Sample records for flow test comment

  1. Comments on "Microscale flow visualization"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kwang-Hua Chu

    2005-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We make comments on the presentation of Sinton's paper (Microfluidics and Nanofluidics {\\bf 1}: 2, 2004) about the microscale flow visualization since the effects of the roughness along the microfabricated wall upon the current macroflow visualization methods could be significant and cannot be neglected in microdomain and even nanodomain.

  2. Comments on cathode contaminants and the LBNL test stand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieniosek, F.; Baca, D.; Greenway, W.; Leitner, M.; Kwan, J.W.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LBNL-61978 Comments oncathode contaminants and the LBNL test stand F. Bieniosek,the process of operating the LBNL DARHT cathode test stand.

  3. Nonlinear optimal power flow 1.0 Some introductory comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Nonlinear optimal power flow 1.0 Some introductory comments Although the LPOPF does bring computation. We will also see that the NLOPF admits additional control capabilities that can be very useful Define: ng: number of generators N: number of buses x: state vector u: control vector Ei

  4. Comment submitted by Whirlpool Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Whirlpool Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  5. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Furnaces and Boilers, Comment Period Extension

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Furnaces and Boilers, Comment Period Extension

  6. Animal Health Diagnostic Center Test and Fee Schedule Test Name Test Fee Discipline Test Days Lag** Samples Container Coolant Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Animal Health Diagnostic Center Test and Fee Schedule Test Name Test Fee Discipline Test Days Lag** Samples Container Coolant Comments Equine Tests Equine Tests Acid Fast Stain (for bacteria) M-F 1-2 days 1 4 hours for equine. For more information, see Equine Cushing's Tests or AppendixC. For Equine only

  7. Comment submitted by Energizer Battery Manufacturing, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Energizer Battery Manufacturing, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  8. Comment submitted by Hoshizaki America, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Hoshizaki America, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  9. Comment submitted by United Lighting, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by United Lighting, Inc. regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  10. Comment submitted by A. O. Smith Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by A. O. Smith Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  11. Comment submitted by Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by Hobart/ITW Food Equipment Group regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  12. Comment submitted by BSH Home Appliances Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by BSH Home Appliances Corporation regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  13. Comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  14. Comment on ``Do cathedral glasses flow?,'' by Edgar Dutra Zanotto Am. J. Phys. 66 ,,5..., 392395 ,,1998...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levi, Anthony F. J.

    Comment on ``Do cathedral glasses flow?,'' by Edgar Dutra Zanotto Am. J. Phys. 66 ,,5..., 392 Received 4 May 1998; accepted 15 May 1998 In ``Do cathedral glasses flow?,'' Edgar Dutra Zanotto addresses

  15. Comments

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. FeedstockCLEANSprings GetsComment ListingComments by the

  16. Dual axis radiographic hydrodynamic test facility. Final environmental impact statement, Volume 2: Public comments and responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 12, 1995, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued the draft Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility Environmental Impact Statement (DARHT EIS) for review by the State of New Mexico, Indian Tribes, local governments, other Federal agencies, and the general public. DOE invited comments on the accuracy and adequacy of the draft EIS and any other matters pertaining to their environmental reviews. The formal comment period ran for 45 days, to June 26, 1995, although DOE indicated that late comments would be considered to the extent possible. As part of the public comment process, DOE held two public hearings in Los Alamos and Santa Fe, New Mexico, on May 31 and June 1, 1995. In addition, DOE made the draft classified supplement to the DARHT EIS available for review by appropriately cleared individuals with a need to know the classified information. Reviewers of the classified material included the State of New Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Defense, and certain Indian Tribes. Volume 2 of the final DARHT EIS contains three chapters. Chapter 1 includes a collective summary of the comments received and DOE`s response. Chapter 2 contains the full text of the public comments on the draft DARHT EIS received by DOE. Chapter 3 contains DOE`s responses to the public comments and an indication as to how the comments were considered in the final EIS.

  17. Response to Comment on "Reliability of a Commercial Kit to Test Groundwater for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    Response to Comment on "Reliability of a Commercial Kit to Test Groundwater for Arsenic field kit continue to be used to test well water for arsenic throughout Bangladesh (1, 2): (1) our study stance on testing with field kits. Was the Evaluation Representative? We believe that comparing

  18. Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...

  19. Comment submitted by the North American Association of Food Equipment Manufacturers (NAFEM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the North American Association of Food Equipment Manufacturers (NAFEM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  20. Comment submitted by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  1. Comment submitted by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a comment submitted by the Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers (AHAM) regarding the Energy Star Verification Testing Program

  2. Comment on Li pellet conditioning in tokamak fusion test reactor R. V. Budny

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Budny, Robert

    Comment on Li pellet conditioning in tokamak fusion test reactor R. V. Budny Princeton Plasma; published online 9 September 2011) Li pellet conditioning in TFTR results in a reduction of the edge technique for introducing Li is via pellet injection. This was pioneered in ALCATOR- CMOD where it was first

  3. Analysis of SPRIHTE LOPA flow excursion tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, J.E.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SPRIHTE FLOPA flow excursion tests, the results of which are presented here, have been modeled using FLOPA, the assembly thermal-hydraulics limits analysis code for the LOPA. FLOPA calculations show T{sub wall} = T{sub sat} is a reliable precursor to the onset of thermal excursion at prototypic flow rates during the ECS addition phase of the LOPA. A FLOPA model was created based on nominal dimensions for the SPRIHTE rig and an assumption that the rig`s cylinders were concentrically located. This model can determine when T{sub wall} = T{sub sat} if adjustments are made to account for differences between measured and calculated subchannel flow and heat transfer rates. To make these adjustments, a multiplier {beta} was applied to the wall saturation temperature criterion (T{sub wall} = {beta} T{sub sat}, in degrees C) to match measured and calculated powers at which the saturation temperature was first exceeded at the wall. Based on preliminary test results, a multiplier of 0.878 was recommended for use in calculating LOPA limits for the K-15.1 subcycle. This multiplier provides margins of 14% to 19% between the calculated wall saturation temperature limits and the measured powers at the onset of thermal excursion. The effective margins used in the final LOPA limits, which include dimensional and heat transfer model uncertainties and biases due to eccentricities, range from 38% to 41%. It is estimated that use of the wall saturation temperature criterion lowers the K-14.1 subcycle LOPA core power limit, which is based on a Stanton number of 0.0025, from 41% to 37% of the historical full power of 2400 MW. This report describes the SPRIHTE LOPA tests, describes and evaluates the FLOPA Model for the SPRIHTE tests, discusses selection of a limit criterion for the SPRIHTE tests, and evaluates the transition between high and low flow rate criteria. Calculated results and a sample of FLOPA input for the analysis of the SPRIHTE tests are provided.

  4. Final report for the flow excursion follow-on testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nash, C.A.; Walters, T.W.

    1992-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Mark 22 Flow Excursion Follow-On testing was to investigate the theory that approximately 15% of the flow bypassed the primary flow channels in previous testing, whereas the design called for only a 3% bypass. The results of the follow-on tests clearly confirmed this theory. The testing was performed in two phases. During the first phase, characterization tests performed during the earlier test program were repeated.

  5. Flow boiling test of GDP replacement coolants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, S.H. [comp.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tests were part of the CFC replacement program to identify and test alternate coolants to replace CFC-114 being used in the uranium enrichment plants at Paducah and Portsmouth. The coolants tested, C{sub 4}F{sub 10} and C{sub 4}F{sub 8}, were selected based on their compatibility with the uranium hexafluoride process gas and how well the boiling temperature and vapor pressure matched that of CFC-114. However, the heat of vaporization of both coolants is lower than that of CFC-114 requiring larger coolant mass flow than CFC-114 to remove the same amount of heat. The vapor pressure of these coolants is higher than CFC-114 within the cascade operational range, and each coolant can be used as a replacement coolant with some limitation at 3,300 hp operation. The results of the CFC-114/C{sub 4}F{sub 10} mixture tests show boiling heat transfer coefficient degraded to a minimum value with about 25% C{sub 4}F{sub 10} weight mixture in CFC-114 and the degree of degradation is about 20% from that of CFC-114 boiling heat transfer coefficient. This report consists of the final reports from Cudo Technologies, Ltd.

  6. Comment on ``Testing Hypotheses about Sun-Climate Complexity Linking''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scafetta, Nicola

    , the SFI index measures a daily average of the intensity of the daily solar flare energy output. SW, both RR's data and method- ology are inappropriate for studying a LW signal and test- ing a solar and West (SW) [2] and developed in subsequent publications [3­6], is not supported by data. However, RR

  7. ISSUANCE 2015-04-29: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters Notice of petition to extend test procedure compliance date and request for comment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters; Notice of petition to extend test procedure compliance date and request for comment.

  8. Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  9. Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Flow Test At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Geothermal Area (Musgrave, Et Al., 1989)...

  10. Capillary flow solderability test for printed wiring boards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosking, F.M.; Yost, F.G.; Hernandez, C.L.; Sackinger, S.J.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new technique for evaluating capillary flow solderability on printed circuit boards. The test involves the flow of molten solder from a pad onto different-sized conductor lines. It simulates the spreading dynamics of either plated-through-hole (PTH) or surface mount technology (SMT) soldering. A standard procedure has been developed for the test. Preliminary experiments were conducted and the results demonstrate test feasibility. Test procedures and results are presented in this report.

  11. Animal Health Diagnostic Center Test and Fee Schedule Test Name Test Fee Discipline Test Days Lag** Samples Container Coolant Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    container; 2) slide mailer 1) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack. 2) Not required *May container 1-3) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack For more information, see Appendix in insulated container with ice pack. For more information, see Canine Adrenal & Pituitary Function Tests

  12. Flight test measurements and theoretical lift prediction for flow energizers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Amit Aravind

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering FLIGHT TEST MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL LIFT PREDICTION FOR FLOW ENERGIZERS A Thesis by AHIT ARAVIND PRADHAN Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Mard (Chairman of Committee...) Howard L. Chevalier (Member) Garng H. Huang (Member) gg~j(EC( C, Clogs' Malter E. Haisler (Head of Department) Hay 1986 ABSTRACT Flight Test Measurements and Theoretical Lift prediction for Flow Energizers. (May 1986) Amit Aravind Pradhan, B...

  13. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 6. Single annulus tests, transient test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1 to 2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. This report presents the experimental results for the transient portion of the single annulus test program. The test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a ribless heater and a ribbed heater under steady state as well as transient conditions. The ribbed heater testing is currently underway and will be reported separately. The steady state portion of this test program with ribless heater was completed and reported in report No. CU-HTRF-T3A. The present report presents transient test results obtained from a ribless, uniform annulus test section. A total of thirty five transients were conducted with six cases in which flow excursion occurred. No unstable conditions resulted for tests in which the steady state Q{sub ratio} OFI limit was not exceeded.

  14. Hanford Tank Farms Waste Certification Flow Loop Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Scott, Paul A.; Adkins, Harold E.; Wells, Beric E.; Blanchard, Jeremy; Denslow, Kayte M.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Burns, Carolyn A.; Bontha, Jagannadha R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A future requirement of Hanford Tank Farm operations will involve transfer of wastes from double shell tanks to the Waste Treatment Plant. As the U.S. Department of Energy contractor for Tank Farm Operations, Washington River Protection Solutions anticipates the need to certify that waste transfers comply with contractual requirements. This test plan describes the approach for evaluating several instruments that have potential to detect the onset of flow stratification and critical suspension velocity. The testing will be conducted in an existing pipe loop in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s facility that is being modified to accommodate the testing of instruments over a range of simulated waste properties and flow conditions. The testing phases, test matrix and types of simulants needed and the range of testing conditions required to evaluate the instruments are described

  15. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  16. Category:Flow Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty EditCalifornia:Power LPInformationCashton Greens Jumppage?Elkins,FOAFFlow Test,

  17. Reversing Flow Test Facility. Technical report, March 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roach, P.D.

    1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) is intended for the study of fluid flow and heat transfer under the reversing-flow conditions that occur in Stirling engines. the facility consists of four major parts: (1) Mechanical Drive - two cylinders with cam-driven pistons which generate the reversing gas flow, (2) Test Section - a U-shaped section containing instrumented test pieces, (3) Instruments -l high-speed transducers for measuring gas pressure and temperature, piston positions, and other system parameters, and (4) Data Acquisition System - a computer-based system able to acquire, store, display and analyze the data from the instruments. The RFTF can operate at pressures up to 8.0 MPa, hot-side temperatures to 800/sup 0/C, and flow-reversal frequencies to 50 Hz. Operation to data has used helium as the working gas at pressures of 3.0 and 6.0 MPa, at ambient temperature, and at frequencies from 1 to 50 Hz. The results show that both frictional and inertial parts of the pressure drop are significant in the heater, coolers and connecting tubes; the inertial part is negligible in the regenerators. In all cases, the frictional part of the pressure drop is nearly in phase with the mass flow. 18 refs., 22 figs., 13 tabs.

  18. Design verification and cold-flow modeling test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a compilation of the following three test reports prepared by TRW for Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) as part of the Healy Clean Coal Project, Phase 1 Design of the TRW Combustor and Auxiliary Systems, which is co-sponsored by the Department of Energy under the Clean Coal Technology 3 Program: (1) Design Verification Test Report, dated April 1993, (2) Combustor Cold Flow Model Report, dated August 28, 1992, (3) Coal Feed System Cold Flow Model Report, October 28, 1992. In this compilation, these three reports are included in one volume consisting of three parts, and TRW proprietary information has been excluded.

  19. Test experience with multiterminal HVDC load flow and stability programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chapman, D.G.; Davies, J.B. (Manitoba HVDC Research Centre, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); McNichol, J.R. (Manitoba Hydro, Winnipeg, Manitoba (CA)); Gulachenski, E.M.; Doe, S. (New England Power Service Co., Westboro, MA (US)); Balu, N.J. (EPRI, Palo Alto, CA (US))

    1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A powerful new set of load flow and stability programs for the study of HVdc systems has recently been completed. During the development of the programs novel applications of multiterminal HVdc systems were investigated, firstly on a large test system and later on actual utility models. This paper describes the test systems used, the HVdc systems studied and some of the interesting system related aspects of the HVdc system performance.

  20. CRA Comments & Responses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - High-Level Liquid Waste (51105) 11 Response to CRA Comments (92005) Enclosure 1 - Computer Code VerificationTesting (92005) Inventory and Performance Assessment Reports...

  1. Flammable gas interlock spoolpiece flow response test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, T.C., Fluor Daniel Hanford

    1997-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this test report is to document the testing performed under the guidance of HNF-SD-WM-TC-073, {ital Flammable Gas Interlock Spoolpiece Flow Response Test Plan and Procedure}. This testing was performed for Lockheed Martin Hanford Characterization Projects Operations (CPO) in support of Rotary Mode Core Sampling jointly by SGN Eurisys Services Corporation and Numatec Hanford Company. The testing was conducted in the 305 building Engineering Testing Laboratory (ETL). NHC provides the engineering and technical support for the 305 ETL. The key personnel identified for the performance of this task are as follows: Test responsible engineering manager, C. E. Hanson; Flammable Gas Interlock Design Authority, G. P. Janicek; 305 ETL responsible manager, N. J. Schliebe; Cognizant RMCS exhauster engineer, E. J. Waldo/J. D. Robinson; Cognizant 305 ETL engineer, K. S. Witwer; Test director, T. C. Schneider. Other support personnel were supplied, as necessary, from 305/306 ETL. The testing, on the flammable Gas Interlock (FGI) system spoolpiece required to support Rotary Mode Core Sampling (RMCS) of single shell flammable gas watch list tanks, took place between 2-13-97 and 2-25-97.

  2. 2014-03-31 Issuance: Test Procedure for Commercial Packaged Boilers; Request for Information, Reopening of the Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice reopening the comment period for the request for information regarding the commercial packaged boiler test procedure rulemaking, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on March 31, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

  3. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  4. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 5: Single annulus tests, steady-state test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents results for the steady state portion of the finless single annulus test program. The objective of the experimental study was to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the MARK 22 reactor. The test program involved testing of both a finless or ribless heater and a ribbed heater. The latter program is currently underway and will be reported separately. For finless heater, testing was conducted in both a steady state and transient mode. The present report presents steady state results for a series of experiments with uniform and asymmetric heating. The demand curves obtained under uniform heating yielded OFI flow-rates which were slightly below those obtained for a circular tube geometry with the same L/D ratio; however, the single annulus had a hydraulic diameter which was approximately fifty percent larger than the circular tube. The asymmetric heating cases were selected to provide the same average power input as the uniform cases. The results for these tests indicated that the flow-rate at OFI increased with the degree of asymmetry.

  5. Comments on DOE's Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR® Draft

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This partAs the Department of EnergyCommentsProcess

  6. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

  7. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535%C2%B0C. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535%C2%B0C and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice won't be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  8. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forum Energy Imbalance Market Meetings Customer Comments Generator Interconnection Reform Implementation Network Integration Transmission Service (NT Service) Network Open...

  9. Experimental onset of flow instability testing by Creare, Inc. Book 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow excursions can occur during subcooled heated flow if the supply system is not adequate to meet the heated channel pressure demand. Available experimental flow instability (FI) data for ribbed annuli such as used in the SRS production reactors is very limited. Creare Inc. completed a series of FI tests which included two annular geometries; one of these included metallic ribs which separated the annulus into four sub-channels. This report summarizes the results of the onset of flow instability (OFI) testing which was completed by Creare in support of the SRS Reactor Restart Program. A copy of the final test report has been attached and the archival locations for the supporting documentation and electronic test data is also included. The purpose of this report is to: Archive the Creare Program data; inspect the data which has been archived; review the results presented by Creare; and evaluate if the Creare Program data may be used in critical applications.

  10. ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ICFT- An Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR Reservoir Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: ICFT- An Initial...

  11. Test report, air flow control device for 241-SY waste tankventilation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuck, J.A.

    1997-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This documents the testing of a passively operated, constant air flow control device for in-duct applications on waste tank ventilation systems in the 50-1000 SCFM range.

  12. Instrumentation of a light twin aircraft for flow energizer flight tests

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Binford, Robert Susumu

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTRUMDITATION OF A LIGHT TWIN AIRCRAFT FOR FLOW ENERGIZER FLIGHT TESTS A Thesis by ROBERT SUSUMU BINFORD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of HASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1986 MaJor SubJect: Aerospace Engineering INSTRUMENTATION OF A LIGHT TWIN AIRCRAFT FOR FLOW ENERGIZER FLIGHT TESTS A Thesis by ROBERT SUSUMU BINFORD Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Ward (Chairman of Committee) Cyrus...

  13. Large scale test rig for flow visualization and leakage measurement of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Daniel Harold

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Approved as to style and content by: David L. Rhode...

  14. Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area (UGTA) Flow...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    December 12, 2014 To view all the P&RA CoP 2014 Technical Exchange Meeting videos click here. Video Presentation Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area...

  15. Glass durability evaluation using product consistency, single-pass flow-through, and vapor hydration tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, X.; Hrma, P.; Kim, D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The current approach to assessing chemical durability of waste glasses focuses on a suite of short-term laboratory tests such as dynamic single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests, static product consistency tests (PCT), and vapor hydration tests. The behavior of the glasses in the three types of tests is quite different, but each test provides insight into the glass corrosion process. The PCT data showed that at constant alumina, silica, and sodium levels the glass durability order for different glass systems is: Boron-series > Boron-Calcium-series > Calcium-series, while the opposite order is observed in SPFT tests. The order for vapor hydration tests is similar to that observed in the PCT tests. The PCT results are consistent with the current understanding of glass structure and are consistent with vapor hydration tests. The SPFT results can be explained using arguments based on solution chemistry.

  16. Regional groundwater flow and tritium transport modeling and risk assessment of the underground test area, Nevada Test Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow system of the Nevada Test Site and surrounding region was evaluated to estimate the highest potential current and near-term risk to the public and the environment from groundwater contamination downgradient of the underground nuclear testing areas. The highest, or greatest, potential risk is estimated by assuming that several unusually rapid transport pathways as well as public and environmental exposures all occur simultaneously. These conservative assumptions may cause risks to be significantly overestimated. However, such a deliberate, conservative approach ensures that public health and environmental risks are not underestimated and allows prioritization of future work to minimize potential risks. Historical underground nuclear testing activities, particularly detonations near or below the water table, have contaminated groundwater near testing locations with radioactive and nonradioactive constituents. Tritium was selected as the contaminant of primary concern for this phase of the project because it is abundant, highly mobile, and represents the most significant contributor to the potential radiation dose to humans for the short term. It was also assumed that the predicted risk to human health and the environment from tritium exposure would reasonably represent the risk from other, less mobile radionuclides within the same time frame. Other contaminants will be investigated at a later date. Existing and newly collected hydrogeologic data were compiled for a large area of southern Nevada and California, encompassing the Nevada Test Site regional groundwater flow system. These data were used to develop numerical groundwater flow and tritium transport models for use in the prediction of tritium concentrations at hypothetical human and ecological receptor locations for a 200-year time frame. A numerical, steady-state regional groundwater flow model was developed to serve as the basis for the prediction of the movement of tritium from the underground testing areas on a regional scale. The groundwater flow model was used in conjunction with a particle-tracking code to define the pathlines followed by groundwater particles originating from 415 points associated with 253 nuclear test locations. Three of the most rapid pathlines were selected for transport simulations. These pathlines are associated with three nuclear test locations, each representing one of the three largest testing areas. These testing locations are: BOURBON on Yucca Flat, HOUSTON on Central Pahute Mesa, and TYBO on Western Pahute Mesa. One-dimensional stochastic tritium transport simulations were performed for the three pathlines using the Monte Carlo method with Latin hypercube sampling. For the BOURBON and TYBO pathlines, sources of tritium from other tests located along the same pathline were included in the simulations. Sensitivity analyses were also performed on the transport model to evaluate the uncertainties associated with the geologic model, the rates of groundwater flow, the tritium source, and the transport parameters. Tritium concentration predictions were found to be mostly sensitive to the regional geology in controlling the horizontal and vertical position of transport pathways. The simulated concentrations are also sensitive to matrix diffusion, an important mechanism governing the migration of tritium in fractured carbonate and volcanic rocks. Source term concentration uncertainty is most important near the test locations and decreases in importance as the travel distance increases. The uncertainty on groundwater flow rates is as important as that on matrix diffusion at downgradient locations. The risk assessment was performed to provide conservative and bounding estimates of the potential risks to human health and the environment from tritium in groundwater. Risk models were designed by coupling scenario-specific tritium intake with tritium dose models and cancer and genetic risk estimates using the Monte Carlo method. Estimated radiation doses received by individuals from chronic exposure to tritium, and the corre

  17. Continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor 20-L demonstration test: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, D.D.; Collins, J.L.

    2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the proposed methods of removing the cesium, strontium, and transuranics from the radioactive waste storage tanks at Savannah River is the small-tank tetraphenylborate (TPB) precipitation process. A two-reactor-in-series (15-L working volume each) continuous-flow stirred-tank reactor (CSTR) system was designed, constructed, and installed in a hot cell to test the Savannah River process. The system also includes two cross-flow filtration systems to concentrate and wash the slurry produced in the process, which contains the bulk of radioactivity from the supernatant processed through the system. Installation, operational readiness reviews, and system preparation and testing were completed. The first test using the filtration systems, two CSTRs, and the slurry concentration system was conducted over a 61-h period with design removal of Cs, Sr, and U achieved. With the successful completion of Test 1a, the following tests, 1b and 1c, were not required.

  18. Results from the Water Flow Test of the Tank 37 Backflush Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowley, M.D.

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow test was conducted in the Thermal Fluids Lab with the Tank 37 Backflush Valve to determine the pressure drop of water flow through the material transfer port. The flow rate was varied from 0 to 100 gpm. The pressure drop through the Backflush Valve for flow rates of 20 and 70 gpm was determined to be 0.18 and 1.77 feet of H2O, respectively. An equivalent length of the Backflush Valve was derived from the flow test data. The equivalent length was used in a head loss calculation for the Tank 37 Gravity Drain Line. The calculation estimated the flow rate that would fill the line up to the Separator Tank, and the additional flow rate that would fill the Separator Tank. The viscosity of the fluid used in the calculation was 12 centipoise. Two specific gravities were investigated, 1.4 and 1.8. The Gravity Drain Line was assumed to be clean, unobstructed stainless steel pipe. The flow rate that would fill the line up to the Separator Tank was 73 and 75 gpm for the 1.4 or 1.8 specific gravity fluids, respectively. The flow rate that would fill the Separator Tank was 96 and 100 gpm for the 1.4 or 1.8 specific gravity fluids, respectively. These results indicate that concentrate will not back up into the Separator Tank during evaporator normal operation, 15-25 gpm, or pot liftout, 70 gpm. A noteworthy observation during the flow test was water pouring from the holes in the catheterization tube. Water poured from the holes at 25 gpm and above. Data from the water flow test indicates that at 25 gpm the pressure drop through the Backflush Valve is 0.26 ft of H2O. A concentrate with a specific gravity of 1.8 and a viscosity of 12 cp will produce the same pressure drop at 20 gpm. This implies that concentrate from the evaporator may spill out into the BFV riser during a transfer.

  19. Columbia University Flow Instability Experimental Program, Volume 10: Critical Heat Flux Test Program data tables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is one of a series of reports which document the flow instability testing conducted by Columbia University during 1989 through 1992. This report volume provides a hardcopy version of the twenty-six electronic media data files: CO515(A-D).DAT, CO525(A-G). DAT, CO530(A-K).DAT, CO718(A-E).DAT.

  20. Assessing the Transient Flow Behavior in Falling-head Permeameter Tests 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cavdar, Sevgi

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    to be combined with Darcy’s Law and eventually leads to Laplace’s equation for an incompressible matrix. If the media is compressible, specific storativity should be taken into account, as well. In this study, we investigated the transiency of flow in FHP tests...

