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1

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2013 Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of...

2

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

3

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection Ancient Lava Flows Trap CO2 for Long-Term Storage in Big Sky Injection August 13, 2013 - 1:59pm Addthis Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey Photo by J.D. Griggs, courtesy of U.S.Geological Survey For Additional Information To learn more about the carbon storage projects in which NETL is involved, please visit the NETL Carbon Storage website How can a prehistoric volcanic eruption help us reduce the amount of CO2 released into the atmosphere today? The answer is found in the basalt formations created by the lava - formations that can be used as sites for injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) captured from industrial sources in a process called carbon capture and storage (CCS).

4

Analysis of Mineral Trapping for CO2 Disposal in Deep Aquifers  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping for CO 2 Disposal in Deep Saline Arenaceous Aquifers Tianfu Xu, John A. Apps, and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract. A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO 2 disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO 2 injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO 2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not

5

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-isothermal CO2 flow through an injection well Orlando SilvaOrlando Silva #12; The Problem CO2 or gas injection well Questions Injection of scCO2 vs. gaseous CO2. Other relevant examples: - gas and therefore the CO2 injection rate. caprock reservoir geothermal gradient hydrostatic gradient well CO2 bubble

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

6

Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LETTERS Solubility trapping in formation water as dominant CO2 sink in natural gas fields Stuart M removal in nine natural gas fields in North America, China and Europe, using noble gas and carbon isotope tracers. The natural gas fields investigated in our study are dominated by a CO2 phase and provide

Haszeldine, Stuart

7

TOUGH+CO2: A multiphase fluid-flow simulator for CO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGH+CO"2 is a new simulator for modeling of CO"2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers. It is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 family of codes for multicomponent, multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation. The code accounts for heat ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Modeling, Multiphase flow, Parallel computing, Saline aquifer, TOUGH+, TOUGH2

Keni Zhang; George Moridis; Karsten Pruess

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Preliminary Geologic Modeling and Flow Simulation Study of CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

recovery of oil and gas from the reservoir. Even with the technological advances and long history of CO 2 injection in enhanced oil recovery operations, a number of unknowns still...

9

Pore-scale study of capillary trapping mechanism during CO2 injection in geological formations  

SciTech Connect

Geological sequestration of CO{sub 2} gas emerged as a promising solution for reducing amount of green house gases in atmosphere. A number of continuum scale models are available to describe the transport phenomena of CO{sub 2} sequestration. These models rely heavily on a phenomenological description of subsurface transport phenomena and the predictions can be highly uncertain. Pore-scale models provide a better understanding of fluid displacement processes, nonetheless such models are rare. In this work we use a Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model to study pore-scale displacement and capillary trapping mechanisms of super-critical CO{sub 2} in the subsurface. Simulations are carried out to investigate the effects of gravitational, viscous, and capillary forces in terms of Gravity, Capillary, and Bond numbers. Contrary to the other published continuum scale investigations, we found that not only Gravity number but also Capillary number plays an important role on the fate of injected CO{sub 2}. For large Gravity numbers (on the order of 10), most of the injected CO{sub 2} reaches the cap-rock due to gravity segregation. A significant portion of CO{sub 2} gets trapped by capillary forces when Gravity number is small (on the order of 0.1). When Gravity number is moderately high (on the order of 1), trapping patterns are heavily dependent on Capillary number. If Capillary number is very small (less than 0.001), then capillary forces dominate the buoyancy forces and a significant fraction of injected CO{sub 2} is trapped by the capillary forces. Conversely, if Capillary number is high (higher than 0.001), capillary trapping is relatively small since buoyancy dominates the capillary forces. In addition, our simulations reveal different types of capillary trapping and flow displacement mechanisms during and after injection. In gravity dominated cases leave behind was the widespread trapping mechanism. Division was the primary trapping mechanism in viscous dominated cases. In capillary dominated cases, snap-off of the CO{sub 2} plume is the most commonly observed displacement mechanism. Large CO{sub 2} blobs are created due to coalescence mechanism.

Bandara, Uditha C.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Palmer, Bruce J.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Trapping and Release of CO2 Guest Molecules by Amorphous Ice S. Malyk, G. Kumi, H. Reisler,* and C. Wittig*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

molecules occurs in two stages. The majority of the trapped 13CO2 escapes during the ASW-to-cubic ice phase and astrochemistry.5-11 There are several distinct H2O ice phases. Among these, amorphous ice has gained considerable of ice with respect to the crystalline phase.15 It is believed to be the most abundant component

Reisler, Hanna

11

Physical and Numerical Models of Pore-Scale Trapping of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations of deep geological carbon sequestration are being used to design field-scale implementations, predict their long-term performance, and evaluate associated risks. However, conventional field-scale simulators are unable to explicitly resolve the pore-scale processes that exert significant control on the migration and fate of supercritical CO2 in the subsurface. A combination of physical and numerical experiments with explicit pore-scale resolution are being performed in order to identify conditions under which continuum model approximations may fail, and to propose alternative simulation approaches that can be used in such cases.

Scheibe, Timothy D.; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Bandara, Uditha C.; Palmer, Bruce J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Zhang, Changyong; Bonneville, Alain HR

2011-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

12

NETL: Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst  

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Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst Delivery System Novel Flow Sheet for Low Energy CO2 Capture Enabled by Biocatalyst Delivery System Project No.: DE-FE0012862 Akermin is conducting laboratory and integrated bench-scale pilot testing to validate the performance of their next generation Biocatalyst Delivery System (BDS). This effort builds upon work conducted under a previous project. The novel system enables on-stream replacement of the catalyst and enables integration with an advanced process flow scheme. Akermin is exploring an enzyme-enabled advanced process flow scheme with non-volatile capture solutions, AKM-24 and potassium carbonate. The advanced process flow scheme is projected to have lower parasitic energy requirements and lower capital costs resulting in greater than 30 percent reduction in the cost of capture. The novel flow sheet enabled by the biocatalyst permits regeneration at lower temperatures allowing heat integration with the lowest grade steam from the power plant and minimizing water consumption. The existing 500 standard liters per minute (SLPM) bench unit will be modified to incorporate the next-generation BDS, accommodate the new process flow scheme, and reduce heat loss for better quantification of energy performance. The modified bench unit will be operated at the National Carbon Capture Center on actual flue gas.

13

Fabrication and characterization of a polymethyl methacrylate continuous-flow PCR microfluidic chip using CO2 laser ablation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An improved microfabrication method was used to fabricate a continuous-flow PCR (polymerase chain reaction) microfluidic chip on the PMMA substrate using the low-power CO2 laser ablation technique. The use of the low-power CO2 laser ...

Heng Qi; Xiansong Wang; Tao Chen; Xuemei Ma; Tiechuan Zuo

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Can aerosols be trapped in open flows?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fate of aerosols in open flows is relevant in a variety of physical contexts. Previous results are consistent with the assumption that such finite-size particles always escape in open chaotic advection. Here we show that a different behavior is possible. We analyze the dynamics of aerosols both in the absence and presence of gravitational effects, and both when the dynamics of the fluid particles is hyperbolic and nonhyperbolic. Permanent trapping of aerosols much heavier than the advecting fluid is shown to occur in all these cases. This phenomenon is determined by the occurrence of multiple vortices in the flow and is predicted to happen for realistic particle-fluid density ratios.

Rafael D. Vilela; Adilson E. Motter

2007-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

15

Two-Phase Flow Within Porous Media Analogies: Application Towards CO2 Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geologic carbon dioxide sequestration (GCO2S) involves the capture of large quantities of CO2 from point-source emitters and pumping this greenhouse gas to subsurface reservoirs (USDOE, 2006). The mechanisms of two-phase fluid displacement in GCO2S, where a less viscous fluid displaces a more viscous fluid in a heterogeneous porous domain is similar to enhanced oil recovery activities. Direct observation of gas-liquid interface movement in geologic reservoirs is difficult due to location and opacity. Over the past decades, complex, interconnected pore-throat models have been developed and used to study multiphase flow interactions in porous media, both experimentally (Buckley, 1994) and numerically (Blunt, 2001). This work expands upon previous experimental research with the use of a new type of heterogeneous flowcell, created with stereolithography (SL). Numerical solutions using the Volume-of-Fluid (VOF) model with the same flowcell geometry, are shown to be in good agreement with the drainage experiments, where the defending fluid wets the surface. This computational model is then used to model imbibition, the case of the invading fluid preferentially wetting the surface. Low capillary flows and imbibition conditions are shown to increase the storage volume of the invading fluid in the porous medium.

Crandall, D.M. Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY); Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson University, Potsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.

2007-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

The impact of climate, CO2, nitrogen deposition and land use change on simulated contemporary global river flow  

SciTech Connect

We investigated how climate, rising atmospheric CO2 concentration, increasing anthropogenic nitrogen deposition and land use change influenced continental river flow over the period 1948-2004 using the Community Land Model version 4 (CLM4) with coupled river transfer model (RTM), a global river routing scheme. The model results indicate that the global mean river flow shows significant decreasing trend and climate forcing likely functions as the dominant controller of the downward trend during the study period. Nitrogen deposition and land use change account for about 5% and 2.5% of the decrease in simulated global scale river flow, respectively, while atmospheric CO2 accounts for an upward trend. However, the relative role of each driving factor is heterogeneous across regions in our simulations. The trend in river flow for the Amazon River basin is primarily explained by CO2, while land use change accounts for 27.4% of the downward trend in river flow for the Yangtze rive basin. Our simulations suggest that to better understand the trends of river flow, it is not only necessary to take into account the climate, but also to consider atmospheric composition, carbon-nitrogen interaction and land use change, particularly for regional scales.

Shi, Xiaoying [ORNL; Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Injection of CO2 with H2S and SO2 and Subsequent Mineral Trapping in Sandstone-Shale Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations can potentially reduce atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases. Sequestering less-pure CO{sub 2} waste streams (containing H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2}) would be less expensive or would require less energy than separating CO{sub 2} from flue gas or a coal gasification process. The long-term interaction of these injected acid gases with shale-confining layers of a sandstone injection zone has not been well investigated. We therefore have developed a conceptual model of injection of CO{sub 2} with H{sub 2}S and/or SO{sub 2} into a sandstone-shale sequence, using hydrogeologic properties and mineral compositions commonly encountered in Gulf Coast sediments of the United States. We have performed numerical simulations of a 1-D radial well region considering sandstone alone and a 2-D model using a sandstone-shale sequence under acid-gas injection conditions. Results indicate that shale plays a limited role in mineral alteration and sequestration of gases within a sandstone horizon for short time periods (10,000 years in present simulations). The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in different pH distribution, mineral alteration patterns, and CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration than the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Simulations generate a zonal distribution of mineral alteration and formation of carbon and sulfur trapping minerals that depends on the pH distribution. The co-injection of SO{sub 2} results in a larger and stronger acidified zone close to the well. Precipitation of carbon trapping minerals occurs within the higher pH regions beyond the acidified zones. In contrast, sulfur trapping minerals are stable at low pH ranges (below 5) within the front of the acidified zone. Corrosion and well abandonment due to the co-injection of SO{sub 2} could be important issues. Significant CO{sub 2} is sequestered in ankerite and dawsonite, and some in siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capability can reach 80 kg per cubic meter of medium. Most sulfur is trapped through alunite precipitation, although some is trapped by anhydrite precipitation and minor amount of pyrite. The addition of the acid gases and induced mineral alteration result in changes in porosity. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of natural high-pressure acid-gas reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

18

Complex Flow and Composition Path in CO2 Injection Schemes from Density Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for many years. The first large-scale, commercial CO2 IOR project began operation in 1972 at the SACROC concentration in the atmosphere because of the burning of fossil fuels and deforestation may be one of the main causes for acceleration in global warming. Because fossil fuels will be a critical component of the world

Firoozabadi, Abbas

19

Modeling Density Effects in CO2 Injection in Oil Reservoirs and A Case Study of CO2 Sequestration in a Qatari Saline Aquifer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 injection has been used to improve oil recovery for several decades. In recent years, CO2 injection has become even more attractive because of a dual effect; injection in the subsurface 1) allows reduction of CO2 concentration in the atmosphere to reduce global warming, and 2) improves the oil recovery. In this study, the density effect from CO2 dissolution in modeling of CO2 injection is examined. A method to model the increase in oil density with CO2 dissolution using the Peng-Robinson equation of state and the Pedersen viscosity correlation is presented. This method is applied to model the observed increase in oil density with CO2 dissolution in a West Texas crude oil. Compositional simulation of CO2 injection was performed in a 2D vertical cross section and a 3D reservoir with the density effect. The results show that the density increase from CO2 dissolution may have a drastic effect on CO2 flow path and recovery performance. One main conclusion from this work is that there is a need to have accurate density data for CO2/oil mixtures at different CO2 concentrations to ensure successful CO2 injection projects. While CO2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is part of the solution, saline aquifers have the largest potential for CO2 sequestration. A literature review of the CO2 sequestration in saline aquifers is performed. The dominant trapping mechanisms and transport processes and the methods used to model them are discussed in detail. The Aruma aquifer, a shallow saline aquifer in southwest Qatar is used as a case study for CO2 sequestration. A compositional simulation model is prepared for the Aruma aquifer using the available log data and flow test data. It was found that the grid size is a key parameter in modeling CO2 sequestration accurately. It affects the propagation of the CO2 plume and amount of CO2 dissolved in brine.

Ahmed, Tausif

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

ARM - Measurement - CO2 flux  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 flux The rate of flow for carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas. Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Promotional effect of CO2 on desulfation processes for pre-sulfated Pt BaO/Al2O3 lean NOx trap catalysts  

SciTech Connect

A combination of H2 TPRX, TR-XRD and XPS analysis has been used to investigate the effects of CO2 on the desulfation of pre-sulfated Pt BaO/Al2O3 samples. The results demonstrate that the presence of CO2 promotes the removal of sulfur species, especially at temperatures below 500 °C, with a corresponding suppression of BaS formation, thus resulting in a lower amount of residual sulfur on the sample after desulfation.

Kim, Do Heui; Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Wang, Xianqin; Engelhard, Mark H.; Peden, Charles HF

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

CO2 interaction with geomaterials.  

SciTech Connect

This work compares the sorption and swelling processes associated with CO2-coal and CO2-clay interactions. We investigated the mechanisms of interaction related to CO2 adsortion in micropores, intercalation into sub-micropores, dissolution in solid matrix, the role of water, and the associated changes in reservoir permeability, for applications in CO2 sequestration and enhanced coal bed methane recovery. The structural changes caused by CO2 have been investigated. A high-pressure micro-dilatometer was equipped to investigate the effect of CO2 pressure on the thermoplastic properties of coal. Using an identical dilatometer, Rashid Khan (1985) performed experiments with CO2 that revealed a dramatic reduction in the softening temperature of coal when exposed to high-pressure CO2. A set of experiments was designed for -20+45-mesh samples of Argonne Premium Pocahontas No.3 coal, which is similar in proximate and ultimate analysis to the Lower Kittanning seam coal that Khan used in his experiments. No dramatic decrease in coal softening temperature has been observed in high-pressure CO2 that would corroborate the prior work of Khan. Thus, conventional polymer (or 'geopolymer') theories may not be directly applicable to CO2 interaction with coals. Clays are similar to coals in that they represent abundant geomaterials with well-developed microporous structure. We evaluated the CO2 sequestration potential of clays relative to coals and investigated the factors that affect the sorption capacity, rates, and permanence of CO2 trapping. For the geomaterials comparison studies, we used source clay samples from The Clay Minerals Society. Preliminary results showed that expandable clays have CO2 sorption capacities comparable to those of coal. We analyzed sorption isotherms, XRD, DRIFTS (infrared reflectance spectra at non-ambient conditions), and TGA-MS (thermal gravimetric analysis) data to compare the effects of various factors on CO2 trapping. In montmorillonite, CO2 molecules may remain trapped for several months following several hours of exposure to high pressure (supercritical conditions), high temperature (above boiling point of water) or both. Such trapping is well preserved in either inert gas or the ambient environment and appears to eventually result in carbonate formation. We performed computer simulations of CO2 interaction with free cations (normal modes of CO2 and Na+CO2 were calculated using B3LYP / aug-cc-pVDZ and MP2 / aug-cc-pVDZ methods) and with clay structures containing interlayer cations (MD simulations with Clayff potentials for clay and a modified CO2 potential). Additionally, interaction of CO2 with hydrated Na-montmorillonite was studied using density functional theory with dispersion corrections. The sorption energies and the swelling behavior were investigated. Preliminary modeling results and experimental observations indicate that the presence of water molecules in the interlayer region is necessary for intercalation of CO2. Our preliminary conclusion is that CO2 molecules may intercalate into interlayer region of swelling clay and stay there via coordination to the interlayer cations.

Guthrie, George D. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Al-Saidi, Wissam A. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Jordan, Kenneth D. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Voora, Vamsee, K. (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Romanov, Vyacheslav N. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lopano, Christina L (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Myshakin, Eugene M. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Hur, Tae Bong (University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA); Warzinski, Robert P. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Lynn, Ronald J. (URS Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA); Howard, Bret H. (U.S. Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA); Cygan, Randall Timothy

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

CO2 Emissions - Gibraltar  

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Gibraltar CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gibraltar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gibraltar...

24

CO2 Emissions - Mozambique  

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Mozambique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mozambique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mozambique image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mozambique...

25

CO2 Emissions - Macau  

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Far East Macau CO2 Emissions from Macau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macau...

26

CO2 Emissions - Guadeloupe  

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Guadeloupe Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guadeloupe image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guadeloupe...

27

CO2 Emissions - Ghana  

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Africa Ghana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Ghana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ghana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ghana...

28

CO2 Emissions - Ireland  

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Ireland CO2 Emissions from Ireland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Ireland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Ireland...

29

CO2 Emissions - Malta  

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Western Europe Malta CO2 Emissions from Malta Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malta image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malta...

30

CO2 Emissions - Montserrat  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Montserrat Graphics CO2 Emissions from Montserrat Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montserrat image Per capita CO2...

31

CO2 Emissions - Kyrgyzstan  

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Centrally Planned Europe Kyrgyzstan CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kyrgyzstan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kyrgyzstan...

32

CO2 Emissions - Mali  

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Africa Mali Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mali Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mali image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mali...

33

CO2 Emissions - Martinique  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Martinique Graphics CO2 Emissions from Martinique Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Martinique image Per capita CO2...

34

CO2 Emissions - Portugal  

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Western Europe Portugal CO2 Emissions from Portugal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Portugal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Portugal...

35

CO2 Emissions - Honduras  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Honduras Graphics CO2 Emissions from Honduras Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Honduras image Per capita CO2...

36

CO2 Emissions - Paraguay  

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Paraguay Graphics CO2 Emissions from Paraguay Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Paraguay image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Paraguay...

37

CO2 Emissions - Macedonia  

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Western Europe Macedonia CO2 Emissions from Macedonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Macedonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Macedonia...

38

CO2 Emissions - Malawi  

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Malawi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Malawi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malawi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malawi...

39

CO2 Emissions - Gabon  

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Africa Gabon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gabon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gabon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gabon...

40

CO2 Emissions - Grenada  

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Grenada Graphics CO2 Emissions from Grenada Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Grenada image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Grenada...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

CO2 Emissions - Kiribati  

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Oceania Kiribati Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kiribati Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kiribati image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kiribati...

42

CO2 Emissions - Israel  

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Israel Graphics CO2 Emissions from Israel Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Israel image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Israel...

43

CO2 Emissions - Phillippines  

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Far East Phillippines CO2 Emissions from Phillippines Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Phillippines image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Phillippines...

44

CO2 Emissions - Niger  

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Africa Niger Graphics CO2 Emissions from Niger Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Niger image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Niger...

45

CO2 Emissions - Mauritius  

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Africa Mauritius Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritius Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritius image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritius...

46

CO2 Emissions - Malaysia  

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Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Malaysia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Malaysia...

47

CO2 Emissions - Reunion  

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Reunion Graphics CO2 Emissions from Reunion Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Reunion image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Reunion...

48

CO2 Emissions - Guatemala  

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Guatemala Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guatemala Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guatemala image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guatemala...

49

CO2 Emissions - Iceland  

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Iceland CO2 Emissions from Iceland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iceland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iceland...

50

CO2 Emissions - Mongolia  

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Asia Mongolia CO2 Emissions from Mongolia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mongolia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mongolia...

51

CO2 Emissions - Romania  

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Centrally Planned Europe Romania CO2 Emissions from Romania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Romania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Romania...

52

CO2 Emissions - Panama  

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Panama Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Panama...

53

CO2 Emissions - Madagascar  

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Madagascar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Madagascar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Madagascar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Madagascar...

54

CO2 Emissions - Netherlands  

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Netherlands CO2 Emissions from Netherlands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherlands image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Netherlands...

55

CO2 Emissions - Greenland  

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Greenland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Greenland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greenland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greenland...

56

CO2 Emissions - Nicaragua  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Nicaragua Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nicaragua image Per capita CO2...

57

CO2 Emissions - Norway  

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Norway CO2 Emissions from Norway Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Norway image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Norway...

58

CO2 Emissions - Guyana  

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Guyana Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guyana Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guyana image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guyana...

59

CO2 Emissions - Mauritania  

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Africa Mauritania Graphics CO2 Emissions from Mauritania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Mauritania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Mauritania...

60

CO2 Emissions - Lithuania  

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Centrally Planned Europe Lithuania CO2 Emissions from Lithuania Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lithuania image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lithuania...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CO2 Emissions - Kenya  

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Africa Kenya Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kenya Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kenya image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kenya...

62

CO2 Emissions - Latvia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Latvia CO2 Emissions from Latvia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Latvia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Latvia...

63

CO2 Emissions - Georgia  

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Centrally Planned Europe Georgia CO2 Emissions from Georgia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Georgia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Georgia...

64

CO2 Emissions - Gambia  

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Gambia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Gambia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Gambia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Gambia...

65

CO2 Emissions - Montenegro  

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Centrally Planned Europe Montenegro CO2 Emissions from Montenegro Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Montenegro image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Montenegro...

66

CO2 Emissions - Oman  

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Middle East Oman Graphics CO2 Emissions from Oman Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Oman image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Oman...

67

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait  

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Middle East Kuwait Graphics CO2 Emissions from Kuwait Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Kuwait image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Kuwait...

68

CO2 Emissions - Lebanon  

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Middle East Lebanon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Lebanon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lebanon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Lebanon...

69

CO2 Emissions - Nigeria  

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Africa Nigeria Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nigeria Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nigeria image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nigeria...

70

CO2 Emissions - Maldives  

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Far East Maldives CO2 Emissions from Maldives Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Maldives image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Maldives...

71

CO2 Emissions - Morocco  

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Morocco Graphics CO2 Emissions from Morocco Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Morocco image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Morocco...

72

CO2 Emissions - Pakistan  

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Far East Pakistan CO2 Emissions from Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Pakistan...

73

CO2 Emissions - Palau  

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Oceania Palau CO2 Emissions from Palau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Palau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Palau...

74

CO2 Emissions - Qatar  

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Middle East Qatar Graphics CO2 Emissions from Qatar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Qatar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Qatar...

75

CO2 Emissions - Guam  

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Oceania Guam Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guam image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guam...

76

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda  

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Africa Rwanda Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda...

77

CO2 Emissions - Guinea  

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Africa Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea...

78

CO2 Emissions - Luxembourg  

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Western Europe Luxembourg CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Luxembourg image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Luxembourg...

79

CO2 Emissions - Liberia  

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Africa Liberia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Liberia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Liberia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Liberia...

80

CO2 Emissions - Haiti  

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Haiti Graphics CO2 Emissions from Haiti Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Haiti image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Haiti...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

CO2 Emissions - Iraq  

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Iraq Graphics CO2 Emissions from Iraq Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Iraq image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Iraq...

82

CO2 Emissions - Hungary  

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Centrally Planned Europe Hungary CO2 Emissions from Hungary Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hungary image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hungary...

83

CO2 Emissions - Nepal  

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Far East Nepal CO2 Emissions from Nepal Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nepal image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nepal...

84

CO2 Emissions - Nauru  

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Nauru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Nauru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Nauru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Nauru...

85

CO2 Emissions - Myanmar  

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Myanmar CO2 Emissions from Myanmar Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Myanmar image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Myanmar...

86

CO2 Emissions - Jordan  

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Middle East Jordan Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jordan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jordan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Jordan...

87

CO2 Emissions - Greece  

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Western Europe Greece CO2 Emissions from Greece Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Greece image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Greece...

88

Long-term Variations of CO2 Trapped in Different Mechanisms in Deep Saline Formations: A Case Study of the Songliao Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO{sub 2} in deep saline formations is increasing seen as a viable strategy to reduce the release of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere. There are numerous sedimentary basins in China, in which a number of suitable CO{sub 2} geologic reservoirs are potentially available. To identify the multi-phase processes, geochemical changes and mineral alteration, and CO{sub 2} trapping mechanisms after CO{sub 2} injection, reactive geochemical transport simulations using a simple 2D model were performed. Mineralogical composition and water chemistry from a deep saline formation of Songliao Basin were used. Results indicate that different storage forms of CO{sub 2} vary with time. In the CO{sub 2} injection period, a large amount of CO{sub 2} remains as a free supercritical phase (gas trapping), and the amount dissolved in the formation water (solubility trapping) gradually increases. Later, gas trapping decreases, solubility trapping increases significantly due to migration and diffusion of the CO{sub 2} plume, and the amount trapped by carbonate minerals increases gradually with time. The residual CO{sub 2} gas keeps dissolving into groundwater and precipitating carbonate minerals. For the Songliao Basin sandstone, variations in the reaction rate and abundance of chlorite, and plagioclase composition affect significantly the estimates of mineral alteration and CO{sub 2} storage in different trapping mechanisms. The effect of vertical permeability and residual gas saturation on the overall storage is smaller compared to the geochemical factors. However, they can affect the spatial distribution of the injected CO{sub 2} in the formations. The CO{sub 2} mineral trapping capacity could be in the order of ten kilogram per cubic meter medium for the Songliao Basin sandstone, and may be higher depending on the composition of primary aluminosilicate minerals especially the content of Ca, Mg, and Fe.

Zhang, Wei; Li, Yilian; Xu, Tianfu; Cheng, Huilin; Zheng, Yan; Xiong, Peng

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

89

CO2 Emissions - Namibia  

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Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Africa Namibia CO2 Emissions from Namibia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Namibia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

90

CO2 Emissions - Peru  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Peru Graphics CO2 Emissions from Peru Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peru image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

91

CO2 Emissions - Bolivia  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Bolivia Graphics CO2 Emissions from Bolivia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Bolivia image Per capita CO2 Emission...

92

CO2 Emissions - Jamaica  

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Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Jamaica Graphics CO2 Emissions from Jamaica Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Jamaica image Per capita CO2 Emission...

93

Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 withH2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations could decrease the atmospheric accumulation of this gas from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, by co-injecting H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2}, the products respectively of coal gasification or combustion, with captured CO{sub 2}, problems associated with surface disposal would be mitigated. We developed models that simulate the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} into an arkose formation at a depth of about 2 km and 75 C. The hydrogeology and mineralogy of the injected formation are typical of those encountered in Gulf Coast aquifers of the United States. Six numerical simulations of a simplified 1-D radial region surrounding the injection well were performed. The injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S results in a concentrically zoned distribution of secondary minerals surrounding a leached and acidified region adjacent to the injection well. Co-injection of SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} results in a larger and more strongly acidified zone, and alteration differs substantially from that caused by the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Precipitation of carbonates occurs within a higher pH (pH > 5) peripheral zone. Significant quantities of CO{sub 2} are sequestered by ankerite, dawsonite, and lesser siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capacity of the formation can attain 40-50 kg/m{sup 3} medium for the selected arkose. In contrast, secondary sulfates precipitate at lower pH (pH < 5) within the acidified zone. Most of the injected SO{sub 2} is transformed and immobilized through alunite precipitation with lesser amounts of anhydrite and minor quantities of pyrite. The dissolved CO{sub 2} increases with time (enhanced solubility trapping). The mineral alteration induced by injection of CO{sub 2} with either SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S leads to corresponding changes in porosity. Significant increases in porosity occur in the acidified zones where mineral dissolution dominates. With co-injection of SO{sub 2}, the porosity increases from an initial 0.3 to 0.43 after 100 years. However, within the CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping zone, the porosity decreases to about 0.28 for both cases, because of the addition of CO{sub 2} mass as secondary carbonates to the rock matrix. Precipitation of sulfates at the acidification front causes porosity to decrease to 0.23. The limited information currently available on the mineralogy of naturally occurring high-pressure CO{sub 2} reservoirs is generally consistent with our simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

94

Numerical modeling of injection and mineral trapping of CO2 withH2S and SO2 in a Sandstone Formation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection into deep geologic formations could decrease the atmospheric accumulation of this gas from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, by co-injecting H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2}, the products respectively of coal gasification or combustion, with captured CO{sub 2}, problems associated with surface disposal would be mitigated. We developed models that simulate the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} into an arkose formation at a depth of about 2 km and 75 C. The hydrogeology and mineralogy of the injected formation are typical of those encountered in Gulf Coast aquifers of the United States. Six numerical simulations of a simplified 1-D radial region surrounding the injection well were performed. The injection of CO{sub 2} alone or co-injection with SO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S results in a concentrically zoned distribution of secondary minerals surrounding a leached and acidified region adjacent to the injection well. Co-injection of SO{sub 2} with CO{sub 2} results in a larger and more strongly acidified zone, and alteration differs substantially from that caused by the co-injection of H{sub 2}S or injection of CO{sub 2} alone. Precipitation of carbonates occurs within a higher pH (pH > 5) peripheral zone. Significant quantities of CO{sub 2} are sequestered by ankerite, dawsonite, and lesser siderite. The CO{sub 2} mineral-trapping capacity of the formation can attain 40-50 kg/m{sup 3} medium for the selected arkose. In contrast, secondary sulfates precipitate at lower pH (pH simulations.

