National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for flow thermal turbulence

  1. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  2. Turbulent Energy Transport in Nonradiative Accretion Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus

    2003-09-24

    Just as correlations between fluctuating radial and azimuthal velocities produce a coherent stress contributing to the angular momentum transport in turbulent accretion disks, correlations in the velocity and temperature fluctuations produce a coherent energy flux. This nonadvective energy flux is always of secondary importance in thin radiative disks, but cannot be neglected in nonradiative flows, in which it completes the mean field description of turbulence. It is, nevertheless, generally ignored in accretion flow theory, with the exception of models explicitly driven by thermal convection, where it is modeled phenomenologically. This flux embodies both turbulent thermal convection as well as wave transport, and its presence is essential for a proper formulation of energy conservation, whether convection is present or not. The sign of the thermal flux is likely to be outward in real systems, but the restrictive assumptions used in numerical simulations may lead to inward thermal transport, in which case qualitatively new effects may be exhibited. We find, for example, that a static solution would require inward, not outward, thermal transport. Even if it were present, thermal convection would be unlikely to stifle accretion, but would simply add to the outward rotational energy flux that must already be present.

  3. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  4. Influences of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer and thermal performance characteristics in laminar and turbulent tube flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eiamsa-ard, Smith [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand); Seemawute, Panida [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand); Wongcharee, Khwanchit [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Mahanakorn University of Technology, Bangkok 10530 (Thailand)

    2010-09-15

    Effects of peripherally-cut twisted tape insert on heat transfer, friction loss and thermal performance factor characteristics in a round tube were investigated. Nine different peripherally-cut twisted tapes with constant twist ratio (y/W = 3.0) and different three tape depth ratios (DR = d/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33), each with three different tape width ratios (WR = w/W = 0.11, 0.22 and 0.33) were tested. Besides, one typical twisted tape was also tested for comparison. The measurement of heat transfer rate was conducted under uniform heat flux condition while that of friction factor was performed under isothermal condition. Tests were performed with Reynolds number in a range from 1000 to 20,000, using water as a working fluid. The experimental results revealed that both heat transfer rate and friction factor in the tube equipped with the peripherally-cut twisted tapes were significantly higher than those in the tube fitted with the typical twisted tape and plain tube, especially in the laminar flow regime. The higher turbulence intensity of fluid in the vicinity of the tube wall generated by the peripherally-cut twisted tape compared to that induced by the typical twisted tape is referred as the main reason for achieved results. The obtained results also demonstrated that as the depth ratio increased and width ratio decreased, the heat transfer enhancement increased. Over the range investigated, the peripherally-cut twisted tape enhanced heat transfer rates in term of Nusselt numbers up to 2.6 times (turbulent regime) and 12.8 times (laminar regime) of that in the plain tube. These corresponded to the maximum performance factors of 1.29 (turbulent regime) and 4.88 (laminar regime). (author)

  5. ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale:...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges...

  6. Transition to turbulence in duct flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biau, Damien; Bottaro, Alessandro; 10.1017/S0022112007009536

    2010-01-01

    The transition of the flow in a duct of square cross-section is studied. Like in the similar case of the pipe flow, the motion is linearly stable for all Reynolds numbers; this flow is thus a good candidate to investigate the 'bypass' path to turbulence. Initially the so-called 'linear optimal perturbation problem' is formulated and solved, yielding optimal disturbances in the form of longitudinal vortices. Such optimals, however, fail to elicit a significant response from the system in the nonlinear regime. Thus, streamwise-inhomogeneous, sub-optimal disturbances are focussed upon; nonlinear quadratic interactions are immediately evoked by such initial perturbations and an unstable streamwise-homogeneous large amplitude mode rapidly emerges. The subsequent evolution of the flow, at a value of the Reynolds number at the edge between fully developed turbulence and relaminarization, shows the alternance of patterns with two pairs of large scale vortices near opposing parallel walls. Such edge states bear a rese...

  7. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The development of turbulent combustion models that reflect some of the most important characteristics of turbulent reacting flows requires knowledge about the behavior of key quantities in well defined combustion regimes. In turbulent flames, the coupling between the turbulence and the chemistry is so strong in certain regimes that is is very difficult to isolate the role played by one individual phenomenon. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is an extremely useful tool to study in detail the turbulence-chemistry interactions in certain well defined regimes. Globally, non-premixed flames are controlled by two limiting cases: the fast chemistry limit, where the turbulent fluctuations. In between these two limits, finite-rate chemical effects are important and the turbulence interacts strongly with the chemical processes. This regime is important because industrial burners operate in regimes in which, locally the flame undergoes extinction, or is at least in some nonequilibrium condition. Furthermore, these nonequilibrium conditions strongly influence the production of pollutants. To quantify the finite-rate chemistry effect, direct numerical simulations are performed to study the interaction between an initially laminar non-premixed flame and a three-dimensional field of homogeneous isotropic decaying turbulence. Emphasis is placed on the dynamics of extinction and on transient effects on the fine scale mixing process. Differential molecular diffusion among species is also examined with this approach, both for nonreacting and reacting situations. To address the problem of large-scale mixing and to examine the effects of mean shear, efforts are underway to perform large eddy simulations of round three-dimensional jets.

  8. FLOW CONDITIONING DESIGN IN TURBULENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at San Diego, University of

    , or liquid sheets, create protective pocket to shield chamber side walls · Lattice of stationary sheets shield front/back walls while allowing beam propagation and target injection (High-Yield Lithium conditioner configurations #12;5 Flow Loop A Pump H 400 gal tank B Bypass line I Butterfly valve C Flow meter

  9. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  10. The spatio-temporal spectrum of turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    di Leoni, P Clark; Mininni, P D

    2015-01-01

    Identification and extraction of vortical structures and of waves in a disorganized flow is a mayor challegen in the study of turbulence. We present a study of the spatio-temporal behavior of turbulent flows in the presence of different restitutive forces. We show how to compute and analyze the spatio-temporal spectrum from data stemming from numerical simulations and from laboratory experiments. Four cases are considered: homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, rotating turbulence, stratified turbulence, and water wave turbulence. For homogeneous and isotropic turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of random sweeping. For rotating and for stratified turbulence, the spectrum allows identification of the waves, quantification of the energy in the waves and in the turbulent eddies, and identification of physical mechanisms such as Doppler shift and wave absorption in critical layers. Finally, in water wave turbulence the spectrum shows a transition from gravity-capillary waves to bound waves as the amplit...

  11. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  12. Regulation of thermal conductivity in hot galaxy clusters by MHD turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; Christopher S. Reynolds

    2008-06-05

    The role of thermal conduction in regulating the thermal behavior of cooling flows in galaxy clusters is reexamined. Recent investigations have shown that the anisotropic Coulomb heat flux caused by a magnetic field in a dilute plasma drives a dynamical instability. A long standing problem of cooling flow theory has been to understand how thermal conduction can offset radiative core losses without completely preventing them. In this Letter we propose that magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the heat flux instability regulates field-line insulation and drives a reverse convective thermal flux, both of which may mediate the stabilization of the cooling cores of hot clusters. This model suggests that turbulent mixing should accompany strong thermal gradients in cooling flows. This prediction seems to be supported by the spatial distribution of metals in the central galaxies of clusters, which shows a much stronger correlation with the ambient hot gas temperature gradient than with the parent stellar population.

  13. Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard W. Johnson

    2012-09-01

    A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical engineering applications.

  14. Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and developed a data post-processing method to reduce the cost of flow and turbulence measurements at MHKAdvanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization and flow characterization within full scale conventional hydropower systems, at marine and hydrokinetic

  15. Thermal Instability-Induced Interstellar Turbulence 1 Alexei Kritsuk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kritsuk, Alexei

    Thermal Instability-Induced Interstellar Turbulence 1 Alexei Kritsuk University of California, San Diego, USA Saint Petersburg State University, Russia In collaboration with Mike Norman, UCSD http://akpc.ucsd.edu/Thermal conditions: periodic box Parameters: box size L, 0, T0, heating rate , = 5 3 , metallicity Z = Z Thermal

  16. Subgrid models for mass and thermal diffusion in turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, David H; Lim, Hyunkyung; Li, Xiao - Lin; Gilmm, James G

    2008-01-01

    We are concerned with the chaotic flow fields of turbulent mixing. Chaotic flow is found in an extreme form in multiply shocked Richtmyer-Meshkov unstable flows. The goal of a converged simulation for this problem is twofold: to obtain converged solutions for macro solution features, such as the trajectories of the principal shock waves, mixing zone edges, and mean densities and velocities within each phase, and also for such micro solution features as the joint probability distributions of the temperature and species concentration. We introduce parameterized subgrid models of mass and thermal diffusion, to define large eddy simulations (LES) that replicate the micro features observed in the direct numerical simulation (DNS). The Schmidt numbers and Prandtl numbers are chosen to represent typical liquid, gas and plasma parameter values. Our main result is to explore the variation of the Schmidt, Prandtl and Reynolds numbers by three orders of magnitude, and the mesh by a factor of 8 per linear dimension (up to 3200 cells per dimension), to allow exploration of both DNS and LES regimes and verification of the simulations for both macro and micro observables. We find mesh convergence for key properties describing the molecular level of mixing, including chemical reaction rates between the distinct fluid species. We find results nearly independent of Reynolds number for Re 300, 6000, 600K . Methodologically, the results are also new. In common with the shock capturing community, we allow and maintain sharp solution gradients, and we enhance these gradients through use of front tracking. In common with the turbulence modeling community, we include subgrid scale models with no adjustable parameters for LES. To the authors' knowledge, these two methodologies have not been previously combined. In contrast to both of these methodologies, our use of Front Tracking, with DNS or LES resolution of the momentum equation at or near the Kolmogorov scale, but without resolving the Batchelor scale, allows a feasible approach to the modeling of high Schmidt number flows.

  17. Turbulent heat transfer in a channel flow at transitional Reynolds numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulation of a turbulent channel flow with heat transfer was performed at very low Reynolds numbers. Two different thermal boundary conditions were studied, and temperature was considered as a passive scalar. The computations were carried out with huge computational boxes (up to 327.7 x 2 x 128 in the streamwise, wall-normal, and spanwise directions, respectively). The emphases of this paper are to investigate the large-scale structure (puff) in the intermittent-turbulent flow including the scalar fields and to provide the values of the transitional and critical Reynolds numbers, below which the turbulent flow becomes intermittent and laminar, respectively. The statistics, such as the skin friction and the Stanton number, were also examined: they suggest that the puff should be effective in sustaining turbulence and in heat transfer enhancement.

  18. Compound cooling flow turbulator for turbine component

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Jiang, Nan; Marra, John J; Rudolph, Ronald J

    2014-11-25

    Multi-scale turbulation features, including first turbulators (46, 48) on a cooling surface (44), and smaller turbulators (52, 54, 58, 62) on the first turbulators. The first turbulators may be formed between larger turbulators (50). The first turbulators may be alternating ridges (46) and valleys (48). The smaller turbulators may be concave surface features such as dimples (62) and grooves (54), and/or convex surface features such as bumps (58) and smaller ridges (52). An embodiment with convex turbulators (52, 58) in the valleys (48) and concave turbulators (54, 62) on the ridges (46) increases the cooling surface area, reduces boundary layer separation, avoids coolant shadowing and stagnation, and reduces component mass.

  19. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  20. Laminar-Turbulent Transition: Calculation of Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Channel Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laminar-Turbulent Transition: Calculation of Minimum Critical Reynolds Number in Channel Flow) for laminar-turbulent transition in pipe and channel flows. For pipe flow, the minimum critical Reynolds laminar to turbulent flow Rc2 Rc from turbulent to laminar flow Rc(min) minimum Rc Re Reynolds number = UH

  1. Space-time correlations in turbulent flow: A review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, James M

    2015-01-01

    This paper reviews some of the principal uses, over almost seven decades, of correlations, in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frames of reference, of properties of turbulent flows at variable spatial locations and variable time instants. Commonly called space--time correlations, they have been fundamental to theories and models of turbulence as well as for the analyses of experimental and direct numerical simulation turbulence data.

  2. Scale invariance at the onset of turbulence in Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Liang; Hof, Bjoern

    2013-01-01

    Laminar-turbulent intermittency is intrinsic to the transitional regime of a wide range of fluid flows including pipe, channel, boundary layer and Couette flow. In the latter turbulent spots can grow and form continuous stripes, yet in the stripe-normal direction they remain interspersed by laminar fluid. We carry out direct numerical simulations in a long narrow domain and observe that individual turbulent stripes are transient. In agreement with recent observations in pipe flow we find that turbulence becomes sustained at a distinct critical point once the spatial proliferation outweighs the inherent decaying process. By resolving the asymptotic size distributions close to criticality we can for the first time demonstrate scale invariance at the onset of turbulence.

  3. SUR LES CASCADES D'ENERGIE EN ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosa, Ricardo M. S.

    SUR LES CASCADES D'´ENERGIE EN ´ECOULEMENTS TURBULENTS CASCADE OF ENERGY IN TURBULENT FLOWS CIPRIAN energy is transferred from low wave number modes to high wave number modes (L. Onsager (1945)). Such a transfer of energy occurs in a spectral range beyond that of injection of energy, and it underlies the so

  4. Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gilmore, Mark A.

    2013-06-27

    Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

  5. The dynamics of transition to turbulence in plane Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viswanath, D

    2007-01-01

    In plane Couette flow, the incompressible fluid between two plane parallel walls is driven by the motion of those walls. The laminar solution, in which the streamwise velocity varies linearly in the wall-normal direction, is known to be linearly stable at all Reynolds numbers ($Re$). Yet, in both experiments and computations, turbulence is observed for $Re \\gtrsim 360$. In this article, we show that when the laminar flow is perturbed on to the transition {\\it threshold}, the flow approaches either steady or traveling wave solutions. These solutions exhibit some aspects of turbulence but are not fully turbulent even at $Re=4000$. However, these solutions are linearly unstable and flows that evolve along their unstable directions become fully turbulent. The solution approached by a threshold perturbation depends upon the nature of the perturbation. Surprisingly, the positive eigenvalue that corresponds to one family of solutions decreases in magnitude with increasing $Re$, with the rate of decrease given by $Re...

  6. Turbulent Flow and Transport Modeling by Long Waves and Currents 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dae Hong

    2010-10-12

    This dissertation presents models for turbulent flow and transport by currents and long waves in large domain. From the Navier-Stokes equations, a fully nonlinear depth-integrated equation model for weakly dispersive, ...

  7. Turbulence of a Unidirectional Flow Bjorn Birnir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birnir, Björn

    -flying aircraft. Turbulent drag also prevents the design of more fuel-efficient cars and aircrafts. Turbulence plays a role in the heat trans- fer in nuclear reactors, causes drag in oil pipelines and influence and intrigued people for centuries. Five centuries ago a fluid engineer by the name of Leonardo da Vinci tackled

  8. Turbulence-chemistry interactions in reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barlow, R.S.; Carter, C.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Interactions between turbulence and chemistry in nonpremixed flames are investigated through multiscalar measurements. Simultaneous point measurements of major species, NO, OH, temperature, and mixture fraction are obtained by combining spontaneous Raman scattering, Rayleigh scattering, and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). NO and OH fluorescence signals are converted to quantitative concentrations by applying shot-to-shot corrections for local variations of the Boltzmann fraction and collisional quenching rate. These measurements of instantaneous thermochemical states in turbulent flames provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions. The measurements also constitute a unique data base for evaluation and refinement of turbulent combustion models. Experimental work during the past year has focused on three areas: (1) investigation of the effects of differential molecular diffusion in turbulent combustion: (2) experiments on the effects of Halon CF{sub 3}Br, a fire retardant, on the structure of turbulent flames of CH{sub 4} and CO/H{sub 2}/N{sub 2}; and (3) experiments on NO formation in turbulent hydrogen jet flames.

  9. Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamak: ETG or TEM Turbulences?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    Electron Thermal Transport in Tokamak: ETG or TEM Turbulences? Z. Lin, L. Chen, Y. Nishimura, H. Qu, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, Univ. of California, Irvine, CA 92697, USA T. S. Hahm, J. Lewandowski, C. Holland, Dept. of Physics, Univ. of California, San Diego, CA 92093, USA F. Zonca, Associazione

  10. REAL TIME FEATURE EXTRACTION FOR THE ANALYSIS OF TURBULENT FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interrante, Victoria

    great unsolved problem in classical physics, and all efforts to develop models to predict turbulent techniques, terabyte scale data sets are being generated, and hence stor- age as well as analysis include flow over aircraft, spacecraft, and other transport vehicles, flow inside of engines and power

  11. TURBULENT SHEAR STRESS IN HETEROGENEOUS SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    TURBULENT SHEAR STRESS IN HETEROGENEOUS SEDIMENT-LADEN FLOWS By Hyoseop Woo,1 Associate Member are the beginning of motion of sediment particles and sediment transport in alluvial channels. If shear stress can be well defined in clear-water flows, compar- atively little is known about shear stresses in sediment

  12. Closure models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Tarbell, J.M. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (USA). Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1989-12-01

    In this paper, a simple procedure based on fast and slow reaction asymptotics has been employed to drive first-order closure models for the nonlinear reaction terms in turbulent mass balances from mechanistic models of turbulent mixing and reaction. The coalescence-redispersion (CRD) model, the interaction by exchange with the mean (IEM) model, the three-environment (3E) model, and the four-environment (4E) model have been used to develop closure equations. The closure models have been tested extensively against experimental data for both single and multiple reactions. The closures based on slow asymptotics for the CRD, 3E and 4E models provide very good predictions of all of the experimental data, while other models available either in the literature or derived here are not adequate. The simple new closure equations developed in this paper may be useful in modeling systems involving turbulent mixing and complex chemical reactions.

  13. Wave turbulence revisited: Where does the energy flow?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. V. Abdurakhimov; I. A. Remizov; A. A. Levchenko; G. V. Kolmakov; Y. V. Lvov

    2014-04-03

    Turbulence in a system of nonlinearly interacting waves is referred to as wave turbulence. It has been known since seminal work by Kolmogorov, that turbulent dynamics is controlled by a directional energy flux through the wavelength scales. We demonstrate that an energy cascade in wave turbulence can be bi-directional, that is, can simultaneously flow towards large and small wavelength scales from the pumping scales at which it is injected. This observation is in sharp contrast to existing experiments and wave turbulence theory where the energy flux only flows in one direction. We demonstrate that the bi-directional energy cascade changes the energy budget in the system and leads to formation of large-scale, large-amplitude waves similar to oceanic rogue waves. To study surface wave turbulence, we took advantage of capillary waves on a free, weakly charged surface of superfluid helium He-II at temperature 1.7K. Although He-II demonstrates non-classical thermomechanical effects and quantized vorticity, waves on its surface are identical to those on a classical Newtonian fluid with extremely low viscosity. The possibility of directly driving a charged surface by an oscillating electric field and the low viscosity of He-II have allowed us to isolate the surface dynamics and study nonlinear surface waves in a range of frequencies much wider than in experiments with classical fluids.

  14. Optimal thermalization in a shell model of homogeneous turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thalabard, Simon

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the turbulence-induced dissipation of the large scales in a statistically homogeneous flow using an "optimal closure," which one of us (BT) has recently exposed in the context of Hamiltonian dynamics. This statistical closure employs a Gaussian model for the turbulent scales, with corresponding vanishing third cumulant, and yet it captures an intrinsic damping. The key to this apparent paradox lies in a clear distinction between true ensemble averages and their proxies, most easily grasped when one works directly with the Liouville equation rather than the cumulant hierarchy. We focus on a simple problem for which the optimal closure can be fully and exactly worked out: the relaxation arbitrarily far-from-equilibrium of a single energy shell towards Gibbs equilibrium in an inviscid shell model of 3D turbulence. The predictions of the optimal closure are validated against DNS and contrasted with those derived from EDQNM closure.

  15. Some questions regarding the understanding and prediction of turbulent flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    generation by thermal power, passenger and cargo service by automobiles, airplanes, or ships, manufacturing more com- petitive industrial processes involving fluid flows. Internal combustion engine, energy

  16. Non-premixed flame-turbulence interaction in compressible turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livescu, D. (Daniel); Madnia, C. K.

    2002-01-01

    Nonpremixed turbulent reacting flows are intrinsically difficult to model due to the strong coupling between turbulent motions and reaction. The large amount of heat released by a typical hydrocarbon flame leads to significant modifications of the thermodynamic variables and the molecular transport coefficients and thus alters the fluid dynamics. Additionally, in nonpremixed combustion, the flame has a complex spatial structure. Localized expansions and contractions occur, enhancing the dilatational motions. Therefore, the compressibility of the flow and the heat release are intimately related. However, fundamental studies of the role of compressibility on the scalar mixing and reaction are scarce. In this paper they present results concerning the fundamental aspects of the interaction between non-premixed flame and compressible turbulence.

  17. Acceleration of relativistic electrons by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Implications for non-thermal emission from black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Parrish, Ian J.

    2014-08-10

    We use analytic estimates and numerical simulations of test particles interacting with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence to show that subsonic MHD turbulence produces efficient second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles. This acceleration is not well described by standard quasi-linear theory but is a consequence of resonance broadening of wave-particle interactions in MHD turbulence. We provide momentum diffusion coefficients that can be used for astrophysical and heliospheric applications and discuss the implications of our results for accretion flows onto black holes. In particular, we show that particle acceleration by subsonic turbulence in radiatively inefficient accretion flows can produce a non-thermal tail in the electron distribution function that is likely important for modeling and interpreting the emission from low-luminosity systems such as Sgr A* and M87.

  18. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  19. Model Reduction of Turbulent Fluid Flows Using the Supply Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, A S

    2013-01-01

    A method for finding reduced-order approximations of turbulent flow models is presented. The method preserves bounds on the production of turbulent energy in the sense of the $\\curly{L}_2$ norm of perturbations from a notional laminar profile. This is achieved by decomposing the Navier-Stokes system into a feedback arrangement between the linearised system and the remaining, normally neglected, nonlinear part. The linear system is reduced using a method similar to balanced truncation, but preserving bounds on the supply rate. The method involves balancing two algebraic Riccati equations. The bounds are then used to derive bounds on the turbulent energy production. An example of the application of the procedure to flow through a long straight pipe is presented. Comparison shows that the new method approximates the supply rate at least as well as, or better than, canonical balanced truncation.

  20. A generic model for transport in turbulent shear flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, Andrew P. L.; Kim, Eun-Jin [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, S3 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2011-05-15

    Turbulence regulation by large-scale shear flows is crucial for a predictive modeling of transport in plasma. In this paper the suppression of turbulent transport by large-scale flows is studied numerically by measuring the turbulent diffusion D{sub t} and scalar amplitude of decaying passive scalar fields n{sup '} advected by various turbulent flows. Both uniform flows and shear flows are shown to suppress turbulence causing the quenching in transport and turbulence amplitude. The uniform flows U{sub 0}={Lambda}y with the advection rate {Lambda} in the case of a finite correlated forcing with {tau}{sub F}=1 gives rise to the advection/sweeping effect which suppresses D{sub t}, and as {proportional_to}{Lambda}{sup -2} for {Lambda}>>{tau}{sub F}{sup -1}. In contrast, no influence of the uniform flow is found in the case of a short correlated forcing {tau}{sub F}{yields}0 due to Galilean invariance. For the shear flow U{sub 0}={Omega}sinxy ({Omega}= constant shearing rate) with the appropriate choice of the forcing ({tau}{sub F}{yields}0) the nature of transport suppression is shown to crucially depend on the properties of the turbulence. Specifically, for prescribed turbulence with a short correlation time {tau}{sub c}={tau}{sub F}<<{Omega}{sup -1}, the turbulence statistics scale as D{sub t{proportional_to}{Omega}}{sup -0.02}, {proportional_to}{Omega}{sup -0.62} and cross-phase cos{theta}{proportional_to}{Omega}{sup 0.29}. For consistently evolved turbulence with a finite correlation time {tau}{sub c{>=}{Omega}}{sup -1}, turbulence statistics are suppressed more strongly as D{sub t{proportional_to}{Omega}}{sup -1.75}, {proportional_to}{Omega}{sup -2.41}, {proportional_to}{Omega}{sup -0.65} and <{omega}{sup '2}>{proportional_to}{Omega}{sup -0.50}. A novel renormalization scheme is then introduced to rescale our results into the regime within which the kinetic energy and enstrophy are unchanged by shear flow. This allows our numerical results to closely match previous analytical predictions [E. Kim, Mod. Phys. Lett. B 18, 1 (2004)] and to understand different experimental scalings observed in laboratory plasmas. Furthermore, D{sub t} is found to be related to by {proportional_to}D{sub t}/D{sub {Omega}}, where D{sub {Omega}}{proportional_to}{Omega}{sup (2/3)} is the shear accelerated diffusion of n{sup '} with an interesting scaling cos{theta}{proportional_to}{radical}(D{sub t}D{sub {Omega}}).

  1. Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witten, Thomas A.

    Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow Michael Baumer University Gravity Wave 2 3 Measurements 3 4 Mechanical Hardware: Problems and Solutions 5 5 Results 7 6 Conclusions investigated a free-surface gravity wave bifurcation in the large-separation regime, that is, where

  2. NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF AN ANISOTHERMAL TURBULENT FLOW WITH EFFUSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicoud, Franck

    NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF AN ANISOTHERMAL TURBULENT FLOW WITH EFFUSION Simon Mendez CFD Team the plate. CONTEXT In gas turbines, the turbine blades and the liner of the combustion chamber are submitted. For economical reasons, computational fluid dynamics is now widely used as a design tool by combustion cham- ber

  3. Micro-jets in confined turbulent cross flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelman, J.B.; Greenhalgh, D.A. [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom); Whiteman, M. [Rolls-Royce plc, Combustion systems, Moor Lane, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-03-01

    The mixing of sub-millimetre diameter jets issuing into a turbulent cross flow is examined with a combination of laser diagnostic techniques. The cross flow stream is in a confined duct and the micro-jet issue from the sides of injector vanes. A range of cross jet momentum ratios, cross flow temperatures and turbulence intensities are investigated to examine the influence on the jet mixing. Methane, seeded with acetone, was used to measure the concentrations of the jets and the mixing of the jet fluid in the duct. Unlike previous jet in cross flow work, mixing appears to be dominated by the free stream turbulence, rather than the cross jet momentum ratios. Temperature increases in the free stream appear to increase the rate of mixing in the duct, despite the associated decrease in the Reynolds number. The dominance of the free stream turbulence in controlling the mixing is of particular interest in respect of gas turbine injection systems, as the cross jet momentum ratio is insufficient in defining the mixing process. (author)

  4. Implicit LES Simulation of Two phase Turbulent Jet Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Implicit LES Simulation of Two phase Turbulent Jet Flow Feb. 27th 2014 Yan 1 #12;Studied ProblemsD 2120 297 629,640 2 #12;Results 3JetDiameter Case · VOF 3 Initialization (t = 0 s) Z Z #12;Results 3JetDiameter Case (click to watch the movie) 4 · VOF 0 Jet

  5. MULTISCALE NUMERICAL STUDY OF TURBULENT FLOW AND BUBBLE ENTRAINMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    MULTISCALE NUMERICAL STUDY OF TURBULENT FLOW AND BUBBLE ENTRAINMENT IN THE SURF ZONE BY GANGFENG MA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1.1.2 Numerical Investigations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Bubble Entrainment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.4 Bubble Entrainment Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 2.5 Bubble Breakup

  6. Turbulent transition in a truncated 1D model for shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dawes, Jon

    to a `turbulent' state (i) takes place more abruptly, with a boundary between laminar and `turbulent' flow at fixed Reynolds number are found to be consistent with exponential distributions. Keywords: fluid flowTurbulent transition in a truncated 1D model for shear flow By J. H. P. Dawes and W. J. Giles

  7. Convection Heat Transfer in Three-Dimensional Turbulent Separated/Reattached Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bassem F. Armaly

    2007-10-31

    The measurements and the simulation of convective heat transfer in separated flow have been a challenge to researchers for many years. Measurements have been limited to two-dimensional flow and simulations failed to predict accurately turbulent heat transfer in the separated and reattached flow region (prediction are higher than measurements by more than 50%). A coordinated experimental and numerical effort has been initiated under this grant for examining the momentum and thermal transport in three-dimensional separated and reattached flow in an effort to provide new measurements that can be used for benchmarking and for improving the simulation capabilities of 3-D convection in separated/reattached flow regime. High-resolution and non-invasive measurements techniques are developed and employed in this study to quantify the magnitude and the behavior of the three velocity components and the resulting convective heat transfer. In addition, simulation capabilities are developed and employed for improving the simulation of 3-D convective separated/reattached flow. Such basic measurements and simulation capabilities are needed for improving the design and performance evaluation of complex (3-D) heat exchanging equipment. Three-dimensional (3-D) convective air flow adjacent to backward-facing step in rectangular channel is selected for the experimental component of this study. This geometry is simple but it exhibits all the complexities that appear in any other separated/reattached flow, thus making the results generated in this study applicable to any other separated and reattached flow. Boundary conditions, inflow, outflow, and wall thermal treatment in this geometry can be well measured and controlled. The geometry can be constructed with optical access for non-intrusive measurements of the flow and thermal fields. A three-component laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) is employed to measure simultaneously the three-velocity components and their turbulent fluctuations. Infrared thermography is utilized to measure the wall temperature and that information is used to determine the local convective heat transfer coefficient. FLUENT – CFD code is used as the platform in the simulation effort and User Defined Functions are developed for incorporating advanced turbulence models into this simulation code. Predictions of 3-D turbulent convection in separated flow, using the developed simulation capabilities under this grant, compared well with measured results. Results from the above research can be found in the seventeen refereed journal articles, and thirteen refereed publications and presentations in conference proceedings that have been published by the PI during the this grant period. The research effort is still going on and several publications are being prepared for reporting recent results.

  8. Transition to turbulence in particulate pipe flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matas, J P; Guazzelli, E; Matas, Jean-Philippe; Morris, Jeffrey F.; Guazzelli, Elisabeth

    2003-01-01

    We investigate experimentally the influence of suspended particles on the transition to turbulence. The particles are monodisperse and neutrally-buoyant with the liquid. The role of the particles on the transition depends both upon the pipe to particle diameter ratios and the concentration. For large pipe-to-particle diameter ratios the transition is delayed while it is lowered for small ratios. A scaling is proposed to collapse the departure from the critical Reynolds number for pure fluid as a function of concentration into a single master curve.

  9. On the laminar to turbulent flow transition in diabatic helically coiled pipe flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cioncolini, Andrea; Santini, Lorenzo [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    Recently the authors experimentally investigated the turbulence emergence process in adiabatic coiled pipe flow. The results of such an investigation compared favorably with existing experimental evidence and revealed as well some new and striking features of the turbulence emergence process in coiled pipes that were not observed in previous research. The objective of the present investigation is to confirm such findings with diabatic flow through coiled pipes. (author)

  10. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent circular jet flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, S. C.; Sotiropoulos, F.; Sale, M. J.

    2002-07-01

    This report presents a numerical method for carrying out large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent free shear flows and an application of a method to simulate the flow generated by a nozzle discharging into a stagnant reservoir. The objective of the study was to elucidate the complex features of the instantaneous flow field to help interpret the results of recent biological experiments in which live fish were exposed to the jet shear zone. The fish-jet experiments were conducted at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Hydropower Turbine Systems program. The experiments were designed to establish critical thresholds of shear and turbulence-induced loads to guide the development of innovative, fish-friendly hydropower turbine designs.

  11. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project ���¢��������Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations���¢�������. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  12. Turbulence Modeling for Compressible Shear Flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez Elizondo, Carlos Arturo 1981-

    2012-11-15

    by requiring consistency between model and direct numerical simulation asymptotic behavior in compressible homogeneous shear flow. The closure models are employed to compute high-speed mixing-layers and boundary layers in a differential Reynolds stress modeling...

  13. Turbulent momentum pinch of diamagnetic flows in a tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jungpyo; Barnes, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The ion toroidal rotation in a tokamak consists of an $E\\times B$ flow due to the radial electric field and a diamagnetic flow due to the radial pressure gradient. The turbulent pinch of toroidal angular momentum due to the Coriolis force studied in previous work is only applicable to the $E\\times B$ flow. In this Letter, the momentum pinch for the rotation generated by the radial pressure gradient is calculated and is compared with the Coriolis pinch. This distinction is important for subsonic flows or the flow in the pedestal where the two types of flows are similar in size and opposite in direction. In the edge, the different pinches due to the opposite rotations can result in intrinsic momentum transport that gives significant rotation peaking.

  14. Computational Study of Turbulent Laminar Patterns in Couette Flow Dwight Barkley*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkley, Dwight

    Computational Study of Turbulent Laminar Patterns in Couette Flow Dwight Barkley* Mathematics, 91403 Orsay, France (Received 29 March 2004; published 7 January 2005) Turbulent-laminar patterns near--undergoes a discontinuous transition from laminar flow to turbulence as the Reynolds number is increased. Because of its

  15. Gyrotactic trapping in laminar and turbulent Kolmogorov flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francesco Santamaria; Filippo De Lillo; Massimo Cencini; Guido Boffetta

    2014-10-07

    Phytoplankton patchiness, namely the heterogeneous distribution of microalgae over multiple spatial scales, dramatically impacts marine ecology. A spectacular example of such heterogeneity occurs in thin phytoplankton layers (TPLs), where large numbers of photosynthetic microorganisms are found within a small depth interval. Some species of motile phytoplankton can form TPLs by gyrotactic trapping due to the interplay of their particular swimming style (directed motion biased against gravity) and the transport by a flow with shear along the direction of gravity. Here we consider gyrotactic swimmers in numerical simulations of the Kolmogorov shear flow, both in laminar and turbulent regimes. In the laminar case, we show that the swimmer motion is integrable and the formation of TPLs can be fully characterized by means of dynamical systems tools. We then study the effects of rotational Brownian motion or turbulent fluctuations (appearing when the Reynolds number is large enough) on TPLs. In both cases we show that TPLs become transient, and we characterize their persistence.

  16. Fractal Potential Flows: An Idealized Model for Fully Developed Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    József Vass

    2014-09-22

    Fully Developed Turbulence (FDT) is a theoretical asymptotic phenomenon which can only be approximated experimentally or computationally, so its defining characteristics are hypothetical. It is considered to be a chaotic stationary flow field, with self-similar fractalline features. A number of approximate models exist, often exploiting this self-similarity. The idealized mathematical model of Fractal Potential Flows is hereby presented, and linked philosophically to the phenomenon of FDT on a free surface, based on its experimental characteristics. The model hinges on the recursive iteration of a fluid dynamical transfer operator. The existence of its unique attractor - called the invariant flow - is shown in an appropriate function space, which will serve as our suggested model for the FDT flow field. Its sink singularities are shown to form an IFS fractal, explicitly resolving Mandelbrot's Conjecture. Meanwhile an isometric isomorphism is defined between flows and probability measures, hinting at a wealth of future research. The inverse problem of representing turbulent flow fields with this model is discussed in closing, along with explicit practical considerations for experimental verification and visualization.

  17. Distinct large-scale turbulent-laminar states in transitional pipe flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkley, Dwight

    ) When fluid flows through a channel, pipe, or duct, there are two basic forms of motion: smooth laminarDistinct large-scale turbulent-laminar states in transitional pipe flow David Moxey1 and Dwight alternat- ing turbulent-laminar flow states on long length scales in subcri- tical shear flows (12

  18. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a, *, J the square of the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient and if the flow is laminar, which­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed waterways

  19. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, Turbulent Transport of Energetic Ions and Thermal Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heidbrink, William W.

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, IRVINE Turbulent Transport of Energetic Ions and Thermal Plasma ............................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Fast Ion Transport in Microturbulence.................................................................................................1 1.2 Thermal Plasma Transport in Electrostatic Waves

  20. TiO{sub 2} Film Deposition by Atmospheric Thermal Plasma CVD Using Laminar and Turbulence Plasma Jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ando, Yasutaka; Tobe, Shogo [Ashikaga Institute of Technology, 268-1 Omae, Ashikaga, Tochigi 326-8558 (Japan); Tahara, Hirokazu [Osaka Institute of Technology, 5-16-1 Omiya, Asahi-Ku, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan)

    2008-02-21

    In this study, to provide continuous plasma atmosphere on the substrate surface in the case of atmospheric thermal plasma CVD, TiO{sub 2} film deposition by thermal plasma CVD using laminar plasma jet was carried out. For comparison, the film deposition using turbulence plasma jet was conducted as well. Consequently, transition of the plasma jet from laminar to turbulent occurred on the condition of over 3.5 1/min in Ar working gas flow rate and the plasma jet became turbulent on the condition of over 10 1/min. In the case of the turbulent plasma jet use, anatase rich titanium oxide film could be obtained though plasma jet could not contact with the surface of the substrate continuously even on the condition that feedstock material was injected into the plasma jet. On the other hand,, in the case of laminar gas flow rate, the plasma jet could contact with the substrate continuously without melt down of the substrate during film deposition. Besides, titanium oxide film could be obtained even in the case of the laminar plasma jet use. From these results, this technique was thought to have high potential for atmospheric thermal plasma CVD.

  1. Thermal energy scavenger (flow control)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hochstein, P.A.; Milton, H.W.; Pringle, W.L.

    1981-12-22

    A thermal energy scavenger assembly is described including a plurality of temperature-sensitive wires made of material which exhibits shape memory due to a thermoelastic, martensitic phase transformation. The wires are placed in tension between fixed and movable plates which are, in turn, supported by a pair of wheels which are rotatably supported by a housing for rotation about a central axis. A pair of upper and lower cams are fixed to the housing and cam followers react with the respective cams. Each cam transmits forces through a pair of hydraulic pistons. One of the pistons is connected to a movable plate to which one end of the wires are connected whereby a stress is applied to the wires to strain the wires during a first phase and whereby the cam responds to the unstraining of the wires during a second phase. A housing defines fluid compartments through which hot and cold fluid passes and flows radially through the wires whereby the wires become unstrained and shorten in length when subjected to the hot fluid for causing a reaction between the cam followers and the cams to effect rotation of the wheels about the central axis of the assembly, which rotation of the wheels is extracted through beveled gearing. The wires are grouped into a plurality of independent modules with each module having a movable plate, a fixed plate and the associated hydraulic pistons and cam follower. The hydraulic pistons and cam follower of a module are disposed at ends of the wires opposite from the ends of the wires at which the same components of the next adjacent modules are disposed so that the cam followers of alternate modules react with one of the cams and the remaining cam followers of the remaining modules react with the other cam. There is also including stress limiting means in the form of coil springs associated with alternate ends of the wires for limiting the stress or strain in the wires.