  1. A NICE Way to Test OpenFlow Applications Marco Canini

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akella, Aditya

    for introducing new func- tionality into the network, Software Defined Networking (SDN) also raises the risksFlow-capable switches enables exciting new network functionality, at the risk of pro- gramming errors that make. In testing three real applications--a MAC-learning switch, in-network server load balancing, and energy

  2. On the Motion of Free Material Test Particles in Arbitrary Spatial Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom Martin

    1999-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We show how the motion of free material test particles in arbitrary spatial flows is easily determined within the context of ordinary vector calculus. This may be useful for everyone, including engineers and other non-specialists, when thinking about gravitational problems. It already has valid application to simple problems such as the problems of motion in rotating and accelerating frames and to the gravitational problem of the single spherically symmetric attractor. When applied to the two body gravitational problem, it may help us determine the actual direction of the flow.

  3. Validation Analysis of the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. Hassan; J. Chapman; H. Bekhit; B. Lyles; K. Pohlmann

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site undergoing environmental restoration. The CNTA is located about 95 km northeast of Tonopah, Nevada, and 175 km southwest of Ely, Nevada (Figure 1.1). It was the site of the Faultless underground nuclear test conducted by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (DOE's predecessor agency) in January 1968. The purposes of this test were to gauge the seismic effects of a relatively large, high-yield detonation completed in Hot Creek Valley (outside the Nevada Test Site [NTS]) and to determine the suitability of the site for future large detonations. The yield of the Faultless underground nuclear test was between 200 kilotons and 1 megaton (DOE, 2000). A three-dimensional flow and transport model was created for the CNTA site (Pohlmann et al., 1999) and determined acceptable by DOE and the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) for predicting contaminant boundaries for the site.

  4. Credit for comments, comments for credit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommer, Robert

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Send correspondence to Robert Sommer, Psychology Department,Comments, Comments for Credit Robert Sommer and Barbara A.Sommer University of California, Davis Abstract Credit for

  5. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 7. Single tube tests, critical heat flux test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report deals with critical heat flux (CHF) measurements in vertical down flow of water at low pressures in a round Inconel tube, 96 inches long and 0.62 inch inside diameter. A total of 28 CHF points were obtained. These data were found to correlate linearly with the single variable q, defined as the heat flux required to raise the enthalpy from the inlet value to the saturation value. These results were compared to the published results of Swedish investigators for vertical upflow of water at low pressures in round tubes of similar diameters and various lengths. The parameter q depends on the inlet enthalpy and is a nonlocal variable, thus this correlation is nonlocal unless the coefficients depend upon tube length in a particular prescribed manner. For the low pressure Swedish data, the coefficients are practically independent of length and hence the correlation is nonlocal. In the present investigation only one length was employed, so it is not possible to determine whether the correlation for these data is local or nonlocal, although there is reason to believe that it is local. The same correlation was applied to a large data base (thousands of CHF points) compiled from the published data of a number of groups and found to apply, with reasonable accuracy over a wide range of conditions, yielding sometimes local and sometimes nonlocal correlations. The basic philosophy of data analysis here was not to generate a single correlation which would reproduce all data, but to search for correlations which apply adequately over some range and which might have some mechanistic significance. The tentative conclusion is that at least two mechanisms appear operative, leading to two types of correlations, one local, the other nonlocal.

  6. Design, testing and two-dimensional flow modeling of a multiple-disk fan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engin, Tahsin; Oezdemir, Mustafa; Cesmeci, Sevki [Department of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Sakarya, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple-disk Tesla type fan has been designed, tested and analyzed two-dimensionally using the conservation of angular momentum principle. Experimental results showed that such multiple-disk fans exhibited exceptionally low performance characteristics, which could be attributed to the low viscosity, tangential nature of the flow, and large mechanical energy losses at both suction and discharge sections that are comparable to the total input power. By means of theoretical analysis, local and overall shearing stresses on the disk surfaces have been determined based on tangential and radial velocity distributions of the air flow of different volume flow rates at prescribed disk spaces and rotational speeds. Then the total power transmitted by rotating disks to air flow, and the power acquired by the air flow in the gap due to transfer of angular momentum have been obtained by numerically integrating shearing stresses over the disk surfaces. Using the measured shaft and hydraulic powers, these quantities were utilized to evaluate mechanical energy losses associated with the suction and discharge sections of the fan. (author)

  7. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovationCustomerCommentsCustomer-Comments

  8. Grout long radius flow testing to support Saltstone disposal Unit 5 design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D. B.; Langton, C. A.; Serrato, M. G.; Brooks, T. E. II; Huff, T. H.

    2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as “Saltstone”. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a “mega vault” and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference saltstone rheology and a saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0º, 2.4º, and 0.72º. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7º to 0.9º. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch.

  9. Grout Long Radius Flow Testing to Support Saltstone Disposal Unit 6 Design - 13352

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stefanko, D.B.; Langton, C.A.; Serrato, M.G. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Brooks, T.E. II; Huff, T.H. [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River Remediation, LLC, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saltstone Facility, located within the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina, consists of two facility segments: The Saltstone Production Facility (SPF) and the Saltstone Disposal Facility (SDF). The SPF receives decontaminated legacy low level sodium salt waste solution that is a byproduct of prior nuclear material processing. The salt solution is mixed with cementitious materials to form a grout slurry known as 'Saltstone'. The grout is pumped to the SDF where it is placed in a Saltstone Disposal Unit (SDU) to solidify. SDU 6 is referred to as a 'mega vault' and is currently in the design stage. The conceptual design for SDU 6 is a single cell, cylindrical geometry approximately 114.3 meters in diameter by 13.1 meter high and is larger than previous cylindrical SDU designs, 45.7 meters in diameter by 7.01 meters high (30 million gallons versus 2.9 million gallons of capacity). Saltstone slurry will be pumped into the new waste disposal unit through roof openings at a projected flow rate of about 34.1 cubic meters per hour. Nine roof openings are included in the design to discharge material into the SDU with an estimated grout pour radius of 22.9 to 24.4 meters and initial drop height of 13.1 meters. The conceptual design for the new SDU does not include partitions to limit the pour radius of the grout slurry during placement other than introducing material from different pour points. This paper addresses two technical issues associated with the larger diameter of SDU 6; Saltstone flow distance in a tank 114.3 meters in diameter and quality of the grout. A long-radius flow test scaled to match the velocity of an advancing grout front was designed to address these technology gaps. The emphasis of the test was to quantify the flow distance and to collect samples to evaluate cured properties including compressive strength, porosity, density, and saturated hydraulic conductivity. Two clean cap surrogate mixes (Saltstone premix plus water) were designed to simulate slurry with the reference Saltstone rheology and a Saltstone with extra water from the process flushing operation. Long-radius flow tests were run using approximately 4.6 cubic meters of each of these mixes. In both tests the pump rate was 0.063 liters/second (1 gpm). A higher pump rate, 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm), was used in a third long-radius flow test. The angle of repose of the grout wedges increased as a function of time in all three tests. The final angles of repose were measured at 3.0 deg., 2.4 deg., and 0.72 deg.. The pump rate had the largest effect on the radial flow distance and slope of the grout surface. The slope on the pour placed at 0.19 liters/second (3 gpm) was most representative of the slope on the grout currently being pumped into SDU 2 which is estimated to be 0.7 deg. to 0.9 deg. The final grout heights at 1/3 of a meter from the discharge point were 115, 105, and 38 cm. Entrapped air (? 0.25 cm bubbles) was also observed in all of the mixes. The entrapped air appeared to be released from the flows within about 3.1 meters (10 feet) of the discharge point. The bleed water was clear but had a thin layer of floating particulates. The bleed water should be retrievable by a drain water collection system in SDU 6 assuming the system does not get clogged. Layering was observed and was attributed to intervals when the hopper was being cleaned. Heat from the hydration reactions was noticeable to the touch. (authors)

  10. ICFT: An initial closed-loop flow test of the Fenton Hill Phase II HDR reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Z.V. (ed.); Aguilar, R.G.; Dennis, B.R.; Dreesen, D.S.; Fehler, M.C.; Hendron, R.H.; House, L.S.; Ito, H.; Kelkar, S.M.; Malzahn, M.V.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 30-day closed-loop circulation test of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, was conducted to determine the thermal, hydraulic, chemical, and seismic characteristics of the reservoir in preparation for a long-term energy-extraction test. The Phase II heat-extraction loop was successfully tested with the injection of 37,000 m/sup 3/ of cold water and production of 23,300 m/sup 3/ of hot water. Up to 10 MW/sub t/ was extracted when the production flow rate reached 0.0139 m/sup 3//s at 192/degree/C. By the end of the test, the water-loss rate had decreased to 26% and a significant portion of the injected water was recovered; 66% during the test and an additional 20% during subsequent venting. Analysis of thermal, hydraulic, geochemical, tracer, and seismic data suggests the fractured volume of the reservoir was growing throughout the test. 19 refs., 64 figs., 19 tabs.

  11. A Validation Process for the Groundwater Flow and Transport Model of the Faultless Nuclear Test at Central Nevada Test Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmed Hassan

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many sites of groundwater contamination rely heavily on complex numerical models of flow and transport to develop closure plans. This has created a need for tools and approaches that can be used to build confidence in model predictions and make it apparent to regulators, policy makers, and the public that these models are sufficient for decision making. This confidence building is a long-term iterative process and it is this process that should be termed ''model validation.'' Model validation is a process not an end result. That is, the process of model validation cannot always assure acceptable prediction or quality of the model. Rather, it provides safeguard against faulty models or inadequately developed and tested models. Therefore, development of a systematic approach for evaluating and validating subsurface predictive models and guiding field activities for data collection and long-term monitoring is strongly needed. This report presents a review of model validation studies that pertain to groundwater flow and transport modeling. Definitions, literature debates, previously proposed validation strategies, and conferences and symposia that focused on subsurface model validation are reviewed and discussed. The review is general in nature, but the focus of the discussion is on site-specific, predictive groundwater models that are used for making decisions regarding remediation activities and site closure. An attempt is made to compile most of the published studies on groundwater model validation and assemble what has been proposed or used for validating subsurface models. The aim is to provide a reasonable starting point to aid the development of the validation plan for the groundwater flow and transport model of the Faultless nuclear test conducted at the Central Nevada Test Area (CNTA). The review of previous studies on model validation shows that there does not exist a set of specific procedures and tests that can be easily adapted and applied to determine the validity of site-specific groundwater models. This is true for both deterministic and stochastic models, with the latter posing a more difficult and challenging problem when it comes to validation. This report then proposes a general validation approach for the CNTA model, which addresses some of the important issues recognized in previous validation studies, conferences, and symposia as crucial to the process. The proposed approach links model building, model calibration, model predictions, data collection, model evaluations, and model validation in an iterative loop. The approach focuses on use of collected validation data to reduce model uncertainty and narrow the range of possible outcomes of stochastic numerical models. It accounts for the stochastic nature of the numerical CNTA model, which used Monte Carlo simulation approach. The proposed methodology relies on the premise that absolute validity is not even a theoretical possibility and is not a regulatory requirement. Rather, it highlights the importance of testing as many aspects of the model as possible and using as many diverse statistical tools as possible for rigorous checking and confidence building in the model and its predictions. It is this confidence that will eventually allow for regulator and public acceptance of decisions based on the model predictions.

  12. Standard Test Method for Resin Flow of Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Prepreg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of the amount of resin flow that will take place from prepreg tape or sheet under given conditions of temperature and pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for reference only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Flow Test At Soda Lake Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information RooseveltFlow Test

  14. Groundwater Flow Systems at the Nevada Test Site, Nevada: A Synthesis of Potentiometric Contours, Hydrostratigraphy, and Geologic Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fenelon, Joseph M.; Sweetkind, Donald S.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminants introduced into the subsurface of the Nevada Test Site by underground nuclear testing are of concern to the U.S. Department of Energy and regulators responsible for protecting human health and safety. The potential for contaminant movement away from the underground test areas and into the accessible environment is greatest by groundwater transport. The primary hydrologic control on this transport is evaluated and examined through a series of contour maps developed to represent the hydraulic-head distribution within each of the major aquifers underlying the area. Aquifers were identified and their extents delineated by merging and analyzing multiple hydrostratigraphic framework models developed by other investigators from existing geologic information. A map of the hydraulic-head distribution in each major aquifer was developed from a detailed evaluation and assessment of available water-level measurements. Multiple spreadsheets that accompany this report provide pertinent water-level and geologic data by well or drill hole. Aquifers are mapped and discussed in general terms as being one of two types: alluvial-volcanic, or carbonate. Both aquifer types are subdivided and mapped as independent regional and local aquifers, based on the continuity of their component rock. Groundwater-flow directions, approximated from potentiometric contours that were developed from the hydraulic-head distribution, are indicated on the maps and discussed for each of the regional aquifers and for selected local aquifers. Hydraulic heads vary across the study area and are interpreted to range in altitude from greater than 5,000 feet in a regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer beneath a recharge area in the northern part of the study area to less than 2,300 feet in regional alluvial-volcanic and carbonate aquifers in the southwestern part of the study area. Flow directions throughout the study area are dominantly south-southwest with some local deviations. Vertical hydraulic gradients between aquifer types are downward throughout most of the study area; however, flow from the alluvial-volcanic aquifer into the underlying carbonate aquifer, where both aquifers are present, is believed to be minor because of an intervening confining unit. Limited exchange of water between aquifer types occurs by diffuse flow through the confining unit, by focused flow along fault planes, or by direct flow where the confining unit is locally absent. Interflow between regional aquifers is evaluated and mapped to define major flow paths. These flow paths delineate tributary flow systems, which converge to form intermediate and regional flow systems. The implications of these flow systems in controlling transport of radionuclides away from the underground test areas at the Nevada Test Site are briefly discussed. Additionally, uncertainties in the delineation of aquifers, the development of potentiometric contours, and the identification of flow systems are identified and evaluated. Eleven tributary flow systems and three larger flow systems are mapped in the Nevada Test Site area. Flow systems within the alluvial-volcanic aquifer dominate the western half of the study area, whereas flow systems within the carbonate aquifer are most prevalent in the southeastern half of the study area. Most of the flow in the regional alluvial-volcanic aquifer that moves through the underground testing area on Pahute Mesa is discharged to the land surface at springs and seeps in Oasis Valley. Flow in the regional carbonate aquifer is internally compartmentalized by major geologic structures, primarily thrust faults, which constrain flow into separate corridors. Contaminants that reach the regional carbonate aquifer from testing areas in Yucca and Frenchman Flats flow toward downgradient discharge areas through the Alkali Flat-Furnace Creek Ranch or Ash Meadows flow systems and their tributaries.

  15. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  16. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Research and Technology Applications Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  17. Flow-induced tube vibration thresholds in heat exchangers from shellside water tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halle, H.; Chenoweth, J.M.; Wambsganss, M.W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Typical industrial shell-and-tube heat exchanger configurations are investigated experimentally for the occurrence of potentially damaging tube vibration as a function of flowrate. The effort is part of a program to develop vibration avoidance criteria to be integrated and optimized with the advanced thermal, hydraulic, and mechanical design methods now available. The tests use a 0.6-m (2-ft)-diameter, 3.7-m (12-ft)-long shell containing a removable tube bundle whose components are readily rearranged or replaced. The 15 different full tube bundle configurations tested represent various combinations of parameters: triangular or square tube layout patterns with different orientations to the flow, number of crosspasses, sizes of nozzles, plain or finned tubes. All bundles have 19-mm (0.75-in.)-diameter tubes spaced with a pitch-to-diameter ratio of 1.25. The heat exchanger is tested with waterflow on the shellside to determine a critical threshold, above which a small increase in the flowrate initiates a fluidelastic instability resulting in large amplitude vibration. The test conditions, the critical flowrates, the vibration frequencies, and the locations of the tubes most susceptible to vibration are presented. The given data are used for a comparison with a presently recognized method of vibration prediction and will permit updated evaluations as more advanced methods become available in the future.

  18. Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic compounds in the vapor phase at trace levels: A tool for testing and Comment on Tunable generation and adsorption of energetic...

  19. Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of Transient Testing of Nuclear Fuels and Materials Public Invited to Comment on Draft Environmental Assessment for the Resumption of...

  20. Wind Tunnel and Flight Testing of Active Flow Control on a UAV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babbar, Yogesh

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Active flow control has been extensively explored in wind tunnel studies but successful in-flight implementation of an active flow control technology still remains a challenge. This thesis presents implementation of active flow control technology...

  1. Search Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook TwitterSearch-Comments Sign In About | Careers | Contact |

  2. Customer Comments

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovation PortalCustomer-Comments Sign

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovation PortalCustomer-Comments

  4. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovationCustomerComments Sign In About |

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovationCustomerComments Sign In About

  6. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovationCustomerComments Sign In

  7. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovationCustomerComments Sign

  8. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4 DepartmentInnovationCustomerComments

  9. Customer Comments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution4Customer-Comments Sign In About | Careers | Contact |

  10. Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

    2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

  11. Project ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia River Basin ~ Response to ISRP/RME Proposal Review Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Synder et al. 2002). The shifting habitat mosaic is controlled by the coupled relationship between flowProject ID: 35062 ~ Impacts of Flow Regulation on Riparian Cottonwood Ecosystems in the Columbia. 1. The ISRP cited a need to "provide better evidence of the linkages of changes in flow regimes

  12. Comparison of the results of short-term static tests and single-pass flow-through tests with LRM glass.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2007-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Static dissolution tests were conducted to measure the forward dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 C and pH(RT) 11.7 {+-} 0.1 for comparison with the rate measured with single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests in an interlaboratory study (ILS). The static tests were conducted with monolithic specimens having known geometric surface areas, whereas the SPFT tests were conducted with crushed glass that had an uncertain specific surface area. The error in the specific surface area of the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests, which was calculated by modeling the particles as spheres, was assessed based on the difference in the forward dissolution rates measured with the two test methods. Three series of static tests were conducted at 70 C following ASTM standard test method C1220 using specimens with surfaces polished to 600, 800, and 1200 grit and a leachant solution having the same composition as that used in the ILS. Regression of the combined results of the static tests to the affinity-based glass dissolution model gives a forward rate of 1.67 g/(m{sup 2}d). The mean value of the forward rate from the SPFT tests was 1.64 g/(m{sup 2}d) with an extended uncertainty of 1.90 g/(m{sup 2}d). This indicates that the calculated surface area for the crushed glass used in the SPFT tests is less than 2% higher than the actual surface area, which is well within the experimental uncertainties of measuring the forward dissolution rate using each test method. These results indicate that the geometric surface area of crushed glass calculated based on the size of the sieves used to isolate the fraction used in a test is reliable. In addition, the C1220 test method provides a means for measuring the forward dissolution rate of borosilicate glasses that is faster, easier, and more economical than the SPFT test method.

  13. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 12. Single annulus transient test program data tables: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D.A.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The single annulus test program was designed to investigate the onset of flow instability in an annular geometry similar to the fuel assemblies used in the Savannah River Site production reactors. Data files were transmitted from Columbia University to Savannah River Site in a DOS compatible format. This report provides a hardcopy version of the electronic media data files.

  14. QER- Comment of WIRES

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find the components of WIRES Comment to the QER. Please direct any questions to Jim Hoecker, below.

  15. Capillary test specimen, system, and methods for in-situ visualization of capillary flow and fillet formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hall, Aaron C. (Albuquerque, NM); Hosking, F. Michael (Albuquerque, NM),; Reece, Mark (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A capillary test specimen, method, and system for visualizing and quantifying capillary flow of liquids under realistic conditions, including polymer underfilling, injection molding, soldering, brazing, and casting. The capillary test specimen simulates complex joint geometries and has an open cross-section to permit easy visual access from the side. A high-speed, high-magnification camera system records the location and shape of the moving liquid front in real-time, in-situ as it flows out of a source cavity, through an open capillary channel between two surfaces having a controlled capillary gap, and into an open fillet cavity, where it subsequently forms a fillet on free surfaces that have been configured to simulate realistic joint geometries. Electric resistance heating rapidly heats the test specimen, without using a furnace. Image-processing software analyzes the recorded images and calculates the velocity of the moving liquid front, fillet contact angles, and shape of the fillet's meniscus, among other parameters.

  16. Flow tests of the Willis Hulin Well. Volume III. Final report for the period October 1985--October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A.

    1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial flow test of the Hulin well was done to obtain brine and gas samples and to get a first measure of the reservoir properties. The 20,602 to 20,690-foot interval was perforated and tested in two short-term draw-down and buildup tests. This zone had an initial pressure of 17,308 psia and temperature of 339 F. The total dissolved solids of 207,000 mg/L (mostly sodium chloride) is higher than for previously tested Gulf Coast geopressured-geothermal wells. The gas content in the brine of 31 to 32 SCF/STB indicates that the brine is at or near saturation with natural gas. The permeability, as deduced from the draw-down and buildup tests, is 13 md for the lower 80-foot-thick sand member. The duration of the tests was too short to determine the lateral extent of the reservoir; but declining measured values for static bottomhole pressure prior to each flow test suggests a relatively small reservoir. When the uppermost interval in the zone of interest (20,220 to 20,260 feet) was perforated such that flow from this zone would commingle with flow from the lower zone, little to no free gas was observed. It had been speculated before the test that there might be free gas in this upper zone. These speculations were generally deduced from logs after assuming the formation contained brine that had a salinity between 70,000 and 100,000 mg/L. The actual salinity was more than twice that number. it is now apparent that the amount of free gas, if any, is too small to make a significant contribution to production in a short-term test. This does not preclude the possibility of mobilization of gas by higher drawdown or coning down from an offsetting gas cap in one or more of the sand members. However, there was no evidence that this was occurring in this test. No measurements of the reservoir parameters, such as permeability, were made for the shallowest interval tested. But substantially lower drawdown for the commingled zones suggests either higher permeability or lower skin for the shallower perforated interval. Hydrate formation in the upper part of the wellbore was a problem. To circumvent this problem, about 10 barrels of diesel were pumped into the top of the well after each flow to displace the brine down to a level in the well where the temperature was too high for hydrates to form. Calculations of saturation index indicated that calcium carbonate scale would also form in the well if the pressure was drawn down too far. Thus all the flow tests were performed at low flow rates to preclude formation of scale in the wellbore. Scale inhibitor was injected into the surface flow lines to control possible scale formation in the surface equipment. Corrosion inhibitor was also injected, and coupon monitoring indicated a corrosion rate of less than 5 mils per year.

  17. Microsoft Word - test | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    test Microsoft Word - test Microsoft Word - test More Documents & Publications Interested Parties - WAPA Public Comment InterestedPartiesCOPSCoWAPA040309.pdf Microsoft Word -...

  18. CFD Simulation and Experimental Testing of Multiphase Flow Inside the MVP Electrical Submersible Pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasmy Marsis, Emanuel 1983-

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The MVP is a special type of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) manufactured by Baker Hughes, model no. G470, and is capable of handling multiphase flow up to 70% Gas Volume Fraction (GVF). Flows at high GVF cause conventional ESPs to surge...

  19. Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 2. Single tube uniformly heated tests -- Part 2: Uncertainty analysis and data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

    1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In June 1988, Savannah River Laboratory requested that the Heat Transfer Research Facility modify the flow excursion program, which had been in progress since November 1987, to include testing of single tubes in vertical down-flow over a range of length to diameter (L/D) ratios of 100 to 500. The impetus for the request was the desire to obtain experimental data as quickly as possible for code development work. In July 1988, HTRF submitted a proposal to SRL indicating that by modifying a facility already under construction the data could be obtained within three to four months. In January 1990, HTFR issued report CU-HTRF-T4, part 1. This report contained the technical discussion of the results from the single tube uniformly heated tests. The present report is part 2 of CU-HTRF-T4 which contains further discussion of the uncertainty analysis and the complete set of data.

  20. QER- Comment of Jerry Toenyes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), specifically the water/energy nexus. Unfortunately there is little relationship between water operations and power generation in decisions involving the Federal hydropower facilities located in California. Power is the lowest priority of the various project purposes met by the Federal projects and does not receive consideration in short term and long term planning. Water only flows through Federal power plants while it is being released by the dams to meet other project purposes.

  1. Modeling of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Transport at the Climax Mine sub-CAU, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Pohlmann; M. Ye; D. Reeves; M. Zavarin; D. Decker; J. Chapman

    2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Flat-Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU) on the Nevada Test Site comprises 747 underground nuclear detonations, all but three of which were conducted in alluvial, volcanic, and carbonate rocks in Yucca Flat. The remaining three tests were conducted in the very different hydrogeologic setting of the Climax Mine granite stock located in Area 15 at the northern end of Yucca Flat. As part of the Corrective Action Investigation (CAI) for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU, models of groundwater flow and radionuclide transport will be developed for Yucca Flat. However, two aspects of these CAU-scale models require focused modeling at the northern end of Yucca Flat beyond the capability of these large models. First, boundary conditions and boundary flows along the northern reaches of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU require evaluation to a higher level of detail than the CAU-scale Yucca Flat model can efficiently provide. Second, radionuclide fluxes from the Climax tests require analysis of flow and transport in fractured granite, a unique hydrologic environment as compared to Yucca Flat proper. This report describes the Climax Mine sub-CAU modeling studies conducted to address these issues, with the results providing a direct feed into the CAI for the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU. Three underground nuclear detonations were conducted for weapons effects testing in the Climax stock between 1962 and 1966: Hard Hat, Pile Driver, and Tiny Tot. Though there is uncertainty regarding the position of the water table in the stock, it is likely that all three tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone. In the early 1980s, the Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) was constructed to evaluate the feasibility of retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercial nuclear reactor wastes. Detailed mapping of fractures and faults carried out for the SFT-C studies greatly expanded earlier data sets collected in association with the nuclear tests and provided invaluable information for subsequent modeling studies at Climax. The objectives of the Climax Mine sub-CAU work are to (1) provide simulated heads and groundwater flows for the northern boundaries of the Yucca Flat-Climax Mine CAU model, while incorporating alternative conceptualizations of the hydrogeologic system with their associated uncertainty, and (2) provide radionuclide fluxes from the three tests in the Climax stock using modeling techniques that account for groundwater flow in fractured granite. Meeting these two objectives required two different model scales. The northern boundary groundwater fluxes were addressed using the Death Valley Regional Flow System (DVRFS) model (Belcher, 2004) developed by the U.S. Geological Survey as a modeling framework, with refined hydrostratigraphy in a zone north of Yucca Flat and including Climax stock. Radionuclide transport was simulated using a separate model confined to the granite stock itself, but linked to regional groundwater flow through boundary conditions and calibration targets.