Xu, Tianfu; Apps, John A.; Pruess, Karsten; Yamamoto, Hajime

2004-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

95

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow model for carbon dioxide and brine, in Proceedings 9 thGeological Storage of Carbon Dioxide, in: S.J. Baines andGeological Storage of Carbon Dioxide, Geological Society,

Birkholzer, J.T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

AZ CO2 Storage Pilot  

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CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 WESTCARB region has major CO2 point sources 3 WESTCARB region has many deep saline formations - candidates for CO2 storage WESTCARB also created GIS layers for oil/gas fields and deep coal basins Source: DOE Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada 4 - Aspen Environmental - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. Arizona Utilities CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Lawrence Berkeley National

98

Interaction between CO2-rich solutions and reservoir-seal rocks. Experimentation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal systems 5.Use of CO2 in enhanced coal bed methane recovery 6.Other suggested options (basalts, oil shales, cavities) #12;Motivation CO2 subsurface behavior and trapping mechanisms Four basic trapping

Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

99

Carbon Dioxide (CO2)  

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Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Gateway Pages to Carbon Dioxide Data Modern records and ice core records back 2000 years 800,000 year records from ice cores Other...

100

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

NETL: CO2 Compression  

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CO2 Compression CO2 Compression The CO2 captured from a power plant will need to be compressed from near atmospheric pressure to a pressure between 1,500 and 2,200 psi in order to be transported via pipeline and then injected into an underground sequestration site. Read More! CO2 Compression The compression of CO2 represents a potentially large auxiliary power load on the overall power plant system. For example, in an August 2007 study conducted for DOE/NETL, CO2 compression was accomplished using a six-stage centrifugal compressor with interstage cooling that required an auxiliary load of approximately 7.5 percent of the gross power output of a subcritical pressure, coal-fired power plant. As a result, DOE/NETL is sponsoring R&D to develop novel methods that can significantly decrease the

102

CO2 Incentives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Crude Fuel Air Separation Plant Air N2 Coal, Refinery Residues, or Biomass NG, Oil or Landfill Gas HP IP LP O 2 Fuel* CO2 Recovery ...

2012-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

103

CO2 Emissions - Guinea Bissau  

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Guinea Bissau Graphics CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Guinea Bissau image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Guinea Bissau...

104

CO2 Emissions - Peninsular Malaysia  

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Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Far East Peninsular Malaysia CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Peninsular Malaysia image Per...

105

CO2 Emissions - New Caledonia  

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New Caledonia Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Caledonia image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Caledonia...

106

CO2 Emissions - United Korea  

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Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Centrally Planned Asia United Korea CO2 Emissions from United Korea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from United Korea...

107

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

BNL | CO2 Laser  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Laser CO2 Laser The ATF is one of the only two facilities worldwide operating picosecond, terawatt-class CO2 lasers. Our laser system consists of a picoseconds pulse-injector based on fast optical switching from the output of a conventional CO2 laser oscillator, and a chain of high-pressure laser amplifiers. It starts with a wavelength converter wherein a near-IR picosecond solid-state laser with l»1 μm produces a mid-IR 10-μm pulse. This process employs two methods; semiconductor optical switching, and the Kerr effect. First, we combine the outputs from a multi-nanosecond CO2 laser oscillator with a picosecond Nd:YAG laser on a germanium Brewster-plate to produce an ~200 ps, 10μm pulse by semiconductor optical switching. Co-propagating this pulse with a Nd:YAG's 2nd harmonic in a

109

CO2 Emissions - Wake Island  

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Fossil Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Wake Island Graphics CO2 Emissions from Wake Island Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Wake Island image Per capita CO2...

110

Capturing CO2 via reactions in nanopores.  

SciTech Connect

This one-year exploratory LDRD aims to provide fundamental understanding of the mechanism of CO2 scrubbing platforms that will reduce green house gas emission and mitigate the effect of climate change. The project builds on the team member's expertise developed in previous LDRD projects to study the capture or preferential retention of CO2 in nanoporous membranes and on metal oxide surfaces. We apply Density Functional Theory and ab initio molecular dynamics techniques to model the binding of CO2 on MgO and CaO (100) surfaces and inside water-filled, amine group functionalized silica nanopores. The results elucidate the mechanisms of CO2 trapping and clarify some confusion in the literature. Our work identifies key future calculations that will have the greatest impact on CO2 capture technologies, and provides guidance to science-based design of platforms that can separate the green house gas CO2 from power plant exhaust or even from the atmosphere. Experimentally, we modify commercial MFI zeolite membranes and find that they preferentially transmit H2 over CO2 by a factor of 34. Since zeolite has potential catalytic capability to crack hydrocarbons into CO2 and H2, this finding paves the way for zeolite membranes that can convert biofuel into H2 and separate the products all in one step.

Leung, Kevin; Nenoff, Tina Maria; Criscenti, Louise Jacqueline; Tang, Z [University of Cincinnati; Dong, J. H. [University of Cincinnati

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Impact of finite-rate kinetics on carbon conversion in a single-stage entrained flow gasifier with coal-CO2 slurry feed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with coal-CO2 slurry feed Cristina Botero , Randall P. Field, Howard J. Herzog, Ahmed F. Ghoniem Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract Coal-CO2 slurry feed has been suggested as an attractive alternative to coal-water slurry feed for single

112

Aquifer Management for CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage of carbon dioxide is being actively considered for the reduction of green house gases. To make an impact on the environment CO2 should be put away on the scale of gigatonnes per annum. The storage capacity of deep saline aquifers is estimated to be as high as 1,000 gigatonnes of CO2.(IPCC). Published reports on the potential for sequestration fail to address the necessity of storing CO2 in a closed system. This work addresses issues related to sequestration of CO2 in closed aquifers and the risk associated with aquifer pressurization. Through analytical modeling we show that the required volume for storage and the number of injection wells required are more than what has been envisioned, which renders geologic sequestration of CO2 a profoundly nonfeasible option for the management of CO2 emissions unless brine is produced to create voidage and pressure relief. The results from our analytical model match well with a numerical reservoir simulator including the multiphase physics of CO2 sequestration. Rising aquifer pressurization threatens the seal integrity and poses a risk of CO2 leakage. Hence, monitoring the long-term integrity of CO2 storage reservoirs will be a critical aspect for making geologic sequestration a safe, effective and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. Verification of long-term CO2 residence in receptor formations and quantification of possible CO2 leaks are required for developing a risk assessment framework. Important aspects of pressure falloff tests for CO2 storage reservoirs are discussed with a focus on reservoir pressure monitoring and leakage detection. The importance of taking regular pressure falloffs for a commercial sequestration project and how this can help in diagnosing an aquifer leak will be discussed. The primary driver for leakage in bulk phase injection is the buoyancy of CO2 under typical deep reservoir conditions. Free-phase CO2 below the top seal is prone to leak if a breach happens in the top seal. Consequently, another objective of this research is to propose a way to engineer the CO2 injection system in order to accelerate CO2 dissolution and trapping. The engineered system eliminates the buoyancy-driven accumulation of free gas and avoids aquifer pressurization by producing brine out of the system. Simulations for 30 years of CO2 injection followed by 1,000 years of natural gradient show how CO2 can be securely and safely stored in a relatively smaller closed aquifer volume and with a greater storage potential. The engineered system increases CO2 dissolution and capillary trapping over what occurs under the bulk phase injection of CO2. This thesis revolves around identification, monitoring and mitigation of the risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration.

Anchliya, Abhishek

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Impact of background flow on dissolution trapping of carbon dioxide injected into saline aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While there has been a large interest in studying the role of dissolution-driven free convection in the context of geological sequestration, the contribution of forced convection has been largely ignored. This manuscript considers CO$_2$ sequestration in saline aquifers with natural background flow and uses theoretical arguments to compute the critical background velocity needed to establish the forced convective regime. The theoretical arguments are supported by two dimensional high-resolution numerical simulations which demonstrate the importance of forced convection in enhancing dissolution in aquifers characterised by low Rayleigh numbers.

Rapaka, Saikiran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

CO2 Emissions - New Zealand  

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Oceania New Zealand Graphics CO2 Emissions from New Zealand Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from New Zealand image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for New Zealand...

115

CO2 Emissions - Hong Kong  

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Far East Hong Kong CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Hong Kong image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Hong Kong...

116

Visualizing multiphase flow and trapped fluid configurations in a model three-dimensional porous medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an approach to fully visualize the flow of two immiscible fluids through a model three-dimensional (3D) porous medium at pore-scale resolution. Using confocal microscopy, we directly image the drainage of the medium by the non-wetting oil and subsequent imbibition by the wetting fluid. During imbibition, the wetting fluid pinches off threads of oil in the narrow crevices of the medium, forming disconnected oil ganglia. Some of these ganglia remain trapped within the medium. By resolving the full 3D structure of the trapped ganglia, we show that the typical ganglion size, and the total amount of residual oil, decreases as the capillary number Ca increases; this behavior reflects the competition between the viscous pressure in the wetting fluid and the capillary pressure required to force oil through the pores of the medium. This work thus shows how pore-scale fluid dynamics influence the trapped fluid configurations in multiphase flow through 3D porous media.

Amber T. Krummel; Sujit S. Datta; Stefan Münster; David A. Weitz

2013-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

117

Visualizing multiphase flow and trapped fluid configurations in a model three-dimensional porous medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an approach to fully visualize the flow of two immiscible fluids through a model three-dimensional (3D) porous medium at pore-scale resolution. Using confocal microscopy, we directly image the drainage of the medium by the non-wetting oil and subsequent imbibition by the wetting fluid. During imbibition, the wetting fluid pinches off threads of oil in the narrow crevices of the medium, forming disconnected oil ganglia. Some of these ganglia remain trapped within the medium. By resolving the full 3D structure of the trapped ganglia, we show that the typical ganglion size, and the total amount of residual oil, decreases as the capillary number Ca increases; this behavior reflects the competition between the viscous pressure in the wetting fluid and the capillary pressure required to force oil through the pores of the medium. This work thus shows how pore-scale fluid dynamics influence the trapped fluid configurations in multiphase flow through 3D porous media.

Krummel, Amber T; Münster, Stefan; Weitz, David A; 10.1002/aic.14005

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

CO2 Separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

t 17% Americas 27% E urope 40% o:pplms m mfgCO 2 s eptech T he S tarting P oint z Bas e cos t of compres s ion 450kW export + 11% Qin z Mea s crubbing 1130kW export...

119

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles Graphics CO2 Emissions from Netherland Antilles Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Netherland...

120

CO2 Emissions - Ryukyu Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Ryukyu Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Ryukyu Islands image...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

CO2 Emissions - Leeward Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Leeward Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Leeward Islands image...

122

Supercritical CO2 Tech Team  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Supercritical CO2 is a highly technical team focused on different heat source applications of the sCO2 Brayton Cycle.

123

System Design and Optimization of CO2 Storage in Deep Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of waterflooding sweep efficiency has been widely applied in reservoir engineering to improve hydrocarbon recovery while delaying water breakthrough and minimizing the bypassed oil in reservoirs. We develop a new framework to optimize flooding sweep efficiency in geologic formations with heterogeneous properties and demonstrate its application to waterflooding and geological CO2 sequestration problems. The new method focuses on equalizing and delaying (under constant total injected volume) the breakthrough time of the injected fluid at production wells. For application to CO2 sequestration where producers may not be present, we introduce the concept of pseudo production wells that have insignificant production rates (with negligible effect on the overall flow regime) for quantification of hypothetical breakthrough curves that can be used for optimization purpose. We apply the new method to waterflooding and CO2 sequestration optimization using two heterogeneous reservoir models. We show that in water flooding experiments, the proposed method improves the sweep efficiency by delaying the field breakthrough and equalizing breakthrough times in all production wells. In this case, the optimization results in increased oil recovery and decreased water production. We apply a modified version of the proposed algorithm to geologic CO2 sequestration problems to maximize the storage capacity of aquifers by enhancing the residual and dissolution trapping. The results from applying the proposed approach to optimization of geologic CO2 storage problems illustrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in improving residual and solubility trapping by increasing the contact between available fresh brine and the injected CO2 plume through a more uniform distribution of CO2 in the aquifer.

Shamshiri, Hossein

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Home > Technologies > Coal & Power Systems > Innovations for Existing Plants > CO2 Emissions Control Innovations for Existing Plants CO2 Emissions Control RD&D Roadmap Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program: Technology Update DOE/NETL Advanced CO2 Capture R&D Program Accomplishments DOE/NETL Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage RD&D Roadmap 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Presentations DOE/NETL's Monthly Carbon Sequestration Newsletter Program Goals and Targets Pre-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Advanced Combustion CO2 Compression Other Systems Analysis Regulatory Drivers Reference Shelf Carbon capture involves the separation of CO2 from coal-based power plant flue gas or syngas. There are commercially available 1st-Generation CO2

125

CO2.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY STORAGE & ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Objective R MOTC can play a signifi cant role in carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) storage and enhanced oil recovery technology development and fi eld demonstra- tions. RMOTC completed a scoping engineering study on Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3's (NPR-3) CO 2 enhanced oil recovery potential. More recent character- ization studies indicate geologic carbon storage would also be an excellent use of NPR-3 resources beyond their economic life in conventional production. Geologic Storage Fossil fuels will remain the mainstay of energy production well into the 21st century. Availability of these fuels to provide clean, affordable energy is es- sential for the prosperity and security of the United States. However, increased atmospheric concentrations

126

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Targets Milestones - Test crucial predictions from theoretical models about the heat transfer and fluid flow properties of CO2; - Obtain essential data to be incorporated...

127

Natural and industrial analogues for leakage of CO2 from storagereservoirs: identification of features, events, and processes and lessonslearned  

SciTech Connect

The injection and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deepgeologic formations is a potentially feasible strategy to reduce CO2emissions and atmospheric concentrations. While the purpose of geologiccarbon storage is to trap CO2 underground, CO2 could migrate away fromthe storage site into the shallow subsurface and atmosphere if permeablepathways such as well bores or faults are present. Large-magnitudereleases of CO2 have occurred naturally from geologic reservoirs innumerous volcanic, geothermal, and sedimentary basin settings. Carbondioxide and natural gas have also been released from geologic CO2reservoirs and natural gas storage facilities, respectively, due toinfluences such as well defects and injection/withdrawal processes. Thesesystems serve as natural and industrial analogues for the potentialrelease of CO2 from geologic storage reservoirs and provide importantinformation about the key features, events, and processes (FEPs) that areassociated with releases, as well as the health, safety, andenvironmental consequences of releases and mitigation efforts that can beapplied. We describe a range of natural releases of CO2 and industrialreleases of CO2 and natural gas in the context of these characteristics.Based on this analysis, several key conclusions can be drawn, and lessonscan be learned for geologic carbon storage. First, CO2 can bothaccumulate beneath, and be released from, primary and secondaryreservoirs with capping units located at a wide range of depths. Bothprimary and secondary reservoir entrapments for CO2 should therefore bewell characterized at storage sites. Second, many natural releases of CO2have been correlated with a specific event that triggered the release,such as magmatic fluid intrusion or seismic activity. The potential forprocesses that could cause geomechanical damage to sealing cap rocks andtrigger the release of CO2 from a storage reservoir should be evaluated.Third, unsealed fault and fracture zones may act as fast and directconduits for CO2 flow from depth to the surface. Risk assessment shouldtherefore emphasize determining the potential for and nature of CO2migration along these structures. Fourth, wells that are structurallyunsound have the potential to rapidly release large quantities of CO2 tothe atmosphere. Risk assessment should therefore be focused on thepotential for both active and abandoned wells at storage sites totransport CO2 to the surface, particularly at sites with depleted oil orgas reservoirs where wellsare abundant. Fifth, the style of CO2 releaseat the surface varies widely between and within different leakage sites.In rare circumstances, the release of CO2 can be a self-enhancing and/oreruptive process; this possibility should be assessed in the case of CO2leakage from storage reservoirs. Sixth, the hazard to human health hasbeen small in most cases of large surface releases of CO2. This could bedue to implementation of public education and CO2 monitoring programs;these programs should therefore be employed to minimize potential health,safety, and environmental effects associated with CO2 leakage. Finally,while changes in groundwater chemistry were related to CO2 leakage due toacidification and interaction with host rocks along flow paths, watersremained potable in most cases. Groundwaters should be monitored forchanges that may be associated with storage reservoirleakage.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Birkholzer, Jens; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

081001 CA CO2 Storage Pilot  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California California CO2 Storage Pilot Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative Review Meeting Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania October 7, 2008 John Henry Beyer, Ph.D. WESTCARB Program Manager, Geophysicist 510-486-7954, jhbeyer@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Earth Sciences Division, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 2 Industry Partner: Shell Oil Company Committed to reducing global CO2 emissions Extensive technical expertise in: - Geologic evaluation - Well log analysis - Porosity and permeability evaluation - Geophysics - Deep well drilling - CO2 injection A welcome industry partner 3 - Bevilacqua-Knight, Inc. (DOE/PIER) - Lawrence Berkeley National Lab (PIER) - Sandia Technologies, LLC (DOE/PIER) - Terralog (DOE) Northern California CO2 Storage Pilot Contracting and Funding Flow

129

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-Combustion CO2 Control Post-combustion CO2 control systems separate CO2 from the flue gas produced by conventional coal combustion in air. The flue gas is at atmospheric pressure and has a CO2 concentration of 10-15 volume percent. Read More! Capturing CO2 under these conditions is challenging because: (1) the low pressure and dilute concentration dictate a high total volume of gas to be treated; (2) trace impurities in the flue gas tend to reduce the effectiveness of the CO2 separation processes; and (3) compressing captured CO2 from atmospheric pressure to pipeline pressure (1,200 - 2,200 pounds per square inch) represents a large parasitic energy load. Plant Picture DOE/NETL's post-combustion CO2 control technology R&D program includes

130

An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements  

SciTech Connect

The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Novel CO2 - Philic Absorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Co Novel Co 2 - PhiliC AbsorbeNts Summary The ability to separate a high pressure mixture of CO 2 and H 2 such that a high pressure stream of CO 2 for sequestration and a high pressure stream of H 2 for energy are produced remains an elusive goal. This research has identified a class of compounds that melt in the presence of high pressure CO 2 , forming a liquid phase composed of roughly 50wt% CO 2 and 50wt% of the compound. Unlike conventional solvents that require substantial depressurization during regeneration to release a low pressure CO 2 stream, these novel compounds completely release the CO 2 at many hundreds of psia as the compound solidifies. This work will reveal whether one of more of these compounds can selectively remove CO 2 from a mixture

132

CO2 Emissions - Puerto Rico  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Puerto Rico Graphics CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Puerto Rico image Per capita...

133

CO2 Blast Cleaning Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) (dry ice) cleaning is a process in which dry ice particles, accelerated by compressed air or nitrogen, are propelled at high velocities to impact and clean a surface. Because CO2 technology produces no secondary waste, the CO2 blast cleaning process has many applications for the cleaning of electrical equipment.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

ARM - Instrument - co2flx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govInstrumentsco2flx govInstrumentsco2flx Documentation CO2FLX : Handbook CO2FLX : Instrument Mentor Monthly Summary (IMMS) reports CO2FLX : Data Quality Assessment (DQA) reports ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2FLX) Instrument Categories Atmospheric Carbon General Overview The Southern Great Plains (SGP) carbon dioxide flux (CO2 flux) measurement systems provide half-hour average fluxes of CO2, H2O (latent heat), and sensible heat. The fluxes are obtained by the eddy covariance technique, which computes the flux as the mean product of the vertical wind component with CO2 and H2O densities, or estimated virtual temperature. A three-dimensional sonic anemometer is used to obtain the orthogonal wind

135

Development of Novel CO2 Adsorbents for Capture of CO2 from Flue Gas  

SciTech Connect

Capturing CO2 emissions generated from fossil fuel-based power plants has received widespread attention and is considered a vital course of action for CO2 emission abatement. Efforts are underway at the Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory to develop viable energy technologies enabling the CO2 capture from large stationary point sources. Solid, immobilized amine sorbents (IAS) formulated by impregnation of liquid amines within porous substrates are reactive towards CO2 and offer an alternative means for cyclic capture of CO2 eliminating, to some degree, inadequacies related to chemical absorption by aqueous alkanolamine solutions. This paper describes synthesis, characterization, and CO2 adsorption properties for IAS materials previously tested to bind and release CO2 and water vapor in a closed loop life support system. Tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA), acrylonitrile-modified tetraethylenepentamine (TEPAN), and a single formulation consisting of TEPAN and N, N’-bis(2-hydroxyethyl)ethylenediamine (BED) were individually supported on a poly (methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate and examined. CO2 adsorption profiles leading to reversible CO2 adsorption capacities were obtained using thermogravimetry. Under 10% CO2 in nitrogen at 25°C and 1 atm, TEPA supported on PMMA over 60 minutes adsorbed ~3.2 mmol/g{sorbent} whereas, TEPAN supported on PMMA along with TEPAN and BED supported on PMMA adsorbed ~1.7 mmol/g{sorbent} and ~2.3 mmol/g{sorbent} respectively. Cyclic experiments with a 1:1 weight ratio of TEPAN and BED supported on poly (methyl methacrylate) beads utilizing a fixed-bed flow system with 9% CO2, 3.5% O2, nitrogen balance with trace gas constituents were studied. CO2 adsorption capacity was ~ 3 mmols CO2/g{sorbent} at 40°C and 1.4 atm. No beneficial effect on IAS performance was found using a moisture-laden flue gas mixture. Tests with 750 ppmv NO in a humidified gas stream revealed negligible NO sorption onto the IAS. A high SO2 concentration resulted in incremental loss in IAS performance and revealed progressive degrees of “staining” upon testing. Adsorption of SO2 by the IAS necessitates upstream removal of SO2 prior to CO2 capture.

Fauth, D.J.; Filburn, T.P. (University of Hartford, West Hartford, CT); Gray, M.L.; Hedges, S.W.; Hoffman, J.; Pennline, H.W.; Filburn, T.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

ARM - Measurement - CO2 concentration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

: CO2 concentration The amount of carbon dioxide, a heavy, colorless greenhouse gas, per unit of volume. Categories Atmospheric Carbon Instruments The above measurement is...

137

NETL: CO2 Control - Other  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Other Other Active and completed projects researching other novel methods for CO2 control. Other Projects (click to expand close) Active Other Projects Geological...

138

NIST Photoionization of CO2 Version History  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CO2-button Photoionization of CO 2. Version History. Example ... 1.0). [Online] Available: http://physics.nist.gov/CO2 [year, month day]. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

CO2 Emissions - Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Graphics CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Libyan Arab Jamahiriyah image Per capita CO2 Emission...

140

Study of CO2 Mobility Control Using Cross-linked Gel Conformance Control and CO2 Viscosifiers in Heterogeneous Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 has been widely used as a displacement fluid in both immiscible and miscible displacement processes to obtain tertiary recovery from the field. There are several problems associated with the application of CO2 flooding, especially when there is a significant presence of heterogeneous elements, such as fractures, channels and high permeability streaks within the reservoir. With flooding, CO2 will finger through the target zone while leaving most of the residual/trapped oil untouched. As a result, early gas breakthrough has been a very common problem in CO2-related projects, reducing the overall sweep efficiency of CO2 flooding. This research aims at improving the CO2 flood efficiency using cross-linked gel conformance control and CO2 viscosifier technique. A series of coreflood experiment studies have been performed to investigate the possibility of applying CO2 mobility control techniques. Corresponding simulation works have also been carried out to predict the benefits of applying CO2 mobility control techniques in the field. In the laboratory study, the CO2 coreflood system was integrated with the CT (Computed Tomography)-scanner and obtained real-time coreflood images of the CO2 saturation distributions in the core. This system was applied to the research of both cross-linked polymer gel treatment and CO2 viscosifier study and produced images with sharp phase contrasts. For the gel conformance study, promising results were obtained by applying cross-linked gel to eliminate permeability contrast and diverting CO2 into low permeability regions to obtain incremental oil recovery; also studied were the gel strength in terms of leak-off extent with the aid of CT (Computed Tomography) images. For the CO2 viscosifier research, we tested several potential viscosifier chemicals and found out PVAc (Polyvinylacetate)/toluene combination to be the most promising. The follow-up study clearly demonstrates the superiority of viscosified CO2 over neat CO2 in terms of sweep efficiency. This research serves as a preliminary study in understanding advanced CO2 mobility control techniques and will provide insights to future studies on this topic.

Cai, Shuzong

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Trinity CO2 LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trinity CO2 LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Trinity CO2 LLC Place Texas Product String representation "Trinity CO2 LLC ... smission lines." is too long. References Trinity CO2...

142

CANMET CO2 Consortium - O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CANMET CO CANMET CO 2 Consortium - O 2 /CO 2 Recycle Combustion Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental

143

Development and validation of a radial inflow turbine model for simulation of the SNL S-CO2 split-flow loop.  

SciTech Connect

A one-dimensional model for a radial inflow turbine has been developed for super-critical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle applications. The model accounts for the main phenomena present in the volute, nozzle, and impeller of a single-stage turbine. These phenomena include internal losses due to friction, blade loading, and angle of incidence and parasitic losses due to windage and blade-housing leakage. The model has been added as a component to the G-PASS plant systems code. The model was developed to support the analysis of S-CO{sub 2} cycles in conjunction with small-scale loop experiments. Such loops operate at less than a MWt thermal input. Their size permits components to be reconfigured in new arrangements relatively easily and economically. However, the small thermal input combined with the properties of carbon dioxide lead to turbomachines with impeller diameters of only one to two inches. At these sizes the dominant phenomena differ from those in larger more typical machines. There is almost no treatment in the literature of turbomachines at these sizes. The present work therefore is aimed at developing turbomachine models that support the task of S-CO{sub 2} cycle analysis using small-scale tests. Model predictions were compared against data from an experiment performed for Sandia National Laboratories in the split-flow Brayton cycle loop currently located at Barber-Nichols Inc. The split-flow loop incorporates two turbo-alternator-compressor (TAC) units each incorporating a radial inflow turbine and a radial flow compressor on a common shaft. The predicted thermodynamic conditions at the outlet of the turbine on the main compressor shaft were compared with measured values at different shaft speeds. Two modifications to the original model were needed to better match the experiment data. First, a representation of the heat loss from the volute downstream of the sensed inlet temperature was added. Second, an empirical multiplicative factor was applied to the Euler head and another to the head loss to bring the predicted outlet pressure into better agreement with the experiment. These changes also brought the overall efficiency of the turbine into agreement with values cited by Barber Nichols for small turbines. More generally, the quality of measurement set data can in the future be improved by additional steps taken in the design and operation of the experimental apparatus. First, a thermocouple mounted at the nozzle inlet would provide a better indication of temperature at this key point. Second, heat losses from the turbine should be measured directly. Allowing the impeller to free wheel at inlet conditions and measuring the temperature drop between inlet and outlet would provide a more accurate measure of heat loss. Finally, the enthalpy change during operation is more accurately obtained by measuring the torque on the stator using strain gauges rather than by measuring pressure and temperature at inlet and outlet to infer thermodynamic states.

Vilim, R. B. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

144

Table H.1co2  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

AC Argentina AR Aruba AA Bahamas, The BF Barbados BB Belize BH Bolivia BL ... Table H.1co2 World Carbon Dioxide Emissions from the Consumption and Flaring of Fossil ...

145

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Emissions Control - Program Goals and Targets The Clean Coal Research Program (CCRP) is currently pursuing the demonstration of 1st-Generation Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)...

146

Health Effects of CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents results of a project to identify and quantify toxic effects of carbon dioxide (CO2) in living organisms. The overall goal is to develop concentration and time-dependent profiles of CO2 toxicity in a variety of organisms. This project phase was designed to develop exposure-effect profiles for humans and nonhuman mammals and to identify the availability of information for other species.

2004-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

147

Numerical Simulation of Flow around a Tall Isolated Seamount. Part II: Resonant Generation of Trapped Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sigma-coordinate, primitive equation ocean circulation model is used to explore the problem of the remnant generation of trapped waves about a tall, circular, isolated seamount by an incident oscillatory barotropic current. The numerical ...

