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1

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Thermal Effects on Turbulent Flow and Dispersion in and above a Street Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on turbulent flow and dispersion in and above an idealized street canyon with a street aspect ratio of 1 are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (“PALM”). Each of upwind building wall, street ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik; Siegfried Raasch; Marcus Oliver Letzel

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Turbulent flow in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

3

Modeling Turbulent Flow  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Turbulent Turbulent Flow with Implicit LES L.G. Margolin 1 Proceedings of the Joint Russian-American Five Laboratory Conference on Computational Mathematics/Physics 19-23 June, 2005 Vienna, Austria 1 Applied Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545, len@lanl.gov 1 Abstract Implicit large eddy simulation (ILES) is a methodology for modeling high Reynolds' num- ber flows that combines computational efficiency and ease of implementation with predictive calculations and flexible application. Although ILES has been used for more than fifteen years, it is only recently that significant effort has gone into providing a physical rationale that speaks to its capabilities and its limitations. In this talk, we will present new theoret- ical results aimed toward building a justification and discuss some remaining gaps in our understanding and our practical

4

Turbulent Mixing in Stably Stratified Shear Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical mixing of momentum and heat is investigated in turbulent stratified shear flows. It is assumed that the flow has uniform shear and stratification with homogeneous turbulence and that an equilibrium is reached between kinetic and ...

U. Schumann; T. Gerz

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

The Turbulence Structure of Nocturnal Slope Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the turbulence structure of nocturnal slope flow are used to test the hypothesis that slope flow turbulence in the region above the low-level wind maximum is decoupled from the surface and has a local structure similar to that ...

T. W. Horst; J. C. Doran

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Clustering of Aerosols in Atmospheric Turbulent Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A mechanism of formation of small-scale inhomogeneities in spatial distributions of aerosols and droplets associated with clustering instability in the atmospheric turbulent flow is discussed. The particle clustering is a consequence of a spontaneous breakdown of their homogeneous space distribution due to the clustering instability, and is caused by a combined effect of the particle inertia and a finite correlation time of the turbulent velocity field. In this paper a theoretical approach proposed in Phys. Rev. E 66, 036302 (2002) is further developed and applied to investigate the mechanisms of formation of small-scale aerosol inhomogeneities in the atmospheric turbulent flow. The theory of the particle clustering instability is extended to the case when the particle Stokes time is larger than the Kolmogorov time scale, but is much smaller than the correlation time at the integral scale of turbulence. We determined the criterion of the clustering instability for the Stokes number larger than 1. We discussed applications of the analyzed effects to the dynamics of aerosols and droplets in the atmospheric turbulent flow.

T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; M. A. Liberman; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

7

Collision Rates of Cloud Droplets in Turbulent Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations of an evolving turbulent flow field have been performed to explore how turbulence affects the motion and collisions of cloud droplets. Large numbers of droplets are tracked through the flow field and their positions, ...

Charmaine N. Franklin; Paul A. Vaillancourt; M. K. Yau; Peter Bartello

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

LES algorithm for turbulent reactive flows simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents the development and implementation of a Large Eddy Simulation numerical algorithm for simulating turbulent reactive flows. The numerical algorithm is based on a 5 step modified Runge - Kutta numerical scheme with a dual time stepping ... Keywords: Runge - Kutta numerical scheme, large eddy simulation, linear eddy model

Ionut Porumbel; Cristian Cârl?nescu; Florin Gabriel Florean; Constantin Eusebiu Hritcu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Thermal Instability and Magnetic Pressure in the Turbulent Interstellar Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent results on the nonlinear development of thermal instability (TI) in the context of the turbulent atomic interstellar medium (ISM). First, we discuss the growth of entropy perturbations in isolation, as a function of the ratio \\eta of the cooling time to the dynamical crossing time. For \\eta~ 0.3) and occurs at scales with \\eta>1. We then consider the behavior of magnetic pressure in turbulent regimes. We propose that the reported lack of correlation between the magnetic pressure and the density is a consequence of the different scaling of the magnetic pressure with density for the slow and fast modes of nonlinear MHD waves. This implies that magnetic ``pressure'' is not a suitable candidate for supplementing thermal pressure in the presence of TI, and that polytropic descriptions of it are probably not adequate in the fully turbulent regime. Finally, we consider TI in a turbulent ISM-like medium. We find that the flow does not exhibit sharp phase transitions, as would be expected in classical...

Vázquez-Semadeni, E; Passot, T; Sánchez-Salcedo, F J; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Gazol, Adriana; Passot, Thierry; Sanchez-Salcedo, Javier

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

Kashiwa, B.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Effective Roughness Length for Turbulent Flow over a Wavy Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-equation turbulence model is used to calculate the effective roughness length for two-dimensional turbulent flow over small amplitude, wavy surface topography. The governing equations are solved using the method of matched asymptotic ...

S. J. Jacobs

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

A Baroclinic Model of turbulent dusty flows  

SciTech Connect

The problem considered here is the numerical simulation of the turbulent dusty flow induced by explosions over soil surfaces. Some of the unresolved issues are: (1) how much dust is scoured from such surfaces; (2) where does the dust go in the boundary layer; (3) what is the dusty boundary layer height versus time; (4) what are the dusty boundary layer profiles; (5) how much of the dust mass becomes entrained into the dust stem; and (6) where does the dust go in the buoyant cloud? The author proposes a Baroclinic Model for flows with large density variations that actually calculates the turbulent mixing and transport of dust on an adaptive grid. The model is based on the following idealizations: (1) a loose dust bed; (2) an instantaneous shock fluidization of the dust layer; (3) the dust and air are in local equilibrium (so air viscosity enforces the no-slip condition); (4) the dust-air mixture is treated as a continuum dense fluid with zero viscosity; and (5) the turbulent mixing is dominated by baroclinically-generated vorticity. These assumptions lead to an inviscid set of conservation laws for the mixture, which are solved by means of a high-order Godunov algorithm for gasdynamics. Adaptive Mesh Refinement (AMR) is used to capture the turbulent mixing processes on the grid. One of the unique characteristics of these flows is that mixing occurs because vorticity is produced by an inviscid, baroclinic mechanism. A number of examples are presented to illustrate these baroclinic effects including shock interactions with dense-gas layers and dust beds, and dusty wall jets of airblast precursors. The conclusion of these studies is that dusty boundary layers grow because of mass entrainment from the fluidized bed (and not because of viscous wall drag) as proven by the Mass Integral Equation.

Kuhl, A.L.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Petascale Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Channel Flow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Petascale Petascale Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Channel Flow MyoungKyu Lee mk@ices.utexas.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of Texas at Austin ESP Meeting May, 2013 M.K. Lee (Univ of Texas, Austin) Petascale DNS of Turbulent Channel Flow ESP Meeting May, 2013 1 / 30 Contents Project Overview Performance Optimization Early Result Conclusion M.K. Lee (Univ of Texas, Austin) Petascale DNS of Turbulent Channel Flow ESP Meeting May, 2013 2 / 30 Project Overview Project Title â—® Petascale Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Channel Flow Goal â—® Expanding our understand of wall-bounded turbulence Personnel â—® P.I. : Robert Moser â—® Primary Developer : M.K.Lee â—® Software Engineering Support : Nicholas Malaya â—® Catalyst : Ramesh Balakrishnan M.K. Lee (Univ of Texas, Austin) Petascale DNS of Turbulent Channel Flow ESP Meeting May, 2013 3 / 30 Turbulent

14

Thermal laminarization of a stratified pipe flow  

SciTech Connect

The present work constitutes a new program that grew out of a scoping assessment by ANL to determine the propensity for pipe stratification to occur in the reactor outlet nozzles and hot-leg piping of a generic LMFBR during events producing reverse pipe flow. This paper focuses on the role that thermal buoyancy plays relative to being able to laminarize a turbulent stratified shear zone in a horizontal pipe. The preceeding can influence the behavior of a pipe stratified-backflow-recirculation zone (cold plenum water down into the hot pipe flow) which developes as the result of a temperature difference between the pipe flow and the plenum.

Oras, J.J.; Kasza, K.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Adaptive LES Methodology for Turbulent Flow Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although turbulent flows are common in the world around us, a solution to the fundamental equations that govern turbulence still eludes the scientific community. Turbulence has often been called one of the last unsolved problem in classical physics, yet it is clear that the need to accurately predict the effect of turbulent flows impacts virtually every field of science and engineering. As an example, a critical step in making modern computational tools useful in designing aircraft is to be able to accurately predict the lift, drag, and other aerodynamic characteristics in numerical simulations in a reasonable amount of time. Simulations that take months to years to complete are much less useful to the design cycle. Much work has been done toward this goal (Lee-Rausch et al. 2003, Jameson 2003) and as cost effective accurate tools for simulating turbulent flows evolve, we will all benefit from new scientific and engineering breakthroughs. The problem of simulating high Reynolds number (Re) turbulent flows of engineering and scientific interest would have been solved with the advent of Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) techniques if unlimited computing power, memory, and time could be applied to each particular problem. Yet, given the current and near future computational resources that exist and a reasonable limit on the amount of time an engineer or scientist can wait for a result, the DNS technique will not be useful for more than 'unit' problems for the foreseeable future (Moin & Kim 1997, Jimenez & Moin 1991). The high computational cost for the DNS of three dimensional turbulent flows results from the fact that they have eddies of significant energy in a range of scales from the characteristic length scale of the flow all the way down to the Kolmogorov length scale. The actual cost of doing a three dimensional DNS scales as Re{sup 9/4} due to the large disparity in scales that need to be fully resolved. State-of-the-art DNS calculations of isotropic turbulence have recently been completed at the Japanese Earth Simulator (Yokokawa et al. 2002, Kaneda et al. 2003) using a resolution of 40963 (approximately 10{sup 11}) grid points with a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of 1217 (Re {approx} 10{sup 6}). Impressive as these calculations are, performed on one of the world's fastest super computers, more brute computational power would be needed to simulate the flow over the fuselage of a commercial aircraft at cruising speed. Such a calculation would require on the order of 10{sup 16} grid points and would have a Reynolds number in the range of 108. Such a calculation would take several thousand years to simulate one minute of flight time on today's fastest super computers (Moin & Kim 1997). Even using state-of-the-art zonal approaches, which allow DNS calculations that resolve the necessary range of scales within predefined 'zones' in the flow domain, this calculation would take far too long for the result to be of engineering interest when it is finally obtained. Since computing power, memory, and time are all scarce resources, the problem of simulating turbulent flows has become one of how to abstract or simplify the complexity of the physics represented in the full Navier-Stokes (NS) equations in such a way that the 'important' physics of the problem is captured at a lower cost. To do this, a portion of the modes of the turbulent flow field needs to be approximated by a low order model that is cheaper than the full NS calculation. This model can then be used along with a numerical simulation of the 'important' modes of the problem that cannot be well represented by the model. The decision of what part of the physics to model and what kind of model to use has to be based on what physical properties are considered 'important' for the problem. It should be noted that 'nothing is free', so any use of a low order model will by definition lose some information about the original flow.

Oleg V. Vasilyev

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

16

Dynamic Multiscale Averaging (DMA) of Turbulent Flow  

SciTech Connect

A new approach called dynamic multiscale averaging (DMA) for computing the effects of turbulent flow is described. The new method encompasses multiple applications of temporal and spatial averaging, that is, multiscale operations. Initially, a direct numerical simulation (DNS) is performed for a relatively short time; it is envisioned that this short time should be long enough to capture several fluctuating time periods of the smallest scales. The flow field variables are subject to running time averaging during the DNS. After the relatively short time, the time-averaged variables are volume averaged onto a coarser grid. Both time and volume averaging of the describing equations generate correlations in the averaged equations. These correlations are computed from the flow field and added as source terms to the computation on the next coarser mesh. They represent coupling between the two adjacent scales. Since they are computed directly from first principles, there is no modeling involved. However, there is approximation involved in the coupling correlations as the flow field has been computed for only a relatively short time. After the time and spatial averaging operations are applied at a given stage, new computations are performed on the next coarser mesh using a larger time step. The process continues until the coarsest scale needed is reached. New correlations are created for each averaging procedure. The number of averaging operations needed is expected to be problem dependent. The new DMA approach is applied to a relatively low Reynolds number flow in a square duct segment. Time-averaged stream-wise velocity and vorticity contours from the DMA approach appear to be very similar to a full DNS for a similar flow reported in the literature. Expected symmetry for the final results is produced for the DMA method. The results obtained indicate that DMA holds significant potential in being able to accurately compute turbulent flow without modeling for practical engineering applications.

Richard W. Johnson

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Filtering Turbulent Sparsely Observed Geophysical Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Filtering sparsely turbulent signals from nature is a central problem of contemporary data assimilation. Here, sparsely observed turbulent signals from nature are generated by solutions of two-layer quasigeostrophic models with turbulent cascades ...

John Harlim; Andrew J. Majda

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Regulation of thermal conductivity in hot galaxy clusters by MHD turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The role of thermal conduction in regulating the thermal behavior of cooling flows in galaxy clusters is reexamined. Recent investigations have shown that the anisotropic Coulomb heat flux caused by a magnetic field in a dilute plasma drives a dynamical instability. A long standing problem of cooling flow theory has been to understand how thermal conduction can offset radiative core losses without completely preventing them. In this Letter we propose that magnetohydrodynamic turbulence driven by the heat flux instability regulates field-line insulation and drives a reverse convective thermal flux, both of which may mediate the stabilization of the cooling cores of hot clusters. This model suggests that turbulent mixing should accompany strong thermal gradients in cooling flows. This prediction seems to be supported by the spatial distribution of metals in the central galaxies of clusters, which shows a much stronger correlation with the ambient hot gas temperature gradient than with the parent stellar population.

Steven A. Balbus; Christopher S. Reynolds

2008-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

19

A Large-Eddy Simulation Study of Thermal Effects on Turbulence Coherent Structures in and above a Building Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal effects on turbulent flow in and above a cubical building array are numerically investigated using the parallelized large-eddy simulation model (PALM). Two cases (no heating and bottom heating) are simulated and are compared with each ...

Seung-Bu Park; Jong-Jin Baik

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

High-Performance Computing and Visualization of Unsteady Turbulent Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The history of high-performance computing in turbulent flows is reviewed and their recent topics in industrial use are addressed. Special attention is paid to the validity of the method in flow visualization, and three-dimensional unsteady simulation ... Keywords: CAE, DNS, HPC, LES, turbulence

T. Kobayashi; M. Tsubokura; N. Oshima

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Final Report - Investigation of Intermittent Turbulence and Turbulent Structures in the Presence of Controlled Sheared Flows  

SciTech Connect

Final Report for grant DE-FG02-06ER54898. The dynamics and generation of intermittent plasma turbulent structures, widely known as "blobs" have been studied in the presence of sheared plasma flows in a controlled laboratory experiment.

Gilmore, Mark A. [University of New Mexico

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

22

Chaotic Dynamos Generated by a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of several dynamical regimes of the magnetic field generated by a turbulent flow of liquid sodium (VKS experiment). Stationary dynamos, transitions to relaxation cycles or to intermittent bursts, and random field reversals occur in a fairly small range of parameters. Large scale dynamics of the magnetic field result from the interactions of a few modes. The low dimensional nature of these dynamics is not smeared out by the very strong turbulent fluctuations of the flow.

Ravelet, F.; Monchaux, R.; Aumaitre, S.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B. [Service de Physique de lEtat Condense, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, CEA-Saclay, CNRS URA 2464, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de lEcole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8550, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bourgoin, M.; Odier, Ph.; Plihon, N.; Pinton, J.-F.; Volk, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de lEcole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 allee dItalie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

23

Turbulent thermal diffusion of aerosols in geophysics and laboratory experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a new phenomenon of turbulent thermal diffusion associated with turbulent transport of aerosols in the atmosphere and in laboratory experiments. The essence of this phenomenon is the appearance of a nondiffusive mean flux of particles in the direction of the mean heat flux, which results in the formation of large-scale inhomogeneities in the spatial distribution of aerosols that accumulate in regions of minimum mean temperature of the surrounding fluid. This effect of turbulent thermal diffusion was detected experimentally. In experiments turbulence was generated by two oscillating grids in two directions of the imposed vertical mean temperature gradient. We used Particle Image Velocimetry to determine the turbulent velocity field, and an Image Processing Technique based on an analysis of the intensity of Mie scattering to determine the spatial distribution of aerosols. Analysis of the intensity of laser light Mie scattering by aerosols showed that aerosols accumulate in the vicinity of the minimum mean temperature due to the effect of turbulent thermal diffusion. Geophysical applications of the obtained results are discussed.

A. Eidelman; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; A. Krein; I. Rogachevskii; J. Buchholz; G. Gruenefeld

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

24

Nonlinear Flow Generation By Electrostatic Turbulence In Tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

Global gyrokinetic simulations have revealed an important nonlinear flow generation process due to the residual stress produced by electrostatic turbulence of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes and trapped electron modes (TEM). In collisionless TEM (CTEM) turbulence, nonlinear residual stress generation by both the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of broken symmetry in the parallel wave number spectrum is identified for the first time. Concerning the origin of the symmetry breaking, turbulence self-generated low frequency zonal flow shear has been identified to be a key, universal mechanism in various turbulence regimes. Simulations reported here also indicate the existence of other mechanisms beyond E × B shear. The ITG turbulence driven “intrinsic” torque associated with residual stress is shown to increase close to linearly with the ion temperature gradient, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations in various devices. In CTEM dominated regimes, a net toroidal rotation is driven in the cocurrent direction by “intrinsic” torque, consistent with the experimental trend of observed intrinsic rotation. The finding of a “flow pinch” in CTEM turbulence may offer an interesting new insight into the underlying dynamics governing the radial penetration of modulated flows in perturbation experiments. Finally, simulations also reveal highly distinct phase space structures between CTEM and ITG turbulence driven momentum, energy and particle fluxes, elucidating the roles of resonant and non-resonant particles.

W.X. Wang, P.H. Diamond, T.S. Hahm, S. Ethier, G. Rewoldt, and W.M. Tang

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Nonlinear flow generation by electrostatic turbulence in tokamaks  

SciTech Connect

Global gyrokinetic simulations have revealed an important nonlinear flow generation process due to the residual stress produced by electrostatic turbulence of ion temperature gradient (ITG) modes and trapped electron modes (TEMs). In collisionless TEM (CTEM) turbulence, nonlinear residual stress generation by both the fluctuation intensity and the intensity gradient in the presence of broken symmetry in the parallel wavenumber spectrum is identified for the first time. Concerning the origin of the symmetry breaking, turbulence self-generated low frequency zonal flow shear has been identified to be a key, universal mechanism in various turbulence regimes. Simulations reported here also indicate the existence of other mechanisms beyond ExB shear. The ITG turbulence driven 'intrinsic' torque associated with residual stress is shown to increase close to linearly with the ion temperature gradient, in qualitative agreement with experimental observations in various devices. In CTEM dominated regimes, a net toroidal rotation is driven in the cocurrent direction by intrinsic torque, consistent with the experimental trend of observed intrinsic rotation. The finding of a 'flow pinch' in CTEM turbulence may offer an interesting new insight into the underlying dynamics governing the radial penetration of modulated flows in perturbation experiments. Finally, simulations also reveal highly distinct phase space structures between CTEM and ITG turbulence driven momentum, energy, and particle fluxes, elucidating the roles of resonant and non-resonant particles.

Wang, W. X.; Hahm, T. S.; Ethier, S.; Rewoldt, G.; Tang, W. M. [Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton University, P.O. Box 451, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Observations of Turbulence in Stratified Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Various theoretical properties of the structure function are evaluated. Additional functions are constructed to describe the overall influence of stratification, the anisotropy and intermittency of the turbulence, and the asymmetry of the main ...

L. Mahrt; N. Gamage

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

A Numerical Study of Thermal Effects on Flow and Pollutant Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates thermal effects on the flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons. A two-dimensional numerical model with a k–? turbulent closure scheme is developed, and the heat transfer between the air and the building wall ...

Jae-Jin Kim; Jong-Jin Baik

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Ignition of hydrogen/air mixing layer in turbulent flows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Autoignition of a scalar hydrogen/air mixing layer in homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation. An initial counterflow of unmixed nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and heated air is perturbed by two-dimensional homogeneous turbulence. The temperature of the heated air stream is chosen to be 1,100 K which is substantially higher than the crossover temperature at which the rates of the chain branching and termination reactions become equal. Three different turbulence intensities are tested in order to assess the effect of the characteristic flow time on the ignition delay. For each condition, a simulation without heat release is also performed. The ignition delay determined with and without heat release is shown to be almost identical up to the point of ignition for all of the turbulence intensities tested, and the predicted ignition delays agree well within a consistent error band. It is also observed that the ignition kernel always occurs where hydrogen is focused, and the peak concentration of HO{sub 2} is aligned well with the scalar dissipation rate. The dependence of the ignition delay on turbulence intensity is found to be nonmonotonic. For weak to moderate turbulence the ignition is facilitated by turbulence via enhanced mixing, while for stronger turbulence, whose timescale is substantially smaller than the ignition delay, the ignition is retarded due to excessive scalar dissipation, and hence diffusive loss, at the ignition location. However, for the wide range of initial turbulence fields studied, the variation in ignition delay due to the corresponding variation in turbulence intensity appears to be quite small.

Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Turbulent Shear Flows 9: Selected Papers from the Ninth International Symposium on Turbulent Shear Flows, Kyoto, Japan, August 16-18, 1993, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume from the well-known series on turbulent shear flows contains four parts on closures and fundamentals, free flows, wall flows and combustion and recirculating flows. Each section begins with an invited introductory article followed by a selection ...

Franz Durst; Nobuhide Kasagi; Brian E. Launder; Frank W. Schmidt; Kenjiro Suzuki; James H. Whitelaw

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Turbulent Channel Flows on a Rotating Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with flow in a rectilinear channel on a rotating earth. The flow is directed perpendicular to the background planetary vorticity; both an analytical theory and numerical simulations are employed. The analytical approach assumes ...

Robert A. Handler; Richard P. Mied; Gloria J. Lindemann; Thomas E. Evans

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Multiphase Turbulent Flow Ken Kiger -UMCP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the dispersion: · Size & geometry · Volume fraction #12;Bubbly Pipe Flow ­ heat exchangers in power plants, A/C units Gas-Liquid Flow #12;Aeration: -produced by wave action - used as reactor in chemical processing delivery Liquid-Gas Flow http://www.mywindpowersystem.com/2009/07/wind-power-when-nature

Gruner, Daniel S.

32

Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gravity Surface Wave Bifurcation in a Highly Turbulent Swirling Flow Michael Baumer University Gravity Wave 2 3 Measurements 3 4 Mechanical Hardware: Problems and Solutions 5 5 Results 7 6 Conclusions investigated a free-surface gravity wave bifurcation in the large-separation regime, that is, where

Witten, Thomas A.

33

Collisions of Small Drops in a Turbulent Flow. Part II: Effects of Flow Accelerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of Lagrangian acceleration on collision efficiency and collision kernels of small cloud droplets in a turbulent flow are investigated using the results of the recent laboratory experiments by La Porta et al., conducted under high Re? ...

M. B. Pinsky; A. P. Khain

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Magnetohydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann simulations of turbulence and rectangular jet flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) investigations of decaying isotropic turbulence and rectangular jets (RJ) are carried out. A novel MHD lattice Boltzmann scheme that combines multiple relaxation time (MRT) parameters for the velocity field with a single relaxation time (SRT) parameter for the Maxwell’s stress tensor is developed for this study. In the MHD homogeneous turbulence studies, the kinetic/magnetic energy and enstrophy decays, kinetic enstrophy evolution, and vorticity alignment with the strain-rate tensor are evaluated to assess the key physical MHD turbulence mechanisms. The magnetic and kinetic energies interact and exchange through the influence of the Lorentz force work. An initial random fluctuating magnetic field increases the vortex stretching and forward cascade mechanisms. A strong uniform mean magnetic field increases the anisotropy of the turbulent flow field and causes inverse cascading. In the RJ studies, an investigation into the MHD effects on velocity, instability, and the axis-switching phenomena is performed at various magnetic field strengths and Magnetic Reynolds Numbers. The magnetic field is found to decelerate the jet core, inhibit instability, and prevent axis-switching. The key physical mechanisms are: (i) the exchange of energy between kinetic and magnetic modes and (ii) the magnetic field effect on the vorticity evolution. From these studies, it is found that magnetic field influences momentum, vorticity, and energy evolution and the degree of modification depends on the field strength. This interaction changes vortex evolution, and alters turbulence processes and rectangular jet flow characteristics. Overall, this study provides more insight into the physics of MHD flows, which suggests possible applications of MHD Flow Control.

Riley, Benjamin Matthew

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project ���¢��������Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations���¢�������. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

Xiaolin Zhong

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

36

A parallel solution - adaptive method for three-dimensional turbulent non-premixed combusting flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A parallel adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) algorithm is proposed and applied to the prediction of steady turbulent non-premixed compressible combusting flows in three space dimensions. The parallel solution-adaptive algorithm solves the system of partial-differential ... Keywords: Adaptive mesh refinement, Parallel solution-adaptive algorithm, Turbulent combustion, Turbulent diffusion flames, Turbulent non-premixed flames

Xinfeng Gao; Clinton P. T. Groth

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Visualization and Diagnostics of Thermal Plasma Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flow visualization is a key tool for the study of thermal plasma flows. Because of their high temperature and associated self emission, standard and high speed photography is commonly used for flow and temperature field visualization. Tracer techniques ... Keywords: d.c. plasma jet, enthalpy probe techniques, induction plasma, laser strobe, photographic techniques, schlieren, thermal plasma flows

M. I. Boulos

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions relevant to the experiments, and (3) to explore whether the corresponding predictions can explain the experimentally-observed behavior of the rise and dispersion of oil droplets in isotropic turbulence. A brief summary of results is presented in Section 4.

Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Rotational intermittency and turbulence induced lift experienced by large particles in a turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The motion of a large, neutrally buoyant, particle, freely advected by a turbulent flow is determined experimentally. We demonstrate that both the translational and angular accelerations exhibit very wide probability distributions, a manifestation of intermittency. The orientation of the angular velocity with respect to the trajectory, as well as the translational acceleration conditioned on the spinning velocity provide evidence of a lift force acting on the particle.

Zimmermann, Robert; Bourgoin, Mickael; Volk, Romain; Pumir, Alain; Pinton, Jean-Francois

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

On integrating LES and laboratory turbulent flow experiments  

SciTech Connect

Critical issues involved in large eddy simulation (LES) experiments relate to the treatment of unresolved subgrid scale flow features and required initial and boundary condition supergrid scale modelling. The inherently intrusive nature of both LES and laboratory experiments is noted in this context. Flow characterization issues becomes very challenging ones in validation and computational laboratory studies, where potential sources of discrepancies between predictions and measurements need to be clearly evaluated and controlled. A special focus of the discussion is devoted to turbulent initial condition issues.

Grinstein, Fernando Franklin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Computation of turbulent recirculating flows using a hybrid adaptive grid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid adaptive gridding procedure is applied to the computation of two-dimensional turbulent, recirculating flows. The procedure combines both the local refinement method and the global moving grid method. The moving grid method is applied to obtain the initial adaptive solution. The local refinement method is then used on the large error regions flagged by using the weight function approach. The test cases are a backward facing step flow, a two-dimensional side jet flow, and an axisymmetric swirling flow. By comparing with the fine uniform grid solution, the numerical efficiencies ranging from 20 to 40 are obtained in the test problems. The most attractive feature of the procedure is its ease of application.

Lee, D.; Yeh, C.L. (National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Inst. of Aeronautics and Astronautics)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

A non-hybrid method for the PDF equations of turbulent flows on unstructured grids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In probability density function (PDF) methods of turbulent flows, the joint PDF of several flow variables is computed by numerically integrating a system of stochastic differential equations for Lagrangian particles. A set of parallel algorithms is proposed ... Keywords: Finite element method, Langevin equation, Monte-Carlo method, Particle tracking, Particle-in-cell method, Probability density function method, Scalar dispersion, Turbulent flow, Unstructured grids

J. Bakosi; P. Franzese; Z. Boybeyi

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

FORMATION OF TURBULENT AND MAGNETIZED MOLECULAR CLOUDS VIA ACCRETION FLOWS OF H I CLOUDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations, including the effects of radiative cooling/heating, chemical reactions, and thermal conduction, we investigate the formation of molecular clouds in the multi-phase interstellar medium. As suggested by recent observations, we consider the formation of molecular clouds due to accretion of H I clouds. Our simulations show that the initial H I medium is piled up behind the shock waves induced by accretion flows. Since the initial medium is highly inhomogeneous as a consequence of thermal instability, a newly formed molecular cloud becomes very turbulent owing to the development of the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability. The kinetic energy of the turbulence dominates the thermal, magnetic, and gravitational energies throughout the entire 10 Myr evolution. However, the kinetic energy measured using CO-fraction-weighted densities is comparable to the other energies, once the CO molecules are sufficiently formed as a result of UV shielding. This suggests that the true kinetic energy of turbulence in molecular clouds as a whole can be much larger than the kinetic energy of turbulence estimated using line widths of molecular emission. We find that clumps in a molecular cloud show the following statistically homogeneous evolution: the typical plasma {beta} of the clumps is roughly constant ({beta}) {approx_equal} 0.4; the size-velocity dispersion relation is {Delta}v {approx_equal} 1.5 km s{sup -1} (l/1 pc){sup 0.5}, irrespective of the density; the clumps evolve toward magnetically supercritical, gravitationally unstable cores; and the clumps seem to evolve into cores that satisfy the condition for fragmentation into binaries. These statistical properties may represent the initial conditions of star formation.

Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

A Gas-Kinetic Scheme For The Simulation Of Compressible Turbulent Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A gas-kinetic scheme for the continuum regime is applied to the simulation of turbu- lent compressible flow, by replacing the molecular relaxation time with a turbulent relaxation time in the BGK model. The turbulence dynamics is modelled on the basis of a standard, linear two-equation turbulence model. The hydrodynamic limit of the resulting turbulence model is linear in smooth flow and non-linear in the presence of stronger flow gradients. The non-linear correction terms in the numerical flux are weighed as a function of "rarefaction" - referred to turbulence dynamics and not to molecular dynamics, i.e. measured by the ratio of turbulence to mean flow scales of motion. Even though no assumptions on the nature of the turbulence have been made and a linear two-equation turbulence model is used, the turbulence gas-kinetic scheme seems able to correct the turbulent stress tensor in an effective way; on the basis of a number of turbulence modelling benchmark flow cases, characterized by strong shock - boundary l...

Righi, Marcello

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Progress in Simulating Turbulent Electron Thermal Transport in NSTX  

SciTech Connect

Nonlinear simulations based on multiple NSTX discharge scenarios have progressed to help differentiate unique instability mechanisms and to validate with experimental turbulence and transport data. First nonlinear gyrokinetic simulations of microtearing (MT) turbulence in a high-beta NSTX H-mode discharge predict experimental levels of electron thermal transport that are dominated by magnetic flutter and increase with collisionality, roughly consistent with energy confinement times in dimensionless collisionality scaling experiments. Electron temperature gradient (ETG) simulations predict significant electron thermal transport in some low and high beta discharges when ion scales are suppressed by E x B shear. Although the predicted transport in H-modes is insensitive to variation in collisionality (inconsistent with confinement scaling), it is sensitive to variations in other parameters, particularly density gradient stabilization. In reversed shear (RS) Lmode discharges that exhibit electron internal transport barriers, ETG transport has also been shown to be suppressed nonlinearly by strong negative magnetic shear, s<<0. In many high beta plasmas, instabilities which exhibit a stiff beta dependence characteristic of kinetic ballooning modes (KBM) are sometimes found in the core region. However, they do not have a distinct finite beta threshold, instead transitioning gradually to a trapped electron mode (TEM) as beta is reduced to zero. Nonlinear simulations of this "hybrid" TEM/KBM predict significant transport in all channels, with substantial contributions from compressional magnetic perturbations. As multiple instabilities are often unstable simultaneously in the same plasma discharge, even on the same flux surface, unique parametric dependencies are discussed which may be useful for distinguishing the different mechanisms experimentally.

Guttenfelder, Walter

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

47

Thermal conduction and particle transport in strong MHD turbulence, with application to galaxy-cluster plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate field-line separation in strong MHD turbulence analytically and with direct numerical simulations. We find that in the static-magnetic-field approximation the thermal conductivity in galaxy clusters is reduced by a factor of about 5-10 relative to the Spitzer thermal conductivity of a non-magnetized plasma. We also estimate how the thermal conductivity would be affected by efficient turbulent resistivity.

Benjamin D. G. Chandran; Jason L. Maron

2003-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

48

Large-eddy simulation of a plane reacting jet transversely injected into supersonic turbulent channel flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A plane, chemically reacting jet of fuel injected through a narrow spanwise slot into supersonic and fully turbulent air flow in a channel with isothermal, parallel walls is investigated using a semi-implicit large-eddy simulation technique. It is based ... Keywords: high-order numerical schemes, infinitely fast chemistry, large-eddy simulation, plane jet in crossflow, supersonic turbulent channel flow

Ch. Schaupp; R. Friedrich

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Complexity analysis of the turbulent environmental fluid flow time series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Kolmogorov complexities, sample and permutation entropies to quantify the randomness degree in river flow time series of two mountain rivers in Bosnia and Herzegovina, representing the turbulent environmental fluid, for the period 1926-1990. In particular, we have examined the monthly river flow time series from two rivers (Miljacka and Bosnia) in mountain part of their flow and then calculated the Kolmogorov Complexity (KL) based on the Lempel-Ziv Algorithm (LZA) (Lower - KLL and Upper - KLU), Sample Entropy (SE) and Permutation Entropy (PE) values for each time series. The results indicate that the KLL, KLU, SE and PE values in two rivers are close to each other regardless of the amplitude differences in their monthly flow rates. We have illustrated the changes in mountain river flow complexity by experiments using (i) the data set for the Bosnia River and (ii) anticipated human activities and projected climate changes. We have explored the sensitivity of considered measures in dependence on the length of time series. In addition, we have divided the period 1926-1990 into three sub-intervals: (a) 1926-1945, (b)1946-1965 and (c)1966-1990, and calculated the KLL, KLU, SE and PE values for the various time series in these sub-intervals. It is found that during the period 1946-1965, there is a decrease in their complexities, and corresponding changes in the SE and PE, in comparison to the period 1926-1990. This complexity loss may be primarily attributed to (i) human interventions, after Second World War, on these rivers because of their use for water consumption and (ii) climate change in recent time.

Dragutin T. Mihailovic; Emilija Nikolic-Djoric; Nusret Dreskovic; Gordan Mimic

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

50

Drag, turbulence, and diffusion in flow through emergent vegetation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aquatic plants convert mean kinetic energy into turbulent kinetic energy at the scale of the plant stems and branches. This energy transfer, linked to wake generation, affects vegetative drag and turbulence intensity. ...

Nepf, Heidi

51

Modeling Turbulent Flow in an Urban Central Business District  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Realistic Urban Spread and Transport of Intrusive Contaminants (RUSTIC) model has been developed as a simplified computational fluid dynamics model with a k–? turbulence model to be used to provide moderately fast simulations of turbulent ...

Donald A. Burrows; Eric A. Hendricks; Steve R. Diehl; Robert Keith

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Origin of the Temperature Oscillation in Turbulent Thermal Convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report an experimental study of the three-dimensional spatial structure of the low frequency temperature oscillations in a cylindrical Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection cell. It is found that thermal plumes are not emitted periodically, but randomly and continuously, from the top and bottom plates. We further found that the oscillation of the temperature field does not originate from the boundary layers, but rather is a result of the horizontal motion of the hot ascending and cold descending fluids being modulated by the twisting and sloshing motion of the bulk flow field.

Xi, Heng-Dong; Zhou, Quan; Chan, Tak-Shing; Xia, Ke-Qing

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Three-dimensional Fast Flux Test Facility plenum model turbulent flow prediction and data comparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two- and three-dimensional numerical simulations of turbulent flow in a scaled Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) upper plenum model were performed using the TEMPEST hydrothermal code. A standard k-element of model was used to describe turbulence through an effective viscosity. Comparisons with previously reported mean velocity and turbulence field data measured in the plenum model and two-dimensional numerical simulations using the TEACH code were made. Predicted horizontal and vertical mean velocities and turbulent kinetic energy are shown to be in good agreement with available experimental data when inlet conditions of the dissipation of turbulent kinetic energy are appropriately prescribed. The three-dimensional quarter-symmetry simulation predicts the turbulent kinetic energy field significantly better than the two-dimensional centerplane simulations. These results lead to conclusions concerning deficiencies in the experimental data and the turbulence model.

Eyler, L.L.; Sawdye, R.W.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Large-eddy simulations of turbulent flow for grid-to-rod fretting in nuclear reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The grid-to-rod fretting (GTRF) problem in pressurized water reactors is a flow-induced vibration problem that results in wear and failure of the fuel rods in nuclear assemblies. In order to understand the fluid dynamics of GTRF and to build an archival database of turbulence statistics for various configurations, implicit large-eddy simulations of time-dependent single-phase turbulent flow have been performed in 3x3 and 5x5 rod bundles with a single grid spacer. To assess the computational mesh and resolution requirements, a method for quantitative assessment of unstructured meshes with no-slip walls is described. The calculations have been carried out using Hydra-TH, a thermal-hydraulics code developed at Los Alamos for the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light water reactors, a United States Department of Energy Innovation Hub. Hydra-TH uses a second-order implicit incremental projection method to solve the single-phase incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The simulations explicitly resolve the la...