  2. TYBO/BENHAM: Model Analysis of Groundwater Flow and Radionuclide Migration from Underground Nuclear Tests in Southwestern Pahute Mesa, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andrew Wolfsberg; Lee Glascoe; Guoping Lu; Alyssa; Olson; Peter Lichtner; Maureen McGraw; Terry Cherry; ,; Guy Roemer

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent field studies have led to the discovery of trace quantities of plutonium originating from the BENHAM underground nuclear test in two groundwater observation wells on Pahute Mesa at the Nevada Test Site. These observation wells are located 1.3 km from the BENHAM underground nuclear test and approximately 300 m from the TYBO underground nuclear test. In addition to plutonium, several other conservative (e.g. tritium) and reactive (e.g. cesium) radionuclides were found in both observation wells. The highest radionuclide concentrations were found in a well sampling a welded tuff aquifer more than 500m above the BENHAM emplacement depth. These measurements have prompted additional investigations to ascertain the mechanisms, processes, and conditions affecting subsurface radionuclide transport in Pahute Mesa groundwater. This report describes an integrated modeling approach used to simulate groundwater flow, radionuclide source release, and radionuclide transport near the BENHAM and TYBO underground nuclear tests on Pahute Mesa. The components of the model include a flow model at a scale large enough to encompass many wells for calibration, a source-term model capable of predicting radionuclide releases to aquifers following complex processes associated with nonisothermal flow and glass dissolution, and site-scale transport models that consider migration of solutes and colloids in fractured volcanic rock. Although multiple modeling components contribute to the methodology presented in this report, they are coupled and yield results consistent with laboratory and field observations. Additionally, sensitivity analyses are conducted to provide insight into the relative importance of uncertainty ranges in the transport parameters.

  3. Experimental investigation of an oscillating circular piston positive displacement flowmeter: II - Leakage flows and wear tests.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morton, Charlotte E; Baker, Roger C; Hutchings, Ian M

    viscosities were mixtures of white spirit and multigrade motor oil. The values achieved for viscosity and resultant density are set out in Part I of this paper [1 Table 3]. To assess the effect of density change, white spirit, motor oil, water and salt water... flow rates was negligible. This suggests that the difference in the leakage f #8;#1; #8;Figure 5 Percentage leakage with the 316 SS circular piston with and without Molykote low friction coating in a water flow. #12;3.4 Effect of lubrication holes...

  4. SPPR Project Customer Comments Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DSW. The transfer capability provided by the project would allow delivery from a new solar generation facility to the Palo Verde Hub. Previous Meetings' Comments: Comments...

  5. Systematic study of polycrystalline flow during tension test of sheet 304 austenitic stainless steel at room temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muñoz-Andrade, Juan D., E-mail: jdma@correo.azc.uam.mx [Departamento de Materiales, División de Ciencias Básicas e Ingeniería, Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana Unidad Azcapotzalco, Av. San Pablo No. 180, Colonia Reynosa Tamaulipas, C.P. 02200, México Distrito Federal (Mexico)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    By systematic study the mapping of polycrystalline flow of sheet 304 austenitic stainless steel (ASS) during tension test at constant crosshead velocity at room temperature was obtained. The main results establish that the trajectory of crystals in the polycrystalline spatially extended system (PCSES), during irreversible deformation process obey a hyperbolic motion. Where, the ratio between the expansion velocity of the field and the velocity of the field source is not constant and the field lines of such trajectory of crystals become curved, this accelerated motion is called a hyperbolic motion. Such behavior is assisted by dislocations dynamics and self-accommodation process between crystals in the PCSES. Furthermore, by applying the quantum mechanics and relativistic model proposed by Muñoz-Andrade, the activation energy for polycrystalline flow during the tension test of 304 ASS was calculated for each instant in a global form. In conclusion was established that the mapping of the polycrystalline flow is fundamental to describe in an integral way the phenomenology and mechanics of irreversible deformation processes.

  6. Integrated test plan for preliminary demonstration of the in situ permeable flow sensor in the unsaturated sediments at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, V.J.

    1994-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated test plan describes the demonstration of the in situ permeable flow sensor, developed by Sandia National Laboratory, to measure air flow in unsaturated sediments. The ability of this technology to measure groundwater flow velocity in saturated sediments has already been successfully demonstrated. This preliminary test of this device in the unsaturated zone will be considered successful if in fact the flowmeters are able to detect a gas flow velocity. The field demonstration described in this integrated test plan is being conducted as part of the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Integrated Demonstration (VOC-Arid ID). The VOC-Arid ID is one of several US Department of Energy (DOE) integrated demonstrations designed to support the testing of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. The purpose of the VOC-Arid ID is to identify, develop, and demonstrate technologies that may be used to characterize, remediate, and/or monitor arid or semiarid sites containing VOCs (e.g., carbon tetrachloride) with or without associated metal and radionuclide contamination. Initially, the VOC-Arid ID activities are focusing primarily on the carbon tetrachloride and associated contamination found in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site. Testing of the in situ permeable flow sensor will be conducted at the location of the proposed Environmental Restoration Disposal Facility (ERDF). The data regarding subsurface air flow rates and pathways collected during the flow sensor testing will be used in the ongoing characterization of the proposed ERDF.

  7. A groundwater flow and transport model of long-term radionuclide migration in central Frenchman flat, Nevada test site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwicklis, Edward Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Becker, Naomi M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ruskauff, Gregory [NAVARRO-INTERA, LLC.; De Novio, Nicole [GOLDER AND ASSOC.; Wilborn, Bill [US DOE NNSA NSO

    2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of groundwater flow and transport models were created for the Central Testing Area of Frenchman Flat at the former Nevada Test Site to investigate the long-term consequences of a radionuclide migration experiment that was done between 1975 and 1990. In this experiment, radionuclide migration was induced from a small nuclear test conducted below the water table by pumping a well 91 m away. After radionuclides arrived at the pumping well, the contaminated effluent was discharged to an unlined ditch leading to a playa where it was expected to evaporate. However, recent data from a well near the ditch and results from detailed models of the experiment by LLNL personnel have convincingly demonstrated that radionuclides from the ditch eventually reached the water table some 220 m below land surface. The models presented in this paper combine aspects of these detailed models with concepts of basin-scale flow to estimate the likely extent of contamination resulting from this experiment over the next 1,000 years. The models demonstrate that because regulatory limits for radionuclide concentrations are exceeded only by tritium and the half-life of tritium is relatively short (12.3 years), the maximum extent of contaminated groundwater has or will soon be reached, after which time the contaminated plume will begin to shrink because of radioactive decay. The models also show that past and future groundwater pumping from water supply wells within Frenchman Flat basin will have negligible effects on the extent of the plume.

  8. Initial test results from the RedFlow 5 kW, 10 kWh zinc-bromide module, phase 1.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferreira, Summer Rhodes; Rose, David Martin

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper the performance results of the RedFlow zinc-bromide module (ZBM) Gen 2.0 are reported for Phase 1 of testing, which includes initial characterization of the module. This included physical measurement, efficiency as a function of charge and discharge rates, efficiency as a function of maximum charge capacity, duration of maximum power supplied, and limited cycling with skipped strip cycles. The goal of this first phase of testing was to verify manufacturer specifications of the zinc-bromide flow battery. Initial characterization tests have shown that the ZBM meets the manufacturer's specifications. Further testing, including testing as a function of temperature and life cycle testing, will be carried out during Phase 2 of the testing, and these results will be issued in the final report, after Phase 2 testing has concluded.

  9. Design, build and test of an axial flow hydrokinetic turbine with fatigue analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketcham, Jerod W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OpenProp is an open source propeller and turbine design and analysis code that has been in development since 2007 by MIT graduate students under the supervision of Professor Richard Kimball. In order to test the performance ...

  10. Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

  11. Final Report: Pilot-scale Cross-flow Filtration Test - Envelope A + Entrained Solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company.This filter technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. This plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  12. Flow Test At Jemez Pueblo Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro Inc IosilEnergy InformationFlintFlow

  13. Flow Test At Steamboat Springs Area (Combs, Et Al., 1999) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information Hydro IncEnergy Information RooseveltFlow

  14. Flow Test At Glass Buttes Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration ActivityFlow

  15. Flow Test At Pilgrim Hot Springs Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump to:ar-80m.pdfFillmoreGabbs Valley Area (DOE GTP) ExplorationMccoyFlow

  16. DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop Discussion Comments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Workshop Discussion Comments, Questions, and Action Items DOE Hydrogen Transition Analysis Workshop Discussion Comments, Questions, and Action Items Discussion comments, questions,...

  17. A study of pumps for the Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Energy extraction experiment (LTFT (Long Term Flow Test))

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tatro, C.A.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of specifications for the hot dry rock (HDR) Phase II circulation pumping system is developed from a review of basic fluid pumping mechanics, a technical history of the HDR Phase I and Phase II pumping systems, a presentation of the results from experiment 2067 (the Initial Closed-Loop Flow Test or ICFT), and consideration of available on-site electrical power limitations at the experiment site. For the Phase II energy extraction experiment (the Long Term Flow Test or LTFT) it is necessary to provide a continuous, low maintenance, and highly efficient pumping capability for a period of twelve months at variable flowrates up to 420 gpm and at surface injection pressures up to 5000 psi. The pumping system must successfully withstand attacks by corrosive and embrittling gases, erosive chemicals and suspended solids, and fluid pressure and temperature fluctuations. In light of presently available pumping hardware and electric power supply limitations, it is recommended that positive displacement multiplex plunger pumps, driven by variable speed control electric motors, be used to provide the necessary continuous surface injection pressures and flowrates for LTFT. The decision of whether to purchase the required circulation pumping hardware or to obtain contractor provided pumping services has not been made.

  18. Current trends and innovations in porometry and porosimetry applicable to battery separator testing and development: Introducing the Micro-Flow Porometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stillwell, C.R.; Gupta, K.M. [Porous Materials Inc., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pore structure of separators is a critical property for efficiency of batteries and fuel cells. As such, porosity characterization is of great interest to those developing, as well as those manufacturing, these materials. This paper discusses the two most frequently used techniques for porosity characterization: porosimetry and porometry. The strengths and limitations of both testing techniques is discussed with a focus on appropriate test selection to obtain optimal results. This paper also describes the new user-friendly instruments now available from Porous Materials Inc. (PMI) and the recent advances that have made these techniques more useful for those involved with product development, product improvement, and quality control in the battery separator industry. This paper introduces the new Micro-Flow Porometer, which is capable of testing flow rates as low as .0001 cc/min. The usefulness of the Micro-Flow Porometer for battery separator testing is discussed and additional advances in porosimetry is introduced.

  19. Automatic Test Generation for Data-Flow Reactive Systems with time constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    instantaneously. We present a conformance relation for this model and we propose a test generation method using(V ) the set of variable assignments for V . Given G G(V ) and a valuation v Dom(V ), we write v |= G when G(v) true. Given a valuation v = (v1, · · · , vn) of V and A A(V ), we define the valuations v[A] as v

  20. Hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization and radial flow through permeability tests for cementitous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Christopher Andrew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    depending on the age and relative strength of the specimen. Since the specimen was sealed at both ends, the fluid would flow T es ti n g Fl u i d ( W a ter etc .) Hy d r a u l i c o i l L V D T c o i l E l ec tr i c - h y d r a u l i c p u m p Ho l... is representative of a typical driveway or sidewalk mix. C e m e n t T y p e I / I I 334 k g / m 3 564 l b s / y d 3 W a t e r 200 k g / m 3 338 l b s / y d 3 C oa r s e A g g r e g a t e ( 9 . 5 m m m a x ) 1232 k g / m 3 2079 l b s / y d 3 F i n e A g g r...

  1. Response to Review Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kota, S.; Haberl, J.S.; Clayton, M.; Yan, W.

    to discuss any further issues with the editor and the reviewers. Review Comments: The paper is useful in facilitating daylighting simulation: the developed prototype realized automatic building data transfer from Revit to Radiance and Daysim... the geometry information is compared before/after transfer from Revit to Radiance, not the material information. To address this comment, the following description is added to Section X on page Y: “ ESL-PA-14-07-04 ” 4 The authors should pay more...

  2. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well. Appendix A, Gladys McCall Site (Cameron Parish, LA): Final report, October 1985--October 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. [Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States)

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor ``pills`` directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  3. QER- Comment of Diane Cray

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good afternoon, Would it be possible to get a list of presenters and their written comments on meeting agenda?

  4. RICAP-07: Summary comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas K. Gaisser

    2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Roma International Conference on Astroparticle Physics covered gamma-ray astronomy, air shower experiments and neutrino astronomy on three successive days. I organize my brief summary comments into four topics that cut across these three techniques. They are detector calibration, galactic sources, extra-galactic sources and cosmology.

  5. Results of Aquifer Tests Performed Near R-Area, Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiergesell, R.A.

    2001-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aquifer testing described in this report was conducted in response to USEPA comments (WSRC, 1998) on the Rev. 0 R-Reactor Seepage Basins RFI/RI Report (WSRC, 1998a), Appendix G, Groundwater Contaminant Transport Modeling for the R-Reactor Seepage Basins (RRSB)/108-4R Overflow Basin Operable Unit. The R-area regional flow model described in Appendix G of the RFI/RI is based on small-scale and/or indirect measures of hydraulic conductivity, including laboratory tests, slug tests, cone penetration testing (CPT) and lithologic core descriptions. The USEPA proposed and SRS- agreed that large-scale conductivity estimates from multiple well pumping tests would be beneficial for validating the model conductivity field. Overall, the aquifer test results validate the 1998 R-area regional groundwater flow model.

  6. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

  7. Microsoft Word - CLWR scoping Comment

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Impact Statement for the Production of Tritium in a Commercial Light Water Reactor U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Written Comment Form Must be...

  8. QER- Comment of Elaine Mroz

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Elaine Mroz Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on the Public Meetings ‘‘Infrastructure Restraints- New England” held April 21, 2014, in Providence, RI and Hartford, CT. Please see attached file.

  9. QER- Comment of Dakota Resource Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are comments from the Dakota Resource Council, a membership-based organization of North Dakotans. Thank you for the opportunity to comment on the Infrastructure Constraints.

  10. QER- Comment of Honda Motor Co., Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Quadrennial Energy Review : Comment on the Public Meeting “Enhancing Infrastructure Resiliency,” Held April 11, 2014, - Please provide link to where public comments are available.

  11. Comments on: Protected: Abuse Testing Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced.

  12. A Comprehensive Review of the Tests Completed on the Flow Loop at the Energy Systems Laboratory (Draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The changing weight of the water is measured to determine the flow rate for comparison with the candidate sensor. Flowloop History Paper: Updated Dec. 1992 : Page 3 The electronic signals from the load cells, candidate meter, ultrasonic meter, differential... equipment such as the flow meters and the Btu transducers. ENEMY SKKMS LABORATORY TECHNICAL REPORT REPRINTED WITH PERMISSION HP APT \\Jt |\\ JH^ 1 1 Flowloop History Paper: Updated Dec. 1992: Page 1 The first task of the facility was to determine the overall...

  13. QER- Comment of Governors' Wind Energy Coalition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find the Governors' Wind Energy Coalition's comments on the QER. Thank you. Larry Pearce

  14. QER- Comment of Northeast Gas Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find enclosed comments of the Northeast Gas Association regarding the Quadrennial Energy Review. Thank you.

  15. COMMENTS | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report,COMMENTS ON BEHALF OF INGAA

  16. COMMENTS | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report,COMMENTS ON BEHALF OF

  17. COMMENTS | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuilding Removal OngoingCERCLA SitesCHICAGOof EnergyCOMMENTS�

  18. Message Flow Modulator Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Robert Stephen

    operational environment at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center with scenarios developed by an independent in testing and demonstrating the flow modulator at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center. #12;MESSAGE FLOW

  19. Comments on the Request for Information on Improving Performance...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Comments from PNM Resources, sent October 29, 2013 Comments from the Arizona Game and Fish Department, sent October 29, 2013 Comments from Minnesota Power, sent October 30, 2013...

  20. TECHNETIUM RETENTION IN WTP LAW GLASS WITH RECYCLE FLOW-SHEET DM10 MELTER TESTING VSL-12R2640-1 REV 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramowitz, Howard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Brandys, Marek [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Cecil, Richard [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; D'Angelo, Nicholas [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Matlack, Keith S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Muller, Isabelle S. [Catholic Univ. of America, Washington, DC (United States). Vitreous State Lab.; Pegg, Ian L. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Callow, Richard A. [Energy Solutions, Federal EPC, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Joseph, Innocent

    2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Melter tests were conducted to determine the retention of technetium and other volatiles in glass while processing simulated Low Activity Waste (LAW) streams through a DM10 melter equipped with a prototypical off-gas system that concentrates and recycles fluid effiuents back to the melter feed. To support these tests, an existing DM10 system installed at Vitreous State Laboratory (VSL) was modified to add the required recycle loop. Based on the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) LAW off-gas system design, suitably scaled versions of the Submerged Bed Scrubber (SBS), Wet Electrostatic Precipitator (WESP), and TLP vacuum evaporator were designed, built, and installed into the DM10 system. Process modeling was used to support this design effort and to ensure that issues associated with the short half life of the {sup 99m}Tc radioisotope that was used in this work were properly addressed and that the system would be capable of meeting the test objectives. In particular, this required that the overall time constant for the system was sufficiently short that a reasonable approach to steady state could be achieved before the {sup 99m}Tc activity dropped below the analytical limits of detection. The conceptual design, detailed design, flow sheet development, process model development, Piping and Instrumentation Diagram (P&ID) development, control system design, software design and development, system fabrication, installation, procedure development, operator training, and Test Plan development for the new system were all conducted during this project. The new system was commissioned and subjected to a series of shake-down tests before embarking on the planned test program. Various system performance issues that arose during testing were addressed through a series of modifications in order to improve the performance and reliability of the system. The resulting system provided a robust and reliable platform to address the test objectives.

  1. QER- Comment of Emily Crowell

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of the Senator’s constituents dropped off comments that she wanted to pass along to your office re: the QER public meeting. For your records her contact information is below:

  2. Final Report: Pilot-Scale X-Flow Filtration Test - Env C Plus Entrained Solids Plus Sr/TRU

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R.

    2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the results of the operation of a cross-flow filter in a pilot-scale experimental facility that was designed, built, and run by the Experimental Thermal Fluids Laboratory of the Savannah River Technology Center of the Westinghouse Savannah River Company. This filtration technology was evaluated for its inclusion in the pretreatment section of the nuclear waste stabilization plant being designed by BNFL, Inc. The plant will be built at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site as part of the River Protection Project.

  3. TRAC-PF1/MOD-1 analysis of Loss-Of-Flow Test L9-4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, J.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing the Transient Reactor Analysis Code (TRAC) to provide advanced best-estimate predictions of postulated accidents in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and for many thermal-hydraulic experimental facilities. As part of our independent assessment of code version TRAC-PF1/MOD1, we analyzed Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) L9-4 and compared the test data to the calculated results. This was an anticipated-transient-without-scram test in which the pumps were tripped, the steam generator main feedwater discontinued, and the main steam-outlet valve closed. This data comparison is the first extensive test of TRAC's reactor-kinetics models. The comparisons show that TRAC can calculate the power generation within a nuclear reactor if the program is supplied with adequate reactor-kinetics input specifications. The data comparisons also indicate that TRAC calculated the thermal-hydraulic parameters within LOFT well with only minor discrepancies. A number of models within TRAC-PF1/MOD1 were verified for the first time. They include the reactor-kinetics models, the trip-activated time-step controls, and the LOFT pump-coastdown calculations. In general, the final input description is adequate to analyze the experiment. The calculations indicate the importance and difficulty of obtaining accurate and applicable reactor-kinetics input data. They also indicate the need to include the effects of xenon-poisoning buildup in the analysis.

  4. TESTING THE ACCRETION FLOW WITH PLASMA WAVE HEATING MECHANISM FOR SAGITTARIUS A* BY THE 1.3 mm VLBI MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026 (China); Takahashi, Rohta [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shen Zhiqiang, E-mail: mlhuang@ustc.edu.c [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vicinity of the supermassive black hole associated with the compact radio source Sagittarius (Sgr) A* is believed to dominate the observed emission at wavelengths near and shorter than approx1 millimeter. We show that a general relativistic accretion flow, heated via the plasma wave heating mechanism, is consistent with the polarization and recent millimeter-VLBI observations of Sgr A* for an inclination angle of approx45{sup 0}, position angle of approx140{sup 0}, and spin approx<0.9. Structure in visibilities produced by the black hole shadow can potentially be observed by 1.3 mm-VLBI on the existing Hawaii-CARMA and Hawaii-SMT baselines. We also consider eight additional potential millimeter-VLBI stations, including sites in Chile and New Zealand, finding that with these the basic geometry of the emission region can be reliably estimated.

  5. QER- Comment of Berkshire Environmental Action Team

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force, Please find attached comments from the Berkshire Environmental Action Team, Inc. (BEAT) regarding the proposed natural gas pipeline expansion. Thank you for considering our comments.

  6. QER- Comment of Geotherman Energy Association (GEA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hi the Geothermal Energy Association would like to submit the attached comments for the 2014 QER process. Thanks,

  7. QER- Comment of National Resource Defense Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please accept this paper as a comment into the QER record on siting energy and transmission resources.

  8. QER- Comment of Institute for Energy Research

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Institute for Energy Research would like to submit a comment for the DOE's Quadrennial Energy Review. You will find the comment attached, and we would like to be listed as: Institute for Energy Research 1155 15th St Nw, Suite 1900 Washington, D.C. 20005 Thank you for the opportunity to comment!

  9. QER- Comment of American Gas Association 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find AGA's comments relating to critical issues facing the natural gas distribution industry, which we believe could be usefully addressed in the first phase of the DOE Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). Our comments as submitted here consist of a cover letter and four additional attachments. My colleague Pam Lacey has previously submitted AGA's comments relating to methane emissions under separate cover.

  10. Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow 1.0 Introduction and notation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow 1.0 Introduction and notation Figure 1 below compares the optimal power flow (OPF) with the security-constrained optimal power flow (SCOPF). Fig. 1 Some comments normal flow moves from just 100% of continuous rating. SCOPF differs from an OPF solution

  11. QER- Comment of Lisa Petrie

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To Whom it May Concern: Attached please find my comments for the Quadrennial Energy Review. I attended the meeting and gave the comments orally, but I wasn't able to finish because of the 3-minute time limit, so I'm sending them in written form (with a couple of very small revisions). I'd also like to say that I was disappointed to find that the meeting was poorly publicized, that very few members of the general public or the environmental community were present, and that there were no environmentalists or opponents of the proposed AIM pipeline expansion project among the formal speakers. I sincerely hope that future hearings will be more balanced, in keeping with this Administration's promise of transparent government that's responsive to the needs and concerns of its citizens. Thank you so much for taking the time to read and consider my comments. Respectfully Yours, Lisa Petrie Stay-at-home mom and concerned citizen

  12. Comments on the use of computer models for merger analysis in the electricity industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    that the commission is considering, electricity market models, production cost/optimal power flow models, and hybridsComments on the use of computer models for merger analysis in the electricity industry FERC Docket for market power in electricity markets. These analyses have yielded several insights about the application

  13. QER- Comment of Southern Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Southern Company Services, Inc., as agent for Alabama Power Company, Georgia Power Company, Gulf Power Company, and Mississippi Power Company, (collectively, “Southern Companies”), are pleased to hereby provide their comments to the Department of Energy as it prepares the Quadrennial Energy Review. If there is anything else that we can do in this regard, please feel free to contact us.

  14. QER- Comment of Mitsubishi Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Karen: On behalf of Brian Heery, president and CEO of Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, attached are comments regarding the Quadrennial Energy Review. As a US-based manufacturer of large transformers and other energy infrastructure technologies, we welcome the opportunity to meet with you on issues affecting the Nation’s transmission grid.

  15. Comment on "Static and spherically symmetric black holes in f(R) theories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Habib Mazharimousavi; M. Halilsoy

    2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the interesting "near-horizon test" reported in (PRD84, 084006(2011), arXiv:1107.5727) for any static, spherically symmetric (SSS) black hole solution admitted in f(R) gravity. Before adopting the necessary conditions for the test, however, revisions are needed as we point out in this Comment.

  16. Single-Pass Flow-Through Test Elucidation of Weathering Behavior and Evaluation of Contaminant Release Models for Hanford Tank Residual Radioactive Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Carroll, Kenneth C.; Buck, Edgar C.; Neiner, Doinita; Geiszler, Keith N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contaminant release models are required to evaluate and predict long-term environmental impacts of even residual amounts of high-level radioactive waste after cleanup and closure of radioactively contaminated sites such as the DOE’s Hanford Site. More realistic and representative models have been developed for release of uranium, technetium, and chromium from Hanford Site tanks C-202, C-203, and C-103 residual wastes using data collected with a single-pass flow-through test (SPFT) method. These revised models indicate that contaminant release concentrations from these residual wastes will be considerably lower than previous estimates based on batch experiments. For uranium, a thermodynamic solubility model provides an effective description of uranium release, which can account for differences in pore fluid chemistry contacting the waste that could occur through time and as a result of different closure scenarios. Under certain circumstances in the SPFT experiments various calcium rich precipitates (calcium phosphates and calcite) form on the surfaces of the waste particles, inhibiting dissolution of the underlying uranium phases in the waste. This behavior was not observed in previous batch experiments. For both technetium and chromium, empirical release models were developed. In the case of technetium, release from all three wastes was modeled using an equilibrium Kd model. For chromium release, a constant concentration model was applied for all three wastes.

