Sample records for flow rates percentage

  1. Smokeless Control of Flare Steam Flow Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agar, J.; Balls, B. W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurement of mass flow rate of flare gas, in spite of the hostile environment. Its use for initiating control of flare steam flow rate and the addition of molecular weight compensation, using specific gravity (relative density) measurement to achieve...

  2. Historical river flow rates for dose calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlton, W.H.

    1991-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual average river flow rates are required input to the LADTAP Computer Code for calculating offsite doses from liquid releases of radioactive materials to the Savannah River. The source of information on annual river flow rates used in dose calculations varies, depending on whether calculations are for retrospective releases or prospective releases. Examples of these types of releases are: Retrospective - releases from routine operations (annual environmental reports) and short term release incidents that have occurred. Prospective - releases that might be expected in the future from routine or abnormal operation of existing or new facilities (EIS`s, EID`S, SAR`S, etc.). This memorandum provides historical flow rates at the downstream gauging station at Highway 301 for use in retrospective dose calculations and derives flow rate data for the Beaufort-Jasper and Port Wentworth water treatment plants.

  3. Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate Requirements Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate Requirements This tip sheet discusses...

  4. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  5. only a 0.2 percentage point increase from the fourth quarter of 2007. The average asking rate was $26.92,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that payroll employment statistics were compiled in the United States. In terms of percentage loss.9 percent from 2.1 percent in the third quarter A quarterly report on employment and office markets employment declines every month in 2008, and by year's end nearly 2.8 million jobs were lost (figure 1

  6. Flow Rate Estimates Qs and As Q: What is the Flow Rate Technical Group?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    to the BP oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico be stepped up as a result of the new flow rate estimates released their initial estimate. · The first approach analyzed how much oil is on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico using,000 and 270,000 barrels of oil are on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico and that a similar amount had already

  7. Scaling of the magnetic reconnection rate with symmetric shear flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassak, P. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Otto, A. [Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska-Fairbanks, Fairbanks, Alaska 99775 (United States)

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The scaling of the reconnection rate during (fast) Hall magnetic reconnection in the presence of an oppositely directed bulk shear flow parallel to the reconnecting magnetic field is studied using two-dimensional numerical simulations of Hall reconnection with two different codes. Previous studies noted that the reconnection rate falls with increasing flow speed and shuts off entirely for super-Alfvenic flow, but no quantitative expression for the reconnection rate in sub-Alfvenic shear flows is known. An expression for the scaling of the reconnection rate is presented.

  8. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  9. Effects of external pressure on the terminal lymphatic flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seale, James Lewis

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure applied to the skin of the canine cause the terminal lymphat- ic flow rate to increase until the external pressure reaches 60mm Hg. At an external pressure of 60mm Hg reduced lymphatic flow is observed in some of the test animals. At 75mm Hg... resulting from the external pressure begins to col- lapse the lymph vessels. External pressure between 60 and 75mm Hg restricts or completely occludes the terminal lymphatic flow rate. ACKNOWLEDGENENTS I would like to express my appreciation...

  10. SHORT COMMUNICATION Flow rate-modified streaming effects in heterogeneous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan, Xiangchun "Schwann"

    the streaming potential (Norde and Rouwendal 1990; Elgersma et al. 1992; Werner et al. 1999) or streamingSHORT COMMUNICATION Flow rate-modified streaming effects in heterogeneous microchannels Junjie Zhu relations is developed to study the streaming potential and streaming current in heterogeneous micro

  11. Multi-rate flowing Wellbore electric conductivity logging method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsang, Chin-Fu; Doughty, Christine

    2003-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The flowing wellbore electric conductivity logging method involves the replacement of wellbore water by de-ionized or constant-salinity water, followed by constant pumping with rate Q, during which a series of fluid electric conductivity logs are taken. The logs can be analyzed to identify depth locations of inflow, and evaluate the transmissivity and electric conductivity (salinity) of the fluid at each inflow point. The present paper proposes the use of the method with two or more pumping rates. In particular it is recommended that the method be applied three times with pumping rates Q, Q /2, and 2Q. Then a combined analysis of the multi-rate data allows an efficient means of determining transmissivity and salinity values of all inflow points along a well with a confidence measure, as well as their inherent or far-field pressure heads. The method is illustrated by a practical example.

  12. DRAFT: Mass Balance Team, part of Flow Rate Technical Group, Completes Estimate of Oil Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    with the reservoir will also be addressed by integration with the MMS team and by incorporation of some degree) The Department of Energy (DOE) was asked to conduct a nodal analysis to estimate flow rates from reservoir to release points. This effort will rely on input from a research team coordinated by the Minerals Management

  13. VARIABLE FIRING RATE OIL BURNER USING PULSE FUEL FLOW CONTROL.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    KRISHNA,C.R.; BUTCHER,T.A.; KAMATH,B.R.

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The residential oil burner market is currently dominated by the pressure-atomized retention head burner, which has an excellent reputation for reliability and efficiency. In this burner, oil is delivered to a fuel nozzle at pressures from 100 to 150 psi. In addition, to atomizing the fuel, the small, carefully controlled size of the nozzle exit orifice serves to control the burner firing rate. Burners of this type are currently available at firing rates of more than 0.5 gallons-per-hour (70,000 Btu/hr). Nozzles have been made for lower firing rates, but experience has shown that such nozzles suffer rapid fouling of the necessarily small passages, leading to bad spray patterns and poor combustion performance. Also, traditionally burners and the nozzles are oversized to exceed the maximum demand. Typically, this is figured as follows. The heating load of the house on the coldest day for the location is considered to define the maximum heat load. The contractor or installer adds to this to provide a safety margin and for future expansion of the house. If the unit is a boiler that provides domestic hot water through the use of a tankless heating coil, the burner capacity is further increased. On the contrary, for a majority of the time, the heating system is satisfying a much smaller load, as only rarely do all these demands add up. Consequently, the average output of the heating system has to be much less than the design capacity and this is accomplished by start and stop cycling operation of the system so that the time-averaged output equals the demand. However, this has been demonstrated to lead to overall efficiencies lower than the steady-state efficiency. Therefore, the two main reasons for the current practice of using oil burners much larger than necessary for space heating are the unavailability of reliable low firing rate oil burners and the desire to assure adequate input rate for short duration, high draw domestic hot water loads. One approach to solve this problem is to develop a burner, which can operate at two firing rates, with the lower rate being significantly lower than 0.5 gallons per hour. This paper describes the initial results of adopting this approach through a pulsed flow nozzle. It has been shown that the concept of flow modulation with a small solenoid valve is feasible. Especially in the second configuration tested, where the Lee valve was integrated with the nozzle, reasonable modulation in flow of the order of 1.7 could be achieved. For this first prototype, the combustion performance is still not quite satisfactory. Improvements in operation, for example by providing a sharp and positive shut-off so that there is no flow under low pressures with consequent poor atomization could lead to better combustion performance. This could be achieved by using nozzles that have shut off or check valves for example. It is recommended that more work in cooperation with the valve manufacturer could produce a technically viable system. Marketability is of course a far more complex problem to be addressed once a technically viable product is available.

  14. Flow Rate Dependence of Soil Hydraulic Characteristics D. Wildenschild,* J. W. Hopmans, J. Simunek

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wildenschild, Dorthe

    Flow Rate Dependence of Soil Hydraulic Characteristics D. Wildenschild,* J. W. Hopmans, J. Simunek that some of the pores in theanalyzed using both steady state and transient flow analysis. One before their air-entry pres- loamy soil to evaluate the influence of flow rate on the calculated sure

  15. Method and apparatus for controlling the flow rate of mercury in a flow system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Speer, Richard (Reading, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for increasing the mercury flow rate to a photochemical mercury enrichment utilizing an entrainment system comprises the steps of passing a carrier gas over a pool of mercury maintained at a first temperature T1, wherein the carrier gas entrains mercury vapor; passing said mercury vapor entrained carrier gas to a second temperature zone T2 having temperature less than T1 to condense said entrained mercury vapor, thereby producing a saturated Hg condition in the carrier gas; and passing said saturated Hg carrier gas to said photochemical enrichment reactor.

  16. Variational bounds on the energy dissipation rate in body-forced shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petrov, Nikola

    , the bulk (space and time averaged) dissipation rate per unit mass is proportional to the power required applied to many flows driven by boundary conditions, including shear flows and a variety of thermal

  17. Effect of flow rate of ethanol on growth dynamics of VA-SWNT -Transition from no-flow CVD to normal ACCVD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Effect of flow rate of ethanol on growth dynamics of VA-SWNT - Transition from no-flow CVD a growth model [2]. In this study, the flow rate of ethanol during the CVD was controlled precisely. Figure 1 shows the growth curve of VA-SWNT film for various ethanol flow rates. In the figure, "No

  18. air flow rates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 Overheat Instability in an Ascending Moist Air Flow as a Mechanism of Hurricane Formation...

  19. air flow rate: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 Overheat Instability in an Ascending Moist Air Flow as a Mechanism of Hurricane Formation...

  20. Momentum rate probe for use with two-phase flows S. G. Bush,a)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Panchagnula, Mahesh

    of flows including nuclear reactor coolant streams, refrigerants in heating-ventilating air flow rates of these flows span a wide range of values, from those in nuclear power plant cooling systems, through supercritical diesel fuel injection, heating-ventilating and air-conditioning HVAC

  1. Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions by Carl, Measurements of Film Flow Rate in Heated Tubes with Various Axial Power Distributions KTH Nuclear Reactor power is limited by a phenomenon called critical heat flux (CHF). It appears as a sudden detoriation

  2. 2010Employee's Arizona Withholding Percentage Election

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    withholding percentage of zero, and I certify that I meet BOTH of the following qualifying conditions at the end of the calendar year (i.e. gross wages net of pretax deductions, such as your portion of health a Withholding Percentage of Zero You may elect an Arizona withholding percentage of zero if you meet BOTH

  3. Cocurrent gas - liquid flow at high rates in small particle beds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilemon, M.; Torrest, R.S. (Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (US))

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas liquid cocurrent flow at high pressure drop often occurs near the well bore and in grabel filled perforations during production of oil and geothermal energy. Available studies have, however, emphasized large particles and low pressure drops. Here, results for air-water flows to high fluxes in beds of small glass spheres and in 0.44 mm sand, show the influence of particle size, and flow composition and rate, on pressure drop enhancement and flow regime extent.

  4. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockel, Ivar H. (Bangor, ME)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity.

  5. High flow rate nozzle system with production of uniform size droplets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stockel, I.H.