  2. On the Peterlin approximation for turbulent flows of polymer solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincenzi, Dario; Biferale, Luca; Toschi, Federico

    2015-01-01

    We study the impact of the Peterlin approximation on the statistics of the end-to-end separation of poly- mers in a turbulent flow. The FENE and FENE-P models are numerically integrated along a large number of Lagrangian trajectories resulting from a direct numerical simulation of three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Although the FENE-P model yields results in qualitative agreement with those of the FENE model, quantitative differences emerge. The steady-state probability of large extensions is overesti- mated by the FENE-P model. The alignment of polymers with the eigenvectors of the rate-of-strain tensor and with the direction of vorticity is weaker when the Peterlin approximation is used. At large Weissenberg numbers, both the correlation times of the extension and of the orientation of polymers are underestimated by the FENE-P model.

  3. Coherent structures in ion temperature gradient turbulence-zonal flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rameswar; Singh, R.; Kaw, P.; Gürcan, Ö. D.; Diamond, P. H.

    2014-10-15

    Nonlinear stationary structure formation in the coupled ion temperature gradient (ITG)-zonal flow system is investigated. The ITG turbulence is described by a wave-kinetic equation for the action density of the ITG mode, and the longer scale zonal mode is described by a dynamic equation for the m?=?n?=?0 component of the potential. Two populations of trapped and untrapped drift wave trajectories are shown to exist in a moving frame of reference. This novel effect leads to the formation of nonlinear stationary structures. It is shown that the ITG turbulence can self-consistently sustain coherent, radially propagating modulation envelope structures such as solitons, shocks, and nonlinear wave trains.

  4. On the Peterlin approximation for turbulent flows of polymer solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dario Vincenzi; Prasad Perlekar; Luca Biferale; Federico Toschi

    2015-05-26

    We study the impact of the Peterlin approximation on the statistics of the end-to-end separation of poly- mers in a turbulent flow. The FENE and FENE-P models are numerically integrated along a large number of Lagrangian trajectories resulting from a direct numerical simulation of three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulence. Although the FENE-P model yields results in qualitative agreement with those of the FENE model, quantitative differences emerge. The steady-state probability of large extensions is overesti- mated by the FENE-P model. The alignment of polymers with the eigenvectors of the rate-of-strain tensor and with the direction of vorticity is weaker when the Peterlin approximation is used. At large Weissenberg numbers, both the correlation times of the extension and of the orientation of polymers are underestimated by the FENE-P model.

  5. Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS Reservoir - Geothermal Code...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS Reservoir - Geothermal Code Comparison Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow and Thermal Behavior of an EGS...

  6. Interpolation between DarcyWeisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interpolation between Darcy­Weisbach and Darcy for laminar and turbulent flows W.L. Hogarth a,*, J is laminar, which is the usual case, the velocity is proportional to the hydraulic gradient. This last result: Darcy; Darcy­Weisbach; Porous media; Open channels; Turbulent flow; Laminar flow 1. Introduction Grassed

  7. FliHy experimental facilities for studying open channel turbulent flows and heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    FliHy experimental facilities for studying open channel turbulent flows and heat transfer B. Freeze) facility was constructed at UCLA to study open channel turbulent flow and heat transfer of low supercritical flow regimes (Fr /1), in which the surface waves are amplified and heat transfer is enhanced due

  8. Simultaneous temperature and velocity Lagrangian measurements in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liot, O; Zonta, F; Chibbaro, S; Coudarchet, T; Gasteuil, Y; Pinton, J -F; Salort, J; Chillà, F

    2015-01-01

    We report joint Lagrangian velocity and temperature measurements in turbulent thermal convection. Measurements are performed using an improved version (extended autonomy) of the neutrally-buoyant instrumented particle that was used by to performed experiments in a parallelepipedic Rayleigh-Benard cell. The temperature signal is obtained from a RFtransmitter. Simultaneously, we determine particle's position and velocity with one camera, which grants access to the Lagrangian heat flux. Due to the extended autonomy of the present particle, we obtain well converged temperature and velocity statistics, as well as pseudo-eulerian maps of velocity and heat flux. Present experimental results have also been compared with the results obtained by a corresponding campaign of Direct Numerical Simulations and Lagrangian Tracking of massless tracers. The comparison between experimental and numerical results show the accuracy and reliability of our experimental measurements. Finally, the analysis of lagrangian velocity and t...

  9. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 71: 333346, 2003. 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 71: 333­346, 2003. © 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed of Technology, CH-8092 Zurich, Switzerland 2CFD Research Corporation, Biomedical Technology Branch, Huntsville

  10. Study of Flow, Turbulence and Transport on the Large Plasma Device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffner, David A.

    2013-01-01

    California Los Angeles Study of Flow, Turbulence and Transportand Transport on the Large Plasma Device by David Andrew Schaffner Doctor of Philosophy in Physics University of California,

  11. Progress in Simulating Turbulent Electron Thermal Transport in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, Walter; Kaye, S. M.; Ren, Y.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., Princeton, NJ (United States); Peterson, J. L.; Nevins, W. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., Livermore, CA (United States); Candy, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Yuh, H. [Nova Photonics, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2013-07-17

    Nonlinear simulations based on multiple NSTX discharge scenarios have progressed to help differentiate unique instability mechanisms and to validate with experimental turbulence and transport data. First nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing (MT) turbulence in a high-beta NSTX H-mode discharge predict experimental levels of electron thermal transport that are dominated by magnetic flutter and increase with collisionality, roughly consistent with energy confinement times in dimensionless collisionality scaling experiments. Electron temperature gradient (ETG) simulations predict significant electron thermal transport in some low and high beta discharges when ion scales are suppressed by E x B shear. Although the predicted transport in H-modes is insensitive to variation in collisionality (inconsistent with confinement scaling), it is sensitive to variations in other parameters, particularly density gradient stabilization. In reversed shear (RS) Lmode discharges that exhibit electron internal transport barriers, ETG transport has also been shown to be suppressed nonlinearly by strong negative magnetic shear, s<<0. In many high beta plasmas, instabilities which exhibit a stiff beta dependence characteristic of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) are sometimes found in the core region. However, they do not have a distinct finite beta threshold, instead transitioning gradually to a trapped electron mode (TEM) as beta is reduced to zero. Nonlinear simulations of this "hybrid" TEM/KBM predict significant transport in all channels, with substantial contributions from compressional magnetic perturbations. As multiple instabilities are often unstable simultaneously in the same plasma discharge, even on the same flux surface, unique parametric dependencies are discussed which may be useful for distinguishing the different mechanisms experimentally.

  12. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bakosi, J.; Christon, M. A.; Lowrie, R. B.; Pritchett-Sheats, L. A.; Nourgaliev, R. R.

    2013-07-12

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carriedmore »out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the singlephase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the large scale motions of the turbulent flow field using first principles and rely on a monotonicity-preserving numerical technique to represent the unresolved scales. Each series of simulations for the 3 × 3 and 5 × 5 rod-bundle geometries is an analysis of the flow field statistics combined with a mesh-refinement study and validation with available experimental data. Our primary focus is the time history and statistics of the forces loading the fuel rods. These hydrodynamic forces are believed to be the key player resulting in rod vibration and GTRF wear, one of the leading causes for leaking nuclear fuel which costs power utilities millions of dollars in preventive measures. As a result, we demonstrate that implicit large-eddy simulation of rod-bundle flows is a viable way to calculate the excitation forces for the GTRF problem.« less

  13. DNS of heat transfer in a transitional channel flow accompanied by a turbulent puff-like structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsukahara, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    Direct numerical simulations of turbulent heat transfer in fully-developed channel flows have been performed in a range of friction Reynolds number between 60 and 180, based on the friction velocity and the channel half width $\\delta$, with emphasis on a puff-like structure, large-scale spatial intermittency. For the Reynolds numbers lower than 80 with a large computational domain of 51.2 x 2 x 22.5, the turbulent puff was observed and its significant influences on the momentum and heat transports were found. The spatial structure of the equilibrium puff, or the localized turbulence, was examined with taking account of two different thermal boundary conditions: the uniform heat-flux heating and the constant temperature difference between the walls. It was revealed that there existed a localized strong turbulent region in the form of an oblique band, along which a spanwise secondary flow was induced. In consequence, at the present lowest Reynolds number as low as 60, the flow remained turbulent and the larger ...

  14. Turbulent Supersonic Channel Flow: Direct Numerical Simulation and Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    modeling: the turbulence frequency production mechanism, wall damping effects on turbulence model frequency production mechanisms and wall damping effects may be explained very well on the basis, Chik w = wall viscosity = kinematic viscosity, = T = turbulent kinematic viscosity, Ck d = pressure

  15. An energy preserving formulation for the simulation of multiphase turbulent flows.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fuster, Daniel

    scheme for the simulation of turbulent mul- tiphase flows. The method is based on the discretizationAn energy preserving formulation for the simulation of multiphase turbulent flows. Abstract formulation reduces the numerical diffusion with respect to previous formulations dealing with multiple phases

  16. Bedforms in a turbulent stream.Part 1: Turbulent flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Fourrière; P. Claudin; B. Andreotti

    2008-11-14

    In the context of subaqueous ripple and dune formation, we present here a Reynolds averaged calculation of the turbulent flow over a topography. We perform a weakly non-linear expansion of the velocity field, sufficiently accurate to recover the separation of streamlines and the formation of a recirculation bubble above some aspect ratio. The basal stresses are investigated in details; in particular, we show that the phase shift of the shear stress with respect to the topography, responsible for the formation of bedforms, appears in an inner boundary layer where shear stress and pressure gradients balance. We study the sensitivity of the calculation with respect to (i) the choice of the turbulence closure, (ii) the motion of the bottom (growth or propagation), (iii) the physics at work in the surface layer, responsible for the hydrodynamic roughness of the bottom, (iv) the aspect ratio of the bedform and (v) the effect of the free surface, which can be interpreted in terms of standing gravity waves excited by topography. The most important effects are those of points (iii) to (v). We show that the dynamical mechanisms controlling the hydrodynamical roughness (mixing due to roughness elements, viscosity, sediment transport, etc) have an influence on the basal shear stress when the thickness of the surface layer is comparable to that of the inner layer. We evidence that non-linear effects tend to oppose linear ones and are of the same order for bedform aspect ratios of the order of 1/10. We show that the influence of the free surface on the basal shear stress is dominant when the wavelength is large compared to the flow depth, so that the inner layer extends throughout the flow and in the resonant conditions, and when the downstream material velocity balances the upstream wave propagation.

  17. Organized Oscillations of Initially-Turbulent Flow Past a Cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J.C. Lin; D. Rockwell

    2002-09-17

    Flow past an open cavity is known to give rise to self-sustained oscillations in a wide variety of configurations, including slotted-wall, wind and water tunnels, slotted flumes, bellows-type pipe geometries, high-head gates and gate slots, aircraft components and internal piping systems. These cavity-type oscillations are the origin of coherent and broadband sources of noise and, if the structure is sufficiently flexible, flow-induced vibration as well. Moreover, depending upon the state of the cavity oscillation, substantial alterations of the mean drag may be induced. In the following, the state of knowledge of flow past cavities, based primarily on laminar inflow conditions, is described within a framework based on the flow physics. Then, the major unresolved issues for this class of flows will be delineated. Self-excited cavity oscillations have generic features, which are assessed in detail in the reviews of Rockwell and Naudascher, Rockwell, Howe and Rockwell. These features, which are illustrated in the schematic of Figure 1, are: (i) interaction of a vorticity concentration(s) with the downstream corner, (ii) upstream influence from this corner interaction to the sensitive region of the shear layer formed from the upstream corner of the cavity; (iii) conversion of the upstream influence arriving at this location to a fluctuation in the separating shear layer; and (iv) amplification of this fluctuation in the shear layer as it develops in the streamwise direction. In view of the fact that inflow shear-layer in the present investigation is fully turbulent, item (iv) is of particular interest. It is generally recognized, at least for laminar conditions at separation from the leading-corner of the cavity, that the disturbance growth in the shear layer can be described using concepts of linearized, inviscid stability theory, as shown by Rockwell, Sarohia, and Knisely and Rockwell. As demonstrated by Knisely and Rockwell, on the basis of experiments interpreted with the aid of linearized theory, not only the fundamental component of the shear layer instability may be present, but a number of additional, primarily lower frequency components can exist as well. In fact, the magnitude of these components can be of the same order as the fundamental component. These issues have not been addressed for the case of a fully-turbulent in-flow and its separation from the leading corner of the cavity.

  18. Subcritical transition to turbulence of a precessing flow in a cylindrical vessel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herault, Johann; Giesecke, Andre; Stefani, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The transition to turbulence in a precessing cylindrical vessel is experimentally investigated. Our measurements are performed for a { nearly-resonant} configuration with an initially laminar flow dominated by an inertial mode with azimuthal wave number $m=1$ superimposed on a solid body rotation. By increasing the precession ratio, we observe a transition from the laminar to a non-linear regime, which then breakdowns to turbulence for larger precession ratio. Our measurements show that the transition to turbulence is subcritical, with a discontinuity of the wall-pressure and the power consumption at the threshold $\\epsilon_{LT}$. The turbulence is self-sustained below this threshold, describing a bifurcation diagram with a hysteresis. In this range of the control parameters, the turbulent flows can suddenly collapse after a finite duration, leading to a definitive relaminarization of the flow. The average lifetime $\\langle \\tau \\rangle$ of the turbulence increases rapidly when $\\epsilon$ tends to $\\epsilon_{...

  19. The propagation of kinetic energy across scales in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardesa, José I; Dong, Siwei; Jiménez, Javier

    2015-01-01

    A temporal study of energy transfer across length scales is performed in 3D numerical simulations of homogeneous shear flow and isotropic turbulence, at Reynolds numbers in the range $Re_{\\lambda}=107-384$. The average time taken by perturbations in the energy flux to travel between scales is measured and shown to be additive, as inferred from the agreement between the total travel time from a given scale to the smallest dissipative motions, and the time estimated from successive jumps through intermediate scales. Our data suggests that the propagation of disturbances in the energy flux is independent of the forcing and that it defines a `velocity' that determines the energy flux itself. These results support that the cascade is, on average, a scale-local process where energy is continuously transmitted from one scale to the next in order of decreasing size.

  20. Transition from thermal to turbulent equilibrium with a resulting electromagnetic spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Yoon, P. H.; School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin, Gyeonggi 446-701 ; Gaelzer, R.; Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS ; Pavan, J.

    2014-01-15

    A recent paper [Ziebell et al., Phys. Plasmas 21, 010701 (2014)] discusses a new type of radiation emission process for plasmas in a state of quasi-equilibrium between the particles and enhanced Langmuir turbulence. Such a system may be an example of the so-called “turbulent quasi-equilibrium.” In the present paper, it is shown on the basis of electromagnetic weak turbulence theory that an initial thermal equilibrium state (i.e., only electrostatic fluctuations and Maxwellian particle distributions) transitions toward the turbulent quasi-equilibrium state with enhanced electromagnetic radiation spectrum, thus demonstrating that the turbulent quasi-equilibrium discussed in the above paper correctly describes the weakly turbulent plasma dynamically interacting with electromagnetic fluctuations, while maintaining a dynamical steady-state in the average sense.

  1. Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakosi, J; Lowrie, R B; Pritchett-Sheats, L A; Nourgaliev, R R

    2013-01-01

    The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3x3 and 5x5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carried out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the single-phase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the la...

  2. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    M. C. 2006 An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence atcant loss of low-mode tidal energy at 28.9 ? . Geophys. Res.of turbulent kinetic energy over a tidal cycle. Maximum T KE

  3. Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nepf, Heidi

    Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

  4. Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, B.; Rogers, B. N.; Ricci, P.; Gentle, K. W.; Bhattacharjee, A.

    2011-05-15

    Turbulence and bias-induced flows in simple magnetized toroidal plasmas are explored with global three-dimensional fluid simulations, focusing on the parameters of the Helimak experiment. The simulations show that plasma turbulence and transport in the regime of interest are dominated by the ideal interchange instability. The application of a bias voltage alters the structure of the plasma potential, resulting in the equilibrium sheared flows.These bias-induced vertical flows located in the gradient region appear to reduce the radial extent of turbulent structures,and thereby lower the radial plasma transport on the low field side.

  5. Laminar and turbulent nozzle-jet flows and their acoustic near-field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bühler, Stefan; Obrist, Dominik; Kleiser, Leonhard

    2014-08-15

    We investigate numerically the effects of nozzle-exit flow conditions on the jet-flow development and the near-field sound at a diameter-based Reynolds number of Re{sub D} = 18?100 and Mach number Ma = 0.9. Our computational setup features the inclusion of a cylindrical nozzle which allows to establish a physical nozzle-exit flow and therefore well-defined initial jet-flow conditions. Within the nozzle, the flow is modeled by a potential flow core and a laminar, transitional, or developing turbulent boundary layer. The goal is to document and to compare the effects of the different jet inflows on the jet flow development and the sound radiation. For laminar and transitional boundary layers, transition to turbulence in the jet shear layer is governed by the development of Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities. With the turbulent nozzle boundary layer, the jet flow development is characterized by a rapid changeover to a turbulent free shear layer within about one nozzle diameter. Sound pressure levels are strongly enhanced for laminar and transitional exit conditions compared to the turbulent case. However, a frequency and frequency-wavenumber analysis of the near-field pressure indicates that the dominant sound radiation characteristics remain largely unaffected. By applying a recently developed scaling procedure, we obtain a close match of the scaled near-field sound spectra for all nozzle-exit turbulence levels and also a reasonable agreement with experimental far-field data.

  6. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaodong Sun; Seungjin Kim; Ling Cheng; Mamoru Ishii [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN 47907 (United States); Beus, Stephen G. [Bechtel Bettis, Inc., Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Post Office Box 79, West Mifflin, PA 15122-0079 (United States)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 200-mm in width and 10-mm in gap. Miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions. (authors)

  7. Development of Interfacial Structure in a Confined Air-Water Cap-Turbulent and Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    X. Sun; S. Kim; L. Cheng; M. Ishii; S.G. Beus

    2001-10-31

    The objective of the present work is to study and model the interfacial structure development of air-water two-phase flow in a confined test section. Experiments of a total of 9 flow conditions in a cap-turbulent and churn-turbulent flow regimes are carried out in a vertical air-water upward two-phase flow experimental loop with a test section of 20-cm in width and 1-cm in gap. The miniaturized four-sensor conductivity probes are used to measure local two-phase parameters at three different elevations for each flow condition. The bubbles captured by the probes are categorized into two groups in view of the two-group interfacial area transport equation, i.e., spherical/distorted bubbles as Group 1 and cap/churn-turbulent bubbles as Group 2. The acquired parameters are time-averaged local void fraction, interfacial velocity, bubble number frequency, interfacial area concentration, and bubble Sauter mean diameter for both groups of bubbles. Also, the line-averaged and area-averaged data are presented and discussed. The comparisons of these parameters at different elevations demonstrate the development of interfacial structure along the flow direction due to bubble interactions.

  8. Flow visualization using momentum and energy transport tubes and applications to turbulent flow in wind farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Johan

    2012-01-01

    As a generalization of the mass-flux based classical stream-tube, the concept of momentum and energy transport tubes is discussed as a flow visualization tool. These transport tubes have the property, respectively, that no fluxes of momentum or energy exist over their respective tube mantles. As an example application using data from large-eddy simulation, such tubes are visualized for the mean-flow structure of turbulent flow in large wind farms, in fully developed wind-turbine-array boundary layers. The three-dimensional organization of energy transport tubes changes considerably when turbine spacings are varied, enabling the visualization of the path taken by the kinetic energy flux that is ultimately available at any given turbine within the array.

  9. ASCR Workshop on Turbulent Flow Simulations at the Exascale: Opportunities and Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The need for accurate simulation of turbulent flows is evident across the US Department of Energy applied-science and engineering portfolio, including combustion, plasma physics, nuclear-reactor...

  10. Numerical modeling of species transport in turbulent flow and experimental study on aerosol sampling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

    2007-04-25

    Numerical simulations were performed to study the turbulent mixing of a scalar species in straight tube, single and double elbow flow configurations. Different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation ...

  11. Notes 08. Turbulence flow in thin film bearings : Characteristics and Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    , D., 1993, ?Turbomachinery Rotordynamics,? John Wiley and Sons, NY. Hinze, J., 1959, ?Turbulence,? McGraw-Hill Pubs., NY. Constantinescu, V.N., 1962, ?Analysis of Bearings Operating in the Turbulent Flow Regime,? ASME Journal of Lubrication... (?,?) are the lubricant material density and viscosity, (R, c) are the bearing radius and clearance, and (?) is the journal rotational speed in rad/s. The Couette flow Reynolds number (Re) denotes the ratio between fluid inertia forces ? (?R) 2 and viscous forces ? (?R...

  12. DNS/LES of Complex Turbulent Flows | Argonne Leadership Computing...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    hot oxygen. The green isocontours illustrate the turbulent structures in the fuel, the blue isocontours show the HO2 radical (an important precursor to autoignition), and the...

  13. Stochastic analysis of the time evolution of Laminar-Turbulent bands of plane Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rolland, Joran

    2015-01-01

    This article is concerned with the time evolution of the oblique laminar-turbulent bands of transitional plane Couette flow under the influence of turbulent noise. Our study is focused on the amplitude of modulation of turbulence. In order to guide the numerical study of the flow, we first perform an analytical and numerical analysis of a Stochastic Ginzburg-Landau equation for a complex order parameter. The modulus of this order parameter models the amplitude of modulation of turbulence. Firstly, we compute the autocorrelation function of said modulus once the band is established. Secondly, we perform a calculation of average and fluctuations around the exponential growth of the order parameter. This type of analysis is similar to the Stochastic Structural Stability Theory. We then perform numerical simulations of the Navier-Stokes equations in order to confront these predictions with the actual behaviour of the bands. Computation of the autocorrelation function of the modulation of turbulence shows quantita...

  14. Effects of polymer additives in the bulk of turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Yi-Chao; Funfschilling, Denis; Li, Xiao-Ming; Ni, Rui; Xia, Ke-Qing

    2015-01-01

    We present experimental evidence that a minute amount of polymer additives can significantly enhance heat transport in the bulk region of turbulent thermal convection. The effects of polymer additives are found to be the \\textit{suppression} of turbulent background fluctuations that give rise to incoherent heat fluxes that make no net contribution to heat transport, and at the same time to \\textit{increase} the coherency of temperature and velocity fields. The suppression of small-scale turbulent fluctuations leads to more coherent thermal plumes that result in the heat transport enhancement. The fact that polymer additives can increase the coherency of thermal plumes is supported by the measurements of a number of local quantities, such as the extracted plume amplitude and width, the velocity autocorrelation functions and the velocity-temperature cross-correlation coefficient. The results from local measurements also suggest the existence of a threshold value for the polymer concentration, only above which c...

  15. Logarithmic corrections to scaling in turbulent thermal convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dubrulle

    2001-01-04

    We use an analytic toy model of turbulent convection to show that most of the scaling regimes are spoiled by logarithmic corrections, in a way consistent with the most accurate experimental measurements available nowadays. This sets a need for the search of new measurable quantities which are less prone to dimensional theories.

  16. GPU accelerated flow solver for direct numerical simulation of turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salvadore, Francesco [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)] [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy); Bernardini, Matteo, E-mail: matteo.bernardini@uniroma1.it [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ – via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Rome ‘La Sapienza’ – via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Rome (Italy); Botti, Michela [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)] [CASPUR – via dei Tizii 6/b, 00185 Rome (Italy)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical processing units (GPUs), characterized by significant computing performance, are nowadays very appealing for the solution of computationally demanding tasks in a wide variety of scientific applications. However, to run on GPUs, existing codes need to be ported and optimized, a procedure which is not yet standardized and may require non trivial efforts, even to high-performance computing specialists. In the present paper we accurately describe the porting to CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) of a finite-difference compressible Navier–Stokes solver, suitable for direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent flows. Porting and validation processes are illustrated in detail, with emphasis on computational strategies and techniques that can be applied to overcome typical bottlenecks arising from the porting of common computational fluid dynamics solvers. We demonstrate that a careful optimization work is crucial to get the highest performance from GPU accelerators. The results show that the overall speedup of one NVIDIA Tesla S2070 GPU is approximately 22 compared with one AMD Opteron 2352 Barcelona chip and 11 compared with one Intel Xeon X5650 Westmere core. The potential of GPU devices in the simulation of unsteady three-dimensional turbulent flows is proved by performing a DNS of a spatially evolving compressible mixing layer.

  17. SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caughey, David

    2010-10-08

    A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

  18. A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Buoyancy flow and thermal stratification problems."a reference. to thermal stratification and water chemistry.

  19. Magnetohydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulence and rectangular jet flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riley, Benjamin Matthew

    2009-05-15

    relaxation time (SRT) parameter for the Maxwell’s stress tensor is developed for this study. In the MHD homogeneous turbulence studies, the kinetic/magnetic energy and enstrophy decays, kinetic enstrophy evolution, and vorticity alignment with the strain...

  20. NUMERICAL MODELING OF TURBULENT FLOW IN A COMBUSTION TUNNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    of turbulent combustion in a 1 ean propane~a1 of high sp r mturbulent combustion stabilized behind a step in a propane~combustion behind a step at R while Su corresponding to a propane-

  1. NUMERICAL MODELING OF TURBULENT FLOW IN A COMBUSTION TUNNEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghoniem, A.F.

    2013-01-01

    1VJcDona·ld, H. (1979) Combustion r 1 iodeJ·ing in Two and1979) Practical Turbulent-Combustion Interaction Models forInternation on Combustors. Combustion The 17th Symposium

  2. Coherent structures in Dissipative Particle Dynamics simulations of the transition to turbulence in compressible shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van de Meent, Jan-Willem; Somfai, Ellak; Sultan, Eric; van Saarloos, Wim

    2008-01-01

    We present simulations of coherent structures in compressible flows near the transition to turbulence using the Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) method. The structures we find are remarkably consistent with experimental observations and DNS simulations of incompressible flows, despite a difference in Mach number of several orders of magnitude. The bifurcation from the laminar flow is bistable and shifts to higher Reynolds numbers when the fluid becomes more compressible. This work underlines the robustness of coherent structures in the transition to turbulence and illustrates the ability of particle-based methods to reproduce complex non-linear instabilities.

  3. Experimental observations on transition to turbulence in confined coaxial jets and other boundary layer flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gore, R.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Crowe, C.T. (Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (USA). Dept. of Mechanical and Materials Engineering); Bejan, A. (Duke Univ., Durham, NC (USA). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science)

    1990-01-01

    Experiments performed demonstrate the transition to turbulent flow of water jets discharging coaxially into a stream confined in a round duct. The critical Reynolds number is shown to be a strong function of velocity ratio. From the flow visualization it is shown that a proportionality between the laminar length of the jet (L) and the wavelength ({lambda}) can be seen in the region of transition to turbulence. The proportionality coincides with similar observations concerning the transition to turbulence in various other flows. A brief argument based on scale analysis is presented for the confined coaxial jet and round plume. The apparent universality of the L/{lambda} {approximately} O(10) scaling law supports the conclusion that the laminar sections of all naturally progressing boundary layer-type flows are geometrically similar. 21 refs., 8 figs.

  4. Large-Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Flow around a Multi-Perforated Plate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mendez, Simon

    Large-Eddy Simulation of a Turbulent Flow around a Multi-Perforated Plate Simon Mendez1 , Franck and used in Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes methods cannot predict momen- tum/heat transfer on perforated plate are reported. Large-Eddy Simulations of the flow created by an infinite multi-perforated plate

  5. Irreversibility and small-scale generation in 3D turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pumir, Alain; Grauer, Rainer; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    In three-dimensional turbulent flows energy is supplied at large scales and cascades down to the smallest scales where viscosity dominates. The flux of energy through scales implies the generation of small scales from larger ones, which is the fundamental reason for the irreversibility of the dynamics of turbulent flows. As we showed recently, this irreversibility manifests itself by an asymmetry of the probability distribution of the instantaneous power $p$ of the forces acting on fluid elements. In particular, the third moment of $p$ was found to be negative. Yet, a physical connection between the irreversibility manifested in the distribution of $p$ and the energy flux or small-scale generation in turbulence has not been established. Here, with analytical calculations and support from numerical simulations of fully developed turbulence, we connect the asymmetry in the power distribution, {\\it i.e.}, the negative value of $\\langle p^3 \\rangle$, to the generation of small scales, or more precisely, to the am...

  6. An experimental investigation regarding the laminar to turbulent flow transition in helically coiled pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cioncolini, Andrea; Santini, Lorenzo [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2006-03-01

    An experimental study was carried out to investigate the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in helically coiled pipes. Twelve coils have been tested, with ratios of coil diameter to tube diameter ranging from 6.9 to 369, and the interaction between turbulence emergence and coil curvature has been analyzed from direct observation of the experimental friction factor profiles. The experimental data compare favorably with existing results and reveal new features that apparently were not observed in previous research. (author)

  7. Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  8. Travelling-waves consistent with turbulence-driven secondary flow in a square duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uhlmann, Markus; Pinelli, Alfredo; 10.1063/1.3466661

    2010-01-01

    We present numerically determined travelling-wave solutions for pressure-driven flow through a straight duct with a square cross-section. This family of solutions represents typical coherent structures (a staggered array of counter-rotating streamwise vortices and an associated low-speed streak) on each wall. Their streamwise average flow in the cross-sectional plane corresponds to an eight vortex pattern much alike the secondary flow found in the turbulent regime.

  9. Turbulence and internal waves in tidal flow over topography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gayen, Bishakhdatta

    2012-01-01

    Flow over sloping topography including streamwise vari-5 Flow over sloping topography without streamwise vari-of internal waves at sloping topography. Here, C p denotes

  10. Self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear model of plane Couette flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Vaughan L.; Gayme, Dennice F.; Lieu, Binh K.; Jovanovi?, Mihailo R.; Farrell, Brian F.; Ioannou, Petros J.

    2014-10-15

    This paper demonstrates the maintenance of self-sustaining turbulence in a restricted nonlinear (RNL) model of plane Couette flow. The RNL system is derived directly from the Navier-Stokes equations and permits higher resolution studies of the dynamical system associated with the stochastic structural stability theory (S3T) model, which is a second order approximation of the statistical state dynamics of the flow. The RNL model shares the dynamical restrictions of the S3T model but can be easily implemented by reducing a DNS code so that it retains only the RNL dynamics. Comparisons of turbulence arising from DNS and RNL simulations demonstrate that the RNL system supports self-sustaining turbulence with a mean flow as well as structural and dynamical features that are consistent with DNS. These results demonstrate that the simplified RNL system captures fundamental aspects of fully developed turbulence in wall-bounded shear flows and motivate use of the RNL/S3T framework for further study of wall-turbulence.

  11. Turbulence: Modeling complex flow C.W. Oosterlee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oosterlee, Cornelis W. "Kees"

    grid should be such that they are captured. #15; Macro structure with length scale L, micro structure with the Kolmogorov length scale #17; #15; Number of grid points: #18; L #17; #19; 3 Turbulence/Folie--Nr. 7 #12; DNS storage: > 10 #2; 10 9 #15; number of computing operations: #24; 500 #15; number of time steps: #24; 10000

  12. Investigation of Turbulent transition in plane Couette flows Using Energy Gradient Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua-Shu Dou; Boo Cheong Khoo

    2010-06-07

    The energy gradient method has been proposed with the aim of better understanding the mechanism of flow transition from laminar flow to turbulent flow. In this method, it is demonstrated that the transition to turbulence depends on the relative magnitudes of the transverse gradient of the total mechanical energy which amplifies the disturbance and the energy loss from viscous friction which damps the disturbance, for given imposed disturbance. For a given flow geometry and fluid properties, when the maximum of the function K (a function standing for the ratio of the gradient of total mechanical energy in the transverse direction to the rate of energy loss due to viscous friction in the streamwise direction) in the flow field is larger than a certain critical value, it is expected that instability would occur for some initial disturbances. In this paper, using the energy gradient analysis, the equation for calculating the energy gradient function K for plane Couette flow is derived. The result indicates that K reaches the maximum at the moving walls. Thus, the fluid layer near the moving wall is the most dangerous position to generate initial oscillation at sufficient high Re for given same level of normalized perturbation in the domain. The critical value of K at turbulent transition, which is observed from experiments, is about 370 for plane Couette flow when two walls move in opposite directions (anti-symmetry). This value is about the same as that for plane Poiseuille flow and pipe Poiseuille flow (385-389). Therefore, it is concluded that the critical value of K at turbulent transition is about 370-389 for wall-bounded parallel shear flows which include both pressure (symmetrical case) and shear driven flows (anti-symmetrical case).

  13. Mesoscale flows in large aspect ratio simulations of turbulent compressible convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; F. Lignieres; M. Rieutord

    2006-11-28

    We present the results of a very large aspect ratio (42.6) numerical simulation of fully compressible turbulent convection in a polytropic atmosphere, and focus on the properties of large-scale flows. Mesoscale patterns dominate the turbulent energy spectrum. We show that these structures, which had already been observed in Boussinesq simulations by Cattaneo et al. (2001), have a genuine convective origin and do not result directly from collective interactions of the smaller scales of the flow, even though their growth is strongly affected by nonlinear transfers. If this result is relevant to the solar photosphere, it suggests that the dominant convective mode below the Sun's surface may be at mesoscales.

  14. A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows Seyed Ali Ale Etrati Khosroshahi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows by Seyed Ali Ale A Detailed Analysis of Guard-Heated Wall Shear Stress Sensors for Turbulent Flows by Seyed Ali Ale Etrati-dimensional analysis of the performance of multi-element guard-heated hot-film wall shear stress microsensors

  15. Turbulent flow and drag over fixed two-and three-dimensional dunes Jeremy G. Venditti1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Turbulent flow and drag over fixed two- and three-dimensional dunes Jeremy G. Venditti1,2 Received measurements of turbulent flow were obtained over a fixed flat bed, two- dimensional (2-D) dunes and four types of three-dimensional (3-D) dune morphologies including (1) full width saddles, (2) full width lobes, (3

  16. Experimental study of forces on freely moving spherical particles during resuspension into turbulent flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traugott, Hadar

    2015-01-01

    Turbulent resuspension is the process of lifting solid particles from the bottom by turbulent flow, ubiquitous in natural and industrial problems. The process is a sequence of events that start with an incipient motion when the particle is dislodged from its place, continue as sliding or rolling along the surface, and ending with the detachment of the particle from the surface and lifting it up into the flow. In this study we measure in details the motion of freely moving solid spherical particles along the bottom smooth wall under an oscillating grid turbulence and track them through the lift-off events. We measure simultaneously the Lagrangian trajectories of the particles and the flow tracers around them. We estimate the local flow parameters and extract the different force terms that act on a particle. For the particles of the diameter comparable with the Kolmogorov length scale, either sliding or rolling along the smooth wall under a zero-mean turbulent flow, we find that: i) the lift force is a dominant...

  17. Stretching of polymers around the Kolmogorov scale in a turbulent shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jahanshah Davoudi; Joerg Schumacher

    2006-01-03

    We present numerical studies of stretching of Hookean dumbbells in a turbulent Navier-Stokes flow with a linear mean profile, =Sy. In addition to the turbulence features beyond the viscous Kolmogorov scale \\eta, the dynamics at the equilibrium extension of the dumbbells significantly below eta is well resolved. The variation of the constant shear rate S causes a change of the turbulent velocity fluctuations on all scales and thus of the intensity of local stretching rate of the advecting flow. The latter is measured by the maximum Lyapunov exponent lambda_1 which is found to increase as \\lambda_1 ~ S^{3/2}, in agreement with a dimensional argument. The ensemble of up to 2 times 10^6 passively advected dumbbells is advanced by Brownian dynamics simulations in combination with a pseudospectral integration for the turbulent shear flow. Anisotropy of stretching is quantified by the statistics of the azimuthal angle $\\phi$ which measures the alignment with the mean flow axis in the x-y shear plane, and the polar angle theta which determines the orientation with respect to the shear plane. The asymmetry of the probability density function (PDF) of phi increases with growing shear rate S. Furthermore, the PDF becomes increasingly peaked around mean flow direction (phi= 0). In contrast, the PDF of the polar angle theta is symmetric and less sensitive to changes of S.

  18. Turbulent Flow Effects on the Biological Performance of Hydro-Turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2014-08-25

    The hydro-turbine industry uses Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools to predict the flow conditions as part of the design process for new and rehabilitated turbine units. Typically the hydraulic design process uses steady-state simulations based on Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) formulations for turbulence modeling because these methods are computationally efficient and work well to predict averaged hydraulic performance, e.g. power output, efficiency, etc. However, in view of the increasing emphasis on environmental concerns, such as fish passage, the consideration of the biological performance of hydro-turbines is also required in addition to hydraulic performance. This leads to the need to assess whether more realistic simulations of the turbine hydraulic environment ?those that resolve unsteady turbulent eddies not captured in steady-state RANS computations? are needed to better predict the occurrence and extent of extreme flow conditions that could be important in the evaluation of fish injury and mortality risks. In the present work, we conduct unsteady, eddy-resolving CFD simulations on a Kaplan hydro-turbine at a normal operational discharge. The goal is to quantify the impact of turbulence conditions on both the hydraulic and biological performance of the unit. In order to achieve a high resolution of the incoming turbulent flow, Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) turbulence model is used. These transient simulations are compared to RANS simulations to evaluate whether extreme hydraulic conditions are better captured with advanced eddy-resolving turbulence modeling techniques. The transient simulations of key quantities such as pressure and hydraulic shear flow that arise near the various components (e.g. wicket gates, stay vanes, runner blades) are then further analyzed to evaluate their impact on the statistics for the lowest absolute pressure (nadir pressures) and for the frequency of collisions that are known to cause mortal injury in fish passing through hydro-turbines.