  17. Flow Test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluating A PotentialJumpGermanFife Energy Park atFisiaFlorida: Energy Resources Jump

  18. Message Flow Modulator Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Robert Stephen

    operational environment at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center with scenarios developed by an independent in testing and demonstrating the flow modulator at the Patuxent River Naval Air Test Center. #12; MESSAGE

  19. Discussion of Comments from a Peer Review of A Technique for Human Event Anlysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bley, D.C.; Cooper, S.E.; Forester, J.A.; Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Ramey-Smith, A,; Wreathall J.

    1999-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In May of 1998, a technical basis and implementation guidelines document for A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA) was issued as a draft report for public comment (NUREG-1624). In conjunction with the release of draft NUREG- 1624, a peer review of the new human reliability analysis method its documentation and the results of an initial test of the method was held over a two-day period in June 1998 in Seattle, Washington. Four internationally known and respected experts in HK4 or probabilistic risk assessment were selected to serve as the peer reviewers. In addition, approximately 20 other individuals with an interest in HRA and ATHEANA also attended the peer and were invited to provide comments. The peer review team was asked to comment on any aspect of the method or the report in which improvements could be made and to discuss its strengths and weaknesses. They were asked to focus on two major aspects: Are the basic premises of ATHEANA on solid ground and is the conceptual basis adequate? Is the ATHEANA implementation process adequate given the description of the intended users in the documentation? The four peer reviewers asked questions and provided oral comments during the peer review meeting and provided written comments approximately two weeks after the completion of the meeting. This paper discusses their major comments.

  20. QER- Comment of Airlines for America

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find the comments of Airlines for America concerning the October 6 meeting, energy infrastructure. Please contact the undersigned if you have any questions.

  1. QER- Comment of Energy Innovation 5

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Please accept these papers as comments into the QER record for the public meeting on finance and market incentives. Thank you, Hallie

  2. QER- Comment of Energy Innovation 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Please accept these papers as comments into the QER record for the August 8th public meeting on infrastructure constraints. Thank you, Hallie

  3. Recommendation 192: Comments on Remediation Effectiveness Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ORSSAB Recommendations and Comments on the Draft 2010 Remediation Effectiveness Report for the U.S. Department of Energy Oak Ridge Reservation.

  4. QER- Comment of American Gas Association 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    From: Peterson, Christopher (EIA)Sent: Tuesday, October 14, 2014 12:11 PMTo: Pierpoint, LaraSubject: FW: AGA comments to QER: Natural Gas Emissions Section

  5. QER- Comment of Energy Innovation 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Please accept this paper as comment into the QER record for the August 21st public meeting on infrastructure siting. Thank you, Hallie

  6. QER- Comment of Energy Innovation 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Please accept this paper as comment into the QER record for the August 11th public meeting on state, local and tribal issues. Thank you, Hallie

  7. Microsoft Word - 2012 RCRA CRP comment table.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community Relations Plan Annual Summary of Comments for July 2011 through August 2012 Last saved on: 8242012 Annual Summary of...

  8. Public Meetings and Comment Deadlines | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Comment Deadlines Activity Meeting Date Comment Period Close Rulemaking Page Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Discharge Lamps;...

  9. US Department of Energy Public Participation Policy Comment Response Document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Niney-nine respondents provided comments to DOE on its ``Draft Public Involvement Policy`` (Dec. 1, 1993). Their comments and DOE`s responses are listed.

  10. Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges in Implementing Smart Grid Solutions Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges...

  11. Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on Policy...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation Toward Energy Efficient Municipalities: General Comments on...

  12. City Utilities of Springfield Missouri Comments on Smart Grid...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Utilities of Springfield Missouri Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges City Utilities of Springfield Missouri Comments on Smart Grid RFI:...

  13. Request for Comments on the Electric Grid Integration Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Comments on the Electric Grid Integration Technical Workshops Summaries: Federal Register Notice Volume 78, No. 35 - Feb. 21, 2013 Request for Comments on the Electric Grid...

  14. Comments of the Institute for Market Transformation on the Dept...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    submits these comments on the Department of Energy's notice of proposed rulemaking on Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings. Comments of...

  15. NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor Electric Deliverty Company LLC NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy- Comments of Oncor Electric Deliverty Company LLC Oncor...

  16. HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment HPBA Comments NOPR on Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment The Hearth, Patio...

  17. Comments Received on Proposed Rulemaking for regulation implementing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE published a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for regulation implementing section 216(h). Comments on the proposed rule were originally due on January 27, 2012. The comment...

  18. QER - Comment of Dairyland Power Cooperative - FWD by John Richards...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    - Comment of Dairyland Power Cooperative - FWD by John Richards QER - Comment of Dairyland Power Cooperative - FWD by John Richards From: Richards, John Sent: Tuesday, August 19,...

  19. NNSA Seeking Comments on Consolidated IT and Cyber Security Support...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NNSA Seeking Comments on Consolidated IT and Cyber Security Support Services Draft NNSA Seeking Comments on Consolidated IT and Cyber Security Support Services Draft July 17, 2013...

  20. Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Public Comment re NOI on Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage ENERGYSOLUTIONS' Comment in...

  1. Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Uranium Leasing Program Draft PEIS Public Comment Period Extended to May 31, 2013 Draft ULPEIS comment extension community notification041813 (3).pdf More Documents & Publications...

  2. COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST FOR INFORMATION REGARDING SMART GRID POLICY COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST...

  3. City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2011 City of Fort Collins Comment on Information Collection Extension, October 2011 The City of Fort Collins provided comments to the Department of Energy's notice of intent to...

  4. Pepco and PJM Interconnection Comments on District of Columbia...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pepco and PJM Interconnection Comments on District of Columbia Public Service Commission, Docket No. EO-05-01 Comments and Answer to Requests for Rehearing Pepco and PJM...

  5. Enhanced Geothermal Systems Documents for Public Comment - Now...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems Documents for Public Comment - Now Closed Enhanced Geothermal Systems Documents for Public Comment - Now Closed February 28, 2012 - 3:41pm Addthis ****...

  6. Sanders, J. E.; and Merguerian, Charles, 1995b, New York City region: Unique testing ground for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merguerian, Charles

    for flow models of Quaternary continental glaciers. The Mesozoic red-bed fills of the Newark (NY for inferring the flow directions of the Quaternary continental glaciers. The most-recent glacier (Woodfordian that this glacier did not reach much of Long Island and thus did not deposit the Harbor Hill Moraine. The next

  7. QER- Comment of Process Gas Consumer Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Attached are comments offered by the Process Gas Consumers Group in response to the August 25, 2014 Federal Register Notice soliciting comments on issues related to the Quadrennial Energy Review. Please let us know if you have any questions or would like any additional information.

  8. QER- Comment of American Gas Association 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find AGA's comments on methane emissions issues in the first phase of the DOE Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), consisting of a cover letter and attachments. Dr. Kathryn Clay will be submitting AGA's comments on other aspects of the QER. Please let me know if you have any questions.

  9. QER- Comment of American Hydrogen Northeast, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Sir or Madam, Attached please find the Hydrogen Association and the American Hydrogen Northeast,inc's Comments on the first round of QER review. I wish to thank Secretary Moniz and Senator Reed for attending the Providence hearing and providing this opportunity to submit these comments.

  10. Solderability test system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, F.; Hosking, F.M.; Jellison, J.L.; Short, B.; Giversen, T.; Reed, J.R.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time. 11 figs.

  11. Solderability test system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yost, Fred (Cedar Crest, NM); Hosking, Floyd M. (Albuquerque, NM); Jellison, James L. (Albuquerque, NM); Short, Bruce (Beverly, MA); Giversen, Terri (Beverly, MA); Reed, Jimmy R. (Austin, TX)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new test method to quantify capillary flow solderability on a printed wiring board surface finish. The test is based on solder flow from a pad onto narrow strips or lines. A test procedure and video image analysis technique were developed for conducting the test and evaluating the data. Feasibility tests revealed that the wetted distance was sensitive to the ratio of pad radius to line width (l/r), solder volume, and flux predry time.

  12. Interactive comment on “Comment on: “Possiblesource of ancient carbon in phytolith concentratesfrom harvested grasses” by G. M. Santoset al. (2012)” by L. A. Sullivan and J. F. Parr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos, G. M; Alexandre, A.; Southon, J. R; Treseder, K. K; Corbineau, R.; Reyerson, P. E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussions BGD 9, C6114–C6124, 2012 InteractiveComment Interactive comment on “Comment on: “Possible sourceRes. , 35, 222–233, 1991. Interactive Comment Levin, I. ,

  13. QER- Comment of Tate Sullivan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you. From: QERcomments [mailto:QERcomments@Hq.Doe.Gov] Sent: Thursday, May 29, 2014 4:14 PM To: Tate Sullivan, CLSA Subject: RE: QER Public Meeting: Petroleum Product Transmission & Distribution Tate, You can find the panelists' statements and other information, including a link to a video of meetings when available, at www.energy.gov/qer. We will post transcripts for all meetings, which will include the facilitated discussion and any public comments given during the open mic, on the same website in the weeks following each meeting. All comments we receive through this email will eventually become public, but not until later this fall. Regards, Karen Karen G. Wayland, Ph.D. Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585 From: Tate Sullivan, CLSA Sent: Wednesday, May 28, 2014 10:47 AM To: QERcomments Subject: QER Public Meeting: Petroleum Product Transmission & Distribution Are any of the presentations or comments during this public meeting going to be released in electronic form? Have they been released? Is there a replay available of the event? Thank you. Tate Sullivan, CFA CLSA Americas, LLC Vice President CLSA is committed to reducing consumption for a better environment and is ISO14001 certified. The content of this communication is subject to CLSA Legal and Regulatory Notices These can be viewed at https://www.clsa.com/disclaimer.html or sent to you upon request. CLSA is committed to reducing consumption for a better environment and is ISO14001 certified. The content of this communication is subject to CLSA Legal and Regulatory Notices These can be viewed at https://www.clsa.com/disclaimer.html or sent to you upon request.

  14. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Keller, A.E. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test`s ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  15. QER- Comment of Tate Sullivan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Are any of the presentations or comments during this public meeting going to be released in electronic form? Have they been released? Is there a replay available of the event? Thank you. Tate Sullivan, CFA CLSA Americas, LLC Vice President CLSA is committed to reducing consumption for a better environment and is ISO14001 certified. The content of this communication is subject to CLSA Legal and Regulatory Notices These can be viewed at https://www.clsa.com/disclaimer.html or sent to you upon request.

  16. Property:FirstWellFlowComments | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag Jump to: navigation, search Property NameFirstWellDepth Jump to: navigation,

  17. NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use and Privacy- Comments of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Use and Privacy- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use and Privacy- Comments of Baltimore Gas & Electric Company Comments from...

  18. Test quality

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartley, R.S. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)); Keller, A.E. (Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document discusses inservice testing of safety-related components at nuclear power plants which is performed under the American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code (the Code). Subsections IWP and IWV of Section XI of the Code state test method and frequency requirements for pumps and valves respectively. Tests vary greatly in quality and frequency. This paper explores the concept of test quality and its relationship with operational readiness and preventive maintenance. This paper also considers the frequencies of component testing. Test quality is related to a test's ability to detect degradation that can cause component failure. The quality of the test depends on several factors, including specific parameters measured, system or component conditions, and instrument accuracy. The quality of some currently required tests for check valves, motor-operated valves, and pumps is also discussed. Suggestions are made to improve test quality by measuring different parameters, testing valves under load, and testing positive displacement pumps at high pressure and centrifugal pumps at high flow rate conditions. These suggestions can help to improve the level of assurance of component operational readiness gained from testing.

  19. QER- Comment of Sander Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good morning. I wanted to follow up on our discussion regarding Section 4.4 of the briefing document used for the QER event on Energy Infrastructure Financing. Per my earlier comments, information in that section does not accurately reflect the business model of pipelines, and particularly for the "midstream" sector, or those gathering and processing activities and intrastate pipelines. Further, it does not accurately describe the "utility" designation of these lines or how or why these designations are used. It is also important to note that the reference to "take-or-pay" contracts is particularly concerning as those types of contracts are prohibited in many states as I understand it. I have attached an updated redline version of that section that addresses the issues. I would be more than happy to work with someone to correct the language if the suggested language does not work for any reason. Thank you for your consideration of the comments and proposed changes. Please let me know if you have any questions or if I can be of further assistance.

  20. QER- Comment of Brian West

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Thanks for the invitation to the QER workshop. Here are a couple of comments that I was probably unable to fully articulate in the main session, although I did try to make some of these points in the breakout session: When considering alternatives and policy that drives alternative fuel use, it is important to learn from Policy successes and failures. Policy drivers put in place in Thailand, Brazil, and Sweden have been successful in transitions to greater alternative fuel use. US policy for Flex Fuel Vehicles has been largely unsuccessful at encouraging alternative fuel use. The fuel economy credit for the OEMs to build FFVs was generous but encouraged only modest production; nonetheless there are over 15M FFVs on the road. However, they use very little ethanol fuel due to cost ($/mile), range, etc. Natural Gas has a very real value proposition (lower $/gge) so fleet owners have good financial incentive to make the switch, even if investments are required. One participant commented that infrastructure costs are small compared to costs of imported oil. I agree with this statement. One presenter mentioned (a city?) with a law that requires infrastructure to support future EV charging be installed in any new parking garage. Great idea. (Better to have and not need than need and not have, especially when cost differential is small on the front end and very large on the back end). In the US we install about 20,000-40,000 new fuel dispensers per year (according to Gilbarco/Wayne). It would be a horrible missed opportunity to not put policy in place that encourages/requires E25 or E85-compatible dispensers. With a successful policy driver, in the next five years the nation could have over 100,000 ethanol-compatible dispensers in place, ready for a new High Octane Fuel (that could very likely contain more than 10 or 15% ethanol). Thanks Brian H. West Fuels, Engines, and Emissions Research Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory http://www.ornl.gov/ http://feerc.ornl.gov/ http://www.fueleconomy.gov/ From: Tillemann, Levi Sent: Thursday, July 03, 2014 3:52 PM To: West, Brian H. Subject: AMR/QER Technical Workshop Dear Brian: On behalf of the Department of Energy's Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis (EPSA) I want to thank you for your participation at the June 20th AMR/QER Alternative Transportation Refueling Infrastructure technical workshop. Your contribution in the breakout sessions and general discussion sessions provided valuable insight that will help inform EPSA during the QER process going forward. During the course of the workshop, detailed notes were taken. These have been anonymized and will be made publically available to you and the general public in the coming weeks. Once they are posted, we will provide you with a link for accessing them online. We encourage you to submit additional comments regarding infrastructure for transmission, storage or distribution of alternative transportation fuels to qercomments@hq.doe.gov. For more information about the QER's stakeholder meeting locations, areas of analysis and public comments you can visit the QER website at: http://energy.gov/epsa/initiatives/quadrennial-energy-review-qer. Please feel free to contact me or Sallie Gilbert (sallie.gilbert@hq.doe.gov) if you have additional questions. I will be leaving the DOE August 1, thereafter you may contact Renee Picket (adonica.pickett@hq.doe.gov) or Carla Frisch (carla.frisch@hq.doe.gov) with questions or comments. Thank you again for making the workshop a great success. I look forward to working together with all of you on these issues in the future. Best regards, Levi Tillemann, Ph.D. Special Advisor, EPSA US Department of Energy

  1. Gas Test Loop Booster Fuel Hydraulic Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gas Test Loop Hydraulic Testing Staff

    2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gas Test Loop (GTL) project is for the design of an adaptation to the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to create a fast-flux test space where fuels and materials for advanced reactor concepts can undergo irradiation testing. Incident to that design, it was found necessary to make use of special booster fuel to enhance the neutron flux in the reactor lobe in which the Gas Test Loop will be installed. Because the booster fuel is of a different composition and configuration from standard ATR fuel, it is necessary to qualify the booster fuel for use in the ATR. Part of that qualification is the determination that required thermal hydraulic criteria will be met under routine operation and under selected accident scenarios. The Hydraulic Testing task in the GTL project facilitates that determination by measuring flow coefficients (pressure drops) over various regions of the booster fuel over a range of primary coolant flow rates. A high-fidelity model of the NW lobe of the ATR with associated flow baffle, in-pile-tube, and below-core flow channels was designed, constructed and located in the Idaho State University Thermal Fluids Laboratory. A circulation loop was designed and constructed by the university to provide reactor-relevant water flow rates to the test system. Models of the four booster fuel elements required for GTL operation were fabricated from aluminum (no uranium or means of heating) and placed in the flow channel. One of these was instrumented with Pitot tubes to measure flow velocities in the channels between the three booster fuel plates and between the innermost and outermost plates and the side walls of the flow annulus. Flow coefficients in the range of 4 to 6.5 were determined from the measurements made for the upper and middle parts of the booster fuel elements. The flow coefficient for the lower end of the booster fuel and the sub-core flow channel was lower at 2.3.

  2. Comments from the City of Alexandria in Support of the Comments...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to Commence Planned Transmission Outages More Documents & Publications Response from PEPCO to the Comments from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality on PEPCO's...

  3. QER- Comment of Cloud Peak Energy Inc

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Ms Pickett Please find attached comments from Cloud Peak Energy as input to the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review. If possible I would appreciate a confirmation that this email has been received Thank you.

  4. QER- Comment of Husch Blackwell LLP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good afternoon, Today, WIRES (www.wiresgroup.com) is submitting the attached communication to the United States Secretary of Energy pertaining to the Quadrennial Energy Review. Your comments are welcome and can be sent to me.

  5. The Year in Review: Comments from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    1 The Year in Review: Comments from the Executive Director The President's Diversity Initiative.udel.edu/udaily/2013/oct/historic-diversity-100212.html. Year in Review 1 Staffing and space 1 Disabilities Support 2

  6. QER- Comment of Skibo Systems LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Paul M. Klemencic, Skibo Systems LLC: Comments regarding the current state of all major energy markets, addressing customer costs and needs, infrastructure, market controls and optimization, and build out of green energy sources.

  7. QER- Comment of ND Ethanol Council

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern, Attached please find comments from the North Dakota Ethanol Council regarding infrastructure constraints in preparation for the OER Public Meeting, which will be held in Bismarck, N.D., on August 8. Sincerely, Deana Wies

  8. QER- Comment of National Propane Gas Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ladies and Gentlemen: Please find attached the QER comments of the National Propane Gas Association. Please feel to contact us if we can provide further information. Thank you for your attention to our submission.

  9. QER- Comment of ALLETE Clean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please accept the attached comments for docketing. These are submitted on behalf of ALLETE Clean Energy. If you have any questions or need anything further, please do not hesitate to contact me. Many thanks,

  10. PalgravePrecautionary Draft -Comments Solicited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niebur, Ernst

    PalgravePrecautionary Draft - Comments Solicited Precautionary Saving and Precautionary Wealth This is an entry for The New Palgrave Dictionary of Economics, 2nd Ed. Keywords: Precautionary saving, prudence, consumption function, buffer stock saving Archive http

  11. Energy Citations Database (ECD) - Alerts Comments

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Alerts Comments If you have a question about Energy Citations Database Alerts, we recommend you check frequently asked questions. If your question still has not been answered or if...

  12. COMMENTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March003MEAM,ofCO2COGRB-1

  13. COMMENTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March003MEAM,ofCO2COGRB-1-1

  14. COMMENTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March003MEAM,ofCO2COGRB-1-14

  15. COMMENTS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. Department ofJune 2,The BigSidingState6Report, March003MEAM,ofCO2COGRB-1-14

  16. COMMENTS

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments EnergyFebruary 29CNG Exports by Truck out of the U.S.TRANSPORTATION-1

  17. QER- Comment of Sempra Energy 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sempra Energy, on behalf of its subsidiaries, San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E), Southern California Gas Company, (SoCalGas) and Sempra U.S. Gas & Power1, respectfully submit the attached comments to the Department of Energy. The attached document provides Sempra Energy’s comments regarding the U.S. Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy review meeting on natural gas and electricity interdependence.

  18. QER- Comment of Quebec Government Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, I am pleased to forward the attached QER comments on behalf of Québec’s Delegate General in New York. These comments from the Government of Québec relate to Part II of the New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints Public Meeting on April 21st, 2014. Thank you for allowing the Government of Québec to participate in this important initiative. Please do not hesitate to reach out should you have further questions. Best regards, Tim

  19. QER- Comment of Sempra Energy 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sempra Energy, on behalf of its subsidiaries, San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E), Southern California Gas Company, (SoCalGas) and Sempra U.S. Gas & Power1, respectfully submit the attached comments to the Department of Energy. The attached document provides Sempra Energy’s comments regarding the U.S. Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy review meeting on natural gas transmission, storage and distribution.

  20. QER- Comment of Sempra Energy 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sempra Energy, on behalf of its subsidiaries, San Diego Gas and Electric Company (SDG&E), Southern California Gas Company, (SoCalGas) and Sempra U.S. Gas & Power, respectfully submit the attached comments to the Department of Energy. The attached document provides Sempra Energy’s comments regarding the U.S. Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy review meeting on electricity transportation, distribution and storage in the west.

  1. Comment/Rebuttal Comments on "Electrorheology Leads to Efficient Combustion" by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gülder, Ömer L.

    Comment/Rebuttal Comments on "Electrorheology Leads to Efficient Combustion" by Tao et al. O¨ mer L of combustion in general and internal combustion (IC) engine combustion technology in particular. Given posit that "because combustion starts at the interface between fuel and air and most harmful emissions

  2. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  3. Motion to intervene and comments of the energy services group...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    intervene and comments of the energy services group of Hydro-Quebec and H.Q. Energy Services (U.S.) Inc, on FE 99-1 Motion to intervene and comments of the energy services group of...

  4. Reply To "Comment on 'Quantum Convolutional Error-Correcting Codes' "

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. F. Chau

    2005-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In their comment, de Almedia and Palazzo \\cite{comment} discovered an error in my earlier paper concerning the construction of quantum convolutional codes (quant-ph/9712029). This error can be repaired by modifying the method of code construction.

  5. Public Comment re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Public Comment re Section 934 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 Public Comment by the Uranium...

  6. CEQ Extends Comment Period on Revised Draft Guidance on Consideration...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    comment period on its revised draft guidance on consideration of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and the effects of climate change in NEPA reviews. The comment period now ends on...

  7. Emailed Comments of Elizabeth Chimento RE: Pepco Scheduled Line...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emailed Comments of Elizabeth Chimento RE: Pepco Scheduled Line Repair Dec. 1-20, 2006 Emailed Comments of Elizabeth Chimento RE: Pepco Scheduled Line Repair Dec. 1-20, 2006 Docket...

  8. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John McCord

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) initiated the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project to assess and evaluate the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater beneath the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and vicinity. The framework for this evaluation is provided in Appendix VI, Revision No. 1 (December 7, 2000) of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO, 1996). Section 3.0 of Appendix VI ''Corrective Action Strategy'' of the FFACO describes the process that will be used to complete corrective actions specifically for the UGTA Project. The objective of the UGTA corrective action strategy is to define contaminant boundaries for each UGTA corrective action unit (CAU) where groundwater may have become contaminated from the underground nuclear weapons tests. The contaminant boundaries are determined based on modeling of groundwater flow and contaminant transport. A summary of the FFACO corrective action process and the UGTA corrective action strategy is provided in Section 1.5. The FFACO (1996) corrective action process for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU 97 was initiated with the Corrective Action Investigation Plan (CAIP) (DOE/NV, 2000a). The CAIP included a review of existing data on the CAU and proposed a set of data collection activities to collect additional characterization data. These recommendations were based on a value of information analysis (VOIA) (IT, 1999), which evaluated the value of different possible data collection activities, with respect to reduction in uncertainty of the contaminant boundary, through simplified transport modeling. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAIP identifies a three-step model development process to evaluate the impact of underground nuclear testing on groundwater to determine a contaminant boundary (DOE/NV, 2000a). The three steps are as follows: (1) Data compilation and analysis that provides the necessary modeling data that is completed in two parts: the first addressing the groundwater flow model, and the second the transport model. (2) Development of a groundwater flow model. (3) Development of a groundwater transport model. This report presents the results of the first part of the first step, documenting the data compilation, evaluation, and analysis for the groundwater flow model. The second part, documentation of transport model data will be the subject of a separate report. The purpose of this document is to present the compilation and evaluation of the available hydrologic data and information relevant to the development of the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU groundwater flow model, which is a fundamental tool in the prediction of the extent of contaminant migration. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are summarized with reference to the complete documentation. The specific task objectives for hydrologic data documentation are as follows: (1) Identify and compile available hydrologic data and supporting information required to develop and validate the groundwater flow model for the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU. (2) Assess the quality of the data and associated documentation, and assign qualifiers to denote levels of quality. (3) Analyze the data to derive expected values or spatial distributions and estimates of the associated uncertainty and variability.

  9. Comments on DOE's Verification Testing in Support of ENERGY STAR®...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Manufacturers (AHAM) Air Conditioning, Heating and Refrigeration Institute (AHRI) A. O. Smith Corporation Alliance for Water Efficiency (AWE) Bradford White Corporation (BWC) BSH...

  10. Comment on Li pellet conditioning in tokamak fusion test reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Li pellet conditioning in TFTR results in a reduction of the edge electron density which allows increased neutral beam penetration, central heating, and fueling. Consequently, the temperature profiles became more peaked with higher central T{sub i}, T{sub e}, toroidal rotation, and neutron emission rates.