    1990-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Method steps for production of substantially uniform size droplets from a flow of liquid include forming the flow of liquid, periodically modulating the momentum of the flow of liquid in the flow direction at controlled frequency, generating a cross flow direction component of momentum and modulation of the cross flow momentum of liquid at substantially the same frequency and phase as the modulation of flow direction momentum, and spraying the so formed modulated flow through a first nozzle outlet to form a desired spray configuration. A second modulated flow through a second nozzle outlet is formed according to the same steps, and the first and second modulated flows impinge upon each other generating a liquid sheet. Nozzle apparatus for modulating each flow includes rotating valving plates interposed in the annular flow of liquid. The plates are formed with radial slots. Rotation of the rotating plates is separably controlled at differential angular velocities for a selected modulating frequency to achieve the target droplet size and production rate for a given flow. The counter rotating plates are spaced to achieve a desired amplitude of modulation in the flow direction, and the angular velocity of the downstream rotating plate is controlled to achieve the desired amplitude of modulation of momentum in the cross flow direction. Amplitude of modulation is set according to liquid viscosity. 5 figs.

  6. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  7. Prediction of Room Air Diffusion for Reduced Diffuser Flow Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gangisetti, Kavita

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    ?, IEA Annex 20 project. The simulated results, in terms of maximum velocity, distribution of velocity and temperature in the room are validated against the experimental data. 3.1.1 Study the effect of various parameters on the CFD simulation. A study... and the walls of the room. The window is assumed to have a surface temperature of 30 0C.The diffuser used is a ?HESCO? type diffuser, which was used in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Annex 20 project (1993): ?Room air and contaminant flow, evaluation...

  8. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  9. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilkins, S. Curtis (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Blotter, Jonathan D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  10. Global energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the deep ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikurashin, Maxim

    A global estimate of the energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into internal lee waves in the ocean is presented. The estimate is based on a linear theory applied to bottom topography at O(1–10) km scales obtained ...

  11. Coal flow aids reduce coke plant operating costs and improve production rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedard, R.A.; Bradacs, D.J.; Kluck, R.W.; Roe, D.C.; Ventresca, B.P.

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical coal flow aids can provide many benefits to coke plants, including improved production rates, reduced maintenance and lower cleaning costs. This article discusses the mechanisms by which coal flow aids function and analyzes several successful case histories. 2 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  12. RATE SENSITIVITY OF PLASTIC FLOW AND IMPLICATIONS FOR YIELD-SURFACE VERTICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RATE SENSITIVITY OF PLASTIC FLOW AND IMPLICATIONS FOR YIELD-SURFACE VERTICES Jwo PAN Stress; in recked form 29 Norember 1982) &tract-When crystalline slip is considered as the micromechanism of plastic sensitivity of plastic flow may be central to understanding the ambiguous conclusions from experimental

  13. Molecule-based approach for computing chemical-reaction rates in upper atmosphere hypersonic flows.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the work completed during FY2009 for the LDRD project 09-1332 'Molecule-Based Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates in Upper-Atmosphere Hypersonic Flows'. The goal of this project was to apply a recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary nonequilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological non-equilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, the difference between the two models can exceed 10 orders of magnitude. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates. Extensions of the model to reactions typically found in combustion flows and ionizing reactions are also found to be in very good agreement with available measurements, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  14. Process For Controlling Flow Rate Of Viscous Materials Including Use Of Nozzle With Changeable Openings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ellingson, William A. (Naperville, IL); Forster, George A. (Westmont, IL)

    1999-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and a method for controlling the flow rate of viscous materials through a nozzle includes an apertured main body and an apertured end cap coupled together and having an elongated, linear flow channel extending the length thereof. An end of the main body is disposed within the end cap and includes a plurality of elongated slots concentrically disposed about and aligned with the flow channel. A generally flat cam plate having a center aperture is disposed between the main body and end cap and is rotatable about the flow channel. A plurality of flow control vane assemblies are concentrically disposed about the flow channel and are coupled to the cam plate. Each vane assembly includes a vane element disposed adjacent the end of the flow channel. Rotation of the cam plate in a first direction causes a corresponding rotation of each of the vane elements for positioning the individual vane elements over the aperture in the end cap blocking flow through the flow channel, while rotation in an opposite direction removes the vane elements from the aperture and positions them about the flow channel in a nested configuration in the full open position, with a continuous range of vane element positions available between the full open and closed positions.

  15. Gas temperature profiles at different flow rates and heating rates suffice to estimate kinetic parameters for fluidised bed combustion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suyadal, Y. [Faculty of Engineering, Department of Chemical Engineering, Ankara University, 06100-Tandogan, Ankara (Turkey)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental work on estimation kinetic parameters for combustion was conducted in a bench-scale fluidised bed (FB: 105x200mm). Combustion medium was obtained by using an electrical heater immersed into the bed. The ratio of heating rate (kJ/s) to molar flow rate of air (mol/s) regulated by a rheostat so that the heat of combustion (kJ/mol) can be synthetically obtained by an electrical power supply for relevant O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration (C{sub 0}). O{sub 2}-restriction ratio ({beta}) was defined by the ratio of O{sub 2}-feedstock concentration to O{sub 2}-air concentration (C{sub O{sub 2}-AIR}) at prevailing heating rates. Compressed air at further atmospheric pressure ({approx_equal}102.7kPa) entered the bed that was alumina particles (250{mu}m). Experiments were carried out at different gas flow rates and heating rates. FB was operated with a single charge of (1300g) particles for obtaining the T/T{sub 0} curves, and than C/C{sub 0} curves. The mathematical relationships between temperature (T) and conversion ratio (X) were expressed by combining total energy balance and mass balance in FB. Observed surface reaction rate constants (k{sub S}) was obtained from the combined balances and proposed model was also tested for these kinetic parameters (frequency factor: k{sub 0}, activation energy: E{sub A}, and reaction order: n) obtained from air temperature measurements. It was found that the model curves allow a good description of the experimental data. Thus, reaction rate for combustion was sufficiently expressed. (author)

  16. A high sensitivity fiber optic macro-bend based gas flow rate transducer for low flow rates: Theory, working principle, and static calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schena, Emiliano; Saccomandi, Paola; Silvestri, Sergio [Center for Integrated Research, Unit of Measurements and Biomedical Instrumentation, Universita Campus Bio-Medico di Roma, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel fiber optic macro-bend based gas flowmeter for low flow rates is presented. Theoretical analysis of the sensor working principle, design, and static calibration were performed. The measuring system consists of: an optical fiber, a light emitting diode (LED), a Quadrant position sensitive Detector (QD), and an analog electronic circuit for signal processing. The fiber tip undergoes a deflection in the flow, acting like a cantilever. The consequent displacement of light spot center is monitored by the QD generating four unbalanced photocurrents which are function of fiber tip position. The analog electronic circuit processes the photocurrents providing voltage signal proportional to light spot position. A circular target was placed on the fiber in order to increase the sensing surface. Sensor, tested in the measurement range up to 10 l min{sup -1}, shows a discrimination threshold of 2 l min{sup -1}, extremely low fluid dynamic resistance (0.17 Pa min l{sup -1}), and high sensitivity, also at low flow rates (i.e., 33 mV min l{sup -1} up to 4 l min{sup -1} and 98 mV min l{sup -1} from 4 l min{sup -1} up to 10 l min{sup -1}). Experimental results agree with the theoretical predictions. The high sensitivity, along with the reduced dimension and negligible pressure drop, makes the proposed transducer suitable for medical applications in neonatal ventilation.

  17. Energy policy act transportation study: Interim report on natural gas flows and rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Interim Report on Natural Gas Flows and Rates, is the second in a series mandated by Title XIII, Section 1340, ``Establishment of Data Base and Study of Transportation Rates,`` of the Energy Policy Act of 1992 (P.L. 102--486). The first report Energy Policy Act Transportation Study: Availability of Data and Studies, was submitted to Congress in October 1993; it summarized data and studies that could be used to address the impact of legislative and regulatory actions on natural gas transportation rates and flow patterns. The current report presents an interim analysis of natural gas transportation rates and distribution patterns for the period from 1988 through 1994. A third and final report addressing the transportation rates and flows through 1997 is due to Congress in October 2000. This analysis relies on currently available data; no new data collection effort was undertaken. The need for the collection of additional data on transportation rates will be further addressed after this report, in consultation with the Congress, industry representatives, and in other public forums.

  18. Microfluidic chemostat and turbidostat with flow rate, oxygen, and temperature control for dynamic continuous culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinskey, Anthony J.

    Microfluidic chemostat and turbidostat with flow rate, oxygen, and temperature control for dynamic are not reasonable. Microfluidics offers a way to address the difficulties relating to conventional continuous.4 Integrating all of these microfluidic components into a working continuous culture system can

  19. Utilizing Distributed Temperature Sensors in Predicting Flow Rates in Multilateral Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Mulla, Jassim Mohammed A.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressure data to determine the flow rate in real time out of a multilateral well. Temperature and pressure changes are harder to predict in horizontal laterals compared with vertical wells because of the lack of variation in elevation and geothermal...

  20. Effects of soil water repellency on infiltration rate and flow instability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhi "Luke"

    . They are difficult to manage and pose negative effects on agricultural productivity and environmental sustain the contaminant transport to ground water. The purpose of this paper is to quantify the effects of soil waterEffects of soil water repellency on infiltration rate and flow instability Z. Wanga,*, Q.J. Wua,1

  1. Toward compressed DMD: spectral analysis of fluid flows using sub-Nyquist-rate PIV data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Jonathan H; Kutz, J Nathan; Shang, Jessica K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is a powerful and increasingly popular tool for performing spectral analysis of fluid flows. However, it requires data that satisfy the Nyquist-Shannon sampling criterion. In many fluid flow experiments, such data are impossible to capture. We propose a new approach that combines ideas from DMD and compressed sensing. Given a vector-valued signal, we take measurements randomly in time (at a sub-Nyquist rate) and project the data onto a low-dimensional subspace. We then use compressed sensing to identify the dominant frequencies in the signal and their corresponding modes. We demonstrate this method using two examples, analyzing both an artificially constructed test dataset and particle image velocimetry data collected from the flow past a cylinder. In each case, our method correctly identifies the characteristic frequencies and oscillatory modes dominating the signal, proving the proposed method to be a capable tool for spectral analysis using sub-Nyquist-rate sampling.

  2. Elastic capsules in shear flow: Analytical solutions for constant and time-dependent shear rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steffen Kessler; Reimar Finken; Udo Seifert

    2009-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the dynamics of microcapsules in linear shear flow within a reduced model with two degrees of freedom. In previous work for steady shear flow, the dynamic phases of this model, i.e. swinging, tumbling and intermittent behaviour, have been identified using numerical methods. In this paper, we integrate the equations of motion in the quasi-spherical limit analytically for time-constant and time-dependent shear flow using matched asymptotic expansions. Using this method, we find analytical expressions for the mean tumbling rate in general time-dependent shear flow. The capsule dynamics is studied in more detail when the inverse shear rate is harmonically modulated around a constant mean value for which a dynamic phase diagram is constructed. By a judicious choice of both modulation frequency and phase, tumbling motion can be induced even if the mean shear rate corresponds to the swinging regime. We derive expressions for the amplitude and width of the resonance peaks as a function of the modulation frequency.