Bakosi, J; Lowrie, R B; Pritchett-Sheats, L A; Nourgaliev, R R

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Turbulent Flow Analysis and Coherent Structure Identification in Experimental Models with Complex Geometries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulent flows and coherent structures emerging within turbulent flow fields have been extensively studied for the past few decades and a wide variety of experimental and numerical techniques have been developed for measurement and analysis of turbulent flows. The complex nature of turbulence requires methods that can accurately estimate its highly chaotic spatial and temporal behavior. Some of the classical cases of turbulent flows with simpler geometries have been well characterized by means of the existing experimental techniques and numerical models. Nevertheless, since most turbulent fields are of complex geometries; there is an increasing interest in the study of turbulent flows through models with more complicated geometries. In this dissertation, characteristics of turbulent flows through two different facilities with complex geometries are studied applying two different experimental methods. The first study involves the investigation of turbulent impinging jets through a staggered array of rods with or without crossflow. Such flows are crucial in various engineering disciplines. This experiment aimed at modeling the coolant flow behavior and mixing phenomena within the lower plenum of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). Dynamic Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and Matched Index of Refraction (MIR) techniques were applied to acquire the turbulent velocity fields within the model. Some key flow features that may significantly enhance the flow mixing within the test section or actively affect some of the structural components were identified in the velocity fields. The evolution of coherent structures within the flow field is further investigated using a Snapshot Proper Orthogonal Decomposition (POD) technique. Furthermore, a comparative POD method is proposed and successfully implemented for identification of the smaller but highly influential coherent structures which may not be captured in the full-field POD analysis. The second experimental study portrays the coolant flow through the core of an annular pebble bed VHTR. The complex geometry of the core and the highly turbulent nature of the coolant flow passing through the gaps of fuel pebbles make this case quite challenging. In this experiment, a high frequency Hot Wire Anemometry (HWA) system is applied for velocity measurements and investigation of the bypass flow phenomena within the near wall gaps of the core. The velocity profiles within the gaps verify the presence of an area of increased velocity close to the outer reflector wall; however, the characteristics of the coolant flow profile is highly dependent on the gap geometry and to a less extent on the Reynolds number of the flow. The time histories of the velocity are further analyzed using a Power Spectra Density (PSD) technique to acquire information about the energy content and energy transfer between eddies of different sizes at each point within the gaps.

Amini, Noushin

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

A robust, colocated, implicit algorithm for direct numerical simulation of compressible, turbulent flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A non-dissipative, robust, implicit algorithm is proposed for direct numerical and large-eddy simulation of compressible turbulent flows. The algorithm addresses the problems caused by low Mach numbers and under-resolved high Reynolds numbers. It colocates ... Keywords: All-Mach number, Compressible turbulence, Direct numerical simulation, Discrete energy conservation, Large-eddy simulation, Non-dissipative

Yucheng Hou; Krishnan Mahesh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

LES Analysis of the Aerodynamic Surface Properties for Turbulent Flows over Building Arrays with Various Geometries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes aerodynamic roughness properties for turbulent flows over various building arrays that represent realistic urban surface geometries. First, building morphological characteristics such as roughness density ?f and building ...

Hiromasa Nakayama; Tetsuya Takemi; Haruyasu Nagai

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Turbulence in Stratified Shear Flows: Implications for Interpreting Shear-induced Mixing in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulations of the time evolution of homogeneous stably stratified turbulent sheer flows have been performed for several Richardson numbers Ri and Reynolds numbers R?. The results show excellent agreement with length scale models ...

E. C. Itsweire; J. R. Koseff; D. A. Briggs; J. H. Ferziger

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Stochastic Models of Shear-Flow Turbulence with Enstrophy Transfer to Subgrid Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic model for shear-flow turbulence is constructed under the constraint that the parameterized nonlinear eddy–eddy interactions conserve energy but dissipate potential enstrophy. This parameterization is appropriate for truncated models ...

Timothy DelSole

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Possible Mechanisms of Clear-Air Turbulence in Strongly Anticyclonic Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The forecasting of clear-air turbulence (CAT) continues to be a challenging problem despite progress made in the understanding of vertical shear (Kelvin–Helmholtz) instabilities. The possible connections between horizontal anticyclonic flows and ...

John A. Knox

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Explicit Filtering and Reconstruction Turbulence Modeling for Large-Eddy Simulation of Neutral Boundary Layer Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard turbulence closures for large-eddy simulations of atmospheric flow based on finite-difference or finite-volume codes use eddy-viscosity models and hence ignore the contribution of the resolved subfilter-scale stresses. These eddy-...

Fotini Katopodes Chow; Robert L. Street; Ming Xue; Joel H. Ferziger

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Flow visualization using momentum and energy transport tubes and applications to turbulent flow in wind farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As a generalization of the mass-flux based classical stream-tube, the concept of momentum and energy transport tubes is discussed as a flow visualization tool. These transport tubes have the property, respectively, that no fluxes of momentum or energy exist over their respective tube mantles. As an example application using data from large-eddy simulation, such tubes are visualized for the mean-flow structure of turbulent flow in large wind farms, in fully developed wind-turbine-array boundary layers. The three-dimensional organization of energy transport tubes changes considerably when turbine spacings are varied, enabling the visualization of the path taken by the kinetic energy flux that is ultimately available at any given turbine within the array.

Meyers, Johan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Numerical simulation of turbulent flow in complex geometries used in power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Performance degradations or improvements of coal-fired power stations depend on effective functioning of pulveriser equipment and combustion efficiency of furnaces in boilers. The function of a pulveriser is to grind the lumped coal and transfer the ... Keywords: CFD, coal fired power station, flow simulation, geometrical modelling, grid generation, particle trajectories, pulveriser, roller mill, turbulent flow, two-phase flow

C. Bhasker

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Some Influences of Background Flow Conditions on the Generation of Turbulence due to Gravity Wave Breaking above Deep Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deep moist convection generates turbulence in the clear air above and around developing clouds, penetrating convective updrafts and mature thunderstorms. This turbulence can be due to shearing instabilities caused by strong flow deformations near ...

Todd P. Lane; Robert D. Sharman

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Effects of Mean Flow Direction on Energy, Isotropy, and Coherence of Baroclinically Unstable Beta-Plane Geostrophic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of mean flow direction on statistically steady, baroclinically unstable, beta-plane quasigeostrophic (QG) turbulence are examined in a two-layer numerical model. The turbulence is forced by an imposed, horizontally homogeneous, ...

Brian K. Arbic; Glenn R. Flierl

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Preliminary Study of Turbulent Flow in the Lower Plenum of a Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary study of the turbulent flow in a scaled model of a portion of the lower plenum of a gas-cooled advanced reactor concept has been conducted. The reactor is configured such that hot gases at various temperatures exit the coolant channels in the reactor core, where they empty into a lower plenum and mix together with a crossflow past vertical cylindrical support columns, then exit through an outlet duct. An accurate assessment of the flow behavior will be necessary prior to final design to ensure that material structural limits are not exceeded. In this work, an idealized model was created to mimic a region of the lower plenum for a simplified set of conditions that enabled the flow to be treated as an isothermal, incompressible fluid with constant properties. This is a first step towards assessing complex thermal fluid phenomena in advanced reactor designs. Once such flows can be computed with confidence, heated flows will be examined. Experimental data was obtained using three-dimensional Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to obtain non-intrusive flow measurements for an unheated geometry. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) predictions of the flow were made using a commercial CFD code and compared to the experimental data. The work presented here is intended to be scoping in nature, since the purpose of this work is to identify improvements that can be made to subsequent computations and experiments. Rigorous validation of computational predictions will eventually be necessary for design and analysis of new reactor concepts, as well as for safety analysis and licensing calculations.

T. Gallaway; D.P. Guillen; H.M. McIlroy, Jr.; S.P. Antal

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

SYMPOSIUM ON TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION - SPECIAL SYMPOSIUM TO BRING TOGETHER TOP RESEARCHERS IN THE FIELDS OF FLUID TURBULENCE AND COMBUSTION TO PROMOTE ADVANCES IN TURBULENT, REACTING FLOWS  

SciTech Connect

A Symposium on Turbulence and Combustion was held at Cornell University on August 3-4, 2009. The overall goal of the Symposium was to promote future advances in the study of turbulence and combustion, through an unique forum intended to foster interactions between leading members of these two research communities. The Symposium program consisted of twelve invited lectures given by world-class experts in these fields, two poster sessions consisting of nearly 50 presentations, an open forum, and other informal activities designed to foster discussion. Topics covered in the lectures included turbulent dispersion, wall-bounded flows, mixing, finite-rate chemistry, and others, using experiment, modeling, and computations, and included perspectives from an international community of leading researchers from academia, national laboratories, and industry.

Caughey, David

2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

68

Some Turbulence Characteristics in Stable Atmospheric Boundary Layer Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric boundary layer measurements during stable and near neutral condition from seven sites in different kinds of terrain have been analyzed in order to find relationships among turbulence parameters.

Ann-Sofi Smedman

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Investigation of Flow, Turbulence, and Dispersion within Built Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Properties of the wind field within the Oklahoma City ParkProperties of the wind field within the Oklahoma City Parkwinds, turbulence, and dispersion in built-up downtown areas of Oklahoma

Pan, Hansheng

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Measurements in film cooling flows: Hole L/D and turbulence intensity effects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot-wire anemometry of simulated film cooling was used to study the influence of freestream turbulence intensity and film cooling hole length-to-diameter ratio on mean velocity and turbulence intensity. Measurements were made in the zone where the coolant and freestream flows mix. Flow from one row of film cooling holes with a streamwise injection of 35{degree} and no lateral injection and with a coolant- to-freestream flow velocity ratio of 1.0 was investigated under freestream turbulence levels of 0.5 and 12%. Coolant-to-freestream density ratio was unity. Two length-to-diameter ratios for the film cooling holes, 2.3 and 7.0, are tested. Results show that under low freestream turbulence conditions, pronounced differences exist in the flowfield between L/D=7.0 and 2.3; the differences are less prominent at high freestream turbulence intensities. Generally, short-L/D injection results in ``jetting`` of the coolant further into the freestream flow and enhanced mixing. Other changes in the flowfield attributable to a rise in freestream turbulence intensity to engine- representative conditions are documented. 15 figs, 2 tabs, refs.

Burd, S.W.; Kaszeta, R.W.; Simon, T.W.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

71

Transport of Magnetic Field by a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium  

SciTech Connect

We study the effect of a turbulent flow of liquid sodium generated in the von Karman geometry, on the localized field of a magnet placed close to the frontier of the flow. We observe that the field can be transported by the flow on distances larger than its integral length scale. In the most turbulent configurations, the mean value of the field advected at large distance vanishes. However, the rms value of the fluctuations increases linearly with the magnetic Reynolds number. The advected field is strongly intermittent.

Volk, R.; Odier, Ph.; Pinton, J.-F. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 47 allee d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France); Ravelet, F.; Monchaux, R.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F. [Service de Physique de l'Etat Condense, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, CEA-Saclay, CNRS URA 2464, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8550, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France)

2006-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

72

A model for stratified gas-liquid turbulent flow in ducts of arbitrary cross-section  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

93 A model for stratified gas-liquid turbulent flow in ducts of arbitrary cross-section J. M the pressure gradient and the liquid fraction in two-phase gas- liquid fully developed stratified flow.60 Nomenclature. - TWO-PHASE VARIABLES. Definition densities statistical average (gas, liquid) mass average phase

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

SPH Simulation of transition to turbulence for planar shear flow subjected to a streamwise magnetic field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Active flow control of electrically conducting fluids finds growing importance in the metallurgical industry. A magnetic field applied in the streamwise direction of electrically conducting fluid flow restrains the velocity fluctuations in the transverse ... Keywords: CFD, magnetohydrodynamics, simulation, smoothed particle hydrodynamics, turbulence control

Fangming Jiang; Mónica S. A. Oliveira; Antonio C. M. Sousa

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

An energy preserving formulation for the simulation of multiphase turbulent flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this manuscript we propose an energy preserving formulation for the simulation of multiphase flows. The new formulation reduces the numerical diffusion with respect to previous formulations dealing with multiple phases, which makes this method to ... Keywords: Advection scheme, Multiphase flows, Turbulence

D. Fuster

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Numerical Investigation of Heat Transfer to Fully Developed Turbulent Air Flow in a Concentric Pipe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulation using standard k-e turbulencemodel was developed to investigate numerically thecharacteristic of backward-facing step flow in a concentricpipe. This research is focused on the surface temperature, localheat transfer coefficient and ... Keywords: Numerical Simulation, Heat Transfer, Turbulent Flow, Computational Fluid Dynamics, Backward Facing Step

Cheen Sean Oon, Ahmad Badarudin, Salim Newaz Kazi, Arif Syazwan

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Radial flow nuclear thermal rocket (RFNTR)  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radial flow nuclear thermal rocket fuel assembly includes a substantially conical fuel element having an inlet side and an outlet side. An annular channel is disposed in the element for receiving a nuclear propellant, and a second, conical, channel is disposed in the element for discharging the propellant. The first channel is located radially outward from the second channel, and separated from the second channel by an annular fuel bed volume. This fuel bed volume can include a packed bed of loose fuel beads confined by a cold porous inlet frit and a hot porous exit frit. The loose fuel beads include ZrC coated ZrC-UC beads. In this manner, nuclear propellant enters the fuel assembly axially into the first channel at the inlet side of the element, flows axially across the fuel bed volume, and is discharged from the assembly by flowing radially outward from the second channel at the outlet side of the element.

Leyse, Carl F. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A Quasi-equilibrium Turbulent Energy Model for Geophysical Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Mellor-Yamada hierarchy of turbulent closure models is reexamined to show that the elimination of a slight inconsistency in their analysis leads to a quasi-equilibrium model that is somewhat simpler than their level 2˝ model. Also the need to ...

B. Galperin; L. H. Kantha; S. Hassid; A. Rosati

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Local volume-time averaged equations of motion for dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In most flows of liquids and their vapors, the phases are dispersed randomly in both space and time. These dispersed flows can be described only statistically or in terms of averages. Local volume-time averaging is used here to derive a self-consistent set of equations governing momentum and energy transfer in dispersed, turbulent, multiphase flows. The empiricisms required for use with these equations are the subject of current research.

Sha, W.T.; Slattery, J.C.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

MASS TRANSFER TO ROTATING DISKS AND ROTATING RINGS IN LAMINAR, TRANSITION, AND FULLY DEVELOPED TURBULENT FLOW  

SciTech Connect

Experimental data and theoretical calculations are presented for the mass-transfer rate to rotating disks and rotating rings when laminar, transition, and fully developed turbulent flow exist upon different portions of the surface. Good agreement of data and the model is obtained for rotating disks and relatively thick rotating rings. Results of the calculations for thin rings generally exceed the experimental data measured in transition and turbulent flow. A y{sup +{sup 3}} form for the eddy diffusivity is used to fit the data. No improvement is noticed with a form involving both y{sup +{sup 3}} and y{sup +{sup 3}}.

Law Jr., C.G.; Pierini, P.; Newman, J.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Tracking the dynamics of translation and absolute orientation of a sphere in a turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the 6-dimensional dynamics -- position and orientation -- of a large sphere advected by a turbulent flow. The movement of the sphere is recorded with 2 high-speed cameras. Its orientation is tracked using a novel, efficient algorithm; it is based on the identification of possible orientation `candidates' at each time step, with the dynamics later obtained from maximization of a likelihood function. Analysis of the resulting linear and angular velocities and accelerations reveal a surprising intermittency for an object whose size lies in the integral range, close to the integral scale of the underlying turbulent flow.

Zimmermann, Robert; Bourgoin, Mickael; Volk, Romain; Pumir, Alain; Pinton, Jean-François

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Gravity-driven enhancement of heavy particle clustering in turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heavy particles suspended in a turbulent flow settle faster than in a still fluid. This effect stems from a preferential sampling of the regions where the fluid flows downward and is quantified here as a function of the level of turbulence, of particle inertia, and of the ratio between gravity and turbulent accelerations. By using analytical methods and detailed, state-of-the-art numerical simulations, settling is shown to induce an effective horizontal two-dimensional dynamics that increases clustering and reduce relative velocities between particles. These two competing effects can either increase or decrease the geometrical collision rates between same-size particles and are crucial for realistic modeling of coalescing particles.

Jeremie Bec; Holger Homann; Samriddhi Sankar Ray

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

82

Energy flux fluctuations in a finite volume of turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The flux of turbulent kinetic energy from large to small spatial scales is measured in a small domain B of varying size R. The probability distribution function of the flux is obtained using a time-local version of Kolmogorov's four-fifths law. The measurements, made at a moderate Reynolds number, show frequent events where the flux is backscattered from small to large scales, their frequency increasing as R is decreased. The observations are corroborated by a numerical simulation based on the motion of many particles and on an explicit form of the eddy damping.

Mahesh Bandi; Walter Goldburg; John Cressman Jr.; Alain Pumir

2006-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

83

On Solutions of the Diffusion–Deposition Equation for Point Sources in Turbulent Shear Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to develop analytical solutions to the three-dimensional diffusion–deposition equation for point sources in turbulent shear flow. In this paper, it is shown that the solution for the three-dimensional diffusion–...

C. H. Huang

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Influence of the Atmospheric Surface Layer on a Turbulent Flow Downstream of a Ship Superstructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a set of turbulence measurements at sea in the area of high flow distortion in the near wake and recirculation zone behind a ship's superstructure that is similar in geometry to a helicopter hangar/flight deck arrangement ...

Luksa Luznik; Cody J. Brownell; Murray R. Snyder; Hyung Suk Kang

85

On the clustering of finite-size particles in a turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate experimentally the spatial distributions of heavy and neutrally buoyant particles of finite size in a fully turbulent flow. As their Stokes number (i.e. ratio of the particle viscous relaxation time to a typical flow time scale) is close to 1, one may expect both classes of particles to aggregate in specific flow regions. This is not observed. Using a Vorono\\"i analysis we show that neutrally buoyant particles sample turbulence homogeneously, whereas heavy particles do cluster. One implication for the understanding and modeling of particle laden flows, is that the Stokes number cannot be the sole key parameter as soon as the dynamics of finite-size objects is considered.

Fiabane, Lionel; Volk, Romain; Pinton, Jean-Francois; Bourgoin, Mickael

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Numerical simulation to determine the effects of incident wind shear and turbulence level on the flow around a building  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of incident shear and turbulence on flow around a cubical building are being investigated by a turbulent kinetic energy/dissipation model (TEMPEST). The numerical simulations demonstrate significant effects due to the differences in the incident flow. The addition of upstream turbulence and shear results in a reduced size of the cavity directly behind the building. The accuracy of numerical simulations is verified by comparing the predicted mean flow fields with the available wind-tunnel measurements of Castro and Robins (1977). Comparing the authors' results with experimental data, the authors show that the TEMPEST model can reasonably simulate the mean flow.

Zhang, Y.Q.; Huber, A.H.; Arya, S.P.S.; Snyder, W.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbulence Turbulence in Alcator C-Mod and Wendelstein 7-AS plasmas during controlled confinement transitions N.P.Basse, E.M.Edlund, C.L.Fiore, M.J.Greenwald, A.E.Hubbard, J.W.Hughes, J.H.Irby, G.J.Kramer 1 , L.Lin, Y.Lin, A.G.Lynn 2 , E.S.Marmar, D.R.Mikkelsen 1 , D.Mossessian, P.E.Phillips 2 , M.Porkolab, J.E.Rice, W.L.Rowan 2 , J.A.Snipes, J.L.Terry, S.M.Wolfe, S.J.Wukitch, K.Zhurovich, S.Zoletnik 3 and the C-Mod and W7-AS 4 Teams MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, USA 1 Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, USA 2 University of Texas at Austin, Austin, USA 3 KFKI-RMKI, EURATOM Association, Budapest, Hungary 4 Max-Planck-Institut f¨ ur Plasmaphysik, EURATOM Association, Greifswald, Germany At certain values of the edge rotational transform, ι a = 1/q a , the confinement time of plasmas in the Wendelstein 7-AS (W7-AS) stellarator was found to

88

Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Heat flow...

89

Generation of a Magnetic Field by Dynamo Action in a Turbulent Flow of Liquid Sodium  

SciTech Connect

We report the observation of dynamo action in the von Karman sodium experiment, i.e., the generation of a magnetic field by a strongly turbulent swirling flow of liquid sodium. Both mean and fluctuating parts of the field are studied. The dynamo threshold corresponds to a magnetic Reynolds number R{sub m}{approx}30. A mean magnetic field of the order of 40 G is observed 30% above threshold at the flow lateral boundary. The rms fluctuations are larger than the corresponding mean value for two of the components. The scaling of the mean square magnetic field is compared to a prediction previously made for high Reynolds number flows.

Monchaux, R.; Chiffaudel, A.; Daviaud, F.; Dubrulle, B.; Gasquet, C.; Marie, L.; Ravelet, F. [Service de Physique de l'Etat Condense, Direction des Sciences de la Matiere, CEA-Saclay, CNRS URA 2464, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette cedex (France); Berhanu, M.; Fauve, S.; Mordant, N.; Petrelis, F. [Laboratoire de Physique Statistique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure, CNRS UMR 8550, 24 Rue Lhomond, 75231 Paris Cedex 05 (France); Bourgoin, M.; Moulin, M.; Odier, Ph.; Pinton, J.-F.; Volk, R. [Laboratoire de Physique de l'Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, CNRS UMR 5672, 46 allee d'Italie, 69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

90

Response Relationship Between Juvenile Salmon and an Autonomous Sensor in Turbulent Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Juvenile fall chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawythscha) and an autonomous sensor device (Sensor Fish) were exposed to turbulent shear flows in order to determine how hydraulic conditions effected fish injury response. Studies were designed to establish correlation metrics between Sensor Fish device measurements and live fish injuries by conducting concurrent releases in a range of turbulent shear flows. Comparisons were made for two exposure scenarios. In the fast-fish-to-slow-water scenario, test fish were carried by the fast-moving water of a submerged turbulent jet and exposed into the standing water of a flume. In the slow-fish-to-fast-water scenario, test fish were introduced into a turbulent jet from standing water through an introduction tube placed just outside the edge of the jet. Motion-tracking analysis was performed on high-speed, high-resolution digital videos of all the releases at water jet velocities ranging from 3 to 22.9 m · s?1. Velocities of the Sensor Fish were very similar to those of live fish, but maximum accelerations of live fish were larger than those by Sensor Fish for all the nozzle velocities of both cenarios. A 10% probability of major injury threshold was found to occur at sensor fish accelerations of 513 and 260 (m · s?2) for the fast-fish-to-slow-water and slow-fish-to-fast-water scenarios, respectively. The findings provide a linkage between laboratory experiments of fish injury, field survival studies, and numerical modeling.

Richmond, Marshall C.; Deng, Zhiqun; McKinstry, Craig A.; Mueller, Robert P.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Dauble, Dennis D.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Creating Small Gas Bubbles in Flowing Mercury Using Turbulence at an Orifice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to create cavitation damage to the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, creating such a population in mercury is difficult due to the high surface tension and particularly the non-wetting behavior of mercury on gas-injection hardware. If the larger injected gas bubbles can be broken down into small bubbles after they are introduced to the flow, then the material interface problem is avoided. Research at the Oak Ridge National Labarotory is underway to develop a technique that has shown potential to provide an adequate population of small-enough bubbles to a flowing spallation target. This technique involves gas injection at an orifice of a geometry that is optimized to the turbulence intensity and pressure distribution of the flow, while avoiding coalescence of gas at injection sites. The most successful geometry thus far can be described as a square-toothed orifice having a 2.5 bar pressure drop in the nominal flow of 12 L/s for one of the target inlet legs. High-speed video and high-resolution photography have been used to quantify the bubble population on the surface of the mercury downstream of the gas injection sight. Also, computational fluid dynamics has been used to optimize the dimensions of the toothed orifice based on a RANS computed mean flow including turbulent energies such that the turbulent dissipation and pressure field are best suited for turbulent break-up of the gas bubbles.

Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL; Paquit, Vincent C [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

A Nocturnal Atmospheric Drainage Flow Simulation Investigating the Application of One-Dimensional Modeling and Current Turbulence Schemes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a one-dimensional boundary layer model to simulate nocturnal atmospheric drainage flow on a simple forest-covered slope using canopy, soil and radiation parameterizations from previous studies along with turbulence simulation (from ...

Warren Heilman; Ronald Dobosy

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive Scavenging in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Overall project demonstrated that toxic metals (cesium Cs and strontium Sr) in aqueous and organic wastes can be isolated from the environment through reaction with kaolinite based sorbent substrates in high temperature reactor environments. In addition, a state-of-the art laser diagnostic tool to measure droplet characteristic in practical 'dirty' laboratory environments was developed, and was featured on the cover of a recent edition of the scientific journal ''applied Spectroscopy''. Furthermore, great strides have been made in developing a theoretical model that has the potential to allow prediction of the position and life history of every particle of waste in a high temperature, turbulent flow field, a very challenging problem involving as it does, the fundamentals of two phase turbulence and of particle drag physics.

Jost O.L. Wendt; Alan R. Kerstein; Alexander Scheeline; Arne Pearlstein; William Linak

2003-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

94

Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is outlined as follows. Section 2 shows an assessment of numerical algorithms that are best suited for the numerical simulation of compressible flows involving turbulence and shock phenomena. Sections 3 and 4 deal with the canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem, from the DNS and LES perspectives, respectively. Section 5 considers the shock-turbulence inter-action in spherical geometry, in particular, the interaction of a converging shock with isotropic turbulence as well as the problem of the blast wave. Section 6 describes the study of shock-accelerated mixing through planar and spherical Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing as well as the shock-curtain interaction problem In section 7 we acknowledge the different interactions between Stanford and other institutions participating in this SciDAC project, as well as several external collaborations made possible through it. Section 8 presents a list of publications and presentations that have been generated during the course of this SciDAC project. Finally, section 9 concludes this report with the list of personnel at Stanford University funded by this SciDAC project.

Sanjiva Lele

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Transilient Turbulence Theory. Part II: Turbulent Adjustment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent adjustment is a scheme where dynamic instabilities in the flow are eliminated by turbulence. It is a form of first-order turbulence closure that is applicable to numerical forecast models of the atmosphere. The responsive form of ...

Roland B. Stull; Takehiko Hasegawa

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Thermal-Instability-Driven Turbulent Mixing in Galactic Disks: I. Effective Mixing of Metals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations show that radial metallicity gradients in disk galaxies are relatively shallow, if not flat, especially at large galactocentric distances and for galaxies in the high-redshift universe. Given that star formation and metal production are centrally concentrated, this requires a mechanism to redistribute metals. However, the nature of this mechanism is poorly understood, let alone quantified. To address this problem, we conduct magnetohydrodynamical simulations of a local shearing sheet of a thin, thermally unstable, gaseous disk driven by a background stellar spiral potential, including metals modeled as passive scalar fields. Contrary to what a simple \\alpha\\ prescription for the gas disk would suggest, we find that turbulence driven by thermal instability is very efficient at mixing metals, regardless of the presence or absence of stellar spiral potentials or magnetic fields. The timescale for homogenizing randomly distributed metals is comparable to or less than the local orbital time in the dis...

Yang, Chao-Chin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes The Effect of Vertical Upward Flow on Thermal Plumes Speaker(s): Pierre S. Farrugia Date: November 18, 2010 - 12:05pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: David Lorenzetti Thermal plumes have been widely investigated in a variety of scenarios, including natural convection and stratified environments. The resulting theory may be used to predict ventilation flow rates in, for example, natural and displacement ventilation, and under-floor air distribution (UFAD) systems. However, there has been little effort in investigating how uniform upward flows affect the plume velocity, rate of growth, and thermal profile. Such situations can arise if, for example, the diffusers of a UFAD system are evenly distributed. In order to study such situations, analytical expressions for the velocity and temperature profiles of a plume

98

A New Horizontal Gradient, Continuous Flow, Ice Thermal Diffusion Chamber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuous-flow, horizontal gradient, ice thermal diffusion chamber has been developed and tested for heterogeneous ice nucleation of aerosol particles under accurately controlled supersaturations and supercooling in the absence of a substrate. ...

E. M. Tomlinson; N. Fukuta

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Multiphase Flow Dynamics 4: Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 4 of the successful book package "Multiphase Flow" is devoted to nuclear thermal hydraulics which is a substantial part of nuclear reactor safety. It provides knowledge and mathematical tools for adequate description of the process of transferring ...

Nikolay I. Kolev

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

DEVELOPMENT AND VALIDATION OF A MULTIFIELD MODEL OF CHURN-TURBULENT GAS/LIQUID FLOWS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The accuracy of numerical predictions for gas/liquid two-phase flows using Computational Multiphase Fluid Dynamics (CMFD) methods strongly depends on the formulation of models governing the interaction between the continuous liquid field and bubbles of different sizes. The purpose of this paper is to develop, test and validate a multifield model of adiabatic gas/liquid flows at intermediate gas concentrations (e.g., churn-turbulent flow regime), in which multiple-size bubbles are divided into a specified number of groups, each representing a prescribed range of sizes. The proposed modeling concept uses transport equations for the continuous liquid field and for each bubble field. The overall model has been implemented in the NPHASE-CMFD computer code. The results of NPHASE-CMFD simulations have been validated against the experimental data from the TOPFLOW test facility. Also, a parametric analysis on the effect of various modeling assumptions has been performed.

Elena A. Tselishcheva; Steven P. Antal; Michael Z. Podowski; Donna Post Guillen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Modelling complex draft-tube flows using near-wall turbulence closures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a finite-volume method for simulating flows through complex hydroturbine draft-tube configurations using near-wall turbulence closures. The method employs the artificial-compressibility pressure-velocity coupling approach in conjunction with multigrid acceleration for fast convergence on very fine grids. Calculations are carried out for a draft tube with two downstream piers on a computational mesh consisting of 1.2x10{sup 6} nodes. Comparisons of the computed results with measurements demonstrate the ability of the method to capture most experimental trends with reasonable accuracy. Calculated three-dimensional particle traces reveal very complex flow features in the vicinity of the piers, including horse-shoe longitudinal vortices and and regions of flow reversal.

Ventikos, Y.; Sotiropoulos, F. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Patel, V.C. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Iowa Institute of Hydraulic Research

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

102

MAGNETOROTATIONAL TURBULENCE IN STRATIFIED SHEARING BOXES WITH PERFECT GAS EQUATION OF STATE AND FINITE THERMAL DIFFUSIVITY  

SciTech Connect

We present a numerical study of turbulence and dynamo action in stratified shearing boxes with zero mean magnetic flux. We assume that the fluid obeys the perfect gas law and has finite (constant) thermal diffusivity. The calculations begin from an isothermal state spanning three scale heights above and below the mid-plane. After a long transient the layers settle to a stationary state in which thermal losses out of the boundaries are balanced by dissipative heating. We identify two regimes. The first is a conductive regime in which the heat is transported mostly by conduction and the density decreases with height. In the limit of large thermal diffusivity this regime resembles the more familiar isothermal case. The second is the convective regime, observed at smaller values of the thermal diffusivity, in which the layer becomes unstable to overturning motions, the heat is carried mostly by advection, and the density becomes nearly constant throughout the layer. In this latter constant-density regime we observe evidence for large-scale dynamo action leading to a substantial increase in transport efficiency relative to the conductive case.

Bodo, G.; Rossi, P. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, Strada Osservatorio 20, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Cattaneo, F. [The Computation Institute, University of Chicago, 5735 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Mignone, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Generale, Univesita di Torino, via Pietro Giuria 1, I-10125 Torino (Italy)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

103

Unsteady Thermally Driven Flows on Gentle Slopes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theoretical and laboratory studies on mean velocity and temperature fields of an unsteady atmospheric boundary layer on sloping surfaces reported here were motivated by recent field observations on thermally driven circulation in very wide ...

J. C. R. Hunt; H. J. S. Fernando; M. Princevac

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Measurement of Turbulent Flow Phenomena for the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mean velocity field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics design (Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor). The datawere obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered as a benchmark for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. The primary objective of this paper is to document the experiment and present a sample of the data set that has been established for this standard problem. Present results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flowin the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined crossflow—with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate flow scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. Posts, side walls and end walls are fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive index of the mineral oil working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3D) particle image velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet-jet Reynolds numbers (based on the hydraulic diameter of the jet and the timemean average flow rate) are approximately 4300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analysis and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal complicated flow patterns that include several large recirculation zones, reverse flow near the simulated reflector wall, recirculation zones in the upper portion of the plenum and complex flow patterns around the support posts. Data include three-dimensional PIV images of flow planes, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model.

Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Donald M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Heat release effects on decaying homogeneous compressible turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High Mach-number compressible flows with heat release are inherently more complicated than incompressible flows due to, among other reasons, the activation of the thermal energy mode. Such flow fields can experience significant fluctuations in density, temperature, viscosity, conductivity and specific heat, which affect velocity and pressure fluctuations. Furthermore, the flow field cannot be assumed to be dilatation-free in high Mach numbers and even in low Mach-number flows involving combustion, or in boundary layers on heated walls. The main issue in these high-speed and highly-compressible flows is the effect of thermal gradients and fluctuations on turbulence. The thermal field has various routes through which it affects flow structures of compressible turbulence. First, it has direct influence through pressure, which affects turbulence via pressure-strain correlation. The indirect effects of thermal fields on compressible turbulence are through the changes in flow properties. The high temperature gradients alter the transport coefficient and compressibility of the flow. The objective of this work is to answer the following questions: How do temperature fluctuations change the compressible flow structure and energetics? How does compressibility in the flow affect the non-linear pressure redistribution process? What is the main effect of spatial transport-coefficient variation? We perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) to answer the above questions. The investigations are categorized into four parts: 1) Turbulent energy cascade and kinetic-internal energy interactions under the influence of temperature fluctuations; 2) Return-to-isotropy of anisotropic turbulence under the influence of large temperature fluctuations; 3) The effect of turbulent Mach number and dilatation level on small-scale (velocity-gradient) dynamics; 4) The effect of variable transport-coefficients (viscosity and diffusivity) on cascade and dissipation processes of turbulence. The findings lead to a better understanding of temperature fluctuation effects on non-linear processes in compressible turbulence. This improved understanding is expected to provide direction for improving second-order closure models of compressible turbulence.

Lee, Kurn Chul

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Dye laser amplifier including a low turbulence, stagnation-free dye flow configuration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A large (high flow rate) dye laser amplifier in which a continuous replenished supply of dye is excited by a first light beam, specifically a copper vapor laser beam, in order to amplify the intensity of a second different light beam, specifically a dye beam, passing through the dye is disclosed herein. This amplifier includes a dye cell defining a dye chamber through which a continuous stream of dye is caused to pass at a flow rate of for example 30 gallons/minute, a specifically designed support vessel for containing the dye cell and a screen device for insuring that the dye stream passes into the dye cell in a substantially turbulent free, stagnation-free manner.

Davin, James (Gilroy, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Study of Flow, Turbulence and Transport on the Large Plasma Device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Axial versus Radial Transport . . . . . . . . . . . . .223 A LAPD Transport172 Turbulence and Transport

Schaffner, David A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Compressible Shear Flow Transition and Turbulence: Enhancement of GKM Numerical Scheme and Simulation/Analysis of Pressure Effects on Flow Stabilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite significant advancements in the understanding of fluid flows, combustion and material technologies, hypersonic flight still presents numerous technological challenges. In hypersonic vehicles turbulence is critical in controlling heat generation in the boundary layer, mixing inside the combustor, generation of acoustic noise, and mass flow in the intake. The study of turbulence in highly compressible flows is challenging compared to incompressible due to a drastic change in the behavior of pressure and a relaxation of the incompressibility constraint. In addition fluid flow inside a flight vehicle is complicated by wall-effects, heat generation and complex boundary conditions. Homogeneous shear flow contains most of the relevant physics of boundary and mixing layers without the aforementioned complicating effects. In this work we aim to understand and characterize the role of pressure, velocity-pressure interaction, velocity-thermodynamics interaction in the late-stage transition-to-turbulence regime in a high speed shear dominated flow by studying the evolution of perturbations in in a high Mach number homogeneous shear flow. We use a modal-analysis based approach towards understanding the statistical behavior of turbulence. Individual Fourier waves constituting the initial flow field are studied in isolation and in combination to understand collective statistical behavior. We demonstrate proof of concept of novel acoustic based strategies for controlling the onset of turbulence. Towards this goal we perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) in three studies: (a) development and evaluation of gas kinetic based numerical tool for DNS of compressible turbulence, and perform detailed evaluation of the efficacy of different interpolation schemes in capturing solenoidal and dilatational quantities, (b) modal investigation in the behavior of pressure and isolation of linear, non-linear, inertial and pressure actions, and (c) modal investigation in the possible acoustic based control strategies in homogeneously sheared compressible flows. The findings help to understand the manifestation of the effects of compressibility on transition and turbulence via the velocity-pressure interactions and the action of individual waves. The present study helps towards the design of control mechanisms for compressible turbulence and the development of physically consistent pressure strain correlation models.

Kumar, Gaurav 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Chaotic mean wind in turbulent thermal convection and long-term correlations in solar activity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is shown that correlation function of the mean wind velocity in a turbulent thermal convection (Rayleigh number $Ra \\sim 10^{11}$) exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time, while corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive. These results together with the reconstructed phase portrait indicate presence of a chaotic component in the examined mean wind. Telegraph approximation is also used to study relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components to the mean wind fluctuations and an equilibrium between these components has been studied. Since solar activity is based on the thermal convection processes, it is reasoned that the observed solar activity long-term correlations can be an imprint of the mean wind chaotic properties. In particular, correlation function of the daily sunspots number exhibits exponential decay with a very long correlation time and corresponding largest Lyapunov exponent is certainly positive, also relative contribution of the chaotic and stochastic components follows the same pattern as for the convection mean wind.