Dale B. Haidvogel; Aike Beckmann; David C. Chapman; Ray-Qing Lin

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Micromodel Investigations of CO2 Exsolution from Carbonated Water in Sedimentary Rocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, carbon dioxide exsolution from carbonated water is directly observed under reservoir conditions (9MPa and 45oC). Fluorescence microscopy and image analysis are used to quantitatively characterize bubble formation, morphology, and mobility. Observations indicate the strong influence of interfacial tension and pore-geometry on bubble growth and evolution. Most of the gas exhibits little mobility during the course of depressurization and clogs water flow paths. However, a snap-off mechanism mobilizes a small portion of the trapped gas along the water flow paths. This feature contributes to the transport of the dispersed exsolved gas phase and the formation of intermittent gas flow. A new definition of critical gas saturation is proposed accordingly as the minimum saturation that snap-off starts to produce mobile bubbles. Low mobility of the water phase and CO2 phase in exsolution is explained by formation of dispersed CO2 bubbles which block water flow and lack the connectivity to create a mobile gas phase.

Zuo, Lin; Zhang, Changyong; Falta, Ronald W.; Benson, Sally M.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

CO2 Utilization | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon dioxide (CO2) use and reuse efforts focus on the conversion of CO2 to useable products and fuels that will reduce CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. These include: Enhanced Oil/Gas Recovery - Injecting CO2 into depleting oil or gas bearing fields to maximize the amount of CO2 that could be stored as well as maximize hydrocarbon production. CO2 as Feedstock - Use CO2 as a feedstock to produce chemicals (including fuels and polymers) and find applications for the end products. Non-Geologic Storage of CO2 - Use CO2 from an effluent stream to immobilize the CO2 permanently by producing stable solid material that are either useful products with economic value or a low cost produced material.

150

CO2 | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 CO2 Dataset Summary Description Emissions from energy use in buildings are usually estimated on an annual basis using annual average multipliers. Using annual numbers provides a reasonable estimation of emissions, but it provides no indication of the temporal nature of the emissions. Therefore, there is no way of understanding the impact on emissions from load shifting and peak shaving technologies such as thermal energy storage, on-site renewable energy, and demand control. Source NREL Date Released April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated April 11th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords buildings carbon dioxide emissions carbon footprinting CO2 commercial buildings electricity emission factors ERCOT hourly emission factors interconnect nitrogen oxides NOx SO2 sulfur dioxide emissions

151

Update on CO2 emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of CO2 are the main contributor to anthropogenic climate change. Here we present updated information on their present and near-future estimates. We calculate that global CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning decreased by 1.3% in 2009 owing to the global financial and economic crisis that started in 2008; this is half the decrease anticipated a year ago1. If economic growth proceeds as expected2, emissions are projected to increase by more than 3% in 2010, approaching the high emissions growth rates that were observed from 2000 to 20081, 3, 4. We estimate that recent CO2 emissions from deforestation and other land-use changes (LUCs) have declined compared with the 1990s, primarily because of reduced rates of deforestation in the tropics5 and a smaller contribution owing to forest regrowth elsewhere.

Friedingstein, P. [University of Exeter, Devon, England; Houghton, R.A. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Hackler, J. [Woods Hole Research Center, Woods Hole, MA; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Canadell, J.G. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Raupach, Mike [GCP, Canberra, Australia; Ciais, Philippe [Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l'Environement, France; Le Quere, Corrine [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequestration Studies Sequestration Studies Introduction, Issues and Plans Philip Goldberg National Energy Technology Laboratory Workshop on CO 2 Sequestration with Minerals August 8, 2001 Mineral Sequestration Program Research effort seeks to refine and validate a promising CO 2 sequestration technology option, mineral sequestration also known as mineral carbonation Goals: * Understand the fundamental mechanisms involved in mineral carbonation * Generate data to support process development * Operate continuous, integrated small-scale process unit to support design Current Partnerships In order to effectively develop Mineral Sequestration, a multi-laboratory Working Group was formed in the Summer of 1998, participants include: * Albany Research Center * Arizona State University * Los Alamos National Laboratory

153

NETL: Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007553 Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) is developing a new type of membrane contactor (or mega-module) to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plant flue gas. This module's membrane area is 500 square meters, 20 to 25 times larger than that of current modules used for CO2 capture. A 500-MWe coal power plant requires 0.5 to 1 million square meters of membrane to achieve 90 percent CO2 capture. The new mega-modules can drastically reduce the cost, complexity, and footprint of commercial-scale membrane module integration. Energy savings due to low-pressure drops for gases circulated through the modules, as well as improved countercurrent flow, are additional benefits. The feasibility of using mega-modules in several different hybrid process designs is being evaluated for future development potential.

154

CO2 Emissions - the Republic of Moldova  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe the Republic of Moldova CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Republic of Moldova image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

155

CO2 Emissions - Rwanda-Urundi  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rwanda-Urundi Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rwanda-Urundi image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Rwanda-Urundi...

156

CO2 Emissions - Republic of Cameroon  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Republic of Cameroon Graphics CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of Cameroon image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates...

157

CO2 Emissions - East and West Pakistan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East East and West Pakistan CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from East and West Pakistan image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

158

CO2 Emissions - Pacific Islands (Palau)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Pacific Islands (Palau) Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Pacific Islands (Palau) image Per capita CO2...

159

CO2 Emissions - Rhodesia-Nyasaland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rhodesia-Nyasaland Graphics CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Rhodesia-Nyasaland image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for...

160

CO2 Emissions - Papua New Guinea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Papua New Guinea Graphics CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Papua New Guinea image Per capita CO2 Emission Estimates for Papua New...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - Niue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Niue Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue Data graphic Data Total Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Niue image Per Capita...

162

1. The Challenge Concentrations of atmospheric CO2 have increased by more than 35% since industrialisation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency and Renewable Energy can go some way to reducing CO2 emissions but the technology gap and time lag concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere traps more reflected heat, leading to enhanced climate changes. Energy is significant. Burning fossil fuels for energy is still the primary method of producing energy. It is therefore

163

Transition Paths CO2 Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aantal van hen hier niet onvermeld laten. Het proefschrift heeft zijn oorsprong in het MATTER-project (Materials Technologies for CO2-reduction). Het project werd gecoördineerd vanuit het ECN door Dolf Gielen en costs 72 4.4.2 System emissions 72 4.4.3 Parameters 73 4.5 Costs and emissions, technical and economic

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

164

CO2 Emissions - Lao People's Democratic Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Lao People's Democratic Republic CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Lao People's Democratic Republic image Per...

165

CO2 Emissions - Republic of South Vietnam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East Republic of South Vietnam CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Republic of South Vietnam...

166

CO2 Emissions - Panama Canal Zone  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Panama Canal Zone Graphics CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from Panama Canal Zone...

167

CO2 Emissions - Occupied Palestinian Territory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Middle East Occupied Palestinian Territory CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Occupied Palestinian Territory image...

168

CO2 Emissions - Netherland Antilles and Aruba  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations Netherland Antilles and Aruba Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Netherland...

169

CO2 Emissions - Kuwait Oil Fires  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Middle East Kuwait Oil Fires Graphics CO2 Emissions from the 1991 Kuwait Oil Fires Data graphic Data...

170

Delta 14CO2 Record from Schauinsland  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Record from Schauinsland 14 CO2 Record from Schauinsland graphics Graphics data Data Investigators Ingeborg Levin and Bernd Kromer Institut fr Umweltphysik, University of...

171

CO2 emissions | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data applicationvnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2...

172

NIST Photoionization of CO2 Introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Return to Photoionization of CO2 home ... of the ionization of CO 2 in the photophysics of planetary atmospheres, including the Earth's atmosphere [ ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

173

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Higher Levels of CO2 May Diminish Decision Making...

174

Use of Forced Mineral Trapping for Sequestration of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Box 999, MS K6-81 Richland, Washington 99352 pete.mcgrail@pnl.gov; 509-376-9193 P. F. Martin Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999, MS P8-37 Richland, Washington...

175

Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Formation Damage due to CO2 Sequestration in Saline Aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration is defined as the removal of gas that would be emitted into the atmosphere and its subsequent storage in a safe, sound place. CO2 sequestration in underground formations is currently being considered to reduce the amount of CO2 emitted into the atmosphere. However, a better understanding of the chemical and physical interactions between CO2, water, and formation rock is necessary before sequestration. These interactions can be evaluated by the change in mineral content in the water before and after injection, or from the change in well injectivity during CO2 injection. It may affect the permeability positively due to rock dissolution, or negatively due to precipitation. Several physical and chemical processes cover the CO2 injection operations; multiphase flow in porous media is represented by the flow of the brine and CO2, solute transportation is represented by CO2 dissolution in the brine forming weak carbonic acid, dissolution-deposition kinetics can be seen in the rock dissolution by the carbonic acid and the deposition of the reaction products, hydrodynamic instabilities due to displacement of less viscous brine with more viscous CO2 (viscous fingering), capillary effects and upward movement of CO2 due to gravity effect. The objective of the proposed work is to correlate the formation damage to the other variables, i.e. pressure, temperature, formation rock type, rock porosity, water composition, sulfates concentration in the water, CO2 volume injected, water volume injected, CO2 to water volumetric ratio, CO2 injection rate, and water injection rate. In order to achieve the proposed objective, lab experiments will be conducted on different rock types (carbonates, limestone and dolomite, and sandstone) under pressure and temperature that simulate the field conditions. CO2 will be used at the supercritical phase and different CO2-water-rock chemical interactions will be addressed. Quantitative analysis of the experimental results using a geochemical simulator (CMG-GEM) will also be performed. The results showed that for carbonate cores, maintaining the CO2/brine volumetric ratio above 1.0 reduced bicarbonate formation in the formation brine and helped in minimizing precipitation of calcium carbonate. Additionally, increasing cycle volume in WAG injection reduced the damage introduced to the core. Sulfate precipitation during CO2 sequestration was primarily controlled by temperature. For formation brine with high total dissolved solids (TDS), calcium sulfate precipitation occurs, even at a low sulfate concentration. For dolomite rock, temperature, injection flow rate, and injection scheme don't have a clear impact on the core permeability, the main factor that affects the change in core permeability is the initial core permeability. Sandstone cores showed significant damage; between 35% and 55% loss in core permeability was observed after CO2 injection. For shorter WAG injection the damage was higher; decreasing the brine volume injected per cycle, decreased the damage. At higher temperatures, 200 and 250 degrees F, more damage was noted than at 70 degrees F.

Mohamed, Ibrahim 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Alstom?s...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Alstoms Chemical Looping Combustion Prototype for CO2 Capture from Existing Pulverized Coal Fired Power Plants Project No.: DE-NT0005286 Alstom chemical looping cold flow model....

178

Thermal Effects During CO2 Leakage from a Geologic Storage Reservoir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the fluid flow and heat transfer processes that wouldflow and associated heat transfer processes that operate onheat transfer effects on CO2 migration and multiphase processes

Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

CO2 Impurities Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to identify what chemical contaminants exist (or are expected to exist) in a post-combustion carbon dioxide (CO2) capture system using aqueous amines and to gather and summarize some representative thermodynamic, chemical, and environmental fate and transport data/properties for these species. The eventual goal of the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) work in this area is to identify liquid/solid/gaseous contaminants and evaluate or predict their fate in the env...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING AND CONTROL OF A O2/CO2 GAS TURBINE CYCLE FOR CO2 CAPTURE Lars Imsland Dagfinn Snarheim and control of a semi-closed O2/CO2 gas turbine cycle for CO2 capture. In the first part the process predictive control, Gas turbines, CO2 capture 1. INTRODUCTION Gas turbines are widely used for power

Foss, Bjarne A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

NETL: CO2 Emissions Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Systems Analysis Systems Analysis DOE/NETL possesses strong systems analysis and policy-support capabilities. Systems analysis in support of the Innovations for Existing Plants Program consists of conducting various energy analyses that provide input to decisions on issues such as national plans and programs, resource use, environmental and energy security policies, technology options for research and development programs, and paths to deployment of energy technology. This work includes technology, benefits, and current situation and trends analyses related to CO2 emissions control. Systems analyses and economic modeling of potential new processes are crucial to providing sound guidance to R&D efforts. Since the majority of new CO2 capture technologies are still at a bench scale level of development, a conceptual design is first generated with emphasis on mass and energy balances. Based on available data and/or engineering estimates, these systems are optimized, and "what-if" scenarios are evaluated to identify barriers to deployment and help the process developers establish system performance targets. Reports that have been generated describing systems analyses in support of carbon capture efforts are shown in the table below.

182

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CO2 Capture for PC-Boiler Using Flue-Gas Recirculation: Evaluation of CO2 CaptureUtilizationDisposal Options Project No.: FWP49539...

183

NETL: Solvents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvents for CO2 Capture Project No.: R&D 048 The most attractive physical solvents for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture are those having such properties as high thermal stability,...

184

Delta 14CO2 Record from Vermunt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Record from Vermunt 14CO2 Record from Vermunt graphics Graphics data Data Investigators I. Levin, B. Kromer, H. Schoch-Fischer, M. Bruns, M. Mnnich, D. Berdau,J.C. Vogel,...

185

NETL: Oxy-Combustion CO2 Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxygen-Fired CO2 Recycle for Application to Direct CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Power Plants Project No.: FC26-05NT42430 Southern Research Institute (SRI) will explore the...

186

CO2 Health Effects in Wildlife Species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CCS) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in wildlife animal species. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans, laboratory animals, and domesticated animals...

2008-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

CO2 laser frequency multiplication  

SciTech Connect

The duration of the mode-locked CO(2) laser pulses was measured to be 0.9 + or - nsec by the technique of (second harmonic) autocorrelation. Knowing the pulse duration, the spot size, and the harmonic conversion efficiency, a detailed fit of experiment to theory gave an estimate of the nonlinear coefficient of AgGaSe(2). d36 = 31 + or - V(1), in agreement with the most accurate literature values. A number of experiments were made with longer pulse trains in which the highest harmonic energy conversion reached 78%. The damage threshold was measured and it turned out to be related much more strongly to fluence than intensity. The shorter pulse trains had peak intensities of close to 300 MW 1/cm squared whereas the longer trains (3 usec) had intensities up to 40 MW 1/cm squared.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Combining Geothermal Energy Capture with CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combining Geothermal Energy Capture with CO2 Sequestration Cold CO2 from emitter CO2 compressor geothermal heat hot CO2 permanent CO2 storage Martin O. Saar Dept. of Earth Sciences University of Minnesota saar@umn.edu CO2-Plume Geothermal (CPG) #12;Cold CO2 from emitter CO2 compressor geothermal heat hot CO

Reich, Peter B.

189

Forest succession at elevated CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We tested hypotheses concerning the response of forest succession to elevated CO2 in the FACTS-1 site at the Duke Forest. We quantified growth and survival of naturally recruited seedlings, tree saplings, vines, and shrubs under ambient and elevated CO2. We planted seeds and seedlings to augment sample sites. We augmented CO2 treatments with estimates of shade tolerance and nutrient limitation while controlling for soil and light effects to place CO2 treatments within the context of natural variability at the site. Results are now being analyzed and used to parameterize forest models of CO2 response.

Clark, James S.; Schlesinger, William H.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Microsoft Word - NEMS CO2 MARKET MODEL FINAL REPORT - APPENDICES...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2CCCST(MNUMNR,MJUMPYR) 87metric ton CO2 co2mminc Regional CO2 capture and compression costs EORRESMAX(MNUMNR) Million bbls oil co2mminc Regional Gross EOR reserve limit based...

191

Dual-phase membrane for High temperature CO2 separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 CO 2 High temp. membrane for CO 2 removal High Temperature CO 2 Selective Membranes Syngas gas CO 2 enriched gas CO 2 High pressure H 2 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 700 1 10 100...

192

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondaryaccumulation at shallow depth  

SciTech Connect

Geologic storage of CO2 can be a viable technology forreducing atmospheric emissions of greenhouse gases only if it can bedemonstrated that leakage from proposed storage reservoirs and associatedhazards are small or can be mitigated. Risk assessment must evaluatepotential leakage scenarios and develop a rational, mechanisticunderstanding of CO2 behavior during leakage. Flow of CO2 may be subjectto positive feedbacks that could amplify leakage risks and hazards,placing a premium on identifying and avoiding adverse conditions andmechanisms. A scenario that is unfavorable in terms of leakage behavioris formation of a secondary CO2 accumulation at shallow depth. This paperdevelops a detailed numerical simulation model to investigate CO2discharge from a secondary accumulation, and evaluates the role ofdifferent thermodynamic and hydrogeologic conditions. Our simulationsdemonstrate self-enhancing as well as self-limiting feedbacks.Condensation of gaseous CO2, 3-phase flow of aqueous phase -- liquid CO2-- gaseous CO2, and cooling from Joule-Thomson expansion and boiling ofliquid CO2 are found to play important roles in the behavior of a CO2leakage system. We find no evidence that a subsurface accumulation of CO2at ambient temperatures could give rise to a high-energy discharge, aso-called "pneumatic eruption."

Pruess, K.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

193

How safe is CO2 storage? Natural analogues for CO2 storage sites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

How safe is CO2 storage? Natural analogues for CO2 storage sites Johannes Miocic, Stuart Gilfillan. Introduction Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is the only technology available to reduce greenhouse gas and analysed a global dataset of natural CO2 reservoirs as analogues for CO2 storage sites. Initial results

194

STOMP Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases: STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e Guide: Version 1.0  

SciTech Connect

This STOMP (Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases) guide document describes the theory, use, and application of the STOMP-CO2 and STOMP-CO2e operational modes. These operational modes of the STOMP simulator are configured to solve problems involving the sequestration of CO2 in geologic saline reservoirs. STOMP-CO2 is the isothermal version and STOMP-CO2e is the nonisothermal version. These core operational modes solve the governing conservation equations for component flow and transport through geologic media; where, the STOMP-CO2 components are water, CO2 and salt and the STOMP-CO2e operational mode also includes an energy conservation equation. Geochemistry can be included in the problem solution via the ECKEChem (Equilibrium-Conservation-Kinetic-Equation Chemistry) module, and geomechanics via the EPRMech (Elastic-Plastic-Rock Mechanics) module. This addendum is designed to provide the new user with a full guide for the core capabilities of the STOMP-CO2 and -CO2e simulators, and to provide the experienced user with a quick reference on implementing features. Several benchmark problems are provided in this addendum, which serve as starting points for developing inputs for more complex problems and as demonstrations of the simulator’s capabilities.

White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; McGrail, B. Peter; Watson, David J.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

195

A Novel CO2 Separation System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel CO Novel CO 2 Separation System Robert J. Copeland (copeland@tda.com 303-940-2323) Gokhan Alptekin (galtpekin@tda.com 303 940-2349) Mike Cesario (czar@tda.com 303-940-2336) Yevgenia Gershanovich (ygershan@tda.com 303-940-2346) TDA Research, Inc. 12345 West 52 nd Avenue Wheat Ridge, Colorado 80033-1917 Project Summary NEED Concern over global climate change has led to a need to reduce CO 2 emissions from power plants. Unfortunately, current CO 2 capture processes reduce the efficiency with which fuel can be converted to electricity by 9-37%, and CO 2 capture costs can exceed $70 per tonne 1 of CO 2 (Herzog, Drake, and Adams 1997). OBJECTIVE To generate electricity with little reduction in conversion efficiency while emitting little or no CO 2 to the atmosphere, TDA Research, Inc. (TDA) is developing a Novel CO

196

CO2 Sequestration in Basalt Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 SequeStratiOn in BaSalt FOrmatiOnS Background There is growing concern that buildup of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere is contributing to global climate change. One option for mitigating this effect is to sequester CO 2 in geologic formations. Numerous site assessments for geologic sequestration of CO 2 have been conducted in virtually every region of the United States. For the most part, these studies have involved storing CO 2 in saline formation, deep coal seams, and depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Another option, however, is basalt formations. Basalt is a dark-colored, silica-rich, volcanic rock that contains cations-such as calcium, magnesium, and iron-that can combine with CO 2 to form carbonate minerals. Basalt formations have not received much

197

IGCC Design Considerations for CO2 Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains technical design, plant performance, cost estimates, and economic analysis of IGCC power plants designed with future retrofit for full CO2 capture in mind. The gasification technologies supplied by General Electric, Shell, and Siemens studied in the report were designed to initially produce power without CO2 capture; but their designs included moderate pre-investment to economically accommodate retrofit of full CO2 capture at a later date. The base plant designs include deep sulfur r...

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Energy Efficiency in CO2 Emissions Trading  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technical Update explores methods to account for carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reductions specifically associated with the implementation of energy efficiency programs into greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions trading or offset markets. It focuses on how to understand, account for, quantify, verify, and optimize how electricity savings may both reduce CO2 emissions and potentially be granted credits for CO2 savings that may be traded in cap-and-trade regimes.

2008-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

199

Sequestration of CO2 by Ocean Fertilization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentation for NETL Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 SEQUESTRATION OF CO 2 BY OCEAN FERTILIZATION Authors: Dr. Michael Markels, Jr. (Markels@greenseaventure.com...

200

CO2 MITIGATION VIA ACCELERATED LIMESTONE WEATHERING  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The climate and environmental impacts of our current, carbon-intensive energy usage demands that effective and practical energy alternatives and CO2 mitigation strategies be found. As part of this effort, various means of capturing and storing CO2 generated from fossil-fuel-based energy production are being investigated. One of the proposed methods involves a geochemistry-based capture and sequestration process that hydrates point-source, waste CO2 with water to produce a carbonic acid solution. This in turn is reacted and neutralized with limestone, thus converting the original CO2 gas to calcium bicarbonate in solution, the overall reaction being:

Rau, G H; Knauss, K G; Langer, W H; Caldeira, K G

2004-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Eliminating CO2 Emissions - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TiO2 pigment is primarily produced by the high temperature chloride process, resulting in considerable CO2 emissions. A novel hydrometallurgical process for  ...

202

Research on CO2 Emission Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

demonstration project of CO 2 separation from coal-fired flue gas was started at Beijing Thermal Power Plant which is affiliated with China Huaneng Group. The demonstration...

203

NIST Photoionization of CO2 References  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A. Dalgarno and JL Fox, Unimolecular and Bimolecular Ion-Molecule ... references on CO 2 research using electron energy loss spectroscopy. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

204

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Global, Regional, and National Annual Time Series (1751-2010) Latest Published Global Estimates (1751-2010) Preliminary 2011 Global & National Estimates...

205

Simulating CO2 storage in saline aquifers with improved code RCB  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geological storage of CO2 in saline aquifers is believed to be one of the most promising ways to reduce the concentration of the greenhouse gas in the atmosphere. Injection of CO2 will, however, lead to dissolution of minerals in regions of lowered ... Keywords: CO2, RCB (retrasocodebright), gas density correction, gas solubility correction, geochemistry, geomechanics, improved Newton-Raphson iteration method, multiphase flow, relaxation factor, saline aquifer, simulation

Shunping Liu; Bjorn Kvamme

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

COLD TRAP  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved linear-flow cold trap is designed for highvacuum applications such as mitigating back migration of diffusion pump oil moiecules. A central pot of liquid nitrogen is nested within and supported by a surrounding, vertical, helical coil of metai sheet, all enveloped by a larger, upright, cylindrical, vacuum vessel. The vertical interstices between successive turns of the coil afford lineal, axial, high-vacuum passages between open mouths at top and bottom of said vessel, while the coil, being cold by virtue of thermal contact of its innermost turn with the nitrogen pot, affords expansive proximate condensation surfaces. (AEC)

Milleron, N.

1963-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

207

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from hazardous waste injection wells, test wells, and oilthe permitting of CO2 injection wells. PROCEEDINGS, CO2SCand completed CO 2 injection wells and continuous monitoring

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Law Vendor Coupon Co2 Blasting Tests  

SciTech Connect

The objectives identified in the test specification for the vendor CO2 blasting tests are to determine the ability of CO2 blasting to remove a measurable amount of surface material from Type 304L stainless steel and to identify the approximate blasting parameters for future testing on radioactively contaminated coupons.

May, C.G.

2003-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

209

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Storage Formations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage Formations Storage Formations NATCARB CO2 Storage Formations CO2 Storage Resource Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) were charged with providing a high-level, quantitative estimate of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage resource available in subsurface environments of their regions. Environments considered for CO2 storage were categorized into five major geologic systems: oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal areas, saline formations, shale, and basalt formations. Where possible, CO2 storage resource estimates have been quantified for oil and gas reservoirs, saline formations, and unmineable coal in the fourth edition of the United States Carbon Utilization and Storage Atlas (Atlas IV). Shale and basalt

210

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Vegetation Response to CO2 and Climate Area and Carbon Content of Sphagnum Since Last Glacial Maximum (2002) TDE Model Intercomparison Project Data Archive Presentations and abstracts from the recent DOE Terrestrial Science Team Meeting (Argonne National Laboratory, October 29-31, 2001) FACE (Free-Air CO2 Enrichment) Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth (2001), NDP-078A | PDF Bibliography on CO2 Effects on Vegetation and Ecosystems: 1990-1999 Literature (2000), CDIAC-129 Direct effects of atmospheric CO2 enrichment on plants and ecosystems: An updated bibliographic data base (1994), CDIAC-70 A Database of Herbaceous Vegetation Responses to Elevated

211

NETL: IEP – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CANMET CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

– Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control – Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control CANMET CO2 Consortium-O2/CO2 Recycle Combustion Project No.: IEA-CANMET-CO2 (International Agreement) Photograph of CANMET's Vertical Combustor Research Facility. Photograph of CANMET’s Vertical Combustor Research Facility. The CANMET carbon dioxide (CO2) consortium will conduct research to further the development of oxy-combustion for retrofit to coal-fired power plants. Research activities include: (1) modeling of an advanced, supercritical pressure oxy-coal plant, including an analysis of the impact of oxygen (O2) purity and O2 partial enrichment, overall process performance, and cost; (2) testing of pilot-scale CO2 capture and compression; (3) investigating CO2 phase change at liquid and supercritical states in gas mixtures

212

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions cease, will atmospheric CO2 concentration continue to increase?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If anthropogenic CO2 emissions were to suddenly cease, the evolution of the atmospheric CO2 concentration would depend on the magnitude and sign of natural carbon sources and sinks. Experiments using Earth system models indicate that overall ...

Andrew H. MacDougall; Michael Eby; Andrew J. Weaver

213

CO2 Capture Using Electric Fields: Low-Cost Electrochromic Film on Plastic for Net-Zero Energy Building  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Two faculty members at Lehigh University created a new technique called supercapacitive swing adsorption (SSA) that uses electrical charges to encourage materials to capture and release CO2. Current CO2 capture methods include expensive processes that involve changes in temperature or pressure. Lehigh University’s approach uses electric fields to improve the ability of inexpensive carbon sorbents to trap CO2. Because this process uses electric fields and not electric current, the overall energy consumption is projected to be much lower than conventional methods. Lehigh University is now optimizing the materials to maximize CO2 capture and minimize the energy needed for the process.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

NIST: Photoionization of CO2 Database Search Form  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Return to Photoionization of CO2 home, Photoionization of CO 2. Vibrational branching ratios and asymmetry parameters. Search Form. Data. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

215

Microsoft PowerPoint - RPS_Comp_Summary_1 CO2 IGTI 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ramgen Proprietary Material Ramgen Proprietary Material 0900-01217 Shock Compression Technology Applied to CCS Applications Ramgen Power Systems, Inc. Bellevue, WA 2 Ramgen Proprietary Material 0900-01217 Typical System Performance Requirements - CCS * IGCC & PC retrofits (geologic carbon sequestration) - PR ~ 100:1 (suction pressure ~ 15 psia) - Two comparably loaded stages - Stage efficiency ~ 85% - Mass flow range ~ 30% Property Summary by Station - 3,000 hp Q . 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 LP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out Q . Q . 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 LP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out 4 Intercooler CO 2 In Q . Q . Aftercooler Electric Motor LP 1 HP 3 HP BL Control HP BL Control 5 2 CO 2 Out Q . Q . Single Pinion Configuration Dual Pinion Configuration Property Station

216

NETL: Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Ion Advanced Solvent CO2 Capture Pilot Project Project No.: DE-FE0013303 ION Engineering is conducting small pilot-scale (~ 0.7 MW) testing of an advanced CO2 capture solvent technology that has previously undergone bench-scale testing. The small pilot-scale testing will involve continuous long-term operation in order to gather the necessary data ultimately required for further scale-up. Activities will include the design and fabrication of the 0.5-0.7 MWe (equivalent) slipstream pilot plant; scale-up of solvent manufacturing; testing, data collection, and analysis of solvent performance; degradation and air emission analysis; modeling and simulation for the detailed preliminary and final techno-economic analyses; and decommissioning of pilot plant equipment upon completion of solvent testing. The advanced solvent is anticipated to have significant operating and capital cost advantages over other solvents currently in development. Advantages include significant reductions in parasitic load and liquid flow rates which directly translate to smaller more efficient CO2 capture processes. Make-up water and amine emissions rates will be examined during this project. There is the potential that additional solvent, system, and integration savings will be identified, which could result in further operating and capital cost reductions.