  3. Effect of transpiration rate on internal plant resistance to water flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hailey, James Lester

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models for liquid water flow in plants. because it enables one to estimate leaf water potential from known or estimated transpiration rates. The predicted leaf water potential can be used for scheduling irrigation ~ The leaf diffusion resistance... OF LITERATURE Soil Resistance Internal Plant Resistance Ohm's Law Analogy Mathematical Models of Water Transport in the Soil-Plant- Atmosphere System . ~ Poiseuille's Law . ~ ~ ~ ~ Leaf Diffusion and Aerodynamic Resistances ~ Conclusions of Literature...

  4. Observation of pressure gradient and related flow rate effect on the plasma parameters in plasma processing reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyo-Chang; Kim, Aram; Chung, Chin-Wook [Department of Electrical Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Se Youn [Solar Energy Group, LG Electronics Advanced Research Institute, 16 Woomyeon-Dong, Seocho-Gu, Seoul 137-724 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In industrial plasma processes, flow rate has been known to a key to control plasma processing results and has been discussed with reactive radical density, gas residence time, and surface reaction. In this study, it was observed that the increase in the flow rate can also change plasma parameters (electron temperature and plasma density) and electron energy distribution function in plasma processing reactor. Based on the measurement of gas pressure between the discharge region and the pumping port region, the considerable differences in the gas pressure between the two regions were found with increasing flow rate. It was also observed that even in the discharge region, the pressure gradient occurs at the high gas flow rate. This result shows that increasing the flow rate results in the pressure gradient and causes the changes in the plasma parameters.

  5. Comparison of entropy production rates in two different types of self-organized flows: Benard convection and zonal flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z. [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8561 (Japan)

    2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different types of self-organizing and sustaining ordered motion in fluids or plasmas--one is a Benard convection (or streamer) and the other is a zonal flow--have been compared by introducing a thermodynamic phenomenological model and evaluating the corresponding entropy production rates (EP). These two systems have different topologies in their equivalent circuits: the Benard convection is modeled by parallel connection of linear and nonlinear conductances, while the zonal flow is modeled by series connection. The ''power supply'' that drives the systems is also a determinant of operating modes. When the energy flux is a control parameter (as in usual plasma experiments), the driver is modeled by a constant-current power supply, and when the temperature difference between two separate boundaries is controlled (as in usual computational studies), the driver is modeled by a constant-voltage power supply. The parallel (series)-connection system tends to minimize (maximize) the total EP when a constant-current power supply drives the system. This minimum/maximum relation flips when a constant-voltage power supply is connected.

  6. A numerical investigation of high-rate gas flow for gravel-packed completions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, James Kenyon

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A NUMERICAL INVESTIGATION OF HIGH-RATE GAS FLOW FOR GRAVEL-PACKED COMPLETIONS A Thesis by JAMES KENYON FORREST Approved as to style and content by: C. . WU ( Chairman of Coamittee) R... used a radius of 30rw. In order to investigate this, several runs were made with various model radii. Three runs were made to determine the effect of radial discretization and model radius on the simulation results. One run used a radius of 30r...

  7. Piping flow erosion in water retaining structures: inferring erosion rates from hole erosion tests and quantifying the failure time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Piping flow erosion in water retaining structures: inferring erosion rates from hole erosion tests-en-Provence Cedex 5, France E-mail: stephane.bonelli@cemagref.fr Abstract The piping flow erosion process, involving structures. Such a pipe can be imputed to roots or burrows. The coefficient of erosion must be known in order

  8. Prediction of flow rates through an orifice at pressures corresponding to the transition between molecular and isentropic flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeMuth, S.F.; Watson, J.S.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model of compressible flow through an orifice, in the region of transition from free molecular to isentropic expansion flow, has been developed and tested for accuracy. The transitional or slip regime is defined as the conditions where molecular interactions are too many for free molecular flow modeling, yet not great enough for isentropic expansion flow modeling. Due to a lack of literature establishing a well-accepted model for predicting transitional flow, it was felt such work would be beneficial. The model is nonlinear and cannot be satisfactorily linearized for a linear regression analysis. Consequently, a computer routine was developed which minimized the sum of the squares of the residual flow for the nonlinear model. The results indicate an average accuracy within 15% of the measured flow throughout the range of test conditions. Furthermore, the results of the regression analysis indicate that the transitional regime lies between Knudsen numbers of approximately 2 and 45. 4 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Method and apparatus for simultaneous determination of fluid mass flow rate, mean velocity and density

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hamel, William R. (Farragut, TN)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to a new method and new apparatus for determining fluid mass flowrate and density. In one aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through a straight cantilevered tube in which transient oscillation has been induced, thus generating Coriolis damping forces on the tube. The decay rate and frequency of the resulting damped oscillation are measured, and the fluid mass flowrate and density are determined therefrom. In another aspect of the invention, the fluid is passed through the cantilevered tube while an electrically powered device imparts steady-state harmonic excitation to the tube. This generates Coriolis tube-damping forces which are dependent on the mass flowrate of the fluid. Means are provided to respond to incipient flow-induced changes in the amplitude of vibration by changing the power input to the excitation device as required to sustain the original amplitude of vibration. The fluid mass flowrate and density are determined from the required change in power input. The invention provides stable, rapid, and accurate measurements. It does not require bending of the fluid flow.

  10. Assessment of reaction-rate predictions of a collision-energy approach for chemical reactions in atmospheric flows.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates is assessed for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary non-equilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological nonequilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, significant differences can be found. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  11. Application of Multi-rate Flowing Fluid Electric ConductivityLogging Method to Well DH-2, Tono Site, Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doughty, Christine; Takeuchi, Shinji; Amano, Kenji; Shimo, Michito; Tsang, Chin-Fu

    2004-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The flowing fluid electric conductivity (FEC) logging method, wellbore fluid is replaced with de-ionized water, following which FEC profiles in the wellbore are measured at a series of times while the well is pumped at a constant rate. Locations were fluid enters the wellbore show peaks in the FEC logs, which may be analyzed to infer inflow strengths and salinities of permeable features intersected by the wellbore. In multi-rate flowing FEC logging, the flowing FEC logging method is repeated using two or more pumping rates, which enables the transmissivities and inherent pressure heads of these features to be estimated as well. We perform multi-rate FEC logging on a deep borehole in fractured granitic rock, using three different pumping rates. Results identify 19 hydraulically conducting fractures and indicate that transmissivity, pressure head, and salinity vary significantly among them. By using three pumping rates rather than the minimum number of two, we obtain an internal consistency check on the analysis that provides a measure of the uncertainty of the results. Good comparisons against static FEC profiles and against independent chemical, geological, and hydrogeological data have further enhanced confidence in the results of the multi-rate flowing FEC logging method.

  12. The effects of flow rate and pressure on breakthrough times and permeation rates through an impermeable membrane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Peter Lee

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . ) the desorption of molecules from the inside surface of the material. ( Measuring the permeation rate of polymers exhibiting the activated diffusion process can be calculated by Pick's First Law of diffusion, calculated by the equation: A -E/RT q x '(p -p) P... e 1 2 o where, q = permeation rate (cm /sec) 3 A = area of membrane (cm ) 2 x = membrane thickness (cm) pl= solvent partial pressure on the outer surface of the membrane (Pa) p2= solvent partial pressure on the inner surface of the membrane (Pa...

  13. The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from Corn Stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    The Effect of Flow Rate of Very Dilute Sulfuric Acid on Xylan, Lignin, and Total Mass Removal from mass, xylan, and lignin and increases cellulose digestibility compared to batch operations at otherwise at a constant residence time also significantly accelerated xylan solubilization. Although lignin removal

  14. Rate of deformation in the Pasco Basin during the Miocene as determined by distribution of Columbia River basalt flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reidel, S.P.; Ledgerwood, R.K.; Myers, C.W.; Jones, M.G.; Landon, R.D.

    1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Detailed mapping of over 8000 square kilometers and logs from 20 core holes were used to determine the distribution and thickness of basalt flows and interbeds in the Pasco Basin. The data indicate the high-MgO Grande Ronde Basalt and Wanapum Basalt thicken from the northeast to the southwest. Deformation began in late Frenchman Springs time in the Saddle Mountains along a northwest-southeast trend and in Roza time along an east-west trend. By late Wanapum time, basalt flows were more restricted on the east side. Saddle Mountains Basalt flows spread out in the basin from narrow channels to the east. The Umatilla Member entered from the southeast and is confined to the south-central basin, while the Wilbur Creek, Asotin, Esquatzel, Pomona, and Elephant Mountain Members entered from the east and northeast. The distribution of these members is controlled by flow volume, boundaries of other flows, and developing ridges. The Wilbur Creek, Asotin, and Esquatzel flows exited from the basin in a channel along the northern margin of the Umatilla flow, while the Pomona and Elephant Mountain flows exited between Umtanum Ridge and Wallula Gap. The thickness of sedimentary interbeds and basalt flows indicated subsidence and/or uplift began in post-Grande Ronde time (14.5 million years before present) and continued through Saddle Mountains time (10.5 million years before present). Maximum subsidence occurred 40 kilometers (24 miles) north of Richland, Washington with an approximate rate of 25 meters (81 feet) per million years during the eruption of the basalt. Maximum uplift along the developing ridges was 70 meters (230 feet) per million years.

  15. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  16. Effects of dips and bumps on saturation flow rates at signalized intersections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Short, Joseph Thomas

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of average width. Each site also has a low percentage of heavy vehicles during the peak hours. The experimental site was the eastbound approach to the intersection of Villa Maria Road and South College Avenue in Bryan. This experimental site... will be referred to as "eastbound Villa Maria". Villa Maria Road is a major east-west arterial with two lanes in each direction and a continuous lef t-turn lane in the median. South College Avenue is a north-south arterial with two lanes in each direction...

  17. Development of analytical and numerical models predicting the deposition rate of electrically charged particles in turbulent channel flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Hanseo

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diameter for Re = 5, 000, 10, 000, and 20, 000. 15 Figure 3 Figure 4. Comparison of different roughness factors (e, = 0, 0. 1, 1. 0, and 10 mm) for dimensionless deposition velocity. Correlation of dimensionless deposition velocity and dimensionless... time for flow rate = 57 I/min, Re = 5, 000, and tube diameter = 15. 8 mm. 17 19 Figure 5. Correlation of dimensionless deposition velocity including electric migration velocity ( Vz = 0. 01, 0. 05, and 0. 1 mm/s) and dimensionless time for flow...

  18. Original article Flow and passage rate studies at the ileal level in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    based mainly on lucerne meal. Flow and transit measurements were carried out using two particulate markers : ytterbium (Yb) fixed on lucerne meal cell-walls by soaking, and chromium (Cr) fixed

  19. Ambient aerosol sampling inlet for flow rates of 100 and 400 l/min

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baehl, Michael Matthew

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    across the cross section of the wind tunnel. Downstream from that is a flow straightener that eliminates large-scale turbulence and flow swirl. A TSI VelociCalc thermal anemometer (TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN) is used to measure the wind speed in the wind... on the slide through use of a coefficient similar 7 to that of Olan-Figuroa et al. (1982), but with a value of 1.29, which is appropriate for the Nyebar K. An Aerodynamic Particle Sizer (APS, Model 3321, TSI Inc., St. Paul, MN) is used to monitor...