A. Bershadskii

2009-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

110

Analysis and identification of vortices within a turbulent channel boundary layer flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vortical structures are regarded as the dominant organized patterns in wall turbulence. They play a key role in physical phenomena of practical importance such as energy and momentum transport, combustion, mixing, and noise and drag production. Considerable investigations have been performed in drag and noise phenomena studies, with a main purpose of controlling and reducing them. Various techniques to control the drag reduction have been studied for over last five decades; however, the detailed understanding of the drag reduction mechanism is still lacking. Vortices play an important role in turbulence structure. Nevertheless, the identification of vortices is still unclear, not even a universal definition of a vortex is accepted. In the present study, several vortex feature extraction schemes are implemented. The methods are applied to analyze instantaneous two-dimensional velocity fields obtained by particle tracking Velocimetry (PTV) measurements of a turbulent channel flow with and without microbubble injection within the boundary layer. Microbubble injection is one of the drag reduction techniques, first studied in early 1970s, that has undergone extensive research in past years, and the generated information has aided into drag reduction understanding. As a general rule, vortex extraction methods can be either a simple visualization scheme or more sophisticated identification tools. The Reynolds decomposition and its variants are suitable due to their capacity to mark vortices advecting at different velocities. In the case of identification techniques, which yield a scalar field calculated from either the velocity vector field or the velocity gradient tensor, both the modified swirling strength ?ci or the ?2 criteria were found to be well suited for vortex identification.

Maroni Veiga, Adrian Gaston

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Thermally Induced Groundwater Flow Resulting from an Underground Nuclear Test  

SciTech Connect

The authors examine the transient residual thermal signal resulting from an underground nuclear test (buried below the water table) and its potential to affect local groundwater flow and radionuclide migration in a saturated, fractured, volcanic aquifer system. Thermal profiles measured in a drillback hole between 154 days and 6.5 years after the test have been used to calibrate a non-isothermal model of fluid flow. In this process, they have estimated the magnitude and relative changes in permeability, porosity and fracture density between different portions of the disturbed and undisturbed geologic medium surrounding the test location. The relative impacts of buoyancy forces (arising from the thermal residual of the test and the background geothermal gradient) and horizontal pressure gradients on the post-test flow system are better understood. A transient particle/streamline model of contaminant transport is used to visualize streamlines and streaklines of the flow field and to examine the migration of non-reactive radionuclides. Sensitivity analyses are performed to understand the effects of local and sub-regional geologic features, and the effects of fractured zones on the movement of groundwater and thermal energy. Conclusions regarding the overall effect of the thermal regime on the residence times and fluxes of radionuclides out of the system are drawn, and implications for more complicated, reactive contaminant transport are discussed.

Maxwell, R.M.; Tompson, A.F.B.; Rambo, J.T.; Carle, S.F.; Pawloski, G.A.

2000-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

112

Simulation of Combustion and Thermal Flow in an Industrial Boiler  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial boilers that produce steam or electric power represent a crucial facility for overall plant operations. To make the boiler more efficient, less emission (cleaner) and less prone to tube rupture problems, it is important to understand the combustion and thermal flow behaviors inside the boiler. This study performs a detailed simulation of combustion and thermal flow behaviors inside an industrial boiler. The simulations are conducted using the commercial CFD package FLUENT. The 3-D Navier-Stokes equations and five species transport equations are solved with the eddy-breakup combustion model. The simulations are conducted in three stages. In the first stage, the entire boiler is simulated without considering the steam tubes. In the second stage, a complete intensive calculation is conducted to compute the flow and heat transfer across about 496 tubes. In the third stage, the results of the saturator/superheater sections are used to calculate the thermal flow in the chimney. The results provide insight into the detailed thermal-flow and combustion in the boiler and showing possible reasons for superheater tube rupture. The exhaust gas temperature is consistent with the actual results from the infrared thermograph inspection.

Saripalli, R.; Wang, T.; Day, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Helical Turbulence Prevails over Inertial Waves in Forced Rotating Flows at High Reynolds and Low Rossby Numbers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of spectral laws for helical turbulence in the presence of solid body rotation up to Reynolds numbers Re ~ 1 × 105 and down to Rossby numbers Ro ~ 3 × 10?3 is presented. The forcing function is a fully helical flow that can also be viewed ...

Julien Baerenzung; D. Rosenberg; P. D. Mininni; A. Pouquet

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model for stably stratified flows. Part II: the role of internal gravity waves  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We advance our prior energy- and flux-budget turbulence closure model (Zilitinkevich et al., 2007, 2008) for the stably stratified atmospheric flows and extend it accounting for additional vertical flux of momentum and additional productions of turbulent kinetic energy, turbulent potential energy (TPE) and turbulent flux of potential temperature due to large-scale internal gravity waves (IGW). Main effects of IGW are following: the maximal value of the flux Richardson number (universal constant 0.2-0.25 in the no-IGW regime) becomes strongly variable. In the vertically homogeneous stratification, it increases with increasing wave energy and can even exceed 1. In the heterogeneous stratification, when IGW propagate towards stronger stratification, the maximal flux Richardson number decreases with increasing wave energy, reaches zero and then becomes negative. In other words, the vertical flux of potential temperature becomes counter-gradient. IGW also reduce anisotropy of turbulence and increase the share of TPE in the turbulent total energy. Depending on the direction (downward or upward), IGW either strengthen or weaken the total vertical flux of momentum. Predictions from the proposed model are consistent with available data from atmospheric and laboratory experiments, direct numerical simulations and large-eddy simulations.

S. S. Zilitinkevich; T. Elperin; N. Kleeorin; V. L'vov; I. Rogachevskii

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

115

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Unit Commitment Including Optimal AC Power Flow Constraints Carlos Murillo{Sanchez Robert J algorithm for unit commitment that employs a Lagrange relaxation technique with a new augmentation. This framework allows the possibility of committing units that are required for the VArs that they can produce

116

Modification of turbulent structure in channel flows by microbubble injection close to the wall  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation of turbulent structure modification of a boundary layer for a fully developed channel flow by microbubble injection close to the upper wall was carried out using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). Two-dimensional velocity components in an x-y plane at Reynolds number of 5128 based on the half height of the channel and bulk velocity were measured. Microbubbles, with an average diameter of 30 ??m were produced by electrolysis and injected in the buffer layer. Different values of the void fraction were attained and used to evaluate the effects of the presence of microbubbles and their concentration within the boundary layer. A reduction in drag was observed due to the injection of microbubbles. Drag reduction augments as the value of the void fraction increases. Furthermore, increases in both the non-dimensional values of streamwise and normal turbulent intensities, normalized by the friction velocity were observed with the void fraction growth. A gradual decrease in the Reynolds shear stresses was achieved as the void fraction increases. This effect is due to a ??decorrelation?? or ??decoupling?? between the streamwise and normal fluctuating velocities. Modifications in the length and time scales due to the presence of microbubbles were detected by calculating two-point correlation coefficients in one and two dimensions and the autocorrelation coefficient at various locations within the measurement zone. Streamline length and time scales were increased. On the contrary, the normal length and time scales were decreased. The vorticity and strain rate values decreased with the injection of microbubbles. Turbulent energy production was also decreased within the boundary layer. Quadrant analysis was used to find out the contribution of the u?? and v?? fluctuating velocity components to the Reynolds stress. The presence of microbubbles reduces the contribution to the Reynolds stresses by Q4 events (sweeps), which are responsible for the production of skin friction. Vortical structure detection in the measurement area was pursued. The structure with and without the microbubble injection is compared. In this study the presence of microbubbles within the boundary layer has produced several modifications in the flow structure as well as reduction in the drag.

Gutierrez Torres, Claudia del Carmen

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Mechanisms of Flame Stabilization and Blowout in a Reacting Turbulent Hydrogen Jet in Cross-Flow  

SciTech Connect

The mechanisms contributing to flame stabilization and blowout in a nitrogen-diluted hydrogen transverse jet in a turbulent boundary layer cross-flow (JICF) are investigated using three-dimensional direct numerical simulation (DNS) with detailed chemistry. Non-reacting JICF DNS were performed to understand the relative magnitude and physical location of low velocity regions on the leeward side of the fuel jet where a flame can potentially anchor. As the injection angle is reduced from 90{sup o} to 70{sup o}, the low velocity region was found to diminish significantly, both in terms of physical extent and magnitude, and hence, its ability to provide favorable conditions for flame anchoring and stabilization are greatly reduced. In the reacting JICF DNS a stable flame is observed for 90{sup o} injection angle and, on average, the flame root is in the vicinity of low velocity magnitude and stoichiometric mixture. When the injection angle is smoothly transitioned to 75{sup o} a transient flame blowout is observed. Ensemble averaged quantities on the flame base reveal two phases of the blowout characterized by a kinematic imbalance between flame propagation speed and flow normal velocity. In the first phase dominant flow structures repeatedly draw the flame base closer to the jet centerline resulting in richer-than-stoichiometric mixtures and high velocity magnitudes. In the second phase, in spite of low velocity magnitudes and a return to stoichiometry, due to jet bending and flame alignment normal to the cross-flow, the flow velocity normal to the flame base increases dramatically perpetuating the blowout.

Kolla, H.; Grout, R. W.; Gruber, A.; Chen, J. H.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Collisions of Small Drops in a Turbulent Flow. Part III: Relative Droplet Fluxes and Swept Volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Swept volumes of cloud droplets with radii below 20 ?m are calculated under conditions typical of atmospheric cloud turbulence characterized by enormous values of Reynolds numbers, high turbulent intermittency, and characteristic values of the ...

M. B. Pinsky; A. P. Khain; B. Grits; M. Shapiro

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Gas flow driven by thermal creep in dusty plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal creep flow (TCF) is a flow of gas driven by a temperature gradient along a solid boundary. Here, TCF is demonstrated experimentally in a dusty plasma. Stripes on a glass box are heated by laser beam absorption, leading to both TCF and a thermophoretic force. The design of the experiment allows isolating the effect of TCF. A stirring motion of the dust particle suspension is observed. By eliminating all other explanations for this motion, we conclude that TCF at the boundary couples by drag to the bulk gas, causing the bulk gas to flow, thereby stirring the suspension of dust particles. This result provides an experimental verification, for the field of fluid mechanics, that TCF in the slip-flow regime causes steady-state gas flow in a confined volume.

Flanagan, T. M.; Goree, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa 52242 (United States)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

VNAP2: a computer program for computation of two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible, turbulent flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

VNAP2 is a computer program for calculating turbulent (as well as laminar and inviscid), steady, and unsteady flow. VNAP2 solves the two-dimensional, time-dependent, compressible Navier-Stokes equations. The turbulence is modeled with either an algebraic mixing-length model, a one-equation model, or the Jones-Launder two-equation model. The geometry may be a single- or a dual-flowing stream. The interior grid points are computed using the unsplit MacCormack scheme. Two options to speed up the calculations for high Reynolds number flows are included. The boundary grid points are computed using a reference-plane-characteristic scheme with the viscous terms treated as source functions. An explicit artificial viscosity is included for shock computations. The fluid is assumed to be a perfect gas. The flow boundaries may be arbitrary curved solid walls, inflow/outflow boundaries, or free-jet envelopes. Typical problems that can be solved concern nozzles, inlets, jet-powered afterbodies, airfoils, and free-jet expansions. The accuracy and efficiency of the program are shown by calculations of several inviscid and turbulent flows. The program and its use are described completely, and six sample cases and a code listing are included.

Cline, M.C.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Numerical Study of Some Unstably Stratified Boundary-Layer Flows over a Valley at Moderate Richardson Number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional numerical model is utilized to investigate steady-state, three-dimensional turbulent flow over a valley under unstable thermal stratifications. An eddy viscosity turbulence model is employed, in which the mixing length is a ...

J. D. Carlson; M. R. Foster

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Effects of Magnetic Field on the Turbulent Wake of a Cylinder in MHD Channel Flow  

SciTech Connect

Results from a free-surface MHD flow experiment are presented detailing the modi cation of vortices in the wake of a circular cylinder with its axis parallel to the applied magnetic fi eld. Experiments were performed with a Reynolds number near Re ~ 104 as the interaction parameter, N = |j x#2; B| / |? (? ? ?), was increased through unity. By concurrently sampling the downstream fluid velocity at sixteen cross-stream locations in the wake, it was possible to extract an ensemble of azimuthal velocity profi les as a function of radius for vortices shed by the cylinder at varying strengths of magnetic field. Results indicate a signi cant change in vortex radius and rotation as N is increased. The lack of deviations from the vortex velocity pro file at high magnetic fi elds suggests the absence of small-scale turbulent features. By sampling the wake at three locations downstream in subsequent experiments, the decay of the vortices was examined and the effective viscosity was found to decrease as N-049±0.4. This reduction in effective viscosity is due to the modi cation of the small-scale eddies by the magnetic fi eld. The slope of the energy spectrum was observed to change from a k-1.8 power-law at low N to a k-3.5 power-law for N > 1. Together, these results suggest the flow smoothly transitioned to a quasi-two-dimensional state in the range 0 < N < 1.

John Rhoads, Eric Edlund and Hantao Ji

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

123

Optimization of a Two-Fluid Hydrodynamic Model of Churn-Turbulent Flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A hydrodynamic model of two-phase, churn-turbulent flows is being developed using the computational multiphase fluid dynamics (CMFD) code, NPHASE-CMFD. The numerical solutions obtained by this model are compared with experimental data obtained at the TOPFLOW facility of the Institute of Safety Research at the Forschungszentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. The TOPFLOW data is a high quality experimental database of upward, co-current air-water flows in a vertical pipe suitable for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. A five-field CMFD model was developed for the continuous liquid phase and four bubble size groups using mechanistic closure models for the ensemble-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Mechanistic models for the drag and non-drag interfacial forces are implemented to include the governing physics to describe the hydrodynamic forces controlling the gas distribution. The closure models provide the functional form of the interfacial forces, with user defined coefficients to adjust the force magnitude. An optimization strategy was devised for these coefficients using commercial design optimization software. This paper demonstrates an approach to optimizing CMFD model parameters using a design optimization approach. Computed radial void fraction profiles predicted by the NPHASE-CMFD code are compared to experimental data for four bubble size groups.

Donna Post Guillen

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Numerical modeling of species transport in turbulent flow and experimental study on aerosol sampling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to study the turbulent mixing of a scalar species in straight tube, single and double elbow flow configurations. Different Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models were used to model the turbulence in the flow. Conventional and dynamic Smagorinsky sub-grid scale models were used for the LES simulations. Wall functions were used to resolve the near wall boundary layer. These simulations were run with both two-dimensional and three-dimensional geometries. The velocity and tracer gas concentration Coefficient of Variations were compared with experimental results. The results from the LES simulations compared better with experimental results than the results from the RANS simulations. The level of mixing downstream of a S-shaped double elbow was higher than either the single elbow or the U-shaped double elbow due to the presence of counter rotating vortices. Penetration of neutralized and non-neutralized aerosol particles through three different types of tubing was studied. The tubing used included standard PVC pipes, aluminum conduit and flexible vacuum hose. Penetration through the aluminum conduit was unaffected by the presence or absence of charge neutralization, whereas particle penetrations through the PVC pipe and the flexible hosing were affected by the amount of particle charge. The electric field in a space enclosed by a solid conductor is zero. Therefore charged particles within the conducting aluminum conduit do not experience any force due to ambient electric fields, whereas the charged particles within the non-conducting PVC pipe and flexible hose experience forces due to the ambient electric fields. This increases the deposition of charged particles compared to neutralized particles within the 1.5� PVC tube and 1.5� flexible hose. Deposition 2001a (McFarland et al. 2001) software was used to predict the penetration through transport lines. The prediction from the software compared well with experiments for all cases except when charged particles were transported through non-conducting materials. A Stairmand cyclone was designed for filtering out large particles at the entrance of the transport section.

Vijayaraghavan, Vishnu Karthik

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Effects of Atmospheric Thermal Stability and Slope Steepness on the Development of Daytime Thermally Induced Upslope Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of background atmospheric thermal stability and slope steepness on the daytime thermally induced upslope flows was investigated using analytical and numerical model approaches. The study focuses on meso-? domains and considers the noon ...

Z. J. Ye; M. Segal; R. A. Pielke

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Algebraic Turbulent Heat Flux Model for Prediction of Thermal Stratification in Piping Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 14th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor Thermal Hydraulics (NURETH-14) / Thermal Hydraulics

M. Pellegrini; H. Endo; E. Merzari; H. Ninokata

127

Dimensionality and morphology of particle and bubble clusters in turbulent flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We conduct numerical experiments to investigate the spatial clustering of particles and bubbles in simulations of homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Varying the Stokes parameter and the densities, striking differences in the clustering of the particles can be observed. To quantify these visual findings we use the Kaplan--Yorke dimension. This local scaling analysis shows a dimension of approximately 1.4 for the light bubble distribution, whereas the distribution of very heavy particles shows a dimension of approximately 2.4. However, clearly separate parameter combinations yield the same dimensions. To overcome this degeneracy and to further develop the understanding of clustering, we perform a morphological (geometrical and topological) analysis of the particle distribution. For such an analysis, Minkowski functionals have been successfully employed in cosmology, in order to quantify the global geometry and topology of the large-scale distribution of galaxies. In the context of dispersed multiphase flow, these Minkowski functionals -- being morphological order parameters -- allow us to discern the filamentary structure of the light particle distribution from the wall-like distribution of heavy particles around empty interconnected tunnels.

Enrico Calzavarini; Martin Kerscher; Detlef Lohse; Federico Toschi

2007-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

128

Effect of Turbulence Models and Spatial Resolution on Resolved Velocity Structure and Momentum Fluxes in Large-Eddy Simulations of Neutral Boundary Layer Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper demonstrates the importance of high-quality subfilter-scale turbulence models in large-eddy simulations by evaluating the resolved-scale flow features that result from various closure models. The Advanced Regional Prediction System (...

Francis L. Ludwig; Fotini Katopodes Chow; Robert L. Street

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Self-Contained Acoustic Scintillation Instrument for Path-Averaged Measurements of Flow and Turbulence with Application to Hydrothermal Vent and Bottom Boundary Layer Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A self-contained acoustical scintillation instrument is described that has been used to measure flow and turbulence characteristics in two diverse oceanographic settings. This instrument is a battery-operated and internally logging acoustic ...

D. Di Iorio; D. Lemon; R. Chave

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Near-Surface Turbulence and Thermal Structure in a Wind-Driven Sea  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ocean surface turbulence at high sea states is evaluated using heat as a naturally occurring passive tracer. A freely drifting instrument with a mechanically driven temperature profiler, fixed depth thermistors, and conductivity cells was used to ...

Johannes R. Gemmrich; David M. Farmer

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Numerical Simulation of a Buoyant Thermal Using the k-? Turbulence Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Possibilities for describing turbulent mixing processes through the use of the two-equation k-? model modified to take into account the effects of streamline curvature and buoyancy are discussed. It is shown that one of the k-? model constants ...

Y. A. Dovgalyuk; M. A. Zatevakhin; E. N. Stankova

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Numerical simulations of turbulent flow fields caused by spraying of water on large releases of hydrogen fluoride  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effectiveness of water sprays in absorbing HF releases was recently demonstrated in extended laboratory and field tests. In this paper, computer simulations are presented of the Hawk, Nevada Test Site, series of field tests. The model used, HFSPRAY, is a Eulerean/Lagrangian model which simulates the momentum, mass and energy interactions between a water spray and a turbulent plume of HF in air; the model can predict the flow velocities, temperature, water vapor, and HF concentration fields in two-dimensional large- geometries for spraying in any direction, (i.e., down-flow, inclined-down-flow, up-flow, and co-current horizontal flow). The model was validated against recent data on spraying of water on large releases of HF. 17 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Schatz, K.W. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States))

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modelling the convective flow in solar thermal receivers K.C. Yeh; G. Hughes & K. Lovegrove density differences produced using the varying salt concentrations in a water tank. The flow to visualise #12;Modelling the Convective Flow in Solar Thermal Receivers Yeh the flow outside the cavity mouth

134

PARTIALLY AVERAGED NAVIER-STOKES METHOD FOR TURBULENCE CLOSURES: CHARACTERIZATION OF FLUCTUATIONS AND EXTENSION TO WALL BOUNDED FLOWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work presented in this dissertation concerns continued development, validation and verification of the partially averaged Navier-Stokes (PANS) method - a variable resolution closure model for turbulence. Linear eddy viscosity models (LEVM), which are popular because of their simplicity and affordability in terms of computational cost have fundamental deficiencies and cannot be trusted to accurately represent turbulence in realistic complex flows. The more high fidelity approaches such as large eddy simulations (LES) and direct numerical simulations (DNS) are out of realm of engineering applicability because of their high requirements in computing power. PANS, a variable resolution approach considered in this study, lies between LEVM and LES in terms of computational cost and is designed to prudently utilize the available computing power to improve accuracy. This dissertation presents the various studies performed to characterize the PANS fluctuations and extend the model for use in various wall bounded flows. The road map towards our goal includes: (i) Comparing a-priori and a-posteriori eddy viscosity values to establish whether PANS is capable of producing the pre-specified level of reduction. (ii) Investigating the scaling of PANS fluctuations for different levels of prescribed resolution and establishing if the fluctuations abide by known turbulence scaling laws. (iii) Extending PANS to k-w formulation which is better suited for wall-bounded shear flows, and (iv) Modifying the present LEVM to yield reasonable behavior in the rapid distortion limit where the turbulence is elastic in nature which ultimately affects PANS performance. Results reported in this dissertation illustrate that the PANS closure yields reliable and predictable reduction in the modeled viscosity. The accuracy of the simulations improve as the effective damping is reduced by lowering the specified viscosity providing credibility to the PANS method as a bridging model that performs as intended.

Lakshmipathy, Sunil

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Study of Flow, Turbulence and Transport on the Large Plasma Device  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is essentially the thermal energy of the particles, thereby the temperature of thermal energy of the particles; theenergy and the electron temperature respectively, and the beam or thermal

Schaffner, David A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Energy and Enstrophy Spectra of Geostrophic Turbulent Flows Derived from a Maximum Entropy Principle  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principle of maximum entropy is used to obtain energy and enstrophy spectra as well as average relative vorticity fields in the context of geostrophic turbulence on a rotating sphere. In the unforced-undamped (inviscid) case, the maximization ...

W. T. M. Verkley; Peter Lynch

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Open-Channel Flow and Turbulence Measurement by High-Resolution Doppler Sonar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of water velocity and turbulence in a water flume using a Doppler sonar operating at 1 MHz are presented. Analysis of the results shows that the instrument qualifies as a very useful tool for nonintrusive and accurate measurement of ...

R. Lhermitte; U. Lemmin

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Turbulence Length Scales in Stably Stratified Free Shear Flow Analyzed from Slant Aircraft Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical turbulence structure in the marine atmosphere close to a coastline is investigated using airborne measurements. The measurements are from a field experiment close to the coast in the southeast of Sweden, in the Baltic Sea. The Baltic ...

Michael Tjernström

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Contribution to the numerical study of turbulence in high intensity discharge lamps  

SciTech Connect

We present in this paper a comparison between results obtained with a laminar and turbulent models for high-pressure mercury arc. The two models are based on the resolution of bidimensional time-dependent equations by a semi-implicit finite-element code. The numerical computation of turbulent model is solved with large eddy simulation model; this approach takes into account the various scales of turbulence by a filtering method on each scale. The results show the quantitative influence of turbulence on the flow fields and also the difference between laminar and turbulent effects on the dynamic thermal behaviour and on the characteristics of the discharge.

Kaziz, S.; Ben Ahmed, R.; Helali, H.; Gazzah, H.; Charrada, K. [Unite d'Etude des Milieux Ionises et Reactifs, IPEIM, 5019 route de Kairouan Monastir (Tunisia)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone in southeastern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a regional study of thermal and non-thermal ground water flow systems in the thrust zone of southern Idaho and western Wyoming are presented. The study involved hydrogeologic and hydrochemical data collection and interpretation. Particular emphasis was placed on analyzing the role that thrust zones play in controlling the movement of thermal and non-thermal fluids.

Ralston, D.R.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Evaluation of uncertainties due to hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis: Steady flow, transient flow, and thermal studies  

SciTech Connect

Starting with regional geographic, geologic, surface and subsurface hydrologic, and geophysical data for the Tono area in Gifu, Japan, we develop an effective continuum model to simulate subsurface flow and transport in a 4 km by 6 km by 3 km thick fractured granite rock mass overlain by sedimentary layers. Individual fractures are not modeled explicitly. Rather, continuum permeability and porosity distributions are assigned stochastically, based on well-test data and fracture density measurements. Lithologic layering and one major fault, the Tsukiyoshi Fault, are assigned deterministically. We conduct three different studies: (1) the so-called base case, in which the model simulates the steady-state groundwater flow through the site, and then stream trace analysis is used to calculate travel times to the model boundary from specified release points; (2) simulations of transient flow during long term pump tests (LTPT) using the base-case model; and (3) thermal studies in which coupled heat flow and fluid flow are modeled, to examine the effects of the geothermal gradient on groundwater flow. The base-case study indicates that the choice of open or closed lateral boundaries has a strong influence on the regional groundwater flow patterns produced by the models, but no field data exist that can be used to determine which boundary conditions are more realistic. The LTPT study cannot be used to distinguish between the alternative boundary conditions, because the pumping rate is too small to produce an analyzable pressure response at the model boundaries. In contrast, the thermal study shows that the temperature distributions produced by the open and closed models differ greatly. Comparison with borehole temperature data may be used to eliminate the closed model from further consideration.

Doughty, Christine; Karasaki, Kenzi

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Wake Turbulence of Two NREL 5-MW Wind Turbines Immersed in a Neutral Atmospheric Boundary-Layer Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fluid dynamics video considers an array of two NREL 5-MW turbines separated by seven rotor diameters in a neutral atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). The neutral atmospheric boundary-layer flow data were obtained from a precursor ABL simulation using a Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) framework within OpenFOAM. The mean wind speed at hub height is 8m/s, and the surface roughness is 0.2m. The actuator line method (ALM) is used to model the wind turbine blades by means of body forces added to the momentum equation. The fluid dynamics video shows the root and tip vortices emanating from the blades from various viewpoints. The vortices become unstable and break down into large-scale turbulent structures. As the wakes of the wind turbines advect further downstream, smaller-scale turbulence is generated. It is apparent that vortices generated by the blades of the downstream wind turbine break down faster due to increased turbulence levels generated by the wake of the upstream wind turbine.

Bashioum, Jessica L; Schmitz, Sven; Duque, Earl P N

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Measurement of Thermal Diffusity and Flow Resistance for TCAP Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

SRS uses the Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) to separate isotopes of hydrogen. The frequency of thermal cycles is a limit of the productivity of the process and that frequency is largely determined by the thermal diffusivity of the absorbent material. For a given tube diameter, a larger thermal diffusivity decreases the time required for each cycle. In 1998, the Engineering Development Laboratory measured thermal diffusivity and thermal conductivity for three TCAP materials in helium.

STEIMKE, JOHN

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

144

Market power and welfare effects in DC power flow electricity models with thermal line losses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A nodal electric power network with Cournot-Nash interaction among power generators is formulated as a mixed complementarity problem. The model incorporates a direct current (DC) power flow approximation with thermal line losses to model real-time flows. ... Keywords: Electricity markets, Imperfect competition, Thermal line losses, Welfare measurement

Rastislav Ivanic; Paul V. Preckel; Zuwei Yu

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

CFD Analysis of Turbulent Flow Phenomena in the Lower Plenum of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the implementation of a computational model of turbulent flow in a section of the lower plenum of Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). The proposed model has been encoded in a state-of-the-art CFD code, NPHASE. The results of NPHASE predictions have been compared against the experimental data collected using a scaled model of a sub-region in the lower plenum of a modular prismatic gas-cooled reactor. It has been shown that the NPHASE-based model is capable of predicting a three-dimensional velocity field in a complex geometrical configuration of VHTR lower plenum. The current and future validations of computational predictions are necessary for design and analysis of new reactor concepts, as well as for safety analysis and licensing calculations.

T. Gallaway; S.P. Antal; M.Z. Podowski; D.P. Guillen

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geothermal Resource-Reservoir Investigations Based On Heat Flow And Thermal Gradient Data For The United States Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of

147

Numerical and experimental investigations on vibration of simulated CANDU fuel bundles subjected to turbulent fluid flow.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Vibration of simulated CANDU fuel bundles induced by coolant flow is investigated in this thesis through experiments and numerical simulations. Two simulated bundles and a… (more)

Zhang, Xuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Statistical Predictability of Decaying Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use statistical models of turbulence with “eddy damping” (EDQNM) in order to study the problem of predictability of freely evolving two- and three-dimensional isotropic turbulent flows.

Olivier Métais; Marcel Lesieur

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Daytime Heat Transfer Processes Related to Slope Flows and Turbulent Convection in an Idealized Mountain Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms governing the daytime development of thermally driven circulations along the transverse axis of idealized two-dimensional valleys are investigated by means of large-eddy simulations. In particular, the impact of slope winds and ...

Stefano Serafin; Dino Zardi

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Scaling Relations for Turbulence in Multiphase Interstellar Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We simulate the dynamics of phase transition in radiatively cooling interstellar gas in three dimensions with a high order hydrodynamic method. We have previously shown (Kritsuk & Norman 2002a) in simulations with non-equilibrium initial conditions that thermal instability induces supersonic turbulence as a by-product of the phase transition which leads to formation of multiphase medium. We rely on a generalization of the She & Leveque (1994) model to study velocity scaling relations in this decaying turbulence and compare those with analogous results for compressible isothermal turbulence. Since radiative cooling promotes nonlinear instabilities in highly supersonic flows, turbulence in our simulations tends to be more intermittent than in the isothermal case. Hausdorff dimension of the most singular dissipative structures, D, can be as high as 2.3, while in supersonic isothermal turbulence D is limited by a more primitive nature of dissipation (shocks): D<=2. We also show that single-phase veloci...

Kritsuk, A G; Kritsuk, Alexei G.; Norman, Michael L.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

10.2.2013bo Akademi Univ -Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 Turku 1/32 Irreversible thermodynamics,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Work from a saline power plant /1 #12;10.2.2013 Ă?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering a saline power plant /2 10.2.2013 Ă?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500 a saline power plant /3 #12;10.2.2013 Ă?bo Akademi Univ - Thermal and Flow Engineering Piispankatu 8, 20500

Zevenhoven, Ron

152

Physical Processes of Interstellar Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss the role of self-gravity and radiative heating and cooling in shaping the nature of the turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our galaxy. The heating and cooling cause it to be highly compressible, and, in some regimes of density and temperature, to become thermally unstable, tending to spontaneously segregate into warm/diffuse and cold/dense phases. On the other hand, turbulence is an inherently mixing process, tending to replenish the density and temperature ranges that would be forbidden under thermal processes alone. The turbulence in the ionized ISM appears to be transonic (i.e, with Mach numbers $\\Ms \\sim 1$), and thus to behave essentially incompressibly. However, in the neutral medium, thermal instability causes the sound speed of the gas to fluctuate by up to factors of $\\sim 30$, and thus the flow can be highly supersonic with respect to the dense/cold gas, although numerical simulations suggest that this behavior corresponds more to the ensemble of cold clumps than to the clumps'...

Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

On Challenges for Hypersonic Turbulent Simulations  

SciTech Connect

This short note discusses some of the challenges for design of suitable spatial numerical schemes for hypersonic turbulent flows, including combustion, and thermal and chemical nonequilibrium flows. Often, hypersonic turbulent flows in re-entry space vehicles and space physics involve mixed steady strong shocks and turbulence with unsteady shocklets. Material mixing in combustion poses additional computational challenges. Proper control of numerical dissipation in numerical methods beyond the standard shock-capturing dissipation at discontinuities is an essential element for accurate and stable simulations of the subject physics. On one hand, the physics of strong steady shocks and unsteady turbulence/shocklet interactions under the nonequilibrium environment is not well understood. On the other hand, standard and newly developed high order accurate (fourth-order or higher) schemes were developed for homogeneous hyperbolic conservation laws and mixed hyperbolic and parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) (without source terms). The majority of finite rate chemistry and thermal nonequilibrium simulations employ methods for homogeneous time-dependent PDEs with a pointwise evaluation of the source terms. The pointwise evaluation of the source term might not be the best choice for stability, accuracy and minimization of spurious numerics for the overall scheme.

Yee, H C; Sjogreen, B

2009-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

154

Spectral element/smoothed profile method for turbulent flow simulations of waterjet propulsion systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed fast numerical algorithms [1] for flows with complex moving domains, e.g. propellers in free-space and impellers in waterjets, by combining the smoothed profile method (SPM, [2, 3, 4]) with the spectral ...

Luo, Xian

155

Thermally Forced Stationary Axisymmetric Flow on the f Plane in a Nearly Frictionless Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates stationary axisymmetric balanced flow of a stably stratified dry non-Boussinesq atmosphere on the f plane. The circulation is forced in the troposphere through thermal relaxation toward a specified equilibrium temperature ...

Volkmar Wirth

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Heat and Momentum Fluxes Induced by Thermal Inhomogeneities with and without Large-Scale Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors Present an analytical evaluation of the vertical heat and momentum fluxes associated with mesoscale flow generated by periodic and isolated thermal inhomogeneities within the convective boundary layer (CBL). The influence of larger-...

G. A. Dalu; R. A. Pielke; M. Baldi; X. Zeng

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Comparative Study of Daytime Thermally Induced Upslope Flow on Mars and Earth  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several characteristics of thermally induced mesoscale upslope flow on Mars and its comparison with that on Earth were investigated using both analytical and numerical model approaches. The conclusions obtained from the analytical and the ...

Z. J. Ye; M. Segal; R. A. Pielke

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Effect of Thermal Buoyancy Force on the Flow, Temperature ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For conventional isothermal water modeling, the RTD parameters obtained are much different as compared with the non-isothermal ones. For the flow control ...

159

MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND THERMAL ISSUES OF THE SiCf0SiC FLOW CHANNEL INSERT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC AND THERMAL ISSUES OF THE SiCf0SiC FLOW CHANNEL INSERT S. SMOLENTSEV,* N. B) made of a silicon carbide composite (SiCf /SiC), which serves as electric and thermal insulator conductivity of the SiCf /SiC as pa- rameters. Under the DEMO reactor conditions, param- eters of the FCI have

Abdou, Mohamed

160

Thermal and flow design of helium-cooled reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book continues the American Nuclear Society's series of monographs on nuclear science and technology. Chapters of the book include information on the first-generation gas-cooled reactors; HTGR reactor developments; reactor core heat transfer; mechanical problems related to the primary coolant circuit; HTGR design bases; core thermal design; gas turbines; process heat HTGR reactors; GCFR reactor thermal hydraulics; and gas cooling of fusion reactors.

Melese, G.; Katz, R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Isolation of Metals from Liquid Wastes: Reactive in Turbulent Thermal Reactors  

SciTech Connect

A Generic Technology for treatment of DOE Metal-Bearing Liquid Waste The DOE metal-bearing liquid waste inventory is large and diverse, both with respect to the metals (heavy metals, transuranics, radionuclides) themselves, and the nature of the other species (annions, organics, etc.) present. Separation and concentration of metals is of interest from the standpoint of reducing the volume of waste that will require special treatment or isolation, as well as, potentially, from the standpoint of returning some materials to commerce by recycling. The variety of metal-bearing liquid waste in the DOE complex is so great that it is unlikely that any one process (or class of processes) will be suitable for all material. However, processes capable of dealing with a wide variety of wastes will have major advantages in terms of process development, capital, and operating costs, as well as in environmental and safety permitting. Moreover, to the extent that a process operates well with a variety of metal-bearing liquid feedwastes, its performance is likely to be relatively robust with respect to the inevitable composition variations in each waste feed. One such class of processes involves high-temperature treatment of atomized liquid waste to promote reactive capture of volatile metallic species on collectible particulate substrates injected downstream of a flame zone. Compared to low-temperature processes that remove metals from the original liquid phase by extraction, precipitation, ion exchange, etc., some of the attractive features of high-temperature reactive scavenging are: The organic constituents of some metal-bearing liquid wastes (in particular, some low-level mixed wastes) must be treated thermally in order to meet the requirements of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and the laws of various states. No species need be added to an already complex liquid system. This is especially important in light of the fact that DOE has already experienced problems with organic complexants added to precipitate radionuclides. For example, the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board has expressed, in a formal Recommendation to the Secretary of Energy, its concern about the evolution of benzene vapor in concentrations greater then the lower flammability limit from tanks to which sodium tetraphenylborate has been added to precipitate 137Cs in the ''In-Tank Precipitation'' (ITP) process at the Savannah River Site. Other species added to the waste in the ITP process are sodium titanate (to adsorb 90Sr and Pu), and oxalic acid. Avoiding addition of organics to radioactive waste has the additional advantage that is likely to significantly reduce the rate of radiolytic and radiolytically-induced hydrogen generation (c.f. Meisel et al., [1993]), in which it is shown that removal of organics reduces the rate of hydrogen generation in simulated waste from Hanford tank 241-SY-101 by over 70%. Organic species already present are destroyed with very high efficiency. This attribute is especially attractive with respect to high-level tank waste at the Hanford Site, in which large amounts of citrate, glyoxylate, EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid), and HEDTA [N-(2- hydroxyethyl)-ethylenediaminetriacetic acid] were added to precipitate radionuclides. These organic species are important in the thermal and radiolytic generation of methane, hydrogen, and nitrous oxide, flammable mixtures of which are episodically vented from 25 tanks on Hanford's Flammable Gas Watch List [Hopkins, 1994]. The same basic approach can be used to treat a broad range of liquid wastes, in each case concentrating the metals (regardless of liquid-phase oxidation state or association with chelators or absorbents) using a collectible sorbent, and destroying any organic species present. In common with the Army's approach (see section 2.2) to the thermal destruction of a 10 range of chemical warfare agents (GB, VX, and two blister agents), this may drastically simplify process and plant design and

Wendt, Jost O.L.