  19. Nature of turbulent transport across sheared zonal flows: insights from gyro-kinetic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, Raul [ORNL; Newman, David E [University of Alaska; Leboeuf, Jean-Noel [JNL Scientific, Inc., Casa Grande, AZ; Decyk, Viktor [University of California, Los Angeles

    2011-01-01

    The traditional view regarding the reduction of turbulence-induced transport across a stable sheared flow invokes a reduction of the characteristic length scale in the direction perpendicular to the flow as a result of the shearing and stretching of eddies caused by the differential pull exerted in the direction of the flow. A reduced effective transport coefficient then suffices to capture the reduction, that can then be readily incorporated into a transport model. However, recent evidence from gyrokinetic simulations of the toroidal ion-temperature-gradient mode suggests that the dynamics of turbulent transport across sheared flows changes in a more fundamental manner, and that the use of reduced effective transport coefficients fails to capture the full dynamics that may exhibit both subdiffusion and non-Gaussian statistics. In this contribution, after briefly reviewing these results, we propose some candidates for the physical mechanisms responsible for endowing transport with such non-diffusive characteristics, backing these proposals with new numerical gyrokinetic data

  20. On the notion of laminar and weakly turbulent elementary fluid flows: a simple mathematical model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianluca Argentini

    2006-08-28

    An elementary analytical fluid flow is composed by a geometric domain, a list of analytical constraints and by the function which depends on the physical properties, as Reynolds number, of the considered fluid. For this object, notions of laminar or weakly turbulent behavior are described using a simple mathematical model.

  1. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 65: 393415, 2000. 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Niles A.

    Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 65: 393­415, 2000. © 2001 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed research groups have developed adjoint CFD codes for de- sign optimisation [3, 4, 6, 8, 22, 29, 30, 44 the adjoint code from an original CFD code; both of these approaches will be discussed further in this paper

  2. Impact of Turbulence Closures and Numerical Errors for the Optimization of Flow Control Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact of Turbulence Closures and Numerical Errors for the Optimization of Flow Control Devices J the use of a Kriging-based global optimization method to determine optimal control parameters conduct an optimization process and measure the impact of numerical and modeling errors on the optimal

  3. Turbulence prediction in two- and three-dimensional bundle flows using Large Eddy Simulation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ibrahim, Wael Abdul-Hamid

    1994-01-01

    to practical engineering problems such as the flow-induced vibration of steam generator tubes. A universal model for all scales of turbulence is unlikely. Thus, the influence of the large-scale structures is directly computed by LES, while the smaller eddies...

  4. Second-moment RANS calculations of turbulent flows in strongly curved channels 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Linhua

    1993-01-01

    for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: Hamn-Ching C en (Chair of Committee) Jun Zhang (Member) Jamal Seye - Yagoobi (Member) Ignacio Rodriguez-Iturbe (Head of Department) December 1993 Major Subject: Ocean Engineering... ABSTRACT Second-Moment RANS Calculations of Turbulent Flows in Strongly Curved Channels. (December 1993) Linhua Wang, M. E. , Southwest Petroleum Institute, P. R. China Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Hamn-Ching Chen Flows with streamline curvature...

  5. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flows: Experimental Studies on the Turbulence of Multiphase Plumes and Tidal Vortices 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryant, Duncan Burnette

    2011-08-08

    stream_source_info BRYANT-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 163756 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name BRYANT-DISSERTATION.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859..., the turbulent energy spectra in inertial particle plumes followed the same modulation as the bubble plumes. PIV experiments from the tidal starting-jet vortices detail the influence of a finite channel length using identified vortice. The results show...

  6. Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

    2006-07-19

    The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

  7. Large-eddy simulation of turbulent cavitating flow in a micro channel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerer, Christian P., E-mail: christian.egerer@aer.mw.tum.de; Hickel, Stefan; Schmidt, Steffen J.; Adams, Nikolaus A. [Institute of Aerodynamics and Fluid Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85748 Garching bei München (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of cavitating flow of a Diesel-fuel-like fluid in a generic throttle geometry are presented. Two-phase regions are modeled by a parameter-free thermodynamic equilibrium mixture model, and compressibility of the liquid and the liquid-vapor mixture is taken into account. The Adaptive Local Deconvolution Method (ALDM), adapted for cavitating flows, is employed for discretizing the convective terms of the Navier-Stokes equations for the homogeneous mixture. ALDM is a finite-volume-based implicit LES approach that merges physically motivated turbulence modeling and numerical discretization. Validation of the numerical method is performed for a cavitating turbulent mixing layer. Comparisons with experimental data of the throttle flow at two different operating conditions are presented. The LES with the employed cavitation modeling predicts relevant flow and cavitation features accurately within the uncertainty range of the experiment. The turbulence structure of the flow is further analyzed with an emphasis on the interaction between cavitation and coherent motion, and on the statistically averaged-flow evolution.

  8. Thermal shallow water models of geostrophic turbulence in Jovian atmospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warneford, Emma S. Dellar, Paul J.

    2014-01-15

    Conventional shallow water theory successfully reproduces many key features of the Jovian atmosphere: a mixture of coherent vortices and stable, large-scale, zonal jets whose amplitude decreases with distance from the equator. However, both freely decaying and forced-dissipative simulations of the shallow water equations in Jovian parameter regimes invariably yield retrograde equatorial jets, while Jupiter itself has a strong prograde equatorial jet. Simulations by Scott and Polvani [“Equatorial superrotation in shallow atmospheres,” Geophys. Res. Lett. 35, L24202 (2008)] have produced prograde equatorial jets through the addition of a model for radiative relaxation in the shallow water height equation. However, their model does not conserve mass or momentum in the active layer, and produces mid-latitude jets much weaker than the equatorial jet. We present the thermal shallow water equations as an alternative model for Jovian atmospheres. These equations permit horizontal variations in the thermodynamic properties of the fluid within the active layer. We incorporate a radiative relaxation term in the separate temperature equation, leaving the mass and momentum conservation equations untouched. Simulations of this model in the Jovian regime yield a strong prograde equatorial jet, and larger amplitude mid-latitude jets than the Scott and Polvani model. For both models, the slope of the non-zonal energy spectra is consistent with the classic Kolmogorov scaling, and the slope of the zonal energy spectra is consistent with the much steeper spectrum observed for Jupiter. We also perform simulations of the thermal shallow water equations for Neptunian parameter values, with a radiative relaxation time scale calculated for the same 25 mbar pressure level we used for Jupiter. These Neptunian simulations reproduce the broad, retrograde equatorial jet and prograde mid-latitude jets seen in observations. The much longer radiative time scale for the colder planet Neptune explains the transition from a prograde to a retrograde equatorial jet, while the broader jets are due to the deformation radius being a larger fraction of the planetary radius.

  9. A new robust consistent hybrid finite-volume/particle method for solving the PDF model equations of turbulent reactive flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muradoglu, Metin

    and pollution are directly related to the conversion of chemical energy into thermal energy via combustion Available online 10 September 2014 Keywords: PDF methods Consistent hybrid method Turbulent combustion Bluff rights reserved. 1. Introduction Turbulent combustion continues to be a key technology in energy

  10. Laminar-turbulent patterning in wall-bounded shear flows: a Galerkin model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seshasayanan, K

    2015-01-01

    On its way to turbulence, plane Couette flow - the flow between counter-translating parallel plates - displays a puzzling steady oblique laminar-turbulent pattern. We approach this problem via Galerkin modelling of the Navier-Stokes equations. The wall-normal dependence of the hydrodynamic field is treated by means of expansions on functional bases fitting the boundary conditions exactly. This yields a set of partial differential equations for the spatiotemporal dynamics in the plane of the flow. Truncating this set beyond lowest nontrivial order is numerically shown to produce the expected pattern, therefore improving over what was obtained at cruder effective wall-normal resolution. Perspectives opened by the approach are discussed.

  11. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmore »and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.« less

  12. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh/Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Mueschke, Nicholas J. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipation and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. These results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.

  13. Analysis of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh–Taylor unstable flow using direct numerical simulation data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Schilling, Oleg; Mueschke, Nicholas J.

    2010-10-18

    Data from a 1152X760X1280 direct numerical simulation (DNS) of a transitional Rayleigh-Taylor mixing layer modeled after a small Atwood number water channel experiment is used to comprehensively investigate the structure of mean and turbulent transport and mixing. The simulation had physical parameters and initial conditions approximating those in the experiment. The budgets of the mean vertical momentum, heavy-fluid mass fraction, turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate, heavy-fluid mass fraction variance, and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance dissipation rate equations are constructed using Reynolds averaging applied to the DNS data. The relative importance of mean and turbulent production, turbulent dissipationmore »and destruction, and turbulent transport are investigated as a function of Reynolds number and across the mixing layer to provide insight into the flow dynamics not presently available from experiments. The analysis of the budgets supports the assumption for small Atwood number, Rayleigh/Taylor driven flows that the principal transport mechanisms are buoyancy production, turbulent production, turbulent dissipation, and turbulent diffusion (shear and mean field production are negligible). As the Reynolds number increases, the turbulent production in the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rate equation becomes the dominant production term, while the buoyancy production plateaus. Distinctions between momentum and scalar transport are also noted, where the turbulent kinetic energy and its dissipation rate both grow in time and are peaked near the center plane of the mixing layer, while the heavy-fluid mass fraction variance and its dissipation rate initially grow and then begin to decrease as mixing progresses and reduces density fluctuations. All terms in the transport equations generally grow or decay, with no qualitative change in their profile, except for the pressure flux contribution to the total turbulent kinetic energy flux, which changes sign early in time (a countergradient effect). The production-to-dissipation ratios corresponding to the turbulent kinetic energy and heavy-fluid mass fraction variance are large and vary strongly at small evolution times, decrease with time, and nearly asymptote as the flow enters a self-similar regime. The late-time turbulent kinetic energy production-to-dissipation ratio is larger than observed in shear-driven turbulent flows. The order of magnitude estimates of the terms in the transport equations are shown to be consistent with the DNS at late-time, and also confirms both the dominant terms and their evolutionary behavior. Thus, these results are useful for identifying the dynamically important terms requiring closure, and assessing the accuracy of the predictions of Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and large-eddy simulation models of turbulent transport and mixing in transitional Rayleigh-Taylor instability-generated flow.« less

  14. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent Taylor–Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-08-23

    Brindley (1984) proposed a mathematical model by partitioning the flow into interior. (Taylor ... A comprehensive verification for several parameters was conducted, ... The cylinder axis is aligned with the z-axis of the coordinate system

  15. Dispersion of swimming algae in laminar and turbulent channel flows: theory and simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croze, O A; Ahmed, M; Bees, M A; Brandt, L

    2012-01-01

    Algal swimming is often biased by environmental cues, e.g. gravitational and viscous torques drive cells towards downwelling fluid (gyrotaxis). In view of biotechnological applications, it is important to understand how such biased swimming affects cell dispersion in a flow. Here, we study the dispersion of gyrotactic swimming algae in laminar and turbulent channel flows. By direct numerical simulation (DNS) of cell motion within upwelling and downwelling channel flows, we evaluate time-dependent measures of dispersion for increasing values of the flow Peclet (Reynolds) numbers, Pe (Re). Furthermore, we derive an analytical `swimming Taylor-Aris dispersion' theory, using flow-dependent transport parameters given by existing microscopic models. In the laminar regime, DNS results and analytical predictions compare very well, providing the first confirmation that cells' response to flow is best described by the generalized-Taylor-dispersion microscopic model. We predict that cells drift along a channel faster th...

  16. Heat Flow Determinations and Implied Thermal Regime of the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heat Flow Determinations and Implied Thermal Regime of the Coso Geothermal Area California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Heat...

  17. Turbulent thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jürgen Berges; Björn Schenke; Sören Schlichting; Raju Venugopalan

    2014-09-05

    We discuss the onset of the thermalization process in high-energy heavy-ion collisions from a weak coupling perspective, using classical-statistical real-time lattice simulations as a first principles tool to study the pre-equilibrium dynamics. Most remarkably, we find that the thermalization process is governed by a universal attractor, where the space-time evolution of the plasma becomes independent of the initial conditions and exhibits the self-similar dynamics characteristic of wave turbulence. We discuss the consequences of our weak coupling results for the thermalization process in heavy-ion experiments and briefly comment on the use of weak coupling techniques at larger values of the coupling.

  18. On the self-sustained nature of large-scale motions in turbulent Couette flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rawat, Subhandu; Hwang, Yongyun; Rincon, François

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale motions in wall-bounded turbulent flows are frequently interpreted as resulting from an aggregation process of smaller-scale structures. Here, we explore the alternative possibility that such large-scale motions are themselves self-sustained and do not draw their energy from smaller-scale turbulent motions activated in buffer layers. To this end, it is first shown that large-scale motions in turbulent Couette flow at Re=2150 self-sustain even when active processes at smaller scales are artificially quenched by increasing the Smagorinsky constant Cs in large eddy simulations. These results are in agreement with earlier results on pressure driven turbulent channels. We further investigate the nature of the large-scale coherent motions by computing upper and lower-branch nonlinear steady solutions of the filtered (LES) equations with a Newton-Krylov solver,and find that they are connected by a saddle-node bifurcation at large values of Cs. Upper branch solutions for the filtered large scale motions a...

  19. Dissipation Scale Fluctuations and Chemical Reaction Rates in Turbulent Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor Yakhot

    2007-06-29

    Small separation between reactants, not exceeding $10^{-8}-10^{-7}cm$, is the necessary condition for various chemical reactions. It is shown that random advection and stretching by turbulence leads to formation of scalar-enriched sheets of {\\it strongly fluctuating thickness} $\\eta_{c}$. The molecular-level mixing is achieved by diffusion across these sheets (interfaces) separating the reactants. Since diffusion time scale is $\\tau_{d}\\propto \\eta_{c}^{2}$, the knowledge of probability density $Q(\\eta_{c},Re)$ is crucial for evaluation of chemical reaction rates. In this paper we derive the probability density $Q(\\eta_{c},Re,Sc)$ and predict a transition in the reaction rate behavior from ${\\cal R}\\propto \\sqrt{Re}$ ($Re\\leq 10^{4}$) to the high-Re asymptotics ${\\cal R}\\propto Re^{0}$. The theory leads to an approximate universality of transitional Reynolds number $Re_{tr}\\approx 10^{4}$. It is also shown that if chemical reaction involves short-lived reactants, very strong anomalous fluctuations of the length-scale $\\eta_{c}$ may lead to non-negligibly small reaction rates.

  20. Accessed Compositions in Turbulent Reactive Flows Stephen B. Pope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the thermochemical composition corresponds to a point in the multi-dimensional composition space. The union of all number flows, these compositions can be taken to be the specific moles of the ns species and the enthalpy, t) is sufficient to determine the elemental compo- sition of the mixture and the enthalpy (provided

  1. Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

    2003-08-06

    The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

  2. Development of analytical and numerical models predicting the deposition rate of electrically charged particles in turbulent channel flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Hanseo

    1994-01-01

    An analytical model is established to predict an electrostatically charged particle deposition as a function of particle size in fully-developed turbulent pipe flow. The convectivediffusion flux equation is solved for the particle concentration as a...

  3. The effect of diamagnetic flows on turbulent driven ion toroidal rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, J. P.; Barnes, M.; Parra, F. I.; Belli, E. A.; Candy, J.

    2014-05-15

    Turbulent momentum redistribution determines the radial profile of rotation in a tokamak. The momentum transport driven by diamagnetic flow effects is an important piece of the radial momentum transport for sub-sonic rotation, which is often observed in experiments. In a non-rotating state, the diamagnetic flow and the E × B flow must cancel. The diamagnetic flow and the E × B flow have different effects on the turbulent momentum flux, and this difference in behavior induces intrinsic rotation. The momentum flux is evaluated using gyrokinetic equations that are corrected to higher order in the ratio of the poloidal Larmor radius to the minor radius, which requires evaluation of the diamagnetic corrections to Maxwellian equilibria. To study the momentum transport due to diamagnetic flow effects, three experimental observations of ion rotation are examined. First, a strong pressure gradient at the plasma edge is shown to result in a significant inward momentum transport due to the diamagnetic effect, which may explain the observed peaking of rotation in a high confinement mode. Second, the direction of momentum transport is shown to change as collisionality increases, which is qualitatively consistent with the observed reversal of intrinsic rotation by varying plasma density and current. Last, the dependence of the intrinsic momentum flux on the magnetic shear is found, and it may explain the observed rotation changes in the presence of lower hybrid current drive.

  4. Turbulent Flow Analysis and Coherent Structure Identification in Experimental Models with Complex Geometries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Noushin

    2012-02-14

    applying two different experimental methods. The first study involves the investigation of turbulent impinging jets through a staggered array of rods with or without crossflow. Such flows are crucial in various engineering disciplines. This experiment... ................................................................................................... 47 II.3.1. Time-Averaged Velocity Fields ................................................ 48 II.3.1.1. Single Impinging Jet in the Corner of Mid-Plane ...... 48 II.3.1.2. Single Impinging Jet in the Middle of the Measurement Plane...

  5. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 73: 95116, 2004. C 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 95

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 73: 95­116, 2004. C 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands. 95 Disappearing Wakes and Dispersion in Numerically Simulated Flows Through Tube Bundles C 2003; accepted in revised form 11 February 2004 Abstract. Flow through a staggered array or 'bundle

  6. On the cover: Seven aqueous streams, each colored with a different dye, converge in a microchannel and proceed in parallel laminar flow, without turbulent mixing.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    and proceed in parallel laminar flow, without turbulent mixing. Using laminar flows of reagents is the basis Capillaries Using Multiphase Laminar Flow Patterning Paul J. A. Kenis, Rustem F. Ismagilov, George M. Whitesides* The reaction of species in solutions flowing laminarly (without turbulent mix- ing) inside

  7. Time-resolved gas temperatures in the oscillating turbulent flow of a pulse combustor tail pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, J.E. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor, MI (USA)); Keller, J.O. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (USA). Combustion Research Faclity)

    1990-06-01

    This paper reports the cyclic behavior of the gas temperature in the oscillating turbulent flow in a pulse combustor tail pipe studied using two-line atomic fluorescence. In this flow, the oscillations result from an acoustic resonance, and have amplitudes of up to 5 times the mean velocity. Oscillation frequencies were varied from 67 to 101 Hz. Spatially resolved temperature measurements were made to within 400 {mu}m of the wall, providing cycle-resolved profiles of the temperature and the random temperature fluctuations. The combustor-cycle phase relationships among the gas temperature, random-temperature-fluctuation intensity, velocity, and combustion chamber pressure, are compared.

  8. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is outlined as follows. Section 2 shows an assessment of numerical algorithms that are best suited for the numerical simulation of compressible flows involving turbulence and shock phenomena. Sections 3 and 4 deal with the canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem, from the DNS and LES perspectives, respectively. Section 5 considers the shock-turbulence inter-action in spherical geometry, in particular, the interaction of a converging shock with isotropic turbulence as well as the problem of the blast wave. Section 6 describes the study of shock-accelerated mixing through planar and spherical Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing as well as the shock-curtain interaction problem In section 7 we acknowledge the different interactions between Stanford and other institutions participating in this SciDAC project, as well as several external collaborations made possible through it. Section 8 presents a list of publications and presentations that have been generated during the course of this SciDAC project. Finally, section 9 concludes this report with the list of personnel at Stanford University funded by this SciDAC project.

  9. Characteristics of a multiple disk pump with turbulent rotor flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roddy, Patrick James

    1985-01-01

    of these turbomachines until the early sixties when Rice [4] designed and tested a multiple disk pump and compressor. Since then, the per- formance of these turbomachines operating with laminar rotor flow has been well documented [1-6, 7-12]. In the seventies, Bakke... the Disk Radius (LT'8) [ (8 + |/)/T + ( aH/8)]2 2T/T ruotq. znba [gy] yyzqoznqg g~otTdxa aqua. go surzag u) passaudxa aq uzo zoq. ozg uoTgo)zg 9uxuuzg aqua '(gT'2) uoTgznba uZ (9T'2) (au 2/1 2 2 ( (n) + (& ? &U)) = sz r(s)p aqua Suoyz guxod fiuz gz...

  10. Fluctuations around Bjorken Flow and the onset of turbulent phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floerchinger, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    We study how fluctuations in fluid dynamic fields can be dissipated or amplified within the characteristic spatio-temporal structure of a heavy ion collision. The initial conditions for a fluid dynamic evolution of heavy ion collisions may contain significant fluctuations in all fluid dynamical fields, including the velocity field and its vorticity components. We formulate and analyze the theory of local fluctuations around average fluid fields described by Bjorken's model. For conditions of laminar flow, when a linearized treatment of the dynamic evolution applies, we discuss explicitly how fluctuations of large wave number get dissipated while modes of sufficiently long wave-length pass almost unattenuated or can even be amplified. In the opposite case of large Reynold's numbers (which is inverse to viscosity), we establish that (after suitable coordinate transformations) the dynamics is governed by an evolution equation of non-relativistic Navier-Stokes type that becomes essentially two-dimensional at late...

  11. Flow field computation of the NREL S809 airfoil using various turbulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Y.L.; Yang, S.L.; Arici, O. [Michigan Technological Univ., Houghton, MI (United States). Mechanical Engineering-Engineering Mechanics Dept.

    1996-10-01

    Performance comparison of three popular turbulence models, namely Baldwin-Lomas algebraic model, Chien`s Low-Reynolds-Number {kappa}-{epsilon} model, and Wilcox`s Low-Reynolds-Number {kappa}-{omega} model, is given. These models were applied to calculate the flow field around the National Renewable Energy Laboratory S809 airfoil using Total Variational Diminishing scheme. Numerical results of C{sub P}, C{sub L}, and C{sub D} are presented along with the Delft experimental data. It is shown that all three models perform well for attached flow, i.e., no flow separation at low angles of attack. However, at high angles of attack with flow separation, convergence characteristics show Wilcox`s model outperforms the other models. Results of this study will be used to guide the authors in their dynamic stall research.

  12. An isogeometric variational multiscale method for large-eddy simulation of coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bauer, Georg; Gamnitzer, Peter [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany); Gravemeier, Volker, E-mail: vgravem@lnm.mw.tum.de [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany) [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany); Emmy Noether Research Group “Computational Multiscale Methods for Turbulent Combustion”, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany); Wall, Wolfgang A. [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany)] [Institute for Computational Mechanics, Technische Universität München, Boltzmannstr. 15, 85747 Garching (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: •We present a computational method for coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow. •The underlying formulation is a variational multiscale finite element method. •It is combined with the isogeometric concept for electrochemical systems. •Coupled multi-ion transport in fully turbulent Taylor–Couette flow is simulated. •This example is an important model problem for rotating cylinder electrodes. -- Abstract: Electrochemical processes, such as electroplating of large items in galvanic baths, are often coupled to turbulent flow. In this study, we propose an isogeometric residual-based variational multiscale finite element method for multi-ion transport in dilute electrolyte solutions under turbulent flow conditions. In other words, this means that the concepts of isogeometric discretization and variational multiscale methods are successfully combined for developing a method capable of simulating the challenging problem of coupled multi-ion transport in turbulent flow. We present a comprehensive three-dimensional computational method taking into account, among others, coupled convection–diffusion-migration equations subject to an electroneutrality constraint in combination with phenomenological electrode-kinetics modeling. The electrochemical subproblem is one-way coupled to turbulent incompressible flow via convection. Ionic mass transfer in turbulent Taylor–Couette flow is investigated, representing an important model problem for rotating-cylinder-electrode configurations. Multi-ion transport as considered here is an example for mass transport at high Schmidt number (Sc=1389). An isogeometric discretization is especially advantageous for the present problem, since (i) curved boundaries can be represented exactly, and (ii) it has been proven to provide very accurate solutions for flow quantities when being applied in combination with residual-based variational multiscale modeling. We demonstrate that the method is robust and provides results which are in good agreement with direct numerical simulation results as well as empirical mass-transfer correlations reported in literature.

  13. A Molecular Dynamics Simulation of the Turbulent Couette Minimal Flow Unit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, E R

    2015-01-01

    A molecular dynamics (MD) simulation of planar Couette flow is presented for the minimal channel in which turbulence structures can be sustained. Evolution over a single breakdown and regeneration cycle is compared to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations. Qualitative similar structures are observed and turbulent statistics show excellent quantitative agreement. The molecular scale law of the wall is presented in which stick-slip molecular wall-fluid interactions replace the no-slip conditions. The impact of grid resolution is explored and the observed structures are seen to be dependant on averaging time and length scales. The kinetic energy spectra show a range of scales are present in the molecular system and that spectral content is dependent on the grid resolution employed. The subgrid velocity of the molecules is compared to spatial averaged velocity using joint probability density functions. Molecular trajectories, diffusions and Lagrangian statistics are presented. The importance of sub-grid ...

  14. The friction factor of two-dimensional rough-boundary turbulent soap film flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholas Guttenberg; Nigel Goldenfeld

    2009-03-25

    We use momentum transfer arguments to predict the friction factor $f$ in two-dimensional turbulent soap-film flows with rough boundaries (an analogue of three-dimensional pipe flow) as a function of Reynolds number Re and roughness $r$, considering separately the inverse energy cascade and the forward enstrophy cascade. At intermediate Re, we predict a Blasius-like friction factor scaling of $f\\propto\\textrm{Re}^{-1/2}$ in flows dominated by the enstrophy cascade, distinct from the energy cascade scaling of $\\textrm{Re}^{-1/4}$. For large Re, $f \\sim r$ in the enstrophy-dominated case. We use conformal map techniques to perform direct numerical simulations that are in satisfactory agreement with theory, and exhibit data collapse scaling of roughness-induced criticality, previously shown to arise in the 3D pipe data of Nikuradse.

  15. DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MULTIFIELD MODEL OF CHURN-TURBULENT GAS/LIQUID FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elena A. Tselishcheva; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski; Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    The accuracy of numerical predictions for gas/liquid two-phase flows using Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) methods strongly depends on the formulation of models governing the interaction between the continuous liquid field and bubbles of different sizes. The purpose of this paper is to develop, test and validate a multifield model of adiabatic gas/liquid flows at intermediate gas concentrations (e.g., churn-turbulent flow regime), in which multiple-size bubbles are divided into a specified number of groups, each representing a prescribed range of sizes. The proposed modeling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for each bubble field. The overall model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. The results of NPHASE-CMFD simulations have been validated against the experimental data from the TOPFLOW test facility. Also, a parametric analysis on the effect of various modeling assumptions has been performed.

  16. Sandia Energy - Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Combustion Home Transportation Energy Predictive Simulation of Engines Reacting Flow Experiments Turbulent Combustion Turbulent CombustionAshley Otero2015-10-30T01:39:47+00...

  17. Instability mechanisms and transition scenarios of spiral turbulence in Taylor-Couette flow Alvaro Meseguer,1,* Fernando Mellibovsky,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meseguer, Alvaro

    or intermittency, i.e., spatiotemporal coexistence between laminar and turbulent regions in a fluid flow. Ca laminar flows have also been identified. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevE.80.046315 PACS number s : 47.20.Lz, 47 explanation of the mecha- nisms that mediate between laminar and fully disordered fluid motion. One

  18. Simulations on the Nonlinear Mode Coupling in Multiple-scale Drift-type Turbulence with Coherent Flow Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    and electron transport. Furthermore, the effect of ITG generated zonal flows regarded as a wave-type mean flow are generated as a beat wave or a modulational instability. Meanwhile, they act back on the turbulence, China 2) Graduate School of Energy Science, Kyoto University, 611-0011 Gokasho, Uji, Japan 3) Department

  19. ACCRETION OF GAS ONTO GAP-OPENING PLANETS AND CIRCUMPLANETARY FLOW STRUCTURE IN MAGNETIZED TURBULENT DISKS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uribe, A. L. [University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Klahr, H.; Henning, Th., E-mail: uribe@oddjob.uchicago.edu [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astronomie, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2013-06-01

    We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamical simulations of stellar accretion disks, using the PLUTO code, and studied the accretion of gas onto a Jupiter-mass planet and the structure of the circumplanetary gas flow after opening a gap in the disk. We compare our results with simulations of laminar, yet viscous disks with different levels of an {alpha}-type viscosity. In all cases, we find that the accretion flow across the surface of the Hill sphere of the planet is not spherically or azimuthally symmetric, and is predominantly restricted to the mid-plane region of the disk. Even in the turbulent case, we find no significant vertical flow of mass into the Hill sphere. The outer parts of the circumplanetary disk are shown to rotate significantly below Keplerian speed, independent of viscosity, while the circumplanetary disk density (therefore the angular momentum) increases with viscosity. For a simulation of a magnetized turbulent disk, where the global averaged alpha stress is {alpha}{sub MHD} = 10{sup -3}, we find the accretion rate onto the planet to be M-dot {approx}2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -6}M{sub J} yr{sup -1} for a gap surface density of 12 g cm{sup -2}. This is about a third of the accretion rate obtained in a laminar viscous simulation with equivalent {alpha} parameter.

  20. WENO schemes on arbitrary unstructured meshes for laminar, transitional and turbulent flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsoutsanis, Panagiotis, E-mail: panagiotis.tsoutsanis@cranfield.ac.uk; Antoniadis, Antonios Foivos, E-mail: a.f.antoniadis@cranfield.ac.uk; Drikakis, Dimitris, E-mail: d.drikakis@cranfield.ac.uk

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the development and implementation of weighted-essentially-non-oscillatory (WENO) schemes for viscous flows on arbitrary unstructured grids. WENO schemes up to fifth-order accurate have been implemented in conjunction with hybrid and non-hybrid unstructured grids. The schemes are investigated with reference to numerical and experimental results for the Taylor–Green vortex, as well as for laminar and turbulent flows around a sphere, and the turbulent shock-wave boundary layer interaction flow problem. The results show that the accuracy of the schemes depends on the arbitrariness of shape and orientation of the unstructured mesh elements, as well as the compactness of directional stencils. The WENO schemes provide a more accurate numerical framework compared to second-order and third-order total variation diminishing (TVD) methods, however, the fifth-order version of the schemes is computationally too expensive to make the schemes practically usable. On the other hand, the third-order variant offers an excellent numerical framework in terms of accuracy and computational cost compared to the fifth-order WENO and second-order TVD schemes. Parallelisation of the CFD code (henceforth labelled as UCNS3D), where the schemes have been implemented, shows that the present methods offer very good scalable performance.

  1. Modification of turbulent structure in channel flows by microbubble injection close to the wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutierrez Torres, Claudia del Carmen

    2005-11-01

    stream_source_info etd-tamu-2004B-MEEN-Gutierrez.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 185058 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name etd-tamu-2004B-MEEN-Gutierrez.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 MODIFICATION OF TURBULENT STRUCTURE IN CHANNEL FLOWS BY MICROBUBBLE INJECTION CLOSE TO THE WALL A Dissertation by CLAUDIA DEL CARMEN GUTIERREZ TORRES Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial...

  2. Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

  3. Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory Ron Zevenhoven Course) that was last updated in 1996. Thus, although the underlying Laws of Physics that (chemical) engineers have "VTG" this course is also the last course in process engineering for quite a few of ÅA's chemical

  4. Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Aug.2013 Department of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory Ron Zevenhoven Course 424101 Processteknikens grunder ("PTG") Introduction to Process Engineering v. 2013 0 > V (m3/s; equations, variables and units 1.1 Process engineering, this course 1.2 Process calculations, equations

  5. Taylor-Couette turbulence at radius ratio $\\eta=0.5$: scaling, flow structures and plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van der Veen, Roeland C A; Merbold, Sebastian; Harlander, Uwe; Egbers, Christoph; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Using high-resolution particle image velocimetry we measure velocity profiles, the wind Reynolds number and characteristics of turbulent plumes in Taylor-Couette flow for a radius ratio of 0.5 and Taylor number of up to $6.2\\cdot10^9$. The extracted angular velocity profiles follow a log-law more closely than the azimuthal velocity profiles due to the strong curvature of this $\\eta=0.5$ setup. The scaling of the wind Reynolds number with the Taylor number agrees with the theoretically predicted 3/7-scaling for the classical turbulent regime, which is much more pronounced than for the well-explored $\\eta=0.71$ case, for which the ultimate regime sets in at much lower Ta. By measuring at varying axial positions, roll structures are found for counter-rotation while no clear coherent structures are seen for pure inner cylinder rotation. In addition, turbulent plumes coming from the inner and outer cylinder are investigated. For pure inner cylinder rotation, the plumes in the radial velocity move away from the inn...

  6. Turbulent thermalization process in heavy-ion collisions at ultrarelativistic energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Berges; K. Boguslavski; S. Schlichting; R. Venugopalan

    2014-03-02

    The non-equilibrium evolution of heavy-ion collisions is studied in the limit of weak coupling at very high energy employing lattice simulations of the classical Yang-Mills equations. Performing the largest classical-statistical simulations to date, we find that the dynamics of the longitudinally expanding plasma becomes independent of the details of the initial conditions. After a transient regime dominated by plasma instabilities and free streaming, the subsequent space-time evolution is governed by a nonthermal fixed point, where the system exhibits the self-similar dynamics characteristic of wave turbulence. This allows us to distinguish between different kinetic scenarios in the classical regime. Within the accuracy of our simulations, the scaling behavior found is consistent with the ``bottom-up" thermalization scenario.

  7. Time-resolved heat transfer in the oscillating turbulent flow of a pulse-combustor tail pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dec, J.E.

    1988-01-01

    The need for efficient combustion systems has led to active research in pulse combustion. One advantage of pulse combustor heating systems is a high rate of heat transfer in the tail pipe. These high heat transfer rates result from large velocity oscillations, which occur in the tailpipe as a result of the acoustic resonance of the pulse combustor. Past research on the effects of flow oscillations on heat transfer rates is inconclusive; however, some oscillating turbulent flows have been shown to have Nusselt numbers, which are much higher than those to steady turbulent flow at the same mean Reynolds number. An experimental study of the heat transfer rates and convective transport processes in a pulse combustor tail pipe was conducted. A test combustor was used, in which the oscillation frequencies could be varied from 54 to 101 Hz, with peak-to-peak velocity oscillations from zero (steady flow) to 10 times the mean velocity, and mean Reynolds numbers from 3100 to 4750. Nusselt numbers in the tail pipe are enhanced by the oscillations up to a factor of 2.5 times the expected value for steady turbulent flow. The Nusselt number enhancement increases with both oscillation frequency and velocity oscillation amplitude. Increases in the mean Reynolds number decreased the enhancement. Possible causes for the heat-transfer enhancement in oscillating flows are discussed. The data indicate that the heat transfer enhancement results from a combination of increased turbulence intensity and transverse flows generated during the streamwise velocity reversals.

  8. Elliptic flow of thermal photons in relativistic nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rupa Chatterjee; Evan S. Frodermann; Ulrich W. Heinz; Dinesh K. Srivastava

    2006-04-09

    We predict the transverse momentum (pT) dependence of elliptic flow of thermal photons for Au+Au collisions at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. We model the system hydrodynamically, assuming formation of a thermalized quark-gluon plasma at some early time, followed by cooling through expansion, hadronization and decoupling. Photons are emitted throughout the expansion history. Contrary to hadron elliptic flow, which hydrodynamics predicts to increase monotonically with pT, the elliptic flow of thermal photons is predicted to first rise and then fall again as pT increases. Photon elliptic flow at high pT is shown to reflect the quark momentum anisotropy at early times when it is small, whereas at low pT it is controlled by the much larger pion momentum anisotropy during the late hadronic emission stage. An interesting structure is predicted at intermediate pT ~ 0.4 GeV/c where photon elliptic flow reflects the momenta and the (compared to pions) reduced v2 of heavy vector mesons in the late hadronic phase.

  9. Particle deposition from turbulent flow: Review of published research and its applicability to ventilation ducts in commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2002-06-01

    This report reviews published experimental and theoretical investigations of particle deposition from turbulent flows and considers the applicability of this body of work to the specific case of particle deposition from flows in the ducts of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Particle deposition can detrimentally affect the performance of HVAC systems and it influences the exposure of building occupants to a variety of air pollutants. The first section of this report describes the types of HVAC systems under consideration and discusses the components, materials and operating parameters commonly found in these systems. The second section reviews published experimental investigations of particle deposition rates from turbulent flows and considers the ramifications of the experimental evidence with respect to HVAC ducts. The third section considers the structure of turbulent airflows in ventilation ducts with a particular emphasis on turbulence investigations that have been used as a basis for particle deposition models. The final section reviews published literature on predicting particle deposition rates from turbulent flows.

  10. Chaotic mean wind in turbulent thermal convection and long-term correlations in solar activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Bershadskii

    2009-12-25

    It is shown that correlation function of the mean wind velocity in a turbulent thermal convection (Rayleigh number $Ra \\sim 10^{11}$) exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time, while corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive. These results together with the reconstructed phase portrait indicate presence of a chaotic component in the examined mean wind. Telegraph approximation is also used to study relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components to the mean wind fluctuations and an equilibrium between these components has been studied. Since solar activity is based on the thermal convection processes, it is reasoned that the observed solar activity long-term correlations can be an imprint of the mean wind chaotic properties. In particular, correlation function of the daily sunspots number exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time and corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive, also relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components follows the same pattern as for the convection mean wind.

  11. Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way catalytic converter through use of insulation within the ceramic monolith Enhanced thermal and gas flow performance in a three-way...

  12. Coherent Structures in Turbulent Flow over Two-Dimensional River Dunes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Omidyeganeh, Mohammad

    2011-01-01

    We performed large-eddy simulations of the flow over a typical two-dimensional dune geometry at laboratory scale (the Reynolds number based on the average channel height and mean velocity is 18,900) using the Lagrangian dynamic eddy-viscosity subgrid-scale model. The flow separates at the dune crest and reattaches downstream on the bed (at x=5.7h). A favorable pressure gradient accelerates the flow over the stoss-side (the upward-sloping region for x > 8h) and an unfavorable gradient for x dune. Due to the separation of the flow, a shear layer is generated after the crest that expands in the wake region towards the next dune. The outer-layer turbulence structures are visualized through isosurfaces of pressure fluctuations colored by distance to the surface. Spanwise vortices are generated in the shear layer separating from the crest due to the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. They are convected downstream and either interact with the wall or rise to the surfa...