  20. Using multi-layer models to forecast gas flow rates in tight gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerez Vera, Sergio Armando

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    pressure at the inner boundary. He combined a back-pressure gas rate equation (Eq 2.9) with the materials balance equation Eq 2.10 onto a rate-time equation for gas wells as described in Eq 2.11, and then he generated the new set of type curves as shown.......................................................................................... 10 2.1 Introduction ...................................................................................................10 2.2 Decline Curve Analysis...

  1. Use of Melt Flow Rate Test in Reliability Study of Thermoplastic Encapsulation Materials in Photovoltaic Modules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moseley, J.; Miller, D.; Shah, Q.-U.-A. S. J.; Sakurai, K.; Kempe, M.; Tamizhmani, G.; Kurtz, S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Use of thermoplastic materials as encapsulants in photovoltaic (PV) modules presents a potential concern in terms of high temperature creep, which should be evaluated before thermoplastics are qualified for use in the field. Historically, the issue of creep has been avoided by using thermosetting polymers as encapsulants, such as crosslinked ethylene-co-vinyl acetate (EVA). Because they lack crosslinked networks, however, thermoplastics may be subject to phase transitions and visco-elastic flow at the temperatures and mechanical stresses encountered by modules in the field, creating the potential for a number of reliability and safety issues. Thermoplastic materials investigated in this study include PV-grade uncured-EVA (without curing agents and therefore not crosslinked); polyvinyl butyral (PVB); thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU); and three polyolefins (PO), which have been proposed for use as PV encapsulation. Two approaches were used to evaluate the performance of these materials as encapsulants: module-level testing and a material-level testing.

  2. Time-dependent tritium inventories and flow rates in fuel cycle components of a tokamak fusion reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuan, W.; Abdou, M.A. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Willms, R.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The dynamic behavior of the fuel cycle in a fusion reactor is of crucial importance due to the need to keep track of the large amount of tritium being constantly produced, transported, and processed in the reactor system. Because tritium is a source of radioactivity, loss and exhaust to the environment must be kept to a minimum. With ITER advancing to its Engineering Design phase, there is a need to accurately predict the dynamic tritium inventories and flow rates throughout the fuel cycle and to study design variations to meet the demands of low tritium inventory. In this paper, time-dependent inventories and flow rates for several components of the fuel cycle are modeled and studied through the use of a new modular-type model for the dynamic simulation of the fuel cycle in a fusion reactor. The complex dynamic behavior in the modeled subsystems is analyzed using this new model. Previous dynamic models focusing on the fuel cycle dealt primarily with a residence time parameter ({tau}{sub res}) defining each subsystem of the model. In this modular model, this residence time approach is avoided in favor of a more accurate and flexible model that utilizes real design parameters and operating schedules of the various subsystems modeled.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF A LOW COST INFERENTIAL NATURAL GAS ENERGY FLOW RATE PROTOTYPE RETROFIT MODULE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E. Kelner; D. George; T. Morrow; T. Owen; M. Nored; R. Burkey; A. Minachi

    2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1998, Southwest Research Institute began a multi-year project to develop a working prototype instrument module for natural gas energy measurement. The module will be used to retrofit a natural gas custody transfer flow meter for energy measurement, at a cost an order of magnitude lower than a gas chromatograph. Development and evaluation of the prototype energy meter in 2002-2003 included: (1) refinement of the algorithm used to infer properties of the natural gas stream, such as heating value; (2) evaluation of potential sensing technologies for nitrogen content, improvements in carbon dioxide measurements, and improvements in ultrasonic measurement technology and signal processing for improved speed of sound measurements; (3) design, fabrication and testing of a new prototype energy meter module incorporating these algorithm and sensor refinements; and (4) laboratory and field performance tests of the original and modified energy meter modules. Field tests of the original energy meter module have provided results in close agreement with an onsite gas chromatograph. The original algorithm has also been tested at a field site as a stand-alone application using measurements from in situ instruments, and has demonstrated its usefulness as a diagnostic tool. The algorithm has been revised to use measurement technologies existing in the module to measure the gas stream at multiple states and infer nitrogen content. The instrumentation module has also been modified to incorporate recent improvements in CO{sub 2} and sound speed sensing technology. Laboratory testing of the upgraded module has identified additional testing needed to attain the target accuracy in sound speed measurements and heating value.

  4. Please Post to USGS Web Site Per BWs RequestlFw: Flow Rate Group Provides Preliminary Best Estimate Of Oil Flowing from BP Oil Wen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Of Oil Flowing from BP Oil Wen Clarice E Ransom to: Barbara W Wainman, 8. Arlene Compher 05127 Provides Preliminary Best Estimate Of Oil Flowing from BP Oil Well "Tsai, Brian" Estimate Of Oil Flowing from BP Oil Well USGS Director Dr. Marcia McNutt today announced that the National

  5. A new technique to analyze simultaneous sandface flow rate and pressure measurements of gas wells with turbulence and damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nashawi, I.S. [Kuwait Univ. (Kuwait); Al-Mehaideb, R.A.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most of the problems associated with conventional gas well test are related to the nonlinearity of the equations describing real gas flow, the presence of the rate dependent (non-Darcy) skin, and the long shut-in time periods required to collect the data for the analysis in tight reservoirs in which the wellbore storage period can be excessively long. This paper presents a new pressure buildup technique that reduces the wellbore storage effects, eliminates the long shut-in periods experienced with conventional tests by using afterflow rate and pressure data, and most importantly provides a direct method to estimate non-Darcy skin. The proposed technique uses normalized pseudofunctions to avoid the nonlinearities of the governing equations and involves using two different plots. The formation permeability is obtained from the slope of the first plot. The mechanical and non-Darcy skin factors are obtained respectively from the slope and intercept of the second plot. A field example and two simulated cases are presented to illustrate the application of the new technique.

  6. The Interest Rate Conundrum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craine, Roger; Martin, Vance L.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flows and US Interest Rates,” NBER Working Paper No 12560. [Working Paper # 2008 -03 The Interest Rate Conundrum Roger

  7. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRatchetPercentage | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URI Jump Name:Information

  8. The minimum flow rate scaling of Taylor cone-jets issued from a nozzle William J. Scheideler and Chuan-Hua Chena)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chuan-Hua

    of applications including electrostatic spraying, spinning, and printing. In the most common setup, a working be justified on dimensional grounds as long as the liquid viscosity (l) drops out of the picture. Note viscosity in the minimum flow rate scaling Eq. (1) lacks a rigorous justification, which poses a severe

  9. The effect of density and lint percentage on the resistance of cottonseed to air flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brashears, Alan Dale

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to air flov (air fl. ow dovnvard). . 28 LIST VF TABLKS Table Page I. Values of C and n for the Equation, V ~ CP II. Data for Acid Delinted Seed Density 31. 85 pounds per cubic foot 37 III. Data for Nachine-Delknted Seed Density 26. 6 pounds per... cubic foot 38 IV. Data for hachine-Delinted Seed- Density 27, 8 pounds per cubic foot 39 V. Data for Nachine Delinted Seed -Density 30. 0 pounds per cubic foot 40 VI. Data for Gin Run Seed Density 24. 8 oounds per cubic foot 41 VII. Data for Gin...

  10. Role of viscoelasticity and non-linear rheology in flows of complex fluids at high deformation rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ober, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We combine pressure, velocimetry and birefringence measurements to study three phenomena for which the fluid rheology plays a dominant role: 1) shear banding in micellar fluids, 2) extension-dominated flows in microfluidic ...

  11. Control of Initiation, Rate, and Routing of Spontaneous Capillary-Driven Flow of Liquid Droplets through Microfluidic Channels on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ismagilov, Rustem F.

    angle hysteresis, the presence or absence of a lubricating oil layer, and adsorption of surface between the plates of the SlipChip ("dead-end flow"). Rupture of the lubricating oil layer (reminiscent containing an aqueous droplet into contact with a slightly deeper channel filled with immiscible oil

  12. GEOCHEMISTRY, GEOPHYSICS, GEOSYSTEMS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Flow Rate Perturbations in a Black Smoker Hydrothermal1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    of aque-21 ous fluids within mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems and mechanical processes22 between mid-35 ocean ridge hydrothermal fluid flow and mechanical processes, there have been no36 direct in a Black Smoker Hydrothermal1 Vent In Response to a Mid-Ocean Ridge Earthquake Swarm2 Timothy J. Crone

  13. Calcite dissolution and Ca/Na ion-exchange reactions in columns with different flow rates through high ESR soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarre, Audrey

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    min?¹ under conditions of saturated flow. Column eluate was monitored for pH, carbonate alkalinity, and Na, Ca and Cl concentrations to evaluate the elution of SAR 10 solution, dissolution of CaCO? and exchange of Na by Ca on the cation...

  14. Spatially resolved measurements of kinematics and flow-induced birefringence in worm-like micellar solutions undergoing high rate deformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ober, Thomas J. (Thomas Joseph)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Worm-like micellar solutions are model non-Newtonian systems on account of their well understood linear viscoelastic behavior. Their high deformation rate, non-linear rheological response, however, remains inadequately ...

  15. Influence of beam parameters on percentage depth dose in electron arc therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pla, M.; Pla, C.; Podgorsak, E.B.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependence of rotational or arc electron beam percentage depth doses on the depth of isocenter di and nominal beam field width w is presented. A characteristic angle beta, which uniquely depends on w and di, is defined and the dependence of the radial percentage depth doses on angle beta discussed. It is shown that the characteristic angle beta concept can be used in clinical situations to predict the shape of the percentage depth dose curve when w and di are known, or, more importantly, it can be used to determine the appropriate w when di and the percentage depth dose characteristics are known.

  16. 129 Iodine: A New Hydrologic Tracer for Aquifer Recharge Conditions Influenced by River Flow Rate and Evapotranspiration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwehr, K. A.; Santschi, P. H.; Moran, J. E.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    analogy to chloride ? Long term database Chloride: Analogy for Iodide y = 5.27x -0.32 R 2 = 0.53 R = 0.73 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 SARPD Monthly Flow m 3 s -1 S ARP D [ C l - ] m e q / L Monthly values INSET: Annual median values.... GW y = 0.46x + 1.27 R 2 = 0.96 -2 -1 0 1 2 -3 -2 -1 0 log [Cl - GW ] or log [Cl - SARPD ] meq/L lo g [ C l - PP T ] m e q/ L ...

  17. A study of the air flow rates and their effects on bin drying sorghum grain with unheated air in South Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldred, William H

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with the foot storage spoon use not availablo to hold their grain for s mors favorable market. Furthermore, only a limited amount of a~nial storage vss available at that time, These oonditions disolosed the need for infox- mstion consuming pxoesdurss.../ustment of the air flow to the desired rates was controlled bp two sliding gates in the latexal ss shown in Figure 5. Bzxcyle ports were installed in each bin at two levels ? one foot. from the bottom snd halfway between the bottom and the toy, This per- mitted...