217

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Title Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant? Direct Effects of Low-to-Moderate CO2 Concentrations on Human Decision-Making Performance Publication Type Journal Article Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6196E Year of Publication 2012 Authors Satish, Usha, Mark J. Mendell, Krishnamurthy Shekhar, Toshifumi Hotchi, Douglas P. Sullivan, Siegfried Streufert, and William J. Fisk Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 120 Issue 12 Pagination 1671-1677 Date Published 09/20/2012 Keywords carbon dioxide, cognition, Decision Making, human performance, indoor environmental quality, ventilation Abstract Background - Associations of higher indoor carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations with impaired

218

Leakage of CO2 from geologic storage: Role of secondary accumulation at shallow depth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.4x10 7 s. CO 2 outflow rates increase with time, and at tperiods during which rate increases almost level off in thereduces the rate of flow rate increase, again dramatizing

Pruess, K.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

CO2 Europipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » CO2 Europipe Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CO2 Europipe Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.co2europipe.eu/ Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/co2-europipe Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Regulations,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Project Development Regulations: "Emissions Mitigation Scheme,Emissions Standards,Enabling Legislation" is not in the list of possible values (Agriculture Efficiency Requirements, Appliance & Equipment Standards and Required Labeling, Audit Requirements, Building Certification, Building Codes, Cost Recovery/Allocation, Emissions Mitigation Scheme, Emissions Standards, Enabling Legislation, Energy Standards, Feebates, Feed-in Tariffs, Fuel Efficiency Standards, Incandescent Phase-Out, Mandates/Targets, Net Metering & Interconnection, Resource Integration Planning, Safety Standards, Upgrade Requirements, Utility/Electricity Service Costs) for this property.

220

NETL: NATCARB - CO2 Stationary Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stationary Sources Stationary Sources NATCARB CO2 Stationary Sources CO2 Stationary Source Emission Estimation Methodology NATCARB Viewer The NATCARB Viewer is available at: http://www.natcarbviewer.com. 2012 Atlas IV DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) employed carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions estimate methodologies that are based on the most readily available representative data for that particular industry type within the respective partnership area. Carbon dioxide emissions data provided by databases (for example, eGRID, IEA GHG, or NATCARB) were the first choice for all of the RCSPs, both for identifying major CO2 stationary sources and for providing reliable emission estimations. Databases are considered to contain reliable and accurate data obtained

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

Microsoft Word - CO2 Supplement.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Understanding the Decline in Carbon Dioxide Understanding the Decline in Carbon Dioxide Emissions in 2009 1 EIA projects carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuels in 2009 to be 5.9 percent below the 2008 level in the Short-Term Energy Outlook, October 2009 (STEO) (Table 1). Projected coal CO2 emissions fall by 10.1 percent in 2009, primarily because of lower consumption for electricity generation. Coal accounts for 63 percent of the total decline in CO2 emissions from fossil fuels this year. Forecast lower natural gas and petroleum emissions this year make up 7 percent and 30 percent of the projected total decline in CO2 emissions from fossil fuels, respectively. Table 1. Short-Term Energy Outlook CO

222

Increasing CO2 Storage in Oil Recovery  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Increasing CO Increasing CO 2 Storage in Oil Recovery Kristian Jessen (krisj@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-6348) Linda C. Sam-Olibale (chizoba@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-725-0831) Anthony R. Kovscek (kovscek@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-1218) Franklin M. Orr, Jr. (fmorr@pangea.stanford.edu, 650-723-2750) Department of Petroleum Engineering, Stanford University 65 Green Earth Sciences Building 367 Panama Street Stanford, CA 94305-2220 Introduction Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) injection has been used as a commercial process for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) since the 1970's. Because the cost of oil recovered is closely linked to the purchase cost of the CO 2 injected, considerable reservoir engineering design effort has gone into reducing the total amount of CO 2 required to recover each barrel of oil. If,

223

Microsoft Word - TURBO EXPO CO2 draft  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAN TURBO MAN TURBO CO2 Compression Challenges presented on May 15, 2007 at the ASME Turbo Expo, Montreal, CO2 Compression Panel By Pierre L. Bovon, MAN TURBO Calgary (pierre.bovon@ca.manturbo.com, tel. +403 233 7151) And Dr. Rolf Habel, MAN TURBO Berlin (rolf.habel@de.manturbo.com, tel. +49 304 301 2224) CO2 has been used for a very long time, for instance in the food industry, and most applications have required it to be compressed. For Sequestration or Enhanced Oil Recovery, the traditional approach to CO2 compression has been to use high-speed reciprocating compressors. The main reasons are: - Flexibility with regards to pressure ratio, and capacity (if equipped with variable speed drive or valve unloaders). - Short delivery times, since many recip. packagers dispose of a selection of frames

224

India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India India India Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends India's 2008 total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions rose 8.1% over the 2007 level to 475 million metric tons of carbon. From 1950 to 2008, India experienced dramatic growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions averaging 5.7% per year and becoming the world's third largest fossil-fuel CO2-emitting country. Indian total emissions from fossil-fuel consumption and cement production have more than doubled since 1994. Fossil-fuel emissions in India continue to result largely from coal burning with India being the world's third largest producer of coal. Coal contributed 87% of the emissions in 1950 and 71% in 2008; at the same time, the oil fraction increased from 11% to 20%. Indian emissions data reveal little impact from the oil price increases that

225

CO2 Tech | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tech Jump to: navigation, search Name CO2 Tech Place London, United Kingdom Zip SW1V 1BZ Product Consultancy and technology developer that produces and installs equipment for...

226

Global Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

metric tonnes of carbon have been released to the atmosphere from the consumption of fossil fuels and cement production. Half of these fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have occurred...

227

Converting Captured CO2 into Useful Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 2, 2010... algae production technology that can capture at least 60 percent of flue gas CO2 from an industrial coal-fired source to produce biofuel and ...

228

ARM - Campaign Instrument - co2lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Carbon Dioxide Doppler Lidar (CO2LIDAR) Instrument...

229

In Situ Delta-13 CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape Grim, Australia In Situ δ13CO2 from Cape Grim, Tasmania, Australia: 1982-1993 graphics Graphics data Data Investigators R.J. Francey and C.E. Allison CSIRO, Division of Atmospheric Research, Private Bag No. 1, Mordialloc, Victoria, Australia 3195 Period of Record 1982-1993 Methods Air samples are collected during baseline condition episodes at a frequency of around one sample per week. Baseline conditions are characterized by wind direction in the sector 190-280°, condensation nucleus concentration below 600 cm3, and steady, continuous CO2 concentrations (variation + 0.2 ppmv per hour). The Cape Grim in situ extraction line is based on 3 high-efficiency glass U-tube traps with internal cooling coils. A vacuum pump draws air from either the 10 m or 70 m intakes, and sampling

230

Research on CO2 Emission Control  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Clean Energy Utilization of Clean Energy Utilization Zhejing University 29 th May, 2008 Status of CCS in China 2 nd U.S.-China Symposium on CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology, Hangzhou China 28 th -30 th , May, 2008 Prof. Zhongyang Luo Global CO 2 Emissions Country CO 2 Emissions (Million Tons Carbon) 1990 1997 2001 2010 USA 1345 1480 1559 1800 China 620 822 832 1109 Former USSR 1034 646 654 825 Japan 274 297 316 334 World 5836 6175 6522 8512 Source: Energy Information Administration/International Energy Outlook 2001 Global CO 2 Emissions from Fossil Fuel Use in 2006 11.72 3,330 EU-15 5.75 1,620 Russia 4.3 1,210 Japan 20.17 5,680 China 20.42 5,750 USA 100 28,160 Total Percentage (%) CO 2 Emissions (1 million metric tons CO 2 ) Country BP Statistical Review of World Energy, June 2007 (http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=6914&contentI

231

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The areal extent, very large thickness, high permeability in portions of the flows, and presence of multiple very low permeability flow interior seals combine to produce a robust sequestration target. Moreover, basalt formations are quite reactive with water-rich supercritical CO2 and formation water that contains dissolved CO2 to generate carbonate minerals, providing for long-term assurance of permanent sequestration. Sub-basalt sediments also exist at the site providing alternative or supplemental storage capacity.

B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Agency/Company /Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Baseline projection, GHG inventory Resource Type: Dataset, Publications Website: www.iea.org/co2highlights/co2highlights.pdf CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion Screenshot References: CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion[1] Overview "This annual publication contains: estimates of CO2 emissions by country from 1971 to 2008 selected indicators such as CO2/GDP, CO2/capita, CO2/TPES and CO2/kWh CO2 emissions from international marine and aviation bunkers, and other relevant information" Excel Spreadsheet References ↑ "CO2 Emissions from Fuel Combustion"

233

Towards Zero Emissions CO2-Reduction in Mediterranean Social Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the construction, use and deconstruction of a 60 apartment social housing complex to be built close to Barcelona revealed the importance of the application of life-cycle analysis, as the materials’ embodied energy showed to be responsible for half of the building’s life-cycle emissions. A 72% energy reduction compared to conventional housing projects is expected by implementation of centralised HVAC and DHW systems, based on ground source heat pumps and solar thermal energy, introducing an in Catalonia innovative facility management approach where energy and flow meters are installed in each flat for internet-based control of energy consumption, invoicing and supervision of the installation. A second study showed that up to 90% CO2 reduction considering the overall lifecycle is feasible at reasonable cost by giving priority to organic building materials like wood (CO2 storage effect), minimizing underground construction and increasing energy supply based on renewable energies.

Sabate, J.; Peters, C.; Cuchi, A.; Lopez, F.; Sagrera, A.; Wadel, G.; Vidal, J.; Cantos, S.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Surface CO2 leakage during the first shallow subsurface CO2 release experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res.from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from geologic carbon sequestration sites, Vadose Zone

Lewicki, J.L.; Oldenburg, C.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Asymptotic behavior of two-phase flows in heterogeneous porous media for capillarity depending only on space. II. Non-classical shocks to model oil-trapping  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a one-dimensional problem modeling two-phase flow in heterogeneous porous media made of two homogeneous subdomains, with discontinuous capillarity at the interface between them. We suppose that the capillary forces vanish inside the domains, but not on the interface. Under the assumption that the gravity forces and the capillary forces are oriented in opposite directions, we show that the limit, for vanishing diffusion, is not the entropy solution of the hyperbolic scalar conservation law. A non-classical shock occurs on the interface, modeling oil-trapping.

Cancès, Clément

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Europe Europe » Poland Poland Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends Carbon dioxide emissions from Poland's use of fossil-fuels and cement production climbed at a remarkably steady rate of 3.9% per year from 1800 until 1980, when they dropped abruptly (11.7%). Fossil-fuel CO2 emissions crept back up throughout the 1980s peaking in 1987 at 127 million metric tons of carbon. Since the 1987 high, CO2 emissions have plummeted 32% to early 1970s levels while per capita emissions have dropped to late 1960s levels. Poland is the world's ninth largest producer of coal and emissions are predominantly from coal burning: 97% in 1950 and 68% in 2008. The drop following 1980 is apparent in rates of liquid fuel burning but releases from consumption of petroleum products have returned and surpassed 1980s

237

Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania » Japan Oceania » Japan Japan Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The history of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions from Japan is remarkable for the abrupt change that occurred in 1973. With postwar growth at 9.8% per year from 1950 to 1973, total emissions were virtually constant from 1974-1987. From 1987-96, emissions grew 25.3% reaching 329 million metric tons of carbon. Growth during this period was characterized by a return to mid-1970s consumption levels for liquid petroleum products and increased contributions from coal and natural gas use. Since 1996, Japan's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have vacilated and now total 329 million metric tons of carbon in 2008. Based on United Nations energy trade data for 2008, Japan is the world's largest importer of coal (184 million metric tons) and

238

CO2 Intensity in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to the launch of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005, the electricity sector was widely proclaimed to have more low-cost emission abatement opportunities than other sectors. If this were true, effects of the EU ETS on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would likely be visible in the electricity sector. Our study looks at the effect of the price of emission allowances (EUA) on CO2 emissions from Swedish electricity generation, using an econometric time series analysis for the period 2004–2008. We control for effects of other input prices and hydropower reservoir levels. Our results do not indicate any link between the price of EUA and the CO2 emissions of Swedish electricity production. A number of reasons may explain this result and we conclude that other determinants of fossil fuel use in Swedish electricity generation probably diminished the effects of the EU ETS.

Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke; Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Sustainable Carbon Sequestration: Increasing CO2-Storage Efficiency through a CO2-Brine Displacement Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 sequestration is one of the proposed methods for reducing anthropogenic CO2 emissions to the atmosphere and therefore mitigating global climate change. Few studies on storing CO2 in an aquifer have been conducted on a regional scale. This study offers a conceptual approach to increasing the storage efficiency of CO2 injection in saline formations and investigates what an actual CO2 storage project might entail using field data for the Woodbine aquifer in East Texas. The study considers three aquifer management strategies for injecting CO2 emissions from nearby coal-fired power plants into the Woodbine aquifer. The aquifer management strategies studied are bulk CO2 injection, and two CO2-brine displacement strategies. A conceptual model performed with homogeneous and average reservoir properties reveals that bulk injection of CO2 pressurizes the aquifer, has a storage efficiency of 0.46% and can only last for 20 years without risk of fracturing the CO2 injection wells. The CO2-brine displacement strategy can continue injecting CO2 for as many as 240 years until CO2 begins to break through in the production wells. This offers 12 times greater CO2 storage efficiency than the bulk injection strategy. A full field simulation with a geological model based on existing aquifer data validates the storage capacity claims made by the conceptual model. A key feature in the geological model is the Mexia-Talco fault system that serves as a likely boundary between the saline aquifer region suitable for CO2 storage and an updip fresh water region. Simulation results show that CO2 does not leak into the fresh water region of the iv aquifer after 1000 years of monitoring if the faults have zero transmissibility, but a negligible volume of brine eventually gets through the mostly sealing fault system as pressure across the faults slowly equilibrates during the monitoring period. However, for fault transmissibilities of 0.1 and 1, both brine and CO2 leak into the fresh water aquifer in increasing amounts for both bulk injection and CO2-brine displacement strategies. In addition, brine production wells draw some fresh water into the saline aquifer if the Mexia-Talco fault system is not sealing. A CO2 storage project in the Woodbine aquifer would impact as many as 15 counties with high-pressure CO2 pipelines stretching as long as 875 km from the CO2 source to the injection site. The required percentage of power plant energy capacity was 7.43% for bulk injection, 7.9% for the external brine disposal case, and 10.2% for the internal saturated brine injection case. The estimated total cost was $0.00132–$0.00146/kWh for the bulk injection, $0.00191–$0.00211/kWh for the external brine disposal case, and $0.0019–$0.00209/kWh for the internal saturated brine injection case.

Akinnikawe, Oyewande

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - American Samoa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania American Samoa Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from American Samoa Data graphic Data Total Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions - Marshall Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Regional Oceania Marshall Islands Graphics Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from the Marshall Islands Data graphic Data Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from...

242

Calibration of Nondispersive Infrared CO2 Analyzers with CO2-in-Air Reference Gases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of eight CO2-in-air secondary standard calibration gases has been established by NOAA/Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change (GMCC) for use in its global CO2 monitoring program. Use of these gases obviates the need for pressure ...

W. D. Komhyr; T. B. Harris; L. S. Waterman

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Numerical Simulation of CO2 Sequestration in Natural CO2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Simulation of CO Simulation of CO 2 Sequestration in Natural CO 2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau Stephen P. White (S.White@irl.cri.nz, (64) 4 5690000) Graham J. Weir (G.Weir@irl.cri.nz, (64) 4 5690000) Warwick M. Kissling (W.Kissling@irl.cri.nz, (64) 4 5690000) Industrial Research Ltd. P.O. Box 31310 Lower Hutt, New Zealand Abstract This paper outlines the proposed research and summarizes pre-project work that forms a basis for a new research program on CO 2 sequestration in saline aquifers. The pre-project work considers storage and disposal of CO 2 several kilometers beneath the surface in generic aquifers and demonstrates the use of reactive chemical transport modeling to simulate mineral sequestration of CO 2. The current research project applies these techniques to particular saline

244

MEMBRANE PROCESS TO SEQUESTER CO2 FROM POWER PLANT FLUE GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to assess the feasibility of using a membrane process to capture CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas. During this program, MTR developed a novel membrane (Polaris™) with a CO2 permeance tenfold higher than commercial CO2-selective membranes used in natural gas treatment. The Polaris™ membrane, combined with a process design that uses a portion of combustion air as a sweep stream to generate driving force for CO2 permeation, meets DOE post-combustion CO2 capture targets. Initial studies indicate a CO2 separation and liquefaction cost of $20 - $30/ton CO2 using about 15% of the plant energy at 90% CO2 capture from a coal-fired power plant. Production of the Polaris™ CO2 capture membrane was scaled up with MTR’s commercial casting and coating equipment. Parametric tests of cross-flow and countercurrent/sweep modules prepared from this membrane confirm their near-ideal performance under expected flue gas operating conditions. Commercial-scale, 8-inch diameter modules also show stable performance in field tests treating raw natural gas. These findings suggest that membranes are a viable option for flue gas CO2 capture. The next step will be to conduct a field demonstration treating a realworld power plant flue gas stream. The first such MTR field test will capture 1 ton CO2/day at Arizona Public Service’s Cholla coal-fired power plant, as part of a new DOE NETL funded program.

Tim Merkel; Karl Amo; Richard Baker; Ramin Daniels; Bilgen Friat; Zhenjie He; Haiqing Lin; Adrian Serbanescu

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Opportunities for CO2 around Scotland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that include drilling of boreholes are likely to provide sufficient confidence to initiate a commercial having potential for CO2 storage. Four gas condensate fields and one gas field offer significant price reaches stability at a commercially attractive level, and make CCS a long-term profitable option

Haszeldine, Stuart

246

NETL: Carbon Storage - CO2 Utilization Focus Area  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Utilization CO2 Utilization Carbon Storage CO2 Utilization Focus Area Carbon dioxide (CO2) utilization efforts focus on pathways and novel approaches for reducing CO2 emissions by developing beneficial uses for the CO2 that will mitigate CO2 emissions in areas where geologic storage may not be an optimal solution. CO2 can be used in applications that could generate significant benefits. It is possible to develop alternatives that can use captured CO2 or convert it to useful products such chemicals, cements, or plastics. Revenue generated from the utilized CO2 could also offset a portion of the CO2 capture cost. Processes or concepts must take into account the life cycle of the process to ensure that additional CO2 is not produced beyond what is already being removed from or going into the atmosphere. Furthermore, while the utilization of CO2 has some potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere, CO2 has certain disadvantages as a chemical reactant. Carbon dioxide is rather inert and non-reactive. This inertness is the reason why CO2 has broad industrial and technical applications. Each potential use of CO2 has an energy requirement that needs to be determined; and the CO2 produced to create the energy for the specific utilization process must not exceed the CO2 utilized.

247

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Title High resolution fossil fuel combustion CO2 emission fluxes for the United States Publication...

248

CO2 Global Solutions International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Solutions International Jump to: navigation, search Name CO2 Global Solutions International Place Madrid, Spain Zip 28001 Sector Carbon Product CO2 Global Solutions is a...

249

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Title CO2 Monitoring for Demand Controlled Ventilation in Commercial Buildings Publication Type Report Year...

250

Supercritical CO2-Corrosion of Steels in CCS Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... even after one year of exposure and not significantly dependent on the atmosphere, that is CO2-saturated geothermal brine or water vapour-saturated CO2.

251

Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

July 06, 2010 Research Projects to Convert Captured CO2 Emissions to Useful Products Six Projects Selected by DOE Will Further Important Technologies for Helping Reduce CO2...

252

CO2 Emissions - the Former German Democratic Republic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany the Former German Democratic Republic Graphics CO2 Emissions from the Former German Democratic Republic Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Former German Democratic...

253

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission...

254

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of...

255

Reactor Design for CO2 Capture Using Sorbents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactor Design for CO 2 Capture Using Sorbents Background Carbon Sequestration is rapidly becoming accepted as a viable option to reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO 2 )...

256

Electricity Without CO2 Emissions: Assessing the Costs of Carbon...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Johnson and Keith: Electricity without CO 2 ... 1 ELECTRICITY FROM FOSSIL FUELS WITHOUT CO 2 EMISSIONS: ASSESSING THE COSTS OF CARBON DIOXIDE CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION IN US...

257

Archer Daniels Midland Company: CO2 Capture from Biofuels Production...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Company: CO 2 Capture from Biofuels Production and Sequestration into the Mt. Simon Sandstone Background Carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial processes, among other...

258

2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Sheraton Station Square, Pittsburgh, PA July 8 - 11, 2013 ION Novel Solvent System for CO 2 Capture FE0005799 Nathan Brown ION Engineering...

259

CO2 uptake and ecophysiological parameters of the grain crops...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ecosystems & Environment Volume 164 Pagination 162-175 Keywords CO2 sink, Gross photosynthesis, Maize, Net CO2 exchange partitioning, VPD limitation of photosynthesis, wheat...

260

on Energy Transition and CO2 Price  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper examines the impact that uncertainty over economic growth may have on global energy transition and CO2 prices. We use a general-equilibrium model derived from MERGE, and define several stochastic scenarios for economic growth. Each scenario is characterized by the likelihood of a rapid global economic recovery. More precisely, during each decade, global economy may- with a given probability- shift from the EIA's (2010) low-economic-growth path to the EIA's (2010) high-economic-growth path. The climate policy considered corresponds in the medium term to the commitments announced after the Copenhagen conference, and in the long term to a reduction of 25 % in global energy-related CO2 emissions (with respect to 2005). For the prices of CO2 and electricity, as well as for the implementation of CCS, the branches of the resulting stochastic trajectories appear to be heavily influenced by agents ’ initial expectations of future economic growth and by the economic growth actually realized. Thus, in 2040, the global price of CO2 may range from $21 (when an initially-anticipated economic recovery never occurs) to $128 (in case of nonanticipated rapid economic recovery). In addition, we show that within each region, the model internalizes the constraints limiting the expansion of each power-generation technology through the price paid by the power utility for the acquisition of new production capacity. As a result, in China, the curves of endogenous investment costs for onshore and offshore wind are all bubble-shaped centered on 2025, a date which corresponds to the establishment of a global CO2 cap-and-trade market in the model. 1.

Olivier Dur; Axel Pierru; Yves Smeers; Olivier Dur; Lasserve A; Axel Pierru B; Yves Smeers A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Computational Evaluation of Metal-Organic Frameworks for CO2 Capture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), a new class of porous solids comprised of metal-containing nodes linked by organic ligands, have become promising materials for gas separations. In particular, their flexible chemistry makes them attractive for CO2 capture from flue gas streams in post-combustion plants. Although numerous efforts have been exerted on the investigation of MOFs for CO2 capture, the exploration of the effects from coexisting components present in very dilute proportions in flue gases is limited because of the experimental difficulty to determine the coadsorption of CO2 with trace components. In this regard, molecular simulations show superiority. In this study, molecular simulations are used to estimate the in?uence of impurities: water, O2, and SO2 on post-combustion CO2 capture in MOFs. Firstly, two MOFs with coordinatively unsaturated metal sites (CUMs), HKUST-1 and Mg-MOF-74 are explored. Increase of CO2 adsorption is observed for hydrated HKUST-1; on the contrary, the opposite water adsorption behavior is observed in hydrated Mg-MOF-74, leading to decrease of CO2 adsorption. Further, water effects on CO2 capture in M-HKUST1 (M = Mg, Zn, Co, Ni) are evaluated to test whether comparing the binding energy could be a general method to evaluate water effects in MOFs with CUMs. It is found that the method works well for Zn-, Co-, and Ni-HKUST1 but partially for Mg-HKUST1. In addition, the effects of O2 and SO2 on CO2 capture in MOFs are also investigated for the first time, showing that the effects of O2 may be negligible but SO2 has negative effects in the CO2 capture process in HKUST-1 systems. Secondly, the influences of water on CO2 capture in three UiO-66 MOFs with functional groups, –NH2, –OH and –Br are explored, respectively. For UiO-66-NH2 and -OH, the presence of water lowers CO2 adsorption significantly; in contrast, water shows much smaller effects in UiO-66-Br. Moreover, the presence of SO2 decreases water adsorption but enhances CO2 uptakes slightly in both UiO-66-NH2 and -Br. Finally, the effects of impurities on CO2 capture in a MOF with suitable pore size (PCN-200) are analyzed. The adsorption of both CO2 and N2 decrease substantially even with 1% water present in the mixture. In addition, the presence of low SO2 does not show obvious effect in PCN-200. However, a lower CO2 adsorption is observed for a mixture with a high SO2 content. In collaboration with experimental groups, the performances of three new MOFs in CO2 capture are evaluated using molecular simulations. The computational results demonstrate the feasibility of precisely designing single-molecule traps (SMT) for CO2 capture. Also, a multi-functional MOF with micro-porosity, open Cu2+ sites and amine groups has also proved computationally the selective adsorption of CO2 over CH4 and N2. Last, we demonstrate that charge separation is an effective strategy for improving CO2 capture in MOFs.

Yu, Jiamei

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Neutrally Buoyant, Upper Ocean Sediment Trap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have designed and deployed a neutrally buoyant sediment trap (NBST) intended for use in the upper ocean. The aim was to minimize hydrodynamic flow interference by making a sediment trap that drifted freely with the ambient current. ...

James R. Valdes; James F. Price

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

On the production behavior of enhanced geothermal systems with CO2as working fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermal depletion. Wepresent the first-ever three-dimensional simulations of CO2injection-production systems. These show strong effects of gravity onmass flow and heat extraction, due to the large contrast of CO2 densitybetween cold injection and hot production conditions. The tendency forpreferential flow of cold, dense CO2 along the reservoir bottom can leadto premature thermal breakthrough. The problem can be avoided byproducing from only a limited depth interval at the top of thereservoir.

Pruess, K.

2007-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

264

CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For the geologic and ocean storage options, CO2 capture costs from another project were added to the costs of CO2 storage estimated in this project to provide combined costs of CO2 capture and storage. Combined costs) cases were used as the basis for the capture component of this project. Costs of CO2 capture were based

265

Measurement on CO_2 Solution Density by Optical Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical technology based on Mach-Zehnder interferometry was successfully applied to a high-pressure liquid CO_2 and water system to measure CO_2 solution density. Experiments were carried out at a pressure range of from 5.0 to 12.5 MPa, temperatures ... Keywords: CO_2 ocean sequestration, CO_2 solution, Mach-Zehnder Interferometry, density

Y. Song; M. Nishio; B. Chen; S. Someya; T. Ohsumi

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

COLD TRAPS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cold trap is presented for removing a condensable component from a gas mixture by cooling. It consists of a shell, the exterior surface of which is chilled by a refrigerant, and conductive fins welded inside the shell to condense the gas, and distribute the condensate evenly throughout the length of the trap, so that the trap may function until it becomes completely filled with the condensed solid. The contents may then be removed as either a gas or as a liquid by heating the trap. This device has particuinr use as a means for removing uranium hexafluoride from the gaseous diffusion separation process during equipment breakdown and repair periods.

Thompson, W.I.

1958-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

267

Novel Solvent System for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solvent System for CO Solvent System for CO 2 Capture Background The mission of the U.S. Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Research & Development (R&D) Program is to develop innovative environmental control technologies to enable full use of the nation's vast coal reserves, while at the same time allowing the current fleet of coal-fired power plants to comply with existing and emerging environmental

268

The Power to Reduce CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2007 EPRI released its first Prism analysis [EPRI 2007], providing a technically and economically feasible roadmap for the electricity sector as it seeks to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The Prism analysis provided a comprehensive assessment of potential CO2 reductions in key technology areas of the electricity sector. In 2009 EPRI, updated the analysis to reflect economic and technological changes that have the potential to affect projected emissions and the technologies to address them. The upda...

2010-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

269

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operation Project No.: DE-FE0004278 American Air Liquide, Inc. will develop a system for CO2 capture based on sub-ambient temperature operation of a hollow fiber membrane. The...

270

Novel regenerable magnesium hydroxide sorbents for CO2 capture at warm gas temperatures  

SciTech Connect

A novel sorbent consisting of Mg(OH)2 was developed for carbon dioxide (CO2) capture at 200-315 °C suitable for CO2 capture applications such as coal gasification systems. Thermodynamic analysis conducted with the FactSage software package indicated that the Mg(OH)2 sorbent system is highly favorable for CO2 capture up to 400 °C at 30 atm. MgCO3 formed during sorption decomposes to release CO2 at temperatures as low as 375 °C up to 20 atm. MgO rehydroxylation to form Mg(OH)2 is possible at temperatures up to 300 °C at 20 atm. The experimental data show that the sorbent is regenerable at 375 °C at high pressure and that steam does not affect the sorbent performance. A multicycle test conducted in a high-pressure fixed-bed flow reactor at 200 °C with 28% CO2 showed stable reactivity during the cyclic tests. The capture capacity also increased with increasing pressure. The sorbent is unique because it exhibits a high CO2 capture capacity of more than 3 mol/kg at 200 °C and also is regenerable at a low temperature of 375 °C and high pressure. High-pressure regeneration is advantageous because the CO2 compression costs required for sequestration can be reduced.