  11. DOE Seeks Comment on Application of Clothes Washer Test Procedure |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractions and

  12. QER- Comment of Association of Oil Pipe Lines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find attached AOPL's comments to DOE's safety discussion in preparation for the New Orleans, LA public meeting. Thanks, John

  13. QER- Comment of Office of Franklin County Commissioner Paula Brooks

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please see the attached comments from Franklin County, Ohio Commissioner Paula Brooks on the Quadrennial Energy Review.

  14. QER- Comment of Debra Walworth

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To Whom It May Concern: I want to state upfront that my name is the only thing I want disclosed in my comments--please do not disclose my address or any other personal contact information to the extent to the law. I attended the QER in North Dakota, and want to thank the entire delegation for coming to North Dakota. I found it very interesting and informative. I would like to support the basic idea of a complete energy package that includes oil, coal, wind, solar and bio-fuels. I understand that coal and oil are under a lot of scrutiny for environmental affects. However, we (as a country) are not in a position to stop the use of any of our energy resources. At this point in time, to do so, in my opinion, would be harmful to our country's national security. I feel the dramatic mandates being placed on coal to make other energy resources competitive, is counter-intuitive to national security and future development of alternative energy resources. North Dakota has lead the nation in environmental strategies for clean air, clean water, and clean environment. We also produce a lot of energy from coal. I think the national energy policy should take common sense steps towards the national energy policy that includes all energy resources, instead of knee-jerk reactions from misunderstood and lop-sided actions. Thank you for the opportunity to provide input on this very important topic. Sincerely, Debra Walworth

  15. QER- Comment of Laurel Greenberg

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To the Energy Review Task Force, I am a resident of Boston and also have property in Cummington, Mass. I am commenting specifically on a proposed gas pipeline by Kinder Morgan through the state of Massachusetts, but also generically on energy policy in New England. I am against building another gas pipeline in Massachusetts. The environmental and ecological risk of running a high pressure gas pipeline through conservation land, pristine nature, important water reservoirs, and residents farms and properties is great, and not where we as stewards of the earth should be putting our efforts. We should heed the findings that climate change is upon us and to the recommendations that we must curtail global warming emissions (like methane) and promote and support renewable energy. We should pay attention to recent independent findings that hydraulic fracturing has serious environmental problems, contributes to global warming, is harming water supplies, causes earthquakes, and is not a safe, secure, renewable method of obtaining energy. In summary, as leaders in environmental policy, we in New England should not be encouraging the production of fracked gas by building a conduit for that gas through our states. Laurel Greenberg

  16. QER- Comment of Philip Saunders

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Sir/Madam: Please oppose the Northeast Expansion of the Tennessee Gas Pipeline. For reasons having to do with climate change, which I don't need to explain to you, it is not in our interest to be enabling further carbon combustion here or anywhere else in the world. Natural gas is not needed in Mass. as a "bridge" fuel. Mass. is making good progress toward lowering CO2 emissions, and with continued declines in the cost of photovoltaic installations, changes in net meter regulations, and expansion of offshore wind power, Mass. can produce enough renewable energy to replace the electric power lost from the closure of coal-fired plants. To the extent that gas through the proposed pipeline will be exported, I see no reason for Mass. to bear the burden of providing natural gas to China and others. The pipeline would inevitably go through wetlands, conservation land, land trust land, and agriculturally restricted land, which owners, donors, and taxpayers have gone to great lengths and expense over the generations to protect. All of this would be undone and wasted, merely so Kinder Morgan could increase its bottom line. We'd be paying the price and they would be reaping the profit. Federal approvals for the project should be withheld. Thank you for allowing me to comment. Very truly yours, Philip Saunders, Jr., Ph.D. ___________________________ PHILIP SAUNDERS ASSOCIATES Economic and Financial Analysis

  17. QER- Comment of James Bennett

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, The notice for the April 21 meeting was too short. The April 15 letter just found its way to me. I hope that there will be more such focused meetings in the not too distant future. If possible, please add me to your notification email list for such meetings. Comments: There is increasing conern over the routing and purpose of additional Natural Gas Pipelines in Massachusetts. There is skepticism that the pipelines will be used for export and that the any improvement in the Energy supply for New England will be shortlived due to a rapid depletion of reserves. In other words, why tear up the landscape with little benefit to the region. If the pipelines are contructed, can a restraint be placed on them to prevent export? Have the impacts of leaks and fires been properly considered? New England has heavily forrested areas and we have been having more frequent exteremly dry summers. At least one pipeline route has been suggested that would run through large wooded areas. A pipeline initiated fire would be devestating. Sincerely, Jim Bennett

  18. QER- Comment of William Smith III

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello DOE, Thanks for accepting my comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review by e-mail. There will be those who wish to promote nuclear energy as a source of electricity for future use in the USA. I speak against this form of energy. Because it creates long-lived radioactive wastes, nuclear power is incompatible with the biological world in which we live and from which we evolved. The lasting nature of these wastes creates a moral quandry for us in this generation, as we leave behind such biological poisons for our descents to manage, in ways which we do not yet know. A further problem with nucler energy is that any fission reaction creates plutonium, the stuff of nuclear weapons. If nuclear power reactors were to be spread around the world, inevitably the proliferation of nuclear weapons would follow. So-called '4th generation' or 'thorium' reactors suffer from a similar problem, for although they may generate less plutonium, their fuel cycle involves creation of large amounts of U-233 which carries a similar proliferation risk to plutonium-239. I advocate crafting an energy future for our nation bsed on the natural flows of renewable energy, coupled with a diversified structure which generates electricity at many smaller sources. Implicit in any modern energy system is the increased efficiency of energy usage which will continue to lower the bulk amounts of energy, particularly electricity, which our society uses to satisfy our industrial, military, commercial, and personal needs. Clearly as a nation we must participate in the worldwide effort to control the buildup of carbon dioxide gases and other pollutants which threaten the stability of the earth's climate. I would like to bring to your attention these papers from the Rocky Mountain Institute which touch on the above issues: http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2009-09_FourNuclearMyths and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/2012-01_FarewellToFossilFuels and http://www.rmi.org/Knowledge-Center/Library/E05-14_NuclearPowerEconomics.... If you have not yet done so, I strongly urge you to contact the Rocky Mountain Institute and contract with them for their advice in consulting on the Quadrennial Energy Review. Sincerely, William Wharton Smith III

  19. Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project Environmental Impact Statement Environmental Impact Report. Final: Comments and Responses to Comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the Comments and Responses to Comments volume of the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Environmental Impact Report prepared for the proposed Telephone Flat Geothermal Development Project (Final EIS/EIR). This volume of the Final EIS/EIR provides copies of the written comments received on the Draft EIS/EIR and the leady agency responses to those comments in conformance with the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA).

  20. QER- Comment of America's Wetland Foundation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for the opportunity to make oral remarks on behalf of the America¹s WETLAND Foundation in New Orleans on May 27, 2014 during the public comment period at the meeting held by the U.S. Department of Energy as the Secretariat for the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER). In follow up, attached is a summation of those comments, along with three reports released by the Foundation for your review that will provide information helpful to the committee. Please do not hesitate to contact me if there are questions or if more information is desired, Sidney Coffee

  1. QER- Comment of PSEG Services Corporation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find the comments and responses of the PSEG Companies (Public Service Electric and Gas Company, PSEG Power LLC and PSEG Long Island LLC) to the questions raised by the U.S. Department of Energy. Should you have any questions or problems regarding the attached document, please do not hesitate to contact me.

  2. QER- Comment of Portland General Electric

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks, Karen. As per our email exchange earlier this week, we're attaching prepared comments from PGE to support the statement Jim Piro offered at the QER public meeting in Portland this past summer. We appreciate your flexibility on the submission deadline! Please let me know if you need anything else from us.

  3. Critical in PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PLANNING AND CONSERVATION COUNCIL AND BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION "RANKINGS" FOR PROJECTS UNDER in annual planning budget and feasibility of approach to achieve efficiencies. BPA reduced by $250PROJECT NUMBER (BiOp Critical in Italics) PROJECT TITLE COMMENTS BPA NPCC 35019 Develop

  4. QER- Comment of Allen Young 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here is a comment from me on the issue of energy infrastructure in Massachusetts. I will address only one issue: the proposed Kinder Morgan pipelines from Albany to Dracut. I am absolutely opposed to the construction of this pipeline and here are my reasons

  5. QER- Comment of Western Environmental Law Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern, I provided the following comments at the public meeting in Santa Fe, NM on 8/11/14: My name is Thomas Singer, and I am a Senior Policy Advisor at the Western Environmental Law Center.

  6. QER- Comment of State Energy Advisory Board

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Melanie: As you are aware, QER is an area of focus for STEAB and we are working directly with EPSA on it. Attached, please find a copy of the State Energy Advisory Board's response to the Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis. Please feel free to contact me with any questions or comments.

  7. Comment on ``Discrete Boltzmann Equation for Microfluidics''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Li-Shi

    Comment on ``Discrete Boltzmann Equation for Microfluidics'' In a recent Letter [1], Li and Kwok use a lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) for microfluidics. Their main claim is that an LBE model for microfluidics can be constructed based on the ``Bhatnagar-Gross-Kooky [sic]'' model by including ``the

  8. Solar cells with a twist Comments ( 35)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, John A.

    Solar cells with a twist Article Comments ( 35) JULIE STEENHUYSEN REUTERS OCTOBER 7, 2008 AT 9:58 AM EDT CHICAGO -- U.S. researchers have found a way to make efficient silicon-based solar cells of buildings as opportunities for solar energy," Prof. Rogers said in a telephone interview. Solar cells, which

  9. QER- Comment of ISO New England, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find comments from ISO New England President & CEO Gordon van Welie on the US Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review. If you are unable to open or access the attached PDF for whatever reason, please contact me at the number below. Thank you,

  10. QER- Comment of American Gas Association 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Ms. Pickett: Attached please find AGA's comments on natural gas vehicle fueling infrastructure as part of our response to the first phase of the DOE Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), consisting of a cover letter and attachments. Respectfully submitted, Kathryn Clay

  11. QER- Comment of Don Ogden

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force and Energy Policy Systems Analysis Staff: We are unable to attend today's public meeting in Hartford, CT. With only four working days advanced notice of this event we find it difficult to believe that any real effort has been made on your part to reach out to the public for their input. Be that as it may, we want to take this opportunity to comment on the very subject of this meeting. The only true energy related "Infrastructure constraints" we are aware of here in New England are those experienced by corporate entities who seek to export our precious resources to other nations for profit. This, of course, is not at all in the public's interest. Certainly you recall all the efforts our goverment put into establishing "Energy Independence"? That phrase has, and continues to be the watchword heard throughout our nation. Why now, when so-called "Energy Independence" has yet to be established, would we choose to enable private corporations to export gas and oil to other countries at our expense? Further, why is it that corporations and their supporters in government are not actively seeking to repair the massive and dangerous leaks in our existing pipelines? How can corporations and government agencies who reportedly oversee energy corporations even consider building new pipelines when the existing ones are in so need of repair? With this in mind, the only "constraints" we are aware of are the lack of constraints on energy corporations run amok, forever seeking more profits at the expense of the public good. Please recall your mission: "The mission of the Energy Department is to ensure America's security and prosperity by addressing its energy, environmental and nuclear challenges through transformative science and technology solutions." Such security is only possible if we plan ahead for future generations in the midst of the Climate Crisis. Selling off our energy resources to other nations until they are depleted is not in keeping with that mission. Allowing existing energy infrastructure to leak methane and other elements into our compromised atmosphere is not in keeping with that mission. Let's have some of those "transformative solutions", let's put every effort into limiting gas & oil leaks and keeping our energy resources here at home. Don Ogden, producer/co-host The Enviro Show WXOJ-LP & WMCB

  12. QER- Comment of American Water

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear QER Team; Thank you for the opportunity to provide comments to the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force to discuss the water and energy nexus, advances in water innovative technologies, and the impact of climate change on water issues. On behalf of American Water, I wish to submit the following White Papers which we have prepared on these critical issues: Innovations in Energy Use Sustainability and Resiliency Planning for Water Utilities One Water Water/Energy Correlation The Value of Water Challenges in the Water Industry: Climate Change Challenges in the Water Industry: Meeting Demand in the West Innovation Solutions Within the Water Industry: Desalination Innovation Solutions Within the Water Industry: Going Green Innovation Solutions Within the Water Industry: Water Reuse Bridging the Water Innovation Gap. Founded in 1886, American Water is the largest publicly traded U.S. water and wastewater utility company. With headquarters in Voorhees, NJ, the company employs approximately 6,600 dedicated professionals who provide drinking water, wastewater and other related services to an estimated 14 million people in more than 40 states. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or if there is any way American Water can be helpful to your mission. Respectfully Yours, Martin (See attached file: White Papers.pdf) Martin D. Kerckhoff Vice President and Divisional General Counsel Central Division American Water CONFIDENTIAL & PRIVILEGED COMMUNICATION This email and any attachments hereto constitute a legally confidential communication from the Legal Department of American Water. The information contained herein is subject to attorney-client privilege and is for the sole use of the intended original addressee. If you are not the intended original addressee, you are hereby notified that any reading, disclosure, copying, distribution, use, or taking of any action in reliance on the contents contained herein is strictly prohibited. If you have received this message in error, please immediately notify us at 314.966.2241 and delete this message from your system. WARNING: Although American Water has taken reasonable precautions to ensure that no viruses are present in this email, it is the responsibility of the recipient to ensure that it is virus free. No responsibility is accepted by American Water for any loss or damage arising in any way from the receipt and/or use of this email.

  13. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  14. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, James Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large scale test rig is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance properties and flow characteristics of labyrinth seals. A novel test facility with multiple cavities that provides 2D, planar flow at a scale...

  15. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  16. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  17. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal Comments on "Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. RedSeal Comments...

  18. Animal Health Diagnostic Center Test and Fee Schedule Test Name Test Fee Discipline Test Days Lag** Samples Container Coolant Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    container; 2) slide mailer 1) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack. 2) Not required *May-3) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack. 4) Not required *May qualify for New York State container 1-3) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack For more information, see Appendix

  19. Animal Health Diagnostic Center Test and Fee Schedule Test Name Test Fee Discipline Test Days Lag** Samples Container Coolant Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    sterile container; 2) slide mailer 1) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack. 2) Slide mailer 1-3) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack. 4) Not required *May qualify; 3) sterile container 1-3) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack For more

  20. Animal Health Diagnostic Center Test and Fee Schedule Test Name Test Fee Discipline Test Days Lag** Samples Container Coolant Comments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    container; 2) slide mailer 1) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack. 2) Not required *May container 1-3) Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack For more information, see Appendix Refrigerate. Ship in insulated container with ice pack. For more information, see Canine Adrenal Function

  1. Multiphase cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Thomas

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the multiphase nature of the intracluster medium whose neglect can lead to overestimates of the baryon fraction of clusters by up to a factor of two. The multiphase form of the cooling flow equations are derived and reduced to a simple form for a wide class of self-similar density distributions. It is shown that steady-state cooling flows are \\emph{not} consistent with all possible emissivity profiles which can therefore be used as a test of the theory. In combination, they provide strong constraints on the mass distribution within the cooling radius.

  2. Comments of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    approximately 65 generation and transmission (-G&T) Cooperatives that supply wholesale power to their distribution Cooperative member-owners. Comments of the National...

  3. Comments of the Southern Environmental Law Center and the American...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Emergency Order and allow federal and state regulators the discretion to enforce binding air pollution control laws. Comments of the Southern Environmental Law Center and the...

  4. U.S. Department of Energy - Quadrennial Energy Review Comments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy - Quadrennial Energy Review Comments Provided by Canadian Hydrogen Fuel Cell Association- Submitted October 10, 2014 U.S. Department of Energy - Quadrennial...

  5. Comments of Tendril Networks, Inc. on DOE Request for Information...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Consumers and the Smart Grid: Data Access, Third Party Use and Privacy Comments of the Demand Response and Smart Grid Coalition on DOE's Implementing the National Broadband Plan...

  6. Tendril RFI Comments - 11.1.10 - DRAFT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    a software and hardware solution that enables residential home energy management and demand response. Therefore, our comments will primarily address issues that affect...

  7. QER- Comment of Electric Power Supply Association 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find the attached comments of the Electric Power Supply Association on the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review due October 10, 2014. Respectfully submitted,

  8. QER- Comment of Electric Power Supply Association 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find the attached comments of the Electric Power Supply Association on the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review due October 10, 2014. Respectfully submitted,

  9. QER- Comment of Electric Power Supply Association 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find the attached comments of the Electric Power Supply Association on the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review due October 10, 2014.

  10. QER- Comment of Electric Power Supply Association 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find the attached comments of the Electric Power Supply Association on the Department of Energy’s Quadrennial Energy Review due October 10, 2014. Respectfully submitted,

  11. Comments by the Energy Storage Association to the Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    by the Energy Storage Association to the Department of Energy Electricity Advisory Council - March 13, 2014 Comments by the Energy Storage Association to the Department of Energy...

  12. AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AARP, National Consumer Law Center, and Public Citizen Comments to:DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges AARP, National Consumer Law...

  13. Comments on Department of Energy's Emergency Order To Resume...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Compliance Plan Docket No. EO-05-01: Riverkeeper, and the Anacostia Riverkeeper at Earth Conservation Corps, submits the following comments on the Department of Energy's...

  14. Supplemental Comments of David K. Paylor, Director of the Commonwealth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    these comments concerning the operation of the Potomac River Generation Station Power Plant ("Potomac River Power Plant" or "Plant"), owned by Mirant Potomac River, LLC...

  15. Comments of New England Electric Transmission Corporation on...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    out of time and comments of New England Electric Transmission Corporation, New England Hydro-Transmission Electric Company, Inc. and New England Hydro-Transmission Corporation and...

  16. QER- Comment of Large Public Power Council 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find comments by the Large Public Power Council for the record regarding the April 11th QER meeting.

  17. Comments from The Center for Democracy and Technology and the...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    from The Center for Democracy and Technology and the Electric Frontier Foundation: Implementing the Fips in the Smart Grid Comments from The Center for Democracy and Technology and...

  18. BPA's proposed oversupply management protocol for comment, Feb...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    comments on a draft proposal to address seasonal electricity oversupply by paying wind energy producers to curtail their output if necessary. There is also an associated...

  19. Agency Information Collection Extension Notice of Public Comment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Management and Budget (OMB), Department of Energy Form OE-417, ''Emergency Electric Incident and Disturbance Report.'' Comments regarding this proposed information collection...

  20. Comments of NRDC on Department of Energy Interim Final Rule:...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    NRDC's comments on Interim Final Rule: Energy Conservation for New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and New Federal Low-Rise Residential...

  1. Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost...

  2. QER- Comment of National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 4

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    NRECA is submitting additional comments to supplement the one previously filed on October 3rd. Please let me know if you have any questions.

  3. Comments on Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Request For Information regarding Reducing Regulatory Reform issued February 3, 2011 (Federal Register Vol. 76, No. 23 Thursday, February 3, 2011 Notices). Comments on Request...

  4. Preliminary Comments on Compliance Plan and Request for Clarification...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Preliminary Comments on Compliance Plan and Request for Clarification or, in the Alternative, Rehearing of the District of Columbia Public Service Commission Docket No....

  5. QER- Comment of American Wind Energy Association 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    QER Task Force – Attached please find brief supplemental comments that AWEA would like to submit for your consideration as you continuing drafting the QER.

  6. Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and Oklahoma Plains and Eastern Clean Line Transmission Line: Comment from Block Plains and Eastern Clean Line: Arkansas and...

  7. BPA Response to Comments on Oversupply Management Protocol

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wind energy producers, regional utilities, interest groups and others submitted approximately 90 comments on Bonneville Power Administration's Feb. 7 proposed protocol for...

  8. BPA, Response to public comment on 2012 Oversupply Management...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Revised March 28, 2012) Wind energy producers, regional utilities, interest groups and others submitted approximately 90 comments on Bonneville Power Administration's Feb. 7...

  9. Reply to 'Comment on 'Noncommutative gauge theories and Lorentz symmetry''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Rabin; Chakraborty, Biswajit; Kumar, Kuldeep [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, JD Block, Sector 3, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a reply to the preceding 'Comment on 'Noncommutative gauge theories and Lorentz symmetry'', Phys. Rev. D 77, 048701 (2008) by Alfredo Iorio.

  10. QER- Comment of Large Public Power Council 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are the Comments of the Large Public Power Council on the QER. Please feel to contact me if you have any questions.

  11. Comments from The National Association of Regulatory Utility...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) appreciates the opportunity to provide comments to the Department of Energy (DOE) on this Request for...

  12. QER- Comment of New England State Committee on Electricity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are comments of the New England States Committee on Electricity (NESCOE) on the QER meeting held in New England on April 21, 2014.

  13. Comments from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages Comments from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality...

  14. Response from PEPCO to the Comments from the Virginia Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    in the event of an interruption in electric power service to that area. Response from PEPCO to the Comments from the Virginia Department of Environmental Quality on PEPCO's...

  15. PEPCO Comments on Special Environmental Analysis For Actions...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PEPCO Comments on Special Environmental Analysis For Actions Taken Under U.S. Department of Energy Emergency Orders Regarding Operation of the Potomac River Generating Station in...

  16. Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Extension of Comment Period on the Draft Integrated, Interagency Pre-Application (IIP) Process for Electric Transmission Projects Requiring Federal Authorizations Extension of...

  17. Comments from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    from Congressman James P. Moran, 8th District of Virginia Supporting the Comments from the City of Alexandria on PEPCO's Intention to Commence Planned Transmission Outages Comments...

  18. EIS-0283-S2: Notice of Extension of Public Review and Comment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Comment Period and Announcement of an Additional Public Hearing Draft Surplus Plutonium Disposition Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement DOE has extended the comment...

  19. QER- Comment of Jennifer Markens 9

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To the QER committee; Over the last six months, as an average citizen, I have learned a great deal about current energy policy. We have no real news any longer, so it takes much work to find out about things that affect our lives as citizens. This opportunity for comment, for example, is really not in any sense "an opportunity for public commentary" since the U.S. public is largely uninformed in any real sense.

  20. QER- Comment of Natural Gas Supply Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    TO: Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force In response to the Department of Energy’s August 25, 2014 Federal Register Notice seeking input on the Quadrennial Energy Review, attached are comments from the Natural Gas Supply Association. Thank you for this opportunity to share our views on the important issue of energy infrastructure. If we can be of further assistance, please let me know. Regards,

  1. QER- Comment of Liberty Goodwin

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As suggested by Sen. Jack Reed, below and attached are my comments on energy policy for now and the future: ***************************************************************************** AN OUTLINE FOR PRACTICAL & FRUITFUL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT WITH SPECIAL ATTENTION TO SENSIBLE PUBLIC INVESTMENT (Thoughts on intelligent action for energy that is abundant, affordable, associated with many jobs and economic health in New England and the nation) ** CLINGING TO OUTMODED & DESTRUCTIVE TECHNOLOGIES – WE DON'T NEED TO ARGUE ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE TO SEE THE WAY FORWARD 1. Fossil fuels and nuclear have clear and present dangers and damaging effects, on human and environmental health. This includes the uncontestable pollution involved in production and use, and the risks of greater disasters, along with concerns about toxic waste that can contaminate our water and more. 2. Renewable sources offer a vast number of possibilities for energy production for a variety of uses. To not explore them is wasteful. To stick to same-old, same-old is foolish, and will leave us at the rear of the pack re: future energy development. **SMALL IS BEAUTIFUL – LESS RISKY – MORE PRODUCTIVE – MORE LOCAL 1 Solyndra is the bad apple that makes the point. Because something costs millions, or even billions of dollars doesn't mean it is the way to achieve huge results. The only thing that is huge about propping up mega-corporations is the risk. 2 Making the money available in far smaller amounts to a variety of solar efforts is both less risky and more promising – gives more chance of positive results. And, to anyone who can do the math – millions of small installations is as productive as one giant. 3 Smaller projects tend to be more labor-intensive – and offer local employment in a bunch of different places, benefiting the economies of all. **BENEFICIAL INNOVATION IS NOT BORN IN A CORPORATE THINK TANK, BUT IN THE MINDS OF INDIVIDUAL GENIUSES. 1. History tells us that great inventions have been developed by unknowns working in garages, bike shops, etc. We need to look beyond the elite in corporate money tanks and prestigious academia to find the gems in our own backyards. 2. One such, Paul Klinkman, has at least 50 inventions on hand, is developing several, has one patent and a few more in process, most related to alternative energy production. 3. The point is that we would find many like him – if we would only look. 4. Also, we should be seeking not just new technologies, but new business models. Check out the example from our greenhouse flyer, below. **SAVVY INVESTORS DON'T PUT THE BULK OF THEIR FORTUNES IN JUST A COUPLE OF STOCKS. THEY SPREAD THE RISK BY DIVERSIFYING. LET US BE LIKEWISE SMART IN USE OF PUBLIC MONEY 1 "Renewable energy" is not just about electricity, or even that and hot water. It is not even just those and wind, and certainly more than "solar panels". 2 We need to explore and use the many different types of alternatives, just as we do in most other aspects of our society. 3 Taking the kind of money that was allocated to Solyndra (or even to 38 Studios here in Rhode Island, and instead investing it in even 10 small projects, is a much wiser choice than betting it on another big boondoggle. **WHAT TO DO? PUT OUR MONEY INTO SUPPORT FOR WIDESPREAD USE OF CURRENT "GREEN" ENERGY TECHNOLOGY, AND EVALUATION & DEVELOPMENT OF NEW, TRULY INNOVATIVE OPTIONS 1 Make renewable energy credits available for all solar, wind and other technologies that show promise for meeting our energy needs. 2 Consider setting up an Important Innovations Center like the one described on the other side. TWO EXAMPLES OF NEW & EXCITING RESEARCH & BUSINESS MODELS A. PROPOSED NEW KSD NON-PROFIT IMPORTANT INNOVATIONS CENTER PURPOSES **Provide a place where small inventors can get help in evaluating and developing their ideas. **Provide a place which will focus specifically on inventions that have the potential to benefit the world and its people. **Provide a place which will especially focus on solutions to energy needs – and to environmental pollution and other

  2. Testing Dependence Among Serially Correlated Multi-category Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pesaran, M Hashem; Timmermann, Allan

    Testing Dependence Among Serially Correlated Multi-category Variables M. Hashem Pesaran and Allan Timmermann July 2006 CWPE 0648 Testing Dependence Among Serially Correlated... Multi-category Variables? M. Hashem Pesaran Cambridge University Allan Timmermann University of California, San Diego July 3, 2006 ?We benefitted from the comments of Herman van Dijk and Adrian Pagan and from participants at the Econometric Institute...