  18. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global energy conversion rate from geostrophic flows into

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari, Raffaele

    , and to bottom velocity obtained from a global ocean model. The total energy flux into internal lee wavesGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Global energy conversion rate from distribution of the energy flux is largest in the Southern Ocean which accounts for half of the total energy

  19. Comprehensive model to determine the effects of temperature and species fluctuations on reaction rates in turbulent reaction flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Magnotti, F.; Diskin, G.; Matulaitis, J.; Chinitz, W.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of silane (SiH4) as an effective ignitor and flame stabilizing pilot fuel is well documented. A reliable chemical kinetic mechanism for prediction of its behavior at the conditions encountered in the combustor of a SCRAMJET engine was calculated. The effects of hydrogen addition on hydrocarbon ignition and flame stabilization as a means for reduction of lengthy ignition delays and reaction times were studied. The ranges of applicability of chemical kinetic models of hydrogen-air combustors were also investigated. The CHARNAL computer code was applied to the turbulent reaction rate modeling.

  20. Evaluation of the relationship between diversion percentage and delay in a freeway corridor in Houston, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Sibok

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVERSION PERCENTAGE AND DELAY IN A FREEWAY CORRIDOR IN HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by SIBOK LEE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1991 Major Subject: Civil Engineering EVALUATION OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN DIVERSION PERCENTAGE AND DELAY IN A FREEWAY CORRIDOR IN HOUSTON, TEXAS A Thesis by SIBOK LEE Approved as to style...

  1. Propeller Flow Meter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enciso, Juan; Santistevan, Dean; Hla, Aung K.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Propeller flow meters are commonly used to measure water flow rate. They can also be used to estimate irrigation water use. This publication explains how to select, install, read and maintain propeller flow meters....

  2. Systematic Method for Evaluating Extraction and Injection Flow Rates for 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Unit Pump-and-Treat Interim Actions for Hydraulic Containment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spiliotopoulos, Alexandros A.

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes a systematic method to develop flow rate recommendations for Pump-and-Treat (P&T) extraction and injection wells in 100-KR-4 and 100-HR-3 Groundwater Operable Units (OU) of the Hanford Site. Flow rate recommendations are developed as part of ongoing performance monitoring and remedy optimization of the P&T interim actions to develop hydraulic contairnnent of the dissolved chromium plume in groundwater and protect the Columbia River from further discharges of groundwater from inland. This document details the methodology and data required to infer the influence of individual wells near the shoreline on hydraulic containment and river protection and develop flow rate recommendations to improve system performance and mitigate potential shortcomings of the system configuration in place.

  3. Evaluation of electron mobility in InSb quantum wells by means of percentage-impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mishima, T. D.; Edirisooriya, M.; Santos, M. B. [Homer L. Dodge Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Center for Semiconductor Physics in Nanostructure, University of Oklahoma, 440 W. Brooks St., Norman, OK 73019 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to quantitatively analyze the contribution of each scattering factor toward the total carrier mobility, we use a new convenient figure-of-merit, named a percentage impact. The mobility limit due to a scattering factor, which is widely used to summarize a scattering analysis, has its own advantage. However, a mobility limit is not quite appropriate for the above purpose. A comprehensive understanding of the difference in contribution among many scattering factors toward the total carrier mobility can be obtained by evaluating percentage impacts of scattering factors, which can be straightforwardly calculated from their mobility limits and the total mobility. Our percentage impact analysis shows that threading dislocation is one of the dominant scattering factors for the electron transport in InSb quantum wells at room temperature.

  4. Interlaboratory study of the reproducibility of the single-pass flow-through test method : measuring the dissolution rate of LRM glass at 70 {sup {degree}}C and pH 10.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, W. L.; Chemical Engineering

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An international interlaboratory study (ILS) was conducted to evaluate the precision with which single-pass flow-through (SPFT) tests can be conducted by following a method to be standardized by the American Society for Testing and Materials - International. Tests for the ILS were conducted with the low-activity reference material (LRM) glass developed previously for use as a glass test standard. Tests were conducted at 70 {+-} 2 C using a LiCl/LiOH solution as the leachant to impose an initial pH of about 10 (at 70 C). Participants were provided with LRM glass that had been crushed and sieved to isolate the -100 +200 mesh size fraction, and then washed to remove fines. Participants were asked to conduct a series of tests using different solution flow rate-to-sample mass ratios to generate a range of steady-state Si concentrations. The glass dissolution rate under each test condition was calculated using the steady-state Si concentration and solution flow rate that were measured in the test. The glass surface area was estimated from the mass of glass used in the test and the Si content of LRM glass was known. A linear relationship between the rate and the steady-state Si concentration (at Si concentrations less than 10 mg/L) was used to estimate the forward dissolution rate, which is the rate in the absence of dissolved Si. Participants were asked to sample the effluent solution at least five times after reaction times of between 3 and 14 days to measure the Si concentration and flow rate, and to verify that steady-state was achieved. Results were provided by seven participants and the data sets provided by five participants were sufficient to determine the forward rates independently.

  5. INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover (Martin et al.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    INTRODUCTIONINTRODUCTION Residential landscapes represent a large percentage of urban land cover to residential landscapes, we propose a conceptual model that integrates socioeconomic factors that influence, and socioeconomic factors: Exploring the relationships in a residential landscape. Susannah B. Lerman1 and Paige S

  6. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  7. Low volume flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

  8. The Effect of Adding Small Percentages of Finely Ground Metals to Enamels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyle, Glenn L.

    1912-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF ADDING SMALL PERCENTAGES OF FINELY GROUND METALS TO ENAMELS GLENN L. PYLE 1 9 1 2 THB OTKCT OP ADDING SMALL PERCENTAGES OF FINELY GROUND EETAL8 TO ENAKBLS. L a w r e n c e , K a n s a s , Hay 1 5 , 1 9 X 2 . P r o f e s s o r H. P... s t e r Row, London , 1 9 0 8 , 2 , T r a n s a c t i o n s American Ceramic S o c i e t y , V o l , X I , 1 9 0 9 , The A l l o w a b l e L i m i t s o f V a r i a t i o n s in the I n g r e d i e n t s o f Enamels f o r Shee t S t e e l , pages 1 0...

  9. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  10. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  11. Ice shelf-ocean interactions in a general circulation model : melt-rate modulation due to mean flow and tidal currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dansereau, Véronique

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between the ocean circulation in sub-ice shelf cavities and the overlying ice shelf have received considerable attention in the context of observed changes in flow speeds of marine ice sheets around Antarctica. ...

  12. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  13. Investigation into the high percentage of positive CG lightning along the west coast of the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ely, Brandon Lee

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    INVESTIGATION INTO THE HIGH PERCENTAGE OF POSITIVE CG LIGHTNING ALONG THE WEST COAST OF THE UNITED STATES A Thesis by BRANDON LEE ELY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2002 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences INVESTIGATION INTO THK HIGH PERCENTAGE OF POSITIVE CG LIGHTNING ALONG THE WEST COAST OF THK UNITED STATES A Thesis by BRANDON LEE ELY Submitted to Texas...

  14. Influence of taming on the episodic pattern of LH in peripheral plasma of percentage-Brahman heifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henricks, Rohn Hayden

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INFLUENCE OF TAMING ON THE EPISODIC PATTERN OF LH IN PERIPHERAL PLASMA OF PERCENTAGE-B~N HEIFERS A Thesis by ROHN HAYDEN HENRICKS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1982 Maj or Subj ect: Physiology of Reproduction INFLUENCE OF TAMING ON THE EPISODIC PATTERN OF LH IN PERIPHERAL PLASMA QF PERCENTAGE-BRAHMM HEIFERS A Thesis by ROHN HAYDEN HENRICKS Approved as to style and content...

  15. The influence of clover and fertilizer on yield and leaf percentage of four warm-season grasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conrad, Billy Ervin

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    the greater part of the plant and contained the major share of the protein. Reduction in leaf percentage as maturity advanced resulted in an overall decrease in protein content and an increase in fiber content. Waite and Sastry (28), working with Timothy...

  16. gtp_flow_power_estimator.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This simple spreadsheet model estimates either the flow rate required to produce a specified level of power output, or the power output that can be produced from a specified flow rate.

  17. Rate Schedules

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    One of the major responsibilities of Southeastern is to design, formulate, and justify rate schedules. Repayment studies prepared by the agency determine revenue requirements and appropriate rate...

  18. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  19. Interrater Agreement and Reliability of Observed Behaviors: Comparing Percentage Agreement, Kappa, Correlation Coefficient, ICC and G Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Qian

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    INTERRATER AGREEMENT AND RELIABILITY OF OBSERVED BEHAVIORS: COMPARING PERCENTAGE AGREEMENT, KAPPA, CORRELATION COEFFICIENT, ICC AND G THEORY A Thesis by QIAN CAO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... 2013 Major Subject: Educational Psychology Copyright 2013 Qian Cao ii ABSTRACT The study of interrater agreement and itnerrater reliability attract extensive attention, due to the fact that the judgments from multiple raters...

  20. Empirical Features of Spontaneous and Induced Traffic Breakdowns in Free Flow at Highway Bottlenecks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerner, Boris S; Klenov, Sergey L; Rehborn, Hubert; Leibel, Michael

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on an empirical study of real field traffic data measured in 1996--2014 through road detectors installed on German freeways, we reveal physical features of empirical nuclei for spontaneous traffic breakdown in free flow at highway bottlenecks. It is shown that the source of a nucleus for traffic breakdown is the solely difference between empirical spontaneous and induced traffic breakdowns at a highway bottleneck. Microscopic traffic simulations with a stochastic traffic flow model in the framework of three-phase theory explain the empirical findings. It turns out that in the most cases, a nucleus for empirical spontaneous traffic breakdown occurs through an interaction of one of waves in free flow with an empirical permanent speed disturbance localized at a highway bottleneck. The wave is a localized structure in free flow, in which the total flow rate is larger and the speed averaged across the highway is smaller than outside the wave. The waves in free flow appear due to oscilations in the percentage...

  1. Energy Rating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cabec Conference; Rashid Mir P. E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consistent, accurate, and uniform ratings based on a single statewide rating scale Reasonable estimates of potential utility bill savings and reliable recommendations on cost-effective measures to improve energy efficiency Training and certification procedures for home raters and quality assurance procedures to promote accurate ratings and to protect consumers Labeling procedures that will meet the needs of home buyers, homeowners, renters, the real estate industry, and mortgage lenders with an interest in home energy ratings

  2. Cotton flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Ulas Ozgur Kisisel; Ozgur Sarioglu; Bayram Tekin

    2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the conformally invariant Cotton tensor, we define a geometric flow, the "Cotton flow", which is exclusive to three dimensions. This flow tends to evolve the initial metrics into conformally flat ones, and is somewhat orthogonal to the Yamabe flow, the latter being a flow within a conformal class. We define an entropy functional, and study the flow of nine homogeneous spaces both numerically and analytically. In particular, we show that the arbitrarily deformed homogeneous 3-sphere flows into the round 3-sphere. Two of the nine homogeneous geometries, which are degenerated by the Ricci flow, are left intact by the Cotton flow.