  13. Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s. May 2015 Exercises IICFD2015 P 32 1 x 15°C 0°C 47°C x WW W P E EE w e x x #12;Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course particletheasvolumesamethewithsphereaofsurface obstacleofsize distancestop Stkwhere 25.0 2 2 Stk Stk X #12;Thermal and Flow Engine

  14. Notes 10. A thermohydrodynamic bulk-flow model for fluid film bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    The complete set of bulk-flow equations for the analysis of turbulent flow fluid film bearings. Importance of thermal effects in process fluid applications. A CFD method for solution of the bulk-flow equations....

  15. Prestellar Core Formation, Evolution, and Accretion from Gravitational Fragmentation in Turbulent Converging Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Munan

    2015-01-01

    We investigate prestellar core formation and accretion based on three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Our simulations represent local $\\sim 1$pc regions within giant molecular clouds where a supersonic turbulent flow converges, triggering star formation in the post-shock layer. We include turbulence and self-gravity, applying sink particle techniques, and explore a range of inflow Mach number ${\\cal M}=2-16$. Two sets of cores are identified and compared: $t_1$-cores are identified of a time snapshot in each simulation, representing dense structures in a single cloud map; $t_\\mathrm{coll}$-cores are identified at their individual time of collapse, representing the initial mass reservoir for accretion. We find that cores and filaments form and evolve at the same time. At the stage of core collapse, there is a well-defined, converged characteristic mass for isothermal fragmentation that is comparable to the critical Bonner-Ebert mass at the post-shock pressure. The core mass functions (CMFs) of $t_\\mathrm...

  16. Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma T. M. Flanagan and J. Goree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goree, John

    Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma T. M. Flanagan and J. Goree Department of Physics 2009 Thermal creep flow TCF is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result

  17. Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marusic, Ivan

    Evolution and lifetimes of flow topology in a turbulent boundary layer G. E. Elsinga and I. Marusic of Physics. Related Articles Lagrangian evolution of the invariants of the velocity gradient tensor subject to AIP license or copyright; see http://pof.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Evolution

  18. Streamwise-Localized Solutions at the Onset of Turbulence in Pipe Flow M. Avila,1,* F. Mellibovsky,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marques, Francisco

    the equations governing fluid flow are well known, there are no analytical expressions that describe, turbulence is organized around unstable solutions of the governing equations which provide the building blocks of the disordered dynamics. We report the discovery of periodic solutions which just like

  19. PhD scholarship on "Particle transport and clustering in stratified turbulent flows" funded by the Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandenburg, Axel

    PhD scholarship on "Particle transport and clustering in stratified turbulent flows" funded PhD students, one based at NTNU in Trondheim and the other at NORDITA in Stockholm. The NTNU-based PhD will be coordinated with that of the NORDITA-based PhD student and the two other supervisors. The vacant scholarship

  20. Prediction of turbulent flow and local heat transfer in internally cooled turbine airfoils: the leading edge region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pontaza, Juan Pablo

    2013-02-22

    -Stokes equations and the energy equation in conjunction with a two-layer K-Epsilon isotropic eddy viscosity model and a near-wall Reynolds-Stress closure model. The fundamental cases of fully developed turbulent pipe flow and an axisymmetric jet impinging on a...

  1. Turbulent flow over a house in a simulated hurricane boundary layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Zachary; Gurka, Roi; Kopp, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    Every year hurricanes and other extreme wind storms cause billions of dollars in damage worldwide. For residential construction, such failures are usually associated with roofs, which see the largest aerodynamic loading. However, determining aerodynamic loads on different portions of North American houses is complicated by the lack of clear load paths and non-linear load sharing in wood frame roofs. This problem of fluid-structure interaction requires both wind tunnel testing and full-scale structural testing. A series of wind tunnel tests have been performed on a house in a simulated atmospheric boundary layer (ABL), with the resulting wind-induced pressures applied to the full-scale structure. The ABL was simulated for flow over open country terrain where both velocity and turbulence intensity profiles, as well as spectra, were matched with available full scale measurements for this type of terrain. The first set of measurements was 600 simultaneous surface pressure measurements over the entire house. A key...

  2. Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

    2009-08-18

    We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

  3. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  4. Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchese, Francis

    Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow Flow

  5. Studies of turbulence and flows in the DIII-D tokamak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hillesheim, Jon Clark

    2012-01-01

    The DIII-D tokamak . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Turbulence in tokamaks: background and review of existingscale instabilities in tokamaks . . . . . . . . . . . .

  6. Effects of quark chemical equilibration on thermal photon elliptic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiko Monnai

    2014-12-25

    Large hadronic elliptic flow $v_2$ is considered as an evidence for the existence of a strongly-coupled QGP fluid in high-energy heavy-ion collisions. On the other hand, direct photon $v_2$ has recently been found to be much larger than hydrodynamic estimations, which is recognized as "photon $v_2$ puzzle". In this study, I discuss the implication of late production of quarks in an initially gluon-rich medium because photons are coupled to quarks. Numerical analyses imply that thermal photon $v_2$ can be visibly enhanced. This indicates that interplay of equilibration processes and collective expansion would be important.

  7. Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donna Post Guillen

    2009-07-01

    A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

  8. High performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mench, Matthew M.

    National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831, USA h i g h l i g h t s Thermal activation of carbon paper: Vanadium redox flow battery Carbon paper Kinetics Surface area Thermal activation Electrode a b s t r a cHigh performance electrodes in vanadium redox flow batteries through oxygen-enriched thermal

  9. Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control Kedar Hippalgaonkar,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Junqiao

    Temperature-Gated Thermal Rectifier for Active Heat Flow Control Jia Zhu,, Kedar Hippalgaonkar to develop advanced all-thermal solid-state devices that actively control heat flow without consuming other of solid-state active-thermal devices with a large rectification in the Rectifier state. This temperature

  10. Hybrid Wind Power Balance Control Strategy using Thermal Power, Hydro Power and Flow Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MacDonald, Mark

    Hybrid Wind Power Balance Control Strategy using Thermal Power, Hydro Power and Flow Batteries the con- trolled use of hybrid flow battery, thermal and hydro power plant system, to support wind power on range of thermal and hydro power plant reaction times. This work suggests that power and energy

  11. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  12. Final Technical Report: Numerical and Experimental Investigation of Turbulent Transport Control via Shaping of Radial Plasma Flow Profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuster, Eugenio

    2014-05-02

    The strong coupling between the different physical variables involved in the plasma transport phenomenon and the high complexity of its dynamics call for a model-based, multivariable approach to profile control where those predictive models could be exploited. The overall objective of this project has been to extend the existing body of work by investigating numerically and experimentally active control of unstable fluctuations, including fully developed turbulence and the associated cross-field particle transport, via manipulation of flow profiles in a magnetized laboratory plasma device. Fluctuations and particle transport can be monitored by an array of electrostatic probes, and Ex#2;B flow profiles can be controlled via a set of biased concentric ring electrodes that terminate the plasma column. The goals of the proposed research have been threefold: i- to develop a predictive code to simulate plasma transport in the linear HELCAT (HELicon-CAThode) plasma device at the University of New Mexico (UNM), where the experimental component of the proposed research has been carried out; ii- to establish the feasibility of using advanced model-based control algorithms to control cross-field turbulence-driven particle transport through appropriate manipulation of radial plasma flow profiles, iii- to investigate the fundamental nonlinear dynamics of turbulence and transport physics. Lehigh University (LU), including Prof. Eugenio Schuster and one full-time graduate student, has been primarily responsible for control-oriented modeling and model-based control design. Undergraduate students have also participated in this project through the National Science Foundation Research Experience for Undergraduate (REU) program. The main goal of the LU Plasma Control Group has been to study the feasibility of controlling turbulence-driven transport by shaping the radial poloidal flow profile (i.e., by controlling flow shear) via biased concentric ring electrodes.

  13. DNS of the effects of thermal stratification and turbulent mixing on H2/air ignition in a constant volume, and comparison with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Im, Hong G.

    DNS of the effects of thermal stratification and turbulent mixing on H2/air ignition in a constant of Mechanical Engineering University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 Abstract The influence of thermal stratification on auto-ignition at constant volume and high pressure is studied by Direct Numerical Simulation

  14. Evidence for internal structures of spiral turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-12-21

    Dec 22, 2009 ... ary laminar-turbulent pattern in plane Couette flow. ... flow internal to the turbulent and laminar spirals, and unique ... 2 ( is the fluid density).

  15. Experimental and numerical investigation of turbulent flow and heat (mass) transfer in a two-pass trapezoidal channel with turbulence promoters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oh, Sung Hyuk

    2009-05-15

    , as results of the secondary flow induced by the (–) 60º ribs. The overall average heat (mass) transfer for the larger inlet cases was always higher than that for the smaller inlet cases in the ribbed trapezoidal channel. Considering the thermal performance...

  16. Polymer heat transport enhancement in thermal convection: the case of Rayleigh-Taylor turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Boffetta; A. Mazzino; S. Musacchio; L. Vozella

    2010-01-19

    We study the effects of polymer additives on turbulence generated by the ubiquitous Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Numerical simulations of complete viscoelastic models provide clear evidence that the heat transport is enhanced up to 50% with respect to the Newtonian case. This phenomenon is accompanied by a speed up of the mixing layer growth. We give a phenomenological interpretation of these results based on small-scale turbulent reduction induced by polymers.

  17. Flow, Turbulence and Combustion 62: 295333, 1999. 1999 Kluwer Academic Publishers. Printed in the Netherlands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PDF of velocity and turbulent frequency or the joint PDF of velocity, wave vector, and turbulent implemented in conjunction with several velocity models. The complete model yields good comparisons and reaction are treated without mod- eling assumption [3, 4]. In contrast, standard moment closure methods

  18. Thermal analysis and air flow modelling of electrical machines 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chong, Yew Chuan

    2015-06-29

    Thermal analysis is an important topic that can affect the electrical machine performance, reliability, lifetime and efficiency. In order to predict the electrical machine thermal performance accurately, thermal analysis ...

  19. Contribution to the numerical study of turbulence in high intensity discharge lamps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaziz, S.; Ben Ahmed, R.; Helali, H.; Gazzah, H.; Charrada, K. [Unite d'Etude des Milieux Ionises et Reactifs, IPEIM, 5019 route de Kairouan Monastir (Tunisia)

    2011-07-15

    We present in this paper a comparison between results obtained with a laminar and turbulent models for high-pressure mercury arc. The two models are based on the resolution of bidimensional time-dependent equations by a semi-implicit finite-element code. The numerical computation of turbulent model is solved with large eddy simulation model; this approach takes into account the various scales of turbulence by a filtering method on each scale. The results show the quantitative influence of turbulence on the flow fields and also the difference between laminar and turbulent effects on the dynamic thermal behaviour and on the characteristics of the discharge.

  20. Thermal-Aware Physical Design Flow for 3-D ICs Jason Cong and Yan Zhang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cong, Jason "Jingsheng"

    Thermal-Aware Physical Design Flow for 3-D ICs Jason Cong and Yan Zhang UCLA Computer Science of the largest challenges in 3-D IC design is heat dissipation. In this paper we propose a thermal-aware physical IC designs [2]. The thermal problem is exacerbated in the 3-D cases for mainly two reasons: (1

  1. Large-Eddy Simulation of Swirling Turbulent Jet Flows in Absence of Vortex Breakdown

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinz, Stefan

    simulation method to studies of the mechanism of swirl effects shows the following. Swirl breaks apart, n i 2 N0; 1 = kinematic viscosity T = Reynolds-averaged Navier­Stokes turbulent viscosity

  2. Analysis and identification of vortices within a turbulent channel boundary layer flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maroni Veiga, Adrian Gaston

    2006-08-16

    understanding of the drag reduction mechanism is still lacking. Vortices play an important role in turbulence structure. Nevertheless, the identification of vortices is still unclear, not even a universal definition of a vortex is accepted. In the present study...

  3. Multi-scale interaction of driftWave turbulence with large scale shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDevitt, Christopher J.

    2008-01-01

    pro?le, killing the free energy source of the turbulence.environmentally benign source of energy free from many ofin fact act as a source of free energy for the convective

  4. Analysis of Thermal Dispersion in an Array of Parallel Plates with Fully-Developed Laminar Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleck, Norman A.

    basic heat transfer problems are addressed, each for steady fully-developed laminar fluid flow: (a1 Analysis of Thermal Dispersion in an Array of Parallel Plates with Fully-Developed Laminar Flow dispersion, parallel plate array, fully-developed laminar flow, Peclet number #12;2 Notation a molecular

  5. Models of stationary siphon flows in stratified, thermally conducting coronal loops: II Shocked Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Models of stationary siphon flows in stratified, thermally conducting coronal loops: II ­ Shocked to explore the conditions for the presence of stationary shocks in critical and supersonic siphon flows of stationary siphon flows in a semicircular solar coronal loop of constant cross section. The model was based

  6. Coarse-grained transport of a turbulent flow via moments of the Reynolds-averaged Boltzmann equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramov, Rafail V

    2015-01-01

    Here we introduce new coarse-grained variables for a turbulent flow in the form of moments of its Reynolds-averaged Boltzmann equation. With the exception of the collision moments, the transport equations for the new variables are identical to the usual moment equations, and thus naturally lend themselves to the variety of already existing closure methods. Under the anelastic turbulence approximation, we derive equations for the Reynolds-averaged turbulent fluctuations around the coarse-grained state. We show that the global relative entropy of the coarse-grained state is bounded from above by the Reynolds average of the fine-grained global relative entropy, and thus obeys the time decay bound of Desvillettes and Villani. This is similar to what is observed in the rarefied gas dynamics, which makes the Grad moment closure a good candidate for truncating the hierarchy of the coarse-grained moment equations. We also show that, under additional assumptions on the form of the coarse-grained collision terms, one a...

  7. Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

    2013-01-01

    The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

  8. A numerical investigation of transonic axial compressor rotor flow using a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arima, T.; Sonoda, T.; Shirotori, M.; Tamura, A.; Kikuchi, K.

    1999-01-01

    The authors have developed a computer simulation code for three-dimensional viscous flow in turbomachinery based on the time-averaged compressible Navier-Stokes equations and a low-Reynolds-number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model. It is described in detail in this paper. The code is used to compute the flow fields for two types of rotor (a transonic fan NASA Rotor 67 and a transonic axial compressor NASA rotor 37), and numerical results are compared to experimental data based on aerodynamic probe and laser anemometer measurements. In the case of Rotor 67, calculated and experimental results are compared under the design speed to validate the code. The calculated results show good agreement with the experimental data, such as the rotor performance map and the spanwise distribution of total pressure, total temperature, and flow angle downstream of the rotor. In the case of Rotor 37, detailed comparisons between the numerical results and the experimental data are made under the design speed condition to assess the overall quality of the numerical solution. Furthermore, comparisons under the part-speed condition are used to investigate a flow field without passage shock. The results are well predicted qualitatively. However, considerable quantitative discrepancies remain in predicting the flow near the tip. In order to assess the predictive capabilities of the developed code, computed flow structures are presented with the experimental data for each rotor and the cause of the discrepancies is discussed.

  9. Canonical models of geophysical and astrophysical flows: Turbulent convection experiments in liquid metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribeiro, A; Fabre, G; Guermond, JL; Aurnou, JM

    2015-01-01

    fluids. The strong thermal anomalies that arise in liquid metal RBC experiments produce remarkably clean

  10. Comparative study of laminar and turbulent flow model with different operating parameters for radio frequency-inductively coupled plasma torch working at 3??MHz frequency at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Punjabi, Sangeeta B.; Sahasrabudhe, S. N.; Das, A. K.; Joshi, N. K.; Mangalvedekar, H. A.; Kothari, D. C.

    2014-01-15

    This paper provides 2D comparative study of results obtained using laminar and turbulent flow model for RF (radio frequency) Inductively Coupled Plasma (ICP) torch. The study was done for the RF-ICP torch operating at 50?kW DC power and 3?MHz frequency located at BARC. The numerical modeling for this RF-ICP torch is done using ANSYS software with the developed User Defined Function. A comparative study is done between laminar and turbulent flow model to investigate how temperature and flow fields change when using different operating conditions such as (a) swirl and no swirl velocity for sheath gas flow rate, (b) variation in sheath gas flow rate, and (c) variation in plasma gas flow rate. These studies will be useful for different material processing applications.

  11. Numerical Investigation of turbulent coupling boundary layer of air-water interaction flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Song, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01

    Air-water interaction flow between two parallel flat plates, known as Couette flow, is simulated by direct numerical simulation. The two flowing fluids are coupled through continuity of velocity and shear stress condition ...

  12. A Bayesian fusion model for space-time reconstruction of finely resolved velocities in turbulent flows from low resolution measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Nguyen, Linh; Chainais, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The study of turbulent flows calls for measurements with high resolution both in space and in time. We propose a new approach to reconstruct High-Temporal-High-Spatial resolution velocity fields by combining two sources of information that are well-resolved either in space or in time, the Low-Temporal-High-Spatial (LTHS) and the High-Temporal-Low-Spatial (HTLS) resolution measurements. In the framework of co-conception between sensing and data post-processing, this work extensively investigates a Bayesian reconstruction approach using a simulated database. A Bayesian fusion model is developed to solve the inverse problem of data reconstruction. The model uses a Maximum A Posteriori estimate, which yields the most probable field knowing the measurements. The DNS of a wall-bounded turbulent flow at moderate Reynolds number is used to validate and assess the performances of the present approach. Low resolution measurements are subsampled in time and space from the fully resolved data. Reconstructed velocities ar...

  13. PLASMA PHYSICS:Turbulence and Sheared Flow --Burrell 281 (5384): 1816 --Science q My Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    About the Journal Home > Science Magazine > 18 September 1998 > Burrell , pp. 1816 - 1817 Article Views with reduced turbulence and transport when an additional source of free energy is applied to it. Usually heating or fueling. Although there are a few cases where neutral fluids exhibit velocity shear

  14. Comparative study of the vorticity field in turbulent flows: Theory, experiments, computations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levich, E.

    1991-09-01

    The Goal of the project was to understand the role of topology vortex lines in general and the helicity invariant (inviscid) in particular for turbulent dynamics. The project consisted of three main ingredients: theoretical, numerical and experimental. The achievements and failures of the above are separately reported in this paper.

  15. Comparative study of the vorticity field in turbulent flows: Theory, experiments, computations. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levich, E.

    1991-09-01

    The Goal of the project was to understand the role of topology vortex lines in general and the helicity invariant (inviscid) in particular for turbulent dynamics. The project consisted of three main ingredients: theoretical, numerical and experimental. The achievements and failures of the above are separately reported in this paper.

  16. Heat transfer enhancement for turbulent flow through blockages with elongated holes in a rectangular channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Yonghee

    2007-09-17

    In this thesis, turbulent forced convective heat transfer downstream of blockages with elongated holes in a rectangular channel was studied. The rectangular channel has a width-to-height ratio of 12:1. The blockages have the same cross section...

  17. Heat Flow in VC-2A and VC-2B, and Constraints on the Thermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Heat Flow in VC-2A and VC-2B, and Constraints on the Thermal Regime of the Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  18. Global vs local energy dissipation: the energy cycle of the turbulent Von K\\'arm\\'an flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuzzay, Denis; Dubrulle, Bérengère

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the relations between global and local energy transfers in a turbulent Von K\\'arm\\'an flow. The goal is to understand how and where energy is dissipated in such a flow and to reconstruct the energy cycle in an experimental device where local as well as global quantities can be measured. We use PIV measurements and we model the Reynolds stress tensor to take subgrid scales into account. This procedure involves a free parameter that is calibrated using angular momentum balance. We then estimate the local and global mean injected and dissipated power for several types of impellers, for various Reynolds numbers and for various flow topologies. These PIV-estimates are then compared with direct injected power estimates provided by torque measurements at the impellers. The agreement between PIV-estimates and direct measurements depends on the flow topology. In symmetric situations, we are able to capture up to 90% of the actual global energy dissipation rate. However, our results become...

  19. Journal ofEnhanced Heat Transfer, 18 (3): 177-190 (2011) THERMALLY-INDUCED OSCILLATORY FLOW AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    2011-01-01

    AND HEAT TRANSFER IN AN OSCILLATING HEAT PIPE Wei Shao & Yuwen Zhang* Department ofMechanical and Aerospace - a building block ofan Oscillating Heat Pipe (OHP) - is modeled by analyzing evaporation and condensation flow and by empirical correlationsfor a turbulent liquid flow. KEY WORDS: oscillating heat pipe

  20. Elliptic flow of thermal photons in chemically non-equilibrated QCD medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiko Monnai

    2014-10-31

    Heavy-ion experiments have recently revealed that azimuthal momentum anisotropy -- elliptic flow -- of direct photons from a QCD medium is a few times larger than hydrodynamic predictions. I present a possible explanation for the enhancement based on late quark chemical equilibration. The color glass theory indicates that the medium is initially gluon-rich. Thermal photons are then mainly produced after quarks are produced, at which point large flow anisotropy is developed. The numerical estimations indicate that slow chemical equilibration visibly enhances the elliptic flow of thermal photons.

  1. OPTIMAL CONTROL OF THERMALLY CONVECTED FLUID FLOWS \\Lambda K. ITO y AND S.S. RAVINDRAN y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OPTIMAL CONTROL OF THERMALLY CONVECTED FLUID FLOWS \\Lambda K. ITO y AND S.S. RAVINDRAN y Abstract. We examine the optimal control of stationary thermally convected fluid flows from the the­ oretical and numerical point of view. We use thermal convection as control mechanism, that is, control is effected

  2. Thermal boundary layer development in dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Lawrence M.

    1982-01-01

    Dispersed flow film boiling consists of a dispersion of droplets which are carried over a very hot surface by their vapor. This process occurs in cryogenic equipment and wet steam turbines. It is also of interest in the ...

  3. Momentum and heat fluxes in a turbulent air flow over a wet, smooth boundary 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rice, Warren

    1958-01-01

    groundwater-land surface model, ParFlow.CLM, to develop a spatial distributed ecohydrological model at the stand scale (~1000 m^(2)). The modified ParFlow.CLM was used to conduct a 8-year simulation with half hourly time step at a AmeriFlux oak savanna site...

  4. A hybrid finite-difference/boundary element procedure for the simulation of turbulent MHD duct flow at finite magnetic Reynolds numbers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandaru, Vinodh; Krasnov, Dmitry; Schumacher, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    A conservative coupled finite difference-boundary element computational procedure for the simulation of turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow in a straight rectangular duct at finite magnetic Reynolds number is presented. The flow is assumed to be periodic in the streamwise direction and is driven by a mean pressure gradient. The duct walls are considered to be electrically insulating. The co-evolution of the velocity and magnetic fields as described respectively by the Navier-Stokes and the magnetic induction equations, together with the coupling of the magnetic field between the conducting domain and the non-conducting exterior is solved using the magnetic field formulation. The aim is to simulate localized magnetic fields interacting with turbulent duct flow. Detailed verification of the implementation of the numerical scheme is conducted in the limiting case of low magnetic Reynolds number by comparing with the results obtained using a quasistatic approach that has no coupling with the exterior. The rigorous...

  5. Interactions between turbulent open channel flow, power and the wake of an axial-flow marine turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siefert, Chris

    turbine Leonardo P. Chamorro1 , Craig Hill1 , Vincent Neary2 , Budi Gunawan2 , Roger Arndt1 , Fotis-flow marine hydrokinetic turbines was lacking. Advancing this area of knowledge within the field of marine and hydrokinetic energy research, development, and deployment will lead to more efficient turbine operations

  6. Spectral element/smoothed profile method for turbulent flow simulations of waterjet propulsion systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Xian

    We have developed fast numerical algorithms [1] for flows with complex moving domains, e.g. propellers in free-space and impellers in waterjets, by combining the smoothed profile method (SPM, [2, 3, 4]) with the spectral ...

  7. Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

    2010-12-10

    The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

  8. Turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Talbot, L.; Cheng, R.K. [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Turbulent combustion is the dominant process in heat and power generating systems. Its most significant aspect is to enhance the burning rate and volumetric power density. Turbulent mixing, however, also influences the chemical rates and has a direct effect on the formation of pollutants, flame ignition and extinction. Therefore, research and development of modern combustion systems for power generation, waste incineration and material synthesis must rely on a fundamental understanding of the physical effect of turbulence on combustion to develop theoretical models that can be used as design tools. The overall objective of this program is to investigate, primarily experimentally, the interaction and coupling between turbulence and combustion. These processes are complex and are characterized by scalar and velocity fluctuations with time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude. They are also influenced by the so-called {open_quotes}field{close_quotes} effects associated with the characteristics of the flow and burner geometries. The authors` approach is to gain a fundamental understanding by investigating idealized laboratory flames. Laboratory flames are amenable to detailed interrogation by laser diagnostics and their flow geometries are chosen to simplify numerical modeling and simulations and to facilitate comparison between experiments and theory.

  9. Electromagnetic Transport From Microtearing Mode Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W; Kaye, S M; Nevins, W M; Wang, E; Bell, R E; Hammett, G W; LeBlanc, B P; Mikkelsen, D R

    2011-03-23

    This Letter presents non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing mode turbulence. The simulations include collisional and electromagnetic effects and use experimental parameters from a high beta discharge in the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). The predicted electron thermal transport is comparable to that given by experimental analysis, and it is dominated by the electromagnetic contribution of electrons free streaming along the resulting stochastic magnetic field line trajectories. Experimental values of flow shear can significantly reduce the predicted transport.

  10. Internal thermal coupling in direct-flow coaxial vacuum tube collectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glembin, J.; Rockendorf, G.; Scheuren, J.

    2010-07-15

    This investigation covers the impact of low flow rates on the efficiency of coaxial vacuum tube collectors. Measurements show an efficiency reduction of 10% if reducing the flow rate from 78 kg/m{sup 2} h to 31 kg/m{sup 2} h for a collector group with 60 parallel vacuum tubes with a coaxial flow conduit at one-sided connection. For a more profound understanding a model of the coaxial tube was developed which defines the main energy fluxes including the internal thermal coupling. The tube simulations show a non-linear temperature profile along the tube with the maximum temperature in the outer pipe. Due to heat transfer to the entering flow this maximum is not located at the fluid outlet. The non-linearity increases with decreasing flow rates. The experimentally determined flow distribution allows simulating the measured collector array. The simulation results confirm the efficiency decrease at low flow rates. The flow distribution has a further impact on efficiency reduction, but even at an ideal uniform flow, a considerable efficiency reduction at low flow rates is to be expected. As a consequence, low flow rates should be prevented for coaxial tube collectors, thus restricting the possible operation conditions. The effect of constructional modifications like diameter or material variations is presented. Finally the additional impact of a coaxial manifold design is discussed. (author)

  11. Pore-scale lattice Boltzmann simulation of laminar and turbulent flow through a sphere pack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fattahia, Ehsan; Wohlmuth, Barbara; Rüde, Ulrich; Manhart, Michael; Helmig, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    The lattice Boltzmann method can be used to simulate flow through porous media with full geometrical resolution. With such a direct numerical simulation, it becomes possible to study fundamental effects which are difficult to assess either by developing macroscopic mathematical models or experiments. We first evaluate the lattice Boltzmann method with various boundary handling of the solid-wall and various collision operators to assess their suitability for large scale direct numerical simulation of porous media flow. A periodic pressure drop boundary condition is used to mimic the pressure driven flow through the simple sphere pack in a periodic domain. The evaluation of the method is done in the Darcy regime and the results are compared to a semi-analytic solution. Taking into account computational cost and accuracy, we choose the most efficient combination of the solid boundary condition and collision operator. We apply this method to perform simulations for a wide range of Reynolds numbers from Stokes flo...

  12. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-29

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  13. FLIHY EXPERIMENTAL FACILITIES FOR STUDYING OPEN CHANNEL TURBULENT FLOWS AND HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    . The pump station is composed of two centrifugal pumps connected in parallel, capable of pumping 75 L/s of water at maximum speed. The pumps are individually controlled with variable speed inverters to allow feeds the fluid to the pumps. 3. Built-in diagnostics tools include the flow meter, thermocouples

  14. Three-dimensional turbulent swirling flow in a cylinder: Experiments and computations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Amit

    and an axial exhaust called a vortex finder tube. Due to the centrif- ugal action of the fluid from fluid forms an inner vortex and exits through the vortex finder tube located at the top. The out- flow through the cone is usually called the underflow and that through the vortex finder tube the overflow

  15. An experimental investigation on the multiphase flows and turbulent mixing in a flat-panel photobioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    . Multiphase flows . Particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements Introduction Microalgae are an ideal source very high biomass productivity (Wu and Merchuk 2004; Chisti 2007). Depending on the carbon num- ber biomass, closed loop PBRs have many inher- ent advantages such as well-controlled culture conditions

  16. Secondary instability in drift wave turbulence as a mechanism for zonal flow and avalanche formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhihong

    University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California, United States of America A.I. Smolyakov University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada F.L. Hinton General Atomics, San Diego, California, United States instability as a mechanism for zonal flow generation, transport barrier dynamics and avalanche formation

  17. ME 413 Systems Dynamics & Control Chapter 7: Fluid Systems and Thermal Systems ChapterChapterChapterChapter 7777

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Qahtani, Hussain M.

    & Control Chapter 7: Fluid Systems and Thermal Systems 2/9 laminar flow and is characterized by a smooth is compressible. 7.2 MATHEMATICAL MODELING OF LIQUID LEVEL SYSTEMS Steady State Flow Laminar Turbulent D Figure 7.1 (a) Velocity profile for laminar flow Flow dominated by viscosity forces is called Figure 7.1 (b

  18. Probabilistic Velocity Estimation for Autonomous Miniature Airships using Thermal Air Flow Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teschner, Matthias

    Probabilistic Velocity Estimation for Autonomous Miniature Airships using Thermal Air Flow Sensors J¨org M¨uller Oliver Paul Wolfram Burgard Abstract-- Recently, autonomous miniature airships have be- come a growing research field. Whereas airships are attractive as they can move freely in the three

  19. Dept. of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Lab course 424508 E Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Dept. of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Lab course 424508 E Ron Zevenhoven exam to add your homework for course 2011 answers to the answers for this exam. 725. In the manufacturing c. the energy to be provided for by the heater (in kJ) during the time it takes to cure the glue

  20. Dept. of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Lab course 424508 E Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Dept. of Chemical Engineering Thermal and Flow Engineering Lab course 424508 E Ron Zevenhoven exam a chemical reaction proceeds that releases heat as a function of temperature. The plate has thickness L (m) and temperatures T1 (K) and T2 (K) on either sides, as shown in the Figure. The heat generated by the chemical

  1. On the meaning of mixing efficiency for buoyancy driven mixing in stratified turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wykes, Megan S. Davies; Hughes, Graham O.; Dalziel, Stuart B.

    2015-09-17

    efficiency including volumetric, bulk, instantaneous and point-wise definitions, and it is often unclear how these measures are related (see Peltier & Caulfield 2003; Tailleux 2009). We concentrate in this paper on a conceptually simple and widely used... or Richardson number (see for example Peltier & Caulfield 2003; Fernando 1991). This often leads to the assumption that a constant mixing efficiency is suitable for many flows if these parameters remain constant (a value often used is 0.17; Wunsch & Ferrari...

  2. Suppression of Turbulence by Self-Generated and Imposed Mean Flows M. G. Shats,* H. Xia, and H. Punzmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falkovich, Gregory

    . Punzmann Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian in magnetized plasma research, since it offers a very effective method of turbulence control [13

  3. Implicit and explicit schemes for mass consistency preservation in hybrid particle/finite-volume algorithms for turbulent reactive flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popov, Pavel P., E-mail: ppopov@uci.edu; Pope, Stephen B.

    2014-01-15

    This work addresses the issue of particle mass consistency in Large Eddy Simulation/Probability Density Function (LES/PDF) methods for turbulent reactive flows. Numerical schemes for the implicit and explicit enforcement of particle mass consistency (PMC) are introduced, and their performance is examined in a representative LES/PDF application, namely the Sandia–Sydney Bluff-Body flame HM1. A new combination of interpolation schemes for velocity and scalar fields is found to better satisfy PMC than multilinear and fourth-order Lagrangian interpolation. A second-order accurate time-stepping scheme for stochastic differential equations (SDE) is found to improve PMC relative to Euler time stepping, which is the first time that a second-order scheme is found to be beneficial, when compared to a first-order scheme, in an LES/PDF application. An explicit corrective velocity scheme for PMC enforcement is introduced, and its parameters optimized to enforce a specified PMC criterion with minimal corrective velocity magnitudes.

  4. THERMAL DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR LOW FLOW RATE SINGLE-PHASE AND TWO-PHASE MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qu, Weilin

    THERMAL DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR LOW FLOW RATE SINGLE-PHASE AND TWO-PHASE MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS-phase micro- channel heat sinks under a fixed liquid coolant flow rate. The parameters relevant to heat sink-channel dimensions corresponding to the prescribed dissipative heat flux and liquid coolant flow rate. Heat sink

  5. 23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    23.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/36 7. Air conditioning, cooling towers Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory

  6. A Generic Model for the Resuspension of Multilayer Aerosol Deposits by Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Friess, H.; Yadigaroglu, G. [Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (Switzerland)

    2001-06-15

    An idealized lattice structure is considered of multilayer aerosol deposits, where every particle at the deposit surface is associated with a resuspension rate constant depending on a statistically distributed particle parameter and on flow conditions. The response of this generic model is represented by a set of integrodifferential equations. As a first application of the general formalism, the behavior of Fromentin's multilayer model is analyzed, and the model parameters are adapted to experimental data. In addition, improved relations between model parameters and physical input parameters are proposed. As a second application, a method is proposed for building multilayer models by using resuspension rate constants of existing monolayer models. The method is illustrated by a sample of monolayer data resulting from the model of Reeks, Reed, and Hall. Also discussed is the error to be expected if a monolayer resuspension model, which works well for thin aerosol deposits, is applied to thick deposits under the classical monolayer assumption that all deposited particles interact with the fluid at all times.

  7. 1.12.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/24 8. Heat pumps, heat pipes,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    pumps, heat pipes, cold thermal energy storage Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/24 8.1 Heat pumps #12;1.12.2014 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 3/24 Heat pumps /1 Using a refrigeration cycle

  8. Effects Of Thermal Exchange On Material Flow During Steel Thixoextrusion Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Eric; Gu Guochao; Langlois, Laurent; Bigot, Regis; Pesci, Raphael

    2011-01-17

    Semisolid processing is an innovative technology for near net-shape production of components, where the metallic alloys are processed in the semisolid state. Taking advantage of the thixotropic behavior of alloys in the semisolid state, significant progress has been made in semisolid processing. However, the consequences of such behavior on the flow during thixoforming are still not completely understood. To explore and better understand the influence of the different parameters on material flow during thixoextrusion process, thixoextrusion experiments were performed using the low carbon steel C38. The billet was partially melted at high solid fraction. Effects of various process parameters including the initial billet temperature, the temperature of die, the punch speed during process and the presence of a Ceraspray layer at the interface of tool and billet were investigated through experiments and simulation. After analyzing the results thus obtained, it was identified that the aforementioned parameters mainly affect thermal exchanges between die and part. The Ceraspray layer not only plays a lubricant role, but also acts as a thermal barrier at the interface of tool and billet. Furthermore, the thermal effects can affect the material flow which is composed of various distinct zones.

  9. Effect of the forcing term in the pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann modeling of thermal flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Q

    2014-01-01

    The pseudopotential lattice Boltzmann (LB) model is a popular model in the LB community for simulating multiphase flows. Recently, several thermal LB models, which are based on the pseudopotential LB model and constructed within the framework of the double-distribution-function LB method, were proposed to simulate thermal multiphase flows [G. H\\'azi and A. M\\'arkus, Phys. Rev. E 77, 026305 (2008); L. Biferale et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 104502 (2012); S. Gong and P. Cheng, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 55, 4923 (2012)]. The objective of the present paper is to show that the effect of the forcing term on the temperature equation must be eliminated in the pseudopotential LB modeling of thermal flows. First, the effect of the forcing term on the temperature equation is shown via the Chapman-Enskog analysis. For comparison, alternative treatments that are free from the forcing-term effect are provided. Subsequently, numerical investigations are performed for two benchmark tests. The numerical results clearly show ...

  10. PARTIALLY AVERAGED NAVIER-STOKES METHOD FOR TURBULENCE CLOSURES: CHARACTERIZATION OF FLUCTUATIONS AND EXTENSION TO WALL BOUNDED FLOWS 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmipathy, Sunil

    2010-07-14

    The work presented in this dissertation concerns continued development, validation and verification of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method - a variable resolution closure model for turbulence. Linear eddy viscosity models (LEVM...

  11. An experimental investigation of thermal mixing and combustion in supersonic flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Srikrishnan, A.R.; Kurian, J.; Sriramulu, V.

    1996-12-01

    A radially lobed nozzle (petal nozzle) is being increasingly recognized as a potential candidate for promoting mixing in compressible flows. An experimental investigation has been conducted to study its effectiveness in improving thermal mixing and combustion in supersonic flow. A hot gas jet issuing supersonically from a lobed nozzle mixes with a cold supersonic jet in a circular mixing tube. The two jets issue coaxially. A detailed survey of the flow field inside the mixing duct reveals that nearly complete thermal mixing (as exemplified by the nearly uniform temperature distribution) could be achieved in a short distance when a lobed nozzle is employed. The results also indicate the presence of large-scale vortices in the flow field downstream of the lobed nozzle. Having thus created a field in which mixing is good, supersonic combustion was then attempted. Kerosene was introduced into the hot stream issuing from the lobed nozzle and it burned mainly in the mixing tube, which served as a supersonic combustor. Resulting temperature and pressure rises were measured and the supersonic combustion efficiency was found to be of the order of 60%. The performance of a conventional conical nozzle was found to be much inferior to that of the petal nozzle under identical conditions.