2001-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Modeling the motion of a hot, turbulent gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: animation, convection, gas simulations, gaseous phenomena, physics-based modeling, smoke, steam, turbulent flow

Nick Foster; Dimitris Metaxas

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s. April 2012 Exercises I of II ­ Numerical fluid dynamics 1. A tornado can be modelled as a steady, incompressible flow : rCv rCv v r x / / 2 1 0 where C1 and C2 are constants. a. Show that this model satisfies

Zevenhoven, Ron

164

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s. April 2013 Exercises I of II ­ Numerical fluid dynamics 1. A tornado can be modelled as a steady, incompressible flow : rCv rCv v r x / / 2 1 0 where C1 and C2 are constants. a. Show that this model satisfies

Zevenhoven, Ron

165

Thermally Forced Low Froude Number Flow past Three-Dimensional Obstacles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study extends the discussion of the flow of a density-stratified fluid past three-dimensional obstacles for Froude number O(1) to flows past an isolated obstacle with heated/cooled surface. The study focuses on a response of thermally ...

Jon M. Reisner; Piotr K. Smolarkiewicz

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Suppression of Turbulence by Self-Generated and Imposed Mean Flows M. G. Shats,* H. Xia, and H. Punzmann  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Punzmann Plasma Research Laboratory, Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian in magnetized plasma research, since it offers a very effective method of turbulence control [13

Falkovich, Gregory

167

Physical Processes of Interstellar Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I discuss the role of self-gravity and radiative heating and cooling in shaping the nature of the turbulence in the interstellar medium (ISM) of our galaxy. The heating and cooling cause it to be highly compressible, and, in some regimes of density and temperature, to become thermally unstable, tending to spontaneously segregate into warm/diffuse and cold/dense phases. On the other hand, turbulence is an inherently mixing process, tending to replenish the density and temperature ranges that would be forbidden under thermal processes alone. The turbulence in the ionized ISM appears to be transonic (i.e, with Mach numbers $\\Ms \\sim 1$), and thus to behave essentially incompressibly. However, in the neutral medium, thermal instability causes the sound speed of the gas to fluctuate by up to factors of $\\sim 30$, and thus the flow can be highly supersonic with respect to the dense/cold gas, although numerical simulations suggest that this behavior corresponds more to the ensemble of cold clumps than to the clumps' internal velocity dispersion. Finally, coherent large-scale compressions in the warm neutral medium (induced by, say, the passage of spiral arms or by supernova shock waves) can produce large, dense molecular clouds that are subject to their own self-gravity, and begin to contract gravitationally. Because they are populated by nonlinear density fluctuations, whose local free-fall times are significantly smaller than that of the whole cloud, the fluctuations terminate their collapse earlier, giving rise to a regime of hierarchical gravitational fragmentation, with small-scale collapses occurring within larger-scale ones. Thus, the "turbulence" in molecular clouds may be dominated by a gravitationally contracting component at all scales.

Enrique Vazquez-Semadeni

2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

168

Turbulence Structure of the Convective Boundary Layer. Part II. Phonenix 78 Aircraft Observations of Thermals and Their Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A conditional sampling technique based upon the mixed layer spectra of vertical velocity and temperature is developed. This technique is used to analyze the turbulence data obtained by aircraft during the Phoenix 78 convective boundary layer ...

George S. Young

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

SciTech Connect

The objective of Task 2 is to develop a numerical method for the efficient and accurate analysis of distributed thermal perturbation sensing (DTPS) data for (1) imaging flow profiles and (2) in situ determination of thermal conductivities and heat fluxes. Numerical forward and inverse modeling is employed to: (1) Examine heat and fluid flow processes near a geothermal well under heating and cooling conditions; (2) Demonstrate ability to interpret DTPS thermal profiles with acceptable estimation uncertainty using inverse modeling of synthetic temperature data; and (3) Develop template model and analysis procedure for the inversion of temperature data collected during a thermal perturbation test using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensors. This status report summarizes initial model developments and analyses.

Freifeld, B.; Finsterle, S.

2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

170

SELF-SIMILAR STRUCTURE OF A HOT MAGNETIZED FLOW WITH THERMAL CONDUCTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have explored the structure of a hot magnetized accretion flow with thermal conduction. The importance of thermal conduction in hot accretion flows has been confirmed by observations of the hot gas surrounding Sgr A* and a few other nearby galactic nuclei. For a steady state structure of such accretion flows, a set of self-similar solutions is presented. In this paper, we have actually tried to re-check the solution presented by Abbassi et al. using a physical constraint. In this study, we find that Equation (29) places a new constraint that limits answers presented by Abbassi et al. In that paper, the parameter space, which is established in the new constraint, was plotted. However, the new requirement makes up only a small parameter space with physically acceptable solutions. And now in this paper, we have followed the idea with more effort and tried to find out how thermal conduction influences the structure of the disks in a physical parameter space. We have found that the existence of thermal conduction will lead to the reduction of accretion and radial and azimuthal velocities as well as the vertical thickness of the disk, which is slightly reduced. Moreover, the surface density of the disk will increase when thermal conduction becomes important in hot magnetized flow.

Ghasemnezhad, M.; Khajavi, M. [Department of Physics, School of Sciences, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad, 91775-1436 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abbassi, S., E-mail: abbassi@ipm.ir [School of Physics, Damghan University, P.O. Box 36715-364, Damghan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Physics and modeling of thermal flow and soil mechanics in unconsolidated porous media  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a new formulation of nonlinear soil mechanics and multiphase thermal flow. The nonlinearites of the soil behavior and their interactions with fluid flow causing shear failure of the soil are the dominant features of the process. The numerical formulation of the coupled flow/stress solution model includes nonlinear compressibility and flow properties as functions of pressure, stress, and temperature; nonlinear, incremental, thermal poroelastic stress analysis; and shear or tensile failure and its effects on transport properties, porosity, and stress. An efficient sequential numerical scheme was developed. It is mass conservative and applicable to external coupling of existing simulators. The 1D examples show some startling new features of reservoir mechanics in unconsolidated media.

Settari, A. (Simtech Consulting Services Ltd. (US))

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

The Effect of Power-Law Body Forces on a Thermally Driven Flow between Concentric Rotating Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical study is conducted to determine the effect of power-law body forces on a thermally driven axisymmetric flow field confined between concentric co-rotating spheres. This study is motivated by Spacelab geophysical fluid-flow experiments, ...

Michele G. Macaraeg

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Atmospheric Turbulence above Coastal Waters: Determination of Stability Classes and a Simple Model for Offshore Flow Including Advection and Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric turbulence intensities and timescales have been measured for one year and modeled in a shoreline environment. Measurements were carded out at two sites on both sides of the shoreline, about 10 km from the beach. The frequency ...

Hans J. Erbrink; Rudy D. A. Scholten

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Evaluation of Turbulence Closure Models for Large-Eddy Simulation over Complex Terrain: Flow over Askervein Hill  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of turbulence closure models for large-eddy simulation (LES) has primarily been performed over flat terrain, where comparisons with theory and observations are simplified. The authors have previously developed improved closure ...

Fotini Katopodes Chow; Robert L. Street

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Tidal Flow Turbulence Measurements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

n still result in some spreading of the corrected , eve case of a unique mean 32. This definition assumes Northwest)Na+onal)Marine) Renewable)Energy)Center)...

176

Turbulence Structure of the Convective Boundary Layer. Part III: The Vertical Velocity Budgets of Thermals and Their Environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics of thermal updrafts and compensating environmental downdrafts in the convective boundary layer are examined using observations from the Phoenix 78 field experiment. Separate vertical velocity budgets are presented for thermal ...

George S. Young

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Heat flow determinations and implied thermal regime of the Coso geothermal area, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Obvious surface manifestations of an anomalous concentration of geothermal energy at the Coso Geothermal Area, California, include fumarolic activity, active hot springs, and associated hydrothermally altered rocks. Abundant Pleistocene volcanic rocks, including a cluster of thirty-seven rhyolite domes, occupy a north-trending structural and topographic ridge near the center of an oval-shaped zone of late Cenozoic ring faulting. In an investigation of the thermal regime of the geothermal

178

Anisotropic Thermal Conduction and the Cooling Flow Problem in Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the long-standing cooling flow problem in galaxy clusters with 3D MHD simulations of isolated clusters including radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The central regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) can have cooling timescales of ~200 Myr or shorter--in order to prevent a cooling catastrophe the ICM must be heated by some mechanism such as AGN feedback or thermal conduction from the thermal reservoir at large radii. The cores of galaxy clusters are linearly unstable to the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), which significantly changes the thermodynamics of the cluster core. The HBI is a convective, buoyancy-driven instability that rearranges the magnetic field to be preferentially perpendicular to the temperature gradient. For a wide range of parameters, our simulations demonstrate that in the presence of the HBI, the effective radial thermal conductivity is reduced to less than 10% of the full Spitzer conductivity. With this suppression of ...

Parrish, Ian J; Sharma, Prateek

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Thermal/chemical degradation of ceramic cross-flow filter materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the 14-month, Phase 1 effort conducted by Westinghouse on the Thermal/Chemical Degradation of Ceramic Cross-Flow Filter Materials program. In Phase 1 expected filter process conditions were identified for a fixed-bed, fluid-bed, and entrained-bed gasification, direct coal fired turbine, and pressurized fluidized-bed combustion system. Ceramic cross-flow filter materials were also selected, procured, and subjected to chemical and physical characterization. The stability of each of the ceramic cross-flow materials was assessed in terms of potential reactions or phase change as a result of process temperature, and effluent gas compositions containing alkali and fines. In addition chemical and physical characterization was conducted on cross-flow filters that were exposed to the METC fluid-bed gasifier and the New York University pressurized fluidized-bed combustor. Long-term high temperature degradation mechanisms were proposed for each ceramic cross-flow material at process operating conditions. An experimental bench-scale test program is recommended to be conducted in Phase 2, generating data that support the proposed cross-flow filter material thermal/chemical degradation mechanisms. Papers on the individual subtasks have been processed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Alvin, M.A.; Lane, J.E.; Lippert, T.E.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Non-thermal X-ray Emission: An Alternative to Cluster Cooling Flows?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of experiments aimed at reducing the major problem with cooling flow models of rich cluster X-ray sources: the fact that most of the cooled gas or its products have not been found. Here we show that much of the X-ray emission usually attributed to cooling flows can, in fact, be modeled by a power-law component which is indicative of a source(s) other than thermal bremsstrahlung from the intracluster medium. We find that adequate simultaneous fits to ROSAT PSPCB and ASCA GIS/SIS spectra of the central regions of ten clusters are obtained for two-component models that include a thermal plasma component that is attributable to hot intracluster gas and a power-law component that is likely generated by compact sources and/or extended non-thermal emission. For five of the clusters that purportedly have massive cooling flows, the best-fit models have power-law components that contribute $\\sim$ 30 % of the total flux (0.14 - 10.0 keV) within the central 3 arcminutes. Because cooling flow mass deposition rates are inferred from X-ray fluxes, our finding opens the possibility of significantly reducing cooling rates.

Ian G. McCarthy; Michael J. West; Gary A. Welch

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Thermal-hydraulic aspects of flow inversion in a research reactor  

SciTech Connect

PARET, a neutronics and thermal-hydraulics computer code, has been modified to account for natural convection in a reactor core. The code was then used to analyze the flow inversion that occurs in a reactor with heat removal by forced convection in the downward direction after a pump failure. Typical results are shown for a number of parameters. Research reactors normally operating much above ten MW are predicted to experience nucleate boiling in the event of a flow inversion. Comparison with experimental results from the Belgian BR2 reactor indicated general agreement although nucleate boiling that was analytically predicted was not noted in the BR2 data.

Smith, R.S.; Woodruff, W.L.

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Advances in compressible turbulent mixing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume includes some recent additions to original material prepared for the Princeton International Workshop on the Physics of Compressible Turbulent Mixing, held in 1988. Workshop participants were asked to emphasize the physics of the compressible mixing process rather than measurement techniques or computational methods. Actual experimental results and their meaning were given precedence over discussions of new diagnostic developments. Theoretical interpretations and understanding were stressed rather than the exposition of new analytical model developments or advances in numerical procedures. By design, compressibility influences on turbulent mixing were discussed--almost exclusively--from the perspective of supersonic flow field studies. The papers are arranged in three topical categories: Foundations, Vortical Domination, and Strongly Coupled Compressibility. The Foundations category is a collection of seminal studies that connect current study in compressible turbulent mixing with compressible, high-speed turbulent flow research that almost vanished about two decades ago. A number of contributions are included on flow instability initiation, evolution, and transition between the states of unstable flow onset through those descriptive of fully developed turbulence. The Vortical Domination category includes theoretical and experimental studies of coherent structures, vortex pairing, vortex-dynamics-influenced pressure focusing. In the Strongly Coupled Compressibility category the organizers included the high-speed turbulent flow investigations in which the interaction of shock waves could be considered an important source for production of new turbulence or for the enhancement of pre-existing turbulence. Individual papers are processed separately.

Dannevik, W.P.; Buckingham, A.C.; Leith, C.E. [eds.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Comprehensive Approaches to Multiphase Flows in Geophysics - Application to nonisothermal, nonhomogenous, unsteady, large-scale, turbulent dusty clouds I. Hydrodynamic and Thermodynamic RANS and LES Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this manuscript is to fully derive a geophysical multiphase model able to ''accommodate'' different multiphase turbulence approaches; viz., the Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS), the Large Eddy Simulation (LES), or hybrid RANSLES. This manuscript is the first part of a larger geophysical multiphase project--lead by LANL--that aims to develop comprehensive modeling tools for large-scale, atmospheric, transient-buoyancy dusty jets and plume (e.g., plinian clouds, nuclear ''mushrooms'', ''supercell'' forest fire plumes) and for boundary-dominated geophysical multiphase gravity currents (e.g., dusty surges, diluted pyroclastic flows, dusty gravity currents in street canyons). LES is a partially deterministic approach constructed on either a spatial- or a temporal-separation between the large and small scales of the flow, whereas RANS is an entirely probabilistic approach constructed on a statistical separation between an ensemble-averaged mean and higher-order statistical moments (the so-called ''fluctuating parts''). Within this specific multiphase context, both turbulence approaches are built up upon the same phasic binary-valued ''function of presence''. This function of presence formally describes the occurrence--or not--of any phase at a given position and time and, therefore, allows to derive the same basic multiphase Navier-Stokes model for either the RANS or the LES frameworks. The only differences between these turbulence frameworks are the closures for the various ''turbulence'' terms involving the unknown variables from the fluctuating (RANS) or from the subgrid (LES) parts. Even though the hydrodynamic and thermodynamic models for RANS and LES have the same set of Partial Differential Equations, the physical interpretations of these PDEs cannot be the same, i.e., RANS models an averaged field, while LES simulates a filtered field. In this manuscript, we also demonstrate that this multiphase model fully fulfills the second law of thermodynamics and fulfills the necessary requirements for a well-posed initial-value problem. In the next manuscripts, we will further develop specific closures for multiphase RANS, LES, and hybrid-LES.

S. Dartevelle

2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Comments on “Turbulence Closure, Steady State, and Collapse into Waves”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-equation models are being increasingly used to model turbulence in geophysical flows. A salient aspect of these flows is the stable gravitational stratification, which implies that turbulent fluctuations can generate internal waves that drain ...

Lakshmi H. Kantha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

ANISOTROPIC THERMAL CONDUCTION AND THE COOLING FLOW PROBLEM IN GALAXY CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

We examine the long-standing cooling flow problem in galaxy clusters with three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics simulations of isolated clusters including radiative cooling and anisotropic thermal conduction along magnetic field lines. The central regions of the intracluster medium (ICM) can have cooling timescales of {approx}200 Myr or shorter-in order to prevent a cooling catastrophe the ICM must be heated by some mechanism such as active galactic nucleus feedback or thermal conduction from the thermal reservoir at large radii. The cores of galaxy clusters are linearly unstable to the heat-flux-driven buoyancy instability (HBI), which significantly changes the thermodynamics of the cluster core. The HBI is a convective, buoyancy-driven instability that rearranges the magnetic field to be preferentially perpendicular to the temperature gradient. For a wide range of parameters, our simulations demonstrate that in the presence of the HBI, the effective radial thermal conductivity is reduced to {approx}<10% of the full Spitzer conductivity. With this suppression of conductive heating, the cooling catastrophe occurs on a timescale comparable to the central cooling time of the cluster. Thermal conduction alone is thus unlikely to stabilize clusters with low central entropies and short central cooling timescales. High central entropy clusters have sufficiently long cooling times that conduction can help stave off the cooling catastrophe for cosmologically interesting timescales.

Parrish, Ian J.; Sharma, Prateek; Quataert, Eliot, E-mail: iparrish@astro.berkeley.ed [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2009-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

186

Thermal characteristics of air flow cooling in the lithium ion batteries experimental chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A battery pack prototype has been designed and built to evaluate various air cooling concepts for the thermal management of Li-ion batteries. The heat generation from the Li-Ion batteries was simulated with electrical heat generation devices with the same dimensions as the Li-Ion battery (200 mm x 150 mm x 12 mm). Each battery simulator generates up to 15W of heat. There are 20 temperature probes placed uniformly on the surface of the battery simulator, which can measure temperatures in the range from -40 C to +120 C. The prototype for the pack has up to 100 battery simulators and temperature probes are recorder using a PC based DAQ system. We can measure the average surface temperature of the simulator, temperature distribution on each surface and temperature distributions in the pack. The pack which holds the battery simulators is built as a crate, with adjustable gap (varies from 2mm to 5mm) between the simulators for air flow channel studies. The total system flow rate and the inlet flow temperature are controlled during the test. The cooling channel with various heat transfer enhancing devices can be installed between the simulators to investigate the cooling performance. The prototype was designed to configure the number of cooling channels from one to hundred Li-ion battery simulators. The pack is thermally isolated which prevents heat transfer from the pack to the surroundings. The flow device can provide the air flow rate in the gap of up to 5m/s velocity and air temperature in the range from -30 C to +50 C. Test results are compared with computational modeling of the test configurations. The present test set up will be used for future tests for developing and validating new cooling concepts such as surface conditions or heat pipes.

Lukhanin A.; Rohatgi U.; Belyaev, A.; Fedorchenko, D.; Khazhmuradov, M.; Lukhanin, O; Rudychev, I.

2012-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

187

Experimental study on turbulent natural convection heat transfer in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 16, 2010 ... ments are conducted to investigate flow and heat transfer ... turbulent region, the heat transfer deterioration occurs for a bubble flow rate Q = 33 ...

188

Wind Tunnel Study of Turbulent Flow Structure in the Convective Boundary Layer Capped by a Temperature Inversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Experiments on simulating the atmospheric convective boundary layer (CBL), capped by a temperature inversion and affected by surface shear, were carried out in the thermally stratified wind tunnel of the Institute of Hydrology and Water Resources,...

Evgeni Fedorovich; Rolf Kaiser; Matthias Rau; Erich Plate

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The mean electromotive force due to turbulence of a conducting fluid in the presence of mean flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mean electromotive force caused by turbulence of an electrically conducting fluid, which plays a central part in mean--field electrodynamics, is calculated for a rotating fluid. Going beyond most of the investigations on this topic, an additional mean motion in the rotating frame is taken into account. One motivation for our investigation originates from a planned laboratory experiment with a Ponomarenko-like dynamo. In view of this application the second--order correlation approximation is used. The investigation is of high interest in astrophysical context, too. Some contributions to the mean electromotive are revealed which have not been considered so far, in particular contributions to the $\\alpha$--effect and related effects due to the gradient of the mean velocity. Their relevance for dynamo processes is discussed. In a forthcoming paper the results reported here will be specified to the situation in the laboratory and partially compared with experimental findings.

Karl-Heinz Readler; Rodion Stepanov

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

190

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequent mixer element in many real chemical-reactor applications. This mixer element is defined by source, or turbulence/kinetic energy, or concentration (species). Select draw grid and set step size to 0.03, press, the turbulent kinetic energy, k, and its dissipation, , and compare the cases with and without baffles. Complete

Zevenhoven, Ron

191

Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory course 424512 E Ron Zevenhoven c.s.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.gz - The model has one mixer. This is very frequent mixer element in many real chemical-reactor applications.g velocity, velocity magnitude, or turbulence/kinetic energy, or concentration (species). Select draw grid, radial and tangential velocities and, for example, the turbulent kinetic energy, k, and its dissipation

Zevenhoven, Ron

192

Imaging Fluid Flow in Geothermal Wells Using Distributed Thermal Perturbation Sensing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and end of the cooling periods for both thermal perturbationduring cooling period are used for estimation of thermal andduring cooling period are used for estimation of thermal and

Freifeld, B.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Progress in sub-grid scale modeling of shock-turbulence interaction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors report on progress in the development of sub grid scale (SGS) closure relationships for the unresolved motion scales in compressible large eddy simulations (LES). At present they are refining the SGS model and overall LES procedure to include: a linearized viscoelastic model for finite thickness shock distortions and shocked turbulence field response; multiple scale asymptotic considerations to improve predictions of average near-wall surface behavior; and a spectral statistical model simulating the effects of high wave number stochastic feed-back from the unresolved SGS nonlinear motion influences on the explicitly resolved grid scale motions. Predicted amplification levels, modal energy partition, shock translational to turbulence kinetic energy transfer, and viscoelastic spatio-temporal response of turbulence to shock interaction are examined in comparison with available experimental evidence. Supplemental hypersonic compressible turbulence experimental information is developed from sub nanosecond interval pulsed shadowgraph evidence of laser impulse generated hypervelocity shocks interacting with intense, previously developed and carefully characterized initial turbulence. Accurate description of the influence of shock-turbulence interactions is vital for predicting their influence on: Supersonic/hypersonic flow field analysis, aerodynamic design, and aerostructural materials selection. Practical applications also include interior supersonic combustion analysis and combustion chamber design. It is also the essential foundation for accurately predicting the development and evolution of flow-field generated thermal and electromagnetic radiation important to hypersonic flight vehicle survivability, detection and communication.

Buckingham, A.C. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Center for Advanced Fluid Dynamics Applications; Grun, J. [Naval Research Lab., Washington, DC (United States). Plasma Physics Div.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Large-eddy simulations of air flow and turbulence within and around low aspect ratio cylindrical open-top chambers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow around cylindrical open-top chambers (OTCs) with aspect ratios (i.e., height-to-diameter ratios) much less than unity is investigated using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. The solid structures are represented using the immersed ...

Philip Cunningham; Rodman R. Linn; Eunmo Koo; Cathy J. Wilson

195

Forced convection heat transfer in the transition region between laminar and turbulent flow for a vertical circular tube  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, first results of the heat transfer characteristic of a vertical double tube heat exchanger were determined. The heat exchanger was operated under cocurrent-flow conditions. The Reynolds-number was varied in the transition region between ... Keywords: circular tube, forced convection, heat transfer, transition region

D. Huber; H. Walter

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Influence of asperities on fluid and thermal flow in a fracture: a coupled Lattice Boltzmann study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characteristics of the hydro-thermal flow which occurs when a cold fluid is injected into a hot fractured bedrock depend on the morphology of the fracture. We consider a sharp triangular asperity, invariant in one direction, perturbing an otherwise flat fracture. We investigate its influence on the macroscopic hydraulic transmissivity and heat transfer efficiency, at fixed low Reynolds number. In this study, numerical simulations are done with a coupled lattice Boltzmann method that solves both the complete Navier-Stokes and advection-diffusion equations in three dimensions. The results are compared with those obtained under lubrication approximations which rely on many hypotheses and neglect the three-dimensional (3D) effects. The lubrication results are obtained by analytically solving the Stokes equation and a two-dimensional (integrated over the thickness) advection-diffusion equation. We use a lattice Boltzmann method with a double distribution (for mass and energy transport) on hypercubic and cubic ...

Neuville, Amélie; Toussaint, Renaud

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Statistics and Dynamics of Aircraft Encounters of Turbulence over Greenland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical records of aviation turbulence encounters above Greenland are examined for the period from 2000 to 2006. These data identify an important flow regime that contributes to the occurrence of aircraft turbulence encounters, associated with ...

Todd P. Lane; James D. Doyle; Robert D. Sharman; Melvyn A. Shapiro; Campbell D. Watson

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Warman, J.c. , "Thermal energy storage in a confinedIn Proceedings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifersand Tsang, c.F. , ~Aquifer thermal energy storage- parameter

Doughty, Christine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

TURBULENT HEAT TRANSPORT IN TWO-AND THREE-DIMENSIONAL TEMPERATURE FIELDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most fluid flows and heat transfer processes of practicalfor turbulent heat and mass transfer processes. The study

Samaraweera, D.S.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fifteen Lectures on Laminar and Turbulent Combustion N. Peters RWTH Aachen Ercoftac Summer School in Combustion Systems 1 Lecture 2: Calculation of Adiabatic Flame Temperatures and Chemical Equilibria 20: Laminar Diffusion Flames: Different Flow Geometries 156 Lecture 11: Turbulent Combustion: Introduction

Peters, Norbert

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A STUDY OF ATES THERMAL BEHAVIOR USING A STEADY FLOW MODEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal conductivity, Aau heat capacity per unit volume, Ca,thermal conductivity Ac and heat capacity per unit volumeCc• Cw• The heat capacity per unit volume of water is All

Doughty, Christine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Validation and Calibration of Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics Multiscale Multiphysics Models - Subcooled Flow Boiling Study  

SciTech Connect

In addition to validation data plan, development of advanced techniques for calibration and validation of complex multiscale, multiphysics nuclear reactor simulation codes are a main objective of the CASL VUQ plan. Advanced modeling of LWR systems normally involves a range of physico-chemical models describing multiple interacting phenomena, such as thermal hydraulics, reactor physics, coolant chemistry, etc., which occur over a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. To a large extent, the accuracy of (and uncertainty in) overall model predictions is determined by the correctness of various sub-models, which are not conservation-laws based, but empirically derived from measurement data. Such sub-models normally require extensive calibration before the models can be applied to analysis of real reactor problems. This work demonstrates a case study of calibration of a common model of subcooled flow boiling, which is an important multiscale, multiphysics phenomenon in LWR thermal hydraulics. The calibration process is based on a new strategy of model-data integration, in which, all sub-models are simultaneously analyzed and calibrated using multiple sets of data of different types. Specifically, both data on large-scale distributions of void fraction and fluid temperature and data on small-scale physics of wall evaporation were simultaneously used in this work’s calibration. In a departure from traditional (or common-sense) practice of tuning/calibrating complex models, a modern calibration technique based on statistical modeling and Bayesian inference was employed, which allowed simultaneous calibration of multiple sub-models (and related parameters) using different datasets. Quality of data (relevancy, scalability, and uncertainty) could be taken into consideration in the calibration process. This work presents a step forward in the development and realization of the “CIPS Validation Data Plan” at the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs to enable quantitative assessment of the CASL modeling of Crud-Induced Power Shift (CIPS) phenomenon, in particular, and the CASL advanced predictive capabilities, in general. This report is prepared for the Department of Energy’s Consortium for Advanced Simulation of LWRs program’s VUQ Focus Area.

Anh Bui; Nam Dinh; Brian Williams

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Elliptic flow of thermal photons in heavy-ion collisions at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and Large Hadron Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the thermal photon transverse momentum spectra and elliptic flow in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 200$ GeV Au+Au collisions at RHIC and in $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} = 2.76$ TeV Pb+Pb collisions at the LHC, using an ideal-hydrodynamical framework which is constrained by the measured hadron spectra at RHIC and LHC. The sensitivity of the results to the QCD-matter equation of state and to the photon emission rates is studied, and the photon $v_2$ is discussed in the light of the photonic $p_T$ spectrum measured by the PHENIX Collaboration. In particular, we make a prediction for the thermal photon $p_T$ spectra and elliptic flow for the current LHC Pb+Pb collisions.

Hannu Holopainen; Sami Räsänen; Kari J. Eskola

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

204

Turbulence and Diapycnal Mixing in Drake Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct measurements of turbulence levels in the Drake Passage region of the Southern Ocean show a marked enhancement over the Phoenix Ridge. At this site, the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) is constricted in its flow between the southern tip ...

L. St. Laurent; A. C. Naveira Garabato; J. R. Ledwell; A. M. Thurnherr; J. M. Toole; A. J. Watson

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Can Quasigeostrophic Turbulence Be Modeled Stochastically?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerically generated data of quasigeostrophic turbulence in an equilibrated shear flow are analyzed to determine the extent to which they can be modeled by a Markov model. The time lagged covariances are collected into a matrix, C?, and are ...

Timothy DelSole

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Dispersion of Heavy Particles by Turbulent Motion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate prediction of heavy particle dispersion in turbulent flows requires a simultaneous consideration of particle's inertia and particle's drift velocity. A mathematically simple and physically comprehensive analysis was developed to solve ...

Lian-Ping Wang; Davd E. Stock

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Active control for turbulent premixed flame simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many turbulent premixed flames of practical interest are statistically stationary. They occur in combustors that have anchoring mechanisms to prevent blow-off and flashback. The stabilization devices often introduce a level of geometric complexity that is prohibitive for detailed computational studies of turbulent flame dynamics. As a result, typical detailed simulations are performed in simplified model configurations such as decaying isotropic turbulence or inflowing turbulence. In these configurations, the turbulence seen by the flame either decays or, in the latter case, increases as the flame accelerates toward the turbulent inflow. This limits the duration of the eddy evolutions experienced by the flame at a given level of turbulent intensity, so that statistically valid observations cannot be made. In this paper, we apply a feedback control to computationally stabilize an otherwise unstable turbulent premixed flame in two dimensions. For the simulations, we specify turbulent in flow conditions and dynamically adjust the integrated fueling rate to control the mean location of the flame in the domain. We outline the numerical procedure, and illustrate the behavior of the control algorithm. We use the simulations to study the propagation and the local chemical variability of turbulent flame chemistry.

Bell, John B.; Day, Marcus S.; Grcar, Joseph F.; Lijewski, Michael J.

2004-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

A finite element analysis modeling tool for solid oxide fuel cell development: coupled electrochemistry, thermal and flow analysis in MARC®  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3D simulation tool for modeling solid oxide fuel cells is described. The tool combines the versatility and efficiency of a commercial finite element analysis code, MARC{reg_sign}, with an in-house developed robust and flexible electrochemical (EC) module. Based upon characteristic parameters obtained experimentally and assigned by the user, the EC module calculates the current density distribution, heat generation, and fuel and oxidant species concentration, taking the temperature profile provided by MARC{reg_sign} and operating conditions such as the fuel and oxidant flow rate and the total stack output voltage or current as the input. MARC{reg_sign} performs flow and thermal analyses based on the initial and boundary thermal and flow conditions and the heat generation calculated by the EC module. The main coupling between MARC{reg_sign} and EC is for MARC{reg_sign} to supply the temperature field to EC and for EC to give the heat generation profile to MARC{reg_sign}. The loosely coupled, iterative scheme is advantageous in terms of memory requirement, numerical stability and computational efficiency. The coupling is iterated to self-consistency for a steady-state solution. Sample results for steady states as well as the startup process for stacks with different flow designs are presented to illustrate the modeling capability and numerical performance characteristic of the simulation tool.

Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Lin, Zijing; Singh, Prabhakar; Surdoval, Wayne; Collin, D

2004-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

209

Turbulence Considerations for Comparing Ecosystem Exchange over Old-Growth and Clear-Cut Stands For Limited Fetch and Complex Canopy Flow Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Carbon dioxide, water vapor and energy fluxes were measured using eddy covariance (EC) methodology over three adjacent forests in southern Washington State to identify stand-level age-effects on ecosystem exchange. The sites represent Douglas-fir forest ecosystems at two contrasting successional stages: old-growth (OG) and early seral (ES). Here we present eddy flux and meteorological data from two early seral stands and the Wind River AmeriFlux old-growth forest during the growing season (March-October) in 2006 and 2007. We show an alternative approach to the usual friction velocity (u*) method for determining periods of adequate atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) mixing based on the ratio of mean horizontal ({bar u}) and vertical ({bar w}) wind flow to a modified turbulent kinetic energy scale (uTKE). This new parameter in addition to footprint modeling showed that daytime CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE}) in small clear-cuts (< 10 hectares) can be measured accurately with EC if micrometeorological conditions are carefully evaluated. Peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -14.0 to -12.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) at OG were measured in April in both 2006 and 2007 before bud break when air and soil temperatures and vapor pressure deficit were relatively low, and soil moisture and light levels were favorable for photosynthesis. At the early seral stands, peak midday CO{sub 2} fluxes (F{sub NEE} = -11.0 to -8.7 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) were measured in June and July while spring-time CO{sub 2} fluxes were much smaller (F{sub NEE} = -3.8 to -3.6 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}). Overall, we measured lower evapotranspiration (OG = 230 mm; ES = 297 mm) higher midday F{sub NEE} (OG F{sub NEE} = -9.0 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}; ES F{sub NEE} = -7.3 {micro}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and higher Bowen ratios (OG {beta} = 2.0. ES {beta} = 1.2) at the old-growth forest than at the ES sites during the summer months (May-August). Eddy covariance studies such as ours add critical land-atmosphere exchange data for an abundant, but rarely studied Douglas-fir age class.

Wharton, S; Schroeder, M; Paw U, K T; Falk, M; Bible, K

2009-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

210

Particle Dynamics In A Turbulent Particle-Gas Suspension At High Stokes Number.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Particle laden turbulent flows find applications in many industrial processes such as energy conversion, air pollution control etc. In these types of flows, there are… (more)

Goswami, Partha Sarathi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Measurement of the Rates of Production and Dissipation of Turbulent Kinetic Energy in an Energetic Tidal Flow: Red Wharf Bay Revisited  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous measurements of the rates of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) dissipation (?) and production (P) have been made over a period of 24 h at a tidally energetic site in the northern Irish Sea in water of 25-m depth. Some ? profiles from 5 ...

Tom P. Rippeth; John H. Simpson; Eirwen Williams; Mark E. Inall

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

On Deep-Water Renewals in Indian Arm, British Columbia: Sensitivity to the Production of Turbulent Kinetic Energy Caused by Horizontal Variations in the Flow Field  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A two-dimensional (i.e., laterally averaged) numerical model of the circulation in Burrard Inlet and Indian Arm near British Columbia, Canada, is used to examine the sensitivity of deep-water renewal events in Indian Arm to the turbulent mixing ...

Michael W. Stacey; S. Pond

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

A Quadratic Closure for Compressible Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated a one-point closure model for compressible turbulence based on third- and higher order cumulant discard for systems undergoing rapid deformation, such as might occur downstream of a shock or other discontinuity. In so doing, we find the lowest order contributions of turbulence to the mean flow, which lead to criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement. Rapid distortion theory (RDT) as originally applied by Herring closes the turbulence hierarchy of moment equations by discarding third order and higher cumulants. This is similar to the fourth-order cumulant discard hypothesis of Millionshchikov, except that the Millionshchikov hypothesis was taken to apply to incompressible homogeneous isotropic turbulence generally, whereas RDT is applied only to fluids undergoing a distortion that is 'rapid' in the sense that the interaction of the mean flow with the turbulence overwhelms the interaction of the turbulence with itself. It is also similar to Gaussian closure, in which both second and fourth-order cumulants are retained. Motivated by RDT, we develop a quadratic one-point closure for rapidly distorting compressible turbulence, without regard to homogeneity or isotropy, and make contact with two equation turbulence models, especially the K-{var_epsilon} and K-L models, and with linear instability growth. In the end, we arrive at criteria for Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Finite Volume simulations.

Futterman, J A

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

214

A Numerical Study of Turbulent Processes in the Marine Upper Layers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A second-order turbulence closure model, similar to Mellor and Yamada's (1974) level-3 model, is implemented. This is used to investigate the role of the different turbulent processes and the resulting dynamical and thermal structures, for ...

Patrice Klein; Michel Coantic

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

A novel thermal optimization flow using incremental floorplanning for 3D ICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal issue is a critical challenge in 3D IC design. To eliminate hotspots, physical layouts are always adjusted by shifting or duplicating hot blocks. However, these modifications may degrade the packing area as well as interconnect distribution greatly. ...

Xin Li; Yuchun Ma; Xianlong Hong

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

TURBULENT FRBRNNING MVK130 Turbulent Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TURBULENT F�RBR�NNING MVK130 Turbulent Combustion Poäng: 3.0 Betygskala: TH Valfri för: M4 to combustion, McGraw-Hill 1996. #12;

217

Premixed turbulent combustion to opposed streams  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Premixed turbulent combustion in opposed streams has been studied experimentally by the use of two component laser doppler aneomometry. This flow geometry is part of a class of stagnating flows used to study turbulent combustion in recent years. It does not involve any surface near the flames because of the flow symmetry thus circumventing many of the effects of flame surface interaction. The mean non-reacting flow is found to be self-similar for all the conditions studied in this and the stagnation plate configuration. A homogeneous region of plane straining is produced in the vicinity of the stagnation and there is a strong interaction between the turbulence in the flow and the mean straining which can increase the rms velocity as the flow stagnates. The reacting flow fields are found to be symmetric about the free stagnation point. The traverses of mean axial velocity in the stagnation streamlines for reaction flows are not dramatically different from the non-reaction flows. These results differ from turbulent combustion experiments where the flow is stagnated by a flat plate. The extinction limits was studied for propane:air mixtures. 11 refs.

Kostiuk, L.W.; Cheng, R.K.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Similarity Solutions for the Stratified Turbulent Rayleigh Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The type of stratified flow suggested by the Kantha Phillips and Azad experiment is examined analytically and shown to be a self-similar, turbulent flow which includes the well-documented fiat-plate, turbulent boundary-layer case. Some relevant ...