  3. GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF MULTIPHASE FLOW NETWORKS IN OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    1 GLOBAL OPTIMIZATION OF MULTIPHASE FLOW NETWORKS IN OIL AND GAS PRODUCTION SYSTEMS MSc. Hans in an oil production system is developed. Each well may be manipulated by injecting lift gas and adjusting in the maximum oil flow rate, water flow rate, liquid flow rate, and gas flow rate. The wells may also

  4. Flow Duration Curve Load Duration Curve

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flow Duration Curve Load Duration Curve 1. Develop Flow Duration Curve 2. Estimate load given flow and concentration data--select appropriate conversion factors 3. Develop Load Duration Curve 4. Plot observed data with Load Duration Curve What are they? How do you make one? Describes the percent of time a flow rate

  5. Microelectromechanical flow control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat (NE Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) flow control apparatus is disclosed which includes a fluid channel formed on a substrate from a first layer of a nonconducting material (e.g. silicon nitride). A first electrode is provided on the first layer of the nonconducting material outside the flow channel; and a second electrode is located on a second layer of the nonconducting material above the first layer. A voltage applied between the first and second electrodes deforms the fluid channel to increase its cross-sectional size and thereby increase a flow of a fluid through the channel. In certain embodiments of the present invention, the fluid flow can be decreased or stopped by applying a voltage between the first electrode and the substrate. A peristaltic pumping of the fluid through the channel is also possible when the voltage is applied in turn between a plurality of first electrodes and the substrate. A MEM flow control assembly can also be formed by providing one or more MEM flow control devices on a common substrate together with a submicron filter. The MEM flow control assembly can optionally include a plurality of pressure sensors for monitoring fluid pressure and determining flow rates through the assembly.

  6. Self-regulating flow control device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Humphreys, Duane A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

  7. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the construction directs flat cells near to the area of one dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates.

  8. Formulation, Pretreatment, and Densification Options to Improve Biomass Specifications for Co-Firing High Percentages with Coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaya Shankar Tumuluru; J Richard Hess; Richard D. Boardman; Shahab Sokhansanj; Christopher T. Wright; Tyler L. Westover

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing interest internationally to use more biomass for power generation, given the potential for significant environmental benefits and long-term fuel sustainability. However, the use of biomass alone for power generation is subject to serious challenges, such as feedstock supply reliability, quality, and stability, as well as comparative cost, except in situations in which biomass is locally sourced. In most countries, only a limited biomass supply infrastructure exists. Alternatively, co-firing biomass alongwith coal offers several advantages; these include reducing challenges related to biomass quality, buffering the system against insufficient feedstock quantity, and mitigating the costs of adapting existing coal power plants to feed biomass exclusively. There are some technical constraints, such as low heating values, low bulk density, and grindability or size-reduction challenges, as well as higher moisture, volatiles, and ash content, which limit the co-firing ratios in direct and indirect co-firing. To achieve successful co-firing of biomass with coal, biomass feedstock specifications must be established to direct pretreatment options in order to modify biomass materials into a format that is more compatible with coal co-firing. The impacts on particle transport systems, flame stability, pollutant formation, and boiler-tube fouling/corrosion must also be minimized by setting feedstock specifications, which may include developing new feedstock composition by formulation or blending. Some of the issues, like feeding, co-milling, and fouling, can be overcome by pretreatment methods including washing/leaching, steam explosion, hydrothermal carbonization, and torrefaction, and densification methods such as pelletizing and briquetting. Integrating formulation, pretreatment, and densification will help to overcome issues related to physical and chemical composition, storage, and logistics to successfully co-fire higher percentages of biomass ( > 40%) with coal.

  9. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A. [Department of Engineering, ROMA TRE University, via della Vasca Navale 79/81, Rome (Italy)

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of {+-}3.00 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} m{sup 3}/s ({+-}18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r{sup 2} is equal to 0.997; for the bi-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r{sup 2} is equal to 0.990 for positive flows (inspiration) and 0.988 for negative flows (expiration). Measurement uncertainty {delta}Q of air flow rate has been evaluated by means of the propagation of distributions and the percentage error in the arrangement of bi-directional sensor ranges from a minimum of about 0.5% at -18.0 l/min to a maximum of about 9% at -12.0 l/min.

  10. Classification of Two-Phase Flow Patterns by Ultrasonic Sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    in addition to several other factors such as the bulk flow rate, fluid properties, and flow boundary conditions [1]. Characterization of flow patterns and identification of the associ- ated flow regimes instrumentation, both for void fraction identification and flow pattern classification. High-speed photog- raphy

  11. Rate schedule

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

  12. The transition from the annular to the slug flow regime in two-phase flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberstroh, Robert D.

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to determine the transition from annular to semiannular flow regimes for two-phase, gas-liquid upflow in vertical tubes. The influencesof liquid flow rate, tube diameter, liquid viscosity, surface ...

  13. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  14. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  15. MSET modeling of Crystal River-3 venturi flow meters.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bockhorst, F. K.; Gross, K. C.; Herzog, J. P.; Wegerich, S. W.

    1998-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of archived Crystal River-3 feedwater flow data reveals a slow and steady degradation of the flow meter measurements during the 1992/1993 operating cycle. MSET can reliably estimate the true flow rate and quantify the degree of departure between the indicated signal and the true flow rate with high accuracy. The MSET computed flow rate could, in principle, be used to provide an improved estimate of the reactor power and hence avoid the revenue loss associated with derating the reactor based on a faulty feedwater flow rate indication.

  16. Rate-decline Relations for Unconventional Reservoirs and Development of Parametric Correlations for Estimation of Reservoir Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Askabe, Yohanes 1985-

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    producing at a constant bottomhole pressure can be shown on a type curve together with Arps' empirical relations. The author showed that material balance relations can be combined with pseudosteady-state relations to provide a rate equation with a form... using percentage decline of rate and cumulative percentage curves to project the performance of the well to future time. The authors have also shown that the average percentage rate decline when plotted on a log-log plot exhibits a power-law behavior...

  17. Active combustion flow modulation valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hensel, John Peter; Black, Nathaniel; Thorton, Jimmy Dean; Vipperman, Jeffrey Stuart; Lambeth, David N; Clark, William W

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow modulation valve has a slidably translating hollow armature with at least one energizable coil wound around and fixably attached to the hollow armature. The energizable coil or coils are influenced by at least one permanent magnet surrounding the hollow armature and supported by an outer casing. Lorentz forces on the energizable coils which are translated to the hollow armature, increase or decrease the flow area to provide flow throttling action. The extent of hollow armature translation depends on the value of current supplied and the direction of translation depends on the direction of current flow. The compact nature of the flow modulation valve combined with the high forces afforded by the actuator design provide a flow modulation valve which is highly responsive to high-rate input control signals.

  18. Workshop on hypersonic flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Povinelli, L.A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview is given of research activity on the application of computational fluid dynamics (CDF) for hypersonic propulsion systems. After the initial consideration of the highly integrated nature of air-breathing hypersonic engines and airframe, attention is directed toward computations carried out for the components of the engine. A generic inlet configuration is considered in order to demonstrate the highly three dimensional viscous flow behavior occurring within rectangular inlets. Reacting flow computations for simple jet injection as well as for more complex combustion chambers are then discussed in order to show the capability of viscous finite rate chemical reaction computer simulations. Finally, the nozzle flow fields are demonstrated, showing the existence of complex shear layers and shock structure in the exhaust plume. The general issues associated with code validation as well as the specific issue associated with the use of CFD for design are discussed. A prognosis for the success of CFD in the design of future propulsion systems is offered.

  19. Two-Phase Flow of Two HFC Refrigerant Mixtures Through Short Tube Orifices, Draft Final Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Payne, W. V.; O'Neal, D. L.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present study presents data for flow of two refrigerant mixtures through short tube orifices. The two mixtures were R3211251134a (23%/25%/52% on a mass percentage basis) and R321125 (50%/50%). The following presents results for the flow...

  20. Test Anxiety is a psychological condition experienced by a very small percentage of individuals. Test Anxiety should be confirmed by a licensed counselor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    ·Test Anxiety is a psychological condition experienced by a very small percentage of individuals. Test Anxiety should be confirmed by a licensed counselor. ·Test Worry is the culmination of real or perceived pressure and expectations from yourself or others. Test Worry is often the result of varying

  1. UZ Flow Models and Submodels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Y. Wu

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to document the unsaturated zone (UZ) flow models and submodels, as well as the flow fields that have been generated using the UZ flow model(s) of Yucca Mountain, Nevada. In this report, the term ''UZ model'' refers to the UZ flow model and the several submodels, which include tracer transport, temperature or ambient geothermal, pneumatic or gas flow, and geochemistry (chloride, calcite, and strontium) submodels. The term UZ flow model refers to the three-dimensional models used for calibration and simulation of UZ flow fields. This work was planned in the ''Technical Work Plan (TWP) for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Section 1.2.7). The table of included Features, Events, and Processes (FEPs), Table 6.2-11, is different from the list of included FEPs assigned to this report in the ''Technical Work Plan for: Unsaturated Zone Flow Analysis and Model Report Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169654], Table 2.1.5-1), as discussed in Section 6.2.6. The UZ model has revised, updated, and enhanced the previous UZ model (BSC 2001 [DIRS 158726]) by incorporating the repository design with new grids, recalibration of property sets, and more comprehensive validation effort. The flow fields describe fracture-fracture, matrix-matrix, and fracture-matrix liquid flow rates, and their spatial distributions as well as moisture conditions in the UZ system. These three-dimensional UZ flow fields are used directly by Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA). The model and submodels evaluate important hydrogeologic processes in the UZ as well as geochemistry and geothermal conditions. These provide the necessary framework to test hypotheses of flow and transport at different scales, and predict flow and transport behavior under a variety of climatic conditions. In addition, the limitations of the UZ model are discussed in Section 8.11.

  2. 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during a one-day period and the rate of air flowing through the furnace are to be determined.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    7-11 7-29 A coal-burning power plant produces 300 MW of power. The amount of coal consumed during The heating value of the coal is given to be 28,000 kJ/kg. Analysis (a) The rate and the amount of heat inputs'tQQ The amount and rate of coal consumed during this period are kg/s48.33 s360024 kg10893.2 MJ/kg28 MJ101.8 6

  3. Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen C, Hoogendoom S, Hudson B, Prince J, Teichert K, Wood J, Chase K

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.

  4. Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

  5. PACKAGE (Plasma Analysis, Chemical Kinetics and Generator Efficiency): a computer program for the calculation of partial chemical equilibrium/partial chemical rate controlled composition of multiphased mixtures under one dimensional steady flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousefian, V.; Weinberg, M.H.; Haimes, R.