Siriwardane, R.; Stevens, R.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

4, 41014133, 2007 CO2 effects on  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the G4 buckles (b). The intermediate sized particles were trapped in buckles with smaller and 67-nm polystyrene latex particles was pumped past the surface (perpendicular to the buckles the Camille & Henry Dreyfus Foundation (J.G.), the NER Program at the National Science Foundation (J.G., E

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

272

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O'Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O' Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Post-Combustion CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Post-Combustion CO2 Capture for Existing PC Boilers by Self-concentrating Amine Absorbent Project No.: DE-FE0004274 3H Company will evaluate the feasibility of its "Self-Concentrating Absorbent CO2 Capture Process." The process is based on amines in a non-aqueous solvent which, upon reaction with CO2, separate into two distinct phases: a CO2-rich liquid phase and a dilute lean phase. The proposed process offers several potential advantages. Preliminary experimental data show that the process has the potential of reducing the total regeneration energy by as much as 70 percent. The solvent has high working capacity, thus required solvent volume would be lower than that required in a currently available amine system. This results in lower pumping requirements, lower auxiliary power demands, and reduced equipment size. In addition, since the solvent is non-aqueous, corrosion issues would be reduced. During the three-year project, an engineering design supported by laboratory data and economic justification will be developed to construct and operate a slipstream demonstration facility at an E-ON power plant in the United States as a next stage of commercialization development.

275

Natural CO2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau Â… Candidates for CO2 Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Reservoirs on the Colorado Plateau and Southern Rocky Mountains: Candidates for CO 2 Sequestration. R. Allis (nrugs.rallis@state.ut.us; 801-537-3301) T. Chidsey (nrugs.tchidsey@state.ut.us; 801-537-3364) W. Gwynn (nrugs.wgwynn@state.ut.us; 801-537-3366) C. Morgan (nrugs.cmorgan@state.ut.us; 801-537-3370) Utah Geological Survey P.O. Box 146100 Salt Lake City, UT 84114 S. White (s.white@irl.cri.nz; 64-4-569-0000) Industrial Research Ltd. P.O. Box 31-310 Lower Hutt, New Zealand M. Adams (madams@egi.utah.edu; 801-585-7784) J. Moore (jmoore@egi.utah.edu; 801-585-6931) Energy and Geoscience Institute, 427 Wakara Way, Suite 300 Salt Lake City, UT84107 Abstract Numerous natural accumulations of CO 2 -dominant gases have been discovered as a result of

276

NETL: IEP – Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture from Flue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption Project No.: FG26-05NT42488 Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Basic Illustration of the Phase Transitional Absorption Process. Hampton University researched a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) absorption concept, phase transitional absorption, that utilizes a two-part proprietary absorbent consisting of an activated agent dissolved in a solvent. Phase separation of the activated agent from the chemical solvent occurs during CO2 absorption and physical separation of the two phases exiting the absorber reduces the volume of process liquid requiring thermal regeneration. This unique aspect of phase transitional absorption also decreases the amount of energy (i.e., steam) required to liberate the CO2. If the proper liquid

277

CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents.

Chakib Bouallou

2010-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

278

CO2 capture processes in power plants - Le captage du CO2 dans les centrales thermiques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This review is devoted to assess and compare various processes aiming at recover CO2 from power plants fed with natural gas (NGCC) and pulverized coal (PC). These processes are post combustion CO2 capture using chemical solvents, natural gas reforming for pre-combustion capture and oxy-fuel combustion with cryogenic recovery of CO2. These processes were evaluated to give some clues for choosing the best option for each type of power plant. The comparison of these various concepts suggests that, in the short and medium term, chemical absorption is the most interesting process for NGCC power plants. For CP power plants, oxy-combustion can be a very interesting option, as well as post-combustion capture by chemical solvents.

Bouallou, Chakib

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at tempera¬tures in the range of 50ºC to 100ºC or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

NETL: 2013 Conference Proceedings - 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting July 8-11, 2013 Previous Proceedings 2012: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2011: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2010: NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2009: Annual NETL CO2 Capture Technology for Existing Plants R&D Meeting Proceedings of the 2013 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, July 8 Opening/Overview Post-Combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Tuesday, July 9 Post-Combustion Solvent-Based Capture CO2 Compression Wednesday, July 10 Post-Combustion Membrane-Based Capture Pre-Combustion Capture Projects Thursday, July 11 ARPA-E Capture Projects System Studies and Modeling Oxy-Combustion and Chemical Looping Posters PRESENTATIONS Monday, July 8, 2013 Opening/Overview Introduction [PDF-MB]

282

Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership PCOR | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Reduction Partnership PCOR CO2 Reduction Partnership PCOR Jump to: navigation, search Name Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR) Place Grand Forks, North Dakota Zip 58202-9018 Product North Dakota-based consortium researching CO2 storage options. PCOR is busy with the ECBM in the Unminable Lignite Research Project. References Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR) is a company located in Grand Forks, North Dakota . References ↑ "Plains CO2 Reduction Partnership (PCOR)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Plains_CO2_Reduction_Partnership_PCOR&oldid=349772"

283

Influence of Stratospheric Sudden Warming on AIRS Midtropospheric CO2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Midtropospheric CO2 retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) were used to explore the influence of stratospheric sudden warming (SSW) on CO2 in the middle to upper troposphere. To choose the SSW events that had strong coupling ...

Xun Jiang; Jingqian Wang; Edward T. Olsen; Thomas Pagano; Luke L. Chen; Yuk L. Yung

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

CO2 Emissions - the Former Federal Republic of Germany  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Germany the Former Federal Republic of Germany CO2 Emissions from the Former Federal Republic of Germany Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the Former Federal Republic of...

285

CO2 Emissions - U.S. Virgin Islands  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central America, South America, and the Caribbean Nations U.S. Virgin Islands Graphics CO2 Emissions from the U.S. Virgin Islands Data graphic Data CO2 Emissions from the U.S....

286

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Advanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004228 Akermin, Inc. is to conduct bench-scale testing...

287

Literature Review of Mobility Control Methods for CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an organic co-solvent such as toluene; although this thickened CO 2 was shown to improve oil recovery from cores, the co-solvent requirement (roughly 10% co-solvent, 90% CO 2 )...

288

Stored CO2 and Methane Leakage Risk Assessment and Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stored Co 2 and Methane Leakage riSk aSSeSSMent and Monitoring tooL deveLopMent: Co 2 Capture projeCt phaSe 2 Background Unmineable coal seams at depths beyond conventional...

289

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WITH HETEROGENEITY IN OIL AND GAS RESERVOIRS APPLIED TO CO 2sedimentary basins, oil and gas fields, and industrial CO 2Harr, C.L. , 1996, Paradox oil and gas potential of the Ute

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Africa  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Africa Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Africa Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data What countries constitute Africa? Map of Africa Trends Africa's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions are...

291

Small Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO2 sequestration in Arbuckle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Scale Field Test Demonstrating CO 2 sequestration in Arbuckle Saline Aquifer and by CO 2 -EOR at Wellington field, Sumner County, Kansas -- W. Lynn Watney and Jason Rush Kansas...

292

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

CO2-Rock Interactions in EGS-CO2: New Zealand TVZ Geothermal Systems as a Natural Analog Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On...

293

Operation and analysis of a supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is investigating advanced Brayton cycles using supercritical working fluids for use with solar, nuclear or fossil heat sources. The focus of this work has been on the supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle (S-CO2) which has the potential for high efficiency in the temperature range of interest for these heat sources, and is also very compact, with the potential for lower capital costs. The first step in the development of these advanced cycles was the construction of a small scale Brayton cycle loop, funded by the Laboratory Directed Research & Development program, to study the key issue of compression near the critical point of CO{sub 2}. This document outlines the design of the small scale loop, describes the major components, presents models of system performance, including losses, leakage, windage, compressor performance, and flow map predictions, and finally describes the experimental results that have been generated.

Wright, Steven Alan; Radel, Ross F.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.; Rochau, Gary Eugene

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Honing in on CO2 to Determine Who's in the 'House' | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Honing in on CO2 to Determine Who's in the 'House' Honing in on CO2 to Determine Who's in the 'House' Honing in on CO2 to Determine Who's in the 'House' September 10, 2010 - 3:35pm Addthis Kevin Craft Heating and cooling a building seems like a straightforward task. But many buildings' heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems waste energy and don't pay any attention to indoor air quality. "Commercial buildings' HVAC systems are regulated by guidelines that dictate how much air flow is needed to provide adequate fresh air ventilation," says Chuck McKinney of Newton, Mass.-based Aircuity. "But the number of people in a given building varies greatly throughout the day and night, and setting one fixed rate of air flow based on the theoretical occupancy usually results in over-ventilation and energy waste."

295

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO CO 2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Background The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Existing Plants, Emissions & Capture (EPEC) Program is performing research to develop advanced technologies focusing on carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions control for existing pulverized coal-fired plants. This new focus on post-combustion and oxy-combustion CO 2 emissions control technology, CO 2 compression, and beneficial reuse is in response to the priority for advanced

296

PFC and CO2 Emissions from an Australian Aluminium Smelter ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, The accurate measurement of perfluorocarbon and CO2 emissions from aluminium smelters is becoming increasingly important. CSIRO has ...

297

CO2-avskiljning med syrgasfrbrnning -nya tekniska mjligheter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

improves with co-firing · But corrosion problems remain · Coal-related CO2 emissions remain #12;Combustion

Lemurell, Stefan

298

CO2 Mineral Sequestration Studies in US  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Mineral Sequestration Studies in US Philip Goldberg 1 , Zhong-Ying Chen 2 , William O'Connor 3 , Richard Walters 3 , and Hans Ziock 4 1 National Energy Technology Laboratory, P.O. Box 10940, Pittsburgh, PA 15236, goldberg@netl.doe.gov, (412)386-5806 2 Science Applications International Corporation, 1710 Goodridge Dr. McLean, VA, zhong- ying.chen@saic.com, (703)676-7328 3 Albany Research Center, Albany, OR oconner@arc.doe.gov, walters@alrc.doe, (541)967-5834 4 Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM, ksl@lanl.gov, ziock@lanl.gov, (505)667- 7265 Abstract Carbon sequestration by reacting naturally occurring Mg and Ca containing minerals with CO 2 to form carbonates has many unique advantages. Most notably is the fact that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO

299

CO2 Sequestration and Recycle by Photosynthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Visible light-photocatalysis could provide a cost-effective route to recycle CO2 to useful chemicals or fuels. Research is planned to study the reactivity of adsorbates, their role in the photosynthesis reaction, and their relation to the nature of surface sites during photosynthesis of methanol and hydrocarbons from CO{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O. The year two research focus catalyst screening and IR studies. Key research results show Pd/TiO2 exhibits the highest activity for hydrocarbon synthesis from photocatalytic reactions. The in situ IR could successfully monitor the adsorbate hydrocarbon species on Cu/TiO2. Year III research will focus on developing a better understanding of the key factors which control the catalyst activity.

Steven S.C. Chuang

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) CO2 Flux Estimated from Air-Sea Difference in CO2 Partial Pressure (Revised October 2009) The files in this site contain a revised (October 2009) version of the climatological mean values in 4° Latitude X 5° Longitude box areas and the distribution maps. These were originally published in: Takahashi, et al. (2009), DSR II, 56, 554-577. The data file containing annual flux data for each 4° X 5° box is located here. The data file from which this map was created, including all 12 months of data is here. This data file, in ASCII form, also contains the flux data and the intermediate values used to calculate that flux for each month. In December 2010 our colleague, R. Wanninkhof pointed out a problem with the flux data for the month of December. The file of ice coverage for December was corrupted and showed zero ice for the entire month, worldwide. This has been corrected with the estimated percent of ice and the flux recalculated. Version "c" of the data files contain this correction.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

Evaluating CO2-EOR and CO2 Storage Capacity in Kansas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waterfloods, and likely to be good CO2 EOR candidates · No single field is large enough to justify the capital second well completed in Chester sand 1999-2001 rapid development of entire field 2001 waterflood to injectors) Waterflood 10 injectors 13 producers (2 of which are not "plumbed into flood") Fluid statistics

Peterson, Blake R.

303

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture 11 -13 July 2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop 11 - 13 July 2010 Tufts European Center Talloires, France Institute | | Clean Air Task Force | | Asia Clean Energy Innovation Initiative | #12;Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop 11 - 13 July 2010 Talloires, France PROCEEDINGS: Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Workshop

304

2, 4378, 2006 Ice-driven CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- dred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine 18 O) have varied in phase both at the 41 000-yearCPD 2, 43­78, 2006 Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume W. F. Ruddiman Title Page Abstract Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate of the Past Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

305

Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids  

SciTech Connect

Current chemical CO2 scrubbing technology is primarily aqueous alkanolamine based. These systems rapidly bind CO2 (forming water-soluble carbamate and bicarbonate salts) however, the process has serious disadvantages. The concentration of monoethanolamine rarely exceeds 30 wt % due to the corrosive nature of the solution, and this reduces the maximum CO2 volumetric (?108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (?7 wt%) of the CO2 scrubber. The ?30 wt % loading of ethanolamine also means that a large excess of water must be pumped and heated during CO2 capture and release, and this greatly increases the energy requirements especially considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1). Our approach is to switch to organic systems that chemically bind CO2 as liquid alkylcarbonate salts. Our CO2-binding organic liquids have higher CO2 solubility, lower specific heats, potential for less corrosion and lower binding energies for CO2 than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs also reversibly bind and release mixed sulfur oxides. Furthermore the CO2BOL system can be direct solvent replacements for any solvent based CO2 capture systems because they are commercially available reagents and because they are fluids they would not require extensive process re-engineering.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

306

Spatiotemporal Imaging for Monitoring CO2 Storage in Coal Jerry M. Harris, Youli Quan, Eduardo Santos, Jolene Robin-McCaskill, Tope Akinbehinje, Yemi Arogunmati, Evan Um  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spatiotemporal Imaging for Monitoring CO2 Storage in Coal Jerry M. Harris, Youli Quan, Eduardo, Stanford University Work Flow Summary References Measurement of Acoustic Properties of Coal (a) CO2 the stationary SIRT for partial surveys. Flow Simulation Porofluid Porofluid Confining fluid Pump Coal Sample

Harris, Jerry M.

307

Development of a Method for Measuring Carbon Balance in Chemical Sequestration of CO2  

SciTech Connect

Anthropogenic CO2 released from fossil fuel combustion is a primary greenhouse gas which contributes to “global warming.” It is estimated that stationary power generation contributes over one-third of total CO2 emissions. Reducing CO2 in the atmosphere can be accomplished either by decreasing the rate at which CO2 is emitted into the atmosphere or by increasing the rate at which it is removed from it. Extensive research has been conducted on determining a fast and inexpensive method to sequester carbon dioxide. These methods can be classified into two categories, CO2 fixation by natural sink process for CO2, or direct CO2 sequestration by artificial processes. In direct sequestration, CO2 produced from sources such as coal-fired power plants, would be captured from the exhausted gases. CO2 from a combustion exhaust gas is absorbed with an aqueous ammonia solution through scrubbing. The captured CO2 is then used to synthesize ammonium bicarbonate (ABC or NH4HCO3), an economical source of nitrogen fertilizer. In this work, we studied the carbon distribution after fertilizer is synthesized from CO2. The synthesized fertilizer in laboratory is used as a “CO2 carrier” to “transport” CO2 from the atmosphere to crops. After biological assimilation and metabolism in crops treated with ABC, a considerable amount of the carbon source is absorbed by the plants with increased biomass production. The majority of the unused carbon source percolates into the soil as carbonates, such as calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). These carbonates are environmentally benign. As insoluble salts, they are found in normal rocks and can be stored safely and permanently in soil. This investigation mainly focuses on the carbon distribution after the synthesized fertilizer is applied to soil. Quantitative examination of carbon distribution in an ecosystem is a challenging task since the carbon in the soil may come from various sources. Therefore synthesized 14C tagged NH4HCO3 (ABC) was used. Products of ammonium bicarbonate (ABC) or long-term effect ammonium bicarbonate (LEABC) were tagged with 14C when they were synthesized in the laboratory. An indoor greenhouse was built and wheat was chosen as the plant to study in this ecosystem. The investigated ecosystem consists of plant (wheat), soils with three different pH values (alkaline, neutral and acid), and three types of underground water (different Ca2+ and Mg2+ concentrations). After biological assimilation and metabolism in wheat receiving ABC or LEABC, it was found that a considerable amount (up to 10%) of the carbon source is absorbed by the wheat with increased biomass production. The majority of the unused carbon source (up to 76%) percolated into the soil as carbonates, such as environmentally benign calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Generally speaking, alkaline soil has a higher capability to capture and store carbon. For the same soil, there is no apparent difference in carbon capturing capability between ABC fertilizer and LEABC fertilizer. These findings answer the question how carbon is distributed after synthesized fertilizer is applied into the ecosystem. In addition, a separate post-experiment on fertilizer carbon forms that exist in the soil was made. It was found that the up to 88% of the trapped carbon exists in the form of insoluble salts (i.e., CaCO3) in alkaline soils. This indicates that alkaline soil has a greater potential for storing carbon after the use of the synthesized fertilizer from exhausted CO2.

Cheng, Zhongxian; Pan, Wei-Ping; Riley, John T.

2006-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

308

WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Proceedings: Workshop on CO2 Transport/Storage Cost Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If reductions in CO2 emissions are needed in the utility industry, one of the potential solutions is application of CO2 capture and storage. In order to make informed decisions on applying CO2 capture and storage to the utility industry, high quality estimates of the costs are needed. While significant efforts have been made to evaluate the costs of CO2 capture from power plants, relatively little has been done to develop costs of transport and storage of CO2. This report presents the results of a worksh...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

310

Capture and Sequestration of CO2 at the Boise White Paper Mill  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the efforts taken to develop a preliminary design for the first commercial-scale CO2 capture and sequestration (CCS) project associated with biomass power integrated into a pulp and paper operation. The Boise Wallula paper mill is located near the township of Wallula in Southeastern Washington State. Infrastructure at the paper mill will be upgraded such that current steam needs and a significant portion of the current mill electric power are supplied from a 100% biomass power source. A new biomass power system will be constructed with an integrated amine-based CO2 capture plant to capture approximately 550,000 tons of CO2 per year for geologic sequestration. A customized version of Fluor Corporation’s Econamine Plus™ carbon capture technology will be designed to accommodate the specific chemical composition of exhaust gases from the biomass boiler. Due to the use of biomass for fuel, employing CCS technology represents a unique opportunity to generate a net negative carbon emissions footprint, which on an equivalent emissions reduction basis is 1.8X greater than from equivalent fossil fuel sources (SPATH and MANN, 2004). Furthermore, the proposed project will offset a significant amount of current natural gas use at the mill, equating to an additional 200,000 tons of avoided CO2 emissions. Hence, the total net emissions avoided through this project equates to 1,100,000 tons of CO2 per year. Successful execution of this project will provide a clear path forward for similar kinds of emissions reduction that can be replicated at other energy-intensive industrial facilities where the geology is suitable for sequestration. This project also represents a first opportunity for commercial development of geologic storage of CO2 in deep flood basalt formations. The Boise paper mill site is host to a Phase II pilot study being carried out under DOE’s Regional Carbon Partnership Program. Lessons learned from this pilot study and other separately funded projects studying CO2 sequestration in basalts will be heavily leveraged in developing a suitable site characterization program and system design for permanent sequestration of captured CO2. The areal extent, very large thickness, high permeability in portions of the flows, and presence of multiple very low permeability flow interior seals combine to produce a robust sequestration target. Moreover, basalt formations are quite reactive with water-rich supercritical CO2 and formation water that contains dissolved CO2 to generate carbonate minerals, providing for long-term assurance of permanent sequestration. Sub-basalt sediments also exist at the site providing alternative or supplemental storage capacity.

B.P. McGrail; C.J. Freeman; G.H. Beeman; E.C. Sullivan; S.K. Wurstner; C.F. Brown; R.D. Garber; D. Tobin E.J. Steffensen; S. Reddy; J.P. Gilmartin

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

311

Dual-phase membrane for High temperature CO2 separation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Jerry Y.S. Lin Jerry Y.S. Lin Chemical Engineering Arizona State University Tempe, AZ 85287 Jerry.lin@asu.edu Pre-Combustion Carbon Dioxide Capture by a New Dual-Phase Ceramic-Carbonate Membrane Reactor 2 Background 3 CO 2 Capture Methods and Efficiency Improvement Coal, Natural gas, Biomass CO 2 separation Power plant CO 2 compression, conditioning for sequestration Gasification Reforming Shift CO 2 Separation Power plant Power plant Air separation N 2 /O 2 CO 2 Post- combustion H 2 /CO H 2 /CO H 2 CO 2 H 2 O/N 2 /O 2 CO 2 H 2 Pre- combustion Air N 2 O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 CO 2 Oxyfuel Combustion Air separation Air Air separation Air Air separation Air Air Air Air Air separation Air Air separation Air N 2 Air separation Air O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 N 2 Air separation Air N 2 Air O 2 or O 2 /CO 2 N 2 Air Air separation N 2 Air 4 Water-Gas-Shift Reaction and Membrane Reactor Reforming

312

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced the award of 11 projects with a total project value of $75.5 million* to conduct site characterization of promising geologic formations for CO2 storage. These Recovery Act projects will increase our understanding of the potential for these formations to safely and permanently store CO2. The information gained from these projects (detailed below) will further DOE's efforts to develop a national assessment of CO2 storage capacity in deep geologic formations. Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage * Subsequently, the Board of Public Works project in Holland, MI has been

313

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Energy Technology Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: GHG inventory Resource Type: Software/modeling tools Website: www.netl.doe.gov/energy-analyses/refshelf/results.asp?ptype=Models/Too References: NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool [1] NETL - World CO2 Emissions - Projected Trends Tool This interactive tool enables the user to look at both total and power sector CO2 emissions from the use of coal, oil, or natural gas, over the period 1990 to 2030. One can use the tool to compare five of the larger CO2 emitters to each other or to overall world emissions. The data are from the

314

ARM - Datastreams - 30co2flx60m  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

flx60m flx60m Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025038 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : 30CO2FLX60M Eddy Correlation CO2 Flux Data: 60 m samples, 30-min avg Active Dates 2001.01.01 - 2013.01.27 Measurement Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Originating Instrument Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2FLX) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Atmospheric turbulence Lmoni CO2 flux fc_corr CO2 flux fc_wpl_h CO2 flux fc_wpl_le Sensible heat flux h Latent heat flux le CO2 concentration mean_c Atmospheric moisture

315

Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Book: Hyperspectral Geobotanical Remote Sensing For Co2 Storage Monitoring Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This project's goal is to develop remote sensing methods for early detection and spatial mapping, over whole regions simultaneously, of any surface areas under which there are significant CO2 leaks from deep underground storage formations. If large amounts of CO2 gas percolated up from a storage formation below to within plant root depth of the surface, the CO2 soil concentrations near the surface would become elevated and would affect individual plants and their local plant ecologies. Excessive soil CO2 concentrations are observed to significantly affect local plant

316

CO2 Sequestration in Deep Aquifers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

v. 69-70, p. 65-69, 2000. Pruess, K., TOUGH2-A general-purpose numerical simulator for multiphase fluid and heat flow, Rep. LBL - 29400, Lawrence Berkeley Lab., September 1991....

317

QGESS: CO2 Impurity Design Parameters  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Q Q U U A A L L I I T T Y Y G G U U I I D D E E L L I I N N E E S S F F O O R R E E N N E E R R G G Y Y S S Y Y S S T T E E M M S S T T U U D D I I E E S S C C O O 2 2 I I m m p p u u r r i i t t y y D D e e s s i i g g n n P P a a r r a a m m e e t t e e r r s s DOE/NETL-2010/???? DOE/NETL-341/011212 August 2013 CO 2 Impurity Design Parameters Quality Guidelines for Energy System Studies Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

318

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - CO2 Capture Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas CO2 Capture Membrane Process for Power Plant Flue Gas Project No.: DE-NT0005313 CLICK ON IMAGE TO ENLARGE Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International is researching fluorinated polymer membranes for carbon dioxide capture. RTI's research effort includes membrane materials development, module design, and process design. RTI is pursuing the development of two hollow-fiber membrane materials. First, RTI is working with Generon to develop a membrane material constructed of polycarbonate-based polymers. Lab-scale membrane modules are being studied with simulated flue-gas mixtures with and without flue gas emission contaminants. Two larger-scale polycarbonate membrane module prototypes are being tested with a slipstream of actual flue gas from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Multipollutant

319

Supersonic Technology for CO2 Capture: A High Efficiency Inertial CO2 Extraction System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

IMPACCT Project: Researchers at ATK and ACENT Laboratories are developing a device that relies on aerospace wind-tunnel technologies to turn CO2 into a condensed solid for collection and capture. ATK’s design incorporates a special nozzle that converges and diverges to expand flue gas, thereby cooling it off and turning the CO2 into solid particles which are removed from the system by a cyclonic separator. This technology is mechanically simple, contains no moving parts and generates no chemical waste, making it inexpensive to construct and operate, readily scalable, and easily integrated into existing facilities. The increase in the cost to coal-fired power plants associated with introduction of this system would be 50% less than current technologies.

None

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect

The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

322

System-level modeling for geological storage of CO2  

SciTech Connect

One way to reduce the effects of anthropogenic greenhousegases on climate is to inject carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrialsources into deep geological formations such as brine formations ordepleted oil or gas reservoirs. Research has and is being conducted toimprove understanding of factors affecting particular aspects ofgeological CO2 storage, such as performance, capacity, and health, safetyand environmental (HSE) issues, as well as to lower the cost of CO2capture and related processes. However, there has been less emphasis todate on system-level analyses of geological CO2 storage that considergeological, economic, and environmental issues by linking detailedrepresentations of engineering components and associated economic models.The objective of this study is to develop a system-level model forgeological CO2 storage, including CO2 capture and separation,compression, pipeline transportation to the storage site, and CO2injection. Within our system model we are incorporating detailedreservoir simulations of CO2 injection and potential leakage withassociated HSE effects. The platform of the system-level modelingisGoldSim [GoldSim, 2006]. The application of the system model is focusedon evaluating the feasibility of carbon sequestration with enhanced gasrecovery (CSEGR) in the Rio Vista region of California. The reservoirsimulations are performed using a special module of the TOUGH2 simulator,EOS7C, for multicomponent gas mixtures of methane and CO2 or methane andnitrogen. Using this approach, the economic benefits of enhanced gasrecovery can be directly weighed against the costs, risks, and benefitsof CO2 injection.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Finsterle, Stefan; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2006-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

323

Modeling global atmospheric CO2 with improved emission inventories and CO2 production from the oxidation of other carbon species  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of global three-dimensional (3-D) models with satellite observations of CO2 in inverse modeling studies is an area of growing importance for understanding Earth s carbon cycle. Here we use the GEOS-Chem model (version 8-02-01) CO2 mode with multiple modifications in order to assess their impact on CO2 forward simulations. Modifications include CO2 surface emissions from shipping (0.19 PgC yr 1), 3-D spatially-distributed emissions from aviation (0.16 PgC yr 1), and 3-D chemical production of CO2 (1.05 PgC yr 1). Although CO2 chemical production from the oxidation of CO, CH4 and other carbon gases is recognized as an important contribution to global CO2, it is typically accounted for by conversion from its precursors at the surface rather than in the free troposphere. We base our model 3-D spatial distribution of CO2 chemical production on monthly-averaged loss rates of CO (a key precursor and intermediate in the oxidation of organic carbon) and apply an associated surface correction for inventories that have counted emissions of CO2 precursors as CO2. We also explore the benefit of assimilating satellite observations of CO into GEOS-Chem to obtain an observation-based estimate of the CO2 chemical source. The CO assimilation corrects for an underestimate of atmospheric CO abundances in the model, resulting in increases of as much as 24% in the chemical source during May June 2006, and increasing the global annual estimate of CO2 chemical production from 1.05 to 1.18 Pg C. Comparisons of model CO2 with measurements are carried out in order to investigate the spatial and temporal distributions that result when these new sources are added. Inclusion of CO2 emissions from shipping and aviation are shown to increase the global CO2 latitudinal gradient by just over 0.10 ppm (3%), while the inclusion of CO2 chemical production (and the surface correction) is shown to decrease the latitudinal gradient by about 0.40 ppm (10%) with a complex spatial structure generally resulting in decreased CO2 over land and increased CO2 over the oceans. Since these CO2 emissions are omitted or misrepresented in most inverse modeling work to date, their implementation in forward simulations should lead to improved inverse modeling estimates of terrestrial biospheric fluxes.