  12. Simple Models for Turbulent Self-Regulation in Galaxy Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck; Daniel C. Smith

    1999-07-29

    We propose that turbulent heating, wave pressure and gas exchanges between different regions of disks play a dominant role in determining the preferred, quasi-equilibrium, self-similar states of gas disks on large-scales. We present simple families of analytic, thermohydrodynamic models for these global states, which include terms for turbulent pressure and Reynolds stresses. Star formation rates, phase balances, and hydrodynamic forces are all tightly coupled and balanced. The models have stratified radial flows, with the cold gas slowly flowing inward in the midplane of the disk, and with the warm/hot phases that surround the midplane flowing outward. The models suggest a number of results that are in accord with observation, as well as some novel predictions, including the following. 1) The large-scale gas density and thermal phase distributions in galaxy disks can be explained as the result of turbulent heating and spatial couplings. 2) The turbulent pressures and stresses that drive radial outflows in the warm gas also allow a reduced circular velocity there. This effect was observed by Swaters, Sancisi and van der Hulst in NGC 891, a particularly turbulent edge-on disk. The models predict that the effect should be universal in such disks. 3) They suggest that a star formation rate like the phenomenological Schmidt Law is the natural result of global thermohydrodynamical balance, and may not obtain in disks far from equilibrium. (Abridged)

  13. Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and Bubbles.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part II: Effect of Batch and thermal structure in glass melting furnaces with a throat. The effects of the following parameters This is a second part of a study concerned with the three-dimensional natural circulation in glass melting furnaces

  14. Modeling and analysis of the movement of fluid-fluid interfaces in porous media coupled with turbulent free flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cirpka, Olaf Arie

    allows the coupling of a laminar single-phase free flow and a two-phase porous-medium flow under non be necessary Coupling Situation coupling exists for laminar free flow (Mostaf et al. 2011) boundary layer DuMux in use for Darcy flow and laminar Stokes flow no RANS solver in DuMux or DUNE PDELab Open

  15. Gravity and Zonal Flows of Giant Planets: From the Euler Equation to the Thermal Wind Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Hao

    2015-01-01

    Any non-spherical distribution of density inside planets and stars gives rise to a non-spherical external gravity and change of shape. If part or all of the observed zonal flows at the cloud deck of giant planets represent deep interior dynamics, then the density perturbations associated with the deep zonal flows could generate gravitational signals detectable by the planned Juno mission and the Cassini Proximal Orbits. It is currently debated whether the thermal wind equation (TWE) can be used to calculate the gravity field associated with deep zonal flows. Here we present a critical comparison between the Euler equation and the thermal wind equation. Our analysis shows that the applicability of the TWE in calculating the gravity moments depends crucially on retaining the non-sphericity of the background density and gravity. Only when the background non-sphericity of the planet is taken into account, the TWE makes accurate enough prediction (with a few tens of percent errors) for the high-degree gravity mome...

  16. Evidence for radial flow of thermal dileptons in high-energy nuclear collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NA60 Collaboration; R. Arnaldi

    2007-11-12

    The NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS has studied low-mass dimuon production in 158 AGeV In-In collisions. An excess of pairs above the known meson decays has been reported before. We now present precision results on the associated transverse momentum spectra. The slope parameter Teff extracted from the spectra rises with dimuon mass up to the rho, followed by a sudden decline above. While the initial rise is consistent with the expectations for radial flow of a hadronic decay source, the decline signals a transition to an emission source with much smaller flow. This may well represent the first direct evidence for thermal radiation of partonic origin in nuclear collisions.

  17. Self-similar spiral flow structure in low Reynolds number isotropic and decaying turbulence J. C. Vassilicos1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brasseur, James G.

    detect well-defined self-similar scaling in the geometry of streamlines around vortex tubes in decaying different types of accumulation of length scales with DK 1 on streamlines around the vortex tubes in the simulated turbulence: an accumulation of the streamline towards a central axis of the vortex tube

  18. The high-energy-density counterpropagating shear experiment and turbulent self-heating

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doss, F. W.; Fincke, J. R.; Loomis, E. N.; Welser-Sherrill, L.; Flippo, K. A.

    2013-12-06

    The counterpropagating shear experiment has previously demonstrated the ability to create regions of shockdriven shear, balanced symmetrically in pressure and experiencing minimal net drift. This allows for the creation of a high-Mach-number high-energy-density shear environment. New data from the counterpropagating shear campaign is presented, and both hydrocode modeling and theoretical analysis in the context of a Reynolds-averaged-Navier-Stokes model suggest turbulent dissipation of energy from the supersonic flow bounding the layer is a significant driver in its expansion. A theoretical minimum shear flow Mach number threshold is suggested for substantial thermal-turbulence coupling.

  19. Advances in compressible turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E.

    1992-01-01

    This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

  20. Energy spectra in bubbly turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prakash, Vivek N; Ramos, Fabio Ernesto Mancilla; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2013-01-01

    We conduct experiments in a turbulent bubbly flow to study the unknown nature of the transition between the classical -5/3 energy spectrum scaling for a single-phase turbulent flow and the -3 scaling for a swarm of bubbles rising in a quiescent liquid and of bubble-dominated turbulence. The bubblance parameter, b, which measures the ratio of the bubble-induced kinetic energy to the kinetic energy induced by the turbulent liquid fluctuations before bubble injection, is used to characterise the bubbly flow. We vary b from $b = \\infty$ (pseudo-turbulence) to b = 0 (single-phase flow) over 2-3 orders of magnitude: ~O(0.01, 0.1, 5) to study its effect on the turbulent energy spectrum and liquid velocity fluctuations. The experiments are conducted in a multi-phase turbulent water tunnel with air bubbles of diameters 2-4 mm and 3-5 mm. An active-grid is used to generate nearly homogeneous and isotropic turbulence in the liquid flow. The liquid speeds and gas void fractions are varied to achieve the above mentioned b...

  1. Static magnetic fields enhance turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pothérat, Alban

    2015-01-01

    More often than not, turbulence occurs under the influence of external fields, mostly rotation and magnetic fields generated either by planets, stellar objects or by an industrial environment. Their effect on the anisotropy and the dissipative behaviour of turbulence is recognised but complex, and it is still difficult to even tell whether they enhance or dampen turbulence. For example, externally imposed magnetic fields suppress free turbulence in electrically conducting fluids (Moffatt 1967), and make it two-dimensional (2D) (Sommeria & Moreau 1982); but their effect on the intensity of forced turbulence, as in pipes, convective flows or otherwise, is not clear. We shall prove that since two-dimensionalisation preferentially affects larger scales, these undergo much less dissipation and sustain intense turbulent fluctuations. When higher magnetic fields are imposed, quasi-2D structures retain more kinetic energy, so that rather than suppressing forced turbulence, external magnetic fields indirectly enha...

  2. 28.1.2015bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/54 Solar energy (thermal, PV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    Turku 2/54 2b.1 Solar energy #12;28.1.2015Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 3/54 Potential Solar energy could within one hour provide the energy that is used in all surface temperature Solar energy irradiation can be used to estimate planet surface temperature T

  3. A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2013-01-01

    heat storage, the thermal pollution caused by the residualwhen estimating thermal pollution. III.2.5 Multiple Layersof the aquifer. The thermal pollution appears to spread out

  4. A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2013-01-01

    within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managedwithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managedmet in seasonal or daily storage. The ratio between thermal

  5. 3.12.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/56 9. Solar cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/Solar_Heating_Cooling_Road map_2012_WEB.pdf 3.12.2014 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500.iea.org/publications/freepublications/publication/Solar_Heating_Cooling_Road map_2012_WEB.pdf #12;3.12.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500.12.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering - Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 8/56 http://www.brighton-webs

  6. Cavitation on a modern ship propeller.This photograph was taken by Mark Duttweiler (PhD '01) in Caltech's Mechanical Engineering, Low Turbulence Water Tunnel. The flow is from right to left. Enter the second issue of ENGenious.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haile, Sossina M.

    ) in Caltech's Mechanical Engineering, Low Turbulence Water Tunnel. The flow is from right to left. #12;4 5 of Engineering and Applied Science itself is ever evolving--a collection of exceptional people doing exceptional of Engineering and Applied Science. Finally, before you read on, I would like to take this opportunity to thank

  7. Influence of asperities on fluid and thermal flow in a fracture: a coupled Lattice Boltzmann study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuville, Amélie; Toussaint, Renaud

    2013-01-01

    The characteristics of the hydro-thermal flow which occurs when a cold fluid is injected into a hot fractured bedrock depend on the morphology of the fracture. We consider a sharp triangular asperity, invariant in one direction, perturbing an otherwise flat fracture. We investigate its influence on the macroscopic hydraulic transmissivity and heat transfer efficiency, at fixed low Reynolds number. In this study, numerical simulations are done with a coupled lattice Boltzmann method that solves both the complete Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations in three dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained under lubrication approximations which rely on many hypotheses and neglect the three-dimensional (3D) effects. The lubrication results are obtained by analytically solving the Stokes equation and a two-dimensional (integrated over the thickness) advection-diffusion equation. We use a lattice Boltzmann method with a double distribution (for mass and energy transport) on hypercubic and cubic ...

  8. Non-Thermal Radio Emission from Colliding Flows in Classical Nova V1723 Aql

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Jennifer H S; Metzger, Brian D; Zheng, Yong; Chomiuk, Laura; Krauss, Miriam I; Linford, Justin; Nelson, Thomas; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael P; Finzell, Tom; Mukai, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The importance of shocks in nova explosions has been highlighted by the recent discovery of \\gamma-ray producing novae by Fermi. We use over three years of multi-band radio observations of nova V1723 Aql with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to show that shocks between fast and slow flows within the ejecta led to the acceleration of particles and the production of synchrotron radiation. Approximately one month after the start of V1723 Aql's eruption in 2010 September, shocks in the ejecta produced an unexpected radio flare, ultimately resulting in a radio light curve with a multi-peaked structure. More than a year after the start of the eruption, the radio emission became consistent with emanating from an expanding thermal remnant with a mass of $2\\times10^{-4}$ M$_\\odot$ and a temperature of $10^4$ K. However, the brightness temperature of greater than $10^6$ K at low frequencies during the first two months was too high to be due to thermal emission from the small amount of X-ray producing shock-hea...

  9. Study of instabilities and quasi-two-dimensional turbulence in volumetrically heated magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    magnetohydrodynamic flows in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha, S. Smolentsev, M. Abdou, and R. Moreau Citation in a vertical rectangular duct N. Vetcha,1 S. Smolentsev,1,a) M. Abdou,1 and R. Moreau2 1 Mechanical 2013; published online 15 February 2013) We consider magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) rectangular duct flows

  10. Simulation of microtearing turbulence in national spherical torus experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenfelder, W.; Kaye, S. M.; Bell, R. E.; Hammett, G. W.; LeBlanc, B. P.; Mikkelsen, D. R.; Ren, Y.; Candy, J.; Nevins, W. M.; Wang, E.; Zhang, J.; Crocker, N. A.; Yuh, H.

    2012-05-15

    Thermal energy confinement times in National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) dimensionless parameter scans increase with decreasing collisionality. While ion thermal transport is neoclassical, the source of anomalous electron thermal transport in these discharges remains unclear, leading to considerable uncertainty when extrapolating to future spherical tokamak (ST) devices at much lower collisionality. Linear gyrokinetic simulations find microtearing modes to be unstable in high collisionality discharges. First non-linear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing turbulence in NSTX show they can yield experimental levels of transport. Magnetic flutter is responsible for almost all the transport ({approx}98%), perturbed field line trajectories are globally stochastic, and a test particle stochastic transport model agrees to within 25% of the simulated transport. Most significantly, microtearing transport is predicted to increase with electron collisionality, consistent with the observed NSTX confinement scaling. While this suggests microtearing modes may be the source of electron thermal transport, the predictions are also very sensitive to electron temperature gradient, indicating the scaling of the instability threshold is important. In addition, microtearing turbulence is susceptible to suppression via sheared E Multiplication-Sign B flows as experimental values of E Multiplication-Sign B shear (comparable to the linear growth rates) dramatically reduce the transport below experimental values. Refinements in numerical resolution and physics model assumptions are expected to minimize the apparent discrepancy. In cases where the predicted transport is strong, calculations suggest that a proposed polarimetry diagnostic may be sensitive to the magnetic perturbations associated with the unique structure of microtearing turbulence.

  11. Convex-Based Thermal Management for 3D MPSoCs Using DVFS and Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Micheli, Giovanni

    Convex-Based Thermal Management for 3D MPSoCs Using DVFS and Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling Francesco multi-processors system on chip (MPSoCs) using microfluidic cooling. The controller uses dynamic volt consumption+cooling power consumption). Our experimental results illustrate that our policy satis- fies

  12. Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part I. Effects of the Heat Flux Distribution.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pilon, Laurent

    Three-Dimensional Flow and Thermal Structures in Glass Melting Furnaces. Part I. Effects in the molten glass bath of a typical glass melting furnace with a throat but without air bubblers or electric constant. The main purpose of the work is to evaluate the capability of the furnace operators to control

  13. A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doughty, Christine

    2013-01-01

    R.R. and Harris, W.B. , "Thermal storage of cold water inand Warman, J.c. , "Thermal energy storage in a confinedProceedings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop,

  14. Polymer Stretching by Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chertkov, Michael

    2000-05-15

    The stretching of a polymer chain by a large-scale chaotic flow is considered. The steady state which emerges as a balance of the turbulent stretching and anharmonic resistance of the chain is quantitatively described, i.e., the dependency on the flow parameters (Lyapunov exponent statistics) and the chain characteristics (the number of beads and the interbead elastic potential) is made explicit. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  15. Turbulent electron transport in edge pedestal by electron temperature gradient turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, R.; Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat Gandhinagar, Gujarat 2382 428 ; Jhang, Hogun; Diamond, P. H.; CMTFO and CASS, University of California, San Diego 92093-0424, California

    2013-11-15

    We present a model for turbulent electron thermal transport at the edge pedestal in high (H)-mode plasmas based on electron temperature gradient (ETG) turbulence. A quasi-linear analysis of electrostatic toroidal ETG modes shows that both turbulent electron thermal diffusivity and hyper-resistivity exhibits the Ohkawa scaling in which the radial correlation length of turbulence becomes the order of electron skin depth. Combination of the Ohkawa scales and the plasma current dependence results in a novel confinement scaling inside the pedestal region. It is also shown that ETG turbulence induces a thermoelectric pinch, which may accelerate the density pedestal formation.

  16. 19.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/55 5. Low temperatures,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ;19.11.2014 Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 5/55 Stirling cycle, Stirling engine Heat is temporarily stored in the regenerator, going from temperature TH to TL during step) Picture: S90 Stirling gas refrigerator (Philips) 19.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering

  17. 9.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/44 3. Absorption, gas expansion and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    (AR) processes 1: NH3 #12;9.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8 energy, solar energy, biogas fuel, etc. Absorption refrigeration involves absorption of refrigerant Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 7/44 A practical NH3/H2O AR system

  18. Cumulant expansions for atmospheric flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ait-Chaalal, Farid; Meyer, Bettina; Marston, J B

    2015-01-01

    The equations governing atmospheric flows are nonlinear, and consequently the hierarchy of cumulant equations is not closed. But because atmospheric flows are inhomogeneous and anisotropic, the nonlinearity may manifests itself only weakly through interactions of mean fields with disturbances such as thermals or eddies. In such situations, truncations of the hierarchy of cumulant equations hold promise as a closure strategy. We review how truncations at second order can be used to model and elucidate the dynamics of turbulent atmospheric flows. Two examples are considered. First, we study the growth of a dry convective boundary layer, which is heated from below, leading to turbulent upward energy transport and growth of the boundary layer. We demonstrate that a quasilinear truncation of the equations of motion, in which interactions of disturbances among each other are neglected but interactions with mean fields are taken into account, can successfully capture the growth of the convective boundary layer. Seco...

  19. Multi-Scale Experiments in Turbulent Subcooled Boiling Flow Through a Square Channel with a Single Heated Wall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estrada Perez, Carlos Eduardo

    2014-12-12

    flow through a square channel. The explored visualization techniques were: 1) Particle tracking velocimetry (PTV), which provides velocity measurements of the liquid phase, 2) High-speed shadowgraphy (HSS) which is used to study the dispersed phase...

  20. Experimental analysis of the vorticity and turbulent flow dynamics of a pitching airfoil at realistic flight (helicopter) conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Dipankar

    2008-10-10

    Improved basic understanding, predictability, and controllability of vortex-dominated and unsteady aerodynamic flows are important in enhancement of the performance of next generation helicopters. The primary objective of this research project...

  1. Toward Understanding and Modeling Compressibility Effects on Velocity Gradients in Turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suman, Sawan

    2011-02-22

    Development of improved turbulence closure models for compressible fluid flow simulations requires better understanding of the effects of compressibility on various underlying processes of turbulence. Fundamental studies of turbulent velocity...

  2. Transport of a passive scalar at a shear-free boundary in fully developed turbulent open channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saylor, John R.

    of surface shear. A model of surface renewal based on the existence of two disparate time scales a fast was maintained at constant temperature and 2 the interfacial flux was fixed. These cases can be considered models manner. The model appears successful in explaining, in a qualitative sense, the surface thermal structure

  3. 2015 UTSR Poster Presentations Prediction of Auto-Ignition Regimes in Turbulent Reacting Flows with Thermal Inhomogeneities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-InspiredAtmosphericdevicesPPONeApril 30,

  4. An analytical oscillating-flow thermal analysis of the heat exchangers and regenerator in Stirling machines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monte, F. de; Galli, G.; Marcotullio, F.

    1996-12-31

    A closed form-expression for the effectiveness of the heat exchangers and regenerator of a Stirling cycle machine is given. This result may be used in a simple way in order to evaluate their effect on the machine performance. The proposed method, indeed, allows the actual cycle gas temperatures in the heater and cooler to be obtained readily, once the geometry of the heater, cooler and regenerator is known and some quantities characterizing the engine dynamics (strokes, frequency and phase angle of the moving elements) and its heat-exchange processes (inlet temperatures of the heating and cooling fluids, and their volumetric flow rates) are measured. Thus, an immediate indication about the effectiveness of the heat exchangers and regenerator as well as about the machine thermal efficiency may be obtained. The availability of a closed-form expression for the heater, regenerator and cooler effectiveness is useful especially for those engines, like the free-piston Stirling engines, whose design requires the application of analytically based optimization criteria.

  5. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Turbulent flame speed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Direct numerical simulations of the interaction of a premixed flame with driven, subsonic, homogeneous, isotropic, Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system are used to study the mechanisms determining the turbulent flame speed, S{sub T}, in the thin reaction zone regime. High intensity turbulence is considered with the r.m.s. velocity 35 times the laminar flame speed, S{sub L}, resulting in the Damkoehler number Da=0.05. The simulations were performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive-flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model, based on the one-step Arrhenius kinetics, represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture under the assumption of the Lewis number Le=1. Global properties and the internal structure of the flame were analyzed in an earlier paper, which showed that this system represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. This paper demonstrates that: (1) The flame brush has a complex internal structure, in which the isosurfaces of higher fuel mass fractions are folded on progressively smaller scales. (2) Global properties of the turbulent flame are best represented by the structure of the region of peak reaction rate, which defines the flame surface. (3) In the thin reaction zone regime, S{sub T} is predominantly determined by the increase of the flame surface area, A{sub T}, caused by turbulence. (4) The observed increase of S{sub T} relative to S{sub L} exceeds the corresponding increase of A{sub T} relative to the surface area of the planar laminar flame, on average, by {approx}14%, varying from only a few percent to as high as {approx}30%. (5) This exaggerated response is the result of tight flame packing by turbulence, which causes frequent flame collisions and formation of regions of high flame curvature >or similar 1/{delta}{sub L}, or ''cusps,'' where {delta}{sub L} is the thermal width of the laminar flame. (6) The local flame speed in the cusps substantially exceeds its laminar value, which results in a disproportionately large contribution of cusps to S{sub T} compared with the flame surface area in them. (7) A criterion is established for transition to the regime significantly influenced by cusp formation. In particular, at Karlovitz numbers Ka >or similar 20, flame collisions provide an important mechanism controlling S{sub T}, in addition to the increase of A{sub T} by large-scale motions and the potential enhancement of diffusive transport by small-scale turbulence. (author)

  6. Small-Scale Forcing of a Turbulent Boundary Layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorkowski, Thomas

    In order to understand the effect of small scale forcing on turbulent flows and its implications on control, an experimental investigation is made into the forcing of the inertial scales in the wall region of a turbulent ...

  7. Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

    2013-09-01

    In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs program’s VUQ Focus Area.

  8. Bacteria in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

  9. Pressure atomizer having multiple orifices and turbulent generation feature

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanBrocklin, Paul G. (Pittsford, NY); Geiger, Gail E. (Caledonia, NY); Moran, Donald James (Rochester, NY); Fournier, Stephane (Rochester, NY)

    2002-01-01

    A pressure atomizer includes a silicon plate having a top surface and a bottom surface. A portion of the top surface defines a turbulent chamber. The turbulent chamber is peripherally bounded by the top surface of the plate. The turbulent chamber is recessed a predetermined depth relative to the top surface. The silicon plate further defines at least one flow orifice. Each flow orifice extends from the bottom surface of the silicon plate to intersect with and open into the turbulent chamber. Each flow orifice is in fluid communication with the turbulent chamber.

  10. 23.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/28 6. Food cooling and freezing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of food gives important alternatives for other food preservation methods like drying, salting, smoking23.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/28 6. Food Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/28 6.1 Thermal properties of foods #12;23.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ

  11. Can we characterize turbulence in premixed flames?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipatnikov, A.N. [Department of Applied Mechanics, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, 412 96 (Sweden)

    2009-06-15

    Modeling of premixed turbulent combustion involves averaging reaction rates in turbulent flows. The focus of most approaches to resolving this problem has been placed on determining the dependence of the mean rate w of product creation on the laminar flame speed S{sub L}, the rms turbulence velocity u', etc. The goal of the present work is to draw attention to another issue: May the input quantity u{sup '} for a model of w= w(u'/S{sub L},..) be considered to be known? The point is that heat release substantially affects turbulence and, hence, turbulence characteristics in premixed flames should be modeled. However, standard moment methods for numerically simulating turbulent flows do not allow us to evaluate the true turbulence characteristics in a flame. For instance, the Reynolds stresses in premixed flames are affected not only by turbulence itself, but also by velocity jump across flamelets. A common way to resolving this problem consists of considering the Reynolds stresses conditioned on unburned (or burned) mixture to be the true turbulence characteristics. In the present paper, this widely accepted but never proved hypothesis is put into question, first, by considering simple model constant-density problems (flame motion in an oscillating one-dimensional laminar flow; flame stabilized in a periodic shear, one-dimensional, laminar flow; turbulent mixing). In all the cases, the magnitude of velocity fluctuations, calculated using the conditioned Reynolds stresses, is affected by the intermittency of reactants and products and, hence, is not the true rms velocity. Second, the above claim is further supported by comparing balance equations for the mean and conditioned Reynolds stresses. The conditioned Reynolds stresses do not characterize the true turbulence in flames, because conditional averaging cuts off flow regions characterized by either high or low velocities. (author)

  12. TURBULENT-LAMINAR PATTERNS IN PLANE COUETTE Dwight Barkley

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barkley, Dwight

    @limsi.fr Abstract Regular patterns of turbulent and laminar fluid motion arise in plane Couette flow near the lowest and is the kinematic viscosity of the fluid. See figure 1. For all val- ues of ¡£¢ , laminar Couette flow at an angle to the streamwise direction. Fluid flows exhibiting coexisting turbulent and laminar regions have

  13. Preventing transition to turbulence using streamwise traveling waves: theoretical analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jovanovic, Mihailo

    . INTRODUCTION Fluid motion is usually classified as either laminar or turbulent; flows that are smooth force on a vehicle moving through a fluid in the laminar regime. Sensorless flow control represents and ordered (laminar) may become complex and disordered (turbulent) as the flow strength increases

  14. Skin friction and pressure: the "footprints" of turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protas, Bartosz

    been a flurry of activity in controlling both laminar and turbulent flows in certain idealized settings, and to begin to shed light on how to control fluid flow in practical engineering applications with modelSkin friction and pressure: the "footprints" of turbulence Thomas R. Bewley and Bartosz Protas Flow

  15. 12.11.2014bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 4. Refrigeration process comparison;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    12.11.2014Åbo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 4 Engineering Laboratory / Värme- och strömningsteknik tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi Kylteknik ("KYL and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 2/32 4.1 Refrigeration process comparison #12;12.11.2014Åbo

  16. Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion N. Peters RWTH Aachen Ercoftac Summer School in Combustion Systems 1 Lecture 2: Calculation of Adiabatic Flame Temperatures and Chemical Equilibria 20: Laminar Diffusion Flames: Different Flow Geometries 156 Lecture 11: Turbulent Combustion: Introduction

  17. Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forslund, Robert Paul

    1966-01-01

    The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

  18. Probing the two temperature paradigm for advection dominated accretion flow: test for the component thermalization time-scale passed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Tsiklauri

    1999-01-15

    We report here on a calculation of thermalization time-scale of the two temperature advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model. It is established that time required to equalize the electron and ion temperatures via electron-ion collisions in the ADAF with plausible physical parameters greatly exceeds age of the Universe, which corroborates validity one of the crucial assumptions of the ADAF model, namely the existence of a hot two temperature plasma. This work is motivated by the recent success (Mahadevan 1998a,b) of ADAF model in explaining the emitted spectrum of Sgr A*.

  19. Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

    2000-04-01

    Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

  20. Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Eugene Fiume 0

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Turbulent Wind Fields for Gaseous Phenomena Jos Stam Eugene Fiume 0 Department of Computer Science of smoke, steam, mist and water re­ acting to a turbulent field such as wind is an attractive, and realistic illumina­ tion. We present a model for turbulent wind flow having a deterministic component

  1. Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

    2006-04-01

    The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

  2. Numerical Methods for Incompressible Viscous Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Pascal

    . The simplest viscous flow problems involve just one fluid in the laminar regime. The governing equations in nature and technological devices are turbulent. The tran- sition from laminar to turbulent flow phenomena, laminar or turbulent viscous flow is coupled with other processes, such as heat tra

  3. Selected problems in turbulence theory and modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Eun-Hwan

    2004-09-30

    pressure-strain correlation is investigated and constraining criteria for the rapid pressure-strain correlation models are developed. In the last topic, "unsteady computation of turbulent flow past a square cylinder using partially-averaged Navier...

  4. Culture of selected organisms in recirculating and flow-through systems using thermal effluent 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berry, Terri Layne

    1978-01-01

    lower in the recircula- ting svst m than in the flow-through system. Decrease in mear length was probably the result of the death of a large oystez rather than an actual decrease in shell length. The meat of oysters opened at the termination... for all species and condition, food conversion and percent efficiency of feed utilization of fish were computed at each sampling period. Polyculture of oysters with fish in the flow- through system did not adversely affect growth or survival...

  5. Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    Chapter 9 Turbulent Jets SUMMARY: This chapter is concerned with turbulent jets, namely their overall shape and velocity structure. The first jets being considered are those penetrating in homogeneous terminology. Continuous Intermittent injection injection Momentum only Jet Puff Buoyancy only Plume Thermal

  6. Large eddy simulation of atmospheric boundary layer flow in urban terrain : implications for transport of pollution and heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Long

    2011-01-01

    pollution. In this research numerical methods are used to investigate some basic turbulent and thermal

  7. Pediatric Mechanical Circulatory Support Thermal Analysis of the PediaFlow Pediatric Ventricular

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paden, Brad

    bearing components. Another main objective is to identify "hot spots" within the pump and ensure transfer equations with thermal finite element analysis (FEA). The models assume three main sources of waste heat gen- eration: copper motor windings, active magnetic thrust bearing windings, and eddy

  8. Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

    2004-03-26

    Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

  9. Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Project objective: A New Geothermal Well Imaging Tool. 1.To develop a robust and easily deployable DTPS for monitoring in geothermal wells; and 2. Develop the associated analysis methodology for flow imaging; and?when possible by wellbore conditions?to determine in situthermal conductivity and basal heat flux.

  10. J. of Thermal Science Vol.7, No.1 Computational Studies of Lobed Forced Mixer Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    and Fluids Engineering Division School of Mechanical and Production Engineering, Nanyang Technological of the mixer. Based on flow visualization tests in a water tunnel, Werle, Paterson and Presz [5] suggested of the mixer trail- ing edge is mainly due to the deformation of the nor- mal vortex into a pinched

  11. Vrme-och strmningsteknik Thermal and Flow Engineering Processteknikens grunder (PTG) 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    such that in 1 second the pressure is reduced to ambient 0.1 MPa, = 100 kPa. The volume of the tire is constant: värmegenomgångstal U (W/(m2 ·K)) beror inte på temperaturskillnaden T. 1104. In a simple, double-tube heat exchanger reversed, giving a parallel flow heat exchanger. Calculate the final temperature of the benzene. Note

  12. Lattice Boltzmann equation simulations of turbulence, mixing, and combustion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Huidan

    2006-04-12

    We explore the capability of lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method for complex fluid flows involving turbulence, mixing, and reaction. In the first study, LBE schemes for binary scalar mixing and multi-component reacting flow with reactions...

  13. Large-Scale Streamwise Turbulent Structures in Hypersonic Boundary Layers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    English, Benjamin L.

    2013-04-22

    Prior research in the field of boundary layer turbulence has identified streamwise-elongated large-scale turbulence structures in both low speed compressible and high speed (M=2.0) flow. No experimental work has been done in any flow of M> or =3...

  14. Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    of II ­ Numerical fluid dynamics 1. A tornado can be modelled as a steady, incompressible flow : rCv rCv v r x / / 2 1 0 where C1 and C2 are constants. a. Show that this model satisfies of time by vx(t) = Asin(1t + 1) + Bsin(2t + 2) + C a. Give the expression for the time-mean velocity b

  15. Anisotropic Formation of Magnetized Cores in Turbulent Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Che-Yu

    2015-01-01

    In giant molecular clouds (GMCs), shocks driven by converging turbulent flows create high-density, strongly-magnetized regions that are locally sheetlike. In previous work, we showed that within these layers, dense filaments and embedded self-gravitating cores form by gathering material along the magnetic field lines. Here, we extend the parameter space of our three-dimensional, turbulent MHD core formation simulations. We confirm the anisotropic core formation model we previously proposed, and quantify the dependence of median core properties on the pre-shock inflow velocity and upstream magnetic field strength. Our results suggest that bound core properties are set by the total dynamic pressure (dominated by large-scale turbulence) and thermal sound speed c_s in GMCs, independent of magnetic field strength. For models with Mach number between 5 and 20, the median core masses and radii are comparable to the critical Bonnor-Ebert mass and radius defined using the dynamic pressure for P_ext. Our results corres...

  16. Flow and Temperature Fields Generated by a Thermally Activated Interventional Vascular Device 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCurrin, Casey

    2012-10-19

    heat alone for actuation, intravascular devices that must retain their crimped configuration inside a catheter during tortuous vessel navigation require a higher Tg in order to overcome absorption effects of Tg depression [6] and prevent premature... a bell jar to remove all air bubbles in the liquid PDMS, the model was cured at 80°C for 1.5 - 2 hours. The mold yields a rectangular PDMS block of dimensions 3.82x3.82x20 cm and a steel rod spanning the full length creates the 6 mm diameter flow...

  17. An h-adaptive finite element method for turbulent heat transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carriington, David B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    A two-equation turbulence closure model (k-{omega}) using an h-adaptive grid technique and finite element method (FEM) has been developed to simulate low Mach flow and heat transfer. These flows are applicable to many flows in engineering and environmental sciences. Of particular interest in the engineering modeling areas are: combustion, solidification, and heat exchanger design. Flows for indoor air quality modeling and atmospheric pollution transport are typical types of environmental flows modeled with this method. The numerical method is based on a hybrid finite element model using an equal-order projection process. The model includes thermal and species transport, localized mesh refinement (h-adaptive) and Petrov-Galerkin weighting for the stabilizing the advection. This work develops the continuum model of a two-equation turbulence closure method. The fractional step solution method is stated along with the h-adaptive grid method (Carrington and Pepper, 2002). Solutions are presented for 2d flow over a backward-facing step.

  18. J. Fluid Mech. (2013), vol. 731, R1, doi:10.1017/jfm.2013.388 Turbulent spots in a channel: large-scale flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wesfreid, José Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    , but of an assemblage of small-scale longitudinal vortices, separated from laminar flow by sharp fronts. For reviews undisturbed stable laminar Poiseuille flow up to Re = 5772 (Orszag 1971), but experiments show transition, surrounded by laminar ones. The inhomogeneity of flow friction generates a coupling between

  19. Polymer dynamics in random flow with mean shear K. Turitsyn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fominov, Yakov

    Polymer dynamics in random flow with mean shear K. Turitsyn Landau Institute for theoretical;Outline · Motivation: Elastic turbulence · Experimental setup · Flow and polymer models · Results: 1. Angular statistics 2. Polymer elongation distribution · Conclusion #12;Elastic Turbulence Elastic

  20. Pipe Flow System Holly Guest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Pipe Flow System Design Holly Guest #12;Problem · An engineer is asked to compute the flow rate · Flow type: Turbulent or Laminar flow · Flow rate · Frictional head loss · Optimal diameters if a pump · = - ( . + . ) · f = friction factor · = relative roughness = · = Reynolds Number = · Laminar flow: 2000

  1. Shear Turbulence: Onset and Structure Fabian Waleffe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebovitz, Norman

    filament in laminar flow (a), and the rapid mixing of the dye and water when the Reynolds number is larger and reproduces the seminal experiments of Osborne Reynolds [24] on the transition from laminar to turbulent flow in a pipe, illustrated in Fig. 1. The 2011 Annual Review 1 #12;of Fluid Mechanics article by Tom Mullin [21

  2. Energy dissipation processes in solar wind turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y; Feng, X S; Xu, X J; Zhang, J; Sun, T R; Zuo, P B

    2015-01-01

    Turbulence is a chaotic flow regime filled by irregular flows. The dissipation of turbulence is a fundamental problem in the realm of physics. Theoretically, dissipation cannot be ultimately achieved without collisions, and so how turbulent kinetic energy is dissipated in the nearly collisionless solar wind is a challenging problem. Wave particle interactions and magnetic reconnection are two possible dissipation mechanisms, but which mechanism dominates is still a controversial topic. Here we analyze the dissipation region scaling around a solar wind magnetic reconnection region. We find that the magnetic reconnection region shows a unique multifractal scaling in the dissipation range, while the ambient solar wind turbulence reveals a monofractal dissipation process for most of the time. These results provide the first observational evidences for the intermittent multifractal dissipation region scaling around a magnetic reconnection site, and they also have significant implications for the fundamental energy...

  3. Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

    2006-01-01

    A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

  4. Application of an EASM model for turbulent convective heat transfer in ribbed duct

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saidi, A.; Sunden, B.

    1999-07-01

    A numerical investigation is performed to predict local and mean thermal-hydraulic characteristics in rib-roughened ducts. The Navier-Stokes and energy equations, and a low-Re number {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model are solved with two methods for determination of the Reynolds stresses, eddy viscosity model (EVM) and explicit algebraic stress model (EASM). The numerical solution procedure uses a collocated grid, and the pressure-velocity coupling is handled by the SIMPLEC algorithm. The assumption of fully developed periodic conditions is applied. The calculated mean and local heat transfer enhancement values are compared with experimental data and fairly good agreement on mean Nu numbers is achieved. The prediction capabilities of the two turbulence models (EVM and EASM) are discussed. Both models have similar ability to predict the mean Nusselt numbers but the EASM model is superior in description of the flow field structure.

  5. Mixed convection heat transfer to and from a horizontal cylinder in cross-flow with heating from below.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greif, Ralph (University of California, Berkeley, CA); Evans, Gregory Herbert; Kearney, Sean Patrick (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Laskowski, Gregory Michael

    2006-02-01

    Heat transfer to and from a circular cylinder in a cross-flow of water at low Reynolds number was studied both experimentally and numerically. The experiments were carried out in a high aspect ratio water channel. The test section inflow temperature and velocity, channel lower surface temperature and cylinder surface temperature were controlled to yield either laminar or turbulent flow for a desired Richardson number. When the lower surface was unheated, the temperatures of the lower surface and water upstream of the cylinder were maintained approximately equal and the flow was laminar. When the lower surface was heated, turbulence intensities as high as 20% were measured several cylinder diameters upstream of the cylinder due to turbulent thermal plumes produced by heating the lower surface. Variable property, two-dimensional simulations were undertaken using a variant of the u{sup 2}-f turbulence model with buoyancy production of turbulence accounted for by a simple gradient diffusion model. Predicted and measured heat flux distributions around the cylinder are compared for values of the Richardson number, Gr{sub d}/Re{sub d}{sup 2} from 0.3 to 9.3. For laminar flow, the predicted and measured heat flux results agreed to within the experimental uncertainty. When the lower surface was heated, and the flow was turbulent, there was qualitative agreement between predicted and measured heat flux distributions around the cylinder. However the predicted spatially averaged Nusselt number was from 37% to 53% larger than the measured spatially averaged Nusselt number. Additionally, spatially averaged Nusselt numbers are compared to correlations in the literature for mixed convection heat transfer to/from cylinders in cross-flow. The results presented here are larger than the correlation values. This is believed to be due to the effects of buoyancy-induced turbulence resulting from heating the lower surface and the proximity of the cylinder to that surface.

  6. Model turbulent floods with the Smagorinski large eddy closure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. J. Roberts; D. J. Georgiev; D. V. Strunin

    2008-05-21

    Floods, tides and tsunamis are turbulent, yet conventional models are based upon depth averaging inviscid irrotational flow equations. We propose to change the base of such modelling to the Smagorinksi large eddy closure for turbulence in order to appropriately match the underlying fluid dynamics. Our approach allows for large changes in fluid depth to cater for extreme inundations. The key to the analysis underlying the approach is to choose surface and bed boundary conditions that accommodate a constant turbulent shear as a nearly neutral mode. Analysis supported by slow manifold theory then constructs a model for the coupled dynamics of the fluid depth and the mean turbulent lateral velocity. The model resolves the internal turbulent shear in the flow and thus may be used in further work to rationally predict erosion and transport in turbulent floods.

  7. Vortices within vortices: hierarchical nature of vortex tubes in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Kai; Westermann, Rüdiger; Werner, Suzanne; Lalescu, Cristian C; Szalay, Alexander; Meneveau, Charles; Eyink, Gregory L

    2012-01-01

    The JHU turbulence database [1] can be used with a state of the art visualisation tool [2] to generate high quality fluid dynamics videos. In this work we investigate the classical idea that smaller structures in turbulent flows, while engaged in their own internal dynamics, are advected by the larger structures. They are not advected undistorted, however. We see instead that the small scale structures are sheared and twisted by the larger scales. This illuminates the basic mechanisms of the turbulent cascade.