George Mellor; Paul T. Strub

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

On the theory of turbulent flame velocity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The renormalization ideas of self-similar dynamics of a strongly turbulent flame front are applied to the case of a flame with realistically large thermal expansion of the burning matter. In that case a flame front is corrugated both by external turbulence and the intrinsic flame instability. The analytical formulas for the velocity of flame propagation are obtained. It is demonstrated that the flame instability is of principal importance when the integral turbulent length scale is much larger than the cut off wavelength of the instability. The developed theory is used to analyse recent experiments on turbulent flames propagating in tubes. It is demonstrated that most of the flame velocity increase measured experimentally is provided by the large scale effects like the flame instability, and not by the small-scale external turbulence.

Vitaly Bychkov; Vyacheslav Akkerman; Arkady Petchenko

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

220

ENERGY EFFICIENT THERMAL MANAGEMENT FOR NATURAL GAS ENGINE AFTERTREATMENT VIA ACTIVE FLOW CONTROL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control  

SciTech Connect

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Energy Efficient Thermal Management for Natural Gas Engine Aftertreatment via Active Flow Control  

SciTech Connect

The project is focused on the development of an energy efficient aftertreatment system capable of reducing NOx and methane by 90% from lean-burn natural gas engines by applying active exhaust flow control. Compared to conventional passive flow-through reactors, the proposed scheme cuts supplemental energy by 50%-70%. The system consists of a Lean NOx Trap (LNT) system and an oxidation catalyst. Through alternating flow control, a major amount of engine exhaust flows through a large portion of the LNT system in the absorption mode, while a small amount of exhaust goes through a small portion of the LNT system in the regeneration or desulfurization mode. By periodically reversing the exhaust gas flow through the oxidation catalyst, a higher temperature profile is maintained in the catalyst bed resulting in greater efficiency of the oxidation catalyst at lower exhaust temperatures. The project involves conceptual design, theoretical analysis, computer simulation, prototype fabrication, and empirical studies. This report details the progress during the first twelve months of the project. The primary activities have been to develop the bench flow reactor system, develop the computer simulation and modeling of the reverse-flow oxidation catalyst, install the engine into the test cell, and begin design of the LNT system.

David K. Irick; Ke Nguyen; Vitacheslav Naoumov; Doug Ferguson

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Interstellar MHD Turbulence and Star Formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This chapter reviews the nature of turbulence in the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) and its connections to the star formation (SF) process. The ISM is turbulent, magnetized, self-gravitating, and is subject to heating and cooling processes that control its thermodynamic behavior. The turbulence in the warm and hot ionized components of the ISM appears to be trans- or subsonic, and thus to behave nearly incompressibly. However, the neutral warm and cold components are highly compressible, as a consequence of both thermal instability in the atomic gas and of moderately-to-strongly supersonic motions in the roughly isothermal cold atomic and molecular components. Within this context, we discuss: i) the production and statistical distribution of turbulent density fluctuations in both isothermal and polytropic media; ii) the nature of the clumps produced by thermal instability, noting that, contrary to classical ideas, they in general accrete mass from their environment; iii) the density-magnetic field correla...

Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Geothermal Resource/Reservoir Investigations Based on Heat Flow and Thermal Gradient Data for the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several activities related to geothermal resources in the western United States are described in this report. A database of geothermal site-specific thermal gradient and heat flow results from individual exploration wells in the western US has been assembled. Extensive temperature gradient and heat flow exploration data from the active exploration of the 1970's and 1980's were collected, compiled, and synthesized, emphasizing previously unavailable company data. Examples of the use and applications of the database are described. The database and results are available on the world wide web. In this report numerical models are used to establish basic qualitative relationships between structure, heat input, and permeability distribution, and the resulting geothermal system. A series of steady state, two-dimensional numerical models evaluate the effect of permeability and structural variations on an idealized, generic Basin and Range geothermal system and the results are described.

D. D. Blackwell; K. W. Wisian; M. C. Richards; J. L. Steele

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Review of the shear-stress transport turbulence model experience from an industrial perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present author was asked to provide an update on the status and the more recent developments around the shear-stress transport (SST) turbulence model for this special issue of the journal. The article is therefore not intended as a comprehensive ... Keywords: SAS, SST turbulence model, engineering flows, laminar-turbulent transition, scale-adaptive simulation, unsteady flows

Florian R. Menter

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Structure of Offshore Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizontal and vertical structure of the mean flow and turbulent fluxes are examined using aircraft observations taken near a barrier island on the east coast of the United States during offshore flow periods. The spatial structure is ...

Dean Vickers; L. Mahrt; Jielun Sun; Tim Crawford

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Along-Valley Structure of Daytime Thermally Driven Flows in the Wipp Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution Doppler lidar observations obtained during the Mesoscale Alpine Program (MAP) 1999 field campaign are used to investigate the along-valley structure of daytime valley flows in the Wipp Valley, Austria. The observations show that ...

Magdalena Rucker; Robert M. Banta; Douw G. Steyn

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Control of Chemical Reactions by Convective Turbulence in the Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influence of convective turbulence on chemical reactions in the atmospheric boundary layer is studied by means of direct numerical simulation (DNS). An archetype of turbulent reacting flows is used to study the reaction zones and to obtain a ...

M. Jeroen Molemaker; Jordi Vilŕ-Guerau de Arellano

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Stably Stratified Shear Turbulence: A New Model for the Energy Dissipation Length Scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is presented to compute the turbulent kinetic energy dissipation length scale l? in a stably stratified shear flow. The expression for l? is derived from solving the spectral balance equation for the turbulent kinetic energy. The buoyancy ...

Y. Cheng; V. M. Canuto

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Heat Transfer and Fluid Flow of Benard-Cell Convection in Rectangular Container with Free Surface Sensed by Infrared Thermography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The natural convection flow phenomena that occur inside an enclosed space are very interesting examples of complex fluid systems that may yield to analytical, empirical and numerical solutions, and many reports have looked into this basic problem. In ... Keywords: Gas-liquid Interface, Heat Transfer, Infrared Thermography, Natural Convection, Thermal Visualization, Turbulence

T. Inagaki; M. Hatori; T. Suzuki; Y. Shiina

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Vibrational Non-Equilibrium on the Decay of Grid-Generated Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The technical feasibility of hypersonic flight (i.e., re-entry, hypersonic flight vehicles, cruise missiles, etc.) hinges on our ability to understand, predict, and control the transport of turbulence in the presence of non-equilibrium effects. A theoretical analysis of the governing equations suggests a mechanism by which fluctuations in internal energy are coupled to the transport of turbulence. Numerical studies of these flows have been conducted, but limited computational power results in reduced fidelity. Experimental studies are exceedingly rare and, consequently, experimental data available to build and evaluate turbulence models is nearly non-existent. The Decaying Mesh Turbulence (DMT) facility was designed and constructed to generate a fundamental decaying mesh turbulent flow field with passive grids. Vibrational non-equilibrium was achieved via a capacitively-coupled radio-frequency (RF) plasma discharge which required an operating pressure of 30 Torr. The flow velocity was 30 m/s. Data was recorded with each grid at multiple plasma powers (Off, 150 W, and 300 W). Over two terabytes of highly resolved (3,450 image pairs) two-dimensional particle image velocimetry (PIV) was acquired and archived. Temperature measurements were carried out using coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). The primary objective of this study was to answer the fundamental scientific question: "Does thermal non-equilibrium alter the decay rate of turbulence?" The results of this study show that the answer is "Yes." The results demonstrate a clear coupling between thermal non-equilibrium and turbulence transport. The trends observed agree with those expected based on an analysis of the Reynolds stress transport equations, which provides confidence in transport equation-based modeling. A non-trivial reduction (~30%) in the decay rate downstream of the 300 W plasma discharge was observed. The data also show that the decay of TKE downstream of the plasma discharge was delayed (~20% downstream shift). In addition, the thermal non-equilbrium was observed to have no effect on the transverse stress. This suggests that, for this flow, the energy dilatation terms are small and unaffected by the plasma discharge, which simplifies modeling.

Fuller, T. J.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Thermal end effects on electroosmotic flow in a capillary Xiangchun Xuan, David Sinton, Dongqing Li *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

advantages over the more conventional pressure-driven flow; in that no moving parts are required, the plug investigated in this paper. The model accounts for the dynamic coupling effects of Joule heating extensively used to ``pump'' the solu- tion through either a capillary [2] or a channel mi- cromachined

Xuan, Xiangchun "Schwann"

233

External Influences on Nocturnal Thermally Driven Flows in a Deep Valley  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamics that govern the evolution of nighttime flows in a deep valley, California’s Owens Valley, are analyzed. Measurements from the Terrain-Induced Rotor Experiment (T-REX) reveal a pronounced valley-wind system with often nonclassical ...

Juerg Schmidli; Gregory S. Poulos; Megan H. Daniels; Fotini K. Chow

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

The Influence of Groundwater Flow on Thermal Regimes in Mountainous Terrain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Active circulation of cool groundwater in mountainous terrain can cause an advective disturbance of the thermal regime. This factor complicates interpretation of data collected in geothermal exploration programs. An isothermal free-surface model has been developed which provides qualitative insight into the nature of an advective disturbance as it is affected by topography, permeability and climate. A fully coupled model of fluid and heat transfer is being developed for quantitative study of idealized mountain hydrothermal systems.

Forster, Craig; Smith, Leslie

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

236

Gyrokinetic Simulation of Global Turbulent Transport Properties in Tokamak Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A general geometry gyro-kinetic model for particle simulation of plasma turbulence in tokamak experiments is described. It incorporates the comprehensive influence of noncircular cross section, realistic plasma profiles, plasma rotation, neoclassical (equilibrium) electric fields, and Coulomb collisions. An interesting result of global turbulence development in a shaped tokamak plasma is presented with regard to nonlinear turbulence spreading into the linearly stable region. The mutual interaction between turbulence and zonal flows in collisionless plasmas is studied with a focus on identifying possible nonlinear saturation mechanisms for zonal flows. A bursting temporal behavior with a period longer than the geodesic acoustic oscillation period is observed even in a collisionless system. Our simulation results suggest that the zonal flows can drive turbulence. However, this process is too weak to be an effective zonal flow saturation mechanism.

Wang, W.X.; Lin, Z.; Tang, W.M.; Lee, W.W.; Ethier, S.; Lewandowski, J.L.V.; Rewoldt, G.; Hahm, T.S.; Manickam, J.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Towards Understanding the Poor Thermal Stability of V5+ Electrolyte Solution in Vanadium Redox Flow Batteries  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The V5+ electrolyte solution from vanadium redox flow batteries was studied by variable temperature 17O and 51V Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and DFT based computational modeling. It was found that the V5+ species exist as hydrated penta co-ordinated vanadate ion, i.e. [VO2(H2O)3]1+. This hydrated structure is not stable at elevated temperature and change into neutral H3VO4 molecule via a deprotonation process. H3VO4 species is also knowingly unstable, leading to the observed V2O5 precipitation in V5+ electrolyte solutions.

Vijayakumar, M.; Li, Liyu; Graff, Gordon L.; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Huamin; Yang, Zhenguo; Hu, Jian Z.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The turbulent spatial redistribution of turbulent and mean kinetic energy and its exchange is investigated in the framework of an K-{epsilon} model in a magnetized plasma column. The kinetic energy is transferred from the turbulence into the zonal flow around the shear layer. The Reynolds stress profile adjusts to the shear layer, which results in a transport of mean kinetic energy from the region around the shear layer into the shear layer.

Manz, P.; Xu, M.; Fedorczak, N.; Thakur, S. C.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization,University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

239

TURBULENT FRBRNNING MVK 130 Turbulent Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TURBULENT F�RBR�NNING MVK 130 Turbulent Combustion Antal poäng: 3.0. Valfri för: M4. Kursansvarig program med hänsyn till de modeller som används. Litteratur S.R. Turns: An introduction to combustion, Mc

240

Quantum Gravity and Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We apply recent advances in quantum gravity to the problem of turbulence. Adopting the AdS/CFT approach we propose a string theory of turbulence that explains the Kolmogorov scaling in 3+1 dimensions and the Kraichnan and Kolmogorov scalings in 2+1 dimensions. In the gravitational context, turbulence is intimately related to the properties of spacetime, or quantum, foam.

Vishnu Jejjala; Djordje Minic; Y. Jack Ng; Chia-Hsiung Tze

2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Thermal and flow analyses of the Nuclear Materials Storage Facility Renovation Title I 60% design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors are continuing to use the computational fluid dynamics code CFX-4.2 to evaluate the steady-state thermal-hydraulic conditions in the Nuclear Material Storage Facility Renovation Title 1 60% Design. The analyses build on those performed for the 30% design. They have run an additional 9 cases to investigate both the performance of the passive vault and of an individual drywell. These cases investigated the effect of wind on the inlet tower, the importance of resolving boundary layers in the analyses, and modifications to the porous-medium approach used in the earlier analyses to represent better the temperature fields resulting from the detailed modeling of the boundary layers. The difference between maximum temperatures of the bulk air inside the vault for the two approaches is small. They continued the analyses of the wind effects around the inflector fixture, a canopy and cruciform device, on the inlet tower by running a case with the wind blowing diagonally across the inflector. The earlier analyses had investigated a wind that was blowing parallel to one set of vanes on the inflector. Several subcases for these analyses investigated coupling the analysis to the facility analysis and design changes for the inflector.

Knight, T.D.; Steinke, R.G.; Mueller, C.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Statistics and Parameterizations of the Effect of Turbulence on the Geometric Collision Kernel of Cloud Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collision statistics of cloud droplets in turbulent flow have been calculated for 12 droplet size combinations in four flow fields with levels of the eddy dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy ranging from 95 to 1535 cm2 s?3. The flow ...

Charmaine N. Franklin; Paul A. Vaillancourt; M. K. Yau

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Steam Generator Management Program: Benchmark Study of EPRI and EDF Steam Generator Thermal-Hydraulic and Flow Induced Vibration Cod es  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator thermal-hydraulics software codes and flow induced vibration software codes are used for steam generator design, root cause investigations, and assessment of operational changes. Organizations within the steam generator industry develop and maintain such software codes. Capabilities of existing codes are being challenged by current demands for more comprehensive results to troubleshoot ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

244

Thermal Particle and Photon Production in Pb+Pb Collisions with Transverse Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle and photon production is analyzed in the presence of transverse flow using two approximations to describe the properties of the hadronic medium, one containing only $\\pi, \\rho, \\omega$, and $\\eta$ mesons (simplified equation of state) and the other containing hadrons and resonances from the particle data table. Both are considered with and without initial quark gluon plasma formation. In each case the initial temperature is fixed by requiring $dN_{ch}/dy \\sim$ 550 in the final state. It is shown that most observables are very sensitive to the equation of state. This is particularly evident when comparing the results of the simplified equation of state in the scenarios with and without phase transition. The hadronic gas scenario leads to a substantially higher rate for the $p_T$-distribution of all particles. In the complete equation of state with several hundreds of hadronic resonances, the difference between the scenarios with and without phase transition is rather modest. Both photon and particle spectra, in a wide $p_T$ range, show very similar behavior. It is therefore concluded that from the $p_T$ spectra it will be hard to disentangle quark gluon plasma formation in the initial state. It is to be stressed however, that there are conceptual difficulties in applying a pure hadronic gas equation of state at SPS-energies. The phase transition scenario with a quark gluon plasma present in the initial state seems to be the more natural one.

J. Cleymans; K. Redlich; D. Srivastava

1996-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Modeling Compressed Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

Israel, Daniel M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

246

Shock-unsteadiness model applied to oblique shock wave/turbulent boundary-layer interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes prediction of shock wave/turbulent boundary layer interactions can yield significant error in terms of the size of the separation bubble. In many applications, this can alter the shock structure and the resulting surface ... Keywords: high-speed flows, separation bubble, shock-unsteadiness, turbulence modelling, turbulent boundary layer

Amjad Ali Pasha; Krishnendu Sinha

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

MHD Turbulence Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kraichnan (1965) proposed that MHD turbulence occurs as a result of collisions between oppositely directed Alfvén wave packets. Recent work has generated some controversy over the nature of non linear couplings between colliding Alfvén waves. We find that the resolution to much of the confusion lies in the existence of a new type of turbulence, intermediate turbulence, in which the cascade of energy in the inertial range exhibits properties intermediate between those of weak and strong turbulent cascades. Some properties of intermediate MHD turbulence are: (i) in common with weak turbulent cascades, wave packets belonging to the inertial range are long lived; (ii) however, components of the strain tensor are so large that, similar to the situation in strong turbulence, perturbation theory is not applicable; (iii) the breakdown of perturbation theory results from the divergence of neighboring field lines due to wave packets whose perturbations in velocity and magnetic fields are localized, but whose perturba...

Goldreich, P

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Generalized similarity in finite range solar wind magnetohydrodynamic turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extended or generalized similarity is a ubiquitous but not well understood feature of turbulence that is realized over a finite range of scales. ULYSSES spacecraft solar polar passes at solar minimum provide \\textit{in situ} observations of evolving anisotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence in the solar wind under ideal conditions of fast quiet flow. We find a single generalized scaling function characterises this finite range turbulence and is insensitive to plasma conditions. The recent unusually inactive solar minimum -with turbulent fluctuations down by a factor of $\\sim 2$ in power- provides a test of this invariance.

Chapman, S C

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbulence is the most important agent for heat transfer. We also show that the domain of applicability of the subdiffusion concept is rather limited.

Alex Lazarian

2007-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

250

Diffusion Processes in Turbulent Magnetic Fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on diffusion processes within magnetized medium. While we exemplify our treatment with heat transfer processes, our results are quite general and are applicable to different processes, e.g. diffusion of heavy elements. Our treatment is also applicable to describing the diffusion of cosmic rays arising from magnetic field wandering. In particular, we find that when the energy injection velocity is smaller than the Alfven speed the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the opposite regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale $l_A$ at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path $\\lambda$ is larger than $l_A$, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective transport, that can provide effective diffusivity. For clusters of galaxies, we find that the turbule...

Lazarian, Alex

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Simulations of observed lee-waves and rotor turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On 18 November 2008 a commercial aircraft encountered severe turbulence while flying in westerly flow along the southeastern coast of Iceland and descending from 2.500 m down to the ground for a safe landing. Numerical simulations at horizontal ...

Hálfdán Ágústsson; Haraldur Ólafsson

252

Spectral Energy Fluxes in Geostrophic Turbulence: Implications for Ocean Energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy pathways in geostrophic turbulence are explored using a two-layer, flat-bottom, f-plane, quasigeostrophic model forced by an imposed, horizontally homogenous, baroclinically unstable mean flow and damped by bottom Ekman friction. A ...

Robert B. Scott; Brian K. Arbic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Internal Waves and Turbulence in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study reports on observations of turbulent dissipation and internal wave-scale flow properties in a standing meander of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) north of the Kerguelen Plateau. The authors characterize the intensity and spatial ...

Stephanie Waterman; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Kurt L. Polzin

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Cloud Droplet Growth by Condensation in Homogeneous Isotropic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The growth of cloud droplets by diffusion of water vapor in a three-dimensional homogeneous isotropic turbulent flow is considered. Within a simple model of advection and condensation, the dynamics and growth of millions of droplets are ...

Alessandra S. Lanotte; Agnese Seminara; Federico Toschi

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Large-Eddy Simulations of Air Flow and Turbulence within and around Low-Aspect-Ratio Cylindrical Open-Top Chambers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow around cylindrical open-top chambers (OTCs) with aspect ratios (i.e., height-to-diameter ratios) much less than unity is investigated using a large-eddy simulation (LES) model. The solid structures are represented using the immersed ...

Philip Cunningham; Rodman R. Linn; Eunmo Koo; Cathy J. Wilson

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

On the need for a nonlinear subscale turbulence term in POD models as exemplified for a high Reynolds number flow over an Ahmed body  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate a hierarchy of eddy-viscosity terms in POD Galerkin models to account for a large fraction of unresolved fluctuation energy. These Galerkin methods are applied to Large Eddy Simulation data for a flow around the vehicle-like bluff body call Ahmed body. This flow has three challenges for any reduced-order model: a high Reynolds number, coherent structures with broadband frequency dynamics, and meta-stable asymmetric base flow states. The Galerkin models are found to be most accurate with modal eddy viscosities as proposed by Rempfer & Fasel (1994). Robustness of the model solution with respect to initial conditions, eddy viscosity values and model order is only achieved for state-dependent eddy viscosities as proposed by Noack, Morzynski & Tadmor (2011). Only the POD system with state-dependent modal eddy viscosities can address all challenges of the flow characteristics. All parameters are analytically derived from the Navier-Stokes based balance equations with the available data. We ar...

Östh, Jan; Krajnovi?, Siniša

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Modeling Fluid and Heat Flow in Fractured Porous Media,with fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media arefluid and heat flow in porous media, heat pipe, reservoir simulation, fractured

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22]. Fluid flow and heat-transfer processes in a two-phase,processes associated with multiphase flow and heat transferprocesses has also motivated development of fluid flow and heat transfer

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluid flow and heat-transfer processes. The physicalcoupled fluid-flow and heat-transfer processes has proven toin which flow and heat transfer processes along drifts are

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Magnetic turbulence suppression by a helical mode in a cylindrical geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study processes involved in a helical structure formation in reversed field pinch devices, the scaling of a turbulent boundary layer width associated with a vortex structure having large shears of magnetic field and flow is obtained for reduced magnetohydrodynamics. The coherent vortex, with its flow and magnetic shears, interacts with Alfven turbulence, forming a turbulent boundary layer at the edge of the vortex. The layer arises from the balance between turbulence diffusion rates and shearing rates and suppresses the turbulence in the structure. The suppression of turbulence impedes relaxation of the coherent vortex profiles, leading to long coherence times. The scaling of the boundary layer width reveals that both magnetic shear and flow shear can effectively suppress magnetic turbulence.

Kim, J.-H.; Terry, P. W. [Department of Physics and Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Cup Anemometer Behavior in Turbulent Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The behavior of the cup anemometer rotor in turbulent atmospheric flow is discussed in terms of a general equation of motion. This equates the rate of change s?? of the rotation rate s? of the rotor to a forcing F(s?, h?, w?), which is proportional ...

Leif Kristensen

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Shock wave / turbulent boundary layer interactions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This visualization shows the results of the simulation of a Mach 4 flow into two cone nosed cylindrical bodies adjacent to a flat plate. The analysis was computed with a Reynolds Averaged Navier Stokes (RANS) code utilizing a Spalart-Allmaras Turbulent ... Keywords: CFD, blender, raytracing, scientific visualization, visit, volume rendering

Michael A. Matheson; Allan D. Grosvenor; Alexander A. Zheltovodov

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Collisionless inter-species energy transfer and turbulent heating in drift wave turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We reconsider the classic problems of calculating 'turbulent heating' and collisionless inter-species transfer of energy in drift wave turbulence. These issues are of interest for low collisionality, electron heated plasmas, such as ITER, where collisionless energy transfer from electrons to ions is likely to be significant. From the wave Poynting theorem at steady state, a volume integral over an annulus r{sub 1}heating as {integral}{sub r{sub 1}} {sup r{sub 2}} dr=-S{sub r}|{sub r{sub 1}{sup r{sub 2}}}{ne}0. Here S{sub r} is the wave energy density flux in the radial direction. Thus, a wave energy flux differential across an annular region indeed gives rise to a net heating, in contrast to previous predictions. This heating is related to the Reynolds work by the zonal flow, since S{sub r} is directly linked to the zonal flow drive. In addition to net heating, there is inter-species heat transfer. For collisionless electron drift waves, the total turbulent energy source for collisionless heat transfer is due to quasilinear electron cooling. Subsequent quasilinear ion heating occurs through linear ion Landau damping. In addition, perpendicular heating via ion polarization currents contributes to ion heating. Since at steady state, Reynolds work of the turbulence on the zonal flow must balance zonal flow frictional damping ({approx}{nu}{sub ii}{sup 2}{approx}|(e{phi}(tilde sign)/T)|{sup 4}), it is no surprise that zonal flow friction appears as an important channel for ion heating. This process of energy transfer via zonal flow has not previously been accounted for in analyses of energy transfer. As an application, we compare the rate of turbulent energy transfer in a low collisionality plasma with the rate of the energy transfer by collisions. The result shows that the collisionless turbulent energy transfer is a significant energy coupling process for ITER plasma.

Zhao, L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); Diamond, P. H. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences and Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0424 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno113, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Radiosonde measurements of turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at Cranwell, Lincolnshire, W. H. Pick and G. A. Bull, 1926. 3 Talk structure * Geomagnetic sensors to measure orientation * Orientation variability as a turbulence measure *...

265

Model-based design of transverse wall oscillations for turbulent drag reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Over the last two decades, both experiments and simulations have demonstrated that transverse wall oscillations with properly selected amplitude and frequency can reduce turbulent drag by as much as 40%. In this paper, we develop a model-based approach for designing oscillations that suppress turbulence in a channel flow. We utilize eddy-viscosity-enhanced linearization of the turbulent flow with control in conjunction with turbulence modeling to determine skin-friction drag in a simulation-free manner. The Boussinesq eddy viscosity hypothesis is used to quantify the effect of fluctuations on the mean velocity in the flow subject to control. In contrast to the traditional approach that relies on numerical simulations, we determine the turbulent viscosity from the second order statistics of the linearized model driven by white-in-time stochastic forcing. The spatial power spectrum of the forcing is selected to ensure that the linearized model for the uncontrolled flow reproduces the turbulent energy spectrum. ...

Moarref, Rashad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Spectral Wave–Turbulence Decomposition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method of wave–turbulence decomposition is introduced, for which the only instrument required is one high-frequency pointwise velocity sensor. This is a spectral method that assumes equilibrium turbulence and no wave–turbulence interaction. ...

Jeremy D. Bricker; Stephen G. Monismith

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Advanced battery thermal management for electrical-drive vehicles using reciprocating cooling flow and spatial-resolution, lumped-capacitance thermal model.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The thermal management of traction battery systems for electrical-drive vehicles directly affects vehicle dynamic performance, long-term durability and cost of the battery systems. The… (more)

Mahamud, Rajib

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Overview of the TurbSim Stochastic Inflow Turbulence Simulator: Version 1.10  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Turbsim stochastic inflow turbulence code was developed to provide a numerical simulation of a full-field flow that contains coherent turbulence structures that reflect the proper spatiotemporal turbulent velocity field relationships seen in instabilities associated with nocturnal boundary layer flows. This report provides the user with an overview of how the TurbSim code has been developed and some of the theory behind that development.

Kelley, N. D.; Jonkman, B. J.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Steam Generator Management Program: Thermal-Hydraulic and Flow-Induced Vibration Analyses of a Representative Model F Steam Generato r  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Fall 2006 refueling outage of Vogtle 1, circumferential outside-diameter stress corrosion cracking (ODSCC) indications were observed in Model F steam generator tubes on the hot leg near the top of the tubesheet at low-row number, high-column number tubes. Additional ODSCC indications were observed in the same region during the Spring 2008 outage. All tubes with cracklike indications were plugged and stabilized. This report summarizes the comprehensive thermal-hydraulic and flow-induced vibrati...

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fossil turbulence and fossil turbulence waves can be dangerous  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turbulence is defined as an eddy-like state of fluid motion where the inertial-vortex forces of the eddies are larger than any other forces that tend to damp the eddies out. By this definition, turbulence always cascades from small scales where vorticity is created to larger scales where turbulence fossilizes. Fossil turbulence is any perturbation in a hydrophysical field produced by turbulence that persists after the fluid is no longer turbulent at the scale of the perturbation. Fossil turbulence patterns and fossil turbulence waves preserve and propagate energy and information about previous turbulence. Ignorance of fossil turbulence properties can be dangerous. Examples include the Osama bin Laden helicopter crash and the Air France 447 Airbus crash, both unfairly blamed on the pilots. Observations support the proposed definitions, and suggest even direct numerical simulations of turbulence require caution.

Carl H Gibson

2012-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

271

Using large eddy simulations to understand flow mixing | Argonne National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

large eddy simulations to understand flow mixing large eddy simulations to understand flow mixing March 4, 2013 Tweet EmailPrint In nuclear power plants, turbulent flow streams of different velocity and density mix rapidly at right angles in pipes. If those mixing flow streams are of different temperatures, thermal fluctuations result on the pipe wall. Such fluctuations can damage a pipe's structure and, ultimately, cause its failure. To better understand this phenomenon and to predict the effects, scientists have developed modeling methods known as large eddy simulations (LES). LES models only the energy-carrying large scales of motion, using a filtering mechanism to account for subgrid-scale motion. Thanks to recent advances in high-performance computing, the technique has become increasingly popular for simulating unsteady flows, allowing high fidelity

272

TEMPEST. Transient 3-D Thermal-Hydraulic  

SciTech Connect

TEMPEST is a transient, three-dimensional, hydrothermal program that is designed to analyze a range of coupled fluid dynamic and heat transfer systems of particular interest to the Fast Breeder Reactor (FBR) thermal-hydraulic design community. The full three-dimensional, time-dependent equations of motion, continuity, and heat transport are solved for either laminar or turbulent fluid flow, including heat diffusion and generation in both solid and liquid materials. The equations governing mass, momentum, and energy conservation for incompressible flows and small density variations (Boussinesq approximation) are solved using finite-difference techniques. Analyses may be conducted in either cylindrical or Cartesian coordinate systems. Turbulence is treated using a two-equation model. Two auxiliary plotting programs, SEQUEL and MANPLOT, for use with TEMPEST output are included. SEQUEL may be operated in batch or interactive mode; it generates data required for vector plots, contour plots of scalar quantities, line plots, grid and boundary plots, and time-history plots. MANPLOT reads the SEQUEL-generated data and creates the hardcopy plots. TEMPEST can be a valuable hydrothermal design analysis tool in areas outside the intended FBR thermal-hydraulic design community.

Eyler, L.L. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1992-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

273

Massively parallel direct numerical simulations of forced compressible turbulence: a hybrid MPI/OpenMP approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A highly scalable simulation code for turbulent flows which solves the fully compressible Navier-Stokes equations is presented. The code, which supports one, two and three dimensional domain decompositions is shown to scale well on up to 262,144 cores. ... Keywords: direct numerical simulations, multilevel parallelism, parallel performance, turbulent flows

Shriram Jagannathan; Diego A. Donzis

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Chemical turbulence equivalent to Nikolavskii turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find evidence that a certain class of reaction-diffusion systems can exhibit chemical turbulence equivalent to Nikolaevskii turbulence. The distinctive characteristic of this type of turbulence is that it results from the interaction of weakly stable long-wavelength modes and unstable short-wavelength modes. We indirectly study this class of reaction-diffusion systems by considering an extended complex Ginzburg-Landau (CGL) equation that was previously derived from this class of reaction-diffusion systems. First, we show numerically that the power spectrum of this CGL equation in a particular regime is qualitatively quite similar to that of the Nikolaevskii equation. Then, we demonstrate that the Nikolaevskii equation can in fact be obtained from this CGL equation through a phase reduction procedure applied in the neighborhood of a codimension-two Turing--Benjamin-Feir point.

Dan Tanaka

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

275

Enhancement and suppression of heat transfer by MHD turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study of the effect of turbulence on heat transfer within magnetized plasmas for energy injection velocities both larger and smaller that the Alfven speed. We find that in the latter regime the heat transfer is partially suppressed, while in the former regime the effects of turbulence depend on the intensity of driving. In fact, the scale l at which the turbulent velocity is equal the Alfven velocity is a new important parameter. When the electron mean free path is larger than l, the stronger the the turbulence, the lower thermal conductivity by electrons is. The turbulent motions, however, induces their own advective heat transport, which, for the parameters of intracluster medium (ICM) provides effective heat diffusivity that exceeds the classical Spitzer value.

A. Lazarian

2006-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

276

The Bolus Velocity in the Stochastic Theory of Ocean Turbulent Tracer Transport  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A stochastic theory of tracer transport in compressible turbulence has recently been developed and then applied to the ocean case because stratified flow in isopycnal coordinates is analogous to compressible flow with the isopycnal layer ...

John K. Dukowicz; Richard J. Greatbatch

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Equatorward Energy Cascade, Critical Latitude, and the Predominance of Cyclonic Vortices in Geostrophic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geostrophic turbulence exhibits features similar to those observed in the oceans: a movement of energy toward the equator, a critical latitude below which are alternating zonal flows and above which the flow is largely isotropic, and a ...

Jürgen Theiss

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Applicability of Boussinesq approximation in a turbulent fluid with constant properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The equations of motion describing buoyant fluids are often simplified using a set of approximations proposed by J. Boussinesq one century ago. To resume, they consist in assuming constant fluid properties, incompressibility and conservation of calories during heat transport. Assuming fulfilment of the first requirement (constant fluid properties), we derive a set of 4 criteria for assessing the validity of the two other requirements in turbulent Rayleigh-B\\'enard convection. The first criterion $\\alpha \\Delta \\ll 1 $ simply results from the incompressibility condition in the thermal boundary layer ($\\alpha$ and $\\Delta$ are the thermal expansion coefficient and the temperature difference driving the flow). The 3 other criteria are proportional or quadratic with the density stratification or, equivalently with the temperature difference resulting from the adiabatic gradient across the cell $\\Delta_{h}$. Numerical evaluations with air, water and cryogenic helium show that most laboratory experiments are free f...

Roche, Philippe-Emmanuel P -E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

830 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPONENTS AND PACKAGING TECHNOLOGIES, VOL. 30, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2007 Thermal Design Methodology for Low Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. M., and Gui, F., 1993, "Experimental Measurements of Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Microchannel, "Developing Convective Heat Transfer in Deep Rectangular Microchannels," Int. J. Heat Fluid Flow, 20, pp. 149 sinks pro- duce much higher convective heat transfer coefficients, reduce coolant flow rate requirements

Qu, Weilin

280

TWO-PHASE FLOW STUDIES IN NUCLEAR POWER PLANT PRIMARY CIRCUITS USING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL THERMAL-HYDRAULIC CODE BAGIRA.  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we present recent results of the application of the thermal-hydraulic code BAGIRA to the analysis of complex two-phase flows in nuclear power plants primary loops. In particular, we performed benchmark numerical simulation of an integral LOCA experiment performed on a test facility modeling the primary circuit of VVER-1000. In addition, we have also analyzed the flow patterns in the VVER-1000 steam generator vessel for stationary and transient operation regimes. For both of these experiments we have compared the numerical results with measured data. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of BAGIRA by modeling a hypothetical severe accident for a VVER-1000 type nuclear reactor. The numerical analysis, which modeled all stages of the hypothetical severe accident up to the complete ablation of the reactor cavity bottom, shows the importance of multi-dimensional flow effects.

KOHURT, P. (BNL), KALINICHENKO, S.D.; KROSHILIN, A.E.; KROSHILIN, V.E.; SMIRNOV, A.V.

2006-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Two-Phase Flow Studies in Nuclear Power Plant Primary Circuits Using the Three-Dimensional Thermal-Hydraulic Code BAGIRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

in this paper we present recent results of the application of the thermal-hydraulic code BAGIRA to the analysis of complex two-phase flows in nuclear power plants primary loops. In particular, we performed benchmark numerical simulation of an integral LOCA experiment performed on a test facility modeling the primary circuit of VVER-1000. In addition, we have also analyzed the flow patterns in the VVER-1000 steam generator vessel for stationary and transient operation regimes. For both of these experiments we have compared the numerical results with measured data. Finally, we demonstrate the capabilities of BAGIRA by modeling a hypothetical severe accident for a VVER-1000 type nuclear reactor. The numerical analysis, which modeled all stages of the hypothetical severe accident up to the complete ablation of the reactor cavity bottom, shows the importance of multi-dimensional flow effects. (authors)

Kalinichenko, S.D.; Kroshilin, A.E.; Kroshilin, V.E.; Smirnov, A.V. [All-Russian Research Institute for Nuclear Power Plant Operations (VNIIAES) 25 Ferganskaya St., 109507 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Bldg. 475 Upton, NY 11973, (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The Influence of Proposed Repository Thermal Load on Multiphase Flow and Heat Transfer in the Unsaturated Zone of Yucca Mountain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadLarge Block Test at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water Resources

Wu, Y.-S.; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, G.S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies Using the Yucca Mountain Unsaturated Zone Model,Unsaturated Zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, to Thermal LoadUnsaturated Zone, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Water-Resources

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Numerical prediction of aerodynamic characteristics of prismatic cylinder by finite element method with Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerodynamic characteristic of prismatic cylinders is numerically investigated by using finite element method with Spalart-Allmaras turbulence model. The developed model is verified against the available experimental and numerical results for turbulent ... Keywords: Aerodynamic characteristic, Afterbody shape, Finite element method, Prismatic cylinder, Turbulent flow, Unsteady S-A model

Yan Bao; Dai Zhou; Cheng Huang; Qier Wu; Xiang-qiao Chen

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Spatial Distribution of -Crystals in Metallocene-Made Isotactic Polypropylene Crystallized under Combined Thermal and Flow Fields  

SciTech Connect

The present Article reports the relationships between molecular orientation, formation, and spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystals in metallocene-made isotactic polypropylene (m-iPP) samples prepared by two industrial processes: conventional injection molding (CIM) and oscillatory shear injection molding (OSIM), in which combined thermal and flow fields typically exist. In particular, spatial distributions of crystallinity, fraction of {gamma}-crystal (f{gamma}) with respect to {alpha}-crystal, and lamella-branched shish-kebab structure in the shaped samples were characterized by synchrotron two-dimensional (2D) wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The results showed that the crystallinity in any given region of OSIM samples was always higher than that of CIM samples. The value of f{gamma} increased monotonously from skin to core in CIM samples, whereas the corresponding f{gamma} increased nonmonotonically in OSIM samples. The spatial distribution of {gamma}-crystal in OSIM samples can be explained by the epitaxial arrangement between {gamma}- and {alpha}-crystal in a lamella-branched shish-kebab structure. In the proposed model, the parent lamellae of {alpha}-crystal provide secondary nucleation sites for daughter lamellae of {alpha}-crystal and {gamma}-crystal, and the different content of parent lamellae results in varying amounts of {gamma}-crystal. In OSIM samples, the smallest parent-daughter ratio ([R] = 1.38) in the core region led to the lowest fraction of {gamma}-crystal (0.57), but relatively higher {gamma}-crystal content (0.69) at 600 and 1200 {micro}m depth of the samples (corresponding to [R] of 4.5 and 5.8, respectively). This is consistent with the proposed model where more parent lamellae provide more nucleation sites for crystallization, thus resulting in higher content of {gamma}-crystal. The melting behavior of CIM and OSIM samples was studied by differential scanning calorimetery (DSC). The observed double-melting peaks could be explained by the melting of {gamma}- and {alpha}-crystal of the shaped samples. The f{gamma} distribution calculated from the relative areas of the peaks in the DSC scans was also consistent with the WAXD results.