    1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NASA CEC Code was the starting point for PACKAGE, whose function is to evaluate the composition of a multiphase combustion product mixture under the following chemical conditions: (1) total equilibrium with pure condensed species; (2) total equilibrium with ideal liquid solution; (3) partial equilibrium/partial finite rate chemistry; and (4) fully finite rate chemistry. The last three conditions were developed to treat the evolution of complex mixtures such as coal combustion products. The thermodynamic variable pairs considered are either pressure (P) and enthalpy, P and entropy, at P and temperature. Minimization of Gibbs free energy is used. This report gives detailed discussions of formulation and input/output information used in the code. Sample problems are given. The code development, description, and current programming constraints are discussed. (DLC)

  6. Research Article Milli-free flow electrophoresis: I. Fast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krylov, Sergey

    , but has not yet been implemented due to an incompatibility of scale. Continuous purification, in FFE a term of milli-free flow electrophoresis (mFFE) to describe mid-scale FFE with flow rates intermediate reactors with product flow rates of $5 to 2000 mL/min, too small for macro-FFE but too large for m

  7. Constraints on flow regimes in wide-aperture fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, significant advances have been made in our understanding of the complex flow processes in individual fractures, aided by flow visualization experiments and conceptual modeling efforts. These advances have led to the recognition of several flow regimes in individual fractures subjected to different initial and boundary conditions. Of these, the most important regimes are film flow, rivulet flow, and sliding of droplets. The existence of such significantly dissimilar flow regimes has been a major hindrance in the development of self-consistent conceptual models of flow for single fractures that encompass all the flow regimes. The objective of this study is to delineate the existence of the different flow regimes in individual fractures. For steady-state flow conditions, we developed physical constraints on the different flow regimes that satisfy minimum energy configurations, which enabled us to segregate the wide range of fracture transmissivity (volumetric flow rate per fracture width) into several flow regimes. These are, in increasing order of flow rate, flow of adsorbed films, flow of sliding drops, rivulet flow, stable film flow, and unstable (turbulent) film flow. The scope of this study is limited to wide-aperture fractures with the flow on the opposing sides of fracture being independent.

  8. Design and Fabrication of a Vertical Pump Multiphase Flow Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirkland, Klayton 1965-

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    is supplied by separate air and water inlet flows that mix just before entering the pump. These flows can be controlled to give a desired gas volume fraction and overall flow rate. The pump outlet flows into a tank which separates the fluids allowing them...

  9. Flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, G.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A Faraday cage is described which encloses the flow chamber of a cytometer. Ground planes associated with each field deflection plate inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates. They also increase forces applied to a passing charged event for accurate focus while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard. 4 figs.

  10. Measuring rates of outdoor airflow into HVAC systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Delp, Woody

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last few years, new technologies have been introduced for measuring the flow rates of outside air into HVAC systems. This document describes one particular technology for measuring these airflows, a system and a related protocol developed to evaluate this and similar measurement technologies under conditions without wind, and the results of our evaluations. We conclude that the measurement technology evaluated can provide a reasonably accurate measurement of OA flow rate over a broad range of flow, without significantly increasing airflow resistance.

  11. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  12. k - Version of Finite Element Method for Polymer flows using Giesekus Constitutive Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshpande, Kedar M.

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    and hence high Deborah number flows are invariably associated with higher flow rates and thus higher velocities. In many standard model problems such as couette flow, lid driven cavity, expansion, contraction etc, severe deborah number (De) limitations...

  13. Pressure-flow reducer for aerosol focusing devices

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gard, Eric (San Francisco, CA); Riot, Vincent (Oakland, CA); Coffee, Keith (Diablo Grande, CA); Woods, Bruce (Livermore, CA); Tobias, Herbert (Kensington, CA); Birch, Jim (Albany, CA); Weisgraber, Todd (Brentwood, CA)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressure-flow reducer, and an aerosol focusing system incorporating such a pressure-flow reducer, for performing high-flow, atmosphere-pressure sampling while delivering a tightly focused particle beam in vacuum via an aerodynamic focusing lens stack. The pressure-flow reducer has an inlet nozzle for adjusting the sampling flow rate, a pressure-flow reduction region with a skimmer and pumping ports for reducing the pressure and flow to enable interfacing with low pressure, low flow aerosol focusing devices, and a relaxation chamber for slowing or stopping aerosol particles. In this manner, the pressure-flow reducer decouples pressure from flow, and enables aerosol sampling at atmospheric pressure and at rates greater than 1 liter per minute.

  14. Flow conditions of fresh mortar and concrete in different pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.jacobsen@ntnu.n [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway); Haugan, Lars; Hammer, Tor Arne [SINTEF Byggforsk AS Building and Infrastructure, Trondheim (Norway); Kalogiannidis, Evangelos [Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Dept of Structural Engineering, Trondheim (Norway)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The variation in fresh concrete flow rate over the pipe cross section was investigated on differently coloured and highly flowable concrete mixes flowing through pipes of different materials (rubber, steel, acryl). First, uncoloured (gray) concrete was poured through the pipe and the pipe blocked. Similar but coloured (black) concrete was then poured into the pipe filled with gray concrete, flowing after the gray concrete for a while before being blocked and hardened. The advance of the colouring along the pipe wall (showing boundary flow rate) was observed on the moulded concrete surface appearing after removing the pipe from the hardened concrete. The shapes of the interfaces between uncoloured and coloured concrete (showing variation of flow rate over the pipe cross section) were observed on sawn surfaces of concrete half cylinders cut along the length axes of the concrete-filled pipe. Flow profiles over the pipe cross section were clearly seen with maximum flow rates near the centre of the pipe and low flow rate at the pipe wall (typically rubber pipe with reference concrete without silica fume and/or stabilizers). More plug-shaped profiles, with long slip layers and less variation of flow rate over the cross section, were also seen (typically in smooth acrylic pipes). Flow rate, amount of concrete sticking to the wall after flow and SEM-images of pipe surface roughness were observed, illustrating the problem of testing full scale pumping.

  15. SFTEL: Flow Cell | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Flow Cell EMSL's Subsurface Flow and Transport Experimental Laboratory offers several meter-scale flow cells and columns for research in saturated and unsaturated porous media....

  16. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, Susan

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  17. Chlorite Dissolution Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Carroll, Susan

    Spreadsheets provides measured chlorite rate data from 100 to 300C at elevated CO2. Spreadsheet includes derived rate equation.

  18. Oil Flow Rale Problem Behler, David D 0 McNutt, Marcia K 05/23/201001 :04 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    Oil Flow Rale Problem t Behler, David D 0 McNutt, Marcia K 05/23/201001 :04 PM Marcia - just some thoughts on the oil flow rate problem. Over the past few weeks, it's become apparent that the oil flow rate it's best to frame a range of estimated oil flow rates and refine the range over time as the tools

  19. Shelling Percentage in Grain Sorghum.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conner, A. B. (Arthur Benjamin)

    1922-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . REINHARD, B. S., Entomolo~ist L. R. \\\\'atson, A. M., Apiculturist C. S. RUDE, B. S , EntornoIo~isf A. H. ALEX, B. S., Queen Breeder \\V P. TRICE. B. S., Assrstant Entomologist AGRONOMY A. B. CONNER R. S Chief- Crops . A. H. ~Ernrc,; B. s:: ~gro...

  20. Capacitance-based prover for gas flow meters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pipkins, Sean Patrick

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Sunday . . . Stability Measurement: /tC vs. Time (21 Feb 95). . . . Capacitance vs. Time for Mass Flow Rate of 124. 7 g/s. . . . 41 41 42 23 Capacitance vs. Time for Mass Flow Rate of 124. 7 g/s (06 Apr 95). . . . . . . . . . . 43 24 25 Pressure... vs. Time for Mass Flow Rate of 124. 7 g/s (06 Apr 95). . . . Capacitance vs. Time for Mass Flow Rate of 209. 1 g/s. . . . 43 44 FIGURE 26 Capacitance vs. Time for Loading Phase 27 Pressure vs. Time for Loading Phase. 28 T; vs. Time...

  1. Scaling bounds on dissipation in turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seis, Christian

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new rigorous method for estimating statistical quantities in fluid dynamics such as the (average) energy dissipation rate directly from the equations of motion. The method is tested on shear flow, channel flow, Rayleigh--B\\'enard convection and porous medium convection.

  2. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the FY Mid-Year Change 10012013 - 03312014 04012014 - 09302014 Power Rates Annual Revenue Requirement Rate Schedule Power Revenue Requirement 73,441,557...

  3. Method and apparatus for controlling fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, J.R.

    1980-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for precisely controlling the rate (and hence amount) of fluid flow are given. The controlled flow rate is finely adjustable, can be extremely small (on the order of microliter-atmospheres per second), can be adjusted to zero (flow stopped), and is stable to better than 1% with time. The dead volume of the valve can be made arbitrarily small, in fact essentially zero. The valve employs no wearing mechanical parts (including springs, stems, or seals). The valve is finely adjustable, has a flow rate dynamic range of many decades, can be made compatible with any fluid, and is suitable for incorporation into an open or closed loop servo-control system.

  4. Electroosmotic flow pumps with polymer frits Shulin Zenga,*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santiago, Juan G.

    Electroosmotic flow pumps with polymer frits Shulin Zenga,* , Chuan-Hua Chena , Juan G. Santiagoa 11 November 2001 Abstract Electroosmotic flow (EOF) pumps with flow rates on the order of 1 ml/min have been designed and fabricated. These pumps use EOF to propel liquid solutions in a compact system

  5. The effects of flow rate on in vivo fluorescence measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sweet, Stephen Thomas

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . 0 0 Te pe:lf 340 2 iZ 15 io I 4 Ti e (GMT) 2( 0 3 6 9 I 15 Io I 4 T [Gl I I I b. p(M 4. 0 3. 0 51 2. 5 'I 0 1. 5 0. 1 I. o 0$ 0. 0 21 4 3 6 9 12 15 Ti e (Ghrrl 10 21 24 0, 0 zr 0 3 6 9 12 )S 10 I Ti e (GI(IT) 150 100 fc ep... the ring ((36. 1 ppt) was lower than surrounding waters of the Gulf of Mexico (36. 4 to 36. 5 ppt). Lower surface salinities within the cyclonic eddy are consistent with previous work in the western Gulf of Mexico ( Elliott, 1979; Sweet and Guinasso...