  8. Effect of argon gas flow rate on properties of film electrodes prepared by thermal vacuum evaporation from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabli, Nordin; Talib, Zainal Abidin; Yunus, Wan Mahmood Mat [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia); Zainal, Zulkarnain [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia); Hilal, Hikmat S. [SSERL, Department of Chemistry An-Najah N. University, PO Box 7, Nablus, West Bank (Country Unknown); Fujii, Masatoshi [Department of Molecular Science, School of Medicine, Shimane University, Izumo, Shimane, 693-8501 (Japan)

    2014-03-05

    This work describes a new technique to enhance photoresponse of metal chalcogenide-based semiconductor film electrodes deposited by thermal vacuum evaporation under argon gas flow from synthesized Cu{sub 2}SnSe{sub 3} sources. SnSe formation with Cu-doped was obtained under higher argon gas flow rate (V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min). Higher value of photoresponse was observed for films deposited under V{sub A} = 25 cm{sup 3}/min which was 9.1%. This finding indicates that Cu atoms inside the SnSe film were important to increase carrier concentrations that promote higher photoresponse.

  9. Large Eddy Simulation of Stable Boundary Layer Turbulent Processes in Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric D. Skyllingstad

    2005-01-26

    Research was performed using a turbulence boundary layer model to study the behavior of cold, dense flows in regions of complex terrain. Results show that flows develop a balance between turbulent entrainment of warm ambient air and dense, cold air created by surface cooling. Flow depth and strength is a function of downslope distance, slope angle and angle changes, and the ambient air temperature.

  10. Aspects of wave turbulence in preheating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crespo, José A.; De Oliveira, H.P., E-mail: jaacrespo@gmail.com, E-mail: oliveira@dft.if.uerj.br [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Instituto de Física - Departamento de Física Teórica, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 20550-013 Brazil. (Brazil)

    2014-06-01

    In this work we have studied the nonlinear preheating dynamics of several inflationary models. It is well established that after a linear stage of preheating characterized by the parametric resonance, the nonlinear dynamics becomes relevant driving the system towards turbulence. Wave turbulence is the appropriated description of this phase since the matter contents are fields instead of usual fluids. Turbulence develops due to the nonlinear interations of waves, here represented by the small inhomogeneities of the scalar fields. We present relevant aspects of wave turbulence such as the Kolmogorov-Zakharov spectrum in frequency and wave number that indicates the energy transfer through scales. From the power spectrum of the matter energy density we were able to estimate the temperature of the thermalized system.

  11. Center for Turbulence Research Annual Research Briefs 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prinz, Friedrich B.

    in a supersonic turbulent crossflow By S. Kawai AND S. K. Lele 1. Motivation and objectives Important recent load, etc. Jet mixing in a supersonic crossflow (JISC) is a type of flow where compressible LES can, the enhancement of supersonic turbulent mixing of jet fuel and crossflow air is a critical issue in developing

  12. Growth of Cloud Droplets in a Turbulent Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Lian-Ping

    Growth of Cloud Droplets in a Turbulent Environment Wojciech W. Grabowski1 and Lian-Ping Wang2 1 Keywords condensational growth, turbulent collision-coalescence, particle-laden flow, cloud microphysical concerning the growth of cloud droplets by water-vapor diffu- sion and by collision

  13. Reaction and diffusion in turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pope, S.B. [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The motivation for this project is the need to obtain a better quantitative understanding of the technologically-important phenomenon of turbulent combustion. In nearly all applications in which fuel is burned-for example, fossil-fuel power plants, furnaces, gas-turbines and internal-combustion engines-the combustion takes place in a turbulent flow. Designers continually demand more quantitative information about this phenomenon-in the form of turbulent combustion models-so that they can design equipment with increased efficiency and decreased environmental impact. For some time the PI has been developing a class of turbulent combustion models known as PDF methods. These methods have the important virtue that both convection and reaction can be treated without turbulence-modelling assumptions. However, a mixing model is required to account for the effects of molecular diffusion. Currently, the available mixing models are known to have some significant defects. The major motivation of the project is to seek a better understanding of molecular diffusion in turbulent reactive flows, and hence to develop a better mixing model.

  14. Meso-scale turbulence in living fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henricus H. Wensink; Jörn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Raymond E. Goldstein; Hartmut Löwen; Julia M. Yeomans

    2012-08-21

    Turbulence is ubiquitous, from oceanic currents to small-scale biological and quantum systems. Self-sustained turbulent motion in microbial suspensions presents an intriguing example of collective dynamical behavior amongst the simplest forms of life, and is important for fluid mixing and molecular transport on the microscale. The mathematical characterization of turbulence phenomena in active non-equilibrium fluids proves even more difficult than for conventional liquids or gases. It is not known which features of turbulent phases in living matter are universal or system-specific, or which generalizations of the Navier-Stokes equations are able to describe them adequately. Here, we combine experiments, particle simulations, and continuum theory to identify the statistical properties of self-sustained meso-scale turbulence in active systems. To study how dimensionality and boundary conditions affect collective bacterial dynamics, we measured energy spectra and structure functions in dense Bacillus subtilis suspensions in quasi-2D and 3D geometries. Our experimental results for the bacterial flow statistics agree well with predictions from a minimal model for self-propelled rods, suggesting that at high concentrations the collective motion of the bacteria is dominated by short-range interactions. To provide a basis for future theoretical studies, we propose a minimal continuum model for incompressible bacterial flow. A detailed numerical analysis of the 2D case shows that this theory can reproduce many of the experimentally observed features of self-sustained active turbulence.

  15. On Proton Energization in Accretion Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Blackman

    1998-08-03

    Two-temperature advection dominated accretion flow (ADAF) or hot ion tori (HIT) models help explain low luminosity stellar and galactic accreting sources and may complement observational support for black holes in nature. But low radiative efficiencies demand that ions receive a fraction $\\eta \\gsim 99%$ of energy dissipated in the turbulent accretion. The $\\eta$ depends on the ratio of particle to magnetic pressure. If compressive modes of dissipation, like magnetic mirroring, dominate incompressible modes, then even when the pressure ratio is O(1), the required large $\\eta$ can be attained. However the relative importance of compressive vs. incompressible modes is hard to estimate. The larger up in the turbulent cascade, the more compressible the turbulence. The relevant length scale for particle energization can be determined by equating the dominant eddy turnover time to the time for which an energy equal to that in the turbulence can be drained. Based on the large scales resulting from this estimate, it is suggested that compressive mirroring may be important. Also, regardless of the precise $\\eta$ or dissipation mechanism, non-thermal protons seem natural in two- temperature discs because all dissipation mechanisms, and the use of an isotopic pressure, require wave-particle resonances that operate only on a subset of the particles. Finally, it is briefly mentioned how mirroring may help to generate an ADAF or HIT in the first place.

  16. Dependence of heat transport on the strength and shear rate of prescribed circulating flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily S. C. Ching; K. M. Pang

    2001-11-28

    We study numerically the dependence of heat transport on the maximum velocity and shear rate of physical circulating flows, which are prescribed to have the key characteristics of the large-scale mean flow observed in turbulent convection. When the side-boundary thermal layer is thinner than the viscous boundary layer, the Nusselt number (Nu), which measures the heat transport, scales with the normalized shear rate to an exponent 1/3. On the other hand, when the side-boundary thermal layer is thicker, the dependence of Nu on the Peclet number, which measures the maximum velocity, or the normalized shear rate when the viscous boundary layer thickness is fixed, is generally not a power law. Scaling behavior is obtained only in an asymptotic regime. The relevance of our results to the problem of heat transport in turbulent convection is also discussed.

  17. Inhomogeneous distribution of droplets in cloud turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Itzhak Fouxon; Yongnam Park; Roei Harduf; Changhoon Lee

    2014-10-30

    We solve the problem of spatial distribution of inertial particles that sediment in turbulent flow with small ratio of acceleration of fluid particles to acceleration of gravity $g$. The particles are driven by linear drag and have arbitrary inertia. The pair-correlation function of concentration obeys a power-law in distance with negative exponent. Divergence at zero signifies singular distribution of particles in space. Independently of particle size the exponent is ratio of integral of energy spectrum of turbulence times the wavenumber to $g$ times numerical factor. We find Lyapunov exponents and confirm predictions by direct numerical simulations of Navier-Stokes turbulence. The predictions include typical case of water droplets in clouds. This significant progress in the study of turbulent transport is possible because strong gravity makes the particle's velocity at a given point unique.

  18. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in annuli: effect of heat flux ratio.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Direct numerical simulation of turbulent heat transfer in annuli: effect of heat flux ratio. M-la-Vall´ee cedex 2, France (Dated: October 23, 2008) Abstract Fully developed turbulent flow and heat transfer square (rms) of temperature fluctuations, turbulent heat fluxes, heat transfer, ...). To validate

  19. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Energy can be saved and thermal pollution reduced if a totalnatural flow, and thermal pollution caused by simultaneousStored Heat Energy and Thermal Pollution Daily stored heat

  20. Quantum Gravity and Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vishnu Jejjala; Djordje Minic; Y. Jack Ng; Chia-Hsiung Tze

    2010-05-18

    We apply recent advances in quantum gravity to the problem of turbulence. Adopting the AdS/CFT approach we propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. In the gravitational context, turbulence is intimately related to the properties of spacetime, or quantum, foam.

  1. Charecterization of inertial and pressure effects in homogeneous turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bikkani, Ravi Kiran

    2005-11-01

    and anisotropy components and invariants are examined. In the second part of the thesis, the velocity gradient dynamics in turbulent flows are studied with the help of inviscid 3D Burgers equations and restricted Euler equations. The analytical asymptotic...

  2. Turbulent drag reduction by constant near-wall forcing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JIN XU, SUCHUAN DONG, MARTIN R. MAXEY and GEORGE E. KARNIADAKIS

    2007-06-07

    This transition of the shear layer is correlated with a Reynolds number ... The quest for 'taming' turbulence with the objective of reducing the skin friction on ...... in principle, extracts kinetic energy from the flow and the positive forcing further.

  3. A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2005-01-01

    Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

  4. The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

  5. Uncovering the Lagrangian Skeleton of Turbulence Manikandan Mathur,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -periodic laminar fluid flow mimic the complicated tangles predicted by numerical studies of chaotic advection on fluid mixing by their special stability properties [4­7]. For time-periodic lami- nar flow models, LCS of laminar chaotic tangles in a turbulent flow. Experiment and data processing.--Our experiments

  6. Spatial Distribution of -Crystals in Metallocene-Made Isotactic Polypropylene Crystallized under Combined Thermal and Flow Fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Y.; Pan, J; Mao, Y; Li, Z; Li, L; Hsiao, B

    2010-01-01

    The present Article reports the relationships between molecular orientation, formation, and spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystals in metallocene-made isotactic polypropylene (m-iPP) samples prepared by two industrial processes: conventional injection molding (CIM) and oscillatory shear injection molding (OSIM), in which combined thermal and flow fields typically exist. In particular, spatial distributions of crystallinity, fraction of {gamma}-crystal (f{gamma}) with respect to {alpha}-crystal, and lamella-branched shish-kebab structure in the shaped samples were characterized by synchrotron two-dimensional (2D) wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The results showed that the crystallinity in any given region of OSIM samples was always higher than that of CIM samples. The value of f{gamma} increased monotonously from skin to core in CIM samples, whereas the corresponding f{gamma} increased nonmonotonically in OSIM samples. The spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystal in OSIM samples can be explained by the epitaxial arrangement between {gamma}- and {alpha}-crystal in a lamella-branched shish-kebab structure. In the proposed model, the parent lamellae of {alpha}-crystal provide secondary nucleation sites for daughter lamellae of {alpha}-crystal and {gamma}-crystal, and the different content of parent lamellae results in varying amounts of {gamma}-crystal. In OSIM samples, the smallest parent-daughter ratio ([R] = 1.38) in the core region led to the lowest fraction of {gamma}-crystal (0.57), but relatively higher {gamma}-crystal content (0.69) at 600 and 1200 {micro}m depth of the samples (corresponding to [R] of 4.5 and 5.8, respectively). This is consistent with the proposed model where more parent lamellae provide more nucleation sites for crystallization, thus resulting in higher content of {gamma}-crystal. The melting behavior of CIM and OSIM samples was studied by differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). The observed double-melting peaks could be explained by the melting of {gamma}- and {alpha}-crystal of the shaped samples. The f{gamma} distribution calculated from the relative areas of the peaks in the DSC scans was also consistent with the WAXD results.

  7. The deterministic chaos and random noise in turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao, Tian-Liang; Liu, Hai-Feng Xu, Jian-Liang; Li, Wei-Feng

    2014-06-01

    A turbulent flow is usually treated as a superposition of coherent structure and incoherent turbulence. In this paper, the largest Lyapunov exponent and the random noise in the near field of round jet and plane jet are estimated with our previously proposed method of chaotic time series analysis [T. L. Yao, et al., Chaos 22, 033102 (2012)]. The results show that the largest Lyapunov exponents of the round jet and plane jet are in direct proportion to the reciprocal of the integral time scale of turbulence, which is in accordance with the results of the dimensional analysis, and the proportionality coefficients are equal. In addition, the random noise of the round jet and plane jet has the same linear relation with the Kolmogorov velocity scale of turbulence. As a result, the random noise may well be from the incoherent disturbance in turbulence, and the coherent structure in turbulence may well follow the rule of chaotic motion.

  8. Hindered energy cascade in highly helical isotropic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stepanov, Rodion; Frick, Peter; Shestakov, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The conventional approach to the turbulent energy cascade, based on Richardson-Kolmogorov phenomenology, ignores the topology of emerging vortices, which is related to the helicity of the turbulent flow. It is generally believed that helicity can play a significant role in turbulent systems, e.g., supporting the generation of large-scale magnetic fields, but its impact on the energy cascade to small scales has never been observed. We suggest for the first time a generalized phenomenology for isotropic turbulence with an arbitrary spectral distribution of the helicity. We discuss various scenarios of direct turbulent cascades with new helicity effect, which can be interpreted as a hindering of the spectral energy transfer. Therefore the energy is accumulated and redistributed so that the efficiency of non-linear interactions will be sufficient to provide a constant energy flux. We confirm our phenomenology by high Reynolds number numerical simulations based on a shell model of helical turbulence. The energy in...

  9. Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Lazarian

    2007-07-05

    We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbulence is the most important agent for heat transfer. We also show that the domain of applicability of the subdiffusion concept is rather limited.

  10. Orientation of eddy fluxes in geostrophic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nadiga, Balasubramanya T. "Balu"

    of potential vorticity (PV) in geostrophic turbulence. We take two different points of view, a classical of the eddy flux of PV with the appropriate mean gradient or the large-scale gradient of PV is required-temporal characteristics of the flow. One way to improve on this is to adopt unsteady RA. In this case, averages

  11. A Fresh Approach to Turbulence towards Reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    impact on energy consumption and CO2 emissions in the transport sector, particularly commercial aviation in a variety of systems relevant to stable isotope analysis, including CO2 , N2 O, and methane. We leverage. Theoretical interests aside, flow turbulence has numerous practical implications in the real world, making its

  12. Gyrokinetic Particle Simulation of Turbulent Transport in Burning Plasmas (GPS - TTBP) Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chame, Jacqueline

    2011-05-27

    The goal of this project is the development of the Gyrokinetic Toroidal Code (GTC) Framework and its applications to problems related to the physics of turbulence and turbulent transport in tokamaks,. The project involves physics studies, code development, noise effect mitigation, supporting computer science efforts, diagnostics and advanced visualizations, verification and validation. Its main scientific themes are mesoscale dynamics and non-locality effects on transport, the physics of secondary structures such as zonal flows, and strongly coherent wave-particle interaction phenomena at magnetic precession resonances. Special emphasis is placed on the implications of these themes for rho-star and current scalings and for the turbulent transport of momentum. GTC-TTBP also explores applications to electron thermal transport, particle transport; ITB formation and cross-cuts such as edge-core coupling, interaction of energetic particles with turbulence and neoclassical tearing mode trigger dynamics. Code development focuses on major initiatives in the development of full-f formulations and the capacity to simulate flux-driven transport. In addition to the full-f -formulation, the project includes the development of numerical collision models and methods for coarse graining in phase space. Verification is pursued by linear stability study comparisons with the FULL and HD7 codes and by benchmarking with the GKV, GYSELA and other gyrokinetic simulation codes. Validation of gyrokinetic models of ion and electron thermal transport is pursed by systematic stressing comparisons with fluctuation and transport data from the DIII-D and NSTX tokamaks. The physics and code development research programs are supported by complementary efforts in computer sciences, high performance computing, and data management.

  13. Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ICONE 15

    2007-04-01

    Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

  14. Physics of Intrinsic Rotation in Flux-Driven ITG Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ku, S; Dimond, P H; Dif-Pradalier, G; Kwon, J M; Sarazin, Y; Hahm, T S; Garbet, X; Chang, C S; Latu, G; Yoon, E S; Ghendrih, Ph; Yi, S; Strugarek, A; Solomon, W

    2012-02-23

    Global, heat flux-driven ITG gyrokinetic simulations which manifest the formation of macroscopic, mean toroidal flow profiles with peak thermal Mach number 0.05, are reported. Both a particle-in-cell (XGC1p) and a semi-Lagrangian (GYSELA) approach are utilized without a priori assumptions of scale-separation between turbulence and mean fields. Flux-driven ITG simulations with different edge flow boundary conditions show in both approaches the development of net unidirectional intrinsic rotation in the co-current direction. Intrinsic torque is shown to scale approximately linearly with the inverse scale length of the ion temperature gradient. External momentum input is shown to effectively cancel the intrinsic rotation profile, thus confirming the existence of a local residual stress and intrinsic torque. Fluctuation intensity, intrinsic torque and mean flow are demonstrated to develop inwards from the boundary. The measured correlations between residual stress and two fluctuation spectrum symmetry breakers, namely E x B shear and intensity gradient, are similar. Avalanches of (positive) heat flux, which propagate either outwards or inwards, are correlated with avalanches of (negative) parallel momentum flux, so that outward transport of heat and inward transport of parallel momentum are correlated and mediated by avalanches. The probability distribution functions of the outward heat flux and the inward momentum flux show strong structural similarity

  15. NO concentration imaging in turbulent nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schefer, R.W. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The importance of NO as a pollutant species is well known. An understanding of the formation characteristics of NO in turbulent hydrocarbon flames is important to both the desired reduction of pollutant emissions and the validation of proposed models for turbulent reacting flows. Of particular interest is the relationship between NO formation and the local flame zone, in which the fuel is oxidized and primary heat release occurs. Planar imaging of NO provides the multipoint statistics needed to relate NO formation to the both the flame zone and the local turbulence characteristics. Planar imaging of NO has been demonstrated in turbulent flames where NO was seeded into the flow at high concentrations (2000 ppm) to determine the gas temperature distribution. The NO concentrations in these experiments were significantly higher than those expected in typical hydrocarbon-air flames, which require a much lower detectability limit for NO measurements. An imaging technique based on laser-induced fluorescence with sufficient sensitivity to study the NO formation mechanism in the stabilization region of turbulent lifted-jet methane flames.

  16. SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2013-01-01

    understanding of thermal stratification dispersion, andBuoyancy Flow and Thermal Stratification Problems." Lawrence

  17. Liquid Salts as Media for Process Heat Transfer from VHTR's: Forced Convective Channel Flow Thermal Hydraulics, Materials, and Coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sridharan, Kumar; Anderson, Mark; Allen, Todd; Corradini, Michael

    2012-01-30

    The goal of this NERI project was to perform research on high temperature fluoride and chloride molten salts towards the long-term goal of using these salts for transferring process heat from high temperature nuclear reactor to operation of hydrogen production and chemical plants. Specifically, the research focuses on corrosion of materials in molten salts, which continues to be one of the most significant challenges in molten salts systems. Based on the earlier work performed at ORNL on salt properties for heat transfer applications, a eutectic fluoride salt FLiNaK (46.5% LiF-11.5%NaF-42.0%KF, mol.%) and a eutectic chloride salt (32%MgCl2-68%KCl, mole %) were selected for this study. Several high temperature candidate Fe-Ni-Cr and Ni-Cr alloys: Hastelloy-N, Hastelloy-X, Haynes-230, Inconel-617, and Incoloy-800H, were exposed to molten FLiNaK with the goal of understanding corrosion mechanisms and ranking these alloys for their suitability for molten fluoride salt heat exchanger and thermal storage applications. The tests were performed at 850��������C for 500 h in sealed graphite crucibles under an argon cover gas. Corrosion was noted to occur predominantly from dealloying of Cr from the alloys, an effect that was particularly pronounced at the grain boundaries Alloy weight-loss due to molten fluoride salt exposure correlated with the initial Cr-content of the alloys, and was consistent with the Cr-content measured in the salts after corrosion tests. The alloys���¢�������� weight-loss was also found to correlate to the concentration of carbon present for the nominally 20% Cr containing alloys, due to the formation of chromium carbide phases at the grain boundaries. Experiments involving molten salt exposures of Incoloy-800H in Incoloy-800H crucibles under an argon cover gas showed a significantly lower corrosion for this alloy than when tested in a graphite crucible. Graphite significantly accelerated alloy corrosion due to the reduction of Cr from solution by graphite and formation on Cr-carbide on the graphite surface. Ni-electroplating dramatically reduced corrosion of alloys, although some diffusion of Fe and Cr were observed occur through the Ni plating. A pyrolytic carbon and SiC (PyC/SiC) CVD coating was also investigated and found to be effective in mitigating corrosion. The KCl-MgCl2 molten salt was less corrosive than FLiNaK fluoride salts for corrosion tests performed at 850oC. Cr dissolution in the molten chloride salt was still observed and consequently Ni-201 and Hastelloy N exhibited the least depth of attack. Grain-boundary engineering (GBE) of Incoloy 800H improved the corrosion resistance (as measured by weight loss and maximum depth of attack) by nearly 50% as compared to the as-received Incoloy 800H sample. Because Cr dissolution is an important mechanism of corrosion, molten salt electrochemistry experiments were initiated. These experiments were performed using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Using this technique, the reduction potential of Cr was determined against a Pt quasi-reference electrode as well as against a Ni(II)-Ni reference electrode in molten FLiNaK at 650 oC. The integrated current increased linearly with Cr-content in the salt, providing for a direct assessment of the Cr concentration in a given salt of unknown Cr concentration. To study heat transfer mechanisms in these molten salts over the forced and mixed convection regimes, a forced convective loop was constructed to measure heat transfer coefficients, friction factors and corrosion rates in different diameter tubes in a vertical up flow configuration in the laminar flow regime. Equipment and instrumentation for the forced convective loop was designed, constructed, and tested. These include a high temperature centrifugal pump, mass flow meter, and differential pressure sensing capabilities to an uncertainty of < 2 Pa. The heat transfer coefficient for the KCl-MgCl2 salt was measured in t

  18. Wind- and thermal-driven air flows and the buoyancy and advection effects on air exchange within urban environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magnusson, Sigurður Pétur

    2014-01-01

    Human exposure to air pollutants and thermal stress in urban areas are public health concerns. The year 2008 was the first year when more than half of the human population lived in urban areas. Studies of the urban air ...

  19. Effect of chemical reactions on decaying isotropic turbulence M. Pino Martin and Graham V. Candler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of chemical reactions on decaying isotropic turbulence M. Pino Marti´n and Graham V. Candler combustion flows, however the interaction between turbulent motion and the chemical reactions that occur. In hypersonic flows the dominant chemical reactions are the dissociation and recombination of nitrogen

  20. Computational aspects of astrophysical MHD and turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Axel Brandenburg

    2001-09-27

    The advantages of high-order finite difference scheme for astrophysical MHD and turbulence simulations are highlighted. A number of one-dimensional test cases are presented ranging from various shock tests to Parker-type wind solutions. Applications to magnetized accretion discs and their associated outflows are discussed. Particular emphasis is placed on the possibility of dynamo action in three-dimensional turbulent convection and shear flows, which is relevant to stars and astrophysical discs. The generation of large scale fields is discussed in terms of an inverse magnetic cascade and the consequences imposed by magnetic helicity conservation are reviewed with particular emphasis on the issue of alpha-quenching.

  1. Turbulent drag reduction through oscillating discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    The changes of a turbulent channel flow subjected to oscillations of wall flush-mounted rigid discs are studied by means of direct numerical simulations. The Reynolds number is $R_\\tau$=$180$, based on the friction velocity of the stationary-wall case and the half channel height. The primary effect of the wall forcing is the sustained reduction of wall-shear stress, which reaches a maximum of 20%. A parametric study on the disc diameter, maximum tip velocity, and oscillation period is presented, with the aim to identify the optimal parameters which guarantee maximum drag reduction and maximum net energy saving, computed by taking into account the power spent to actuate the discs. This may be positive and reaches 6%. The Rosenblat viscous pump flow is used to predict the power spent for disc motion in the turbulent channel flow and to estimate localized and transient regions over the disc surface subjected to the turbulent regenerative braking effect, for which the wall turbulence exerts work on the discs. The...

  2. The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    2006-01-01

    and Heat Flow Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada: Some Tectonic andLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resourcesthe Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Journal of

  3. Heat release effects on decaying homogeneous compressible turbulence 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Kurn Chul

    2009-05-15

    High Mach-number compressible flows with heat release are inherently more complicated than incompressible flows due to, among other reasons, the activation of the thermal energy mode. Such flow fields can experience significant fluctuations...

  4. Development of the T+M coupled flow-geomechanical simulator to describe fracture propagation and coupled flow-thermal-geomechanical processes in tight/shale gas systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jihoon; Moridis, George

    2013-05-22

    We developed a hydraulic fracturing simulator by coupling a flow simulator to a geomechanics code, namely T+M simulator. Modeling of the vertical fracture development involves continuous updating of the boundary conditions and of the data connectivity, based on the finite element method for geomechanics. The T+M simulator can model the initial fracture development during the hydraulic fracturing operations, after which the domain description changes from single continuum to double or multiple continua in order to rigorously model both flow and geomechanics for fracture-rock matrix systems. The T+H simulator provides two-way coupling between fluid-heat flow and geomechanics, accounting for thermoporomechanics, treats nonlinear permeability and geomechanical moduli explicitly, and dynamically tracks changes in the fracture(s) and in the pore volume. We also fully accounts for leak-off in all directions during hydraulic fracturing. We first validate the T+M simulator, matching numerical solutions with the analytical solutions for poromechanical effects, static fractures, and fracture propagations. Then, from numerical simulation of various cases of the planar fracture propagation, shear failure can limit the vertical fracture propagation of tensile failure, because of leak-off into the reservoirs. Slow injection causes more leak-off, compared with fast injection, when the same amount of fluid is injected. Changes in initial total stress and contributions of shear effective stress to tensile failure can also affect formation of the fractured areas, and the geomechanical responses are still well-posed.

  5. Toward the Theory of Turbulence in Magnetized Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boldyrev, Stanislav

    2013-07-26

    The goal of the project was to develop a theory of turbulence in magnetized plasmas at large scales, that is, scales larger than the characteristic plasma microscales (ion gyroscale, ion inertial scale, etc.). Collisions of counter-propagating Alfven packets govern the turbulent cascade of energy toward small scales. It has been established that such an energy cascade is intrinsically anisotropic, in that it predominantly supplies energy to the modes with mostly field-perpendicular wave numbers. The resulting energy spectrum of MHD turbulence, and the structure of the fluctuations were studied both analytically and numerically. A new parallel numerical code was developed for simulating reduced MHD equations driven by an external force. The numerical setting was proposed, where the spectral properties of the force could be varied in order to simulate either strong or weak turbulent regimes. It has been found both analytically and numerically that weak MHD turbulence spontaneously generates a “condensate”, that is, concentration of magnetic and kinetic energy at small k{sub {parallel}}. A related topic that was addressed in the project is turbulent dynamo action, that is, generation of magnetic field in a turbulent flow. We were specifically concentrated on the generation of large-scale magnetic field compared to the scales of the turbulent velocity field. We investigate magnetic field amplification in a turbulent velocity field with nonzero helicity, in the framework of the kinematic Kazantsev-Kraichnan model.

  6. Turbulent AGN tori

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schartmann; K. Meisenheimer; H. Klahr; M. Camenzind; S. Wolf; Th. Henning

    2008-08-05

    Recently, the MID-infrared Interferometric instrument (MIDI) at the VLTI has shown that dust tori in the two nearby Seyfert galaxies NGC 1068 and the Circinus galaxy are geometrically thick and can be well described by a thin, warm central disk, surrounded by a colder and fluffy torus component. By carrying out hydrodynamical simulations with the help of the TRAMP code (Klahr et al. 1999), we follow the evolution of a young nuclear star cluster in terms of discrete mass-loss and energy injection from stellar processes. This naturally leads to a filamentary large scale torus component, where cold gas is able to flow radially inwards. The filaments open out into a dense and very turbulent disk structure. In a post-processing step, we calculate observable quantities like spectral energy distributions or images with the help of the 3D radiative transfer code MC3D (Wolf 2003). Good agreement is found in comparisons with data due to the existence of almost dust-free lines of sight through the large scale component and the large column densities caused by the dense disk.

  7. Parallel Anisotropic Block-Based Adaptive Mesh Refinement Algorithm For Three-Dimensional Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groth, Clinton P. T.

    dynamics (CFD) evolves and its use becomes more widespread in various science and engineering fields: (i) turbulent flows around complex geometries; (ii) chemically reacting flows, especially combustion

  8. Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H Gibson

    2012-11-25

    Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

  9. Significance of thermal fluctuations and hydrodynamic interactions in receptor-ligand mediated adhesive dynamics of a spherical particle in wall bound shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. V. Ramesh; R. Thaokar; J. Ravi Prakash; R. Prabhakar

    2015-01-29

    The dynamics of adhesion of a spherical micro-particle to a ligand-coated wall, in shear flow, is studied using a Langevin equation that accounts for thermal fluctuations, hydrodynamic interactions and adhesive interactions. Contrary to the conventional assumption that thermal fluctuations play a negligible role at high P$\\acute{e}$clet numbers, we find that for particles with low surface densities of receptors, rotational diffusion caused by fluctuations about the flow and gradient directions aids in bond formation, leading to significantly greater adhesion on average, compared to simulations where thermal fluctuations are completely ignored. The role of wall hydrodynamic interactions on the steady state motion of a particle, when the particle is close to the wall, has also been explored. At high P$\\acute{e}$clet numbers, the shear induced force that arises due to the stresslet part of the Stokes dipole, plays a dominant role, reducing the particle velocity significantly, and affecting the states of motion of the particle. The coupling between the translational and rotational degrees of freedom of the particle, brought about by the presence of hydrodynamic interactions, is found to have no influence on the binding dynamics. On the other hand, the drag coefficient, which depends on the distance of the particle from the wall, plays a crucial role at low rates of bond formation. A significant difference in the effect of both the shear force and the position dependent drag force, on the states of motion of the particle, is observed when the P$\\acute{e}$let number is small.

  10. Integrated thermal treatment system study: Phase 1 results. Appendix B, Flow sheets and material balances: Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Hempill, H.G.; Groffie, F.J.

    1994-07-01

    This document accompanies a full report which describes the testing and evaluation of ten different methods for incinerating mixed low-level radioactive wastes. It consists of flowsheets and diagrams of a rotary kiln, pyrolysis methods, a plasma furnace, a fixed hearth, and thermal desorption methods.

  11. Low flow fume hood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Geoffrey C. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Feustel, Helmut E. (Albany, CA); Dickerhoff, Darryl J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  12. RELAXATION PROCESSES IN SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Servidio, S.; Carbone, V.; Gurgiolo, C.; Goldstein, M. L.

    2014-07-10

    Based on global conservation principles, magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) relaxation theory predicts the existence of several equilibria, such as the Taylor state or global dynamic alignment. These states are generally viewed as very long-time and large-scale equilibria, which emerge only after the termination of the turbulent cascade. As suggested by hydrodynamics and by recent MHD numerical simulations, relaxation processes can occur during the turbulent cascade that will manifest themselves as local patches of equilibrium-like configurations. Using multi-spacecraft analysis techniques in conjunction with Cluster data, we compute the current density and flow vorticity and for the first time demonstrate that these localized relaxation events are observed in the solar wind. Such events have important consequences for the statistics of plasma turbulence.

  13. Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquiza, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a2009 Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical AnalysisAbstract Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Stress

  14. Characterization of Fuego for laminar and turbulent natural convection heat transfer.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Francis, Nicholas Donald, Jr. (,; .)

    2005-08-01

    A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is conducted for internal natural convection heat transfer using the low Mach number code Fuego. The flow conditions under investigation are primarily laminar, transitional, or low-intensity level turbulent flows. In the case of turbulent boundary layers at low-level turbulence or transitional Reynolds numbers, the use of standard wall functions no longer applies, in general, for wall-bounded flows. One must integrate all the way to the wall in order to account for gradients in the dependent variables in the viscous sublayer. Fuego provides two turbulence models in which resolution of the near-wall region is appropriate. These models are the v2-f turbulence model and a Launder-Sharma, low-Reynolds number turbulence model. Two standard geometries are considered: the annulus formed between horizontal concentric cylinders and a square enclosure. Each geometry emphasizes wall shear flow and complexities associated with turbulent or near turbulent boundary layers in contact with a motionless core fluid. Overall, the Fuego simulations for both laminar and turbulent flows compared well to measured data, for both geometries under investigation, and to a widely accepted commercial CFD code (FLUENT).

  15. Distributed Energy Resources On-Site Optimization for Commercial Buildings with Electric and Thermal Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stadler, Michael

    2008-01-01

    lost per hour electrical flow battery 8 thermal Not alland energy ratings of a flow battery are independent of eacha) thermal storage 11 flow battery absorption chiller solar

  16. Validating the BHR RANS model for variable density turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Israel, Daniel M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gore, Robert A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Stalsberg - Zarling, Krista L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The BHR RANS model is a turbulence model for multi-fluid flows in which density variation plays a strong role in the turbulence processes. In this paper they demonstrate the usefulness of BHR over a wide range of flows which include the effects of shear, buoyancy, and shocks. The results are in good agreement with experimental and DNS data across the entire set of validation cases, with no need to retune model coefficients between cases. The model has potential application to a number of aerospace related flow problems.

  17. Thermal design requirements of a 50-kW zinc/redox flow battery for solar electrical energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selman, J.R.; Wu, H.; Hollandsworth, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    The conceptual engineering design of a large-scale zinc/redox battery for solar electrical energy storage involves the management of considerable heat flows. This is due to the large heat-of-crystallization of sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate produced during discharge, as well as the usual reversible and irreversible cell-reaction heat effects. A discussion of practical design implications is presented.

  18. Thermal design requirements of a 50-kW zinc/redox flow battery for solar electrical energy storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selman, J.R.; Wu, H.; Hollandsworth, R.P.

    1984-09-01

    The conceptual engineering design of a large-scale zinc/redox battery for solar electrical energy storage involves the management of considerable heat flows. This is due to the large heat-of-crystallization of sodium ferrocyanide decahydrate produced during discharge as well as the usual reversible and irreversible cell-reaction heat effects. A discussion of practical design implications is presented.

  19. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Enda

    2006-01-01

    Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

  20. Understanding mechanisms of flow instability leads to improved control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    ? CO2 absorption at the turbulent free-surface deformed by the shear wind, by means of direct numerical solution procedure for a coupled gas-liquid flow Wind flow Free surface contour - wind-driven calculation ? #12;Coherent Structures in Wind-driven Turbulent Free Surface Flow Water Wind 10-1 100 10-7 10-6 10 -5

  1. Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Norbert

    Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion N. Peters Institut f¨ur Technische Mechanik RWTH Aachen Turbulent Combustion: Introduction and Overview 1 1.1 Moment Methods in Modeling Turbulence with Combustion and Velocity Scales . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Regimes in Premixed Turbulent Combustion

  2. Groundwater Flow and Thermal Modeling to Support a Preferred Conceptual Model for the Large Hydraulic Gradient North of Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGraw, D.; Oberlander, P.

    2007-12-18

    The purpose of this study is to report on the results of a preliminary modeling framework to investigate the causes of the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. This study builds on the Saturated Zone Site-Scale Flow and Transport Model (referenced herein as the Site-scale model (Zyvoloski, 2004a), which is a three-dimensional saturated zone model of the Yucca Mountain area. Groundwater flow was simulated under natural conditions. The model framework and grid design describe the geologic layering and the calibration parameters describe the hydrogeology. The Site-scale model is calibrated to hydraulic heads, fluid temperature, and groundwater flowpaths. One area of interest in the Site-scale model represents the large hydraulic gradient north of Yucca Mountain. Nearby water levels suggest over 200 meters of hydraulic head difference in less than 1,000 meters horizontal distance. Given the geologic conceptual models defined by various hydrogeologic reports (Faunt, 2000, 2001; Zyvoloski, 2004b), no definitive explanation has been found for the cause of the large hydraulic gradient. Luckey et al. (1996) presents several possible explanations for the large hydraulic gradient as provided below: The gradient is simply the result of flow through the upper volcanic confining unit, which is nearly 300 meters thick near the large gradient. The gradient represents a semi-perched system in which flow in the upper and lower aquifers is predominantly horizontal, whereas flow in the upper confining unit would be predominantly vertical. The gradient represents a drain down a buried fault from the volcanic aquifers to the lower Carbonate Aquifer. The gradient represents a spillway in which a fault marks the effective northern limit of the lower volcanic aquifer. The large gradient results from the presence at depth of the Eleana Formation, a part of the Paleozoic upper confining unit, which overlies the lower Carbonate Aquifer in much of the Death Valley region. The Eleana Formation is absent at borehole UE-25 p#1 at Yucca Mountain, which penetrated the lower Carbonate Aquifer directly beneath the lower volcanic confining unit. The Site-scale model uses an area of very low permeability, referenced as the east-west barrier, to simulate the large hydraulic gradient. The Site-scale model is further refined in this study to provide a base-case model for exploring the geologic causes of the large hydraulic gradient.