Nassar, Ray [University of Toronto; Jones, DBA [University of Toronto; Suntharalingam, P [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Wecht, K. J. [Harvard University; Yantosca, R. M. [Harvard University; Kulawik, SS [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Bowman, K [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Worden, JR [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Machida, T [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Japan; Matsueda, H [Meteorological Research Institute, Japan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

CO2 HYDRATE PROCESS FOR GAS SEPARATON  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document reports on the activities of the second quarter, April through June, of 2003 for phase 2 of the project on syngas upgrading, a low temperature approach. Modifications were implemented to the hydrogen flow test rig per safety review comments. Delivery of ETM hardware continued and buildup of the ETM system continued. SIMTECHE analyzed the data from flow tests, provided input to the test plan and project review presentation and provided input to the facility requirements specification produced for Tennessee Eastman's consideration. Nexant also helped to analyze the flow test data, prepared the facility requirements specification for consideration by Eastman, and prepared presentation materials for the CO{sub 2} project review. A presentation was made of the program status to the Carbon Sequestration review team in Pittsburgh, PA on June 3, 2003.

G. Deppe; R. Currier; D. Spencer

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Efficiency of Sequestrating CO2 in the Ocean  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficiency of Sequestrating CO Efficiency of Sequestrating CO 2 in the Ocean Richard Dewey (RDewey@uvic.ca ; 250-472-4009) University of Victoria, P.O. Box 3055, Victoria BC Canada V8N 3P6 Gilbert Stegen (Dr_Stegen@hotmail.com ; 425-869-7236) SAIC and GRS Associates 17257 NE 116 th St., Redmond WA USA 98052 Abstract Ocean disposal of CO 2 continues to be of great interest as a possible mitigation strategy for reducing atmospheric emissions of anthropogenic CO 2 . The ocean, and ultimately ocean sediments, naturally represents the single largest sink of CO 2 , and annually sequesters several gigatons of carbon from the atmosphere. The injection of additional CO 2 to artificially accelerate the use of the ocean as a sink for atmospheric CO 2 and avoid a short-term build-up of greenhouse gases has been investigated for

326

NETL: 2011 Conference Proceedings - 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

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2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting August 22 - 26, 2011 Previous Proceedings 2009: Annual NETL CO2 Capture Technology for Existing Plants R&D Meeting 2010: 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Proceedings of the 2011 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting Table of Contents Presentations Monday, August 22 Opening/Overview Post-combustion Sorbent-Based Capture Post-combustion Membrane-Based Capture Tuesday, August 23 Post-combustion Solvent-Based Capture ARPA-E Capture Projects Wednesday, August 24 Oxy-Combustion and Oxygen Production Chemical Looping Process CO2 Compression Thursday, August 25 FutureGen 2.0, CCPI and ICCS Demonstration Projects System Studies and Modeling Pre-Combustion Capture Projects Friday, August 26 Pre-combustion Capture Projects Posters

327

High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Diffuse emissions of CO2 are known to be large around some volcanoes and hydrothermal areas. Accumulation-chamber measurements of CO2 flux are increasingly used to estimate the total magmatic or metamorphic CO2 released from such areas. To assess the performance of accumulation chamber systems at fluxes one to three orders of magnitude higher than normally encountered in soil respiration studies, a test system was

328

People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

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Asia Asia » People's Republic of China People's Republic of China Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends According to reported energy statistics, coal production and use in China has increased ten-fold since the 1960s. As a result, Chinese fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have more than doubled 2000 alone. At 1.92 billion metric tons of carbon in 2008, the People's Republic of China is the world's largest emitter of CO2 due to fossil-fuel use and cement production. Even with the reported decline in Chinese emissions from 1997 to 1999, China's industrial emissions of CO2 have grown phenomenally since 1950, when China stood tenth among nations based on annual fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. From 1970 to 1997, China's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions grew at an annual rate of

329

Supported polyethylenimine adsorbents for CO2 capture from flue gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anthropogenic CO2 emissions produced from fossil fuel combustion are believed to contribute to undesired consequences in global climate. Major contributors towards CO2 emissions are fossil fuel-fired power plants for electricity production. For this reason, CO2 capture from flue gas streams together with permanent sequestration in geologic formations is being considered a viable solution towards mitigation of the major greenhouse gas1. Technologies based on chemical absorption with alkanolamines have been assessed for first generation CO2 post-combustion capture primarily due to its advanced stage of development. However, limitations associated with these chemical solvents (i.e., low CO2 loadings, amine degradation by oxygen, equipment corrosion) manifest themselves in high capital and operating costs with reduced thermal efficiencies. Therefore, necessary design and development of alternative, lower cost approaches for CO2 capture from coal-fired combustion streams are warranted.

Fauth, D.J.; Gray, M.L.; Pennline, H.W.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii  

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Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii Atmospheric Concentrations of CO2 from Mauna Loa, Hawaii The graphs on this page are generated from data taken from "Trends in Carbon Dioxide" page on the Department of Commerce/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) website. The NOAA website presents monthly and weekly atmospheric CO2 concentrations measured at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. It offers weekly and monthly data, additional graphs, analysis, descriptions of how the data are collected, and an animation of historical changes in atmospheric CO2. Mauna Loa constitutes the longest record of direct measurements of CO2 in the atmosphere. The measurents were started by C. David Keeling of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in March of 1958. Recent Monthly Average CO2

331

CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals  

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Co Co 2 SequeStration Potential of texaS low-rank CoalS Background Fossil fuel combustion is the primary source of emissions of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a major greenhouse gas. Sequestration of CO 2 by injecting it into geologic formations, such as coal seams, may offer a viable method for reducing atmospheric CO 2 emissions. Injection into coal seams has the potential added benefit of enhanced coalbed methane recovery. The potential for CO 2 sequestration in low-rank coals, while as yet undetermined, is believed to differ significantly from that for bituminous coals. To evaluate the feasibility and the environmental, technical, and economic impacts of CO 2 sequestration in Texas low-rank coal beds, the Texas Engineering Experimental Station is conducting a four-year study

332

ARM - Datastreams - 30co2flx4mmet  

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mmet mmet Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025037 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : 30CO2FLX4MMET Eddy Correlation CO2 Flux Data: 4 m samples, meteorological data, 30-min stats Active Dates 2002.12.18 - 2013.01.27 Measurement Categories Atmospheric Carbon, Atmospheric State, Radiometric, Surface Properties Originating Instrument Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems (CO2FLX) Measurements The measurements below provided by this product are those considered scientifically relevant. Measurement Variable Atmospheric turbulence Lmoni Atmospheric pressure bar_pres CO2 flux fc_corr CO2 flux fc_wpl_h CO2 flux fc_wpl_le Sensible heat flux

333

Scaling considerations for a multi-megawatt class supercritical CO2 brayton cycle and commercialization.  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale supercritical CO2 demonstration loops are successful at identifying the important technical issues that one must face in order to scale up to larger power levels. The Sandia National Laboratories supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle test loops are identifying technical needs to scale the technology to commercial power levels such as 10 MWe. The small size of the Sandia 1 MWth loop has demonstration of the split flow loop efficiency and effectiveness of the Printed Circuit Heat Exchangers (PCHXs) leading to the design of a fully recuperated, split flow, supercritical CO2 Brayton cycle demonstration system. However, there were many problems that were encountered, such as high rotational speeds in the units. Additionally, the turbomachinery in the test loops need to identify issues concerning the bearings, seals, thermal boundaries, and motor controller problems in order to be proved a reliable power source in the 300 kWe range. Although these issues were anticipated in smaller demonstration units, commercially scaled hardware would eliminate these problems caused by high rotational speeds at small scale. The economic viability and development of the future scalable 10 MWe solely depends on the interest of DOE and private industry. The Intellectual Property collected by Sandia proves that the ~10 MWe supercritical CO2 power conversion loop to be very beneficial when coupled to a 20 MWth heat source (either solar, geothermal, fossil, or nuclear). This paper will identify a commercialization plan, as well as, a roadmap from the simple 1 MWth supercritical CO2 development loop to a power producing 10 MWe supercritical CO2 Brayton loop.

Fleming, Darryn D.; Holschuh, Thomas Vernon,; Conboy, Thomas M.; Pasch, James Jay; Wright, Steven Alan; Rochau, Gary Eugene; Fuller, Robert Lynn [Barber-Nichols, Inc., Arvada, CO] [Barber-Nichols, Inc., Arvada, CO

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of EnhancedGeothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is used to evaluate mass flow and heatextraction rates from enhanced geothermal injection-production systemsthat are operated using either CO2 or water as heat transmission fluid.For a model system patterned after the European hot dry rock experimentat Soultz, we find significantly greater heat extraction rates for CO2 ascompared to water. The strong dependence of CO2 mobility (=density/viscosity) upon temperature and pressure may lead to unusualproduction behavior, where heat extraction rates can actually increasefor a time, even as the reservoir is subject to thermaldepletion.

Pruess, Karsten

2007-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

335

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly  

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31, 2011 31, 2011 CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says Near-Miscible Flooding in Arbuckle Formation Would Help Small Producers Tap Additional Domestic Resources Washington, D.C. - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas. Miscibility refers to the pressure at which the CO2 and oil are completely soluble in one another or form a single phase. Below the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) the injected CO2 mixes with and swells the oil to reduce its viscosity, increasing its ability to flow through the reservoir more easily to the production well.

336

Mode trap  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This report discusses a mode trap to trap and absorb transverse modes formed by a beam in a linear accelerator includes a waveguide having a multiplicity of electrically conductive (preferably copper) irises and rings, each iris and ring including an aperture, and the irises and rings being stacked in a side-by-side, alternating fashion such that the apertures of the irises and rings are concentrically aligned. An absorbing material layer such as a dielectric is embedded in each iris and ring, and this absorbing material layer encircles, but is circumferentially spaced from its respective aperture. Each iris and ring includes a plurality of circumferentially spaced slots around it`s aperture and extending radially out toward it`s absorbing material layer.

Chojnacki, E.P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 18 , 2008 Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO2 Injection into Michigan Basin Test Part of DOE's National Strategy to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Emissions Washington, DC...

338

NETL: News Release - DOE Technology Monitors CO2 Injection in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3, 2008 DOE Technology Monitors CO2 Injection in Australian Gas Field CSLF Project Demonstrates Unique Carbon Sequestration Technologies WASHINGTON, D.C. - Australia has launched...

339

Electrochemical CO2 Capture and Instant Conversion into Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, burning fossil fuels produces CO2, emission of which to atmosphere causes global warming and climate change. A near-term realistic solution to ...

340

5th International CO2 Capture Test Network  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2003 CMU Descriptor - include initials, orgdate Novel CO 2 Capture Technologies For Power Generation Point Sources Scrubbing with Regenerable Sorbents Amine-Enriched Sorbents...

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341

NETL: News Release - DOE Partnership Completes Successful CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Mount Simon Sandstone Formation Proves to be Promising CO2 Storage Candidate in the Ohio Valley Region Washington, D.C. - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership...

342

NETL: News Release - Reining in CO2 Emissions....  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reining in CO2 Emissions.... DOE Selects Eight Innovative Projects to Capture and Store Carbon Dioxide from Power Plants WASHINGTON, DC - New ways to capture carbon dioxide from...

343

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sound ways to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions. Onegeological storage for carbon dioxide. In: Baines SJ, WordenGeological storage of carbon dioxide. Geol Soc Spec Publ

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

EGR Distribution and Fluctuation Probe Based on CO2 Measurements  

EGR Distribution and Fluctuation Probe Based on CO2 Measurements ... NOx emissions, and which involves mixing some of the exhaust with the intake air.

345

The geomechanics of CO2 storage in deep sedimentary formations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and interference with other injection wells could occur (above active CO 2 injection wells, with the uplift bulgeskilometers from each injection well (Vasco et al. , 2008a,

Rutqvist, J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Microsoft Word - Is CO2 an Indoor Pollutant v3  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

were dramatic. More details are provided in reference 2. Figure 1. Impact of CO 2 on Human Decision-Making Performance. Error bars indicate one standard deviation The...

347

Reduction Process Of Zinc From Concentrates With CO2 Reduced ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recoveries of >90% of Zinc, and reduced CO2 gas emission product are expected after evaluation. Proceedings Inclusion? Planned: A print-only volume ...

348

NETL: IEP ? Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Biomimetric...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Papers and Publications: Development of Biomimetic Membranes for Near Zero PC Power Plant Emissions, PDF-4MB (March 2011) Final Report. Biomimetic Membrane for CO2 Capture for...

349

High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon High Co2 Emissions Through Porous Media- Transport Mechanisms And Implications For Flux Measurement And Fractionation Jump...

350

Study of Supercritical CO2 Emulsion in Ni Electroplating and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Study of Supercritical CO2 Emulsion in Ni Electroplating and Application in Fabrication of Defect-Free Micromechanical Component with High  ...

351

Sustainability, Energy Efficiency and CO2 Elimination in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Sustainability, Energy Efficiency and CO2 Elimination in Concentrate Drying. Author(s), Jyri J Talja, Shaolong Chen, Hannu Mansikkaviita

352

Development of Novel Carbon Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

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May 2009 Planned Activities Phase I: * Determine the relevant physical, mechanical, and thermal properties of the sorbent that are relevant for effective CO 2 capture from...

353

Study of Regenerable Sorbents for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(CO 2 ) is a greenhouse gas that is customarily released to the environment during the usage of fossil fuels, including electric power generation. With the projected increase in...

354

Review: CO(2) Rising: The World's Greatest Environmental Challenge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Challenge By Tyler Volk Reviewed by Byron AndersonIllinois University, USA Volk, Tyler. CO 2 Rising: Theor 130 billion tons. Volk cleverly introduces carbon cycling

Anderson, Byron P.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Speeding up Mother Nature's very own CO2 mitigation process  

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in the journal Environmental Science & Technology. More Information "CO2 Mitigation via Capture and Chemical Conversion in Seawater," Environmental Science & Technology...

356

Health Effects of CO2 in Animals of Economic Importance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impetus for this project is the possible development of large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) capture, transport, and storage (CT&S) sites that have the potential to release CO2 into the environment and cause adverse health effects. The purpose of this project is to obtain information from the scientific literature on the effects of CO2 exposure in animals of economic importance. This report, along with previously documented information on the effects of CO2 in humans and selected animals, primarily labor...

2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Western Europe  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

now contributes 28.1% of total CO2 emissions. All countries in the region with discrete energy statistics reported, except Montenegro, have per capita emission rates exceeding...

358

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Oceania  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceania Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from Oceania Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data What countries constitute Oceania? Oceania map Trends Oceania consists of approximately...

359

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from North America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North America Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions from North America Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data What countries constitute North America? North America map Trends North America,...

360

Liquid Fuels from CO2, Water, and Solar Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Technologies and Carbon Dioxide Management. Presentation Title, Liquid Fuels from CO2, Water, and Solar Energy. Author(s), Aldo ...

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361

How much carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is produced when different ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy. ... (CO 2) is produced per kilowatt-hour when generating electricity with fossil fuels?

362

Composition and Method for Rapid and Equimolar CO2 Capture ...  

The emission of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from burning of fossil fuels has received worldwide attention because of its implication in climate change, which threatens ...

363

Strategies for Controlling Coal Permeability in CO2-Enhanced...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), caused primarily by combustion of fossil fuels for power generation and transportation, are considered to be leading...

364

Distributed Optical Sensor for CO2 Leak Detection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the technology "Distributed Optical Sensor for CO 2 Leak Detection," for which a Patent Application has been filed. This technology is available for licensing andor further...

365

Peak CO2? China's Emissions Trajectories to 2050  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Date Published 062011 Institution Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords china, china energy, china energy group, co2, data, energy analysis and environmental...

366

Estimation of CO2 Emissions from China's Cement Production: Methodolog...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the need to understand the uncertainty of current estimates of cement emissions in China. This paper compares several methodologies for calculating CO2 emissions from cement...

367

FACE Program, Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE), Brookhaven National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The FACE Program Science | Engineering | Research Sites | DOEBER FACE Program The atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration (CO2) has risen by 35% since the start of the...

368

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

India's Iron and Steel Industry Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in India's Iron and Steel Industry Publication Type Report...

369

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Iron and Steel Industry in China Title Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China Publication Type...

370

CO2 Capture Poject CCP | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

companies and government organisations that are undertaking research and development of carbon capture and storage technologies. References CO2 Capture Poject (CCP)1 LinkedIn...

371

Capture, Separation and Triggered Release of CO2 with Metal ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Capture, Separation and Triggered Release of CO2 with Metal ... pores can be tailored to act as high capacity sites for carbon dioxide capture.

372

Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project GRACE | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRACE is a project consortium that aims to develop cost improving technologies for carbon capture and separation. References Grangemouth Advanced CO2 Capture Project...

373

Microsoft Word - CO2 Utilization - Table.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials using Carbon Feedstocks RTI International NC04 High Efficiency Solar-based Catalytic Structure for CO 2 Reforming PhosphorTech Corporation GA13 Integrated...

374

Methods for Integrated Leak Detection Inference at CO2 Sequestration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

vadose zone thickness. Natural background soil CO2 flux rates are characterized by a Bayesian hierarchical model that predicts the background flux as a function of soil...

375

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 7/2/2003 through 10/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we are preparing for the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (A) The solar collector used in the light delivery system showed signs of degradation and hence had to be replaced by ORNL. A set of light readings were taken after the new solar collector was installed. The readings showed an acceptable light profile. (B) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe end sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. The improvements have been completed and the system is ready for testing. (C) The pilot scale bioreactor is ready for testing pending some information from the CRF-2 tests. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (A) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis sp. cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected by environmental pH, which may be useful in culture quality control. Besides, the further investigation of this phenomenon suggested that the rate of cell adhesion to glass surface decreases upon medium alkalinization. Thus, harvesting effectiveness may be improved by increasing medium pH up to 9 before harvesting of cyanobacteria from a substratum.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from geologic carbon sequestration sites: unsaturated zoneCO 2 from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites, Vadose Zoneseepage from geologic carbon sequestration sites may occur.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Interaction of trapped ions with trapped atoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, I present results from two Paul-trap based ion traps carried out in the Vuleti? laboratory: the Atom-Ion trap for collision studies between cold atoms and cold ions, and the Cavity-Array trap for studying ...

Grier, Andrew T. (Andrew Todd)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Control of CO2 Emissions of China under Kyoto Protocol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

the paper explores the major factors that affect CO2 emissions by the analysis for time-series of China since Chinese innovation and opening. The analysis concludes that there is no inverse-U curve between economic development and CO2 emissions. The ...

Zhao Yong

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development in China Xiliang Zhang, Tianyu Qi, and Valerie J. Karplus Report No. 242 April 2013 China Energy & Climate Project TSINGHUA - MIT://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 The Energy and CO2 Emissions Impact of Renewable Energy Development

380

Oxidation in Environments with Elevated CO2 Levels  

SciTech Connect

Efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from fossil energy power productions focus primarily on either pre- or post-combustion removal of CO2. The research presented here examines corrosion and oxidation issues associated with two types of post-combustion CO2 removal processes—oxyfuel combustion in refit boilers and oxyfuel turbines.

Gordon H. Holcomb

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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381

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline Edited by Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Risø-R-1712(EN) September 2009 Proceedings Risø International Energy Conference 2009 #12;Editors: Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Title: Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak

382

Reduction of CO2 emissions and utilization of slag  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Expectations from the industry partners (as pre- sented at the kick-off meeting): Applicability of the steel emissions is 314 #12;CO2 sequestration by mineral carbonation. Con- crete and steel manufacturers produce of industrial by-products and residues is the possibility to use CO2 in local flue gases for the carbonation

Zevenhoven, Ron

383

The Legal Rights and Liabilities of Underground CO2 Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report reviews the legal and regulatory landscape of CO2 storage through an analysis of current rules from state and federal agencies that have jurisdiction now, or may have jurisdiction in the future, and which will impact the planning, construction, management and operation of underground CO2 storage projects.

2009-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

384

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/03/2001 through 7/02/2001. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Note that this version of the quarterly technical report is a revision to add the reports from subcontractors Montana State and Oak Ridge National Laboratories The significant accomplishments for this quarter include: Development of an experimental plan and initiation of experiments to create a calibration curve that correlates algal chlorophyll levels with carbon levels (to simplify future experimental procedures); Completion of debugging of the slug flow reactor system, and development of a plan for testing the pressure drop of the slug flow reactor; Design and development of a new bioreactor screen design which integrates the nutrient delivery drip system and the harvesting system; Development of an experimental setup for testing the new integrated drip system/harvesting system; Completion of model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on Nostoc 86-3 growth rates; Completion of the construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities and initiation of tests; Substantial progress on construction of a pilot-scale bioreactor; and Preliminary economic analysis of photobioreactor deployment. Plans for next quarter's work are included in the conclusions. A preliminary economic analysis is included as an appendix.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

385

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) < Back Eligibility Industrial Program Info State Kentucky Program Type Industry Recruitment/Support Provider Consultant, Division of Carbon Management Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In 2012, KGS conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through perforations in a cased, shut-in shale gas well. Industry partners for this research included Crossrock Drilling, Advanced Resources International, Schlumberger, Ferus Industries, and

386

DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada DOE Regional Partnership Successfully Demonstrates Terrestrial CO2 Storage Practices in Great Plains Region of U.S. and Canada August 19, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A field test demonstrating the best approaches for terrestrial carbon dioxide (CO2) storage in the heartland of North America has been successfully completed by one of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs). The Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership , a collaboration of over 80 U.S. and Canadian stakeholders, conducted the field test at sites in the Prairie Pothole Region, extending from central Iowa into Northern Alberta,

387

North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East » North Korea Far East » North Korea North Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends The total fossil-fuel CO2 emissions for North Korea, or the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, averaged 11.2% growth from 1950-93, reaching 71 million metric tons of carbon. Since 1993 according to published UN energy statistics, fossil-fuel CO2 emissions have declined 70% to 21.4 million metric tons of carbon. As the world's 14th largest producer of coal, it is no surprise North Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions record is dominated by emissions from coal burning. Coal consumption accounted for 93% of the 2008 CO2 emission total. With no natural gas usage, another 3.4% currently comes from liquid petroleum consumption, and the remainder is from cement

388

Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Emerging Technologies » Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project Super Building Insulation by CO2 Foaming Process Research Project The Department of Energy is currently researching the development of building superinsulation through a carbon dioxide (CO2) foaming process. Project Description This project seeks to develop building super insulation through a carbon dioxide foaming process that does not use hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), and which produces insulation with a high R-value. Project Partners Research is being undertaken between the Department of Energy and The Industrial Science & Technology Network. Project Goals The goal of this project is to develop advanced insulation without HFC, and to achieve a competitive processing cost for CO2 foaming technology.

389

South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Far East » South Korea Far East » South Korea South Korea Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends South Korea, or the Republic of Korea, is the world's tenth largest emitter of CO2 based on 2008 fossil-fuel consumption and cement production with 139 million metric tons of carbon. From 1946-1997 South Korea experienced phenomenal growth in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions with a growth rate that averaged 11.5%. Initial growth in emissions was due to coal consumption, which still accounts for 46.9% of South Korea's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. Since the late 1960s oil consumption has been a major source of emissions. South Korea is the world's fifth largest importer of crude oil. Natural gas became a significant source of CO2 for the first time in 1987, as South

390

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says CO2 Injection in Kansas Oilfield Could Greatly Increase Production, Permanently Store Carbon Dioxide, DOE Study Says August 31, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The feasibility of using carbon dioxide (CO2) injection for recovering between 250 million and 500 million additional barrels of oil from Kansas oilfields has been established in a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The University of Kansas Center for Research studied the possibility of near-miscible CO2 flooding for extending the life of mature oilfields in the Arbuckle Formation while simultaneously providing permanent geologic storage of carbon dioxide, a major greenhouse gas.

391

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

392

NETL: 2010 Conference Proceedings - 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting 2010 NETL CO2 Capture Technology Meeting September 13-17, 2010 Table of Contents Presentations Monday, September 13 Opening/Overview Post-combustion Sorbent Based Capture Post-combustion Solvent Based Capture Tuesday, September 14 Post-combustion Membrane Based Capture Pulverized Coal Oxy-combustion ARPA-E Projects Wednesday, September 15 National Carbon Capture Center Chemical Looping Processes Systems Studies and Modeling Efforts CO2 Compression New CO2 Capture Projects Thursday, September 16 New CO2 Capture Projects - Cont'd CCPI and ICCS Demonstration Projects Pre-combustion Capture Projects Friday, September 17 Pre-combustion Capture Projects - Cont'd Posters Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) NETL Office of Research and Development Research Projects

393

Definition: Reduced Co2 Emissions | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co2 Emissions Co2 Emissions Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Co2 Emissions Functions that provide this benefit can lead to avoided vehicle miles, decrease the amount of central generation needed to their serve load (through reduced electricity consumption, reduced electricity losses, more optimal generation dispatch), and or reduce peak generation. These impacts translate into a reduction in CO2 emissions produced by fossil-based electricity generators and vehicles.[1] Related Terms electricity generation, reduced electricity losses, smart grid References ↑ SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits' An in LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. line Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reduced_Co2_Emissions&oldid=502618

394

Inverse modeling of CO2 sources and sinks using satellite observations of CO2 from TES and surface flask measurements  

SciTech Connect

We infer CO2 surface fluxes using satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) and measurements of CO2 from surface flasks in a time-independent inversion analysis based on the GEOS-Chem model. Using TES CO2 observations over oceans, spanning 40 S 40 N, we find that the horizontal and vertical coverage of the TES and flask data are complementary. This complementarity is demonstrated by combining the datasets in a joint inversion, which provides better constraints than from either dataset alone, when a posteriori CO2 distributions are evaluated against independent ship and aircraft CO2 data. In particular, the joint inversion offers improved constraints in the tropics where surface measurements are sparse, such as the tropical forests of South America. Aggregating the annual surface-to-atmosphere fluxes from the joint inversion for the year 2006 yields 1.13 0.21 PgC for the global ocean, 2.77 0.20 PgC for the global land biosphere and 3.90 0.29 PgC for the total global natural flux (defined as the sum of all biospheric, oceanic, and biomass burning contributions but excluding CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion). These global ocean and global land fluxes are shown to be near the median of the broad range of values from other inversion results for 2006. To achieve these results, a bias in TES CO2 in the Southern Hemisphere was assessed and corrected using aircraft flask data, and we demonstrate that our results have low sensitivity to variations in the bias correction approach. Overall, this analysis suggests that future carbon data assimilation systems can benefit by integrating in situ and satellite observations of CO2 and that the vertical information provided by satellite observations of mid-tropospheric CO2 combined with measurements of surface CO2, provides an important additional constraint for flux inversions.

Nassar, Ray [University of Toronto; Jones, DBA [University of Toronto; Kulawik, SS [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Worden, JR [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Bowman, K [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA; Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Suntharalingam, P [University of East Anglia, Norwich, United Kingdom; Chen, j. [University of Toronto; Brenninkmeijer, CAM [Max Planck Institut fur Chemie, Mainz; Schuck, TJ [Max Planck Institut fur Chemie, Mainz; Conway, T.J. [NOAA, Boulder, CO; Worthy, DE [Environment Canada

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

A workflow for handling heterogeneous 3D models with the TOUGH2 family of codes: Applications to numerical modeling of CO2 geological storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is addressed to the TOUGH2 user community. It presents a new tool for handling simulations run with the TOUGH2 code with specific application to CO"2 geological storage. This tool is composed of separate FORTRAN subroutines (or modules) that ... Keywords: 3D visualization, CO2 geological storage, Multiphase flow, Pre and post processing, Reactive transport modeling, TOUGH2

Pascal Audigane; Christophe Chiaberge; Frédéric Mathurin; Julie Lions; Géraldine Picot-Colbeaux

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

CO2 Huff-n-Puff Process in a Light Oil Shallow Shelf Carbonate Reservoir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of cyclic CO2, often referred to as the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process, may find its niche in the maturing waterfloods of the Permian Basin. Coupling the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process to miscible flooding applications could provide the needed revenue to sufficiently mitigate near-term negative cash flow concerns in the capital-intensive miscible projects. Texaco Exploration & Production Inc. and the U. S. Department of Energy have teamed up in an attempt to develop the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in the Grayburg and San Andres formations which are light oil, shallow shelf carbonate reservoirs that exist throughout the Permian Basin. This cost-shared effort is intended to demonstrate the viability of this underutilized technology in a specific class of domestic reservoir. A significant amount of oil reserves are located in carbonate reservoirs. Specifically, the carbonates deposited in shallow shelf (SSC) environments make up the largest percentage of known reservoirs within the Permian Basin of North America. Many of these known resources have been under waterflooding operations for decades and are at risk of abandonment if crude oil recoveries cannot be economically enhanced 1,2 . The selected sites for this demonstration project are the Central Vacuum Unit waterflood in Lea County, New Mexico and the Sundown Slaughter Field in Hockley County, Texas. Miscible CO2 flooding is the process of choice for enhancing recovery of light oils 3 and already accounts for over 12% of the Permian Basin?s daily production.4 There are significant probable reserves associated with future miscible CO2 projects. However, many are marginally economic at current market conditions due to large up-front capital commitments for a peak response, which may be several years in the future. The resulting negative cash-flow is sometimes too much for an operator to absorb. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is being investigated as a near-term option to mitigate the negative cash-flow situation--allowing acceleration of inventoried miscible CO2 projects when coupled together. The CO2 Huff-n-Puff process is a proven enhanced oil recovery technology in Louisiana-Texas Gulf-coast sandstone reservoirs 5,6 . Application seems to mostly confine itself to low pressure sandstone reservoirs 7 . The process has even been shown to be moderately effective in conjunction with steam on heavy California crude oils 8,9 . A review of earlier literature 5,10,11 provides an excellent discussion on the theory, mechanics of the process, and several case histories. Although the technology is proven in light oil sandstones, it continues to be a very underutilized enhanced recovery option for carbonates. However, the theories associated with the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process are not lithology dependent. It was anticipated that this project would show that the application of the CO2 Huff-n-Puff process in shallow shelf carbonates could be economically implemented to recover appreciable volumes of light oil. The goals of the project were the development of guidelines for cost-effective selection of candidate reservoirs and wells, along with estimating recovery potential.