Wang, Y.; Pan, J; Mao, Y; Li, Z; Li, L; Hsiao, B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

The first turbulent combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The first turbulent combustion arises in a hot big bang cosmological model Gibson (2004) where nonlinear exothermic turbulence permitted by quantum mechanics, general relativity, multidimensional superstring theory, and fluid mechanics cascades from Planck to strong force freeze out scales with gravity balancing turbulent inertial-vortex forces. Interactions between Planck scale spinning and non-spinning black holes produce high Reynolds number turbulence and temperature mixing with huge Reynolds stresses driving the rapid inflation of space. Kolmogorovian turbulent temperature patterns are fossilized as strong-force exponential inflation stretches them beyond the scale of causal connection ct where c is light speed and t is time. Fossil temperature turbulence patterns seed nucleosynthesis, and then hydro-gravitational structure formation in the plasma epoch, Gibson (1996, 2000). Evidence about formation mechanisms is preserved by cosmic microwave background temperature anisotropies. CMB spectra indicate hydro-gravitational fragmentation at supercluster to galaxy masses in the primordial plasma with space stretched by \\~10^50. Bershadskii and Sreenivasan (2002, 2003) CMB multi-scaling coefficients support a strong turbulence origin for the anisotropies prior to the plasma epoch.

Carl H. Gibson

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

287

Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four Lectures on Turbulent Combustion N. Peters Institut f¨ur Technische Mechanik RWTH Aachen Turbulent Combustion: Introduction and Overview 1 1.1 Moment Methods in Modeling Turbulence with Combustion and Velocity Scales . . . . . . . . . . . 11 1.4 Regimes in Premixed Turbulent Combustion

Peters, Norbert

288

Effects of Wave—Wave and Wave-Mean Flow Interactions on the Growth and Maintenance of Transient Planetary Waves in the Presence of a Mean Thermal Restoring Force  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to clarify the effects of wave—wave and wave-mean flow interactions on the growth and maintenance of extratropical tropospheric transient waves in the presence of a mean thermal restoring force, numerical experiments are conducted with ...

Y. Hayashi; D. G. Golder

1987-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

TURBULENT CONVECTION MODEL IN THE OVERSHOOTING REGION. II. THEORETICAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Turbulent convection models (TCMs) are thought to be good tools to deal with the convective overshooting in the stellar interior. However, they are too complex to be applied to calculations of stellar structure and evolution. In order to understand the physical processes of the convective overshooting and to simplify the application of TCMs, a semi-analytic solution is necessary. We obtain the approximate solution and asymptotic solution of the TCM in the overshooting region, and find some important properties of the convective overshooting. (1) The overshooting region can be partitioned into three parts: a thin region just outside the convective boundary with high efficiency of turbulent heat transfer, a power-law dissipation region of turbulent kinetic energy in the middle, and a thermal dissipation area with rapidly decreasing turbulent kinetic energy. The decaying indices of the turbulent correlations k, u{sub r}'T'-bar, and T'T'-bar are only determined by the parameters of the TCM, and there is an equilibrium value of the anisotropic degree {omega}. (2) The overshooting length of the turbulent heat flux u{sub r}'T'-bar is about 1H{sub k} (H{sub k} = |dr/dln k|). (3) The value of the turbulent kinetic energy at the convective boundary k{sub C} can be estimated by a method called the maximum of diffusion. Turbulent correlations in the overshooting region can be estimated by using k{sub C} and exponentially decreasing functions with the decaying indices.

Zhang, Q. S.; Li, Y., E-mail: zqs@ynao.ac.cn, E-mail: ly@ynao.ac.cn [National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 110, Kunming 650011 (China)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

grain-specific heat for each model grid layer, are providedand heat flow is simulated using the 3-D TH model grid (

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

ICONE 15

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Observations of Edge Turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edge Turbulence Edge Turbulence near the X-point of Alcator C-Mod APS-2007 (1) J.L. Terry, S.J. Zweben*, B. LaBombard, I. Cziegler, O. Grulke + , D.P. Stotler* MIT - Plasma Science and Fusion Center *Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory + MPI for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Assoc., Greifswald, Germany American Physical Society - Div. of Plasma Physics Orlando, FL Nov. 12 - Nov. 16, 2007 APS-2007 (2) Background and Motivation for "Xpt-region" View Strong edge turbulence has been observed in nearly all magnetic confinement devices. Desire predictive capability Most previous measurements made near outboard midplane where the turbulence has the following main features: - generation is ballooning-like (absent at inboard midplane, etc.) - filaments/blobs moves radially outward with some poloidal motion

293

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric turbulence  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

turbulence turbulence ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric turbulence High frequency velocity fluctuations that lead to turbulent transport of momentum, heat, mositure, and passive scalars, and often expressed in terms of variances and covariances. Categories Atmospheric State, Surface Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

294

THERMAL DESIGN METHODOLOGY FOR LOW FLOW RATE SINGLE-PHASE AND TWO-PHASE MICRO-CHANNEL HEAT SINKS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Engine Cooling Systems,'' Experimental Heat Transfer, Fluid Mechanics, and Thermodynamics 1997, June 1997, ``A Correlation for Boiling Heat Transfer to Saturated Fluids in Convective Flow,'' Ind. Eng. Chem the engines in automotive applications. Heat is transferred essentially under subcooled flow boiling

Qu, Weilin

295

Thermally Driven Flows at an Asymmetric Valley Exit: Observations and Model Studies at the Lech Valley Exit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The summertime thermal circulation in the region of an asymmetric valley exit is investigated by means of observations and high-resolution model simulations. The northeastward-oriented Alpine Lech Valley opening into the Bavarian Alpine foreland ...

Thomas Spengler; Jan H. Schween; Markus Ablinger; Günther Zängl; Joseph Egger

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

MHD Turbulence Revisited  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kraichnan (1965) proposed that MHD turbulence occurs as a result of collisions between oppositely directed Alfv\\'en wave packets. Recent work has generated some controversy over the nature of non linear couplings between colliding Alfv\\'en waves. We find that the resolution to much of the confusion lies in the existence of a new type of turbulence, intermediate turbulence, in which the cascade of energy in the inertial range exhibits properties intermediate between those of weak and strong turbulent cascades. Some properties of intermediate MHD turbulence are: (i) in common with weak turbulent cascades, wave packets belonging to the inertial range are long lived; (ii) however, components of the strain tensor are so large that, similar to the situation in strong turbulence, perturbation theory is not applicable; (iii) the breakdown of perturbation theory results from the divergence of neighboring field lines due to wave packets whose perturbations in velocity and magnetic fields are localized, but whose perturbations in displacement are not; (iv) 3--wave interactions dominate individual collisions between wave packets, but interactions of all orders $n\\geq 3$ make comparable contributions to the intermediate turbulent energy cascade; (v) successive collisions are correlated since wave packets are distorted as they follow diverging field lines; (vi) in common with the weak MHD cascade, there is no parallel cascade of energy, and the cascade to small perpendicular scales strengthens as it reaches higher wave numbers; (vii) For an appropriate weak excitation, there is a natural progression from a weak, through an intermediate, to a strong cascade.

P. Goldreich; S. Sridhar

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

297

Development of the T+M coupled flow-geomechanical simulator to describe fracture propagation and coupled flow-thermal-geomechanical processes in tight/shale gas systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We developed a hydraulic fracturing simulator by coupling a flow simulator to a geomechanics code, namely T+M simulator. Modeling of the vertical fracture development involves continuous updating of the boundary conditions and of the data connectivity, ... Keywords: Double porosity, Fracture propagation, Hydraulic fracturing, Poromechanics, Shale gas, Tensile failure

Jihoon Kim, George J. Moridis

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

One-dimensional turbulence model simulations of autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide fuel mixtures in a turbulent jet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The autoignition of hydrogen/carbon monoxide in a turbulent jet with preheated co-flow air is studied using the one-dimensional turbulence (ODT) model. The simulations are performed at atmospheric pressure based on varying the jet Reynolds number and the oxidizer preheat temperature for two compositions corresponding to varying the ratios of H{sub 2} and CO in the fuel stream. Moreover, simulations for homogeneous autoignition are implemented for similar mixture conditions for comparison with the turbulent jet results. The results identify the key effects of differential diffusion and turbulence on the onset and eventual progress of autoignition in the turbulent jets. The differential diffusion of hydrogen fuels results in a reduction of the ignition delay relative to similar conditions of homogeneous autoignition. Turbulence may play an important role in delaying ignition at high-turbulence conditions, a process countered by the differential diffusion of hydrogen relative to carbon monoxide; however, when ignition is established, turbulence enhances the overall rates of combustion of the non-premixed flame downstream of the ignition point. (author)

Gupta, Kamlesh G.; Echekki, Tarek [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, NC (United States)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

Stratified Tidal Flow over a Bump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The interaction of a stratified flow with an isolated topographic feature can introduce numerous disturbances into the flow, including turbulent wakes, internal waves, and eddies. Measurements made near a “bump” east of Race Rocks, Vancouver ...

Richard Dewey; David Richmond; Chris Garrett

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Turbulent Mixing due to Surface Waves Indicated by Remote Sensing of Suspended Particulate Matter and Its Implementation into Coupled Modeling of Waves, Turbulence, and Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies the impact of the surface waves on the turbulent mixing. The satellite observations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) at the ocean surface as an indicator of turbulent quantities of the flow are used. In a water column, SPM ...

Andrey Pleskachevsky; Mikhail Dobrynin; Alexander V. Babanin; Heinz Günther; Emil Stanev

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Influence of Stratification and Nonlocal Turbulent Production on Estuarine Turbulence: An Assessment of Turbulence Closure with Field Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field observations of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE), dissipation rate ?, and turbulent length scale demonstrate the impact of both density stratification and nonlocal turbulent production on turbulent momentum flux. The data were collected in a ...

Malcolm E. Scully; W. Rocky Geyer; John H. Trowbridge

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Mountain-Scale Thermal Hydrologic Model for Simulating Fluid Flow and Heat Transfer in Unsaturated Fractured Rock  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat flow in porous media, heat pipe, reservoir simulation,and vapor often leads to “heat-pipe” conditions, the steadytwo-phase zone, is the heat-pipe (i.e. , a zone of constant

Wu, Yu-Shu; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Zhang, Keni; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Inertial range turbulence in kinetic plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The transfer of turbulent energy through an inertial range from the driving scale to dissipative scales in a kinetic plasma followed by the conversion of this energy into heat is a fundamental plasma physics process. A theoretical foundation for the study of this process is constructed, but the details of the kinetic cascade are not well understood. Several important properties are identified: (a) the conservation of a generalized energy by the cascade; (b) the need for collisions to increase entropy and realize irreversible plasma heating; and (c) the key role played by the entropy cascade--a dual cascade of energy to small scales in both physical and velocity space--to convert ultimately the turbulent energy into heat. A strategy for nonlinear numerical simulations of kinetic turbulence is outlined. Initial numerical results are consistent with the operation of the entropy cascade. Inertial range turbulence arises in a broad range of space and astrophysical plasmas and may play an important role in the thermalization of fusion energy in burning plasmas.

G. G. Howes

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

304

Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry: Spray Simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion (TSTC) project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of the approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring the highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. Under this component of the TSTC program the simulation code named S3D, developed and shared with coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for turbulent liquid fuel spray dynamics. Major accomplishments include improved fundamental understanding of mixing and auto-ignition in multi-phase turbulent reactant mixtures and turbulent fuel injection spray jets.

Rutland, Christopher J.

2009-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Autoignition in turbulent two-phase flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the following section. 1.2 Diesel engine combustion Compression-ignition (CI) engines are the most fuel-efficient engines ever devel- oped for transportation purposes [28]. This is due to their higher compression ratio and absence of throttling losses... within the bulk gas, leading to air entrainment. As the cold liquid jet is heated by mixing with the hot oxidizer, a thin sheet of air / fuel vapor mixture is formed around the jet’s periphery. Further entrainment of hot air is responsible for start- ing...

Borghesi, Giulio

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

306

Flow and Turbulence in an Urban Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A better understanding of the interaction between the built environment and the atmosphere is required to more effectively manage urban airsheds. This paper reports an analysis of data from an atmospheric measurement campaign in Oklahoma City, ...

D. Zajic; H. J. S. Fernando; R. Calhoun; M. Princevac; M. J. Brown; E. R. Pardyjak

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

Murphy, Enda

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion  

SciTech Connect

A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

309

A spray-suppression model for turbulent combustion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A spray-suppression model that captures the effects of liquid suppressant on a turbulent combusting flow is developed and applied to a turbulent diffusion flame with water spray suppression. The spray submodel is based on a stochastic separated flow approach that accounts for the transport and evaporation of liquid droplets. Flame extinguishment is accounted for by using a perfectly stirred reactor (PSR) submodel of turbulent combustion. PSR pre-calculations of flame extinction times are determined using CHEMKIN and are compared to local turbulent time scales of the flow to determine if local flame extinguishment has occurred. The PSR flame extinguishment and spray submodels are incorporated into Sandia's flow fire simulation code, VULCAN, and cases are run for the water spray suppression studies of McCaffrey for turbulent hydrogen-air jet diffusion flames. Predictions of flame temperature decrease and suppression efficiency are compared to experimental data as a function of water mass loading using three assumed values of drop sizes. The results show that the suppression efficiency is highly dependent on the initial droplet size for a given mass loading. A predicted optimal suppression efficiency was observed for the smallest class of droplets while the larger drops show increasing suppression efficiency with increasing mass loading for the range of mass loadings considered. Qualitative agreement to the experiment of suppression efficiency is encouraging, however quantitative agreement is limited due to the uncertainties in the boundary conditions of the experimental data for the water spray.

DESJARDIN,PAUL E.; TIESZEN,SHELDON R.; GRITZO,LOUIS A.

2000-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

310

Mixing in Thermals with and without Buoyancy Reversal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing characteristics of turbulent thermals were investigated in a water tank via laser-induced fluorescence techniques. The concentration of mixed fluid in the far field of a “classical” thermal is approximately uniform, whereas the near ...

Hamid Johari

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

A Theory of Baroclinic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the physical mechanism maintaining fluid turbulence remains a fundamental theoretical problem. The two-layer model is an analytically and computationally simple system in which the dynamics of turbulence can be conveniently studied; ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Supersaturation Intermittency in Turbulent Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is hypothesized that bursts of high supersaturation are produced in turbulent, convective clouds through interactions between cloud droplets and the small-scale structure of atmospheric turbulence. This hypothesis is based on the observation ...

Raymond A. Shaw

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Decay of Convective Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using simulations with a large-eddy model we have studied the decay of convective turbulence in the atmospheric boundary layer when the upward surface sensible heat flux is suddenly stopped. The decay of turbulent kinetic energy and temperature ...

F. T. M. Nieuwstadt; R. A. Brost

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a2009 Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical AnalysisAbstract Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Stress

Urquiza, Eugenio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Influence of a New Turbulence Regime on the Global Air–Sea Heat Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research has found that boundary layer turbulence changes its organization as the stratification approaches neutral from the unstable side. When the thermal forcing weakens in combination with wind speed above approximately 10 m s?1, ...

Erik Sahlée; Ann-Sofi Smedman; Anna Rutgersson; Ulf Högström

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

MU Radar and Lidar Observations of Clear-Air Turbulence underneath Cirrus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulence generation mechanisms prevalent in the atmosphere are mainly shear instabilities, breaking of internal buoyancy waves, and convective instabilities such as thermal convection due to heating of the ground. In the present work, clear-air ...

Hubert Luce; Takuji Nakamura; Masayuki K. Yamamoto; Mamoru Yamamoto; Shoichiro Fukao

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

turbulence | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

turbulence turbulence Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords DOE irradiance NREL NWTC temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (txt, 82 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Raw data field descriptions (xlsx, 52.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html). Temporal and Spatial Coverage

318

Long-Term Simulations of Thermally Driven Flows and Orographic Convection at Convection-Parameterizing and Cloud-Resolving Resolutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to validate the representation of topographic flows and moist convection over the European Alps in a convection-parameterizing simulation (CPM; ?x = 6.6 km) and two cloud-resolving simulations (CRM; ?x = 1.1 and 2.2 km)...

Wolfgang Langhans; Juerg Schmidli; Oliver Fuhrer; Susanne Bieri; Christoph Schär

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Generation of residual energy in the turbulent solar wind  

SciTech Connect

In situ observations of the fluctuating solar wind flow show that the energy of magnetic field fluctuations always exceeds that of the kinetic energy, and therefore the difference between the kinetic and magnetic energies, known as the residual energy, is always negative. The same behaviour is found in numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We study the dynamics of the residual energy for strong, anisotropic, critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using the eddy damped quasi-normal Markovian approximation. Our analysis shows that for stationary critically balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, negative residual energy will always be generated by nonlinear interacting Alfven waves. This offers a general explanation for the observation of negative residual energy in solar wind turbulence and in the numerical simulations.

Gogoberidze, G. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Ilia State University, 3/5 Cholokashvili Ave., 0162 Tbilisi (Georgia); Chapman, S. C.; Hnat, B. [Centre for Fusion, Space and Astrophysics, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Prediction of turbulence control for arbitrary periodic spanwise wall movement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to generalize the well-known spanwise-oscillating-wall technique for drag reduction, non-sinusoidal oscillations of a solid wall are considered as a means to alter the skin-friction drag in a turbulent channel flow. A series of Direct Numerical Simulations is conducted to evaluate the control performance of nine different temporal waveforms, in addition to the usual sinusoid, systematically changing the wave amplitude and the period for each waveform. The turbulent average spanwise motion is found to coincide with the laminar Stokes solution that is constructed, for the generic waveform, through harmonic superposition. This allows us to define and compute, for each waveform, a new penetration depth of the Stokes layer which correlates with the amount of turbulent drag reduction, and eventually to predict both turbulent drag reduction and net energy saving rate for arbitrary waveforms. Among the waveforms considered, the maximum net energy saving rate is obtained by the sinusoidal wave at its optimal ...

Cimarelli, Andrea; Hasegawa, Yosuke; De Angelis, Elisabetta; Quadrio, Maurizio

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

DNS and LES of decaying isotropic turbulence with and without frame rotation using lattice Boltzmann method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the paper is to assess the effectiveness of the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) as a computational tool for performing direct numerical simulations (DNS) and large-eddy simulations (LES) of turbulent flows. Decaying homogeneous isotropic ... Keywords: Smagorinsky model, decaying homogeneous isotropic turbulence in 3D, direct numerical simulation, large-eddy simulation, lattice Boltzmann equation

Huidan Yu; Sharath S. Girimaji; Li-Shi Luo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Turbulence within a Baroclinic Laboratory Mixed Layer above a Sloping Surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A convection tank (of water) containing a buoyancy-driven turbulent boundary layer was tilted at a 10° angle so that mean-flow shear would occur. This caused shear-stress turbulence production to exceed buoyant production in the central portions ...

J. W. Deardorff; G. E. Willis

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Errors in the Measurement of Turbulence Upstream of an Axisymmetric Body  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use a Taylor series expansion technique to calculate the effects of mean-flow distortion on turbulence measurements ahead of an axisymmetric body. The approach is valid when the integral scale of the turbulence is large compared to the maximum ...

John C. Wyngaard; Larry Rockwell; Carl A. Friehe

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

An efficient parallel simulation of interacting inertial particles in homogeneous isotropic turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study has conducted parallel simulations of interacting inertial particles in statistically-steady isotropic turbulence using a newly-developed efficient parallel simulation code. Flow is computed with a fourth-order finite-difference method and ... Keywords: Homogeneous isotropic turbulence, Hydrodynamic interaction, Parallel computing, Particle collision

Ryo Onishi, Keiko Takahashi, J. C. Vassilicos

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Quasi-Lagrangian Models of Nascent Thermals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermals are modeled by considering their boundaries as self-advecting vortex sheets. Both slab-symmetric and axisymmetiic geometries are considered. Discussion is restricted to the case of a neutral environment, and turbulent processes are not ...

Sandro Rambaldi; David A. Randall

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

A statistical method for estimating wood thermal diffusivity and probe geometry using in situ heat response curves from sap flow measurements  

SciTech Connect

The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux through plants; it works by inferring the velocity of water through a porous medium from the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity, e.g., wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtain the correct transpiration flux density from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale; and consequently, to up-scale tree-level water fluxes to canopy and landscape scales. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework for estimating the wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing simutaneously from in-situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of a heat ratio apparatus. Conditioned on the time traces of wood temperature following a heat pulse, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique, based on the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not require known probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that repeated tests using the same apparatus are essential to obtain reliable and accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests are conducted during different seasons and automated using the existing data logging system. The seasonality of wood thermal diffusivity is obtained as a by-product of the parameter estimation process, and it is shown to be affected by both moisture content and temperature. Empirical factors are often introduced to account for the influence of non-ideal probe geometry on the estimation of heat pulse velocity, and they are estimated in this study as well. The proposed methodology can be applied for the calibration of existing heat ratio sap flow systems at other sites. It is especially useful when an alternative transpiration calibration device, such as a lysimeter, is not available.

Chen, Xingyuan; Miller, Gretchen R.; Rubin, Yoram; Baldocchi, Dennis

2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

327

X-ray Diffraction Studies of Forward and Reverse Plastic Flow in Nanoscale Layers during Thermal Cycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The biaxial stress-strain response of layers within Cu/Ni nanolaminates is determined from in-plane x-ray diffraction spectra during heating/cooling. Thinner (11 nm) Cu and Ni layers with coherent, cube-on-cube interfaces reach ~1.8 GPa (Cu) and ~2.9 GPa (Ni) without yielding. Thicker (21 nm) layers with semi-coherent interfaces exhibit unusual plastic phenomena, including extraordinary plastic work hardening rates, and forward vs. reverse plastic flow with small (~10%) changes in stress, and evidence that threshold plastic stress in Ni layers is altered by preceding plastic flow in Cu layers. Line energy, pinning strength, net interfacial dislocation density and hardness are provided.

Gram, Michael D [Ohio State University, Columbus; Carpenter, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Anderson, Peter M [Ohio State University, Columbus

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

First Hybrid Turbulence Modeling for Turbine Blade Cooling Sagar Kapadia*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

First Hybrid Turbulence Modeling for Turbine Blade Cooling Sagar Kapadia* and Subrata Roy turbines require proper cooling mechanism to protect the airfoils from thermal stresses generated by exposure to hot combustion gases. The problem becomes aggravated by the growing trend to use higher turbine

Roy, Subrata

329

Causality detection and turbulence in fusion plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work explores the potential of an information-theoretical causality detection method for unraveling the relation between fluctuating variables in complex nonlinear systems. The method is tested on some simple though nonlinear models, and guidelines for the choice of analysis parameters are established. Then, measurements from magnetically confined fusion plasmas are analyzed. The selected data bear relevance to the all-important spontaneous confinement transitions often observed in fusion plasmas, fundamental for the design of an economically attractive fusion reactor. It is shown how the present method is capable of clarifying the interaction between fluctuating quantities such as the turbulence amplitude, turbulent flux, and Zonal Flow amplitude, and uncovers several interactions that were missed by traditional methods.

van Milligen, B Ph; Ramisch, M; Estrada, T; Hidalgo, C; Alonso, A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Turbulence in the Molecular Interstellar Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. The observational record of turbulence within the molecular gas phase of the interstellar medium is summarized. We briefly review the analysis methods used to recover the velocity structure function from spectroscopic imaging and the application of these tools on sets of cloud data. These studies identify a near-invariant velocity structure function that is independent of local the environment and star formation activity. Such universality accounts for the cloud-to-cloud scaling law between the global line-width and size of molecular clouds found by Larson (1981) and constrains the degree to which supersonic turbulence can regulate star formation. In addition, the evidence for large scale driving sources necessary to sustain supersonic flows is summarized.

Mark H. Heyer; Chris Brunt

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Multiple mapping conditioning of velocity in turbulent jet flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple mapping conditioning (MMC) has emerged as a new approach to model turbulent reacting flows. This study revises the standard MMC closure for velocity in turbulent jet flows from linearity in the reference space to linearity in the composition space. This modeling amendment ensures that the standard velocity model in conditional moment closure studies can now be used for MMC computation as well. A simplified model for the velocity-dependence of MMC drift coefficients is derived without loss of generality and is implemented for the revised velocity closure. Modeling results have been corroborated against the Direct Numerical Simulation database of a spatially evolving, planar turbulent jet flame. The revised model shows marked improvement over standard MMC closure in predicting velocity statistics close to the nozzle. (author)

Vaishnavi, P. [Mechanical Engineering Department, Imperial College, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Kronenburg, A. [Institut fuer Technische Verbrennung, Universitaet Stuttgart, 70174 Stuttgart (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

332

A Numerical Study of Gravity Wave Breaking and Impacts on Turbulence and Mean State  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model system is established that includes three interactive components: a dynamics model, a turbulence model, and a chemistry model. The dynamics model solves the two-dimensional, nonlinear, nonhydrostatic, compressible, and viscous flow ...

H-L. Liu; P. B. Hays; R. G. Roble

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Primitive Equations in the Stochastic Theory of Adiabatic Stratified Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stochastic theory of compressible turbulent fluid transport recently developed by Dukowicz and Smith is applied to the ensemble-mean primitive equations (PEs) for adiabatic stratified flow. The theory predicts a generalized Gent–McWilliams ...

Richard D. Smith

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

The Chemistry of a Dry Cloud: The Effects of Radiation and Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The combined effect of ultraviolet radiation and turbulent mixing on chemistry in a cloud-topped boundary layer is investigated. The authors study a flow driven by longwave radiative cooling at cloud top. They consider a chemical cycle that is ...

Jordi Vilŕ-Guerau de Arellano; Joannes W. M. Cuijpers

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Equilibrium Geostrophic Turbulence I: A Reference Solution in a ?-Plane Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical solution is calculated for quasi-geostrophic, adiabatic, baroclinic, wind-driven flow in a ? channel. The rates of driving and dissipation are such that the solution is turbulent in equilibrium. The equilibrium state is characterized ...

James C. McWilliams; Julianna H. S. Chow

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Near-N Oscillations and Deep-Cycle Turbulence in an Upper-Equatorial Undercurrent Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct numerical simulation (DNS) is used to investigate the role of shear instabilities in turbulent mixing in a model of the upper Equatorial Undercurrent (EUC). The background flow consists of a westward-moving surface mixed layer above a ...

Hieu T. Pham; Sutanu Sarkar; Kraig B. Winters

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

The Relation between Baroclinic Adjustment and Turbulent Diffusion in the Two-Layer Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic adjustment and turbulent diffusion are two popular paradigms used to describe the eddy–mean flow closure in the two-layer model, with very different implications for the criticality of the system. Baroclinic adjustment postulates the ...

Pablo Zurita-Gotor

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Critical Evaluation of the Aerodynamical Error of a Turbulence Instrument  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrument, intended for tower-borne measurements of atmospheric turbulence, constructed at the Department of Meteorology, Uppsala University, has been carefully tested for the errors induced by the local flow around the instrument itself, ...

Ulf Högström

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Dynamics on the Laminar-Turbulent Boundary and the Origin of the Maximum Drag Reduction Asymptote  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamical trajectories on the boundary in state space between laminar and turbulent plane channel flow—edge states—are computed for Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. Viscoelasticity has a negligible effect on the properties ...

Graham, Michael D.

340

The Cycle of Turbulent Dissipation in the Presence of Tidal Straining  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In regions of large horizontal density gradient, tidal straining acts to produce a periodic component of stratification that interacts with turbulent mixing to control water column structure and flow. A 25-h series of measurements of the rate of ...

Tom P. Rippeth; Neil R. Fisher; John H. Simpson

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Transducer-Shadow Effects on Turbulence Spectra Measured by Sonic Anemometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the horizontal turbulent velocity components measured by the common sonic anemometer array can suffer attenuation and crosstalk as a result of the flow blockage caused by the acoustic transducer assemblies. Using an analytical model ...

John C. Wyngaard; Shi-Feng Zhang

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Weak turbulence and collapses in the Majda-Mc-Laughlin-Tabak equation: Fluxes in wavenumber and in amplitude space  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The turbulent energy flow of the onedimensional Majda-McLaughlin-Tabak equation is studied numerically. The system exhibits weak turbulence for weak driving forces, while weak turbulence coexists with strongly nonlinear intermittent collapses when the system is strongly driven. These two types of dynamics can be distinguished by their energy and particle fluxes. The weakly turbulent process can be characterized by fluxes in wavenumber space, while additional fluxes in amplitude space emerge in the intermittent process. The particle flux is directed from low amplitudes towards high amplitudes, and the energy flows in the opposite direction.

Benno Rumpf Laura Biven

2005-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy flux limitation by tame turbulence  

SciTech Connect

A quasi-linear theory of energy flux limitation by ion acoustic turbulence is presented. This distribution function is modelled by a Maxwellian plus an additional piece which carries a heat flux Q. By taking the fourth moment of the Vlasov equation one finds the anomalous thermal conductivity K approximately 3 v/sub e/ delta/sub De/ (e phi/T/sub e/)$sup -2$. Other moments treated self-consistently include anomalous ion heating, electron cooling, current generation and enhanced inverse bremsstrahlung due to the nonthermal ion fluctuations. (auth)

Manheimer, W.M.

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Simulation of air flow in the typical boiler windbox segments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulation of turbulent air flow distribution in CFBC furnace, wherein primary air is entrained through inlet duct system called windbox, is attempted through state of art CAD/CFD softwares. Establishment of flow in windbox channel, distributed plate ... Keywords: CFBC boiler, air flow, combustor geometry, distributed plate nozzles, multi-block grids, recirculation flow, simulation of flow, unequal air flow, windbox channel

C. Bhasker

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This SciDAC project enabled a multidisciplinary research consortium to develop a high fidelity direct numerical simulation (DNS) software package for the simulation of turbulent reactive flows. Within this collaboration, the authors, based at CMU's Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center (PSC), focused on extensive new developments in Sandia National Laboratories' "S3D" software to address more realistic combustion features and geometries while exploiting Terascale computational possibilities. This work significantly advances the state-of-the-art of DNS of turbulent reacting flows.

Raghurama Reddy; Roberto Gomez; Junwoo Lim; Yang Wang; Sergiu Sanielevici

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Reynolds Stress and Turbulent Energy Production in a Tidal Channel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-frequency (1.2 MHz) acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) moored on the seabed has been used to observe the mean and turbulent flow components in a narrow tidally energetic channel over six tidal cycles at neap and spring tides. The ...

Tom P. Rippeth; Eirwen Williams; John H. Simpson

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Structure and Spacing of Jets in Barotropic Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turbulent flows are often observed to be organized into large-spatial-scale jets such as the familiar zonal jets in the upper levels of the Jovian atmosphere. These relatively steady large-scale jets are not forced coherently but are maintained ...

Brian F. Farrell; Petros J. Ioannou

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames stabilized by swirl  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel means has been developed for using weak swirl to stabilize freely propagating open premixed turbulent flames (swirl numbers between 0.05 to 0.3). By injecting a small amount of air tangentially into the co-flow of a concentric burner, stationary flames can be maintained above the burner exit for a large range of mixture, turbulence and flow conditions. The absence of physical surfaces in the vicinity of the flame provides free access to laser diagnostics. Laser Doppler anemometry and laser Mie scattering measurements of four flames with and without incident turbulence show that their features are typical of wrinkled laminar flames. The most distinct characteristics is that flame stabilization does not rely on flow recirculation. Centrifugal force induced by swirl causes flow divergence, and the flame is maintained at where the local mass flux balances the burning rate. The flame speeds can be estimated based on the centerline velocity vector, which is locally normal to the flame brush. This flame geometry is the closest approximation to the 1-D planar flame for determining fundamental properties to advance turbulent combustion theories. 18 refs.

Chan, C.K.; Lau, K.S.; Chin, W.K. (Hong Kong Polytechnic, Kowloon (Hong Kong)); Cheng, R.K. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Thermal-fluid and electrochemical modeling and performance study of a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell : analysis on SOEC resistances, size, and inlet flow conditions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory researchers are analyzing the electrochemical and thermal-fluid behavior of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for high temperature steam electrolysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The major challenges facing commercialization of steam electrolysis technology are related to efficiency, cost, and durability of the SOECs. The goal of this effort is to guide the design and optimization of performance for high temperature electrolysis (HTE) systems. An SOEC module developed by FLUENT Inc. as part of their general CFD code was used for the SOEC analysis by INL. ANL has developed an independent SOEC model that combines the governing electrochemical mechanisms based on first principals to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics in the operation of SOECs. The ANL model was embedded into the commercial STAR-CD CFD software, and is being used for the analysis of SOECs by ANL. The FY06 analysis performed by ANL and reported here covered the influence of electrochemical properties, SOEC component resistances and their contributing factors, SOEC size and inlet flow conditions, and SOEC flow configurations on the efficiency and expected durability of these systems. Some of the important findings from the ANL analysis are: (1) Increasing the inlet mass flux while going to larger cells can be a compromise to overcome increasing thermal and current density gradients while increasing the cell size. This approach could be beneficial for the economics of the SOECs; (2) The presence of excess hydrogen at the SOEC inlet to avoid Ni degradation can result in a sizeable decrease in the process efficiency; (3) A parallel-flow geometry for SOEC operation (if such a thing be achieved without sealing problems) yields smaller temperature gradients and current density gradients across the cell, which is favorable for the durability of the cells; (4) Contact resistances can significantly influence the total cell resistance and cell temperatures over a large range of operating potentials. Thus it is important to identify and avoid SOEC stack conditions leading to such high resistances due to poor contacts.

Yildiz, B.; Smith, J.; Sofu, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

350

Turbulence structure in a Taylor-Couette apparatus  

SciTech Connect

Turbulence measurements were made in a Taylor-Couette apparatus as a basis for future flame propagation studies. Results of the present study extend that of earlier work by more complete characterization of the featureless turbulence regime generated by the Taylor-Couette apparatus. Laser Doppler Velocimetry was used to measure Reynolds stresses, integral and micro time scales and power spectra over a wide range of turbulence intensities typically encountered by turbulent pre-mixed hydrocarbon-air flames. Measurements of radial velocity intensities are consistent with earlier axial and circumferential velocity measurements that indicated a linear relationship between turbulence intensity and the Reynolds number based on the average cylinder rotation speed and wall separation distance. Measured integral and micro time scales and approximated integral length scales were all found to decrease with the Reynolds number, possibly associated with a confinement of the largest scales (of the order of the cylinder wall separation distance). Regions of transverse isotropy were discovered in axial-radial cross correlations for average cylinder Reynolds numbers less than 6000 and are predicted to exist also for circumferential cross correlations at higher average Reynolds numbers, greater than 6000. Power spectra for the independent directions of velocity fluctuation exhibited -5/3 slopes, suggesting that the flow also has some additional isotropic characteristics and demonstrating the role of the Taylor-Couette apparatus as a novel means for generating turbulence for flame propagation studies. (author)

Fehrenbacher, Noah; Aldredge, Ralph C.; Morgan, Joshua T. [Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

351

Fast Turbulent Reconnection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reconnection is the process by which magnetic fields in a conducting fluid change their topology. This process is essential for understanding a wide variety of astrophysical processes, including stellar and galactic dynamos and astrophysical turbulence. To account for solar flares, solar cycles and the structure of the galactic magnetic field reconnection must be fast, propagating with a speed close to the Alfven speed. We show that the presence of a random magnetic field component substantially enhances the reconnection rate and enables fast reconnection, i.e. reconnection that does not depend on fluid resistivity. The enhancement of the reconnection rate is achieved via a combination of two effects. First of all, only small segments of magnetic field lines are subject to direct Ohmic annihilation. Thus the fraction of magnetic energy that goes directly into fluid heating goes to zero as fluid resistivity vanishes. However, the most important enhancement comes from the fact that unlike the laminar fluid case where reconnection is constrained to proceed line by line, the presence of turbulence enables many magnetic field lines to enter the reconnection zone simultaneously. A significant fraction of magnetic energy goes into MHD turbulence and this enhances reconnection rates through an increase in the field stochasticity. In this way magnetic reconnection becomes fast when field stochasticity is accounted for. As a consequence solar and galactic dynamos are also fast, i.e. do not depend on fluid resistivity.

A. Lazarian; E. Vishniac

2000-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

352

Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NY: McGraw-Hill, 1980. Thermal-Fluid Sciences. New York, NY:R. Greif. “Multi-Scale Thermal Analysis for Compact Plate-Exchanger. ” Experimental Thermal and Fluid Science 10 (

Urquiza, Eugenio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Beyond the Betz Theory - Blockage, Wake Mixing and Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent analytical models concerning the limiting efficiency of marine hydrokinetic (MHK) devices are reviewed with an emphasis on the significance of blockages (of local as well as global flow passages) and wake mixing. Also discussed is the efficiency of power generation from fully developed turbulent open channel flows. These issues are primarily concerned with the design/optimization of tidal turbine arrays; however, some of them are relevant to wind turbines as well.