  3. Statistical nature of boiling flows: an experimental approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, P.K.

    1981-01-01

    Two vertical, concentric annular test sections were used. Two flow-field variables, viz. static pressure fluctuations at the test section outer wall and instantaneous chordal-average vapor fraction, were studied. Matched piezo-electric pressure transducers were used for the pressure fluctuation measurements, and a linearized dual-beam x-ray system was used for the vapor fraction measurements. Steady state (mean) thermal-hydraulic condition in the last section was determined by an analytical model and verified to a certain extent by capacitance probe vapor volume fraction measurements. A wide range of local (measurement station) vapor fraction conditions with prevalent flow regimes ranging from subcooled bubbly to saturated churn turbulent-slug-annular was investigated. It is suggested that diagnosis of boiling flow regimes on the basis of the statistical properties of wall static pressure fluctuations and vapor fraction fluctuations may be possible.

  4. Vortex Tubes of Turbulent Solar Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitiashvili, I N; Mansour, N N; Lele, S K; Wray, A A

    2011-01-01

    Investigation of turbulent properties of solar convection is extremely important for understanding of the multi-scale dynamics observed on the solar surface. In particular, recent high-resolution observations revealed ubiquitous vortical structures, and numerical simulations demonstrated links between the vortex tube dynamics and magnetic field organization, and also importance of vortex tube interactions in the mechanism of acoustic wave excitation on the Sun. In this paper we investigate mechanisms of formation of vortex tubes in highly-turbulent convective flows near the solar surface by using realistic radiative hydrodynamic LES simulations. Analysis of data, obtained by the simulations, indicates two basic processes of the vortex tube formation: 1) development of small-scale convective instability inside convective granules, and 2) a Kelvin-Helmholtz type instability of shearing flows in intergranular lanes. Our analysis shows that vortex stretching during these processes is a primary source of generatio...

  5. One-dimensional turbulence model simulations of autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide fuel mixtures in a turbulent jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Kamlesh G.; Echekki, Tarek [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC (United States)

    2011-02-15

    The autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide in a turbulent jet with preheated co-flow air is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model. The simulations are performed at atmospheric pressure based on varying the jet Reynolds number and the oxidizer preheat temperature for two compositions corresponding to varying the ratios of H{sub 2} and CO in the fuel stream. Moreover, simulations for homogeneous autoignition are implemented for similar mixture conditions for comparison with the turbulent jet results. The results identify the key effects of differential diffusion and turbulence on the onset and eventual progress of autoignition in the turbulent jets. The differential diffusion of hydrogen fuels results in a reduction of the ignition delay relative to similar conditions of homogeneous autoignition. Turbulence may play an important role in delaying ignition at high-turbulence conditions, a process countered by the differential diffusion of hydrogen relative to carbon monoxide; however, when ignition is established, turbulence enhances the overall rates of combustion of the non-premixed flame downstream of the ignition point. (author)

  6. Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquiza, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    better reflects flow maldistribution phenomena that wouldnumber. Therefore, flow maldistribution will create areasthat is where flow maldistribution is most likely to occur

  7. Petrophysical analysis of regional-scale thermal properties for improved simulations of geothermal installations and basin-scale heat and fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Andreas; Clauser, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    Development of geothermal energy and basin-scale simulations of fluid and heat flow both suffer from uncertain physical rock properties at depth. Therefore, building better prognostic models are required. We analysed hydraulic and thermal properties of the major rock types in the Molasse Basin in Southern Germany. On about 400 samples thermal conductivity, density, porosity, and sonic velocity were measured. Here, we propose a three-step procedure with increasing complexity for analysis of the data set: First, univariate descriptive statistics provides a general understanding of the data structure, possibly still with large uncertainty. Examples show that the remaining uncertainty can be as high as 0.8 W/(m K) or as low as 0.1 W/(m K). This depends on the possibility to subdivide the geologic units into data sets that are also petrophysically similar. Then, based on all measurements, cross-plot and quick-look methods are used to gain more insight into petrophysical relationships and to refine the analysis. Be...

  8. Particle dispersion in homogeneous turbulence using the one-dimensional turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Guangyuan, E-mail: gysungrad@gmail.com; Lignell, David O., E-mail: davidlignell@byu.edu [Chemical Engineering Department, Brigham Young University, Provo, Utah 84602 (United States); Hewson, John C., E-mail: jchewso@sandia.gov [Fire Science and Technology Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Gin, Craig R., E-mail: cgin@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Lagrangian particle dispersion is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model in homogeneous decaying turbulence configurations. The ODT model has been widely and successfully applied to a number of reacting and nonreacting flow configurations, but only limited application has been made to multiphase flows. Here, we present a version of the particle implementation and interaction with the stochastic and instantaneous ODT eddy events. The model is characterized by comparison to experimental data of particle dispersion for a range of intrinsic particle time scales and body forces. Particle dispersion, velocity, and integral time scale results are presented. The particle implementation introduces a single model parameter ?{sub p}, and sensitivity to this parameter and behavior of the model are discussed. Good agreement is found with experimental data and the ODT model is able to capture the particle inertial and trajectory crossing effects. These results serve as a validation case of the multiphase implementations of ODT for extensions to other flow configurations.

  9. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry: Spray Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutland, Christopher J.

    2009-04-26

    The Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion (TSTC) project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of the approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring the highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. Under this component of the TSTC program the simulation code named S3D, developed and shared with coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for turbulent liquid fuel spray dynamics. Major accomplishments include improved fundamental understanding of mixing and auto-ignition in multi-phase turbulent reactant mixtures and turbulent fuel injection spray jets.

  10. Analysis of the effects of energy deposition on shock-driven turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haines, Brian M.; Grinstein, Fernando F.; Welser-Sherrill, Leslie; Fincke, James R.; Doss, Forrest W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS T087, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-07-15

    We perform simulations of laser-driven turbulence experiments with energy deposition, modeling situations where energy is deposited in a mixing layer before or after it is reshocked. Such situations are experienced in, e.g., inertial confinement fusion capsules. We show that the timing of the energy deposition has a significant impact on the development of turbulent flow and corresponding turbulent material mixing. In particular, if the energy is deposited before the shock wave begins interacting with the mixing layer, the development of turbulence and turbulent mixing are inhibited. If, however, the energy is deposited after the shock wave has interacted with a portion of the mixing layer, turbulence generation and turbulent mixing are enhanced.

  11. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion...

  12. Autoignition in turbulent two-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borghesi, Giulio

    2013-01-08

    . Similar concerns about the limited availability and rising price of conventional fuels have encouraged and motivated research on fuel-efficient engines. Meeting these requirements has proven to be an extraor- dinary challenge, and requires a profound... within the bulk gas, leading to air entrainment. As the cold liquid jet is heated by mixing with the hot oxidizer, a thin sheet of air / fuel vapor mixture is formed around the jet’s periphery. Further entrainment of hot air is responsible for start- ing...

  13. Turbulent flow of gas in fractures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koh, Wong In

    1974-01-01

    his sincere appreciation to Dr. W, D. Yon Gonten, Chairman of the author's graduate committee, for his kind and helpful guidanoe and sugges- tion, to Dr. R. A. Norse and to Dr. C . ED Gates for serving on his graduate oommittee. The author... of this study by paying full scholarship from the Petroleum Educational Fund in the Ninistry of Commeroe and Industry. He expresses his appreoiation to Dr C . K. Hong, Head of the department of Mineral and Petroleum Engineering in Seoul National University...

  14. A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

    2000-02-14

    A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

  15. Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Howes

    2007-11-27

    The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

  16. Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeremie Bec; Luca Biferale; Guido Boffetta; Massimo Cencini; Stefano Musacchio; Federico Toschi

    2006-06-08

    Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles and tracers advected by homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flows are investigated by means of direct numerical simulations. For large values of the Stokes number, the main effect of inertia is to reduce the chaoticity with respect to fluid tracers. Conversely, for small inertia, a counter-intuitive increase of the first Lyapunov exponent is observed. The flow intermittency is found to induce a Reynolds number dependency for the statistics of the finite time Lyapunov exponents of tracers. Such intermittency effects are found to persist at increasing inertia.

  17. A turbulent transport network model in MULTIFLUX coupled with TOUGH2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danko, G.; Bahrami, D.; Birkholzer, J.T.

    2011-02-15

    A new numerical method is described for the fully iterated, conjugate solution of two discrete submodels, involving (a) a transport network model for heat, moisture, and airflows in a high-permeability, air-filled cavity; and (b) a variably saturated fractured porous medium. The transport network submodel is an integrated-parameter, computational fluid dynamics solver, describing the thermal-hydrologic transport processes in the flow channel system of the cavity with laminar or turbulent flow and convective heat and mass transport, using MULTIFLUX. The porous medium submodel, using TOUGH2, is a solver for the heat and mass transport in the fractured rock mass. The new model solution extends the application fields of TOUGH2 by integrating it with turbulent flow and transport in a discrete flow network system. We present demonstrational results for a nuclear waste repository application at Yucca Mountain with the most realistic model assumptions and input parameters including the geometrical layout of the nuclear spent fuel and waste with variable heat load for the individual containers. The MULTIFLUX and TOUGH2 model elements are fully iterated, applying a programmed reprocessing of the Numerical Transport Code Functionalization model-element in an automated Outside Balance Iteration loop. The natural, convective airflow field and the heat and mass transport in a representative emplacement drift during postclosure are explicitly solved in the new model. The results demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the air circulation patterns and all transport modes are strongly affected by the heat and moisture transport processes in the surrounding rock, justifying the need for a coupled, fully iterated model solution such as the one presented in the paper.

  18. Turbulence structure of drag-reducing surfactant solution in two-dimensional channel with additional heat transfer enhancement method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, P.W.; Daisaka, H.; Kawaguchi, Y.; Yabe, A.; Hishida, K.; Maeda, M.

    1999-07-01

    The turbulent characteristics of a surfactant water solution in changing from drag-reducing flow to turbulent flow inside a two-dimensional smooth channel and in changing from turbulent flow to drag-reducing flow in the same channel with a mesh plug were investigated through LDV measurement in this study. The mesh plug was used to exert high shear stress to destroy micelle structures in the surfactant solution so that turbulence could be produced for better heat transfer. The two-component LDV system was installed on a movable platform, which could be moved streamwise of the flow to measure the two-dimensional velocity at different stations downstream from the mesh plug. The surfactant tested was Cetyltrimethyl ammonium chloride (C{sub 16}H{sub 33}N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}Cl, abbreviated as CTAC). Local tap water was used as solvent and same weight concentration of sodium salicylate was used as the counter-ion material. The investigation of turbulent parameters for the drag-reducing flow with increasing Reynolds number showed that when the Reynolds number exceeded the drag-reducing region, the turbulent character was the same as that of water. The turbulent parameters of surfactant flow downstream the mesh plug showed that the high heat transfer region had the same turbulent intensity as that of water flow. As the critical Reynolds number was approached, it became easier to obtain such a turbulent region by mesh plug. In such cases, the mesh helped to create high wall shear stress and therefore to destroy the super-ordered structures of rod-like micelles for introducing turbulence. However, it was found that the turbulent intensities of the velocity gradually decreased to the same as those of drag-reducing flow downstream from the mesh because the mesh plug only produced a local high shear stress.

  19. Practical application of large eddy simulation to film cooling flow analysis on gas turbine airfoils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takata, T.; Takeishi, K.; Kawata, Y.; Tsuge, A.

    1999-07-01

    Large eddy simulation (LES) using body-fitted coordinates is applied to solve film cooling flow on turbine blades. The turbulent model was tuned using the experimental flow field and adiabatic film cooling effectiveness measurements for a single row of holes on a flat plate surface. The results show the interaction between the main stream boundary layer and injected film cooling air generates kidney and horseshoe shaped vortices. Comparison of the temperature distribution between experimental results and present analysis has been conducted. The non-dimensional temperature distribution at x/d = 1 is dome style and quantitatively agrees with experimental results. LES was also applied to solve film cooling on a turbine airfoil. If LES was applied to solve whole flow field domain large CPU time would make the solution impractical. LES, using body-fitted coordinates, is applied to solve the non-isotropic film cooling flow near the turbine blade. The cascade flow domain, with a pitch equal to one film cooling hole spacing, is solved using {kappa}-{epsilon} model. By using such a hybrid numerical method, CPU time is reduced and numerical accuracy is insured. The analytical results show the interaction between the flow blowing through film cooling holes and mainstream on the suction and pressure surfaces of the turbine airfoil. They also show the fundamental structure of the film cooling air flow is governed by arch internal secondary flow and horseshoe vortices which have a similar structure to film cooling air flow blowing through a cooling hole on a flat plate. In the flow field, the effect of turbulent structure on curvature (relaminarization) and flow pattern, involving the interaction between main flow and the cooling jet, are clearly shown. Film cooling effectiveness on the blade surface is predicted from the results of the thermal field calculation and is compared with the test result.

  20. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    heat. flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the ofpossibility of land subsidence or upliftu thermal pollution,flow, land uplift or subsidence 1 water chemistry and

  1. Plasticity and deformation of crystals: Analogies to turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woosong; Papanikolaou, Stefanos; Sethna, James P

    2011-01-01

    We describe intriguing analogies between our model of material deformation (how crystals deform under load) and fluid turbulence (how liquids flow under shear). Our model present mathematical, physical, and computational challenges, but offer intriguing new predictions of fractal, scale-invariant structure formation for experiments. We show here that these challenges are shared with classic models of turbulence. In particular, we find precisely analogous physical and mathematical challenges associated with the formation of singularities in the evolving flows, and associated computational challenges with even defining a solution in the continuum limit where the grid size and the viscosities go to zero.

  2. Simulations of drift resistive ballooning L-mode turbulence in the edge plasma of the DIII-D tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cohen, B. I.; Umansky, M. V.; Nevins, W. M.; Makowski, M. A.; Boedo, J. A.; Rudakov, D. L.; McKee, G. R.; Yan, Z.; Groebner, R. J.

    2013-05-15

    Results from simulations of electromagnetic drift-resistive ballooning turbulence for tokamak edge turbulence in realistic single-null geometry are reported. The calculations are undertaken with the BOUT three-dimensional fluid code that solves Braginskii-based fluid equations [X. Q. Xu and R. H. Cohen, Contrib. Plasma Phys. 36, 158 (1998)]. The simulation setup models L-mode edge plasma parameters in the actual magnetic geometry of the DIII-D tokamak [J. L. Luxon et al., Fusion Sci. Technol. 48, 807 (2002)]. The computations track the development of drift-resistive ballooning turbulence in the edge region to saturation. Fluctuation amplitudes, fluctuation spectra, and particle and thermal fluxes are compared to experimental data near the outer midplane from Langmuir probe and beam-emission-spectroscopy for a few well-characterized L-mode discharges in DIII-D. The simulations are comprised of a suite of runs in which the physics model is varied to include more fluid fields and physics terms. The simulations yield results for fluctuation amplitudes, correlation lengths, particle and energy fluxes, and diffusivities that agree with measurements within an order of magnitude and within factors of 2 or better for some of the data. The agreement of the simulations with the experimental measurements varies with respect to including more physics in the model equations within the suite of models investigated. The simulations show stabilizing effects of sheared E × B poloidal rotation (imposed zonal flow) and of lower edge electron temperature and density.

  3. Numerical simulation of Lewis number effects on lean premixed turbulent flames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    turbulent flames for lean hydrogen, propane and methane mixtures in two dimensions. Each simulation is broken indicating local extinction. Keywords: turbulent premixed combustion, low Mach number flow for propane, methane and hydrogen using de- tailed chemistry and transport, corresponding to Le > 1, Le 1

  4. The interaction of high-speed turbulence with flames: Global properties and internal flame structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poludnenko, A.Y.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2010-05-15

    We study the dynamics and properties of a turbulent flame, formed in the presence of subsonic, high-speed, homogeneous, isotropic Kolmogorov-type turbulence in an unconfined system. Direct numerical simulations are performed with Athena-RFX, a massively parallel, fully compressible, high-order, dimensionally unsplit, reactive flow code. A simplified reaction-diffusion model represents a stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixture. The system being modeled represents turbulent combustion with the Damkoehler number Da=0.05 and with the turbulent velocity at the energy injection scale 30 times larger than the laminar flame speed. The simulations show that flame interaction with high-speed turbulence forms a steadily propagating turbulent flame with a flame brush width approximately twice the energy injection scale and a speed four times the laminar flame speed. A method for reconstructing the internal flame structure is described and used to show that the turbulent flame consists of tightly folded flamelets. The reaction zone structure of these is virtually identical to that of the planar laminar flame, while the preheat zone is broadened by approximately a factor of two. Consequently, the system evolution represents turbulent combustion in the thin reaction zone regime. The turbulent cascade fails to penetrate the internal flame structure, and thus the action of small-scale turbulence is suppressed throughout most of the flame. Finally, our results suggest that for stoichiometric H{sub 2}-air mixtures, any substantial flame broadening by the action of turbulence cannot be expected in all subsonic regimes. (author)

  5. Stability and angular-momentum transport of fluid flows between corotating cylinders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avila, Marc

    2012-01-01

    Turbulent transport of angular momentum is a necessary process to explain accretion in astrophysical disks. Although the hydrodynamic stability of disk-like flows has been tested in experiments, results are contradictory and suggest either laminar or turbulent flow. Direct numerical simulations reported here show that currently investigated laboratory flows are hydrodynamically unstable and become turbulent at low Reynolds numbers. The underlying instabilities stem from the axial boundary conditions, affect the flow globally and enhance angular-momentum transport.

  6. Numerical Simulation of a Premixed Turbulent V-Flame1 , M. S. Day, J. F. Grcar, M. J. Lijewski, M. Johnson, R. K. Cheng and I. G. Shepherd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, John B.

    and Dufour effects, and radiative heat transfer, and assume a mixture-averaged model for differential species methods, low Mach number flows Turbulent premixed combustion is a major active research topic without introducing models for turbulence or turbulence chemistry interaction. We outline the numerical

  7. Multidimensional turbulence spectra -identifying properties of turbulent structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kevlahan, Nicholas

    Sweden 2 Department of Mathematics and Statistics, McMaster University, Hamilton L8S 4K1, Canada * E turbulent structures are presented. Results from analysis of the turbulent kinetic energy in turbulent energy associated with a coherent vortex defined using different vortex identification methods

  8. Toward a wave turbulence formulation of statistical nonlinear optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garnier, Josselin

    Toward a wave turbulence formulation of statistical nonlinear optics Josselin Garnier,1, * Mietek optical waves have been reported in the literature. This article is aimed at providing a generalized wave, the process of optical wave thermalization to thermo- dynamic equilibrium, which slows down significantly

  9. Extracting Energy from Atmospheric Turbulence Chinmay K. Patel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ;2 thermal convection, birds also exploit the energy from wind shear and random gusts. Albatross, for example1 Extracting Energy from Atmospheric Turbulence Chinmay K. Patel Acuity Technologies Inc. Menlo@stanford.edu XXIX OSTIV Congress, Lüsse-Berlin, Germany, 6 August - 13 August 2008 Abstract Birds frequently use

  10. Quantum ghost imaging through turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, P. Ben

    We investigate the effect of turbulence on quantum ghost imaging. We use entangled photons and demonstrate that for a specific experimental configuration the effect of turbulence can be greatly diminished. By decoupling ...

  11. Dynamics on the Laminar-Turbulent Boundary and the Origin of the Maximum Drag Reduction Asymptote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graham, Michael D.

    Dynamical trajectories on the boundary in state space between laminar and turbulent plane channel flow—edge states—are computed for Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. Viscoelasticity has a negligible effect on the properties ...

  12. Rapidly Sheared Compressible Turbulence: Characterization of Different Pressure Regimes and Effect of Thermodynamic Fluctuations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch, Rebecca Lynne

    2011-10-21

    evolution shows three distinct stages. The physics of each stage is clearly explained. Next, the influence of initial velocity and thermodynamic fluctuations on the flow field are investigated. The evolution of turbulence is shown to be strongly dependent...

  13. Wave turbulent statistics in non-weak wave turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoto Yokoyama

    2011-05-08

    In wave turbulence, it has been believed that statistical properties are well described by the weak turbulence theory, in which nonlinear interactions among wavenumbers are assumed to be small. In the weak turbulence theory, separation of linear and nonlinear time scales derived from the weak nonlinearity is also assumed. However, the separation of the time scales is often violated even in weak turbulent systems where the nonlinear interactions are actually weak. To get rid of this inconsistency, closed equations are derived without assuming the separation of the time scales in accordance with Direct-Interaction Approximation (DIA), which has been successfully applied to Navier--Stokes turbulence. The kinetic equation of the weak turbulence theory is recovered from the DIA equations if the weak nonlinearity is assumed as an additional assumption. It suggests that the DIA equations is a natural extension of the conventional kinetic equation to not-necessarily-weak wave turbulence.

  14. Lagrangian view of time irreversibility of fluid turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Haitao; Bodenschatz, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    A turbulent flow is maintained by an external supply of kinetic energy, which is eventually dissipated into heat at steep velocity gradients. The scale at which energy is supplied greatly differs from the scale at which energy is dissipated, the more so as the turbulent intensity (the Reynolds number) is larger. The resulting energy flux over the range of scales, intermediate between energy injection and dissipation, acts as a source of time irreversibility. As it is now possible to follow accurately fluid particles in a turbulent flow field, both from laboratory experiments and from numerical simulations, a natural question arises: how do we detect time irreversibility from these Lagrangian data? Here we discuss recent results concerning this problem. For Lagrangian statistics involving more than one fluid particle, the distance between fluid particles introduces an intrinsic length scale into the problem. The evolution of quantities dependent on the relative motion between these fluid particles, including t...

  15. Characterization of Relativistic MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, David

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work is to understand if and how the characteristics of relativistic MHD turbulence may differ from those of nonrelativistic MHD turbulence. We accomplish this by studying the invariants in the relativistic case and comparing them to what we know of nonrelativistic turbulence. Although much work has been done to understand the dynamics of nonrelativistic systems (mostly for ideal incompressible fluids), there is minimal literature explicitly describing the dynamics of relativistic MHD turbulence. Many authors simply assume that relativistic turbulence has the same invariants and obeys the same inverse energy cascade as non-relativistic systems.

  16. DIRECT OBSERVATION OF THE TURBULENT emf AND TRANSPORT OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN A LIQUID SODIUM EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahbarnia, Kian; Brown, Benjamin P.; Clark, Mike M.; Kaplan, Elliot J.; Nornberg, Mark D.; Rasmus, Alex M.; Taylor, Nicholas Zane; Forest, Cary B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1150 University Ave, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Jenko, Frank; Limone, Angelo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik (IPP), EURATOM Association, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pinton, Jean-Francois; Plihon, Nicolas; Verhille, Gautier, E-mail: kian.rahbarnia@ipp.mpg.de [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS and Universite de Lyon, F-69364 Lyon (France)

    2012-11-10

    For the first time, we have directly measured the transport of a vector magnetic field by isotropic turbulence in a high Reynolds number liquid metal flow. In analogy with direct measurements of the turbulent Reynolds stress (turbulent viscosity) that governs momentum transport, we have measured the turbulent electromotive force (emf) by simultaneously measuring three components of velocity and magnetic fields, and computed the correlations that lead to mean-field current generation. Furthermore, we show that this turbulent emf tends to oppose and cancel out the local current, acting to increase the effective resistivity of the medium, i.e., it acts as an enhanced magnetic diffusivity. This has important implications for turbulent transport in astrophysical objects, particularly in dynamos and accretion disks.

  17. Effect of Inhomogeneity and Unsteadiness on the Stability of High-Speed Shear Flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertsch, Rebecca Lynne

    2014-07-09

    In hypersonic flows, turbulence critically influences mass and momentum transport, mixing, heat transfer and acoustic noise generation. In contrast to incompressible flow, in high speed flows pressure is a true thermodynamic variable...

  18. Development of one-equation transition/turbulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, J.R.; Roy, C.J.; Blottner, F.G.; Hassan, H.A.

    2000-01-14

    This paper reports on the development of a unified one-equation model for the prediction of transitional and turbulent flows. An eddy viscosity--transport equation for nonturbulent fluctuation growth based on that proposed by Warren and Hassan is combined with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model for turbulent fluctuation growth. Blending of the two equations is accomplished through a multidimensional intermittency function based on the work of Dhawan and Narasimha. The model predicts both the onset and extent of transition. Low-speed test cases include transitional flow over a flat plate, a single element airfoil, and a multi-element airfoil in landing configuration. High-speed test cases include transitional Mach 3.5 flow over a 5{degree} cone and Mach 6 flow over a flared-cone configuration. Results are compared with experimental data, and the grid-dependence of selected predictions is analyzed.

  19. PLASMA EMISSION BY WEAK TURBULENCE PROCESSES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ziebell, L. F.; Gaelzer, R.; Yoon, P. H.; Pavan, J. E-mail: rudi.gaelzer@ufrgs.br E-mail: joel.pavan@ufpel.edu.br

    2014-11-10

    The plasma emission is the radiation mechanism responsible for solar type II and type III radio bursts. The first theory of plasma emission was put forth in the 1950s, but the rigorous demonstration of the process based upon first principles had been lacking. The present Letter reports the first complete numerical solution of electromagnetic weak turbulence equations. It is shown that the fundamental emission is dominant and unless the beam speed is substantially higher than the electron thermal speed, the harmonic emission is not likely to be generated. The present findings may be useful for validating reduced models and for interpreting particle-in-cell simulations.

  20. Paper # B03 Topic: Turbulent Flames US Combustion Meeting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitsch, Heinz

    a crucial role in transferring chemical energy stored in fossil fuels into heat. It has been estimatedPaper # B03 Topic: Turbulent Flames 5th US Combustion Meeting Organized by the Western States subfilter model, which is designed for inhomogeneous flow in complex configurations, is employed. Laminar

  1. Universal decay of high Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Verschoof, Ruben A; van der Veen, Roeland C A; Sun, Chao; Lohse, Detlef

    2015-01-01

    We study the decay of high-Reynolds number Taylor-Couette turbulence, i.e. the turbulent flow between two coaxial rotating cylinders. To do so, the rotation of the inner cylinder ($Re_i = 2 \\cdot 10^6$, the outer cylinder is at rest) was suddenly stopped. Using a combination of laser Doppler anemometry and particle image velocimetry measurements, six decay decades of the kinetic energy could be captured. First, in the absence of cylinder rotation, the flow-velocity during the decay does not develop any height dependence in contrast to the well-known Taylor vortex state. Next, the radial profile of the azimuthal velocity is found to be self-similar, i.e. when normalizing it with the mean velocity, it is universal. Nonetheless, the decay of this wall-bounded inhomogeneous turbulent flow does not follow a strict power law as for decaying turbulent homogeneous isotropic flows, but it is faster, due to the strong viscous drag applied by the bounding walls. We theoretically describe the decay in a quantitative way ...

  2. Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles in turbulence Jrmie Bec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cencini, Massimo

    Lyapunov exponents of heavy particles in turbulence Jérémie Bec CNRS UMR6202, Observatoire de la Ferrara, Italy Received 7 June 2006; accepted 7 August 2006; published online 7 September 2006 Lyapunov, a counterintuitive increase of the first Lyapunov exponent is observed. The flow intermittency is found to induce

  3. Turbulence transition and internal wave generation in density stratified jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Turbulence transition and internal wave generation in density stratified jets B. FL Sutherland (Received 3 June 1993; accepted 18 November 1993) The nonlinear evolution of an unstable symmetric jet torques. In this case, the mean flow of the fully evolved jet is stable to subharmonic disturbances

  4. Modeling of Noise Reduction for Turbulent Jets with Induced Asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papamoschou, Dimitri

    (flight) conditions I. Introduction The exhaust of jet engines continues to be a significant contributorModeling of Noise Reduction for Turbulent Jets with Induced Asymmetry Dimitri Papamoschou and Sara for the noise reduction of dual-stream jets with induced asymmetry in the plume flow field, with emphasis

  5. HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN POSITION-POSITION-VELOCITY SPACE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.; Goodman, Alyssa; Rosolowsky, Erik

    2013-06-20

    Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is able to create hierarchical structures in the interstellar medium (ISM) that are correlated on a wide range of scales via the energy cascade. We use hierarchical tree diagrams known as dendrograms to characterize structures in synthetic position-position-velocity (PPV) emission cubes of isothermal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We show that the structures and degree of hierarchy observed in PPV space are related to the presence of self-gravity and the global sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers. Simulations with higher Alfvenic Mach number, self-gravity and supersonic flows display enhanced hierarchical structure. We observe a strong dependency on the sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and self-gravity when we apply the statistical moments (i.e., mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis) to the leaf and node distribution of the dendrogram. Simulations with self-gravity, larger magnetic field and higher sonic Mach number have dendrogram distributions with higher statistical moments. Application of the dendrogram to three-dimensional density cubes, also known as position-position-position (PPP) cubes, reveals that the dominant emission contours in PPP and PPV are related for supersonic gas but not for subsonic. We also explore the effects of smoothing, thermal broadening, and velocity resolution on the dendrograms in order to make our study more applicable to observational data. These results all point to hierarchical tree diagrams as being a promising additional tool for studying ISM turbulence and star forming regions for obtaining information on the degree of self-gravity, the Mach numbers and the complicated relationship between PPV and PPP data.

  6. Wavelet transforms and their applications to MHD and plasma turbulence: a review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farge, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Wavelet analysis and compression tools are reviewed and different applications to study MHD and plasma turbulence are presented. We introduce the continuous and the orthogonal wavelet transform and detail several statistical diagnostics based on the wavelet coefficients. We then show how to extract coherent structures out of fully developed turbulent flows using wavelet-based denoising. Finally some multiscale numerical simulation schemes using wavelets are described. Several examples for analyzing, compressing and computing one, two and three dimensional turbulent MHD or plasma flows are presented.

  7. Notes 09. Fluid inertia and turbulence in fluid film bearings 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01

    . Use the program to observe the effects of fluid inertia in the pressure field (shifting and increase/decrease) and the resulting forces. In addition, derive conclusions from the effects of the Gumbel cavitation condition on the fluid film forces.... Question to ponder: Does the physical modeling of liquid cavitation in superlaminar thin film flows must be revised? (Inertialess) Turbulent flow model for short length journal bearings Fluid inertia effects are not that important in a hydrodynamic...

  8. Fully Developed Turbulent Mixing in an Annular Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Hyun-Kyung; Zhou, Yijie; de Almeida, Valmor F; Glimm, James G

    2014-01-01

    We review recent progress on the characterization of turbulent mixing fluid flow and relate these ideas to high-speed, two-phase Couette flow with application to mixing in a centrifugal contactor. The general ideas are more broadly applicable and have been applied to the study of Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov fluid mixing, combustion in the engine of a scram jet and the analysis of inertial confinement pellet simulations.

  9. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLOWS IN ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to transitions to turbulence in rotating flows and to design corresponding dynamic ..... but possess special structures such that the equation (c1B + c2D)x = f can.

  10. Optimal lengthscale for a turbulent dynamo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadek, Mira; Fauve, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate that there is an optimal forcing length scale for low Prandtl number dynamo flows, that can significantly reduce the required energy injection rate. The investigation is based on simulations of the induction equation in a periodic box of size $2\\pi L$. The flows considered are turbulent ABC flows forced at different forcing wavenumbers $k_f$ simulated using a subgrid turbulent model. The critical magnetic Reynolds number $Rm_c^T$ decreases as the forcing wavenumber $k_f$ increases from the smallest allowed $k_{min}=1/L$. At large $k_f$ on the other hand, $Rm_c^T$ increases with the forcing wavenumber as $Rm_c^T \\propto \\sqrt{ k_f}$ in agreement with mean-field scaling prediction. At $k_f L\\simeq 4$ an optimal wavenumber is reached where $Rm_c^T$ obtains its minimum value. At this optimal wavenumber $Rm_c^T$ is smaller by more than a factor of ten than the case forced in $k_f=1$. This leads to a reduction of the energy injection rate by three orders of magnitude when compared to the case that th...

  11. A comparison of experimental and numerical results on convective thermal mixing of three vertical, quasi-planar jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tokuhiro, A.T.; Kimura, N.; Nishimura, M.; Kobayashi, J.; Miyakoshi, H.

    1999-07-01

    The thermal-hydraulic mixing of three quasi-planar vertical water jets was experimentally and numerically investigated. The central jet was initially 5 C lower in temperature than the other two. The hydraulic diameter and average exit velocity-based Reynolds and Richardson numbers were, Re{sub D} = 2 x 10{sup 4}, Ri{sub D} = 0.002. Besides temperature measurements from a traversing array of 37 thermocouples, velocity measurements were made using laser and ultrasound Doppler velocimetries (LDV and UDV). In parallel the in-house code, CASCADE, featuring a {kappa}-{epsilon} turbulence model was used to simulate the experimental flow configuration. A comparison of the experimental and numerical results showed that code validation by LDV/UDV was possible and in particular that time-averaged field and frequency characteristics of transversely swaying jets, even under Reynolds averaging of the conservation equations, could be simulated. A representative comparison of the amplitude of oscillation is shown in Figure A-1 with an inset of the visualized flow and sample time-series of the temperature fluctuations at the position indicated. The difference in the predominant frequency, the numerically predicted {approximately}1.6 Hz versus the experimental {approximately}2.25 Hz, is attributed to the turbulence model that overestimate thus effective fluid viscosity. Development of an accurate numerical simulation is of relevance to the design of the liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR), where the lack of mixing of the cold sodium may initiate thermal striping; that is, poorly mixed hot and cold streams may thermally stress the components onto which they impinge. Turbulent mixing of jets is equally of general interest to environmental and material processing flows.

  12. Thermal radiation Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .00032, similarly for 2·T = 0.7·2500 = 1750 µmK4 this gives f0-2 = 0.03392. Thus for 0.4 - 0.7 µm, f1-2 = 0Thermal radiation revisited Ron Zevenhoven Åbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory / Värme- och strömningsteknik tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi Process Engineering

  13. Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fichtl, G.H.

    1983-09-01

    When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

  14. J. of Thermal Science Vol.2, No4. Journal of Thermal Science Science Press 1993 ~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yuwen

    J. of Thermal Science Vol.2, No4. Journal of Thermal Science· Science Press 1993 ~ Flow P atterns and Thermal Drag in a One-Dimen- sional Inviscid Channel wit h Heating or Cooling Yuwen Zhang Yonglin Ju investigations on the fl.ow patterns and the thermal drag phenomenon in one-dimensional inviscid channel fiow

  15. Fluid Flow, Thermal History, and Diagenesis of the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group and Overlying Units in South-Central Kansas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Bradley Donald

    2013-12-31

    A diagenetic study of the Cambrian-Ordovician Arbuckle Group to the Middle Pennsylvanian Cherokee Group in south-central Kansas produced evidence of regional advective fluid flow and more localized fracture-controlled fluid flow affecting porosity...

  16. Study of natural circulation in a VHTR after a LOFA using different turbulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu-Hsin Tung; Yuh-Ming Ferng; Richard W. Johnson; Ching-Chang Chieng

    2013-10-01

    Natural convection currents in the core are anticipated in the event of the failure of the gas circulator in a prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The paths that the helium coolant takes in forming natural circulation loops and the effective heat transport are of interest. The heated flow in the reactor core is turbulent during normal operating conditions and at the beginning of the LOFA with forced convection, but the flow may significantly be slowed down after the event and laminarized with mixed convection. In the present study, the potential occurrence and effective heat transport of natural circulation are demonstrated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations with different turbulence models as well as laminar flow. Validations and recommendation on turbulence model selection are conducted. The study concludes that large loop natural convection is formed due to the enhanced turbulence levels by the buoyancy effect and the turbulent regime near the interface of upper plenum and flow channels increases the flow resistance for channel flows entering upper plenum and thus less heat can be removed from the core than the prediction by laminar flow assumption.

  17. Few-Freedom Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. V. Chirikov; V. G. Davidovsky

    2000-06-15

    The results of numerical experiments on the structure of chaotic attractors in the Khalatnikov - Kroyter model of two freedoms are presented. This model was developed for a qualitative description of the wave turbulence of the second sound in helium. The attractor dimension, size, and the maximal Lyapunov exponent in dependence on the single dimensionless parameter $F$ of the model are found and discussed. The principal parameter $F$ is similar to the Reynolds number in hydrodynamic turbulence. We were able to discern four different attractors characterized by a specific critical value of the parameter ($F=F_{cr}$), such that the attractor exists for $F>F_{cr}$ only. A simple empirical relation for this dependence on the argument ($F-F_{cr}$) is presented which turns out to be universal for different attractors with respect to the dimension and dimensionless Lyapunov exponents. Yet, it differs as to the size of attractor. In the main region of our studies the dependence of all dimensionless characteristics of the chaotic attractor on parameter $F$ is very slow (logarithmic) which is qualitatively different as compared to that of a multi-freedom attractor, e.g., in hydrodynamic turbulence (a power law). However, at very large $F\\sim 10^7$ the transition to a power-law dependence has been finally found, similar to the multi-freedom attractor. Some unsolved problems and open questions are also discussed.

  18. ENSEMBLE SIMULATIONS OF PROTON HEATING IN THE SOLAR WIND VIA TURBULENCE AND ION CYCLOTRON RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cranmer, Steven R.

    2014-07-01

    Protons in the solar corona and heliosphere exhibit anisotropic velocity distributions, violation of magnetic moment conservation, and a general lack of thermal equilibrium with the other particle species. There is no agreement about the identity of the physical processes that energize non-Maxwellian protons in the solar wind, but a traditional favorite has been the dissipation of ion cyclotron resonant Alfvén waves. This paper presents kinetic models of how ion cyclotron waves heat protons on their journey from the corona to interplanetary space. It also derives a wide range of new solutions for the relevant dispersion relations, marginal stability boundaries, and nonresonant velocity-space diffusion rates. A phenomenological model containing both cyclotron damping and turbulent cascade is constructed to explain the suppression of proton heating at low alpha-proton differential flow speeds. These effects are implemented in a large-scale model of proton thermal evolution from the corona to 1 AU. A Monte Carlo ensemble of realistic wind speeds, densities, magnetic field strengths, and heating rates produces a filled region of parameter space (in a plane described by the parallel plasma beta and the proton temperature anisotropy ratio) similar to what is measured. The high-beta edges of this filled region are governed by plasma instabilities and strong heating rates. The low-beta edges correspond to weaker proton heating and a range of relative contributions from cyclotron resonance. On balance, the models are consistent with other studies that find only a small fraction of the turbulent power spectrum needs to consist of ion cyclotron waves.