Mark Kovar; Scott Wehner

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

397

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project for the period ending 09/30/2004. The primary effort of this quarter was focused on mass transfer of carbon dioxide into the water film to study the potential effects on the photosynthetic organisms that depend on the carbon. Testing of the carbon dioxide scrubbing capability (mass transfer capability) of flowing water film appears to be relatively high and largely unaffected by transport of the gas through the bioreactor. The implications are that the transfer of carbon dioxide into the film is nearly at maximum and that it is sufficient to sustain photosynthesis at whatever rate the organisms can sustain. This finding is key to assuming that the process is an energy (photon) limited reaction and not a nutrient limited reaction.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

398

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/3/2001 through 4/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, we are continuing to evaluate candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and we are expanding the test facilities in preparation for scaled up system-level testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the first quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) has been selected for further investigations because of its favorable growth properties. (2) Research on optimal conditions for the growth of cyanobacterial isolates from YNP should be carried out using distilled water which has more stable chemical parameters, although tap water use may be permissible during full scale operations (at the cost of longer organism doubling times). (3) Tr. 9.4 WF is able to generate a biofilm on an Omnisil surface. Over the long term Omnisil does not inhibit the growth of TR 9.4 isolate, though it does elongate the lag phase of growth of this isolate. (4) Initial survivability tests for the TR 9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 modelscale bioreactor are underway. We have experienced problems keeping the organisms alive for more than three days, but we are currently investigating several possible causes for this unexpected result. (5) Accelerated materials testing have shown that Omnisil fabric has acceptable strength properties for use in a practical bioreactor system. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) Several CO{sub 2} scrubbing experiments have been completed in the translating slug flow test system, however the error introduced by the original process for measuring CO{sub 2} concentration in the solution was so big that the resulting data was unreasonable. A new sampling method to prevent degassing of the liquid sample is being implemented, and a new set of tests has been scheduled for the week of 4/15/2002. (2) Qualitative harvesting tests of TR 9.4 on Omnisil have been completed but the results are inconclusive. Very little harvesting effect was observed with the current harvesting system design, but the results were greatly impacted by the minimal amount of organism growth on the screens at the time of the harvesting tests. Measures are being taken to extend the colonization time to achieve a screen loading condition that represents a more realistic harvesting condition, and additional tests will be run in the near future with these screens. (3) Significant work has been completed in the design of a new up-flow bioreactor test facility, using a vertical flow as expected in practical applications as opposed to the horizontal flow used for convenience in our current CRF test systems. (4) A reasonably priced location has been selected for the pilot scale bioreactor system, and construction can now proceed in order to prepare for the installation of the solar collectors and the bioreactor.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

399

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 1/03/2001 through 4/02/2001. Many of the activities and accomplishments are continuations of work initiated and reported in last quarter's status report. Major activities and accomplishments for this quarter include: Three sites in Yellowstone National Park have been identified that may contain suitable organisms for use in a bioreactor; Full-scale culturing of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has progressed to the point that there is a sufficient quantity to test this organism in the model-scale bioreactor; The effects of the additive monoethanolamine on the growth of one thermophilic organism from Yellowstone has been tested; Testing of growth surface adhesion and properties is continuing; Construction of a larger model-scale bioreactor to improve and expand testing capabilities is completed and the facility is undergoing proof tests; Model-scale bioreactor tests examining the effects of CO{sub 2} concentration levels and lighting levels on organism growth rates are continuing; Alternative fiber optic based deep-penetration light delivery systems for use in the pilot-scale bioreactor have been designed, constructed and tested; An existing slug flow reactor system has been modified for use in this project, and a proof-of-concept test plan has been developed for the slug flow reactor; Research and testing of water-jet harvesting techniques is continuing, and a harvesting system has been designed for use in the model-scale bioreactor; and The investigation of comparative digital image analysis as a means for determining the ''density'' of algae on a growth surface is continuing Plans for next quarter's work and an update on the project's web page are included in the conclusions.

Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2001-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

400

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2003 through 1/1/2004. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have seen very encouraging results from the model scale tests in terms of organism growth rates and we have begun the final tests necessary to meet our project goals. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities--(A) The solar collector is working well and has survived the winter weather. (B) The improved high-flow CRF-2 test system has been used successfully to run several long-term growth tests with periodic harvesting events. The high flow harvesting system performed well. The mass measurement results after a 4-week test show 275% growth over the initial mass loading. This figure would have been higher had there been no leakage and handling losses. Carbon dating of biomass from this test is planned for carbon uptake estimation. The next test will include direct measurement of carbon uptake in addition to organism mass measurements. (C) Qualitative organism growth testing has begun in the pilot scale bioreactor. Some issues with uniformity of organism loading, fluid leakage and evaporation have surfaced and are currently being addressed, and quantitative testing will begin as soon as these problems are resolved. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces--(A) Montana State University (Subcontracted to do organism studies) submitted their final (3-year) project report. An abstract of the report in included in this quarterly report.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2004-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

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401

CO2 Removal from Gas Streams Using a Carbon Fiber Composite Molecular  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel adsorbent carbon monolith has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The monolith is fabricated from isotropic-pitch-derived carbon fibers and powdered phenolic resin via a slurry molding process. The resultant green-form is dried, cured, and carbonized to convert the phenolic resin to carbon, and then activated to develop a connected network of micropores within the carbon fibers and resin-derived carbon binder. The monolith is also macroporous, exhibiting large (>50 µm) pores between the fibers. The resultant open structure allows the free flow of fluids through the monoliths such that gases can reach the micropores where they may be selectively adsorbed. This novel adsorbent has been named a “carbon fiber composite molecular sieve” (CFCMS). Several separations have been demonstrated such as the separation of hydrogen from experimental gas mixtures containing H2 and H2S or H2 and CO2; the separation of CO2 from CH4; the separation of CO2 from air; and the separation of CO2, CO, H2S, and H2O from a variety of proprietary gas mixtures. The CFCMS is being investigated as a CO2 separation and capture device in carbon mitigation strategies for natural gas processing, fuel cells, and gas turbines. The monolithic material is rigid and strong, resistant to attrition and dusting, and because of its continuous carbon skeletal structure, electrically conductive. An adsorbed gas may be quickly and efficiently desorbed by the passage of an electric current, thereby allowing for a low-energy, electrical-swing separation system. It is possible to regenerate the carbon monoliths in the absence of a temperature increase, potentially reducing swing cycle times and improving separation efficiency. The structure and properties of the adsorbent CFCMS monoliths are reported. Some information on the experimental apparatus is provided. Breakthrough plots and performance data for CO2 separation and capture are presented, and the electrical swing adsorption process is discussed

Roddie R. Judkins; Timothy D. Burchell

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Fundamental study of CO2-H2O-mineral interactions for carbon sequestration, with emphasis on the nature of the supercritical fluid-mineral interface.  

SciTech Connect

In the supercritical CO2-water-mineral systems relevant to subsurface CO2 sequestration, interfacial processes at the supercritical fluid-mineral interface will strongly affect core- and reservoir-scale hydrologic properties. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that water films will form on mineral surfaces in supercritical CO2, but will be thinner than those that form in vadose zone environments at any given matric potential. The theoretical model presented here allows assessment of water saturation as a function of matric potential, a critical step for evaluating relative permeabilities the CO2 sequestration environment. The experimental water adsorption studies, using Quartz Crystal Microbalance and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy methods, confirm the major conclusions of the adsorption/condensation model. Additional data provided by the FTIR study is that CO2 intercalation into clays, if it occurs, does not involve carbonate or bicarbonate formation, or significant restriction of CO2 mobility. We have shown that the water film that forms in supercritical CO2 is reactive with common rock-forming minerals, including albite, orthoclase, labradorite, and muscovite. The experimental data indicate that reactivity is a function of water film thickness; at an activity of water of 0.9, the greatest extent of reaction in scCO2 occurred in areas (step edges, surface pits) where capillary condensation thickened the water films. This suggests that dissolution/precipitation reactions may occur preferentially in small pores and pore throats, where it may have a disproportionately large effect on rock hydrologic properties. Finally, a theoretical model is presented here that describes the formation and movement of CO2 ganglia in porous media, allowing assessment of the effect of pore size and structural heterogeneity on capillary trapping efficiency. The model results also suggest possible engineering approaches for optimizing trapping capacity and for monitoring ganglion formation in the subsurface.

Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas A.; Heath, Jason E.; Wang, Yifeng; Matteo, Edward N.; Meserole, Stephen P.; Tallant, David Robert

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Quantifying Regional Economic Impacts of CO2 Intensity Targets in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To address rising energy use and CO2 emissions, China’s leadership has enacted energy and CO2 intensity

Zhang, Da

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Spatial Disaggregation of CO2 Emissions for the State of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Petroleum ..7. CO 2 emissions from petroleum product combustion bycapita CO 2 emissions from petroleum product combustion by

de la Rue du Can, Stephane

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report highlights significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation Project during the period from 10/1/2001 through 01/02/2006. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts during this project were focused on the selection of candidate organisms and growth surfaces and initiating long-term tests in the bench-scale and pilot-scale bioreactor test systems. Specific results and accomplishments for the program include: (1) CRF-2 test system: (a) Sampling test results have shown that the initial mass of algae loaded into the Carbon Recycling Facility Version 2 (CRF-2) system can be estimated with about 3% uncertainty using a statistical sampling procedure. (b) The pressure shim header pipe insert design was shown to have better flow for harvesting than the drilled-hole design. (c) The CRF-2 test system has undergone major improvements to produce the high flow rates needed for harvesting (as determined by previous experiments). The main changes to the system are new stainless steel header/frame units, with increased flow capacity and a modified pipe-end-sealing method to improve flow uniformity, and installation and plumbing for a new high flow harvesting pump. Qualitative system tests showed that the harvesting system performed wonderfully, cleaning the growth surfaces within a matter of seconds. (d) Qualitative tests have shown that organisms can be repopulated on a harvested section of a bioreactor screen, demonstrating that continuous bioreactor operation is feasible, with continuous cycles of harvesting and repopulating screens. (e) Final preparations are underway for quantitative, long-term tests in the CRF-2 with weekly harvesting. (2) Pilot-scale test system: (a) The construction of the pilot-scale bioreactor was completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. Over the course of the project, the solar collector used in the light delivery system showed some degradation, but performed well overall. (b) Testing confirmed that algae can be grown in a sustainable fashion in the pilot bioreactor, even with intermittent availability of sunlight. (c) The pilot-scale tests indicated that algal growth rate followed photon delivery during productivity testing. (3) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) The aeration of growth media with 5% CO{sub 2} in air stimulates cyanobacterial growth 10-20 times over that with air alone. It is possible that the rate of the stimulation of cyanobacterial growth in the CRF will be higher because cyanobacteria will be grown as a biofilm. We plan to increase the concentration to 15% CO{sub 2} in air. (b) Tests have shown a doubling time of the cyanobacterial culture of about 7.5 hours with illumination of about 170 {micro}mol m{sup -2} sec{sup -1}. All lower levels of illumination led to a decrease in the cyanobacterial growth rate. (c) Macroscopical and microscopical observations suggest that the culture of this isolate undergoes significant morphological changes after 60-70 hours of incubation in the batch culture mode. First of all, the culture begins to clump. This clumping could lead to the decrease of effective illumination of culture and may reflect a medium alkalinization. (d) Organization of our collection of the thermophilic cyanobacteria isolated from Yellowstone National Park has resulted in 13 unialgal cultures of thermophilic cyanobacteria. (e) A new species (even probably a new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1, isolated from LaDuke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin, demonstrates an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl{sub 3}* 6H{sub 2}O on the growth of the 5.2 s.c.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of the isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments. (f) The shape of the Chlorogloeopsis siderophila cells (cyanobacteria) was found to be affected b

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

406

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/2/2001 through 10/01/2002. This report marks the end of year 2 of a three-year project as well as the milestone date for completion of Phase I activities. This report includes our current status and defines the steps being taken to ensure that we meet the project goals by the end of year 3. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below our current efforts are focused on evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, preparing to conduct long-term tests in the bench-scale bioreactor test systems, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the third quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Test results continue to indicate that thermophilic cyanobacteria have significant advantages as agents for practical photosynthetic CO{sub 2} mitigation before mesophilic forms. (2) Additional thermal features with developed cyanobacterial mats, which might be calcium resistant, were found in YNP. (3) Back to back tests show that there is no detectable difference in the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) in standard and Ca-modified BG-11 medium. The doubling time for both cases was about 12 hours. (4) The cultivation of cyanobacteria in Ca-BG medium should proceed in the pH range between 7 and 7.4, but this suggestion requires additional experiments. (5) Cyanobacteria can be grown in media where sodium is present at trace levels. (6) Ca{sup 2+} enriched medium can be used as a sink for CO{sub 2} under alkaline conditions. (7) Cyanobacteria are able to generate cones of filaments on travertine surfaces. [Travertine is a mixture of CaCO{sub 3} and CaSO{sub 4}]. We hypothesize that SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} stimulates the generation of such cones, because they are not almost generated on CaCO3 surface. On the other hand, we know that plant gas contains elevated concentrations of SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}. We may speculate that the introduction of 11.2 isolate in CRF might significantly increase the productivity of such facility. It is possible that a higher colonization potential for the screens may allow a higher surface productivity than some of the other isolates. (8) The colonization of Omnisil surface is an auto-inducible and time-requiring process. (9) Omnisil coupons should be treated under pH control, preferably using KOH. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) The pilot-scale bioreactor construction and debugging is continuing on schedule. Tests of the ''natural'' lighting system have shown acceptable levels of illumination for the bioreactor screens using only collected sunlight. (2) Flow control inserts have been designed for the CRF-2 screens, which require header pipes for flow distribution and control. A staggered drilled-hole design and a thick shim design have both shown acceptable performance results (little to no clogging, uniform flow, ability to load algae on to the screen). They will both be tested in the CRF-2 to see which performs the best over long durations, and the best performing design will be used for the pilot scale bioreactor screens.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

407

CO2 Capture with Liquid-to-Solid Absorbents: CO2 Capture Process Using Phase-Changing Absorbents  

SciTech Connect

IMPACCT Project: GE and the University of Pittsburgh are developing a unique CO2 capture process in which a liquid absorbent, upon contact with CO2, changes into a solid phase. Once in solid form, the material can be separated and the CO2 can be released for storage by heating. Upon heating, the absorbent returns to its liquid form, where it can be reused to capture more CO2. The approach is more efficient than other solventbased processes because it avoids the heating of extraneous solvents such as water. This ultimately leads to a lower cost of CO2 capture and will lower the additional cost to produce electricity for coal-fired power plants that retrofit their facilities to include this technology.

None

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

NETL: Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Bench-Scale Development of a Hybrid Membrane-Absorption CO2 Capture Process Project No.: DE-FE0013118 Membrane Technology and Research (MTR) is developing and evaluating a hybrid membrane-absorption CO2 capture system. This work builds on prior DOE-funded work and combines MTR's Polaris(tm) membrane, in a low-pressure-drop, large area, plate-and-frame module, with UT Austin's piperazine (PZ) solvent and advanced, high-temperature and pressure regeneration technology. Preliminary estimates indicate that this hybrid system could lower the regeneration energy by 30 percent compared to that required with 30 weight percent monoethanolamine (MEA). MTR is evaluating two variations of the hybrid design consisting of the cross-flow Polaris membrane, which enriches flue gas to approximately 20 percent CO2, and an advanced 5 molal PZ advanced flash stripper with cold-rich bypass. The flash stripper will be optimized to take advantage of the higher CO2 concentration. In the first variation, the two systems are operated in series; in the second, the flue gas flow is split and treated by each system in parallel. The first phase of this project will include an examination of both hybrid configurations, using an integrated process model and a preliminary techno-economic assessment. In the second phase, MTR will manufacture and test a low pressure drop, large-area membrane module and UT Austin will modify their 0.1 MWe pilot plant and operate it under simulated series and parallel configurations. Based on the model and test results, the most promising configuration will be identified. In the final stage of the project, the membrane module will be integrated into the pilot plant where the fully integrated hybrid system, in its most promising cost optimized configuration, will be tested on simulated flue gas.

409

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Hybrid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Hybrid Membrane/Absorption Process for Post-Combustion CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0004787 Gas Technology Institute is partnering with PoroGen Corporation and Aker Process Systems in a three-year effort to develop a hybrid technology for CO2 capture from flue gases based on a combination of solvent absorption and hollow fiber membrane technologies. The technology could also apply to removal of numerous other gas pollutants such as NOx and SOx, separation of CO2 from hydrogen in refinery streams, and separation of CO2 from natural gas (natural gas sweetening). The technology increases interfacial gas/liquid area by a factor of ten over conventional packed or tray columns, thus increasing mass transfer. The selectivity is controlled by the chemical affinity of CO2 with a hindered amine. The process results in lower steam regeneration energy, and the CO2 is generated at pressure, reducing compression costs. The project includes bench-scale testing on a 25 kWe-equivalent slipstream at Midwest Generation's Joliet Power Station.

410

Combustion-Assisted CO2 Capture Using MECC Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mixed Electron and Carbonate ion Conductor (MECC) membranes have been proposed as a means to separate CO2 from power plant flue gas. Here a modified MECC CO2 capture process is analyzed that supplements retentate pressurization and permeate evacuation as a means to create a CO2 driving force with a process assisted by the catalytic combustion of syngas on the permeate side of the membrane. The combustion reactions consume transported oxygen, making it unavailable for the backwards transport reaction. With this change, the MECC capture system becomes exothermic, and steam for electricity production may be generated from the waste heat. Greater than 90% of the CO2 in the flue gas may be captured, and a compressed CO2 product stream is produced. A fossil-fueled power plant using this process would consume 14% more fuel per unit electricity produced than a power plant with no CO2 capture system, and has the potential to meet U.S. DOE s goal that deployment of a CO2 capture system at a fossil-fueled power plant should not increase the cost of electricity from the combined facility by more than 30%.

Sherman, Steven R [ORNL; Gray, Dr. Joshua R. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Brinkman, Dr. Kyle S. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), Aiken, S.C.; Huang, Dr. Kevin [University of South Carolina, Columbia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Growth, CO2 Consumption, and H2 Production of Anabaena variabilis ATCC 29413-U under Different Irradiances and CO2 Concentrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

34 (a) Normalized CO 2 consumption data versus time, (b)speci?c growth, CO 2 consumption and H 2 production ratesGrowth, CO 2 Consumption, and H 2 Production of Anabaena

Berberoglu, Halil; Barra, Natasha; Pilon, Laurent; Jay, Jenny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A Phase-Partitioning Model for CO2–Brine Mixtures at Elevated Temperatures and Pressures: Application to CO2-Enhanced Geothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO 2 content in produced ?uid, with water production endingafter 36.5 years, water content in produced CO 2 Applicationeffects on the water content of produced CO 2 . While

Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated towards light along a light gradient, and against acid gradient, in whole. Nonetheless, some microcolonies were able to generate ''secondary'' microcolonies with increased ability to move towards acid area. These microcolonies with elevated resistance to acidity have been isolated and inoculated in BG-11 with pH 6. They are still under incubation. (b) We have continued our work on the genotyping of unialgal cyanobacterial cultures isolated in YNP. Because partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene of the isolate 5.2 S.C.1 did not appear to be more than 93% identical to published cyanobacterial sequences, we carried out entire sequence of this gene using the combination of different primers. It appears that we have found a representative of putative new genus. We expect to publish all sequences. (c) The new species (even probably new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1 that was isolated from La Duke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin demonstrate an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl3 6H2O on the growth of 5.2 S.C.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of 5.2. S.C.1 isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

414

Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4  

SciTech Connect

This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

2012-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

415

Evaluating the Suitability for CO2 Storage at the FutureGen 2.0 Site, Morgan County, Illinois, USA  

SciTech Connect

FutureGen 2.0 site will be the first near-zero emission power plant with fully integrated long-term storage in a deep, non-potable saline aquifer in the United States. The proposed FutureGen 2.0 CO2 storage site is located in northeast Morgan County, Illinois, U.S.A., forty-eight kilometres from the Meredosia Energy Center where a large-scale oxy-combustion demonstration will be conducted. The demonstration will involve > 90% carbon capture, which will produce more than one million metric tons (MMT) of CO2 per year. The CO2 will be compressed at the power plant and transported via pipeline to the storage site. To examine CO2 storage potential of the site, a 1,467m characterization well (FGA#1) was completed in December 2011. The target reservoir for CO2 storage is the Mt. Simon Sandstone and Elmhurst Sandstone Member of the lower Eau Claire Formation for a combined thickness of 176 m. Confining beds of the overlying Lombard and Proviso Members (upper Eau Claire Formation) reach a thickness of 126 m. Characterization of the target injection zone and the overlying confining zone was based on wellbore data, cores, and geophysical logs, along with surface geophysical (2-D seismic profiles, magnetic and gravity), and structural data collected during the initial stage of the project . Based on this geological model, 3D simulations of CO2 injection and redistribution were conducted using STOMP-CO2, a multiphase flow and transport simulator. After this characterization stage, it appears that the injection site is a suitable geologic system for CO2 sequestration and that the injection zone is sufficient to receive up to 33 MMT of CO2 at a rate of 1.1 MMT/yr. GHGT-11 conference

Bonneville, Alain HR; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Sullivan, E. C.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Kelley, Mark E.; White, Signe K.; Appriou, Delphine; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Gerst, Jacqueline L.; Gupta, Neeraj; Horner, Jacob A.; McNeil, Caitlin; Moody, Mark A.; Rike, William M.; Spane, Frank A.; Thorne, Paul D.; Zeller, Evan R.; Zhang, Z. F.; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Humphreys, Kenneth K.

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

416

Evaluating the impact of caprock and reservoir properties on potential risk of CO2 leakage after injection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical models are essential tools for CO2 sequestration projects and should be included in the life cycle of a project. Common practice involves modeling the behavior of CO2 during and after injection using site-specific reservoir and caprock properties. Little has been done to systematically evaluate and compare the effects of a broad but realistic range of reservoir and caprock properties on potential CO2 leakage through caprock. Broad-based research addressing the impacts of caprock properties and their heterogeneity on seal permeation is absent. Efforts along this direction require obtaining information about the physically reasonable range of caprock and reservoir properties, effectively sampling the parameter space to fully explore the range of these properties, and performing flow and transport calculations using reliable numerical simulators. In this study, we identify the most important factors affecting CO2 leakage through intact caprock and try to understand the underlying mechanisms. We use caprock and reservoir properties from various field sites and literature data to identify the range of caprock thickness, permeability, and porosity that might occur. We use a quasi Monte Carlo sampling approach to ensure that the full range of caprock and seal properties is evaluated without bias. For each set of sampled properties, the migration of injected CO2 is simulated for up to 200 years using the water-salt-CO2 operational mode of the STOMP simulator. Preliminary results show that critical factors determining CO2 leakage rate through intact caprock are, in decreasing order of significance, the caprock thickness, caprock permeability, reservoir permeability, caprock porosity, and reservoir porosity. This study provides a function for prediction of potential CO2 leakage risk due to permeation of intact caprock, and identifies a range of acceptable seal thicknesses and permeability for sequestration projects. As a byproduct, the dependence of CO2 injectivity on reservoir properties is also evaluated.

Hou, Zhangshuan; Rockhold, Mark L.; Murray, Christopher J.

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

417

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification ofgeologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect

To detect and quantify subtle surface CO2 leakage signals, we present a strategy that combines measurements of CO2 fluxes or concentrations in the near-surface environment with an algorithm that enhances temporally- and spatially-correlated leakage signals while suppressing random background noise. The algorithm consists of a filter that highlights spatial coherence in the leakage signal, and temporal stacking (averaging) that reduces noise from temporally uncorrelated background fluxes/concentrations. We assess the performance of our strategy using synthetic data sets in which the surface leakage signal is either specified directly or calculated using flow and transport simulations of leakage source geometries one might expect to be present at sequestration sites. We estimate the number of measurements required to detect a potential CO2 leakage signal of given magnitude and area. Results show that given a rigorous field-sampling program, subtle CO2 leakage may be detected using the algorithm; however, leakage of very limited spatial extent or exceedingly small magnitude may be difficult to detect with a reasonable set of monitoring resources.

Lewicki, Jennifer L.; Hilley, George E.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

418

NETL: Alstom's Chemical Looping Combustion Technology with CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Oxy-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control Commercialization of the Iron Based Coal Direct Chemical Looping Process for Power Production with in situ CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0009761 CDLC Process Concept CDLC Process Concept (click to enlarge) Babcock & Wilcox Power Generation Group (B&W) is developing the coal direct chemical looping (CDCL) process. The CDCL process consists of a unique moving bed reactor - the reducer - where pulverized coal is fully converted using iron-based oxygen carriers. The oxygen carrier is reduced from Fe2O3 to FeO/Fe and the flue gas is a concentrated stream of CO2 that is available for storage or beneficial use. The reduced FeO/Fe is oxidized to Fe2O3 using air in the combustor, liberating heat to produce steam for a

419

Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Emissions Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/ffe.007_V2012 world map Kyoto-Related Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emission Totals Year Annex B Countries Non Annex B Countries Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions (million metric tonnes C) Bunkers (million metric tonnes C) 1990 3894 90 2111 46 1991 3801 94 2299 38 1992 3750 109 2263 44 1993 3685 107 2339 48 1994 3656 107 2469 54 1995 3681 110 2570 59 1996 3704 111 2657 72 1997 3727 114 2737 74 1998 3746 118 2698 82 1999 3678 124 2718 90 2000 3725 130 2821 90 2001 3781 120 2936 92 2002 3764 128 3013 94 2003 3853 123 3347 98 2004 3888 135 3683 107 2005 3933 142 3926 106

420

Direct Solar Energy Conversion by the Reduction of CO2  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Solar Energy Conversion by the Reduction of CO2 Direct Solar Energy Conversion by the Reduction of CO2 Speaker(s): Reed Jensen Date: August 25, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Reed Jensen has successfully demonstrated the direct solar reduction of CO2 to CO and O2 using a solar concentrator dish and ceramic converter that grew out of his work at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He will discuss the thermochemical, kinetic and spectral properties of the CO2 /CO/ O2 system that enable this process and how the CO is subsequently converted to useful fuels by a range of catalytic processes. He will also discuss the technical difficulties associated with the design, construction and operation of a multi-component optical system that must operate at high temperatures. Results from a prototype system will be discussed defining the efficiencies

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While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ARM - Field Campaign - Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar govCampaignsBoundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign : Boundary Layer CO2 Using CW Lidar 2005.05.21 - 2005.05.24 Lead Scientist : Michael Dobbs Description Overflights Underway at ACRF Southern Great Plains Site (M.Dobbs/J.Liljegren) Science collaborators at ITT Industries and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Langley Research Center (LaRC) conducted flights over the Central Facility at ACRF's Southern Great Plains (SGP) site as part of the Climate Sources and Sink (CO2) Intensive Operational Period (IOP), using a CW lidar. The objective of the flights was to validate, by demonstration and comparison with SGP ground observations, the performance of the ITT system when used in conjunction with retrieval

422

Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Feed Systems Feed Systems Coal-CO2 Slurry Feeding System for Pressurized Gasifiers Massachusetts Institute of Technology Project Number: FE0012500 Project Description This project will develop and assess a slurry feeding system based on a suspension of coal in liquid CO2 that can be pumped into a high-pressure gasifier. The advantages of this solution are that CO2 has a low heat capacity, a low heat of vaporization and low viscosity. Thus, the liquid CO2 imposes a much smaller thermal load on the gasifier relative to a water slurry, and has the potential to improve the efficiency and economics of integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plants with carbon capture and dramatically reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal fired power plants. Project Details

423

Advanced Low Energy Enzyme Catalyzed Solvent for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Although carbonate solvent systems have been used for CO 2 removal in high-pressure applications such as natural gas sweetening, they have not been considered practical for flue...