Nishino, Takafumi

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

HIERARCHICAL STRUCTURE OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE IN POSITION-POSITION-VELOCITY SPACE  

SciTech Connect

Magnetohydrodynamic turbulence is able to create hierarchical structures in the interstellar medium (ISM) that are correlated on a wide range of scales via the energy cascade. We use hierarchical tree diagrams known as dendrograms to characterize structures in synthetic position-position-velocity (PPV) emission cubes of isothermal magnetohydrodynamic turbulence. We show that the structures and degree of hierarchy observed in PPV space are related to the presence of self-gravity and the global sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers. Simulations with higher Alfvenic Mach number, self-gravity and supersonic flows display enhanced hierarchical structure. We observe a strong dependency on the sonic and Alfvenic Mach numbers and self-gravity when we apply the statistical moments (i.e., mean, variance, skewness, kurtosis) to the leaf and node distribution of the dendrogram. Simulations with self-gravity, larger magnetic field and higher sonic Mach number have dendrogram distributions with higher statistical moments. Application of the dendrogram to three-dimensional density cubes, also known as position-position-position (PPP) cubes, reveals that the dominant emission contours in PPP and PPV are related for supersonic gas but not for subsonic. We also explore the effects of smoothing, thermal broadening, and velocity resolution on the dendrograms in order to make our study more applicable to observational data. These results all point to hierarchical tree diagrams as being a promising additional tool for studying ISM turbulence and star forming regions for obtaining information on the degree of self-gravity, the Mach numbers and the complicated relationship between PPV and PPP data.

Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A. [Astronomy Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison, 475 N. Charter St., WI 53711 (United States); Goodman, Alyssa [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rosolowsky, Erik [University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, 3333 University Way, Kelowna BC V1V 1V7 (Canada)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

355

Renormalized weak plasma turbulence theory  

SciTech Connect

A renormalized Vlasov turbulence theory, derived by neglecting a mode coupling term in the Direct Interaction Approximation, is discussed. The theory reduces correctly to weak turbulence theory; it predicts both diffusion and polarization effects of the turbulent medium on test particles, as well as the inverse effects of the test particles on the medium. A heuristic, physical algorithm is presented for constructing the equations. The theory of the renormalized dielectric function is reviewed.

Krommes, J.A.; Kleva, R.G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Transient Thermal, Hydraulic, and Mechanical Analysis of a Counter Flow Offset Strip Fin Intermediate Heat Exchanger using an Effective Porous Media Approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work presents a comprehensive thermal hydraulic analysis of a compact heat exchanger using offset strip fins. The thermal hydraulics analysis in this work is… (more)

Urquiza, Eugenio

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Statistics of Supersonic Isothermal Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of large-scale three-dimensional simulations of supersonic Euler turbulence with the piecewise parabolic method (PPM) and multiple grid resolutions up to 2048^3 points. Our numerical experiments describe non-magnetized driven turbulent flows with an isothermal equation of state and an rms Mach number of 6. We discuss numerical resolution issues and demonstrate convergence, in a statistical sense, of the inertial range dynamics in simulations on grids larger than 512^3 points. The simulations allowed us to measure the absolute velocity scaling exponents for the first time. The inertial range velocity scaling in this strongly compressible regime deviates substantially from the incompressible Kolmogorov laws. The slope of the velocity power spectrum, for instance, is -1.95 compared to -5/3 in the incompressible case. The exponent of the third-order velocity structure function is 1.28, while in incompressible turbulence it is known to be unity. We propose a natural extension of Kolmogorov's phe...

Kritsuk, Alexei G; Padoan, Paolo; Wagner, Rick

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

COMSOL Simulations for Steady State Thermal Hydraulics Analyses of ORNL s High Flux Isotope Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Simulation models for steady state thermal hydraulics analyses of Oak Ridge National Laboratory s High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) have been developed using the COMSOL Multiphysics simulation software. A single fuel plate and coolant channel of each type of HFIR fuel element was modeled in three dimensions; coupling to adjacent plates and channels was accounted for by using periodic boundary conditions. The standard k- turbulence model was used in simulating turbulent flow with conjugate heat transfer. The COMSOL models were developed to be fully parameterized to allow assessing impacts of fuel fabrication tolerances and uncertainties related to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel design and reactor operating parameters. Heat source input for the simulations was obtained from separate Monte Carlo N Particle calculations for the axially non-contoured LEU fuel designs at the beginning of the reactor cycle. Mesh refinement studies have been performed to calibrate the models against the pressure drop measured across the HFIR core.

Khane, Vaibhav B [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Simulation of turbulence in fireballs  

SciTech Connect

The ALE technique is applied to the calculation of a small yield, low altitude nuclear explosion. When artificial diffusion effects caused by numerical errors are minimized, the fireball rises too rapidly, reaching an altitude in excess of that which is observed. This suggests that turbulent diffusion and entrainmert may be important. Hence, a turbulence model has been added to later calculations of the fireball dynamics. Some of the more important features of the calculational technique and the turbulence model are discussed. Preliminary results for a set of turbulence parameters and a particular low altitude fireball are presented. (auth)

Ruppel, H.M.; Gentry, R.A.; Daly, B.J.

1973-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Measurements of Enhanced Turbulent Mixing near Highways  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In August and September of 2010, measurements of turbulent fluxes and turbulent kinetic energy were made on highways in the Toronto area (Ontario, Canada). In situ turbulence measurements were made with a mobile laboratory while driving on the ...

Mark Gordon; Ralf M. Staebler; John Liggio; Paul Makar; Shao-Meng Li; Jeremy Wentzell; Gang Lu; Patrick Lee; Jeffrey R. Brook

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Covariance statistics of turbulence velocity components for wind-energy-conversion system design-homogeneous, isotropic case  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When designing a wind energy converison system (WECS), it may be necessary to take into account the distribution of wind across the disc of rotation. The specific engineering applications include structural strength, fatigue, and control. This wind distribution consists of two parts, namely that associated with the mean wind profile and that associated with the turbulence velocity fluctuation field. The work reported herein is aimed at the latter, namely the distribution of turbulence velocity fluctuations across the WECS disk of rotation. A theory is developed for the two-time covariance matrix for turbulence velocity vector components for wind energy conversion system (WECS) design. The theory is developed for homogeneous and iotropic turbulance with the assumption that Taylor's hypothesis is valid. The Eulerian turbulence velocity vector field is expanded about the hub of the WECS. Formulae are developed for the turbulence velocity vector component covariance matrix following the WECS blade elements. It is shown that upon specification of the turbulence energy spectrum function and the WECS rotation rate, the two-point, two-time covariance matrix of the turbulent flow relative to the WECS bladed elements is determined. This covariance matrix is represented as the sum of nonstationary and stationary contributions. Generalized power spectral methods are used to obtain two-point, double frequency power spectral density functions for the turbulent flow following the blade elements. The Dryden turbulence model is used to demonstrate the theory. A discussion of linear system response analysis is provided to show how the double frequency turbulence spectra might be used to calculate response spectra of a WECS to turbulent flow. Finally the spectrum of the component of turbulence normal to the WECS disc of rotation, following the blade elements, is compared with experimental results.

Fichtl, G.H.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Instability of Baroclinic Tidal Flow in a Stratified Fjord  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Taylor–Goldstein equation is used to investigate the stability of a baroclinic tidal flow observed in a stratified fjord. The flow is analyzed at hourly intervals when turbulent dissipation measurements were made. The critical gradient ...

Zhiyu Liu

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Hall MHD Stability and Turbulence in Magnetically Accelerated Plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The object of the research was to develop theory and carry out simulations of the Z pinch and plasma opening switch (POS), and compare with experimental results. In the case of the Z pinch, there was experimental evidence of ion kinetic energy greatly in excess of the ion thermal energy. It was thought that this was perhaps due to fine scale turbulence. The simulations showed that the ion energy was predominantly laminar, not turbulent. Preliminary studies of a new Z pinch experiment with an axial magnetic field were carried out. The axial magnetic is relevant to magneto - inertial fusion. These studies indicate the axial magnetic field makes the Z pinch more turbulent. Results were also obtained on Hall magnetohydrodynamic instability of the POS.

H. R. Strauss

2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Turbulent Combustion Properties of Premixed Syngases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Turbulent Combustion Properties of Premixed Syngases Title Turbulent Combustion Properties of Premixed Syngases Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2009 Authors...

365

Simulation of lean premixed turbulent combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

turbulent methane combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. , 29:in premixed turbulent combustion. Proc. Combust. Inst. ,for zero Mach number combustion. Combust. Sci. Technol. ,

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Advanced Computational Methods for Turbulence and Combustion Bell.png Key Challenges: Development and application of...

367

Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Supercomputers Capture Turbulence in the Solar Wind Berkeley Lab visualizations could help scientists forecast destructive space...

368

Evaluation and Performance Enhancement of a Pressure Transducer under Flows, Waves, and a Combination of Flows and Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a pressure transducer, with its inlet attached to differing hydromechanical front ends, has been evaluated in flow flume and wave flume experiments in which laminar and turbulent flows, and regular progressive gravity waves and ...

Antony Joseph; J. A. Erwin Desa; Peter Foden; Kevin Taylor; Jim McKeown; Ehrlich Desa

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Turbulent molecular clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stars form within molecular clouds but our understanding of this fundamental process remains hampered by the complexity of the physics that drives their evolution. We review our observational and theoretical knowledge of molecular clouds trying to confront the two approaches wherever possible. After a broad presentation of the cold interstellar medium and molecular clouds, we emphasize the dynamical processes with special focus to turbulence and its impact on cloud evolution. We then review our knowledge of the velocity, density and magnetic fields. We end by openings towards new chemistry models and the links between molecular cloud structure and star--formation rates.

Hennebelle, Patrick

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Study of natural circulation in a VHTR after a LOFA using different turbulence models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural convection currents in the core are anticipated in the event of the failure of the gas circulator in a prismatic gas-cooled very high temperature reactor (VHTR). The paths that the helium coolant takes in forming natural circulation loops and the effective heat transport are of interest. The heated flow in the reactor core is turbulent during normal operating conditions and at the beginning of the LOFA with forced convection, but the flow may significantly be slowed down after the event and laminarized with mixed convection. In the present study, the potential occurrence and effective heat transport of natural circulation are demonstrated using computational fluid dynamic (CFD) calculations with different turbulence models as well as laminar flow. Validations and recommendation on turbulence model selection are conducted. The study concludes that large loop natural convection is formed due to the enhanced turbulence levels by the buoyancy effect and the turbulent regime near the interface of upper plenum and flow channels increases the flow resistance for channel flows entering upper plenum and thus less heat can be removed from the core than the prediction by laminar flow assumption.

Yu-Hsin Tung; Yuh-Ming Ferng; Richard W. Johnson; Ching-Chang Chieng

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Magnetized Turbulent Dynamo in Protogalaxies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The prevailing theory for the origin of cosmic magnetic fields is that they have been amplified to their present values by the turbulent dynamo inductive action in the protogalactic and galactic medium. Up to now, in calculation of the turbulent dynamo, it has been customary to assume that there is no back reaction of the magnetic field on the turbulence, as long as the magnetic energy is less than the turbulent kinetic energy. This assumption leads to the kinematic dynamo theory. However, the applicability of this theory to protogalaxies is rather limited. The reason is that in protogalaxies the temperature is very high, and the viscosity is dominated by magnetized ions. As the magnetic field strength grows in time, the ion cyclotron time becomes shorter than the ion collision time, and the plasma becomes strongly magnetized. As a result, the ion viscosity becomes the Braginskii viscosity. Thus, in protogalaxies the back reaction sets in much earlier, at field strengths much lower than those which correspond to field-turbulence energy equipartition, and the turbulent dynamo becomes what we call the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In this paper we lay the theoretical groundwork for the magnetized turbulent dynamo. In particular, we predict that the magnetic energy growth rate in the magnetized dynamo theory is up to ten times larger than that in the kinematic dynamo theory. We also briefly discuss how the Braginskii viscosity can aid the development of the inverse cascade of magnetic energy after the energy equipartition is reached.

Leonid Malyshkin; Russell M. Kulsrud

2002-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

372

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat. flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the ofpossibility of land subsidence or upliftu thermal pollution,flow, land uplift or subsidence 1 water chemistry and

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Understanding Galaxy Outflows as the Product of Unstable Turbulent Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interstellar medium is a multiphase gas in which turbulent support is as important as thermal pressure. Sustaining this configuration requires both continuous turbulent stirring and continuous radiative cooling to match the decay of turbulent energy. While this equilibrium can persist for small turbulent velocities, if the one-dimensional velocity dispersion is larger than approximately 35 km/s, the gas moves into an unstable regime that leads to rapid heating. I study the implications of this turbulent runaway, showing that it causes a hot gas outflow to form in all galaxies with a gas surface density above approximately 50 solar masses/pc^2 corresponding to a star formation rate per unit area of 0.1$ solar masses/yr/kpc^2. For galaxies with escape velocities above 200 km/s, the sonic point of this hot outflow should lie interior to the region containing cold gas and stars, while for galaxies with smaller escape velocities, the sonic point should lie outside this region. This leads to efficient cold clou...

Scannapieco, Evan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analyze the turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak (K. W. Gentle and Huang He, Plasma Sci. and Technology, 10, 284 (2008)), a toroidal plasma device with one-dimensional equilibrium with magnetic curvature and shear. Alterations on the radial electric field, through an external voltage bias, change spectral plasma characteristics inducing a dominant frequency for negative bias values and a broad band frequency spectrum for positive bias values. For negative biased plasma discharges, the transport is high where the waves propagate with phase velocities near the plasma flow velocity, an indication that the transport is strongly affected by a wave particle resonant interaction. On the other hand, for positive bias the plasma has a reversed shear flow and we observe that the transport is almost zero in the shearless radial region, an evidence of a transport barrier in this region.

Toufen, Dennis L; Caldas, Iberę L; Marcus, Francisco A; Gentle, Kenneth W

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak  

SciTech Connect

We analyze the turbulence driven particle transport in Texas Helimak [K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)], a toroidal plasma device with a one-dimensional equilibrium with magnetic curvature and shear. Alterations on the radial electric field, through an external voltage bias, change the spectral plasma characteristics inducing a dominant frequency for negative bias values and a broad band frequency spectrum for positive bias values. When applying a negative bias, the transport is high where the waves propagate with phase velocities near the plasma flow velocity, an indication that the transport is strongly affected by a wave particle resonant interaction. On the other hand, for positive bias values, the plasma has a reversed shear flow, and we observe that the transport is almost zero in the shearless radial region, an evidence of a transport barrier in this region.

Toufen, D. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sao Paulo--IFSP, 07115-000 Guarulhos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O.; Marcus, F. A. [Aix-Marseille Univ., International Institute for Fusion Science, CNRS-PIIM UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Caldas, I. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Gentle, K. W. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Thermal Performance of a Novel Heat Transfer Fluid Containing Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes and Microencapsulated Phase Change Materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present research work aims to develop a new heat transfer fluid by combining multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and microencapsulated phase change materials (MPCMs). Stable nanofluids have been prepared using different sizes of multiwalled carbon nanotubes and their properties like thermal conductivity and viscosity have been measured. Microencapsulated phase change material slurries containing microcapsules of octadecane have been purchased from Thies Technology Inc. Tests have been conducted to determine the durability and viscosity of the MPCM slurries. Heat transfer experiments have been conducted to determine the heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop of the MWCNT nanofluids and MPCM slurries under turbulent flow and constant heat flux conditions. The MPCM slurry and the MWCNT nanofluid have been combined to form a new heat transfer fluid. Heat transfer tests have been conducted to determine the heat transfer coefficient and the pressure drop of the new fluid under turbulent flow and constant heat flux conditions. The potential use of this fluid in convective heat transfer applications has also been discussed. The heat transfer results of the MPCM slurry containing octadecane microcapsules was in good agreement with the published literature. The thermal conductivity enhancement obtained for MWCNTs with diameter (60-100 nm) and length (0.5-40?m) was 8.11%. The maximum percentage enhancement (compared to water) obtained in the heat transfer coefficient of the MWCNT nanofluid was in the range of 20-25%. The blend of MPCMs and MWCNTs was highly viscous and displayed a shear thinning behavior. Due to its high viscosity, the flow became laminar and the heat transfer performance was lowered. It was interesting to observe that the value of the maximum local heat transfer coefficient achieved in the case of the blend (laminar flow), was comparable to that obtained in the case of the MPCM slurry (turbulent flow). The pressure drop of the blend was lower than that of the MWCNT nanofluid.

Tumuluri, Kalpana

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Multiscalar measurements of turbulence-chemistry interactions in nonpremixed flames  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Selected results from experiments conducted over the past several years involving simultaneous multiscalar point measurements in turbulent nonpremixed flames are reviewed in this paper. In these experiments, spontaneous Raman scattering and Rayleigh scattering measurements of the major species and temperature were combined with laser-induced fluorescence measurements of minor species. The most important feature of these experiments is that they provide detailed data on the instantaneous relationships among species concentration, temperature, and derived scalar quantities that reflect the state of mixing or the progress of reaction. The data allow quantitative comparisons of the thermochemical states in turbulent flames with those in idealized representations, such as steady strained laminar flames, perfectly stirred reactors, or adiabatic equilibrium. The data may also be compared with results (measured or calculated) from unsteady laminar flames and from direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent reacting flows. such comparisons provide insights into the fundamental nature of turbulence-chemistry interactions, and they allow one to examine the validity of some of the basic assumptions that turbulent combustion models are built upon. Furthermore, these data allow quantitative evaluations of the predictive accuracy, strengths, and limitations of a wide variety of combustions models.

Barlow, R.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in the FLAG Hydrocode  

SciTech Connect

The BHR-2 turbulence model, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for variable density and compressible flows, is implemented in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode, FLAG. The BHR-2 formulation is discussed, with emphasis on its connection to multi-component flow formulations that underlie FLAG's treatment of multi-species flow. One-dimensional and two-dimensional validation tests are performed and compared to experiment and Eulerian simulations. Turbulence is an often studied and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and modeling its effects is essential in many practical applications. Specifically the behavior of turbulence in the presence of strong density gradients and compressibility is of fundamental importance in applications ranging from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) [1], supernovae [2], and atmospheric flows. The BHR closure approach [3] seeks to model the physical processes at work in variable density turbulence including Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) [4], Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) [5], and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) [6], driven turbulence. The effectiveness of the BHR-2 implementation has been demonstrated for variable density mixing in the KH, RT, and RM cases in an Eulerian framework [7]. The primary motivation of the present work is to implement the BHR-2 turbulence model in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code FLAG. The goal is not only to demonstrate results in agreement with previous Eulerian calculations, but also document behavior that arises from the underlying differences in code philosophy.

Denissen, Nicholas A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reisner, Jon M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

379

On Collective Properties of Turbulent QED Plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polarization properties of turbulent stochastically inhomogeneous ultrarelativistic QED plasma are studied. It is shown that the sign of nonlinear turbulent Landau damping corresponds to an instability of the spacelike modes and, for sufficiently large turbulent fields, to an actual instability of a system. Modification of plasmon dispersion relations due to turbulent effects are studied.

Martin Kirakosyan; Andrei Leonidov; Berndt Muller

2013-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Lattice Boltzmann equation simulations of turbulence, mixing, and combustion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We explore the capability of lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) method for complex fluid flows involving turbulence, mixing, and reaction. In the first study, LBE schemes for binary scalar mixing and multi-component reacting flow with reactions are developed. Simulations of initially non-premixed mixtures yield scalar probability distribution functions that are in good agreement with numerical data obtained from Navier-Stokes (NS) equation based computation. One-dimensional chemically-reacting flow simulation of a premixed mixture yields a flame speed that is consistent with experimentally determined value. The second study involves direct numerical simulation (DNS) and large-eddy simulation (LES) of decaying homogenous isotropic turbulence (HIT) with and without frame rotation. Three categories of simulations are performed: (i) LBE-DNS in both inertial and rotating frames; (ii) LBE-LES in inertial frame; (iii) Comparison of the LBE-LES vs. NS-LES. The LBE-DNS results of the decay exponents for kinetic energy k and dissipation rate ?, and the low wave-number scaling of the energy spectrum agree well with established classical results. The LBE-DNS also captures rotating turbulence physics. The LBE-LES accurately captures low-wave number scaling, energy decay and large scale structures. The comparisons indicate that the LBE-LES simulations preserve flow structures somewhat more accurately than the NS-LES counterpart. In the third study, we numerically investigate the near-field mixing features in low aspect-ratio (AR) rectangular turbulent jets (RTJ) using the LBE method. We use D3Q19 multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) LBE incorporating a subgrid Smagorinsky model for LES. Simulations of four jets which characterized by AR, exit velocity, and Reynolds number are performed. The investigated near-field behaviors include: (1) Decay of mean streamwise velocity (MSV) and inverse MSV; (2) Spanwise and lateral profiles of MSV; (3) Half-velocity width development and MSV contours; and (4) Streamwise turbulence intensity distribution and spanwise profiles of streamwise turbulence intensity. The computations are compared against experimental data and the agreement is good. We capture both unique features of RTJ: the saddle-back spanwise profile of MSV and axis-switching of long axis from spanwise to lateral direction. Overall, this work serves to establish the feasibility of the LBE method as a viable tool for computing mixing, combustion, and turbulence.

Yu, Huidan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Charecterization of inertial and pressure effects in homogeneous turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the thesis is to characterize the linear and nonlinear aspects of inertial and pressure effects in turbulent flows. In the first part of the study, computations of Navier-Stokes and 3D Burgers equations are performed in the rapid distortion (RD) limit to analyze the inviscid linear processes in homogeneous turbulence. By contrasting the results of Navier- Stokes RD equations and Burgers RD equations, the effect of pressure can be isolated. The evolution of turbulent kinetic energy and anisotropy components and invariants are examined. In the second part of the thesis, the velocity gradient dynamics in turbulent flows are studied with the help of inviscid 3D Burgers equations and restricted Euler equations. The analytical asymptotic solutions of velocity gradient tensor are obtained for both Burgers and restricted Euler equations. Numerical computations are also performed to identify the stable solutions. The results are compared and contrasted to identify the effect of pressure on nonlinear velocity gradient dynamics. Of particular interest are the sign of the intermediate principle strain-rate and tendency of vorticity to align with the intermediate principle strain-rate. These aspects of velocity gradients provide valuable insight into the role of pressure in the energy cascade process.

Bikkani, Ravi Kiran

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Stellar IMF as a Property of Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose to interpret the stellar IMF as a property of the turbulence in the star--forming gas. Gravitationally unstable density enhancements in the turbulent flow collapse and form stars. Their mass distribution can be derived analytically from the power spectrum of the turbulent flow and the isothermal shock jump conditions in the magnetized gas. For a power spectrum index \\beta=1.74, consistent with Larson's velocity dispersion--size relation as well as with new numerical and analytic results on supersonic turbulence, we obtain a power law mass distribution of dense cores with a slope equal to 3/(4-\\beta)=1.33, consistent with the slope of Salpeter's stellar IMF. Below one solar mass, the mass distribution flattens and turns around at a fraction of a solar mass, as observed for the stellar IMF in a number of stellar clusters, because only the densest cores are gravitationally unstable. The mass distribution at low masses is determined by the Log--Normal distribution of the gas density. The intermittent nature of this distribution is responsible for the generation of a significant number of collapsing cores of brown dwarf mass.

Paolo Padoan; Ake Nordlund

2004-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

383

Toward a General Theory for Multiphase Turbulence Part I: Development and Gauging of the Model Equations  

SciTech Connect

A formalism for developing multiphase turbulence models is introduced by analogy to the phenomenological method used for single-phase turbulence. A sample model developed using the formalism is given in detail. The procedure begins with ensemble averaging of the exact conservation equations, with closure accomplished by using a combination of analytical and experimental results from the literature. The resulting model is applicable to a wide range of common multiphase flows including gas-solid, liquid-solid and gas-liquid (bubbly) flows. The model is positioned for ready extension to three-phase turbulence, or for use in two-phase turbulence in which one phase is accounted for in multiple size classes, representing polydispersivity. The formalism is expected to suggest directions toward a more fundamentally based theory, similar to the way that early work in single-phase turbulence has led to the spectral theory. The approach is unique in that a portion of the total energy decay rate is ascribed to each phase, as is dictated by the exact averaged equations, and results in a transport equation for energy decay rate associated with each phase. What follows is a straightforward definition of a turbulent viscosity for each phase, and accounts for the effect of exchange of fluctuational energy among phases on the turbulent shear viscosity. The model also accounts for the effect of slip momentum transfer among the phases on the production of turbulence kinetic energy and on the tensor character of the Reynolds stress. Collisional effects, when appropriate, are included by superposition. The model reduces to a standard form in limit of a single, pure material, and is expected to do a credible job of describing multiphase turbulent flows in a wide variety of regimes using a single set of coefficients.

B. A. Kashiwa; W. B. VanderHeyden

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Distribution of particles and bubbles in turbulence at small Stokes number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The inertia of particles driven by the turbulent flow of the surrounding fluid makes them prefer certain regions of the flow. The heavy particles lag behind the flow and tend to accumulate in the regions with less vorticity, while the light particles do the opposite. As a result of the long-time evolution, the particles distribute over a multi-fractal attractor in space. We consider this distribution using our recent results on the steady states of chaotic dynamics. We describe the preferential concentration analytically and derive the correlation functions of density and the fractal dimensions of the attractor. The results are obtained for real turbulence and are testable experimentally.

Itzhak Fouxon

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

385

ENHANCED DISSIPATION RATE OF MAGNETIC FIELD IN STRIPED PULSAR WINDS BY THE EFFECT OF TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report on turbulent acceleration of the dissipation of the magnetic field in the post-shock region of a Poynting flux-dominated flow, such as the Crab pulsar wind nebula. We have performed two-dimensional resistive relativistic magnetohydrodynamics simulations of subsonic turbulence driven by the Richtmyer-Meshkov instability at the shock fronts of the Poynting flux-dominated flows in pulsar winds. We find that turbulence stretches current sheets which substantially enhances the dissipation of the magnetic field, and that most of the initial magnetic field energy is dissipated within a few eddy-turnover times. We also develop a simple analytical model for turbulent dissipation of the magnetic field that agrees well with our simulations. The analytical model indicates that the dissipation rate does not depend on resistivity even in the small resistivity limit. Our findings can possibly alleviate the {sigma}-problem in the Crab pulsar wind nebulae.

Takamoto, Makoto [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Oiwake-cho, Kitashirakawa, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Inoue, Tsuyoshi [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, Fuchinobe, Chuou-ku, Sagamihara 252-5258 (Japan); Inutsuka, Shu-ichiro, E-mail: takamoto@tap.scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp, E-mail: inouety@phys.aoyama.ac.jp, E-mail: inutsuka@nagoya-u.jp [Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

The Modification of Bottom Boundary Layer Turbulence and Mixing by Internal Waves Shoaling on a Barrier Reef  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are presented from an observational study of stratified, turbulent flow in the bottom boundary layer on the outer southeast Florida shelf. Measurements of momentum and heat fluxes were made using an array of acoustic Doppler velocimeters ...

Kristen A. Davis; Stephen G. Monismith

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Structure and Generation of Turbulence at Interfaces Strained by Internal Solitary Waves Propagating Shoreward over the Continental Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed observations of the structure within internal solitary waves propagating shoreward over Oregon's continental shelf reveal the evolving nature of interfaces as they become unstable and break, creating turbulent flow. A persistent feature ...

J. N. Moum; D. M. Farmer; W. D. Smyth; L. Armi; S. Vagle

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Investigation of the effect of a circular patch of vegetation on turbulence generation and sediment deposition using four case studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study describes the spatial distribution of sediment deposition in the wake of a circular patch of model vegetation and the effect of the patch on turbulence and mean flow. Two difference types pf vegetation were used ...

Ortiz, Alejandra C

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Baroclinically Unstable Geostrophic Turbulence in the Limits of Strong and Weak Bottom Ekman Friction: Application to Midocean Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines the plausibility of mesoscale eddy generation through local baroclinic instability of weak midocean gyre flows. The main tool is a statistically steady, two-layer quasigeostrophic turbulence model driven by an imposed, ...

Brian K. Arbic; Glenn R. Flierl

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Rapidly Sheared Compressible Turbulence: Characterization of Different Pressure Regimes and Effect of Thermodynamic Fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rapid distortion theory (RDT) is applied to compressible ideal-gas turbulence subjected to homogeneous shear flow. The study examines the linear or rapid processes present in turbulence evolution. Specific areas of investigation include:(i) characterization of the multi-stage flow behavior,(ii) changing role of pressure in the three-regime evolution and (iii) influence of thermodynamic fluctuations on the different regimes. Preliminary investigations utilizing the more accurate Favre-averaged RDT approach show promise however, this approach requires careful validation and testing. In this study the Favre-averaged RDT approach is validated against Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) and Reynolds-averaged RDT results. The three-stage growth of the flow field statistics is first confirmed. The three regime evolution of turbulence is then examined in three different timescales and the physics associated with each regime is discussed in depth. The changing role of pressure in compressible turbulence evolution shows three distinct stages. The physics of each stage is clearly explained. Next, the influence of initial velocity and thermodynamic fluctuations on the flow field are investigated. The evolution of turbulence is shown to be strongly dependent on the initial gradient Mach number and initial temperature fluctuations which tend to delay the onset of the second regime of evolution. The initial turbulent Mach number, which quantifies velocity fluctuations in the flow, influences turbulence evolution only weakly. Comparison of Reynolds-averaged RDT against Favre-averaged RDT for simulations of nonzero initial flow field fluctuations shows the higher fidelity of the latter approach.

Bertsch, Rebecca Lynne

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Evolution of a confined turbulent jet in a long cylindrical cavity: Homogeneous fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow induced in a long cylinder by an axially discharging round turbulent jet was investigated experimentally with applications to crude oil storage in the U.S. strategic petroleum reserves (SPR). It was found that the flow does not reach a true steady state

S. I. Voropayev; X. Sanchez; S. Webb; H. J. S. Fernando

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

On the Use of Hot-Wire Anemometers for Turbulence Measurements in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of a hot-wire anemometer for high-resolution turbulence measurements in a two-phase flow (e.g., atmospheric clouds) is discussed. Experiments in a small wind tunnel (diameter of 0.2 and 2 m in length) with a mean flow velocity in the ...

Holger Siebert; Katrin Lehmann; Raymond A. Shaw

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry  

SciTech Connect

The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

Hong G. Im; Arnaud Trouve; Christopher J. Rutland; Jacqueline H. Chen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

394

Terascale High-Fidelity Simulations of Turbulent Combustion with Detailed Chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The TSTC project is a multi-university collaborative effort to develop a high-fidelity turbulent reacting flow simulation capability utilizing terascale, massively parallel computer technology. The main paradigm of our approach is direct numerical simulation (DNS) featuring highest temporal and spatial accuracy, allowing quantitative observations of the fine-scale physics found in turbulent reacting flows as well as providing a useful tool for development of sub-models needed in device-level simulations. The code named S3D, developed and shared with Chen and coworkers at Sandia National Laboratories, has been enhanced with new numerical algorithms and physical models to provide predictive capabilities for spray dynamics, combustion, and pollutant formation processes in turbulent combustion. Major accomplishments include improved characteristic boundary conditions, fundamental studies of auto-ignition in turbulent stratified reactant mixtures, flame-wall interaction, and turbulent flame extinction by water spray. The overarching scientific issue in our recent investigations is to characterize criticality phenomena (ignition/extinction) in turbulent combustion, thereby developing unified criteria to identify ignition and extinction conditions. The computational development under TSTC has enabled the recent large-scale 3D turbulent combustion simulations conducted at Sandia National Laboratories.

Im, Hong G [University of Michigan; Trouve, Arnaud [University of Maryland; Rutland, Christopher J [University of Wisconsin; Chen, Jacqueline H [Sandia National Laboratories

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

395

Turbulence Regimes and Turbulence Intermittency in the Stable Boundary Layer during CASES-99  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of nocturnal intermittent turbulence during the Cooperative Atmosphere–Surface Exchange Study in 1999 (CASES-99) revealed three turbulence regimes at each observation height: 1) regime 1, a weak turbulence regime when the wind ...

Jielun Sun; Larry Mahrt; Robert M. Banta; Yelena L. Pichugina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Finescale Parameterizations of Turbulent Dissipation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fine- and microstructure data from a free fall profiler are analysed to test models that relate the turbulent dissipation rate (?) to characteristics of the internal wave field. The data were obtained from several distinct internal wave ...

Kurt L. Polzin; John M. Toole; Raymond W. Schmitt

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Predictability of Rotating Stratified Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although predictability represents one of the fundamental problems in atmospheric science, gaps in our knowledge remain. Theoretical understanding of the inverse error cascade is limited mostly to homogeneous, isotropic turbulence, whereas ...

K. Ngan; P. Bartello; D. N. Straub

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

An improved numerical model for the investigation of thermal hydraulic phenomena with applications to LMR reactor components  

SciTech Connect

A basic limited scope, fast-running computer model is presented for the solution of single phase two-dimensional transients in thermally coupled incompressible fluid flow problems. The governing equations and the two-equation transport model (k-{epsilon}) of turbulence are reduced to a set of linear algebraic equations in an implicit finite difference scheme, based on the control volume approach. These equations are solved iteratively in a line-by-line procedure using the tri-diagonal matrix algorithm. The numerical formulation and general calculational procedure are described in detail. The calculations show good agreement when compared with experimental data and other independent analyses.

Chan, B.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

An improved numerical model for the investigation of thermal hydraulic phenomena with applications to LMR reactor components  

SciTech Connect

A basic limited scope, fast-running computer model is presented for the solution of single phase two-dimensional transients in thermally coupled incompressible fluid flow problems. The governing equations and the two-equation transport model (k-{epsilon}) of turbulence are reduced to a set of linear algebraic equations in an implicit finite difference scheme, based on the control volume approach. These equations are solved iteratively in a line-by-line procedure using the tri-diagonal matrix algorithm. The numerical formulation and general calculational procedure are described in detail. The calculations show good agreement when compared with experimental data and other independent analyses.

Chan, B.C.; Kennett, R.J.; Van Tuyle, G.J.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae  

SciTech Connect

The large range of time and length scales involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of flame models. As a prelude to exploring various options for flame models, we consider, in this paper, high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the small-scale dynamics of nuclear flames in the supernova environment in which the details of the flame structure are fully resolved. The range of densities examined, 1 to 8 x 107 g cm-3, spans the transition from the laminar flamelet regime to the distributed burning regime where small scale turbulence disrupts the flame. The use of a low Mach number algorithm facilitates the accurate resolution of the thermal structure of the flame and the inviscid turbulent kinetic energy cascade, while implicitly incorporating kinetic energy dissipation at the grid-scale cutoff. For an assumed background of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence with an energy characteristic of SN Ia, we find a transition density between 1 and 3 x 107 g cm-3 where the nature of the burning changes ualitatively. By 1 x 107 g cm-3, energy diffusion by conduction and radiation is exceeded, on the flame scale, by turbulent advection. As a result, the effective Lewis Number approaches unity. That is, the flame resembles a laminar flame, but is turbulently broadened with an effective diffusion coefficient, D_T \\sim u' l, where u' is the turbulent intensity and l is the integral scale. For the larger integral scales characteristic of a real supernova, the flame structure is predicted to become complex and unsteady. Implications for a possible transition to detonation are discussed.

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, MS 50A-1148, Berkeley, CA 94720 (Authors 1, 2& 3); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California at Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (Author 4); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794 (Author 5); Aspden, Andrew J; Aspden, Andrew J.; Bell, John B.; Day, Marc S.; Woosley, Stan E.; Zingale, Mike

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow thermal turbulence" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Turbulence-Flame Interactions in Type Ia Supernovae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The large range of time and length scales involved in type Ia supernovae (SN Ia) requires the use of flame models. As a prelude to exploring various options for flame models, we consider, in this paper, high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of the small-scale dynamics of nuclear flames in the supernova environment in which the details of the flame structure are fully resolved. The range of densities examined, 1 to $8 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$, spans the transition from the laminar flamelet regime to the distributed burning regime where small scale turbulence disrupts the flame. The use of a low Mach number algorithm facilitates the accurate resolution of the thermal structure of the flame and the inviscid turbulent kinetic energy cascade, while implicitly incorporating kinetic energy dissipation at the grid-scale cutoff. For an assumed background of isotropic Kolmogorov turbulence with an energy characteristic of SN Ia, we find a transition density between 1 and $3 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$ where the nature of the burning changes qualitatively. By $1 \\times 10^7$ g cm$^{-3}$, energy diffusion by conduction and radiation is exceeded, on the flame scale, by turbulent advection. As a result, the effective Lewis Number approaches unity. That is, the flame resembles a laminar flame, but is turbulently broadened with an effective diffusion coefficient, $D_T \\sim u' l$, where $u'$ is the turbulent intensity and $l$ is the integral scale. For the larger integral scales characteristic of a real supernova, the flame structure is predicted to become complex and unsteady. Implications for a possible transition to detonation are discussed.