  3. Fairness and dynamic pricing: comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, William W.

    2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In ''The Ethics of Dynamic Pricing,'' Ahmad Faruqui lays out a case for improved efficiency in using dynamic prices for retail electricity tariffs and addresses various issues about the distributional effects of alternative pricing mechanisms. The principal contrast is between flat or nearly constant energy prices and time-varying prices that reflect more closely the marginal costs of energy and capacity. The related issues of fairness criteria, contracts, risk allocation, cost allocation, means testing, real-time pricing, and ethical policies of electricity market design also must be considered. (author)

  4. The gradient flow running coupling scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zoltan Fodor; Kieran Holland; Julius Kuti; Daniel Nogradi; Chik Him Wong

    2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yang-Mills gradient flow in finite volume is used to define a running coupling scheme. As our main result the discrete beta-function, or step scaling function, is calculated for scale change s=3/2 at several lattice spacings for SU(3) gauge theory coupled to N_f = 4 fundamental massless fermions. The continuum extrapolation is performed and agreement is found with the continuum perturbative results for small renormalized coupling. The case of SU(2) gauge group is briefly commented on.

  5. Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

  6. QER- Comment of Elizabeth Clarke

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I am writing to state my opposition to the natural gas pipeline currently proposed to run through Massachusetts, from the New York border to Dracut. The proposed route goes through some of the most beautiful land in the country, land that has been "Conserved" by its owners in order to prevent its development and preserve its clean and pristine condition. It goes across residential properties in areas where a leak would be catastrophic to those living in the area. The company proposing the pipeline has declined to participate in requested public discussions with those who would be most affected. As currently proposed it would involve the taking by eminent domain, very much against the will of the property owners, for a piece of infrastructure that enables the destructive process of "Fracking" natural gas, and proposes to fund the construction, which would benefit a private, for profit corporation, with a tariff on energy bills. That same money could be used to promote and develop the use of energy that is less environmentally devastating to produce and less environmentally devastating to consume, and that does not present nearly the same environmental hazards. Pipelines leak. They occasionally explode. The installation of this pipeline alone would threaten an environment that its present stewards have worked for years to protect, and it would be done very much against the will of not only those stewards, but their neighbors, the local governments, almost all interested local parties. Our government does occasionally need to exercise eminent domain to provide necessary infrastructure, but this is not for a government project. It's to increase the profits of a corporation that does not have the public interest as its driving motivator. This is not a necessary project. Conservation alone could replace the natural gas proposed to flow through this pipeline. If such a pipeline is found to be necessary, then it should be routed with the consultation and input of local land conservation experts and local governments, and not forced upon a population that can propose better alternatives because it may be the most expedient conduit for a profit motivated corporation that so far has frightened and threatened ("If you don't let us survey your land, we'll just come back once we have eminent domain") the affected landowners. Sincerely yours, Elizabeth Clarke Law Office of Elizabeth Clarke Equine Business Institute

  7. Science fictions: Comment on Godfrey-Smith Arthur Fine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fine, Arthur

    Science+Business Media B.V. 2008 Abstract This is a comment on Peter Godfrey-Smith's, ``ModelsScience fictions: Comment on Godfrey-Smith Arthur Fine Published online: 2 December 2008 � Springer in a naturalized and deflationary framework. Keywords Hans Vaihinger Á Models Á Fictions Á Peter Godfrey-Smith Hans

  8. HUD Tribal Government to Government Consultation Policy Request for Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) request for comments is to enhance communication and coordination between HUD and federally recognized Indian Tribes, and to outline guiding principles and procedures under which all HUD employees are to operate with regard to federally recognized Indian or Alaska Native Tribes. Comments are due June 8, 2015.

  9. QER- Comment of PA Chamber of Business and Industry

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On behalf of Gene Barr, President & CEO of the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, please find attached our comments regarding Natural Gas Transmission, Storage & Distribution, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania July 21, 2014. Thanks in advance for the attention to our comments and for holding a hearing today in our state. All the best, Kevin

  10. QER- Comment of Lake Charles Harbor & Terminal District

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good Afternoon, Please find the Lake Charles Harbor and Terminal District’s comments on Infrastructure Constraints in re: the QER Investigation hearing scheduled for Bismarck, ND on August 8, 2014. Please include these comments in the public record of the hearing. Thank you.

  11. QER- Comment of Clean Line Energy Partners LLC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hello, Clean Line Energy Partners would like to submit the attached written comments to the QER task force, in conjunction with the verbal comments Jimmy Glotfelty provided today in Newark. Thank you for your consideration, and please let us know if you would like any additional information. Sincerely, Diana Rivera

  12. Discussion of comments from a peer review of a technique for human event analysis (ATHEANA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forester, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ramey-Smith, A. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States); Bley, D.C. [Buttonwood Consulting, Inc. (United States); Kolaczkowski, A.M.; Cooper, S.E. [Science Applications International Corp. (United States); Wreathall, J. [John Wreathall and Company (United States)

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May of 1998, a technical basis and implementation guidelines document for A Technique for Human Event Analysis (ATHEANA) was issued as a draft report for public comment (NUREG-1624). In conjunction with the release of the draft NUREG, a paper review of the method, its documentation, and the results of an initial test of the method was held over a two-day period in Seattle, Washington, in June of 1998. Four internationally-known and respected experts in human reliability analysis (HRA) were selected to serve as the peer reviewers and were paid for their services. In addition, approximately 20 other individuals with an interest in HRA and ATHEANA also attended the peer review meeting and were invited to provide comments. The peer review team was asked to comment on any aspect of the method or the report in which improvements could be made and to discuss its strengths and weaknesses. All of the reviewers thought the ATEANA method had made significant contributions to the field of PRA/HRA, in particular by addressing the most important open questions and issues in HRA, by attempting to develop an integrated approach, and by developing a framework capable of identifying types of unsafe actions that generally have not been considered using existing methods. The reviewers had many concerns about specific aspects of the methodology and made many recommendations for ways to improve and extend the method, and to make its application more cost effective and useful to PRA in general. Details of the reviewers` comments and the ATHEANA team`s responses to specific criticisms will be discussed.

  13. THE ROTATING TARGET FLOW TEST FACILITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    @idom.com) Fernando Sordo, ESS Bilbao Tom McManamy, ORNL/SNS #12;Status of the RTFT 4th HPTW of a RotaAng Target for ESS · In 2009 ESS Bilbao worked out a preliminary design for a rotaZng target for ESS. · Disc formed by un-clad tungsten bricks cooled

  14. QER- Comment of GenConn Energy on behalf of UIL Holdings Corporation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provided are comments of UIL Holdings Corporation on New England Regional Infrastructure Constraints.

  15. QER- Comment of Bay Area Biosolids to Energy Coalition (BAB2E)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please Accept the attached written comments as submitted to the: Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on Public Meeting "Water-Energy Nexus, June 19, 2014, Washington DC Please let me know that you received the comments and that they will be put on the record for this comment period Thank You Paul

  16. QER- Comment of John R. Schmidt

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "Quadrennial Energy Review: Comment on the Public Meeting "Enhancing Infrastructure Resiliency," held April 11, 2014, Washington, DC". Why would this meeting not be conducted live onLine? or, at least, recorded for later access. Thank you, sincerely, john r schmidt, master (lover) of Science understanding GOD president, NCAD Corporation www.NCAD.net owner, schmidtPro www.schmidtPro.com dedicated River-straddler Erlanger, KY 41018 Cincinnati, OH 45202-0931 computer engineering Network Communications Geospatial Integrative Service Business engineering schmidtPro professional green improv improving earth and health for better world earth Model Do http://emoDo.net

  17. Comments/Observations: R. Tayloe, Nuint'09

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would like submit the following comments response NAESB Business PracticePath

  18. PFR Public Comments (rates/pfr)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and4/26/11: eliza18 emergency3 , 2 015PERIPublic Comments

  19. Entry/Exit Port testing, test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkelman, R.H.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module I (WRAP-1) facility must have the ability to allow 55-gallon drums to enter and exit glovebox enclosures. An Entry/Exit Port (Appendix 1, Figure 1), designed by United Engineers and Constructors (UE&C), is one method chosen for drum transfer. The Entry/Exit Port is to be used for entry of 55-gallon drums into both process entry gloveboxes, exit of 55-gallon drum waste pucks from the low-level waste (LLW) glovebox, and loadout of waste from the restricted waste management glovebox. The Entry/Exit Port relies on capture velocity air flow and a neoprene seal to provide alpha confinement when the Port is in the open and closed positions, respectively. Since the glovebox is in a slight vacuum, air flow is directed into the glovebox through the space between the overpack drum and glovebox floor. The air flow is to direct any airborne contamination into the glovebox. A neoprene seal is used to seal the Port door to the glovebox floor, thus maintaining confinement in the closed position. Entry/Exit Port testing took place February 17, 1993, through April 14, 1993, in the 305 building of Westinghouse Hanford Company. Testing was performed in accordance with the Entry/Exit Port Testing Test Plan, document number WHC-SD-WO26-TP-005. A prototype Entry/Exit Port built at the Hanford Site was tested using fluorescent paint pigment and smoke candles as simulant contaminants. This test report is an interim test report. Further developmental testing is required to test modifications made to the Port as the original design of the Port did not provide complete confinement during all stages of operation.

  20. application test reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    flow reactors (OFRs). A micro-bioreactor (working (more) Reis, N. 2006-01-01 4 Web Application Testing with Customized Test Requirements Computer Technologies and...

  1. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of worn labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Brian Frank

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale flow visualization test facility is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance and flow characteristics of worn labyrinth seals. Wear in labyrinth seals is a consequence of contact between the rotating...

  2. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  3. QER - Comment of Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association QER - Comment of Canadian Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Association From: Carolyn Bailey cbailey@chfca.ca Sent: Friday, October 10, 2014 2:21...

  4. Comments of the Natural Resource Defense Council on Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    submit these comments1 on the Department of Energy"s notice of proposed rulemaking on Energy Efficiency and Sustainable Design Standards for New Federal Buildings, 75 Fed. Reg....

  5. QER- Comment of American Wind Energy Association 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached please find the comments of the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA) on the QER. Please don’t hesitate to contact me if you have any questions. Thank you. Tom

  6. Response to Comments Regarding EPAct 2005 Section 242: October 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document contains the response to comments that were received in regards to a revised draft of the EPAct 2005 Section 242 "Hydroelectric Incentive Program" Application Guidance that was released on October 20, 2014.

  7. Comments in response to FERC rulemaking on regional transmission organizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 13, 1999, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) on Regional Transmission Organizations (RTO). The purpose of the NOPR is to solicit comments on proposed FERC ...

  8. Microsoft Word - remote handled waste comment extension.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    extends public comment period on the Remote-handled Waste Disposition Project Environmental Assessment Jan. 26, 2009 Media contact: Brad Bugger, (208) 526-0833 In response to a...

  9. Comment on the narrow structure reported by Amaryan et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Anghinolfi; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; I. Bedlinskiy; M. Bellis; A. S. Biselli; C. Bookwalter; S. Boiarinov; P. Bosted; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; P. L. Cole; V. Crede; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; B. Dey; R. Dickson; D. Doughty; M. Dugger; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; A. El Alaoui; L. El Fassi; L. Elouadrhiri; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; M. Y. Gabrielyan; M. Garcon; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; E. Golovatch; M. Guidal; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; D. Heddle; K. Hicks; M. Holtrop; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; P. Khetarpal; A. Kim; W. Kim; V. Kubarovsky; S. V. Kuleshov; H. Y. Lu; L. J. D. MacGregor; N. Markov; M. E. McCracken; B. McKinnon; M. D. Mestayer; C. A. Meyer; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; K. Moriya; B. Morrison; A. Ni; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I Ostrovidov; K. Park; S. Park; S. Anefalos Pereira; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; G. Ricco; M. Ripani; B. G. Ritchie; P. Rossi; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; Y. G. Sharabian; E. S. Smith; D. I Sober; S. S. Stepanyan; P. Stoler; W. Tang; M. Ungaro; B. Vernarsky; M. F. Vineyard; D. P. Weygand; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; B. Zhao

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The CLAS Collaboration provides a comment on the physics interpretation of the results presented in a paper published by M. Amaryan et al. regarding the possible observation of a narrow structure in the mass spectrum of a photoproduction experiment.

  10. QER- Comment of National Rural Electric Cooperative Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find attached comments regarding the agenda item, “RAIL - HOW A CRITICAL COMPONENT OF OUR NATION'S ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE IS ADAPTING TO 21ST CENTURY ENERGY TRANSPORTATION CHALLENGES” submitted by Steve Sharp on behalf of Consumers United for Rail Equity.

  11. QER- Comment of National Rural Electric Cooperative Association 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please find attached additional comments from the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA). Thank you for the opportunity to participate. If you have questions or need additional information, please do not hesitate to contact me.

  12. QER- Comment of American Public Power Association 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Attached are APPA’s comments for the Second public QER meeting. I have tried to submit these before too, so please send me a confirmation e-mail. Thanks in advance for your consideration of my request.

  13. Comment on "Evidence for Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. E. Aalseth; F. T. Avignone III; A. Barabash; F. Boehm; R. L. Brodzinski; J. I. Collar; P. J. Doe; H. Ejiri; S. R. Elliott; E. Fiorini; R. J. Gaitskell; G. Gratta; R. Hazama; K. Kazkaz; G. S. King III; R. T. Kouzes; H. S. Miley; M. K. Moe; A. Morales; J. Morales; A. Piepke; R. G. H. Robertson; W. Tornow; P. Vogel; R. A. Warner; J. F. Wilkerson

    2002-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We comment on the recent claim for the experimental observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay. We discuss several limitations in the analysis provided in that paper and conclude that there is no basis for the presented claim.

  14. QER- Comment of Oceti Sakowin Sioux Wind Power Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Secretariat: Attached please find the Comments of the Oceti Sakowin Sioux Wind Power Project, for inclusion in the record of the QER. If any questions, please direct to the undersigned.

  15. QER- Comment of Alaska Department of Natural Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To Whom It May Concern: Attached please find the State of Alaska Department of Natural Resources’ official comments on the Quadrennial Energy Review being conducted by the Department of Energy pursuant to Presidential Memorandum of January 9, 2014.

  16. Motion to Intervene and Comments of Public Utility District No...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A motion to intervene and comments from Public Utility District No. 1 (Pend Oreille County, Washington) on PP 99-1 Notice of Intent to Amend Presidential Permit, where DOE proposes...

  17. QER- Comment of America's Natural Gas Alliance 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good morning - Please find attached ANGA’s comments on the New England public meeting during the Quadrennial Energy Review earlier this year. Please do not hesitate to reach out if you have any questions. Thank you Sarah

  18. Natural Gas Industry Comments on Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    undersigned members of the natural gas industry are pleased to submit for your consideration the following comments in response to the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of...

  19. QER- Comment of Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern: Please find attached comments from the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association on the Quadrennial Energy Review. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me.

  20. Comments of Cisco Systems to Office of Electricity Delivery and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security Act (EISA) of 2007 A POLICY FRAMEWORK FOR THE 21st CENTURY GRID: Enabling Our Secure Energy Future Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comments on Smart Grid RFI...

  1. Reply to Baur's and Bertulani's Comment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benesh, C J; Friar, J L

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shortcomings of a momentum-space treatment of strong absorption, as discussed in the previous Comment [nucl-th/9611025], are only of concern at low projectile energies, $\\gamma$< 1.5. At intermediate and high energies, for which the quantum-mechanical equivalent-photon spectrum is intended, the quantum-mechanical cross sections are reduced relative to the semi-classical results whether one treats strong effects via a momentum-space or an impact-parameter (spatial) cut-off. At these energies the origin of the discrepancy between the predictions of full quantuym-mechanical and the semi-classical calulations cannot be traced to differences in the treatment of strong-interaction effects. Rather, they arise from quantum effects neglected in the semi-classical calculations.

  2. Comment on 'Nonlocality, Counterfactuals and Quantum Mechanics'

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stapp, H.P.

    1999-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent proof [H. P. Stapp, Am. J. Phys. 65, 300 (1997)], formulated in the symbolic language of modal logic, claims to show that contemporary quantum theory, viewed as a set of rules that allow us to calculate statistical predictions among certain kinds of observations, cannot be imbedded in any rational framework that conforms to the principles that (1) the experimenters' choices of which experiments they will perform can be considered to be free choices, (2) outcomes of measurements are unique, and (3) the free choices just mentioned have no backward-in-time effects of any kind. This claim is similar to Bell's theorem, but much stronger, because no reality assumption alien to quantum philosophy is used. The paper being commented on [W. Unruh, Phys. Rev. A 59, 126 (1999)] argues that some such reality assumption has been ''smuggled'' in. That argument is examined here and shown, I believe, to be defective.

  3. (a finite-element computer code for the computation of visco-plastic creeping flows with applications to tectonics)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaumont, Christopher

    SOPALE (a finite-element computer code for the computation of visco-plastic creeping flows are bracketed like this ** 1. What is SOPALE? SOPALE is a computer code written in Fortran 77 which computes of the code history and contributors ** my comments, which may be eliminated or used at your discretion

  4. JOHNSON-MATTHEY DIFFUSER CHARACTERIZATION TESTING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foster, P; James Klein, J; Henry Sessions, H; Gregg Morgan, G

    2007-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A diffuser/permeator commercially fabricated by Johnson-Matthey was purchased for characterization testing at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). A test system was fabricated to not only feed and bleed flows and pressures, but also permeate pressure for flows up to 20 SLPM.

  5. CONTROL VALVE TESTING PROCEDURES AND EQUATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmeyer, William J.

    APPENDIX A CONTROL VALVE TESTING PROCEDURES AND EQUATIONS FOR LIQUID FLOWS #12;APPENDIX A CONTROL VALVE TESTING PROCEDURES AND EQUATIONS FOR LIQUID FLOWS 2 Cv Q P Sg net gpm net = / Cv = Q P / Sg 75 is used to relate the pressure loss of a valve to the discharge of the valve at a given valve opening

  6. Generalized one-dimensional, steady, compressible flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, F.M. (Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present development and testing of a generalized method for analytically examining 1D steady flow of perfect gases allows area change, heat transfer, friction, and mass injection. Generalized flow functions are developed, and sample tables are calculated and tested for both simple cases and combined changes. Normal shocks are noted to occur from the supersonic portion of these loci to the subsonic portion, in a manner analogous to simple-change behavior. 9 refs.

  7. Two-Phase Flow Pressure Drop of High Quality Steam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curtis, J. M.; Coffield, R. D.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-phase pressure drop across a straight test pipe was experimentally determined for high Reynolds (Re) number steam flow for a flow quality range of 0.995 to 1.0. The testing described has been performed in order to reduce uncertainties associated with the effects of two-phase flow on pressure drop. Two-phase flow develops in steam piping because a small fraction of the steam flow condenses due to heat loss to the surroundings. There has been very limited two-phase pressure drop data in open literature for the tested flow quality range. The two-phase pressure drop data obtained in this test has enabled development of a correlation between friction factor, Reynolds number, and flow quality.

  8. NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NWEC Comments: Environmental Costs and Benefits 1 Methodology for Determining Quantifiable Environmental Costs and Benefits Comments of the NW Energy Coalition October 31, 2014 Introduction: Applying (Council) to include a methodology for determining quantifiable environmental costs and benefits in its

  9. AFFECT Notice of Intent June 27, 2013 CO and Legal Comments July...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFFECT Notice of Intent June 27, 2013 CO and Legal Comments July 3, 2013 AFFECT Notice of Intent June 27, 2013 CO and Legal Comments July 3, 2013 Document details the Assisting...

  10. Electrolux to DOE General Counsel; Re:Request for Comment on...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Re:Request for Comment on Large Capacity Clothes Washers More Documents & Publications GE to DOE General Counsel; Re:Request for Comment on Large Capacity Clothes Washers LG to...

  11. U.S. Science Journalists' Views and Uses of Online Reader Comments: A Qualitative Study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaefer, Mary Elizabeth

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    publications also provide insight into how some journalists view comments. In an article on the Nieman Reports website, an NPR ombudsman recounts some of her experiences with comments, which have consisted largely of personal attacks, and addresses issues...

  12. Ice-condenser aerosol tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ligotke, M.W.; Eschbach, E.J.; Winegardner, W.K. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of an experimental investigation of aerosol particle transport and capture using a full-scale height and reduced-scale cross section test facility based on the design of the ice compartment of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) ice-condenser containment system. Results of 38 tests included thermal-hydraulic as well as aerosol particle data. Particle retention in the test section was greatly influenced by thermal-hydraulic and aerosol test parameters. Test-average decontamination factor (DF) ranged between 1.0 and 36 (retentions between {approximately}0 and 97.2%). The measured test-average particle retentions for tests without and with ice and steam ranged between DF = 1.0 and 2.2 and DF = 2.4 and 36, respectively. In order to apparent importance, parameters that caused particle retention in the test section in the presence of ice were steam mole fraction (SMF), noncondensible gas flow rate (residence time), particle solubility, and inlet particle size. Ice-basket section noncondensible flows greater than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in stable thermal stratification whereas flows less than 0.1 m{sup 3}/s resulted in thermal behavior termed meandering with frequent temperature crossovers between flow channels. 10 refs., 66 figs., 16 tabs.

  13. Summary and comments on the month's production and injection................. Using the production table...................................................................................

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Summary and comments on the month's production and injection................. Using the production table................................................................................... Monthly Oil and Gas Production........................................................................ Using

  14. QER- Comment of Ariel Elan 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you for your attention to my comment and those of other citizens. I am among many who experience climate disruption as an emergency, and I feel emergency measures to slow or stabilize it are not only justified, but are essential. Humanity's consumption and production of energy is what needs to change in order to stabilize our climate at any point. The sooner we accomplish this, the sooner we can reduce the suffering of billions of people, and the expenditure of billions and trillions of dollars, that are all due to climate-change impacts. It is not necessary to agree that the extraction, processing, and burning of fossil fuels has caused the atmospheric and temperature changes that have caused climate disruption. Suppose an asteroid larger than planet Earth was hurtling directly towards our planet right now. We did not "cause" the asteroid to move toward us; does that mean we should do nothing to redirect it or mitigate its impact? No one would recommend that. Climate disruption is the asteroid that could make the Earth uninhabitable for future generations of human beings. The one and only thing humanity can do that we KNOW would help to slow down its cascading and exponential increase is to reduce heat-trapping gas in our atmosphere. We can do that, no matter what we believe caused the problem. And we must.

  15. QER- Comment of Stephen Arthur 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thank you, I appreciate being informed about the updates to the QER. I have one last request, which is that if there are additional changes to the final Washington D.C. meeting, can I be informed for stakeholder purposes. On Tue, Oct 7, 2014 at 10:13 AM, QERcomments wrote: Stephen, We held the last stakeholder meeting for this installment of the QER in New York City yesterday. The wrap up meeting in Washington will be held at a later date and will be a slightly different format, and we do not have that scheduled yet. We were not able to fit in the Iowa meeting for this installment but do anticipate holding a meeting next year on rural energy issues for the second installment of the QER. Karen Wayland Karen G. Wayland, Ph.D. Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585 From: Stephen Arthur Sent: Friday, October 03, 2014 3:27 PM To: QERcomments Subject: QER Final Meetings Good afternoon, I was simply curious about the preliminary reports about the final meeting of the QER. I know the deadline for public comments is quickly approaching and was wondering if the last meeting in New York, Iowa, and final meeting in Washington D.C. were still going to occur? Thank you. Sincerely, Stephen Arthur

  16. Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the underground coal gasification field test at the Hoe Creek site No. 2, Wyoming, helium pulses were introduced to develop information to characterize the flow field, and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Quantitative analysis of the tracer response curves shows an increasing departure from a plug flow regime with time because of the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex non-uniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model. 17 refs.

  17. Low volume flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

  18. Phase I Hydrologic Data for the Groundwater Flow and Contaminant Transport Model of Corrective Action Unit 99: Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan Bryant

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents a summary and framework of the available hydrologic data and other information directly relevant to the development of the Rainier Mesa/Shoshone Mountain (RMSM) Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 99 groundwater flow models. Where appropriate, data and information documented elsewhere are briefly summarized with reference to the complete documentation.

  19. Bacteria in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

  20. Dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Graydon L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

  1. CFD analysis of laminar oscillating flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booten, C. W. Charles W.); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Smith, B. L. (Barton L.); Martin, R. A. (Richard A.)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a numerical simulations of oscillating flow in a constricted duct and compares the results with experimental and theoretical data. The numerical simulations were performed using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code CFX4.2. The numerical model simulates an experimental oscillating flow facility that was designed to test the properties and characteristics of oscillating flow in tapered ducts, also known as jet pumps. Jet pumps are useful devices in thermoacoustic machinery because they produce a secondary pressure that can counteract an unwanted effect called streaming, and significantly enhance engine efficiency. The simulations revealed that CFX could accurately model velocity, shear stress and pressure variations in laminar oscillating flow. The numerical results were compared to experimental data and theoretical predictions with varying success. The least accurate numerical results were obtained when laminar flow approached transition to turbulent flow.