  19. Turbulent Flame Propagation Characteristics of High Hydrogen Content Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitzman, Jerry; Lieuwen, Timothy

    2014-09-30

    This final report describes the results of an effort to better understand turbulent flame propagation, especially at conditions relevant to gas turbines employing fuels with syngas or hydrogen mixtures. Turbulent flame speeds were measured for a variety of hydrogen/carbon monoxide (H2/CO) and hydrogen/methane (H2/CH4) fuel mixtures with air as the oxidizer. The measurements include global consumption speeds (ST,GC) acquired in a turbulent jet flame at pressures of 1-10 atm and local displacement speeds (ST,LD) acquired in a low-swirl burner at atmospheric pressure. The results verify the importance of fuel composition in determining turbulent flame speeds. For example, different fuel-air mixtures having the same unstretched laminar flame speed (SL,0) but different fuel compositions resulted in significantly different ST,GC for the same turbulence levels (u'). This demonstrates the weakness of turbulent flame speed correlations based simply on u'/SL,0. The results were analyzed using a steady-steady leading points concept to explain the sensitivity of turbulent burning rates to fuel (and oxidizer) composition. Leading point theories suggest that the premixed turbulent flame speed is controlled by the flame front characteristics at the flame brush leading edge, or, in other words, by the flamelets that advance farthest into the unburned mixture (the so-called leading points). For negative Markstein length mixtures, this is assumed to be close to the maximum stretched laminar flame speed (SL,max) for the given fuel-oxidizer mixture. For the ST,GC measurements, the data at a given pressure were well-correlated with an SL,max scaling. However the variation with pressure was not captured, which may be due to non-quasi-steady effects that are not included in the current model. For the ST,LD data, the leading points model again faithfully captured the variation of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of fuel-compositions and turbulence intensities. These results provide evidence that the leading points model can provide useful predictions of turbulent flame speed over a wide range of operating conditions and flow geometries.

  20. Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    H. R. Strauss

    2012-11-27

    The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

  1. Eddy fluxes in baroclinic turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Andrew F.

    2006-01-01

    cant dissipation of tidal energy in the deep ocean inferred2006: An estimate of tidal energy lost to turbulence at the

  2. Sandia Energy - Applied Turbulent Combustion

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and they form the basis for the creation of validated submodels that bridge fundamental energy sciences with applied device engineering and optimization. Turbulent-combustion-lab...

  3. Flow visualization around cylinders in a channel flow using Particle Image Velocimetry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martinez, Ramiro Serna

    1994-01-01

    The objective of the undertaken study was to apply state-of the-art Particle Image Velocimetry to measure full field turbulent flow around cylinders, starting with one cylinder and eventually to a quad cylinder arrangement. Particle Image...

  4. Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Berkeley Lab visualizations could help scientists forecast destructive space weather...

  5. Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

  6. Instability 1) All flows become unstable above a certain Reynolds number.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    show flow in a boundary layer · Below Recrit the flow is laminar and adjacent fluid layers side past) At low Reynolds numbers flows are laminar. 3) For high Reynolds numbers flows are turbulent. 4) The transition occurs anywhere between R ~ 2000 and 106 , depending on the flow. 5) For laminar flow problems

  7. Instability 1) All flows become unstable above a certain Reynolds number.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    · Photographs show flow in a boundary layer · Below Recrit the flow is laminar and adjacent fluid layers side) At low Reynolds numbers flows are laminar. 3) For high Reynolds numbers flows are turbulent. 4) The transition occurs anywhere between R ~ 2000 and 106 , depending on the flow. 5) For laminar flow problems

  8. Scaling Relations for Collision-less Dark Matter Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akika Nakamichi; Masahiro Morikawa

    2009-06-15

    Many scaling relations are observed for self-gravitating systems in the universe. We explore the consistent understanding of them from a simple principle based on the proposal that the collision-less dark matter fluid terns into a turbulent state, i.e. dark turbulence, after crossing the caustic surface in the non-linear stage. The dark turbulence will not eddy dominant reflecting the collision-less property. After deriving Kolmogorov scaling laws from Navier-Stokes equation by the method similar to the one for Smoluchowski coagulation equation, we apply this to several observations such as the scale-dependent velocity dispersion, mass-luminosity ratio, magnetic fields, and mass-angular momentum relation, power spectrum of density fluctuations. They all point the concordant value for the constant energy flow per mass: $0.3 cm^2/sec^3$, which may be understood as the speed of the hierarchical coalescence process in the cosmic structure formation.

  9. The Time-Dependent NavierStokes Equations Laminar Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Volker

    Chapter 6 The Time-Dependent Navier­Stokes Equations ­ Laminar Flows Remark 6.1. Motivation to distinguish between laminar and turbulent flows. It does not exist an exact definition of these terms. From the point of view of simulations, a flow is considered to be laminar, if on reasonable grids all flow

  10. Medium-induced jet evolution: wave turbulence and energy loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard Fister; Edmond Iancu

    2014-09-06

    We study the gluon cascade generated via successive medium-induced branchings by an energetic parton propagating through a dense QCD medium. We focus on the high-energy regime where the energy $E$ of the leading particle is much larger than the characteristic medium scale $\\omega_c=\\hat q L^2/2$, with $\\hat q$ the jet quenching parameter and $L$ the distance travelled through the medium. In this regime the leading particle loses only a small fraction $\\sim\\alpha_s(\\omega_c/E)$ of its energy and can be treated as a steady source of radiation for gluons with energies $\\omega\\le\\omega_c$. For this effective problem with a source, we obtain exact analytic solutions for the gluon spectrum and the energy flux. The solutions exhibit wave turbulence: the basic physical process is a continuing fragmentation which is `quasi-democratic' (i.e. quasi-local in energy) and which provides an energy transfer from the source to the medium at a rate (the energy flux $\\mathcal{F}$) which is quasi-independent of $\\omega$. The locality of the branching process implies a spectrum of the Kolmogorov-Obukhov type, i.e. a power-law spectrum which is a fixed point of the branching process and whose strength is proportional to the energy flux: $D(\\omega)\\sim\\mathcal{F}/\\sqrt\\omega$ for $\\omega\\ll\\omega_c$. Via this turbulent flow, the gluon cascade loses towards the medium an energy $\\Delta E\\sim\\alpha_s^2\\omega_c$, which is independent of the initial energy $E$ of the leading particle and of the details of the thermalization mechanism at the low-energy end of the cascade. This energy is carried away by very soft gluons, which propagate at very large angles with respect to the jet axis. Our predictions for the value of $\\Delta E$ and for its angular distribution appear to agree quite well, qualitatively and even semi-quantitatively, with the phenomenology of di-jet asymmetry in nucleus-nucleus collisions at the LHC.

  11. STATIONARITY IN SOLAR WIND FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perri, S.; Balogh, A. E-mail: a.balogh@imperial.ac.u

    2010-05-01

    By using single-point measurements in space physics it is possible to study a phenomenon only as a function of time. This means that we cannot have direct access to information about spatial variations of a measured quantity. However, the investigation of the properties of turbulence and of related phenomena in the solar wind widely makes use of an approximation frequently adopted in hydrodynamics under certain conditions, the so-called Taylor hypothesis; indeed, the solar wind flow has a bulk velocity along the radial direction which is much higher than the velocity of a single turbulent eddy embedded in the main flow. This implies that the time of evolution of the turbulent features is longer than the transit time of the flow through the spacecraft position, so that the turbulent field can be considered frozen into the solar wind flow. This assumption allows one to easily associate time variations with spatial variations and stationarity to homogeneity. We have investigated, applying criteria for weak stationarity to Ulysses magnetic field data in different solar wind regimes, at which timescale and under which conditions the hypothesis of stationarity, and then of homogeneity, of turbulence in the solar wind is well justified. We extend the conclusions of previous studies by Matthaeus and Goldstein to different parameter ranges in the solar wind. We conclude that the stationarity assumption in the inertial range of turbulence on timescales of 10 minutes to 1 day is reasonably satisfied in fast and uniform solar wind flows, but that in mixed, interacting fast, and slow solar wind streams the assumption is frequently only marginally valid.

  12. The Numerical Simulation Of A Transitional Flow In The VKI-GENOA Turbine Cascade

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yershov, Sergiy; Yakovlev, Viktor; Gryzun, Maria

    2015-01-01

    This study presents a numerical simulation of a 3D viscous flow in the VKI-Genoa cascade that takes into account the laminar-turbulent transition. The numerical simulation is performed using the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations and the two-equation k-omega SST turbulence model. The algebraic Production Term Modification model is used for modeling the laminar-turbulent transition. Computations of both fully turbulent and transitional flows are carried out. The contours of the Mach number, the turbulence kinetic energy, the entropy function, as well as limiting streamlines are presented. The analysis of the numerical results demonstrates the influence of the laminar-turbulent transition on the secondary flow pattern. The comparison between the present computational results and the existing experimental and numerical data shows that the proposed approach reflects sufficiently the physics of the laminar-turbulent transition in turbine cascades.

  13. THE VIOLATION OF THE TAYLOR HYPOTHESIS IN MEASUREMENTS OF SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, K. G.; Howes, G. G.; TenBarge, J. M.

    2014-08-01

    Motivated by the upcoming Solar Orbiter and Solar Probe Plus missions, qualitative and quantitative predictions are made for the effects of the violation of the Taylor hypothesis on the magnetic energy frequency spectrum measured in the near-Sun environment. The synthetic spacecraft data method is used to predict observational signatures of the violation for critically balanced Alfvénic turbulence or parallel fast/whistler turbulence. The violation of the Taylor hypothesis can occur in the slow flow regime, leading to a shift of the entire spectrum to higher frequencies, or in the dispersive regime, in which the dissipation range spectrum flattens at high frequencies. It is found that Alfvénic turbulence will not significantly violate the Taylor hypothesis, but whistler turbulence will. The flattening of the frequency spectrum is therefore a key observational signature for fast/whistler turbulence.

  14. Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Urquiza, Eugenio

    2009-01-01

    for Compact Plate-Type Heat Exchangers. ” American Institutethese conditions, plate-type heat exchangers with small flowHeatric plate-type compact heat exchanger showing multiple

  15. Turbulent heat transfer and friction in a segmental channel that simulates leading-edge cooling channels of modern turbine blades 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Rodney Brian

    1995-01-01

    Experiments are conducted to study the effects of channel geometry and asymmetric heating on the heat transfer and friction characteristics of turbulent flows in leading edge cooling channels in stator blades of gas turbines. The leading edge...

  16. Fish use of turbulence around wood in winter: physical experiments on hydraulic variability and habitat selection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Fish use of turbulence around wood in winter: physical experiments on hydraulic variability-introduction of large wood for expanding hydraulic variability is an increasingly common prac- tice, yet it is not yet on flow strength, depth, distance to wood, or based on temporal or spatial variability of the flow field

  17. Power law and composite power law friction factor correlations for laminar and turbulent gasliquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Daniel D.

    new unpublished, and data for gas and heavy oil from PDVSA-Intevep. Dimensionless pressure gradients oil are compiled and processed for power law and composite power law friction factor correlations reduce to the power laws for laminar flow when the Reynolds number is low and to turbulent flow when

  18. Development of a One-Equation Transition/Turbulence Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EDWARDS,JACK R.; ROY,CHRISTOPHER J.; BLOTTNER,FREDERICK G.; HASSAN,HASSAN A.

    2000-09-26

    This paper reports on the development of a unified one-equation model for the prediction of transitional and turbulent flows. An eddy viscosity - transport equation for non-turbulent fluctuation growth based on that proposed by Warren and Hassan (Journal of Aircraft, Vol. 35, No. 5) is combined with the Spalart-Allmaras one-equation model for turbulent fluctuation growth. Blending of the two equations is accomplished through a multidimensional intermittence function based on the work of Dhawan and Narasimha (Journal of Fluid Mechanics, Vol. 3, No. 4). The model predicts both the onset and extent of transition. Low-speed test cases include transitional flow over a flat plate, a single element airfoil, and a multi-element airfoil in landing configuration. High-speed test cases include transitional Mach 3.5 flow over a 5{degree} cone and Mach 6 flow over a flared-cone configuration. Results are compared with experimental data, and the spatial accuracy of selected predictions is analyzed.

  19. The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, Julian

    The turbulent/non-turbulent interface at the outer boundary of a self-similar turbulent jet J-similar turbulent jet at Re=2·103 is investigated ex- perimentally by means of combined particle image velo- cimetry (PIV) laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) measurements. The jet fluid contains a fluorescent dye so

  20. ENHANCED DISSIPATION RATE OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN STRIPED PULSAR WINDS BY THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Takamoto, Makoto [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: takamoto@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp, E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

    2012-08-10

    In this paper, we report on turbulent acceleration of the dissipation of the magnetic field in the post-shock region of a Poynting flux-dominated flow, such as the Crab pulsar wind nebula. We have performed two-dimensional resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of subsonic turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the shock fronts of the Poynting flux-dominated flows in pulsar winds. We find that turbulence stretches current sheets which substantially enhances the dissipation of the magnetic field, and that most of the initial magnetic field energy is dissipated within a few eddy-turnover times. We also develop a simple analytical model for turbulent dissipation of the magnetic field that agrees well with our simulations. The analytical model indicates that the dissipation rate does not depend on resistivity even in the small resistivity limit. Our findings can possibly alleviate the {sigma}-problem in the Crab pulsar wind nebulae.

  1. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Im, Hong G [University of Michigan] [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin] [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories] [Sandia National Laboratories

    2012-08-13

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  2. Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hong G. Im; Arnaud Trouve; Christopher J. Rutland; Jacqueline H. Chen

    2009-02-02

    The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

  3. The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chung-Sang

    The Effect of Magnetic Turbulence Energy Spectral Scaling on the Heating of the Solar Wind C. S. Ng), Kraichnan (1965) #12;Solar wind turbulence model The steady state solar wind turbulence model developed wind with uniform speed Vsw 1D (radial position r) Turbulence characterized by two fields

  4. Memory effects in turbulent transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Hubbard; Axel Brandenburg

    2009-11-13

    In the mean-field theory of magnetic fields, turbulent transport, i.e. the turbulent electromotive force, is described by a combination of the alpha effect and turbulent magnetic diffusion, which are usually assumed to be proportional respectively to the mean field and its spatial derivatives. For a passive scalar there is just turbulent diffusion, where the mean flux of concentration depends on the gradient of the mean concentration. However, these proportionalities are approximations that are valid only if the mean field or the mean concentration vary slowly in time. Examples are presented where turbulent transport possesses memory, i.e. where it depends crucially on the past history of the mean field. Such effects are captured by replacing turbulent transport coefficients with time integral kernels, resulting in transport coefficients that depend effectively on the frequency or the growth rate of the mean field itself. In this paper we perform numerical experiments to find the characteristic timescale (or memory length) of this effect as well as simple analytical models of the integral kernels in the case of passive scalar concentrations and kinematic dynamos. The integral kernels can then be used to find self-consistent growth or decay rates of the mean fields. In mean-field dynamos the growth rates and cycle periods based on steady state values of alpha effect and turbulent diffusivity can be quite different from the actual values.

  5. Power-law wrinkling turbulence-flame interaction model for astrophysical flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jackson, Aaron P.; Townsley, Dean M.; Calder, Alan C.

    2014-04-01

    We extend a model for turbulence-flame interactions (TFI) to consider astrophysical flames with a particular focus on combustion in Type Ia supernovae. The inertial range of the turbulent cascade is nearly always under-resolved in simulations of astrophysical flows, requiring the use of a model in order to quantify the effects of subgrid-scale wrinkling of the flame surface. We provide implementation details to extend a well-tested TFI model to low-Prandtl number flames for use in the compressible hydrodynamics code FLASH. A local, instantaneous measure of the turbulent velocity is calibrated for FLASH and verification tests are performed. Particular care is taken to consider the relation between the subgrid rms turbulent velocity and the turbulent flame speed, especially for high-intensity turbulence where the turbulent flame speed is not expected to scale with the turbulent velocity. Finally, we explore the impact of different TFI models in full-star, three-dimensional simulations of Type Ia supernovae.

  6. The time evolution of turbulent parameters in reversed-field pinch plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Titus, J. B.; Alexander, Brandon [Florida A and M University, Tallahassee, Florida 32310 (United States); Johnson, J. A. III [Pyramid Plasmas LLC, Lawrenceville, Georgia 30043 (United States)

    2013-04-28

    Turbulence is abundant in fully ionized fusion plasmas, with unique turbulent characteristics in different phases of the discharge. Using Fourier and chaos-based techniques, a set of parameters have been developed to profile the time evolution of turbulence in high temperature, fusion plasmas, specifically in self-organized, reversed-field pinch plasma in the Madison Symmetric Torus. With constant density and plasma current, the turbulence profile is measured during ramp-up, magnetic reconnection, and increased confinement phases. During magnetic reconnection, a scan of plasma current is performed with a constant density. Analysis revealed that the energy associated with turbulence (turbulent energy) is found to increase when changes in magnetic energy occur and is correlated to edge ion temperatures. As the turbulent energy increases with increasing current, the rate at which this energy flow between scales (spectral index) and anti-persistence of the fluctuations increases (Hurst exponent). These turbulent parameters are then compared to the ramp-up phase and increased confinement regime.

  7. Topological characterization of the transition from laminar regime to fully developed turbulence in the resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, L.; Carreras, B. A.; Llerena, I.; Calvo, I. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes, Madrid (Spain); Departament d'Algebra i Geometria, Facultat de Matematiques, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, Asociacion EURATOM-CIEMAT, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-10-15

    For the resistive pressure-gradient-driven turbulence model, the transition from laminar regime to fully developed turbulence is not simple and goes through several phases. For low values of the plasma parameter {beta}, a single quasicoherent structure forms. As {beta} increases, several of these structures may emerge and in turn take the dominant role. Finally, at high {beta}, fully developed turbulence with a broad spectrum is established. A suitable characterization of this transition can be given in terms of topological properties of the flow. Here, we analyze these properties that provide an understanding of the turbulence-induced transport and give a measure of the breaking of the homogeneity of the turbulence. To this end, an approach is developed that allows discriminating between topological properties of plasma turbulence flows that are relevant to the transport dynamics and the ones that are not. This is done using computational homology tools and leads to a faster convergence of numerical results for a fixed level of resolution than previously presented in Phys. Rev. E 78, 066402 (2008)

  8. Rotation Rate of Particle Pairs in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daddi-Moussa-Ider, Abdallah

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the dynamics of particles in turbulent flow is important in many environmental and industrial applications. In this paper, the statistics of particle pair orientation is numerically studied in homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow, with Taylor microscale Rynolds number of 300. It is shown that the Kolmogorov scaling fails to predict the observed probability density functions (PDFs) of the pair rotation rate and the higher order moments accurately. Therefore, a multifractal formalism is derived in order to include the intermittent behavior that is neglected in the Kolmogorov picture. The PDFs of finding the pairs at a given angular velocity for small relative separations, reveals extreme events with stretched tails and high kurtosis values. Additionally, The PDFs are found to be less intermittent and follow a complementary error function distribution for larger separations.

  9. Wave Decay in MHD Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrey Beresnyak; Alex Lazarian

    2008-05-06

    We present a model for nonlinear decay of the weak wave in three-dimensional incompressible magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. We show that the decay rate is different for parallel and perpendicular waves. We provide a general formula for arbitrarily directed waves and discuss particular limiting cases known in the literature. We test our predictions with direct numerical simulations of wave decay in three-dimensional MHD turbulence, and discuss the influence of turbulent damping on the development of linear instabilities in the interstellar medium and on other important astrophysical processes.

  10. Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    then go on to pair or to break down turbulently through three­dimensional e#ects. As a result of mixing in that the mean flow kinetic energy that feeds their growth is partially siphoned­o# as potential energy. Thus where they are generated and they accelerate the mean flow at levels where they break. Most

  11. Stratified Shear Flow: Instability and Wave Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    then go on to pair or to break down turbulently through three-dimensional effects. As a result of mixing in that the mean flow kinetic energy that feeds their growth is partially siphoned-off as potential energy. Thus where they are generated and they accelerate the mean flow at levels where they break. Most

  12. Computational analysis of a three-dimensional High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel (HVOF) Thermal Spray torch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, B.; Lopez, A.R.; Oberkampf, W.L.

    1995-07-01

    An analysis of a High-Velocity Oxygen-Fuel Thermal Spray torch is presented using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Three-dimensional CFD results are presented for a curved aircap used for coating interior surfaces such as engine cylinder bores. The device analyzed is similar to the Metco Diamond Jet Rotating Wire torch, but wire feed is not simulated. To the authors` knowledge, these are the first published 3-D results of a thermal spray device. The feed gases are injected through an axisymmetric nozzle into the curved aircap. Argon is injected through the center of the nozzle. Pre-mixed propylene and oxygen are introduced from an annulus in the nozzle, while cooling air is injected between the nozzle and the interior wall of the aircap. The combustion process is modeled assuming instantaneous chemistry. A standard, two-equation, K-{var_epsilon} turbulence model is employed for the turbulent flow field. An implicit, iterative, finite volume numerical technique is used to solve the coupled conservation of mass, momentum, and energy equations for the gas in a sequential manner. Flow fields inside and outside the aircap are presented and discussed.

  13. Study of active control of instability in a boundary layer over a flat plate flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oryu, Hiroshi

    2000-01-01

    A feasibility study of utilizing synthetic jet actuators as a mean to mitigate disturbances that can cause instability and turbulent flow is described. Prediction of flow transition via linear stability theory was performed by solving the Orr...

  14. Multifractal statistics of Lagrangian velocity and acceleration in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Biferale; G. Boffetta; A. Celani; B. J. Devenish; A. Lanotte; F. Toschi

    2004-03-11

    The statistical properties of velocity and acceleration fields along the trajectories of fluid particles transported by a fully developed turbulent flow are investigated by means of high resolution direct numerical simulations. We present results for Lagrangian velocity structure functions, the acceleration probability density function and the acceleration variance conditioned on the instantaneous velocity. These are compared with predictions of the multifractal formalism and its merits and limitations are discussed.

  15. Dispersion in two-dimensional turbulent buoyant plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocco, Stefano; Woods, Andrew W.

    2015-06-02

    terrestrial explosive volcanism. Journal of Geophysical Research 113 (B9), B09201. Chen, By Daoyi & Jirka, Gerhard H 1999 LIF study of plane jet bounded in shallow water layer. Journal of Hydraulic Engineering 125 (August), 817–826. Danckwerts, P. V. 1953... Continuous Flow Systems, Distribution of Residence Times. Chemical Engineering Science 2 (1). Daoyi, Chen & Jirka, Gerhard H. 1998 Linear stability analysis of turbulent mixing layers and jets in shallow water layers. Journal of Hydraulic Research 36 (5), 815...

  16. SINGLE POLYMER DYNAMICS IN RANDOM FLOW A. Celani1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iooss, Gérard

    SINGLE POLYMER DYNAMICS IN RANDOM FLOW A. Celani1,2 , S. Musacchio3 , and D. Vincenzi2,4 1 CNRS The character of turbulence in dilute polymer solutions differs substantially from that in classical Newtonian fluids. The ability of polymers to change drastically the largescale statistics of turbulent flows has

  17. Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

    2006-09-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

  18. Magnetohydrodynamic turbulent cascade of coronal loop magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rappazzo, A. F. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Bartol Research Institute, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Delaware 19716 (United States); Velli, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States)

    2011-06-15

    The Parker model for coronal heating is investigated through a high resolution simulation. An inertial range is resolved where fluctuating magnetic energy E{sub M}(k{sub perpendicular}){proportional_to}k{sub perpendicular}{sup -2.7} exceeds kinetic energy E{sub K}(k{sub perpendicular}){proportional_to}k{sub perpendicular}{sup -0.6}. Increments scale as {delta}b{sub l}{approx_equal}l{sup -0.85}and {delta}u{sub l}{approx_equal}l{sup +0.2} with velocity increasing at small scales, indicating that magnetic reconnection plays a prime role in this turbulent system. We show that spectral energy transport is akin to standard magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence even for a system of reconnecting current sheets sustained by the boundary. In this new MHD turbulent cascade, kinetic energy flows are negligible while cross-field flows are enhanced, and through a series of ''reflections'' between the two fields, cascade more than half of the total spectral energy flow.

  19. Spark ignition of lifted turbulent jet flames

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed, S.F.; Mastorakos, E. [Hopkinson Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2006-07-15

    This paper presents experiments on ignition and subsequent edge flame propagation in turbulent nonpremixed methane jets in air. The spark position, energy, duration, electrode diameter and gap, and the jet velocity and air premixing of the fuel stream are examined to study their effects on the ignition probability defined as successful flame establishment. The flame is visualized by a high-speed camera and planar laser-induced fluorescence of OH. It was found that after an initially spherical shape, the flame took a cylindrical shape with a propagating edge upstream. The probability of successful ignition increases with high spark energy, thin electrode diameter and wide gap, but decreases with increasing dilution of the jet with air. The flame kernel growth rate is high when the ignition probability is high for all parameters, except for jet velocity. Increasing the jet velocity decreases the ignition probability at all locations. The average flame position as a function of time from the spark was measured and the data were used to estimate a net propagation speed, which then resulted in an estimate of the average edge flame speed relative to the incoming flow. This was about 3 to 6 laminar burning velocities of a stoichiometric mixture. The measurements can assist theoretical models for the probability of ignition of nonpremixed flames and for edge flame propagation in turbulent inhomogeneous mixtures, both of which determine the success of ignition in practical combustion systems. (author)

  20. Magnetic flux concentrations from turbulent stratified convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Käpylä, P J; Kleeorin, N; Käpylä, M J; Rogachevskii, I

    2015-01-01

    (abridged) Context: The mechanisms that cause the formation of sunspots are still unclear. Aims: We study the self-organisation of initially uniform sub-equipartition magnetic fields by highly stratified turbulent convection. Methods: We perform simulations of magnetoconvection in Cartesian domains that are $8.5$-$24$ Mm deep and $34$-$96$ Mm wide. We impose either a vertical or a horizontal uniform magnetic field in a convection-driven turbulent flow. Results: We find that super-equipartition magnetic flux concentrations are formed near the surface with domain depths of $12.5$ and $24$ Mm. The size of the concentrations increases as the box size increases and the largest structures ($20$ Mm horizontally) are obtained in the 24 Mm deep models. The field strength in the concentrations is in the range of $3$-$5$ kG. The concentrations grow approximately linearly in time. The effective magnetic pressure measured in the simulations is positive near the surface and negative in the bulk of the convection zone. Its ...

  1. Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

    2001-01-01

    The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

  2. Understanding and modeling turbulent fluxes and entrainment in a gravity current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Odier, P; Ecke, R E

    2015-01-01

    We present an experimental study of the mixing processes in a gravity current flowing on an inclined plane. The turbulent transport of momentum and density can be described in a very direct and compact form by a Prandtl mixing length model: the turbulent vertical fluxes of momentum and density are found to scale quadratically with the vertical mean gradients of velocity and density. The scaling coefficient, the square of the mixing length, is approximately constant over the mixing zone of the stratified shear layer. We show how, in different flow configurations, this length can be related to the shear length of the flow ($\\epsilon$/$\\partial$ z u^3)^1/2. We also study the fluctuations of the momentum and density turbulent fluxes, showing how they relate to mixing and to the entrainment/detrainment balance. We suggest a quantitative measure of local entrainment and detrainment derived from observed conditional correlations of density flux and density or vertical velocity fluctuations.

  3. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane–air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore »the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  4. Response of flame thickness and propagation speed under intense turbulence in spatially developing lean premixed methane air jet flames

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sankaran, Ramanan; Hawkes, Evatt R.; Yoo, Chun Sang; Chen, Jacqueline H.

    2015-06-22

    Direct numerical simulations of three-dimensional spatially-developing turbulent Bunsen flames were performed at three different turbulence intensities. We performed these simulations using a reduced methane–air chemical mechanism which was specifically tailored for the lean premixed conditions simulated here. A planar-jet turbulent Bunsen flame configuration was used in which turbulent preheated methane–air mixture at 0.7 equivalence ratio issued through a central jet and was surrounded by a hot laminar coflow of burned products. The turbulence characteristics at the jet inflow were selected such that combustion occured in the thin reaction zones (TRZ) regime. At the lowest turbulence intensity, the conditions fall onmore »the boundary between the TRZ regime and the corrugated flamelet regime, and progressively moved further into the TRZ regime by increasing the turbulent intensity. The data from the three simulations was analyzed to understand the effect of turbulent stirring on the flame structure and thickness. Furthermore, statistical analysis of the data showed that the thermal preheat layer of the flame was thickened due to the action of turbulence, but the reaction zone was not significantly affected. A global and local analysis of the burning velocity of the flame was performed to compare the different flames. Detailed statistical averages of the flame speed were also obtained to study the spatial dependence of displacement speed and its correlation to strain rate and curvature.« less

  5. Numerical Simulations of MHD Turbulence in Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven A. Balbus; John F. Hawley

    2002-03-20

    We review numerical simulations of MHD turbulence. The last decade has witnessed fundamental advances both in the technical capabilities of direct numerical simulation, and in our understanding of key physical processes. Magnetic fields tap directly into the free energy sources in a sufficiently ionized gas. The result is that adverse angular velocity and adverse temperature gradients, not the classical angular momentum and entropy gradients, destabilize laminar and stratified flow. This has profound consequences for astrophysical accretion flows, and has opened the door to a new era of numerical simulation experiments.}

  6. Neutrino and Cosmic-Ray Emission and Cumulative Background from Radiatively Inefficient Accretion Flows in Low-Luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shigeo S. Kimura; Kohta Murase; Kenji Toma

    2015-06-29

    We study high-energy neutrino and cosmic-ray (CR) emission from the cores of low-luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGN). In LLAGN, the thermalization of particles is expected to be incomplete in radiatively inefficient accretion flows (RIAFs), allowing the existence of non-thermal particles. In this work, assuming stochastic particle acceleration due to turbulence in RIAFs, we solve the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate spectra of escaping neutrinos and CRs. The RIAF in LLAGN can emit CR protons with $\\gtrsim10$ PeV energies and TeV-PeV neutrinos generated via $pp$ and/or $p\\gamma$ reactions. We find that, if $\\sim1$\\% of the accretion luminosity is carried away by non-thermal ions, the diffuse neutrino intensity from the cores of LLAGN may be as high as $E_\

  7. Tunable thermal link

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  8. Experimental study of turbulent flame kernel propagation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mansour, Mohy [National Institute of Laser Enhanced Sciences, Cairo University, Giza (Egypt); Peters, Norbert; Schrader, Lars-Uve [Institute of Combustion Technology, Aachen (Germany)

    2008-07-15

    Flame kernels in spark ignited combustion systems dominate the flame propagation and combustion stability and performance. They are likely controlled by the spark energy, flow field and mixing field. The aim of the present work is to experimentally investigate the structure and propagation of the flame kernel in turbulent premixed methane flow using advanced laser-based techniques. The spark is generated using pulsed Nd:YAG laser with 20 mJ pulse energy in order to avoid the effect of the electrodes on the flame kernel structure and the variation of spark energy from shot-to-shot. Four flames have been investigated at equivalence ratios, {phi}{sub j}, of 0.8 and 1.0 and jet velocities, U{sub j}, of 6 and 12 m/s. A combined two-dimensional Rayleigh and LIPF-OH technique has been applied. The flame kernel structure has been collected at several time intervals from the laser ignition between 10 {mu}s and 2 ms. The data show that the flame kernel structure starts with spherical shape and changes gradually to peanut-like, then to mushroom-like and finally disturbed by the turbulence. The mushroom-like structure lasts longer in the stoichiometric and slower jet velocity. The growth rate of the average flame kernel radius is divided into two linear relations; the first one during the first 100 {mu}s is almost three times faster than that at the later stage between 100 and 2000 {mu}s. The flame propagation is slightly faster in leaner flames. The trends of the flame propagation, flame radius, flame cross-sectional area and mean flame temperature are related to the jet velocity and equivalence ratio. The relations obtained in the present work allow the prediction of any of these parameters at different conditions. (author)

  9. REVIEW ARTICLE Planar laser induced fluorescence in aqueous flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crimaldi, John P.

    REVIEW ARTICLE Planar laser induced fluorescence in aqueous flows J. P. Crimaldi Received: 14 for measuring scalar concentra- tions in fluid flows. A fluorescent dye is used as a scalar proxy, and local Osbourne Reynolds performed his famous experiments on laminar and turbulent flow in round pipes (Reynolds

  10. Chaotic self-sustaining structure embeded in turbulent-laminar interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teramura, Toshiki

    2015-01-01

    An iterface structure between turbulence and laminar flow is investigated in two-dimensional channel flow. This spatially localized structure not only sustains itself, but also converts laminar state into turbulence actively. In other words, this coherent structure has a functionality to generate inhomogeneity by its inner dynamics. The dynamics of this functional coherent structure is isolated using the filtered simulation, and a physical perspective of its dynamics is summarized in a phenomenological model called an "ejection-jet" cycle, which includes multiscale interaction process.

  11. Chaotic self-sustaining structure embeded in turbulent-laminar interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshiki Teramura; Sadayoshi Toh

    2015-03-16

    An iterface structure between turbulence and laminar flow is investigated in two-dimensional channel flow. This spatially localized structure not only sustains itself, but also converts laminar state into turbulence actively. In other words, this coherent structure has a functionality to generate inhomogeneity by its inner dynamics. The dynamics of this functional coherent structure is isolated using the filtered simulation, and a physical perspective of its dynamics is summarized in a phenomenological model called an "ejection-jet" cycle, which includes multiscale interaction process.

  12. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  13. Transport relaxation time and length scales in turbulent suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Claudin; F. Charru; B. Andreotti

    2010-11-03

    We show that in a turbulent flow transporting suspended sediment, the unsaturated sediment flux $q(x,t)$ can be described by a first-order relaxation equation. From a mode analysis of the advection-diffusion equation for the particle concentration, the relaxation length and time scales of the dominant mode are shown to be the deposition length $H U/V_{\\rm fall}$ and deposition time $H/V_{\\rm fall}$, where $H$ is the flow depth, $U$ the mean flow velocity and $V_{\\rm fall}$ the sediment settling velocity. This result is expected to be particularly relevant for the case of sediment transport in slowly varying flows, where the flux is never far from saturation. Predictions are shown to be in quantitative agreement with flume experiments, for both net erosion and net deposition situations.

  14. The impact of small-scale turbulence on laminar magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watson, P. G.; Oughton, S.; Craig, I. J. D. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Department of Mathematics, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2007-03-15

    Initial states in incompressible two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics that are known to lead to strong current sheets and (laminar) magnetic reconnection are modified by the addition of small-scale turbulent perturbations of various energies. The evolution of these states is computed with the aim of ascertaining the influence of the turbulence on the underlying laminar solution. Two main questions are addressed here: (1) What effect does small-scale turbulence have on the energy dissipation rate of the underlying solution? (2) What is the threshold turbulent perturbation level above which the original laminar reconnective dynamics is no longer recognizable. The simulations show that while the laminar dynamics persist the dissipation rates are largely unaffected by the turbulence, other than modest increases attributable to the additional small length scales present in the new initial condition. The solutions themselves are also remarkably insensitive to small-scale turbulent perturbations unless the perturbations are large enough to undermine the integrity of the underlying cellular flow pattern. Indeed, even initial states that lead to the evolution of small-scale microscopic sheets can survive the addition of modest turbulence. The role of a large-scale organizing background magnetic field is also addressed.

  15. Analysis of the influence of external biasing on Texas Helimak turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toufen, D. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sao Paulo-IFSP, 07115-000 Guarulhos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Szezech, J. D. [Department of Physics, State University of Ponta Grossa, 84030-900 Parana (Brazil); Lopes, S.; Viana, R. L. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Parana, 81531-990 Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Gentle, K. W. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    We analyze alterations on the electrostatic turbulence in experiments with imposed bias to control the plasma radial electric field in Texas Helimak (K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)), a toroidal plasma device with a one-dimensional equilibrium, magnetic curvature, and shear. Comparing discharges from different biased potentials, we identify, in a roughly uniform gradient region, a continuous variation from low turbulence level and narrower frequency spectra, for negative bias, to high turbulence level and broadband spectra for positive bias. Overall, we distinguish two kinds of perturbed turbulence, classified according to their intensity, spectral, statistical, and recurrence properties. When the bias is positive, the turbulence shows enhanced and broadband spectra with non Gaussian probability distribution functions having noticeable long tails (extreme events) similar to the turbulence in tokamak scrape-off layer. On the other hand, negative bias reduces the turbulence level and decreases the spectrum widths. Also for negative bias, we found large frequency widths whenever the coupling between drift waves and the sheared plasma flow is fast enough to allow the enhancement of sidebands modes.

  16. Terascale Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Combustion: Capabilities and Limits (PReSS Talk)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Chun Sang

    2009-03-26

    The rapid growth in computational capabilities has provided great opportunities for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion, a type of simulations without any turbulence model. With the help of terascale high performance supercomputing (HPC) resources, we are now able to provide fundamental insight into turbulence-chemistry interaction in simple laboratory-scale turbulent flames with detailed chemistry using three-dimensional (3D) DNS. However, the actual domain size of 3D-DNS is still limited within {approx} O(10 cm{sup 3}) due to its tremendously high grid resolution required to resolve the smallest turbulent length scale as well as flame structures. Moreover, 3D-DNS will require more computing powers to investigate next-generation engines, of which operating conditions will be characterized by higher pressures, lower temperatures, and higher levels of dilution. In this talk, I will discuss the capabilities and limits of DNS of turbulent combustion and present some results of ignition/extinction characteristics of a highly diluted hydrogen flame counter-flowing against heated air. The results of our recent 3D-DNS of a spatially-developing turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in heated coflow will also be presented. The 3D-DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 11,000 with {approx} 1 billion grid points, which required 3.5 million CPU hours on Cray XT3/XT4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratories.

  17. Shear flow instabilities in viscoelastic fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Joel C.

    2006-05-23

    . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.3.1 Flows with curved streamlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 1.3.2 Flows with straight streamlines . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 1.4 Theoretical study of extrusion flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 1.4.1 Single fluid... pipe, a phenomenon known as turbulent drag reduction. This has applications including fire hose design, waste water disposal, and crude oil transport. The phenomenon is not well understood, in part because even the simplest effects of polymers on high...

  18. The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Stawarz, Joshua E.; Forman, Miriam A.

    2013-06-13

    Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

  19. Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

    2011-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

  20. Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

    2005-09-01

    The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.