424

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) No revision has been approved for this page. It is currently under review by our subject matter experts. Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on February 12, 2013. EZFeed Policy Place Kentucky Name CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) Policy Category Other Policy Policy Type Industry Recruitment/Support , Technical Feasibility Projects Affected Technologies Coal with CCS Active Policy Yes Implementing Sector State/Province Program Administrator Brandon Nutall, Division of Carbon Management Primary Website http://energy.ky.gov/carbon/Pages/default.aspx Summary Division staff, in partnership with the Kentucky Geological Survey (KGS), continued to support projects to investigate and demonstrate the technical feasibility of geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) in Kentucky. In

425

CO2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,842,126 entitled "Co 2 Separation from Low-Temperature Flue Gases." Disclosed in this patent are novel methods for processing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from combustion gas streams. Researchers at NETL are focused on the development of novel sorbent systems that can effectively remove CO 2 and other gases in an economically feasible manner with limited impact on energy production cost. The current invention will help in reducing greenhouse gas emissions by using an improved, regenerable aqueous amine and soluble potassium carbonate sorbent system. This novel solvent system may be capable of achieving CO 2 capture from larger emission streams at lower overall cost. Overview Sequestration of CO

426

CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Begins in Illinois Begins in Illinois CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois November 17, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon storage technologies nationwide, has begun injecting carbon dioxide (CO2) for their large-scale CO2 injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change. "Establishing long-term, environmentally safe and secure underground CO2 storage is a critical component in achieving successful commercial

427

CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Storage and Sink Enhancements: Storage and Sink Enhancements: Developing Comparable Economics Richard G. Rhudy (rrhudy@epri.com; 650-855-2421) Electric Power Research Institute P.O. Box 10412 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 Bert R. Bock (brbock@tva.gov; 256-386-3095) David E. Nichols (denichols@tva.gov; 256-386-2489) Tennessee Valley Authority P.O. Box 1010 Muscle Shoals, AL 35662-1010 Abstract One of the major difficulties in evaluating CO 2 sequestration technologies and practices, both geologic storage of captured CO 2 and storage in biological sinks, is obtaining consistent, transparent, accurate, and comparable economics. This paper reports on a project that compares the economics of major technologies and practices under development for CO 2 sequestration, including captured CO 2 storage options, such as active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas

428

Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Europe » Italy Western Europe » Italy (including San Marino) Italy (including San Marino) Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Graph graphic Graphics Data graphic Data Trends As occurred in many industrialized nations, CO2 emissions from Italy rose steeply since the late 1940's until the growth was abruptly terminated in 1974. Since 1974, emissions from liquid fuels have vacillated, dropping from 76% to 46% of a static but varying total. Significant increases in natural gas consumption have compensated for the drop in oil consumption. In 2008, 35.8% of Italy's fossil-fuel CO2 emissions were due to natural gas consumption. Coal usage grew steadily until 1985 when CO2 emissions from coal consumption reached 16 million metric tons of carbon. Not until 2004 did coal usage exceed 1985 levels and now accounts for 13.9% of Italy's

429

Solar Activated Photocatalytic Conversion of CO2 and Water to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

However, the low CO2-to-fuel conversion efficiency has impeded the development of this technology. TiO2 has been widely used as a photocatalyst due to its ...

430

Tropical Pacific Interannual Variability and CO2 Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an attempt is made to estimate possible sensitivities of El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO)-related effects in a climate with increased carbon dioxide (CO2). To illustrate this sensitivity, results are shown from two different ...

Gerald A. Meehl; Grant W. Branstator; Warren M. Washington

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Modeling the release of CO2 in the deep ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The idea of capturing and disposing of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the flue gas of fossil fuel-fired power plants has recently received attention as a possible mitigation strategy to counteract potential global warming due ...

Liro, Christopher R.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Geologic Sequestration of CO2 in Deep, Unmineable Coalbeds: ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

base case where no gas injection occurs, and one each for N 2 and CO 2 injection at a rate of 500 Mcfd. The simulation well pattern is a quarter 5 -spot; reservoir parameters are...

433

Comments on Recent Doubts About the CO2 Greenhouse Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two papers recently appeared in the literature purporting to show that the warming of the earth's surface due to increase in the atmospheric CO2 concentration should be an order of magnitude less than predicted by most climate models. The ...

A. J. Crane

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Geologic and Geochemical Evaluation of the Potential for CO2...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

suitability for this project. Gasses cannot be used as inputs to the system, preventing simulation of injection of CO 2 and pressure is fixed at 1 atm. However, its...

435

Reducing CO2 Emissions: Technology, Uncertainty, Decision Making...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reducing CO2 Emissions: Technology, Uncertainty, Decision Making and Consumer Behavior Speaker(s): Ins Magarida Lima de Azevedo Date: October 31, 2012 - 4:00pm Location: 90-3122...

436

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Slipstream...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Testing of a Membrane CO2 Capture Process for Existing Coal-Fired Power Plant Project No.: DE-FE0005795 MTRs high-permeance membranes MTRs high-permeance membranes Membrane...

437

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Evaluation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the use of concentrated piperazine (PZ) as a solvent for absorbing CO2 from coal-fired power plant flue gas, coupled with two-stage flash regeneration. This process offers...

438

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as a thermal power plant, and CO 2 sequestration tech-statistics at the thermal power plants in different statesis from eighty one thermal power plants across the country.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Gravity monitoring of CO2 movement during sequestration: Model studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

right. Figure 14: Surface gravity response (?Gal) for theAbsolute and relative gravity integration for high precision2003, Seafloor Micro-gravity Survey of the Sleipner CO 2

Gasperikova, E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor CO2 and Communicable Disease Transmission in Offices and Non-Industrial Environments Speaker(s): Don Milton Date: October 16, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Improving CO2 Efficiency for Recovering Oil in Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work strived to improve industry understanding of CO2 flooding mechanisms with the ultimate goal of economically recovering more of the U.S. oil reserves. The principle interests are in the related fields of mobility control and injectivity.

Grigg, Reid B.; Svec, Robert K.

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

442

CO2 Geologic Storage (Kentucky) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conducted a test of carbon dioxide enhanced natural gas recovery in the Devonian Ohio Shale, Johnson County, east Kentucky. During the test, 87 tons of CO2 were injected through...

443

Laser rock Drilling Using a Superpulse CO2 Laser Beam  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

by A Super-Pulsed CO 2 Laser Beam Z. Xu and C. B. Reed Technology Development Division, Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, Illinois 60540 R.A. Parker Packer Geoscience...

444

International Symposium on Site Characterization for CO2 Geological Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the arrival of CO 2 . The drilling fluids were tagged withSeismic survey Drilling phase Fluid loss record, PWD Leak-as fluid path should be investigated during drilling phase.

Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions by Region  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Regional Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions by Region Map of the World Africa (1884-2008) Developing America (Central America, South America, and the Caribbean) (1884-2008) Centrally...

446

Canada’s Bitumen Industry Under CO2 Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the effects of implementing CO2 emissions reduction policies on Canada’s oil sands industry, the largest of its kind in the world. The production of petroleum products from oils sands involves extraction of ...

Chen, Y.-H. Henry

447

NETL - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - Evaluation of...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of CO2 Capture from Existing Coal-Fired Plants by Hybrid Sorption Using Solid Sorbents (CACHYS(tm)) Project No.: DE-FE0007603 The University of North Dakota (UND) is...

448

CO2 Capture and Storage Project, Education and Training Center...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

storage. It's the process of capturing and storing or re-using carbon dioxide (CO2) from coal-fired power plants and industrial sources. In Decatur, Illinois, a new carbon capture...

449

Implications of "peak oil" for atmospheric CO2 and climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Peaking of global oil production may have a large effect on future atmospheric CO2 amount and climate change, depending upon choices made for subsequent energy sources. We suggest that, if estimates of oil and gas reserves by the Energy Information Administration are realistic, it is feasible to keep atmospheric CO2 from exceeding approximately 450 ppm, provided that future exploitation of the huge reservoirs of coal and unconventional fossil fuels incorporates carbon capture and sequestration. Existing coal-fired power plants, without sequestration, must be phased out before mid-century to achieve this limit on atmospheric CO2. We also suggest that it is important to "stretch" oil reserves via energy efficiency, thus avoiding the need to extract liquid fuels from coal or unconventional fossil fuels. We argue that a rising price on carbon emissions is probably needed to keep CO2 beneath the 450 ppm ceiling.

Kharecha, P A

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Feasibility of Large-Scale CO2 Ocean Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gas emissions, due in large part to the burning of fossil fuels for energy consumption, has spawned debate over global climate change and...

451

Thermophysical Properties of Carbon Dioxide and CO2-Rich Mixtures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions; and will help maintain the nation's leader- ship in the export of gas turbine equipment. In this NETL-managed project, the National Institute of...

452

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection Boosts Oil Recovery, Captures...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbine generator to provide thermal energy for a 25 million gallon-per-year corn ethanol plant. The project then recovers some of the CO2 that is a byproduct of the...

453

CO2e Capital Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, New York Zip 10022 Product New York based merchant bank focused on reducing global greenhouse gas emissions. References CO2e Capital Limited1 LinkedIn Connections...

454

Co2 Deep Store Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AB11 7LH Sector Carbon Product UK based organization focused on the commercialization of carbon capture and storage. References Co2 Deep Store Ltd1 LinkedIn Connections...

455

NETL: IEP - Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control - National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

IEP Post-Combustion CO2 Emissions Control National Carbon Capture Center at the Power Systems Development Facility Project No.: DE-FC26-08NT0000749 (active), DE-FC21-90MC25140...

456

Porous Organic Molecular Materials for CO2 Capture Applications  

~4.6 Å in diameter 0 100 200 300 400 500 340 345 350 355 360 365 370 Pressure, psi 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 Time, min CO 2 wt% 25% of the crystal volume is ...

457

NETL: 2012 Conference Proceedings - 2012 NETL CO2 Capture Technology...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of a Heat Integrated CO2 Capture System PDF-1.12MB Jim Neathery, University of Kentucky Efficient Use of Waste Heat to Reduce Parasitism of CCS PDF-714KB...

458

NETL: News Release - Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5, 2010 Illinois CO2 Injection Project Moves Another Step Forward Baseline Data Important for CCS Project's Planned 2011 Startup Washington, D.C. - The recent completion of a...

459

NETL: News Release - CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

21, 2011 CO2 Injection Begins in Illinois Large-Scale Test to Inject 1 Million Metric Tons of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Formation Washington, D.C. - The Midwest Geological...

460

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 10/3/2001 through 1/02/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives. Our research team has made significant progress towards completion of our Phase I objectives, and our current efforts remain focused on fulfilling these research objectives in accordance with the project timeline. Overall, we believe that we are on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, which is the milestone date from the original project timeline. Specific results and accomplishments for the fourth quarter of 2001 include: (1) New procedures and protocols have been developed to increase the chances of successful implementation in the bioreactor of organisms that perform well in the lab. The new procedures include pre-screening of organisms for adhesion characteristics and a focus on identifying the organisms with maximum growth rate potential. (2) Preliminary results show an increase in adhesion to glass and a decrease in overall growth rates when using growth media prepared with tap water rather than distilled water. (3) Several of the organisms collected from Yellowstone National Park using the new procedures are currently being cultured in preparation for bioreactor tests. (4) One important result from a test of growth surface temperature distribution as a function of gas stream and drip-fluid temperatures showed a high dependence of membrane temperature on fluid temperature, with gas stream temperature having minimal effect. This result indicates that bioreactor growth surface temperatures can be controlled using fluid delivery temperature. The possible implications for implementation of the bioreactor concept are encouraging, since it may be possible to use the bioreactor with very high gas stream temperatures by controlling the temperature of the organisms with the fluid temperature. (5) Investigation of growth surface materials continues, with Omnisil and Scotch Brite emerging as the leading candidates. More investigation of these and other material types is still needed to determine the best material for particular combinations of organisms and harvesting methods. (6) Tests of harvesting methods and harvesting system designs have shown that desirable levels of ''percentage algae removal'' can be achieved for particular organisms and growth surface materials, for example Cyanidium on polyester felt. Additional testing continues to better characterize sensitivity of the ''percentage removal'' to various system design parameters, but these tests have been delayed due to the lack of suitable organisms for the tests. (7) The solar collectors and the pilot-scale bioreactor light distribution panels for the deep-penetration hybrid solar lighting system have been designed. One solar lighting system (solar collector tracking unit, fiber optic light transmission cables, light distribution panels) is almost completely prepared for installation during the next quarter in the pilot scale bioreactor system. (8) Pressure drop results from tests on the enhanced mass transfer CO{sub 2} absorption technique (the translating slug flow reactor) are encouraging, with reasonable values of 2.5 psi maximum over an 11.48 meter distance between pressure taps for test conditions of 0.6 m/sec slug velocity and approximately 10 m/sec gas velocity. Preparations are under way for CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flows trap co2" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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461

ENHANCED PRACTICAL PHOTOSYNTHETIC CO2 MITIGATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2001 through 7/01/2002. Most of the achievements are milestones in our efforts to complete the tasks and subtasks that constitute the project objectives, and we are currently on schedule to complete Phase I activities by 10/2002, the milestone date from the original project timeline. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below, our efforts are focused on improving the design of the bioreactor test system, evaluating candidate organisms and growth surfaces, and scaling-up the test facilities from bench scale to pilot scale. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2002 include: Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (1) Our collection of cyanobacteria, isolated in YNP was increased to 15 unialgal cultures. (2) Illumination rate about 50 {micro}E/m{sup 2}/sec is not saturated for the growth of 1.2 s.c. (2) isolate. The decrease of illumination rate led to the decrease of doubling time of this isolate. (3) The positive effect of Ca{sup 2+} on the growth of isolate 1.2 s.c. (2) without Omnisil was revealed, though Ca{sup 2+} addition was indifferent for the growth of this isolate at the presence of Omnisil. (4) Calcium addition had a positive effect on the generation of cyanobacterial biofilm on Omnisil surface. (5) The survivability problems with the Tr9.4 organism on Omnisil screens in the CRF2 model-scale bioreactor have been solved. The problems were related to the method used to populate the growth surfaces. When pre-populated screens were placed in the bioreactor the microalgae died within 72 hours, but when the microalgae were cultured while in place in the bioreactor using a continuous-population method they grew well inside of the CRF2 test system and survived for the full 7-day test duration. CRF2 tests will continue as soon as the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe design is refined. Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (1) A solar collector, fiber optic light cables, and 8 light distribution panels have been installed at the pilot-scale bioreactor site. The ''natural'' lighting system is ready for the pilot-scale bioreactor system-level debugging tests scheduled for early to mid July. (2) CO{sub 2} scrubbing tests were carried out to understand the CO{sub 2} scrubbing capability of translating slug flow under various conditions. Within experimental error, for liquid velocities of 0.6 m/s and 1m/s it was shown that different gas velocities (including 4.8, 6.6 and 9m/s) cause no significant change in CO{sub 2} concentration. (3) The harvesting tests were put on hold while an alternative loading method was developed and to concentrate our resources on the design of the new combined drip system/harvesting system header pipe. A new header pipe design has been completed and proof-of-concept tests have shown good performance in the drip loading mode. Tests have also shown that we can create preferable conditions for harvesting with this design, and actual harvesting tests will be run as soon as screens are available that have achieved a sufficiently ''thick'' growth state such that harvesting is desired.

Dr. Gregory Kremer; Dr. David J. Bayless; Dr. Morgan Vis; Dr. Michael Prudich; Dr. Keith Cooksey; Dr. Jeff Muhs

2002-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Economic Evaluation of CO2 Storage and Sink Enhancement Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed life-cycle costs for the major technologies and practices under development for carbon dioxide (CO2) storage and sink enhancement. The technologies evaluated included options for storing captured CO2 in active oil reservoirs, depleted oil and gas reservoirs, deep aquifers, coal beds, and oceans, as well as the enhancement of the carbon sequestration in forests and croplands. The capture costs for a nominal 500 MWe integrated gasification combined cycle plant from an earlier study w...

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

463

Biominetic Membrane for Co2 Capture from Flue Gas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biomimetic Membrane for CO Biomimetic Membrane for CO 2 Capture from Flue Gas Background Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) is a three-step process including capture, pipeline transport, and geologic storage of which the capture of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) is the most costly and technically challenging. Current available methods impose significant energy burdens that severely impact their overall effectiveness as a significant deployment option. Of the available capture technologies for post

464

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands marginal CO2 intensities of energy eff...

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

465

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency Webcast Presentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

his is a PDF of PowerPoint™ slides presented during the 17 February 2009 webcast, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency. The webcast was based on work conducted for the report, Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency (product number 1016085). The webcast and the slides include the following information: Modeling approaches and assumptions Summary of results for two approaches How model output can be applied by utilities Planned refinements to the model in 2009 and beyond, includin...

2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

466

Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Costs of Reducing Electricity Sector CO2 Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents a high-level analysis of some of the critical challenges associated with cutting United States electricity-sector CO2 emissions and an order of magnitude feeling for what it will cost to meet emission-reduction targets now under consideration. Three basic strategies to limit emissions are illustrated to give readers a basic understanding of the tradeoff between CO2 reductions and additional cost inherent in several generation choices. Regional power market system simulations are then...

2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

468

Reversible Acid Gas Capture Using CO2-Binding Organic Liquids  

SciTech Connect

Acid gas scrubbing technology is predominantly aqueous alkanolamine based. Of the acid gases, CO2, H2S and SO2 have been shown to be reversible, however there are serious disadvantages with corrosion and high regeneration costs. The primary scrubbing system composed of monoethanolamine is limited to 30% by weight because of the highly corrosive solution. This gravimetric limitation limits the CO2 volumetric (?108 g/L) and gravimetric capacity (?7 wt%) of the system. Furthermore the scrubbing system has a large energy penalty from pumping and heating the excess water required to dissolve the MEA bicarbonate salt. Considering the high specific heat of water (4 j/g-1K-1), low capacities and the high corrosion we set out to design a fully organic solvent that can chemically bind all acid gases i.e. CO2 as reversible alkylcarbonate ionic liquids or analogues thereof. Having a liquid acid gas carrier improves process economics because there is no need for excess solvent to pump and to heat. We have demonstrated illustrated in Figure 1, that CO2-binding organic liquids (CO2BOLs) have a high CO2 solubility paired with a much lower specific heat (<1.5 J/g-1K-1) than aqueous systems. CO2BOLs are a subsection of a larger class of materials known as Binding Organic Liquids (BOLs). Our BOLs have been shown to reversibly bind and release COS, CS2, and SO2, which we denote COSBOLS, CS2BOLs and SO2BOLs. Our BOLs are highly tunable and can be designed for post or pre-combustion gas capture. The design and testing of the next generation zwitterionic CO2BOLs and SO2BOLs are presented.

Heldebrant, David J.; Koech, Phillip K.; Yonker, Clement R.; Rainbolt, James E.; Zheng, Feng

2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report details EPRI's continued efforts to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study refines and expands the marginal CO2 intensities of en...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

470

Modeling CO2 Emissions Impact of Energy Efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an effort to model the marginal carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions impact of energy efficiency. Though intuitively recognized to reduce emissions, energy efficiency is not universally accepted as an eligible category for emissions credit in most trading or offset markets today. Chief among the barriers to eligibility is the lack of precision in emissions reduction estimates based on average emissions factors. This study establishes a proof-of-concept for quantifying marginal CO2 intensi...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

471

Dehydrated Prussian Blues for CO2 Storage and Separation Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adsorption isotherms of pure gases present in flue and natural gas including CO2, N2, CH4 and water were studied using prussian blues of chemical formula M3[Co(CN)6]2 (M = Cu, Ni, Mn). These materials adsorbed 8-12 wt % of CO2 at room temperature and 1 bar of pressure with heats of adsorption ranging from 6 to 16 kcal/mol.

Motkuri, Radha K.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; McGrail, B. Peter; Ghorishi, Behrooz S.

2010-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

472

INTEGRATING MEA REGENERATION WITH CO2 COMPRESSION AND PEAKING TO REDUCE CO2 CAPTURE COSTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that links the core and the steam generator. It goes through the exchanger inside a U-shaped tube bundle in liquid phase but starts to boil and leaves this area in a two-phase situation with a void fraction around). In all these works an homogenization of the tube bundle has been used and the two- phase flow has been

Rochelle, Gary T.

473

Analysis of Field Development Strategies of CO2 EOR/Capture Projects Using a Reservoir Simulation Economic Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for the evaluation of CO2-EOR projects has been developed. This model includes both reservoir simulation to handle reservoir properties, fluid flow and injection and production schedules, and a numerical economic model that generates a monthly cash flow stream from the outputs of the reservoir model. This model is general enough to be used with any project and provide a solid common basis to all of them. This model was used to evaluate CO2-EOR injection and production strategies and develop an optimization workflow. Producer constraints (maximum oil and gas production rates) should be optimized first to generate a reference case. Further improvements can then be obtained by optimizing the injection starting date and the injection plateau rate. Investigation of sensitivity of CO2-EOR to the presence of an aquifer showed that CO2 injection can limit water influx in the reservoir and is beneficial to recovery, even with a strong water drive. The influence of some key parameters was evaluated: the producer should be completed in the top part of the reservoir, while the injector should be completed over the entire thickness; it is recommended but not mandatory that the injection should start as early as possible to allow for lower water cut limit. Finally, the sensitivity of the economics of the projects to some key parameters was evaluated. The most influent parameter is by far the oil price, but other parameters such as the CO2 source to field distance, the pipeline cost scenario, the CO2 source type or the CO2 market price have roughly the same influence. It is therefore possible to offset an increase of one of them by reducing another.

Saint-Felix, Martin

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Regional Ecosystem-Atmosphere CO2 Exchange Via Atmospheric Budgets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inversions of atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurements to determine CO2 sources and sinks are typically limited to coarse spatial and temporal resolution. This limits our ability to evaluate efforts to upscale chamber- and stand-level CO2 flux measurements to regional scales, where coherent climate and ecosystem mechanisms govern the carbon cycle. As a step towards the goal of implementing atmospheric budget or inversion methodology on a regional scale, a network of five relatively inexpensive CO2 mixing ratio measurement systems was deployed on towers in northern Wisconsin. Four systems were distributed on a circle of roughly 150-km radius, surrounding one centrally located system at the WLEF tower near Park Falls, WI. All measurements were taken at a height of 76 m AGL. The systems used single-cell infrared CO2 analyzers (Licor, model LI-820) rather than the siginificantly more costly two-cell models, and were calibrated every two hours using four samples known to within ± 0.2 ppm CO2. Tests prior to deployment in which the systems sampled the same air indicate the precision of the systems to be better than ± 0.3 ppm and the accuracy, based on the difference between the daily mean of one system and a co-located NOAA-ESRL system, is consistently better than ± 0.3 ppm. We demonstrate the utility of the network in two ways. We interpret regional CO2 differences using a Lagrangian parcel approach. The difference in the CO2 mixing ratios across the network is at least 2?3 ppm, which is large compared to the accuracy and precision of the systems. Fluxes estimated assuming Lagrangian parcel transport are of the same sign and magnitude as eddy-covariance flux measurements at the centrally-located WLEF tower. These results indicate that the network will be useful in a full inversion model. Second, we present a case study involving a frontal passage through the region. The progression of a front across the network is evident; changes as large as four ppm in one minute are captured. Influence functions, derived using a Lagrangian Particle Dispersion model driven by the CSU Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and nudged to NCEP reanalysis meteorological fields, are used to determine source regions for the towers. The influence functions are combined with satellite vegetation observations to interpret the observed trends in CO2 concentration. Full inversions will combine these elements in a more formal analytic framework.

Davis, K.J.; Richardson, S.J.; Miles, N.L.

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

475

Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products  

SciTech Connect

A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

Sabine, Christopher [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Hankin, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koyuk, H [Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington; Bakker, D C E [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Pfeil, B [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen; Uni Research AS, Bergen, Norway; Olsen, A [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, UNIFOB AS, Bergen, Norway; Metzl, N [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Fassbender, A [School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Manke, A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Malczyk, J [Jetz Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University; Akl, J [CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Alin, S R [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Bellerby, R G J [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Borges, A [University of Liege, Chemical Oceanography Unit, Institut de Physique, Liege, Belgium; Boutin, J [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Brown, P J [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Cai, W-J [Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia; Chavez, F P [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA; Chen, A [Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Cosa, C [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Feely, R A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Gonzalez-Davila, M [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,; Goyet, C [Institut de Modélisation et d'Analyse en Géo-Environnement et Santé, Université de Perpignan; Hardman-Mountford, N [CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research, Wembley, Western Australia, Australia; Heinze, C [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hoppema, M [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; Hunt, C W [Ocean Process Analysis Lab, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire; Hydes, D [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK; Ishii, M [Japan Meteorological Agency, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan; Johannessen, T [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Key, R M [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Kortzinger, A [GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany; Landschutzer, P [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Lauvset, S K [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Lefevre, N [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Lenton, A [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Lourantou, A [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Merlivat, L [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Midorikawa, T [Nagasaki Marine Observatory, Nagasaki, Japan; Mintrop, L [MARIANDA, Kiel, Germany; Miyazaki, C [Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan; Murata, A [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakadate, A [Marine Division, Global Environment and Marine Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan; Nakano, Y [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakaoka, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Tsukuba, Japan; Nojiri, Y [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; et al.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

CO2 Sequestration in Unmineable Coal Seams: Potential Environmental Impacts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An initial investigation into the potential environmental impacts of CO2 sequestration in unmineable coal seams has been conducted, focusing on changes in the produced water during enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) production using a CO2 injection process (CO2-ECBM). Two coals have been used in this study, the medium volatile bituminous Upper Freeport coal (APCS 1) of the Argonne Premium Coal Samples series, and an as-mined Pittsburgh #8 coal, which is a high volatile bituminous coal. Coal samples were reacted with either synthetic produced water or field collected produced water and gaseous carbon dioxide at 40 ?C and 50 bar to evaluate the potential for mobilizing toxic metals during CO2-ECBM/sequestration. Microscopic and x-ray diffraction analysis of the post-reaction coal samples clearly show evidence of chemical reaction, and chemical analysis of the produced water shows substantial changes in composition. These results suggest that changes to the produced water chemistry and the potential for mobilizing toxic trace elements from coalbeds are important factors to be considered when evaluating deep, unmineable coal seams for CO2 sequestration.

Hedges, S.W.; Soong, Yee; McCarthy Jones, J.R.; Harrison, D.K.; Irdi, G.A.; Frommell, E.A.; Dilmore, R.M.; Pique, P.J.; Brown, T.D

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

CO2-selective, Hybrid Membranes by Silation of Alumina  

SciTech Connect

Hybrid membranes are feasible candidates for the separation of CO2 from gas produced in coal-based power generation since they have the potential to combine the high selectivity of polymer membranes and the high permeability of inorganic membranes. An interesting method for producing hybrid membranes is the silation of an inorganic membrane. In this method, trichloro- or alkoxy-silanes interact with hydroxyl groups on the surface of ?-AlO3 or TiO2, binding organic groups to that surface. By varying the length of these organic groups on the organosilane, it should be possible to tailor the effective pore size of the membrane. Similarly, the addition of “CO2-phillic” groups to the silating agent allows for the careful control of surface affinity and the enhancement of surface diffusion mechanisms. This method of producing hybrid membranes selective to CO2 was first attempted by Hyun [1] who silated TiO2 with phenyltriethoxysilane. Later, Way [2] silated ?-AlO3 with octadecyltrichlorosilane. Both researchers were successful in producing membranes with improved selectivity toward CO2, but permeability was not maintained at a commercially applicable level. XPS data indicated that the silating agent did not penetrate into the membrane pores and separation actually occurred in a thin “polymer-like” surface layer. The present study attempts to overcome the mass transfer problems associated with this technique by producing the desired monolayer coverage of silane, and thus develop a highly-permeable CO2-selective hybrid membrane.

Luebke, D.R.; Pennline, H.W.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

CO2 Storage and Enhanced Oil Recovery: Bald Unit Test Site, Mumford Hills Oil Field, Posey County, Indiana  

SciTech Connect

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) carried out a small-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in a sandstone within the Clore Formation (Mississippian System, Chesterian Series) in order to gauge the large-scale CO2 storage that might be realized from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) of mature Illinois Basin oil fields via miscible liquid CO2 flooding. As part of the MGSC�������¢����������������s Validation Phase (Phase II) studies, the small injection pilot test was conducted at the Bald Unit site within the Mumford Hills Field in Posey County, southwest