  2. Flow characteristics in underground coal gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.L.; Himmelblau, D.M.; Edgar, T.F.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Hoe Creek No. 2 (Wyoming) underground-coal-gasification field test, researchers introduced helium pulses to characterize the flow field and to estimate the coefficients in dispersion models of the flow. Flow models such as the axial-dispersion and parallel tanks-in-series models allowed interpretation of the in situ combustion flow field from the residence time distribution of the tracer gas. A quantitative analysis of the Hoe Creek tracer response curves revealed an increasing departure from a plug-flow regime with time, which was due to the combined effects of the free and forced convection in addition to the complex nonuniformity of the flow field. The Peclet number was a function of temperature, pressure, gas recovery, and characteristic velocity, as well as the split of the gas between the parallel streams in the model.

  3. The gradient flow running coupling with twisted boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ramos

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gradient flow for Yang-Mills theories with twisted boundary conditions. The perturbative behavior of the energy density $\\langle E(t)\\rangle$ is used to define a running coupling at a scale given by the linear size of the finite volume box. We compute the non-perturbative running of the pure gauge $SU(2)$ coupling constant and conclude that the technique is well suited for further applications due to the relatively mild cutoff effects of the step scaling function and the high numerical precision that can be achieved in lattice simulations. We also comment on the inclusion of matter fields.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Propped Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using The Dynamic Conductivity Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero Lugo, Jose 1985-

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    deep into the formation, changing the flow pattern from radial to linear flow. The dynamic conductivity test was used for this research to evaluate the effect of closure stress, temperature, proppant concentration, and flow back rates on fracture...

  5. QER- Comment of Katy Eiseman 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Dear Commissioner Cash, Thank you for responding. By the way, congratulations on your new position at DEP. I am an Amherst High School graduate, and it's always nice to see western Mass. representation in Boston. I will make sure that the progressives I am in touch with across the state understand where you stand on the natural gas question. I am sorry if I misrepresented your point of view. Sincerely, Katy Eiseman On Mon, Apr 21, 2014 at 8:52 AM, Cash, David (DEP) wrote: Dear Katy, Thank you for your engagement in this issue – so crucial right now in terms of protecting our environment for the future and growing our economy. I would like to take this opportunity to correct what appears to be a misunderstanding in your email below about what I presented. I DO believe that through the committed work of the legislature, Governor Patrick and the Secretary of Energy and Environment, Rick Sullivan, we have charted a course that will achieve the 80% reduction of GHGs below 1990 levels by 2050 required by our Global Warming Solutions Act. Our transition to a more energy efficient economy and our unleashing of renewable energy has been a transformative game-changer and the envy of other states and even countries. However, during my presentation, I never said nor implied that we do not still need new fossil fuel infrastructure in the near term in order to balance the expected influx of intermittent wind and solar, keep energy prices reasonable, and maintain grid reliability. In fact, I made clear that near term investments in new infrastructure will better enable the more rapid and sustainable transition to renewable and energy efficiency that is required to address climate change and continue to grow clean energy jobs and protect ratepayers. Thanks. Sincerely, David =========================== David W. Cash, Ph.D. Commissioner Department of Environmental Protection Commonwealth of Massachusetts One Winter Street Boston, MA 02108 Phone: (617) 292-5856 email: david.cash@state.ma.us MassDEP on Twitter: https://twitter.com/massdep MassDEP on the Web: http://mass.gov/dep MassDEP's e-Newsletter and/or Regulations updates: http://mass.gov/dep/signup From: Katy Eiseman Sent: Sunday, April 20, 2014 11:09 AM To: QERcomments@hq.doe.gov Cc: Kulik, Stephen - Rep. (HOU); benjamin.downing@masenate.gov; internet, env (ENV); Cooper, Stephanie (ENV); Cash, David (DEP); Sullivan, Rick (EEA); Berwick, Ann (DPU); goffice@state.ma.us Subject: Quadrennial Energy Review - New England Infrastructure Constraints To members of the QER Task Force: Thank you for taking time to address energy concerns for our region. Here is my brief comment: We do not need more fossil fuel infrastructure. Natural gas has served its purpose as a bridge fuel here, and new gas infrastructure now will act as a raised drawbridge, holding back investments in renewables. Subsidies that would be going to the natural gas industry via the proposed tariff on our electric bills (http://www.nescoe.com/uploads/ISO_assistance_Trans___Gas_1_21_14_final.pdf) should be directed to sustainable, renewable sources and to the development of electrical storage capacity for those sources. Our new DEP Commissioner, David Cash, has put together a very compelling presentation on New England's ability to power itself solely with renewable sources. Please see http://netransition.org/net-zero-new-england/ It is unfortunate that we are learning about this important meeting during the holiest week of the year for many Americans. Most who care about this issue will not have time to comment thoughtfully. I trust that there will be ample opportunity for the public and our elected and appointed representatives to weigh these matters very carefully, as they impact the viability of life on this planet. Thank you, Katy Eiseman

  6. WRAP 2A advanced conceptual design report comments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamberd, D.L.

    1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the compilation of the 393 comments that were submitted during the review of the Advanced Conceptual Design Report for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility Module 2A. The report was prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors, Inc. of Englewood, Colorado for the United States Department of Energy. The review was performed by a variety of organizations identified in the report. The comments were addressed first by the Westinghouse cognizant engineers and then by the Raytheon cognizant engineers, and incorporated into the final issue of the Advanced Conceptual Design Report.

  7. Comments of Verizon and Verizon Wireless | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space Data Corporation Comments of SpaceWireless Comments

  8. Comments of the Utilities Telecom Council | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space Data Corporation Comments oftheLowerofComments of

  9. Comments on Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Coordination of Federal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space Data Corporation Comments oftheLowerofComments

  10. Comments Received on Proposed Rulemaking for regulation implementing

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China U.S. DepartmentEnergy This part governs theDepartmentComment ListingComments

  11. Comments of North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) to DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave the WhiteNational Broadband Plan byCommentsComments ofSmart Grid

  12. Romanian experience on packaging testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vieru, G. [IAEA Technical Expert, Head, Reliability and Testing Lab., Institute for Nuclear Research (Romania)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With more than twenty years ago, the Institute for Nuclear Research Pitesti (INR), through its Reliability and Testing Laboratory, was licensed by the Romanian Nuclear Regulatory Body- CNCAN and to carry out qualification tests [1] for packages intended to be used for the transport and storage of radioactive materials. Radioactive materials, generated by Romanian nuclear facilities [2] are packaged in accordance with national [3] and the IAEA's Regulations [1,6] for a safe transport to the disposal center. Subjecting these packages to the normal and simulating test conditions accomplish the evaluation and certification in order to prove the package technical performances. The paper describes the qualification tests for type A and B packages used for transport and storage of radioactive materials, during a period of 20 years of experience. Testing is used to substantiate assumption in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural response. The Romanian test facilities [1,3,6] are used to simulate the required qualification tests and have been developed at INR Pitesti, the main supplier of type A packages used for transport and storage of low radioactive wastes in Romania. The testing programme will continue to be a strong option to support future package development, to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on radioactive material packages or component sections, such as packages used for transport of radioactive sources to be used for industrial or medical purposes [2,8]. The paper describes and contain illustrations showing some of the various tests packages which have been performed during certain periods and how they relate to normal conditions and minor mishaps during transport. Quality assurance and quality controls measures taken in order to meet technical specification provided by the design there are also presented and commented. (authors)

  13. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  14. RMOTC - Testing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sale of Equipment and Materials DOE to Sell NPR-3 Testing Tomorrow's Technology Today RMOTC - Testing - From Lab to Industry, Moving Your Ideas Forward RMOTC provides a neutral,...

  15. A constitutive law for dense granular flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Jop; Yoël Forterre; Olivier Pouliquen

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

  16. Response to Comment on "The National Ignition Facility Laser Performance Status"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haynam, C A; Sacks, R A; Moses, E I; Manes, K; Haan, S; Spaeth, M L

    2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We appreciate Stephen Bodner's continuing interest in the performance of the NIF laser system. However, we find it necessary to disagree with the conclusions he reached in his comments [Appl. Opt. 47, XXX (2008)] on 'National Ignition Facility Laser Performance Status' [Appl. Opt. 46, 3276 (2007)]. In fact, repeated and ongoing tests of the NIF beamlines have demonstrated that NIF can be expected not only to meet or exceed its requirements as established in the mid-1990s in the document National Ignition Facility Functional Requirements and Primary Criteria [Revision 1.3, Report NIF-LLNL-93-058 (1994)], but also to have the flexibility that provides for successfully meeting an ever expanding range of mission goals, including those of ignition.

  17. Comment on "Cyclotron resonance study of the electron and hole velocity in graphene monolayers"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. C. Tiwari

    2007-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this comment it is pointed out that the electron velocity of the same order as observed in graphene had been measured in GaAs submicron devices long ago. Particle- antiparticle asymmetry related with electron and hole effective masses in graphene seems puzzling as hole in a condensed matter system cannot be treated as anti-electron. It is argued that there should be a universal electrodynamics for QHE and superconductivity. In this context attention is drawn to the new approach based on massless electron and the interpretation that magnetic field represents angular momentum of the photon fluid. Measurement of electron velocity in graphene and GaAs in parallel is suggested for testing the massless electrodynamics.

  18. Hazardous Waste Facility Permit Public Comments to Community...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 SECTION COMMENT POST? 2.0 & 4.0 1. Fix broken links on pages 3 and 4 for the HWA permit. Yes 2.0 2. Revise a sentence on page 4 to: "Limits on LANL waste facilities may be...

  19. Comment on the Article "Picturing Newton's Formula for "

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Glyn

    Comment on the Article "Picturing Newton's Formula for " by Hasan Ã?nal Mathematics in School, 2012 letter of 2013 January which invalidates the derivation of the generalised form of Newton's formula, yet: Mathematics in School, 2013 Jan., vol. 42, no. 1, page 39 I enjoyed reading the extension of Newton's formula

  20. Comments, Questions and Responses For PON-11-603

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on Buy-Down Incentives for Natural Gas and Propane Vehicles in Sacramento. At the workshop, CEC staffComments, Questions and Responses For PON-11-603 Buy Down Incentives for Natural Gas and Propane in the incentives provided for vehicles they manufacture. CEC staff also recognizes the independent business nature

  1. Joseph Addison's comments on physico-theology in The Spectator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Marylyn Hicks

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Restoration and the ~E' l t th ~Ct ' E gh' A ~L't* H~to f ~E land) writes that "if one wishes to know what the eigh- teenth-century Londoner thought about, one can do no bet- Hll t th l d fh ~S* t t . " Etl* tho ght h* that Addison's comments on physico...

  2. QER- Comment of Business Council for Sustainable Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good afternoon, I was simply curious about the preliminary reports about the final meeting of the QER. I know the deadline for public comments is quickly approaching and was wondering if the last meeting in New York, Iowa, and final meeting in Washington D.C. were still going to occur? Thank you. Sincerely, Stephen Arthur

  3. Phenetic and DNA taxonomy; a comment on Waugh

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeSalle, Rob

    Phenetic and DNA taxonomy; a comment on Waugh Sir, This correspondence attempts to clarify two that the taxonomic sciences are accomplished if the view of taxonomy that is expressed by Waugh(1) is the way better decisions about how this important scientific endeavor moves forward. Phenetic taxonomy

  4. QER- Comment of Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern: Please find attached comments from the Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Energy Association on the Quadrennial Energy Review public meeting held in Washington, DC on April 11. If you have any questions or concerns, please feel free to contact me.

  5. October 18, 2002 comment@bpa.gov Stephen J. Wright

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be allowed to purchase an equivalent amount of federal power at the §7(c) rate. As discussed in Alcoa to perform on its power purchase agreement with BPA. Thus, there would be no costs that BPA must recover from1 October 18, 2002 comment@bpa.gov Stephen J. Wright Administrator Bonneville Power Administration

  6. Comment on "Quantum bound states with zero binding energy"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergio A. Hojman; Dar{\\'?}o Núñez

    1995-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Comment is to show that the solutions to the zero energy Schr\\"odinger equations for monomial central potentials discussed in a recently published Letter, may also be obtained from the corresponding free particle solutions in a straight forwardly way, using an algorithm previously devised by us. New solutions to the zero energy Schr\\"odinger equation are also exhibited.

  7. Reply to "Comment on Protocol for Direct Counterfactual Quantum Communication"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatim Salih; Zheng-Hong Li; M. Al-Amri; M. Suhail Zubairy

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In reply to Vaidman's Comment [arXiv:1304.6689], we show that his claim that our Protocol for Direct Counterfactual Quantum Communication [PRL 110, 170502 (2013), arXiv:1206.2042] is counterfactual only for one type of information bit is wrong.

  8. June 11, 1998 Comments on ``A nonlinear correction to Landaufluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammett, Greg

    June 11, 1998 Comments on ``A nonlinear correction to Landau­fluid closures'', Part II G. W. Hammett, et.al. Princeton University Plasma Physics Laboratory P.O. Box 451, Princeton, NJ 08543 USA I 4­moment closures and Scott's nonlinear correction to a 3­moment closure to do the reverse of my

  9. QER- Comment of America's Natural Gas Alliance 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Good morning- Please find attached a transmittal letter from Marty Durbin as well as supplemental comments from America’s Natural Gas Alliance on the April 11, 2014 meeting of the Quadrennial Energy Review entitled ‘Enhancing Energy Infrastructure Resiliency and Addressing Vulnerabilities’. Please do not hesitate to contact us with any questions. Thank you very much.

  10. QER- Comment of American Public Power Association 6

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To whom it may concern: Please find attached comments jointly filed by the American Public Power Association, Large Public Power Council, and Transmission Access Policy Study Group, in relation to the issues discussed at the October 6, 2014, QER Public Stakeholder Meeting on Finance (Transmission, Storage and Distribution).

  11. Freshwater Flow Charts - 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiper, G V

    2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the following: (1) Explanation of Charts Showing Freshwater Flow in 1995; (2) Estimated U.S. Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (3) Estimated California Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (4) Estimated New Mexico Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); and (5) Web locations and credits.

  12. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  13. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  14. QER- Comment of Industrial Energy Consumer Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Thanks Tony. We'll be announcing dates for a number of other meetings in the next few days so hopefully you'll be able to participate in one of those, or have some of your member companies join. Regards, Karen Karen G. Wayland, Ph.D. Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585 Phone: +1 (202) 586-1347 Cell: +1 (240) 751-8483 From: Buxton, Anthony W. Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2014 11:44 AM To: Wayland, Karen Subject: Re: Save the Date: June 19 QER meeting on Water-Energy Nexus Thank you, Karen. Our participation in the Providence hearing was a very positive and useful experience. IECG will be unable to attend the San Francisco hearing for obvious reasons, though it is always a temptation. IECG appreciates the effort going into and the significance of the Review and will continue to observe and comment as appropriate. We have become increasingly concerned recently about whether the Federal Power Act and related statutes provide adequate authority for the federal government and related energy institutions ( NERC) to take the actions necessary to ensure the supply of energy to America on a reliable and low cost basis. The decision of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals invalidating FERC's Order 750 and the consequent challenges to Order 1000 on the same basis exemplify this difficulty. The states are generally without adequate powers and legal authority as well, save for several large states. The RTOs are an ongoing answer from FERC, but they also are limited by the Federal Power Act. We urge attention to this important issue. Thank you again for your New England hearings and for your excellent work. Tony Buxton Counsel to Industrial Energy Consumer Group. From: Wayland, Karen [mailto:Karen.Wayland@Hq.Doe.Gov] Sent: Thursday, June 12, 2014 11:22 AM Eastern Standard Time To: Wayland, Karen Subject: Save the Date: June 19 QER meeting on Water-Energy Nexus Thank you for your interest in the Quadrennial Energy Review (QER), and apologies for any duplicate emails. The next stakeholders meeting for the QER will focus on the Water-Energy Nexus. The meeting will be held at the San Francisco City Hall on June 19 at 9 am. Doors open at 8 am. We will be posting an agenda and background memo on the QER website over the next week at http://www.energy.gov/epsa/events/qer-public-meeting-water-energy-nexus, so check back regularly. We encourage you to attend and participate, and to share the meeting information with your lists. Please note that we are extending the comment period for stakeholders during the open mic session from 3 minutes (as described in the Federal Register notice) to 5 minutes to give stakeholders adequate time to make substantive statements. We look forward to hearing from you! Information on past meetings, including panelists' statements and summaries of discussions, as well the list of upcoming meetings, can be found at www.energy.gov/qer. Regards, Karen Wayland Karen G. Wayland, Ph.D. Deputy Director for State, Local and Tribal Cooperation Energy Policy and Systems Analysis U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave. SW Washington, DC 20585 In accordance with Internal Revenue Service Circular 230, we hereby advise you that if this E-mail or any attachment hereto contains any tax advice, such tax advice was not intended or written to be used, and it cannot be used, by any taxpayer for the purpose of avoiding penalties that may be imposed on the taxpayer by the Internal Revenue Service. This E-Mail may contain information that is privileged, confidential and / or exempt from discovery or disclosure under applicable law. Unintended transmission shall not constitute waiver of the attorney-client or any other privilege. If you are not the intended recipient of this communication, and have received it in error, please do not distribute it and notify me immediately by E-mail at abuxton@preti.com or via telephone at 207.791.3000 and delete the original message. Unless expressly stated in this e-mail, noth

  15. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

  16. Randomized controlled trials and the flow of information: comment on Cartwright

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Philosophy, Group in Logic and the Methodology of Science, U.C, 314 Moses Hall #2390, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA of these familiar points are simplifications that can be misleading. Some non-RCT type studies (e.g., soft system that portrays some methods as always better than others, is definitely not faithful to what

  17. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Analysis and testing the performance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Analysis and testing the performance of a centrifugal two phase flow separator Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  18. Low differential pressure and multiphase flow measurements by means of differential pressure devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justo, Hernandez Ruiz,

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    performance in the gas mass flow rate estimation was exhibited by the slotted and standard plates for the air-water flow, while poor results were obtained for the air-oil and air-water oil flows. The performance of all the flow meter tested in the analysis...

  19. Test Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

  20. Comment on Ashtekar: Generalization of Wigner's Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Roberts

    2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ashtekar (2013) has illustrated that two of the available roads to testing for time asymmetry can be generalized beyond the structure of quantum theory, to much more general formulations of mechanics. The purpose of this note is to show that a third road to T-violation, which I have called "Wigner's Principle," can be generalized in this way as well.

  1. Buoyancy-driven flow excursions in fuel assemblies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurinat, J.E.; Paul, P.K.; Menna, J.D.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A power limit criterion was developed for a postulated Loss of Pumping Accident (LOPA) in one of the recently shut down heavy water production reactors at the Savannah River Site. These reactors were cooled by recirculating moderator downward through channels in cylindrical fuel tubes. Powers were limited to prevent a flow excursion from occurring in one or more of these parallel channels. During full-power operation, limits prevented a boiling flow excursion from taking place. At low flow rates, during the addition of emergency cooling water, buoyant forces reverse the flow in one of the coolant channels before boiling occurs. As power increases beyond the point of flow reversal, the maximum wall temperature approaches the fluid saturation temperature, and a thermal excursion occurs. The power limit criterion for low flow rates was the onset of flow reversal. To determine conditions for flow reversal, tests were performed in a mock-up of a fuel assembly that contained two electrically heated concentric tubes surrounded by three flow channels. These tests were modeled using a finite difference thermal-hydraulic code. According to code calculations, flow reversed in the outer flow channel before the maximum wall temperature reached the local fluid saturation temperature. Thermal excursions occurred when the maximum wall temperature approximately equaled the saturation temperature. For a postulated LOPA, the flow reversal criterion for emergency cooling water addition was more limiting than the boiling excursion criterion for full power operation. This criterion limited powers to 37% of historical levels.

  2. Measurement of steam quality in two-phase critical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, John William

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow orifice meter 4 Vapor-phase orifice meter 5 Steam quality adjustment valves 6 Critical flow test section 12 13 15 17 7 Two-phase mixture vent to atmosphere passage through test section 8 Fluke data logger 9 Condenser apparatus 18 21...-water 15 Steam quality as a function of vapor-phase Reynolds number for critical flow of steam-water . . . . . . . . , . . . . 48 16 Steam quality as a function of pressure measured upstream from critical flow orifice 17 Steam quality as a function...

  3. Diesel Engine Idling Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larry Zirker; James Francfort; Jordon Fielding

    2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technology Program Office goal to minimize diesel engine idling and reduce the consumption of millions of gallons of diesel fuel consumed during heavy vehicle idling periods, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) conducted tests to characterize diesel engine wear rates caused by extended periods of idling. INL idled two fleet buses equipped with Detroit Diesel Series 50 engines, each for 1,000 hours. Engine wear metals were characterized from weekly oil analysis samples and destructive filter analyses. Full-flow and the bypass filter cartridges were removed at four stages of the testing and sent to an oil analysis laboratory for destructive analysis to ascertain the metals captured in the filters and to establish wear rate trends. Weekly samples were sent to two independent oil analysis laboratories. Concurrent with the filter analysis, a comprehensive array of other laboratory tests ascertained the condition of the oil, wear particle types, and ferrous particles. Extensive ferrogram testing physically showed the concentration of iron particles and associated debris in the oil. The tests results did not show the dramatic results anticipated but did show wear trends. New West Technologies, LLC, a DOE support company, supplied technical support and data analysis throughout the idle test.

  4. On the Proper Use of Statistical Analyses; a Comment on "Evaluation of Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey" by Douglas et al

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wieman, Carl E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper "Evaluation of Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey" [1] proposes a new, much shorter, version of the CLASS based on standard factor analysis. In this comment we explain why we believe the analysis that is used is inappropriate, and the proposed modified CLASS will be measuring something quite different, and less useful, than the original. The CLASS was based on extensive interviews with students and is intended to be a formative measurement of instruction that is probing a much more complex construct and with different goals than what is handled with classic psychometrics. We are writing this comment to reiterate the value of combining techniques of cognitive science with statistical analyses as described in detail in Adams & Wieman, 2011 [2] when developing a test of expert-like thinking for use in formative assessment. This type of approach is also called for by the National Research Council in a recent report [3].

  5. QER- Comment of Iviti Lighting Limited

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Sir/Madam, I am not a stakeholder but I think I could help with information that may add to the discussion for the Quadrennial Energy Review. It may appear just like any sales pitch but have a read through, please. Our Company, Iviti Lighting has developed Real Time Demand Grid Monitoring technology which we call 'Automated Demand Response' (ADR). The invention, design, testing and manufacturing is all U.K. based.

  6. Comment on "The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Bradley; H. A. Ishii

    2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This Comment is in response to an Erratum to the paper entitled "The shape and composition of interstellar silicate grains" (Min et al., A&A, 462, 667-676 (2007). The Erratum corrects erroneously cited data but upholds the paper's original conclusions that GEMS are not remnant interstellar grains and that most GEMS formed in the early solar system. In our Comment, we show that the correct data in fact strengthen the relationship between GEMS and interstellar silicates, contrary to the conclusions of Min et al. in their Erratum. We also explore the validity of the isotopic and bulk chemical bases for comparison and present additional indicators of past ISM radiation processing of silicates.

  7. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mauseth, Jason A. (Pocatello, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  8. -News Home Help Japan regrets French minister's comments on nuclear project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with EU, French, Russian and Chinese funding. India, Brazil and Switzerland are also interested! Inc. All rights reserved. - - - Questions or Comments Privacy Policy Terms of Service Copyright Policy

  9. JCPES Smart_Grid_Comments_July 12.2010_DoE_FINAL

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the National Broadband Plan by ) Docket No. Empowering Consumers and the Smart Grid: ) Data Access, Third Party Use, and Privacy ) COMMENTS OF THE JOINT CENTER FOR POLITICAL AND...

  10. NBP RFI: Data Access, Third Party Use and Privacy- Comments of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    comments in response to the Department of Energy (DOE) request for information on data access, third party use, and privacy. In summary, UTC submits that the innovative...

  11. Network Working Group S. Bryant, Ed. Request for Comments: 3985 Cisco Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Lloyd

    Network Working Group S. Bryant, Ed. Request for Comments: 3985 Cisco Systems Category . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 5. PW Encapsulation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Bryant & Pate Standards Track

  12. Comment on Thompson's "Complexity, Diminishing Marginal Returns and Serial Mesopotamian Fragmentation."

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    Comment on Thompson's "Complexity, Diminishing Marginal Returns and Serial Mesopotamian and correlations of Thompson's Figure 5 and redraws the figure to highlight the feedback loop versus the large

  13. Comment on "Measurement of 2- and 3-Nucleon Short-Range Correlation Probabilities in Nuclei"

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Higinbotham, Douglas W. [Jefferson Lab, Newport News; Hen, Or [Tel Aviv University

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comment on 'Measurement of 2- and 3-nucleon short range correlation probabilities in nuclei' shows how the reported three-nucleon plateau was likely due to resolution effects.

  14. EIS-0380: Notice to Extend Comment Period on the Draft Site-Wide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Impact Statement Continued Operation of Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico In response to requests for additional time to review and comment on the...

  15. Public Comments on DOE's NOI re Section 934 of the Energy Independence...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Notice of Inquiry (N0l) on the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage (CSC) Contingent Cost Allocation. 75 Fed. Reg. 43945 (July 27, 2010). Public Comments...

  16. DOE Extends Comment Period on Notice of Inquiry Under the Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Act of 2007, which implements the Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage. The public comment period will be extended to October 27, 2010. The signed extension...

  17. Comment on "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scully, Marlan O

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a comment on PRL paper by A.P. Kirk "Analysis of quantum coherent semiconductor quantum dot p-i-n junction photovoltaic cells"

  18. Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 4, Comments and Responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Final Environmental Impact Statement (Final EIS) contains public comments addressing the Initial Northwest Power Act Power Sales Contracts Draft EIS, August 1990 and Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) responses. The Introduction provides information about the process BPA follows in addressing these comments. Part I contains a listing of the Alternative Actions evaluated in the Final EIS; Part II is organized by Alternatives and includes summaries of the comments and BPA responses; Part III provides copies of the original comments letters, and, for ease of identification, are coded in the margins according to the alternative(s) addressed.

