes. Many, but not all of these advanced dry processes are based upon sorbents composed of supported polyamines. In this analysis, experiments have been conducted in a small facility at different temperatures and compared to CFD reactor predictions using kinetics obtained from TGA tests. This particular investigation compares the predicted performance and the experimental performance of one of these new class of sorbents in a fluidized bed reactor. In the experiment, the sorbent absorbs CO{sub 2} from simulated flue gas in a riser reactor, separates the carbonated particles from the de-carbonated flue gas in a cyclone and then regenerates the sorbent, creating a concentrated stream of pure CO{sub 2} for sequestration. In this work, experimental measurements of adsorption are compared to predictions from a 3-dimensional non-isothermal reacting multiphase flow model. The effects of the gas flow rate and reactor temperature are explored. It is shown that the time duration for CO{sub 2} adsorption decreased for an increase in the gas flow. The details of the experimental facility and the model as well as the comparative analysis between the data and the simulation results are discussed.

  16. Mixing models for the two-way-coupling of CFD codes and zero-dimensional multi-zone codes to model HCCI combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barths, H. [HFV6 Performance and Emissions, GM Powertrain, MC: 480-712-140, 30003 Van Dyke Ave, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Felsch, C.; Peters, N. [Institut fuer Technische Verbrennung, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 64, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is the development of a consistent mixing model for the two-way-coupling of a CFD code and a multi-zone code based on multiple zero-dimensional reactors. The two-way-coupling allows for a computationally efficient modeling of HCCI combustion. The physical domain in the CFD code is subdivided into multiple zones based on three phase variables (fuel mixture fraction, dilution, and total enthalpy). Those phase variables are sufficient for the description of the thermodynamic state of each zone, assuming that each zone is at the same pressure. Each zone in the CFD code is represented by a corresponding zone in the zero-dimensional code. The zero-dimensional code solves the chemistry for each zone, and the heat release is fed back into the CFD code. The difficulty in facing this kind of methodology is to keep the thermodynamic state of each zone consistent between the CFD code and the zero-dimensional code after the initialization of the zones in the multi-zone code has taken place. The thermodynamic state of each zone (and thereby the phase variables) will change in time due to mixing and source terms (e.g., vaporization of fuel, wall heat transfer). The focus of this work lies on a consistent description of the mixing between the zones in phase space in the zero-dimensional code, based on the solution of the CFD code. Two mixing models with different degrees of accuracy, complexity, and numerical effort are described. The most elaborate mixing model (and an appropriate treatment of the source terms) keeps the thermodynamic state of the zones in the CFD code and the zero-dimensional code identical. The models are applied to a test case of HCCI combustion in an engine. (author)

  17. Mixing models for the two-way-coupling of CFD codes and zero-dimensional multi-zone codes to model HCCI combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barths, H. [HFV6 Performance and Emissions, GM Powertrain, MC: 480-712-140, 30003 Van Dyke Ave, Warren, MI 48090 (United States); Felsch, C.; Peters, N. [Institut fuer Technische Verbrennung, RWTH Aachen University, Templergraben 64, 52056 Aachen (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this work is the development of a consistent mixing model for the two-way-coupling of a CFD code and a multi-zone code based on multiple zero-dimensional reactors. The two-way-coupling allows for a computationally efficient modeling of HCCI combustion. The physical domain in the CFD code is subdivided into multiple zones based on three phase variables (fuel mixture fraction, dilution, and total enthalpy). Those phase variables are sufficient for the description of the thermodynamic state of each zone, assuming that each zone is at the same pressure. Each zone in the CFD code is represented by a corresponding zone in the zero-dimensional code. The zero-dimensional code solves the chemistry for each zone, and the heat release is fed back into the CFD code. The difficulty in facing this kind of methodology is to keep the thermodynamic state of each zone consistent between the CFD code and the zero-dimensional code after the initialization of the zones in the multi-zone code has taken place. The thermodynamic state of each zone (and thereby the phase variables) will change in time due to mixing and source terms (e.g., vaporization of fuel, wall heat transfer). The focus of this work lies on a consistent description of the mixing between the zones in phase space in the zero-dimensional code, based on the solution of the CFD code. Two mixing models with different degrees of accuracy, complexity, and numerical effort are described. The most elaborate mixing model (and an appropriate treatment of the source terms) keeps the thermodynamic state of the zones in the CFD code and the zero-dimensional code identical. The models are applied to a test case of HCCI combustion in an engine. (author)

  18. LUBRICANTS AND HYDRAULIC FLUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Engineer Manual Department

    Contents) Major General, USA Chief of Staff i Table of Contents Purpose ........................................................ 1-1 1-1 Applicability .................................................... 1-2 1-1 References ...................................................... 1-3 1-1 Distribution Statement ............................................. 1-4 1-1 Scope ......................................................... 1-5 1-2 Friction ........................................................ 2-1 2-1 Wear .......................................................... 2-2 2-4 Lubrication and Lubricants ......................................... 2-3 2-6 Hydrodynamic or Fluid Film Lubrication ............................... 2-4 2-6 Boundary Lubrication ............................................. 2-5 2-8 Extreme Pressure (EP) Lubrication ................................... 2-6 2-9 Elastohydrodynamic (EHD) Lubrication ................................ 2-7 2-9 Oil R

  19. EXPERIMENTING WITH FLUIDS OC-569a Winter 2010 GFD lab: Ocean Sciences Bldg. Rm 107; teaching lab: Ocean Teaching Building Rm 206

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , interactions of fluids with solid boundaries, with gases, or with membranes (opening on a vast topic might want to experiment with turbulence, or with fluid energy devices, like hydrogen fuel cells or basic Stirling engines. There are so few fluid dynamics labs in the world that meaningful and unique

  20. Self-regulation in Self-Propelled Nematic Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aparna Baskaran; M. Cristina Marchetti

    2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the hydrodynamic theory of an active fluid of self-propelled particles with nematic aligning interactions. This class of materials has polar symmetry at the microscopic level, but forms macrostates of nematic symmetry. We highlight three key features of the dynamics. First, as in polar active fluids, the control parameter for the order-disorder transition, namely the density, is dynamically convected by active currents, resulting in a generic, model independent dynamical self-regulation that destabilizes the uniform nematic state near the mean-field transition. Secondly, curvature driven currents render the system unstable deep in the nematic state, as found previously. Finally, and unique to self-propelled nematics, nematic order induces local polar order that in turn leads to the growth of density fluctuations. We propose this as a possible mechanism for the smectic order of polar clusters seen in numerical simulations.