A. J. Aspden; J. B. Bell; M. S. Day; S. E. Woosley; M. Zingale

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

The Statistics of Supersonic Isothermal Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of large-scale three-dimensional simulations of supersonic Euler turbulence with the piecewise parabolic method and multiple grid resolutions up to 2048^3 points. Our numerical experiments describe non-magnetized driven turbulent flows with an isothermal equation of state and an rms Mach number of 6. We discuss numerical resolution issues and demonstrate convergence, in a statistical sense, of the inertial range dynamics in simulations on grids larger than 512^3 points. The simulations allowed us to measure the absolute velocity scaling exponents for the first time. The inertial range velocity scaling in this strongly compressible regime deviates substantially from the incompressible Kolmogorov laws. The slope of the velocity power spectrum, for instance, is -1.95 compared to -5/3 in the incompressible case. The exponent of the third-order velocity structure function is 1.28, while in incompressible turbulence it is known to be unity. We propose a natural extension of Kolmogorov's phenomenology that takes into account compressibility by mixing the velocity and density statistics and preserves the Kolmogorov scaling of the power spectrum and structure functions of the density-weighted velocity v=\\rho^{1/3}u. The low-order statistics of v appear to be invariant with respect to changes in the Mach number. For instance, at Mach 6 the slope of the power spectrum of v is -1.69, and the exponent of the third-order structure function of v is unity. We also directly measure the mass dimension of the "fractal" density distribution in the inertial subrange, D_m = 2.4, which is similar to the observed fractal dimension of molecular clouds and agrees well with the cascade phenomenology.

Alexei G. Kritsuk; Michael L. Norman; Paolo Padoan; Rick Wagner

2007-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

403

Simulating the effects of upstream turbulence on dispersion around a building  

SciTech Connect

The effects of high turbulence versus no turbulence in a sheared boundary-layer flow approaching a building are being investigated by a turbulent kinetic energy/dissipation model (TEMPEST). The effects on both the mean flow and the concentration field around a cubical building are presented. The numerical simulations demonstrate significant effects due to the differences in the incident flow. The addition of upstream turbulence results in a reduced size of the cavity directly behind the building. The velocity deficits in the wake strongly depend on the upstream turbulence intensities. The accuracy of numerical simulations is verified by comparing the predicted mean flow and concentration fields with the wind tunnel measurements of Castro and Robins (1977) and Robins and Castro (1977, 1975). Comparing the results with experimental data, the authors show that the TEMPEST model can reasonably simulate the mean flow. The numerical simulations of the concentration fields due to a source on the roof-top of the building are presented. Both the value and the position of the maximum ground-level concentration are changed dramatically due to the effects of the upstream level of turblence.

Zhang, Y.Q.; Arya, S.P.S.; Huber, A.H.; Snyder, W.H.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Prediction of flow pattern of gas-liquid flow through circular microchannel using probabilistic neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present study attempts to develop a flow pattern indicator for gas-liquid flow in microchannel with the help of artificial neural network (ANN). Out of many neural networks present in literature, probabilistic neural network (PNN) has been chosen ... Keywords: Hydrodynamics, Microchannel, Microstructure, Multiphase flow, Probabilistic neural network, Transition boundary, Turbulence

Seim Timung; Tapas K. Mandal

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Dynamics of quasi-two-dimensional turbulent jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

they can provide, jets have been used in various indus- trial applications, such as waste water disposal (Yannopoulos, 2006), chemical reactors (Jirka & Harleman, 1979), or as a means of propulsion (Stanley, Sarkar & Mellado, 2002). In geophysical flows... .1 Introduction The study of turbulent plane jets is relevant to a wide variety of problems where both qualitative and quantitative knowledge of the concentration in time and space of tracers transported by the jet is needed (Kotsovinos, 1975). In many industrial...

Landel, Julien Rémy Dominique Gérard

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

406

THE EFFECT OF ANISOTROPIC CONDUCTION ON THE THERMAL INSTABILITY IN THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM  

SciTech Connect

Thermal instability (TI) can strongly affect the structure and dynamics of the interstellar medium (ISM) in the Milky Way and other disk galaxies. Thermal conduction plays an important role in the TI by stabilizing small scales and limiting the size of the smallest condensates. In the magnetized ISM, however, heat is conducted anisotropically (primarily along magnetic field lines). We investigate the effects of anisotropic thermal conduction on the nonlinear regime of the TI by performing two-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic simulations. We present models with magnetic fields of different initial geometries and strengths, and compare them to hydrodynamic models with isotropic conduction. We find that anisotropic conduction does not significantly alter the overall density and temperature statistics in the saturated state of the TI. However, it can strongly affect the shapes and sizes of cold clouds formed by the TI. For example, for uniform initial fields long filaments of cold gas are produced that are reminiscent of some observed H I clouds. For initially tangled fields, such filaments are not produced. We also show that anisotropic conduction suppresses turbulence generated by evaporative flows from the surfaces of cold blobs, which may have implications for mechanisms for driving turbulence in the ISM.

Choi, Ena; Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2012-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

407

The conservative cascade of kinetic energy in compressible turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical nature of compressible turbulence is of fundamental importance in a variety of astrophysical settings. We present the first direct evidence that mean kinetic energy cascades conservatively beyond a transitional "conversion" scale-range despite not being an invariant of the compressible flow dynamics. We use high-resolution three-dimensional simulations of compressible hydrodynamic turbulence on $512^3$ and $1024^3$ grids. We probe regimes of forced steady-state isothermal flows and of unforced decaying ideal gas flows. The key quantity we measure is pressure dilatation cospectrum, $E^{PD}(k)$, where we provide the first numerical evidence that it decays at a rate faster than $k^{-1}$ as a function of wavenumber. This is sufficient to imply that mean pressure dilatation acts primarily at large-scales and that kinetic and internal energy budgets statistically decouple beyond a transitional scale-range. Our results suggest that an extension of Kolmogorov's inertial-range theory to compressible turbulence is possible.

Hussein Aluie; Shengtai Li; Hui Li

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

Turbulence at Hydroelectric Power Plants and its Potential Effects on Fish.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural fluid phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This paper discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. The final section provides the preliminary design of an experimental apparatus that will be used to expose fish to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

Cada, Glenn F.; Odeh, Mufeed

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Quasi-Linear Equilibration of a Thermally Maintained, Stochastically Excited Jet in a Quasigeostrophic Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory for quasigeostrophic turbulence in baroclinic jets is examined in which interaction between the mean flow and the perturbations is explicitly modeled by the nonnormal operator obtained by linearization about the mean flow, while the eddy–...

Timothy Delsole; Brian F. Farrell

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

THREE-DIMENSIONAL MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC MODELING OF THE SOLAR WIND INCLUDING PICKUP PROTONS AND TURBULENCE TRANSPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To study the effects of interstellar pickup protons and turbulence on the structure and dynamics of the solar wind, we have developed a fully three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic solar wind model that treats interstellar pickup protons as a separate fluid and incorporates the transport of turbulence and turbulent heating. The governing system of equations combines the mean-field equations for the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and pickup protons and the turbulence transport equations for the turbulent energy, normalized cross-helicity, and correlation length. The model equations account for photoionization of interstellar hydrogen atoms and their charge exchange with solar wind protons, energy transfer from pickup protons to solar wind protons, and plasma heating by turbulent dissipation. Separate mass and energy equations are used for the solar wind and pickup protons, though a single momentum equation is employed under the assumption that the pickup protons are comoving with the solar wind protons. We compute the global structure of the solar wind plasma, magnetic field, and turbulence in the region from 0.3 to 100 AU for a source magnetic dipole on the Sun tilted by 0 Degree-Sign -90 Degree-Sign and compare our results with Voyager 2 observations. The results computed with and without pickup protons are superposed to evaluate quantitatively the deceleration and heating effects of pickup protons, the overall compression of the magnetic field in the outer heliosphere caused by deceleration, and the weakening of corotating interaction regions by the thermal pressure of pickup protons.

Usmanov, Arcadi V.; Matthaeus, William H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Goldstein, Melvyn L., E-mail: arcadi.usmanov@nasa.gov [Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

411

THE IPOS FRAMEWORK: LINKING FISH SWIMMING PERFORMANCE IN ALTERED FLOWS FROM LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS TO RIVERS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current understanding of the effects of turbulence on the swimming performance of fish 32 is primarily derived from laboratory experiments under pressurized flow swim tunnels 33 and open channel flow facilities. These studies have produced valuable information on 34 the swimming mechanics and behavior of fish in turbulent flow. However, laboratory 35 studies have limited representation of the flows fish experience in nature. The complex 36 flow structure in rivers is imparted primarily by the highly heterogeneous and non37 uniform bed and planform geometry. Our goal is to direct future laboratory and field 38 studies to adopt a common framework that will shape the integration of both approaches. 39 This paper outlines four characteristics of turbulent flow, which we suggest should be 40 evaluated when generalizing results from fish turbulent studies in both the laboratory and 41 the field. The framework is based on four turbulence characteristics that are summarized 42 under the acronym IPOS: Intensity, Periodicity, Orientation, and Scale.

Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Turbulence Structure and Implications for Dispersion: Insights from Large-Eddy Simulations  

SciTech Connect

We have presented two flows where detailed knowledge of the fluid mechanics would appear to be crucial for accurate dispersion modeling. We expect that Large-eddy simulations (LES) will complement traditional dispersion modeling by providing both the ability to discern between cases where traditional models work well and cases where more complicated characterizations are necessary, and a method to investigate potentially unique flow features and turbulence structure for specific flow problems.

Calhoun, R; Cederwall, R; Street, R

1999-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

413

Problem Set # 5 1. In a stratified flow the energy containing eddies have a time scale of N-1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problem Set # 5 1. In a stratified flow the energy containing eddies have a time scale of N-1 . (a , .1 o T C z m , (b) calculate the characteristic velocity of the energy containing eddies. (c is the turbulent kinetic energy per unit mass 23 2 E u , u, the characteristic turbulent velocity, the turbulent

Goodman, Louis

414

Complex Geometry Creation and Turbulent Conjugate Heat Transfer Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The multiphysics capabilities of COMSOL provide the necessary tools to simulate the turbulent thermal-fluid aspects of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Version 4.1, and later, of COMSOL provides three different turbulence models: the standard k-{var_epsilon} closure model, the low Reynolds number (LRN) k-{var_epsilon} model, and the Spalart-Allmaras model. The LRN meets the needs of the nominal HFIR thermal-hydraulic requirements for 2D and 3D simulations. COMSOL also has the capability to create complex geometries. The circular involute fuel plates used in the HFIR require the use of algebraic equations to generate an accurate geometrical representation in the simulation environment. The best-estimate simulation results show that the maximum fuel plate clad surface temperatures are lower than those predicted by the legacy thermal safety code used at HFIR by approximately 17 K. The best-estimate temperature distribution determined by COMSOL was then used to determine the necessary increase in the magnitude of the power density profile (PDP) to produce a similar clad surface temperature as compared to the legacy thermal safety code. It was determined and verified that a 19% power increase was sufficient to bring the two temperature profiles to relatively good agreement.

Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL; Arimilli, Rao V [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dust Motions Driven by MHD Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the relative grain motions due to MHD turbulence in interstellar medium. It has been known for decades that turbulent drag is an efficient way to induce grain relative motions. However, earlier treatments disregarded magnetic field and used Kolmogorov turbulence. Unlike hydro turbulence, MHD turbulence is anisotropic on small scales. Moreover, compressible modes are important for MHD and magnetic perturbations can directly interact with grains. We provide calculations of grain relative motion for realistic interstellar turbulence driving that is consistent with the velocity dispersions observed in diffuse gas and for realistic grain charging. We account for the turbulence cutoff arising from abmipolar drag. Our results on grain shattering are consistent with the customary accepted cutoff size. We obtain grain velocities for turbulence with parameters consistent with those in HI and dark clouds. These velocities are smaller than those in earlier papers, where MHD effects were disregarded. Finally, w...

Lazarian, A; Yan, Huirong

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Turbulent Kinetic Energy Budgets over Mountainous Terrain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to describe the characteristics of the airflow and turbulence structure over mountainous terrain. Turbulent characteristics of the airflow were measured using well-instrumented aircraft. The shear, buoyancy, ...

Theodore S. Karacostas; John D. Marwitz

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Strong Turbulence in the Wave Crest Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-resolution vertical velocity profiles in the surface layer of a lake reveal the turbulence structure beneath strongly forced waves. Dissipation rates of turbulence kinetic energy are estimated based on centered second-order structure ...

Johannes Gemmrich

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canopy Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (CHATS) took place in spring 2007 and is the third in the series of Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (HATS) experiments. The HATS experiments have been instrumental in testing and developing subfilterscale (...

Edward G. Patton; Thomas W. Horst; Peter P. Sullivan; Donald H. Lenschow; Steven P. Oncley; William O. J. Brown; Sean P. Burns; Alex B. Guenther; Andreas Held; Thomas Karl; Shane D. Mayor; Luciana V. Rizzo; Scott M. Spuler; Jielun Sun; Andrew A. Turnipseed; Eugene J. Allwine; Steven L. Edburg; Brian K. Lamb; Roni Avissar; Ronald J. Calhoun; Jan Kleissl; William J. Massman; Kyaw Tha Paw U; Jeffrey C. Weil

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Effects of Atmospheric Turbulence on Ballistic Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effects of atmospheric turbulence on munition target scatter are determined from numerical simulations of ballistic trajectories through many realizations of realistic simulated turbulent wind fields. A technique is evaluated for correcting ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Charles Clough; Michael Padovani; Kelly Fling; Ward Boughers; W. Scott Walton

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

The Influence of Atmospheric Stability on the Budgets of the Reynolds Stress and Turbulent Kinetic Energy within and above a Deciduous Forest  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows that the inclusion of thermal effects is necessary to correctly interpret the physical processes involved in the generation or suppression of Reynolds stress and turbulent kinetic energy inside a form canopy. In both of thew ...

M. Y. Leclerc; R. H. Shaw; G. Den Hartog; H. H. Neumann

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Terascale Direct Numerical Simulations of Turbulent Combustion: Capabilities and Limits (PReSS Talk)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The rapid growth in computational capabilities has provided great opportunities for direct numerical simulations (DNS) of turbulent combustion, a type of simulations without any turbulence model. With the help of terascale high performance supercomputing (HPC) resources, we are now able to provide fundamental insight into turbulence-chemistry interaction in simple laboratory-scale turbulent flames with detailed chemistry using three-dimensional (3D) DNS. However, the actual domain size of 3D-DNS is still limited within {approx} O(10 cm{sup 3}) due to its tremendously high grid resolution required to resolve the smallest turbulent length scale as well as flame structures. Moreover, 3D-DNS will require more computing powers to investigate next-generation engines, of which operating conditions will be characterized by higher pressures, lower temperatures, and higher levels of dilution. In this talk, I will discuss the capabilities and limits of DNS of turbulent combustion and present some results of ignition/extinction characteristics of a highly diluted hydrogen flame counter-flowing against heated air. The results of our recent 3D-DNS of a spatially-developing turbulent lifted hydrogen jet flame in heated coflow will also be presented. The 3D-DNS was performed at a jet Reynolds number of 11,000 with {approx} 1 billion grid points, which required 3.5 million CPU hours on Cray XT3/XT4 at Oak Ridge National Laboratories.

Yoo, Chun Sang (Combustion Research Facility, SNL)

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

422

Analysis of the influence of external biasing on Texas Helimak turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We analyze alterations on the electrostatic turbulence in experiments with imposed bias to control the plasma radial electric field in Texas Helimak (K. W. Gentle and H. He, Plasma Sci. Technol. 10, 284 (2008)), a toroidal plasma device with a one-dimensional equilibrium, magnetic curvature, and shear. Comparing discharges from different biased potentials, we identify, in a roughly uniform gradient region, a continuous variation from low turbulence level and narrower frequency spectra, for negative bias, to high turbulence level and broadband spectra for positive bias. Overall, we distinguish two kinds of perturbed turbulence, classified according to their intensity, spectral, statistical, and recurrence properties. When the bias is positive, the turbulence shows enhanced and broadband spectra with non Gaussian probability distribution functions having noticeable long tails (extreme events) similar to the turbulence in tokamak scrape-off layer. On the other hand, negative bias reduces the turbulence level and decreases the spectrum widths. Also for negative bias, we found large frequency widths whenever the coupling between drift waves and the sheared plasma flow is fast enough to allow the enhancement of sidebands modes.

Toufen, D. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Federal Institute of Education, Science and Technology of Sao Paulo-IFSP, 07115-000 Guarulhos, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Guimaraes-Filho, Z. O.; Caldas, I. L. [Institute of Physics, University of Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Szezech, J. D. [Department of Physics, State University of Ponta Grossa, 84030-900 Parana (Brazil); Lopes, S.; Viana, R. L. [Department of Physics, Federal University of Parana, 81531-990 Curitiba, Parana (Brazil); Gentle, K. W. [Department of Physics and Institute for Fusion Studies, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

423

Stimulated Neutrino Transformation Through Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive an analytical solution for the flavor evolution of a neutrino through a turbulent density profile which is found to accurately predict the amplitude and transition wavelength of numerical solutions on a case-by-case basis. The evolution is seen to strongly depend upon those Fourier modes in the turbulence which are approximately the same as the splitting between neutrino eigenvalues and, unexpectedly, we also find a dependence upon the long wavelength modes when the ratio of their amplitude and the wavenumber is of order, or greater than, the first root of the Bessel function $J_0$.

Kelly M. Patton; James P. Kneller; Gail C. McLaughlin

2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

424

Structure of the mean velocity and turbulence in premixed axisymmetric acetylene flames  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser-Doppler measurements of axial mean velocities and the corresponding rms values of turbulent velocity fluctuations are reported for premixed, axisymmetric, acetylene flames together with the probability density distributions of the turbulent velocity fluctuations. All this information provides an insight into the structure of the flow field. Characteristic zones of the flow field are defined that show common features for all acetylene flames studied by the authors. These features are discussed in the paper and are suggested to characterize, in general, interesting parts of the flames.

Matovic, M.; Oka, S. (Inst. for Thermal Engineering and Energy Research, Beograd (Yugoslavia)); Durst, F. (Univ. Erlangen-Nuernberg, Erlangen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Stroemungsmechanik)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

RESONANCE BROADENING AND HEATING OF CHARGED PARTICLES IN MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC TURBULENCE  

SciTech Connect

The heating, acceleration, and pitch-angle scattering of charged particles by magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence are important in a wide range of astrophysical environments, including the solar wind, accreting black holes, and galaxy clusters. We simulate the interaction of high-gyrofrequency test particles with fully dynamical simulations of subsonic MHD turbulence, focusing on the parameter regime with {beta} {approx} 1, where {beta} is the ratio of gas to magnetic pressure. We use the simulation results to calibrate analytical expressions for test particle velocity-space diffusion coefficients and provide simple fits that can be used in other work. The test particle velocity diffusion in our simulations is due to a combination of two processes: interactions between particles and magnetic compressions in the turbulence (as in linear transit-time damping; TTD) and what we refer to as Fermi Type-B (FTB) interactions, in which charged particles moving on field lines may be thought of as beads sliding along moving wires. We show that test particle heating rates are consistent with a TTD resonance that is broadened according to a decorrelation prescription that is Gaussian in time (but inconsistent with Lorentzian broadening due to an exponential decorrelation function, a prescription widely used in the literature). TTD dominates the heating for v{sub s} >> v{sub A} (e.g., electrons), where v{sub s} is the thermal speed of species s and v{sub A} is the Alfven speed, while FTB dominates for v{sub s} << v{sub A} (e.g., minor ions). Proton heating rates for {beta} {approx} 1 are comparable to the turbulent cascade rate. Finally, we show that velocity diffusion of collisionless, large gyrofrequency particles due to large-scale MHD turbulence does not produce a power-law distribution function.

Lynn, Jacob W. [Physics Department, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Parrish, Ian J.; Quataert, Eliot [Astronomy Department and Theoretical Astrophysics Center, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Chandran, Benjamin D. G., E-mail: jacob.lynn@berkeley.edu [Space Science Center and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

2012-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

426

PRATHAM: Parallel Thermal Hydraulics Simulations using Advanced Mesoscopic Methods  

SciTech Connect

At the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, efforts are under way to develop a 3D, parallel LBM code called PRATHAM (PaRAllel Thermal Hydraulic simulations using Advanced Mesoscopic Methods) to demonstrate the accuracy and scalability of LBM for turbulent flow simulations in nuclear applications. The code has been developed using FORTRAN-90, and parallelized using the message passing interface MPI library. Silo library is used to compact and write the data files, and VisIt visualization software is used to post-process the simulation data in parallel. Both the single relaxation time (SRT) and multi relaxation time (MRT) LBM schemes have been implemented in PRATHAM. To capture turbulence without prohibitively increasing the grid resolution requirements, an LES approach [5] is adopted allowing large scale eddies to be numerically resolved while modeling the smaller (subgrid) eddies. In this work, a Smagorinsky model has been used, which modifies the fluid viscosity by an additional eddy viscosity depending on the magnitude of the rate-of-strain tensor. In LBM, this is achieved by locally varying the relaxation time of the fluid.

Joshi, Abhijit S [ORNL; Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Mudrich, Jaime A [ORNL; Popov, Emilian L [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Numerical Study on Flow Pass of a Three-Dimensional Obstacle under a Strong Stratification Condition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A three-dimensional, nonhydrostatic, numerical turbulent model was used to study the flow pass of a three-dimensional obstacle under a strong stratification condition. The numerical results clarify the behavior of the flow at a low Froude number, ...

W. Sha; K. Nakabayashi; H. Ueda

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

A Numerical Study of Flow and Pollutant Dispersion Characteristics in Urban Street Canyons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow and pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons are investigated using a two-dimensional numerical model with the k–? turbulent closure scheme. It is shown that the flow field is characterized mainly by the number and intensity of ...

Jong-Jin Baik; Jae-Jin Kim

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Atmospheric and Wake Turbulence Impacts on Wind Turbine Fatigue Loading: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Large-eddy simulations of atmospheric boundary layers under various stability and surface roughness conditions are performed to investigate the turbulence impact on wind turbines. In particular, the aeroelastic responses of the turbines are studied to characterize the fatigue loading of the turbulence present in the boundary layer and in the wake of the turbines. Two utility-scale 5 MW turbines that are separated by seven rotor diameters are placed in a 3 km by 3 km by 1 km domain. They are subjected to atmospheric turbulent boundary layer flow and data is collected on the structural response of the turbine components. The surface roughness was found to increase the fatigue loads while the atmospheric instability had a small influence. Furthermore, the downstream turbines yielded higher fatigue loads indicating that the turbulent wakes generated from the upstream turbines have significant impact.

Lee, S.; Churchfield, M.; Moriarty, P.; Jonkman, J.; Michalakes, J.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The turbulent cascade and proton heating in the solar wind during solar minimum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solar wind measurements at 1 AU during the recent solar minimum and previous studies of solar maximum provide an opportunity to study the effects of the changing solar cycle on in situ heating. Our interest is to compare the levels of activity associated with turbulence and proton heating. Large-scale shears in the flow caused by transient activity are a source that drives turbulence that heats the solar wind, but as the solar cycle progresses the dynamics that drive the turbulence and heat the medium are likely to change. The application of third-moment theory to Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) data gives the turbulent energy cascade rate which is not seen to vary with the solar cycle. Likewise, an empirical heating rate shows no significan changes in proton heating over the cycle.

Coburn, Jesse T.; Smith, Charles W.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Physics Department and Space Science Center, Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire (United States); Stawarz, Joshua E. [Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Forman, Miriam A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, State University of New York at Stony Brook, Stony Brook, New York (United States)

2013-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

431

Turbulent magnetic pumping in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The turbulent pumping effect corresponds to the transport of magnetic flux due to the presence of density and turbulence gradients in convectively unstable layers. In the induction equation it appears as an advective term and for this reason it is expected to be important in the solar and stellar dynamo processes. In this work, we have explored the effects of the turbulent pumping in a flux-dominated Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model with a solar-like rotation law. The results reveal the importance of the pumping mechanism for solving current limitations in mean field dynamo modeling such as the storage of the magnetic flux and the latitudinal distribution of the sunspots. In the case that a meridional flow is assumed to be present only in the upper part of the convective zone, it is the full turbulent pumping that regulates both the period of the solar cycle and the latitudinal distribution of the sunspots activity.

Guerrero, G

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Turbulent magnetic pumping in a Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The turbulent pumping effect corresponds to the transport of magnetic flux due to the presence of density and turbulence gradients in convectively unstable layers. In the induction equation it appears as an advective term and for this reason it is expected to be important in the solar and stellar dynamo processes. In this work, we have explored the effects of the turbulent pumping in a flux-dominated Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model with a solar-like rotation law. The results reveal the importance of the pumping mechanism for solving current limitations in mean field dynamo modeling such as the storage of the magnetic flux and the latitudinal distribution of the sunspots. In the case that a meridional flow is assumed to be present only in the upper part of the convective zone, it is the full turbulent pumping that regulates both the period of the solar cycle and the latitudinal distribution of the sunspots activity.

G. Guerrero; E. M. de Gouveia Dal Pino

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

433

Caustics in turbulent aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Networks of caustics can occur in the distribution of particles suspended in a randomly moving gas. These can facilitate coagulation of particles by bringing them into close proximity, even in cases where the trajectories do not coalesce. We show that the long-time morphology of these caustic patterns is determined by the Lyapunov exponents lambda_1, lambda_2 of the suspended particles, as well as the rate J at which particles encounter caustics. We develop a theory determining the quantities J, lambda_1, lambda_2 from the statistical properties of the gas flow, in the limit of short correlation times.

M. Wilkinson; B. Mehlig

2004-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

434

The application of new combustion and turbulence models to H[sub 2]-air nonpremixed supersonic combustion  

SciTech Connect

Finite reaction rate effects and dilatation effects are explored using an extended laminar flamelet model and turbulence models including dilatation processes. For the H[sub 2]-air nonpremixed turbulent combustion experiment conducted by Evans et al. in a high-speed shear flow, the flamesheet model can reasonably predict the combustion region but fails to predict the profiles of mass fractions, especially for H[sub 2] near the jet axis and O[sub 2] close to the jet edge. The inclusion of both dilatation dissipation and pressure dilatation leads to no significant improvement of the simulation results in this relatively low Mach number test case. The results predicted by the laminar flamelet model dramatically improve the profiles of species mass fractions. This indicates that the high turbulent strain rate usually observed in high-speed flow has a significant influence on the turbulent combustion. The widely used assumptions, such as fast chemical reaction rate, and unity Prandtl and Lewis numbers, are not suitable for this high-speed turbulent flow. It is necessary to include effects of kinetic energy changes in the calculations. Numerical results also show that this supersonic nonpremixed turbulent combustion flow satisfies the criteria of the laminar flamelet model.

Zheng, L.L.; Bray, K.N.C. (Cambridge Univ. (United Kingdom). Dept. of Engineering)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Flow Variability in a North American Downtown Street Canyon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous field and laboratory studies have indicated that flow and turbulence inside urban areas and, in particular, in street canyons, is very complex and is associated with wakes and vortices developing near buildings. However, a number of open ...

Petra Klein; James V. Clark

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

CFD Modeling of Fluid Flow Behavior and Bath Surface Deformation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct Numerical Simulation of Inclusion Turbulent Deposition at Liquid ... Flow and Shrinkage Pipe Formation on Macrosegregation of Investment Cast -TiAl Alloys ... Numerical Modeling of the Interaction between a Foreign Particle an ...

437

Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thermal transient anemometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal transient anemometer is disclosed having a thermocouple probe which is utilized to measure the change in temperature over a period of time to provide a measure of fluid flow velocity. The thermocouple probe is located in the fluid flow path and pulsed to heat or cool the probe. The cooling of the heated probe or the heating of the cooled probe from the fluid flow over a period of time is measured to determine the fluid flow velocity. The probe is desired to be locally heated near the tip to increase the efficiency of devices incorporating the probe. 12 figs.

Bailey, J.L.; Vresk, J.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

439

Evaluation of the Effects of Turbulence on the Behavior of Migratory Fish, 2002 Final Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fundamental influence of fluid dynamics on aquatic organisms is receiving increasing attention among aquatic ecologists. For example, the importance of turbulence to ocean plankton has long been a subject of investigation (Peters and Redondo 1997). More recently, studies have begun to emerge that explicitly consider the effects of shear and turbulence on freshwater invertebrates (Statzner et al. 1988; Hart et al. 1996) and fishes (Pavlov et al. 1994, 1995). Hydraulic shear stress and turbulence are interdependent natural hydraulic phenomena that are important to fish, and consequently it is important to develop an understanding of how fish sense, react to, and perhaps utilize these phenomena under normal river flows. The appropriate reaction to turbulence may promote movement of migratory fish (Coutant 1998) or prevent displacement of resident fish. It has been suggested that one of the adverse effects of flow regulation by hydroelectric projects is the reduction of normal turbulence, particularly in the headwaters of reservoirs, which can lead to disorientation and slowing of migration (Williams et al. 1996; Coutant et al. 1997; Coutant 1998). On the other hand, greatly elevated levels of shear and turbulence may be injurious to fish; injuries can range from removal of the mucous layer on the body surface to descaling to torn opercula, popped eyes, and decapitation (Neitzel et al. 2000a,b). Damaging levels of fluid stress, such turbulence, can occur in a variety of circumstances in both natural and man-made environments. This report discusses the effects of shear stress and turbulence on fish, with an emphasis on potentially damaging levels in man-made environments. It defines these phenomena, describes studies that have been conducted to understand their effects, and identifies gaps in our knowledge. In particular, this report reviews the available information on the levels of turbulence that can occur within hydroelectric power plants, and the associated biological effects. Furthermore, this report describes an experimental apparatus designed to test the effect of turbulence on fish, and defines its hydraulics. It gives the results of experiments in which three different fish species were exposed to representative levels of turbulence in the laboratory.

Odeh, Mufeed.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

On the Possibility of Singular Low-Frequency Spectra and Lévy Law Persistence Statistics in the Planetary-Scale Turbulent Circulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Long-time integrations of general circulation models with constant forcing and idealized models of turbulent rotating discrete vortex flows in a planar dish have consistently yielded red ultralow-frequency spectra. A red spectrum having an ...

J. A. Viecelli

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Thermally Indirect Motions in the Convective Atmospheric Boundary Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energetics of the dry convective boundary layer is studied by partitioning the turbulent heat flux into thermally indirect (w???thermally direct (w???>0) components as a function of z/Zi. It is found that except for the inversion ...

J. M. Wilczak; Joost A. Businger

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Prediction of strongly-heated internal gas flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purposes of the present article are to remind practitioners why the usual textbook approaches may not be appropriate for treating gas flows heated from the surface with large heat fluxes and to review the successes of some recent applications of turbulence models to this case. Simulations from various turbulence models have been assessed by comparison to the measurements of internal mean velocity and temperature distributions by Shehata for turbulent, laminarizing and intermediate flows with significant gas property variation. Of about fifteen models considered, five were judged to provide adequate predictions.

McEligot, D.M. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.]|[Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)]|[Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Shehata, A.M. [Xerox Corp., Webster, NY (United States); Kunugi, Tomoaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)]|[Tokai Univ., Hiratsuka, Kanagawa (Japan)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

443

Dust Motions Driven by MHD Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss the relative grain motions due to MHD turbulence in interstellar medium. It has been known for decades that turbulent drag is an efficient way to induce grain relative motions. However, earlier treatments disregarded magnetic field and used Kolmogorov turbulence. Unlike hydro turbulence, MHD turbulence is anisotropic on small scales. Moreover, compressible modes are important for MHD and magnetic perturbations can directly interact with grains. We provide calculations of grain relative motion for realistic interstellar turbulence driving that is consistent with the velocity dispersions observed in diffuse gas and for realistic grain charging. We account for the turbulence cutoff arising from abmipolar drag. Our results on grain shattering are consistent with the customary accepted cutoff size. We obtain grain velocities for turbulence with parameters consistent with those in HI and dark clouds. These velocities are smaller than those in earlier papers, where MHD effects were disregarded. Finally, we consider grain velocities arising from photoelectric emission, radiation pressure and the thrust due to molecular hydrogen formation. These are lower than relative velocities induced by turbulence. We conclude that turbulence should prevent these mechanisms from segregating grains by size.

A. Lazarian; Huirong Yan

2002-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

444

Zonal flow triggers the L-H transition in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak  

SciTech Connect

The kinetic energy transfer between shear flows and the ambient turbulence is investigated in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak during the L-H transition. As the rate of energy transfer from the turbulence into the shear flow becomes comparable to the energy input rate into the turbulence, the transition into the H-mode occurs. As the observed behavior exhibits several predicted features of zonal flows, the results show the key role that zonal flows play in mediating the transition into H-mode.

Manz, P.; Cziegler, I.; Fedorczak, N.; Mueller, S. H.; Thakur, S. C.; Xu, M.; Tynan, G. R. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Xu, G. S.; Wan, B. N.; Wang, H. Q.; Guo, H. Y. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Holland, C. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Miki, K. [WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Diamond, P. H. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); WCI Center for Fusion Theory, National Fusion Research Institute, Gwahangno 113, Yusung-gu, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Astrophysics and Space Science and Department of Physics, University of California at San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

445

Velocity-Space Proton Diffusion in the Solar Wind Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a velocity-space quasilinear diffusion of the solar wind protons driven by oblique Alfven turbulence at proton kinetic scales. Turbulent fluctuations at these scales possess properties of kinetic Alfven waves (KAWs) that are efficient in Cherenkov resonant interactions. The proton diffusion proceeds via Cherenkov kicks and forms a quasilinear plateau - nonthermal proton tail in the velocity distribution function (VDF). The tails extend in velocity space along the mean magnetic field from 1 to (1.5-3) VA, depending on the spectral break position, turbulence amplitude at the spectral break, and spectral slope after the break. The most favorable conditions for the tail generation occur in the regions where the proton thermal and Alfven velocities are about the same, VTp/VA = 1. The estimated formation times are within 1-2 h for typical tails at 1 AU, which is much shorter than the solar wind expansion time. Our results suggest that the nonthermal proton tails, observed in-situ at all heliocentric distan...

Voitenko, Yuriy

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Parallel electric field generation by Alfven wave turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

{This work aims to investigate the spectral structure of the parallel electric field generated by strong anisotropic and balanced Alfvenic turbulence in relation with the problem of electron acceleration from the thermal population in solar flare plasma conditions.} {We consider anisotropic Alfvenic fluctuations in the presence of a strong background magnetic field. Exploiting this anisotropy, a set of reduced equations governing non-linear, two-fluid plasma dynamics is derived. The low-$\\beta$ limit of this model is used to follow the turbulent cascade of the energy resulting from the non-linear interaction between kinetic Alfven waves, from the large magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s}\\ll 1$ down to the small "kinetic" scales with $k_{\\perp}\\rho_{s} \\gg 1$, $\\rho_{s}$ being the ion sound gyroradius.} {Scaling relations are obtained for the magnitude of the turbulent electromagnetic fluctuations, as a function of $k_{\\perp}$ and $k_{\\parallel}$, showing that the electric field develops ...

Bian, N H; Brown, J C

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Reflective ghost imaging through turbulence  

SciTech Connect

Recent work has indicated that ghost imaging may have applications in standoff sensing. However, most theoretical work has addressed transmission-based ghost imaging. To be a viable remote-sensing system, the ghost imager needs to image rough-surfaced targets in reflection through long, turbulent optical paths. We develop, within a Gaussian-state framework, expressions for the spatial resolution, image contrast, and signal-to-noise ratio of such a system. We consider rough-surfaced targets that create fully developed speckle in their returns and Kolmogorov-spectrum turbulence that is uniformly distributed along all propagation paths. We address both classical and nonclassical optical sources, as well as a computational ghost imager.

Hardy, Nicholas D.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H. [Research Laboratory of Electronics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Fluid dynamics of bacterial turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-sustained turbulent structures have been observed in a wide range of living fluids, yet no quantitative theory exists to explain their properties. We report experiments on active turbulence in highly concentrated 3D suspensions of Bacillus subtilis and compare them with a minimal fourth-order vector-field theory for incompressible bacterial dynamics. Velocimetry of bacteria and surrounding fluid, determined by imaging cells and tracking colloidal tracers, yields consistent results for velocity statistics and correlations over two orders of magnitude in kinetic energy, revealing a decrease of fluid memory with increasing swimming activity and linear scaling between energy and enstrophy. The best-fit model parameters allow for quantitative agreement with experimental data.

Jörn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Henricus H. Wensink; Markus Bär; Raymond E. Goldstein

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

449

Vortex Formation in Ellipsoidal Thermal Bubbles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rise of an isolated dry thermal bubble in a quiescent unstratified environment is a prototypical natural convective flow. This study considers the rise of an isolated dry thermal bubble of ellipsoidal shape (elliptical in both horizontal and ...

Alan Shapiro; Katharine M. Kanak

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Object-oriented Pseudo-spectral code TARANG for turbulence simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we describe the design and implementation of TARANG, a pseudospectral code to simulate turbulent flows in fluids, magnetohydrodynamics (MHD), convection, passive scalar, etc. We use the object-oriented features of C++ to abstract operations involved in the simulation. TARANG has been validated and used for solving problems in convection and MHD.

Mahendra K. Verma

2011-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

451

Measurement of Turbulence in the Oceanic Bottom Boundary layer with an Acoustic Current Meter Array  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertical array of acoustic current meters measures the vector flow field in the lowest 5 m of the oceanic boundary layer. By resolving the velocity to 0.03 cm s?1 over 15 cm paths, it samples the dominant turbulent eddies responsible for ...

Albert J. Williams 3rd; John S. Tochko; Richard L. Koehler; William D. Grant; Thomas F. Gross; Christopher V. R. Dunn

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Imaging and Diagnostics of Turbulent Methane-Air Premixed Flames by Acetone-OH Simultaneous PLIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A strategy of diagnostics of ultra-lean combustion based on acetone-OH simultaneous PLIF is presented. Acetone seeded in the fuel flow and combustion-generated OH work for a marker of "unburned" and "burnt" zones, respectively. Since acetone and OH does ... Keywords: Acetone, Flame imaging, OH, PLIF, Turbulent flame

Y. Nakamura; S. Manome; H. Yamashita

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z