  19. Response to 'Comment on 'Species separation in inertial confinement fusion fuels'' [Phys. Plasmas 20, 044701 (2013)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellei, C.; Amendt, P. A.; Wilks, S. C. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Casey, D. T.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Welch, D. R. [Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87108 (United States)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The claims made in the preceding Comment are categorically refuted. Further evidence to support the conclusions of our original paper is herein provided.

  20. Reply to Comment on "Modified Coulomb Law in a Strongly Magnetized Vacuum"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. E. Shabad; V. V. Usov

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a reply to the Comment by S.-Y. Wang concerning our paper "Modified Coulomb Law in a Strongly Magnetized Vacuum"

  1. Appendix: ISAB and ISRP Comments on Comparative Survival Study Proposals and Experimental Designs 1997-2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1997-2006 Contents ISRP and ISAB Comments on CSS Proposals) ....................................................................................................................................... 11 ISRP 2005-14: Retrospective Report 1997-2005 (August 31, 2005

  2. Comments of Santiago Grijalva: High-Level Response to DOE RFI...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to DOE RFI on Smart Grid Policy More Documents & Publications Initial Comments of Honeywell, Inc. on Policy and Logistical Challenges in Implementing Smart Grid Solutions...

  3. Comments of the City of Alexandria Virginia to the U.S. Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Virginia ("Alexandria") hereby submits these Comments to the Special Environmental Analysis ("SEA") for Actions Taken under U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE") Emergency...

  4. Columbia River System Operation Review : Final Environmental Impact Statement, Appendix T (Second Continued Volume): Comments & Responses.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Columbia River System Operation Review (U.S.)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is Appendix T (second continued volume) giving public comments and responses to the final environmental impact statement for the Columbia River System.

  5. Comments of DRSG to DOE Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to smart grid Implementation: eMeter Response to Department of Energy RFI Association of Home Appliance Manufacturers Comments on Smart Grid RFI ASHRAE draft regarding Smart Grid...

  6. Some comments on high precision study of neutrino oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilenky, S M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss some problems connected with the high precision study of neutrino oscillations. In the general case of $n$-neutrino mixing I derive a convenient expression for transition probability in which only independent terms (and mass-squared differences) enter. For three-neutrino mixing I discuss a problem of a definition of a large (atmospheric) neutrino mass-squared difference. I comment also possibilities to reveal the character of neutrino mass spectrum in future reactor neutrino experiments.

  7. SMART GRID Request for Information And Public Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of its ongoing effort regarding the formation of smart grid policy, the Department of Energy issued a Request for Information in September of 2010 on the topic of “Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation.” The purpose was to solicit comments from interested stakeholders on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, and recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges.

  8. Review of public comments on proposed seismic design criteria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Philippacopoulos, A.J.; Shaukat, S.K.; Chokshi, N.C.; Bagchi, G.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the first quarter of 1988, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) prepared a proposed Revision 2 to the NUREG-0800 Standard Review Plan (SRP) Sections 2.5.2 (Vibratory Ground Motion), 3.7.1 (Seismic Design Parameters), 3.7.2 (Seismic Systems Analysis) and 3.7.3 (Seismic Subsystem Analysis). The proposed Revision 2 to the SRP was a result of many years' work carried out by the NRC and the nuclear industry on the Unresolved Safety Issue (USI) A-40: ''Seismic Design Criteria.'' The background material related to NRC's efforts for resolving the A-40 issue is described in NUREG-1233. In June 1988, the proposed Revision 2 of the SRP was issued by NRC for public review and comments. Comments were received from Sargent and Lundy Engineers, Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Stevenson and Associates, Duke Power Company, General Electric Company and Electric Power Research Institute. In September 1988, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and its consultants (C.J. Costantino, R.P. Kennedy, J. Stevenson, M. Shinozuka and A.S. Veletsos) were requested to carry out a review of the comments received from the above six organizations. The objective of this review was to assist the NRC staff with the evaluation and resolution of the public comments. This review was initiated during October 1988 and it was completed on January 1989. As a result of this review, a set of modifications to the above mentioned sections of the SRP were recommended by BNL and its consultants. This paper summarizes the recommended modifications. 4 refs.

  9. QER- Comment of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P.

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To: Members of the Quadrennial Energy Review Task Force Secretariat and Energy Policy and Systems Analysis Staff, U.S. Department of Energy Enclosed please find comments submitted on behalf of Plains All American Pipeline, L.P. for the record of the QER’s August 21, 2014 Infrastructure Siting and Permitting Meeting in Cheyenne, WY. Feel free to contact me if you need anything further regarding this communication.

  10. Comment on "Accelerating cosmological expansion from shear and bulk viscosity"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a recent Letter [Phys. Rev. Lett. 114 091301 (2105)] the cause of the acceleration of the present Universe has been identified with the shear viscosity of an imperfect relativistic fluid even in the absence of any bulk viscous contribution. The gist of this comment is that the shear viscosity, if anything, can only lead to an accelerated expansion over sufficiently small scales well inside the Hubble radius.

  11. QER- Comment of America's Natural Gas Alliance 3

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Apologies – please use this version Karen & John – Please see attached ANGA comments on the QER for Pittsburgh & ND. I had attempted to send these on Friday but just got a bounceback. My sincere apologies as this may have been on our end. Please let me know if this is a problem. Thank you very much and please let me know if you have any questions.

  12. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  13. Characterizing flow fluctuations with moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajeev S. Bhalerao; Jean-Yves Ollitrault; Subrata Pal

    2015-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a complete set of multiparticle correlation observables for ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. These include moments of the distribution of the anisotropic flow in a single harmonic, and also mixed moments, which contain the information on correlations between event planes of different harmonics. We explain how all these moments can be measured using just two symmetric subevents separated by a rapidity gap. This presents a multi-pronged probe of the physics of flow fluctuations. For instance, it allows to test the hypothesis that event-plane correlations are generated by non-linear hydrodynamic response. We illustrate the method with simulations of events in A MultiPhase Transport (AMPT) model.

  14. In-service filter testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terada, K.; Woodard, R.W.; Jensen, R.T.

    1985-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the observations, test results, and conclusions of three separate in-service tests beginning in November 1979 and concluding in September 1983. The in-service tests described in this report produced encouraging results on filters constructed with fiberglass medium containing 5% Nomex and separators of aluminum foil coated with a thin film of vinyl-epoxy polymer. Filters containing medium with Kevlar fiber additives demonstrated they merited further evaluation. Other types of filters tested include separatorless filters (Flanders SuperFlow) and one filter with fiberglass separators. Asbestos-containing filters were used for comparison until their supply was exhausted. All filters tested were judged to have performed satisfactorily under the test conditions.

  15. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Pearson, Francesca S. (Livermore, CA); Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L. (Livermore, CA)

    2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Two-Phase Flow in Rock Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malama, Bwalya; Howard, Clifford L.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Test Plan describes procedures for conducting laboratory scale flow tests on intact, damaged, crushed, and consolidated crushed salt to measure the capillary pressure and relative permeability functions. The primary focus of the tests will be on samples of bedded geologic salt from the WIPP underground. However, the tests described herein are directly applicable to domal salt. Samples being tested will be confined by a range of triaxial stress states ranging from atmospheric pressure up to those approximating lithostatic. Initially these tests will be conducted at room temperature, but testing procedures and equipment will be evaluated to determine adaptability to conducting similar tests under elevated temperatures.

  17. Gravity as Quantum Foam In-Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahill, R T

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new information-theoretic Process Physics provides an explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. The older Newtonian and General Relativity theories for gravity are analysed. It is shown that Newtonian gravity may be written in the form of an in-flow. General Relativity is also analysed as an in-flow, for those cases where it has been tested. An analysis of various experimental data demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Jaseja et al, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The experimental data suggests that the in-flow is turbulent, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. A new in-flow theory of gravity is proposed which passes all the tests that General Relativity was claimed to have passed, but as well the new theory...

  18. Gravity as Quantum Foam In-Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reginald T Cahill

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The new information-theoretic Process Physics provides an explanation of space as a quantum foam system in which gravity is an inhomogeneous flow of the quantum foam into matter. The older Newtonian and General Relativity theories for gravity are analysed. It is shown that Newtonian gravity may be written in the form of an in-flow. General Relativity is also analysed as an in-flow, for those cases where it has been tested. An analysis of various experimental data demonstrates that absolute motion relative to space has been observed by Michelson and Morley, Miller, Illingworth, Jaseja et al, Torr and Kolen, and by DeWitte. The Dayton Miller and Roland DeWitte data also reveal the in-flow of space into matter which manifests as gravity. The experimental data suggests that the in-flow is turbulent, which amounts to the observation of a gravitational wave phenomena. A new in-flow theory of gravity is proposed which passes all the tests that General Relativity was claimed to have passed, but as well the new theory suggests that the so-called spiral galaxy rotation-velocity anomaly may be explained without the need of `dark matter'. Various other gravitational anomalies also appear to be explainable. Newtonian gravity appears to be strictly valid only outside of spherically symmetric matter systems.

  19. Analysis of pressure drops under reversing flow conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krazinski, J.L.; Holtz, R.E.; Uherka, K.L.; Lottes, P.A.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines pressure-drop data from the Reversing Flow Test Facility (RFTF) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The data comprise part of an initial series of measurements conducted with pressurized helium gas under reversing flow conditions. The characteristics of fluid pressure drops in compressible, reversing flows are discussed in the paper and compared with pressure-drop measurements for steady, incompressible flows. The methodology used to calculate instantaneous mass flows in the test section of the RFTF is summarized. The measured pressure drops are analyzed in terms of their frictional and inertial components. Pressure-drop data are presented for both tubes and wire mesh regenerators over a range of flow reversal frequencies. The results are discussed with reference to other experimental data and analytical models available in the literature. 10 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Air flow characteristics of dry and liquid loaded packed and fluidized systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millsap, George Wayne

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acknowledgnent s List of Tables List of Figures Introduction Description of s Fluidised Bed Obgectives Application 1 2 3 Description of Apparatus Test Procedure Preparation of Bed Material Beds With Upward Flow of Air Beds With Upward Flow of Air... obgectives of thi ~ investigation were: (1) to deternine the air flow-pressure drop relationships in a dry bed of unifornly sised spherical particles in both the packed and fluidised regines of air flow; (3) to deternine under the sane air flow conditions...

  1. Comment response document for the Secretary of Energy`s ``Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On November 29, 1989, the Secretary of Energy published his ``Report to Congress on the Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program`` (Report), and sent copies to numerous interested parties for their review and comment. This document summarizes comments received on the Report and presents the DOE`s current responses to those comments as a basis for further discussions. Included as appendixes are a list of commenters, a crosswalk showing where each comment is addressed, the comment letters themselves with specific comments delineated, and the DOE`s response to those letters. Twenty-five individuals or organizations submitted comments on the Report. The DOE identified 130 individual comments and classified them into the following seven categories: Management, Institutional, Regulatory, Transportation, Monitored Retrievable Storage, Scheduling, and Yucca Mountain. For the responses, comments were than grouped into more specific topics under each of the major headings. The DOE attempted to respond to all comments.

  2. Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Efficiency Program for Residential Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Residential Dishwashers, Reopening of the Comment Period

  3. Response to “Comment on ‘Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall’” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strauss, H. R., E-mail: hank@hrsfusion.com [HRS Fusion, West Orange, New Jersey 07052 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A response is given to “Comment on ‘Velocity boundary conditions at a tokamak resistive wall’?” [Phys. Plasmas 21, 094701 (2014)].

  4. Can we model DNA at the mesoscale ? Comment on: Fluctuations in the DNA double helix: A critical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peyrard, Michel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Comment on "Fluctuations in the DNA double helix: A critical review" by Frank-Kamenetskii and Prakash

  5. Tonopah test range - outpost of Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, L.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tonopah Test Range is a unique historic site. Established in 1957 by Sandia Corporation, Tonopah Test Range in Nevada provided an isolated place for the Atomic Energy Commission to test ballistics and non-nuclear features of atomic weapons. It served this and allied purposes well for nearly forty years, contributing immeasurably to a peaceful conclusion to the long arms race remembered as the Cold War. This report is a brief review of historical highlights at Tonopah Test Range. Sandia`s Los Lunas, Salton Sea, Kauai, and Edgewood testing ranges also receive abridged mention. Although Sandia`s test ranges are the subject, the central focus is on the people who managed and operated the range. Comments from historical figures are interspersed through the narrative to establish this perspective, and at the end a few observations concerning the range`s future are provided.

  6. National emission standards for hazardous air pollutants (NESHAP) for the polyether polyols manufacturing industry: Summary of public comments and responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document contains a summary of public comments received on the NESHAP for Polyether Polyols Production (40 CFR 63, subpart PPP), which was proposed on September 4, 1997 (62 FR 46804). This document also provides the EPA's response to each comment, and outlines the changes made to the regulation in response to public comments.

  7. Radioactive Testing Results in Support of the In-Tank Precipitation Facility - Filtrate Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents results investigating the decomposition of excess NaTPB in presence of filtrate from one of the Cycle I Demonstration tests, fulfilling a request by CST Engineering and the ITP Flow Sheet Team.

  8. Reply to "Comment on 'Falsification Of The Atmospheric CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics' by Joshua B. Halpern, Christopher M. Colose, Chris Ho-Stuart, Joel D. Shore, Arthur P. Smith, J\\"org Zimmermann"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerlich, Gerhard; 10.1142/S0217979210055573

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It is shown that the notorious claim by Halpern et al. recently repeated in their comment that the method, logic, and conclusions of our "Falsification Of The CO2 Greenhouse Effects Within The Frame Of Physics" would be in error has no foundation. Since Halpern et al. communicate our arguments incorrectly, their comment is scientifcally vacuous. In particular, it is not true that we are "trying to apply the Clausius statement of the Second Law of Thermodynamics to only one side of a heat transfer process rather than the entire process" and that we are "systematically ignoring most non-radiative heat flows applicable to Earth's surface and atmosphere". Rather, our falsification paper discusses the violation of fundamental physical and mathematical principles in 14 examples of common pseudo-derivations of fictitious greenhouse effects that are all based on simplistic pictures of radiative transfer and their obscure relation to thermodynamics, including but not limited to those descriptions (a) that define a "Pe...

  9. Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comments of the Renewable Northwest Project And the Natural Resources Defense Council, 2004 The Renewable Northwest Project (RNP) and the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) appreciate to the recommendations on renewable resources. We agree with many of the comments submitted by the NW Energy coalition

  10. Public Comment "Toolkit" for Regulatory Agencies Launched at UMass Amherst October 30, 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    export coded comments for use in other documents, enabling officials to more easily incorporate citizen) to enable government officials to listen to and engage with the American public about regulations officials to review the hundreds, thousands, or at times hundreds of thousands of comments submitted

  11. Supplementary Methods for "Comment on 'Nuclear Emissions During Self-Nucleated Acoustic Cavitation'"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Naranjo

    2006-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutron simulation methods and statistical fitting methods for "Comment on 'Nuclear Emissions During Self-Nucleated Acoustic Cavitation'" are presented. The fit that underlies the Comment's background-subtracted "Cf-252" curve is shown. Also included are numerically sampled distributions of the goodness-of-fit variable for the four candidate neutron sources and a sketch of the assumed geometry.

  12. Heat transfer and pressure drop in tape generated swirl flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopina, Robert F.

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water in tape generated swirl flow were investigated. The test sections were electrically heated small diameter nickel tubes with tight fitting full length Inconel ...

  13. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Comments on "Piecewise Potential Vorticity Inversion: Elementary Tests"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Vries, Hylke

    by inverting a single PV com- ponent, assuming zero PV in its surroundings, are also not easily related state PV gradient). The propagation mechanism involves the invertibility property of PV: the PV evolution." He goes fur- ther by arguing that we should not consider velocities as "induced" by PV anomalies

  14. D:\\Web\\GC\\Test\\Price-Anderson\\public-comments\\TRW-sig\\TRW-FAX...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TRW Systems Integration One Federal Systems Park Group Faifax, VA 22033 703.968.1000 VIA FACSIMILE January 30, 1998 U.S. Department of Energy Office of General Counsel, GC-52 1000...

  15. Reply to "Comment on Test of nonequilibrium thermodynamics in glassy systems: The soft-sphere case"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    V,T,Te = - TeSconf V,EIS + EIS + Fvib V,T,EIS , 1 where EIS is the energy of the IS local minimum of the potential energy surface explored by the glass, Sconf V,EIS is the configurational entropy representing the degeneracy of inherent structures of depth EIS and Fvib V,T,EIS is the vi- brational free energy

  16. Public comment sought on soil cleanup project at the Idaho Site�s Test

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL INLET8, 2012Media Contacts:Area North

  17. High Power Testing of RF Cavities for the PEP II B Factory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rimmer, R.A.; /LBL, Berkeley; Allen, M.; Fant, K.; Hill, A.; Hoyt, M.; Judkins, J.; Neubauer, Mark Stephen; Schwarz, H.; /SLAC

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the process of conditioning and high-power testing of RF cavities for PEP-II. Procedures for vacuum assembly, bakeout and automated processing are described. Interlocks and safety precautions for protection of equipment and personnel are discussed and performance data of tested cavity assemblies are reported. Performance of ancillary components such as windows, couplers and tuners is also discussed. Comments are included on handling, alignment, installation and commissioning issues where appropriate.

  18. Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    Generating Test Data from SOFL Specifications \\Lambda A. Jefferson Offutt ISSE Department, 4A4@cs.hiroshima­cu.ac.jp Abstract Software testing can only be formalized and quantified when a solid basis for test generation can be defined. Tests are commonly generated from the source code, control flow graphs, design representations

  19. Test Comparability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Christine; Shulenburger, David E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu Test Comparability 2010 by Christine Keller and David Shulenburger This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication and Copyright. Please... and Shulenburger, David. “Test comparability,” with Christine Keller in the Letters section of Change, September/October 2010, p. 6. Published version: http://www.changemag.org/Archives/Back%20 Issues/September-October%202010/letters-to-editor.html Terms of Use...

  20. What is tested when experiments test that quantum dynamics is linear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas F. Jordan

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments that look for nonlinear quantum dynamics test the fundamental premise of physics that one of two separate systems can influence the physical behavior of the other only if there is a force between them, an interaction that involves momentum and energy. The premise is tested because it is the assumption of a proof that quantum dynamics must be linear. Here variations of a familiar example are used to show how results of nonlinear dynamics in one system can depend on correlations with the other. Effects of one system on the other, influence without interaction between separate systems, not previously considered possible, would be expected with nonlinear quantum dynamics. Whether it is possible or not is subject to experimental tests together with the linearity of quantum dynamics. Concluding comments and questions consider directions our thinking might take in response to this surprising unprecedented situation.

  1. In Situ Field Testing of Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Wang

    2001-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to update and document the data and subsequent analyses from ambient field-testing activities performed in underground drifts of the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP). This revision updates data and analyses presented in the initial issue of this AMR. This AMR was developed in accordance with the ''Technical Work Plan for Unsaturated Zone (UZ) Flow and Transport Process Model Report'' and ''Technical Work Plan for UZ Flow, Transport, and Coupled Processes Process Model Report. These activities were performed to investigate in situ flow and transport processes. The evaluations provide the necessary framework to: (1) refine and confirm the conceptual model of matrix and fracture processes in the unsaturated zone (UZ) and (2) analyze the impact of excavation (including use of construction water and effect of ventilation) on the UZ flow and transport processes. This AMR is intended to support revisions to ''Conceptual and Numerical Models for UZ Flow and Transport'' and ''Unsaturated Zone Flow and Transport Model Process Model Report''. In general, the results discussed in this AMR are from studies conducted using a combination or a subset of the following three approaches: (1) air-injection tests, (2) liquid-release tests, and (3) moisture monitoring using in-drift sensors or in-borehole sensors, to evaluate the impact of excavation, ventilation, and construction-water usage on the surrounding rocks. The liquid-release tests and air-injection tests provide an evaluation of in situ fracture flow and the competing processes of matrix imbibition. Only the findings from testing and data not covered in the ''Seepage Calibration Model and Seepage Testing Data'' are analyzed in detail in the AMR.

  2. Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Ant JUnit Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2012 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Outline Test Automation Ant JUnit Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Ant JUnit Why? Challenges of Manual Testing

  3. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  4. Development of Next Generation Multiphase Pipe Flow Prediction Tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tulsa Fluid Flow

    2008-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The developments of fields in deep waters (5000 ft and more) is a common occurrence. It is inevitable that production systems will operate under multiphase flow conditions (simultaneous flow of gas-oil-and water possibly along with sand, hydrates, and waxes). Multiphase flow prediction tools are essential for every phase of the hydrocarbon recovery from design to operation. The recovery from deep-waters poses special challenges and requires accurate multiphase flow predictive tools for several applications including the design and diagnostics of the production systems, separation of phases in horizontal wells, and multiphase separation (topside, seabed or bottom-hole). It is very crucial to any multiphase separation technique that is employed either at topside, seabed or bottom-hole to know inlet conditions such as the flow rates, flow patterns, and volume fractions of gas, oil and water coming into the separation devices. The overall objective was to develop a unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase flow in wells, flow lines, and pipelines to predict the flow characteristics such as flow patterns, phase distributions, and pressure gradient encountered during petroleum production at different flow conditions (pipe diameter and inclination, fluid properties and flow rates). The project was conducted in two periods. In Period 1 (four years), gas-oil-water flow in pipes were investigated to understand the fundamental physical mechanisms describing the interaction between the gas-oil-water phases under flowing conditions, and a unified model was developed utilizing a novel modeling approach. A gas-oil-water pipe flow database including field and laboratory data was formed in Period 2 (one year). The database was utilized in model performance demonstration. Period 1 primarily consisted of the development of a unified model and software to predict the gas-oil-water flow, and experimental studies of the gas-oil-water project, including flow behavior description and closure relation development for different flow conditions. Modeling studies were performed in two parts, Technology Assessment and Model Development and Enhancement. The results of the Technology assessment study indicated that the performance of the current state of the art two-phase flow models was poor especially for three-phase pipeline flow when compared with the existing data. As part of the model development and enhancement study, a new unified model for gas-oil-water three-phase pipe flow was developed. The new model is based on the dynamics of slug flow, which shares transition boundaries with all the other flow patterns. The equations of slug flow are used not only to calculate the slug characteristics, but also to predict transitions from slug flow to other flow patterns. An experimental program including three-phase gas-oil-water horizontal flow and two-phase horizontal and inclined oil-water flow testing was conducted utilizing a Tulsa University Fluid Flow Projects Three-phase Flow Facility. The experimental results were incorporated into the unified model as they became available, and model results were used to better focus and tailor the experimental study. Finally, during the Period 2, a new three-phase databank has been developed using the data generated during this project and additional data available in the literature. The unified model to predict the gas-oil-water three phase flow characteristics was tested by comparing the prediction results with the data. The results showed good agreements.

  5. A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTH SELECTIVE AND NON-SELECTIVE ABSORBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lampert, C.M.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    6974 Rev. e. ' A SOLAR TEST COLLECTOR FOR EVALUATION OF BOTHFig. L r2 r2 Solar test collector flow chart. Type Slope (-2. ai ei ai/ei SOlar test collector in operation, side view.

  6. ISSUANCE 2015-01-26: Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program: Energy Conservation Standards for High-Intensity Lamps, Notice to Reopen Comment Period

  7. Amendments to Newborough Forest Management Plan Draft v0.9 The following comments (in the left-hand column below) were received as part of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management plan. The comments (in the right-hand column) alongside each of these comments records what has- 1 - Amendments to Newborough Forest Management Plan Draft v0.9 The following comments (in version of the Newborough Forest Management Plan (FINAL version 1.0). Ref Comment received as part

  8. Comment submitted by the Bradford White Corporation (BWC) regarding the

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  9. Comment to NOI re Retrospective Risk Pooling Program For Suppliers |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  10. Comments by Battelle Memorial Institute to DOE Rulemaking | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  11. Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  12. Comments by the National Association of State Utility Consumer Advocates |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  13. Comments of Mille Lacs Energy Cooperative | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  14. Comments of Space Data Corporation | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  15. Comments of Steele-Waseca Cooperative Electric | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  16. Comments of Utilities Telecom Council | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  17. Comments of Verizon and Verizon Wireless on DOE Request for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  18. Comments of Verizon and Verizon Wireless | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  19. Comments of the American Petroleum Institute | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  20. Comments of the American Public Power Association | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  1. Comments of the Bonneville Power Administration | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  2. Comments of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  3. Comments of the Lower Colorado River Authority | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  4. Comments of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Request

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  5. Comments on RFI on Permitting of Transmission Lines Available | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  6. Comments on Smart Grid data access | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  7. Comments on reducing regulatory burden | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  8. ESPC Project Review Comment Template | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  9. Interested Parties - WAPA Public Comment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment of EnergyIndustry15Among States in theWAPA Public Comment

  10. FOIA Comments January 23, 2009 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you want toworldPowerHome |CookingFAQs FAQs Topics: Shuttle BusComments

  11. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges, Comments from

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  12. Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. Comments of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of Energy Ready,Smart Grid RFI Public Comments andthe

  13. Comments of ATT&T Inc | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  14. Responses to Public Comments on Draft Vitrification Melter Evaluation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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  15. Power North America RFI Comments | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  16. AHAM Comments Regulatory Burden RFI | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

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  17. Agency Information Collection Extension Notice of Public Comment: Federal

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  18. Air Conditioning Heating and Refrigeration Institute Comment | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  19. Comments of the Edison Electric Institute Quadrennial Energy Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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  20. DOE Seeks Comment on Definition of Showerhead | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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