  6. Control Strategies for Centrifugal Pumps with Variable Flow Rate

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009 activities on DOE facilitiesWorkforce

  7. Property:FirstWellFlowRate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProcedures Jump to: navigation,JumpFirstWellDepth

  8. Property:GeofluidGeosteamFlowRate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County, Maine:Plug PowerAddressDataFormat JumpNercMroURL. Pages using

  9. A survey of air flow models for multizone structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feustel, H.E.; Dieris, J.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Air flow models are used to simulate the rates of incoming and outgoing air flows for a building with known leakage under given weather and shielding conditions. Additional information about the flow paths and air-mass flows inside the building can only by using multizone air flow models. In order to obtain more information on multizone air flow models, a literature review was performed in 1984. A second literature review and a questionnaire survey performed in 1989, revealed the existence of 50 multizone air flow models, all developed since 1966, two of which are still under development. All these programs use similar flow equations for crack flow but differ in the versatility to describe the full range of flow phenomena and the algorithm provided for solving the set of nonlinear equations. This literature review was found that newer models are able to describe and simulate the ventilation systems and interrelation of mechanical and natural ventilation. 27 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Evolution of flow disturbances in cocurrent gas-liquid flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCready, M.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of interfacial waves in horizontal gas-liquid flows, close to neutral stability, suggest that the rate of evolution of the interface may be linked to nonlinear interactions between the fundamental mode and the subharmonic -- even if the subharmonic is linearly stable. The rate of evolution increases as the subharmonic becomes more unstable. A comparison of linear stability techniques used to predict the initial behavior of waves reveals similar predictions of growth rates and almost identical speeds between a two layer laminar Orr-Sommerfeld theory and an Orr-Sommerfeld theory when the effect of the (turbulent) gas flow enters as boundary conditions on the liquid layer. However, there is disagreement at small wavenumbers as to the point at which the growth curve crosses 0. This is a significant problem because longwave disturbances, in our case roll waves, form by growth of (initially) small amplitude waves that have frequencies which are 0.5 to 1 Hz, which is in the range where the two theories disagree about the sign of the growth rate. While nonlinear effects are probably involved in the formation of the peak (at least while its amplitude is small), the linear growth rate must play an important role when the amplitude is small.

  11. Numerical simulations of the Macondo well blowout reveal strong control of oil flow by reservoir permeability and exsolution of gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, C.M.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for estimates of the oil and gas flow rate from the Macondoteam and carried out oil and gas flow simulations using theoil-gas system. The flow of oil and gas was simulated using

  12. Pressure Normalization of Production Rates Improves Forecasting Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacayo Ortiz, Juan Manuel

    2013-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . However, these new decline curve analysis (DCA) methods are still based only on production rate data, relying on the assumption of stable flowing pressure. Since this stabilized state is not reached rapidly in most cases, the applicability of these methods...

  13. Basal melt rates beneath Whillans Ice Stream, West Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beem, Lucas H.; Jezek, Ken C.; Van Der Veen, C. J.

    2010-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Basal water lubricates and enables the fast flow of the West Antarctic ice streams which exist under low gravitational driving stress. Identification of sources and rates of basal meltwater production can provide insight into the dynamics of ice...

  14. Dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Graydon L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

  15. Bacteria in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

  16. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at various planes. Together, these two techniques can provide the needed local solids flow dynamic information for the same setup under identical operating conditions, and the data obtained can be used as a benchmark for development, and refinement of the appropriate riser models. For the above reasons these two techniques were implemented in this study on a fully developed section of the riser. To derive the global mixing information in the riser, accurate solids RTD is needed and was obtained by monitoring the entry and exit of a single radioactive tracer. Other global parameters such as Cycle Time Distribution (CTD), overall solids holdup in the riser, solids recycle percentage at the bottom section of the riser were evaluated from different solids travel time distributions. Besides, to measure accurately and in-situ the overall solids mass flux, a novel method was applied.

  17. Binary fish passage models for uniform and nonuniform flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Binary fish passage models are considered by many fisheries managers to be the best 21 available practice for culvert inventory assessments and for fishway and barrier design. 22 Misunderstandings between different binary passage modeling approaches often arise, 23 however, due to differences in terminology, application and presentation. In this paper 24 one-dimensional binary fish passage models are reviewed and refined to clarify their 25 origins and applications. For uniform flow, a simple exhaustion-threshold (ET) model 26 equation is derived that predicts the flow speed threshold in a fishway or velocity barrier 27 that causes exhaustion at a given maximum distance of ascent. Flow speeds at or above 28 the threshold predict failure to pass (exclusion). Flow speeds below the threshold predict 29 passage. The binary ET model is therefore intuitive and easily applied to predict passage 30 or exclusion. It is also shown to be consistent with the distance-maximizing model. The 31 ET model s limitation to uniform flow is addressed by deriving a passage model that 32 accounts for nonuniform flow conditions more commonly found in the field, including 33 backwater profiles and drawdown curves. Comparison of these models with 34 experimental observations of volitional passage for Gambusia affinis in uniform and 35 nonuniform flows indicates reasonable prediction of binary outcomes (passage or 36 exclusion) if the flow speed is not near the threshold flow velocity. More research is 37 needed on fish behavior, passage strategies under nonuniform flow regimes and 38 stochastic methods that account for individual differences in swimming performance at or 39 near the threshold flow speed. Future experiments should track and measure ground 40 speeds of ascending fish to test nonuniform flow passage strategies and to improve model 41 predictions. Stochastic models, such as Monte-Carlo techniques, that account for 42 different passage performance among individuals and allow prediction of the percentage 43 of fish passing would be particularly useful near flow speed thresholds where binary 44 passage models are clearly limited.

  18. Flow enhancement in nanotubes of different materials and lengths

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ritos, Konstantinos, E-mail: konstantinos.ritos@strath.ac.uk [James Weir Fluids Lab, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom)] [James Weir Fluids Lab, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G1 1XJ (United Kingdom); Mattia, Davide [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Calabrò, Francesco [DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, 03043 Cassino (Italy)] [DIEI, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale, 03043 Cassino (Italy); Reese, Jason M. [School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)] [School of Engineering, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh EH9 3JL (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The high water flow rates observed in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have previously been attributed to the unfavorable energetic interaction between the liquid and the graphitic walls of the CNTs. This paper reports molecular dynamics simulations of water flow in carbon, boron nitride, and silicon carbide nanotubes that show the effect of the solid-liquid interactions on the fluid flow. Alongside an analytical model, these results show that the flow enhancement depends on the tube's geometric characteristics and the solid-liquid interactions.

  19. Pressure and flow characteristics of restrictive flow orifice devices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrouf, Roger D.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Restrictive Flow Orifice (RFO) can be used to enhance the safe design of a pressure system in several ways. Pressure systems frequently incorporate a regulator and relief valve to protect the downstream equipment from accidental overpressure caused by regulator failure. Analysis frequently shows that in cases of high-flow regulator failure, the downstream pressure may rise significantly above the set pressure of the relief valve. This is due to limited flow capacity of the relief valve. A different regulator or relief valve may need to be selected. A more economical solution to this problem is to use an RFO to limit the maximum system flow to acceptable limits within the flow capacity of the relief valve, thereby enhancing the overpressure protection of laboratory equipment. An RFO can also be used to limit the uncontrolled release of system fluid (gas or liquid) upon component or line failure. As an example, potential asphyxiation hazards resultant from the release of large volumes of inert gas from a 'house' nitrogen system can be controlled by the use of an RFO. This report describes a versatile new Sandia-designed RFO available from the Swagelok Company and specifies the gas flow characteristics of this device. Two sizes, 0.010 and 0.020 inch diameter RFOs are available. These sizes will allow enhanced safety for many common applications. This new RFO design are now commercially available and provide advantages over existing RFOs: a high pressure rating (6600 psig); flow through the RFO is equal for either forward or reverse directions; they minimize the potential for leakage by incorporating the highest quality threaded connections; and can enhance the safety of pressure systems.

  20. Predicting the pressure driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, B.L.; Carlson, R.W.; Fischer, L.E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large body of experimentally measured gas flow rates were obtained from the literature and then compared to the predictions obtained with constitutive flow equations. This was done to determine whether the equations apply to the predictions of gas flow rates from leaking containment vessels used to transport radioactive materials. The experiments consisted of measuring the volumetric pressure-driven flow of gases through micro-capillaries and micro-orifices. The experimental results were compared to the predictions obtained with the equations given in ANSI N14.5 the American National Standard for Radioactive Materials-Leakage Tests on Package for Shipment. The equations were applied to both (1) the data set according to the recommendations given in ANSI N14.5 and (2) globally to the complete data set. It was found that: The continuum and molecular flow equation provided good agreement between the experimental and calculated flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s. The choked flow equation resulted in over-prediction of the flow rates for flow rates less than about 1 atm-cm{sup 3}/s. For flow rates higher than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, the molecular and continuum flow equation over-predicted the measured flow rates and the predictions obtained with the choked flow equation agreed well with the experimental values. Since the flow rates of interest for packages used to transport radioactive materials are almost always less than 1 atm{center_dot}cm{sup 3}/s, it is suggested that the continuum and molecular flow equation be used for gas flow rate predictions related to these applications.

  1. Flow Distances on Open Flow Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guo, Liangzhu; Shi, Peiteng; Wang, Jun; Huang, Xiaohan; Zhang, Jiang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Open flow network is a weighted directed graph with a source and a sink, depicting flux distributions on networks in the steady state of an open flow system. Energetic food webs, economic input-output networks, and international trade networks, are open flow network models of energy flows between species, money or value flows between industrial sectors, and goods flows between countries, respectively. Flow distances (first-passage or total) between any given two nodes $i$ and $j$ are defined as the average number of transition steps of a random walker along the network from $i$ to $j$ under some conditions. They apparently deviate from the conventional random walk distance on a closed directed graph because they consider the openness of the flow network. Flow distances are explicitly expressed by underlying Markov matrix of a flow system in this paper. With this novel theoretical conception, we can visualize open flow networks, calculating centrality of each node, and clustering nodes into groups. We apply fl...

  2. A constitutive law for dense granular flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierre Jop; Yoël Forterre; Olivier Pouliquen

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A continuum description of granular flows would be of considerable help in predicting natural geophysical hazards or in designing industrial processes. However, the constitutive equations for dry granular flows, which govern how the material moves under shear, are still a matter of debate. One difficulty is that grains can behave like a solid (in a sand pile), a liquid (when poured from a silo) or a gas (when strongly agitated). For the two extreme regimes, constitutive equations have been proposed based on kinetic theory for collisional rapid flows, and soil mechanics for slow plastic flows. However, the intermediate dense regime, where the granular material flows like a liquid, still lacks a unified view and has motivated many studies over the past decade. The main characteristics of granular liquids are: a yield criterion (a critical shear stress below which flow is not possible) and a complex dependence on shear rate when flowing. In this sense, granular matter shares similarities with classical visco-plastic fluids such as Bingham fluids. Here we propose a new constitutive relation for dense granular flows, inspired by this analogy and recent numerical and experimental work. We then test our three-dimensional (3D) model through experiments on granular flows on a pile between rough sidewalls, in which a complex 3D flow pattern develops. We show that, without any fitting parameter, the model gives quantitative predictions for the flow shape and velocity profiles. Our results support the idea that a simple visco-plastic approach can quantitatively capture granular flow properties, and could serve as a basic tool for modelling more complex flows in geophysical or industrial applications.

  3. Theoretical uncertainty of orifice flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Husain, Z.D. [Daniel Flow Products, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Orifice meters are the most common meters used for fluid flow measurement, especially for measuring hydrocarbons. Meters are rugged, mechanically simple, and well suited for field use under extreme weather conditions. Because of their long history of use and dominance in the fluid flow measurement, their designs, installation requirements, and equations for flow rate calculation have been standardized by different organizations in the United States and internationally. These standards provide the guideline for the users to achieve accurate flow measurement. and minimize measurement uncertainty. This paper discusses different factors that contribute to the measurement inaccuracy and provide an awareness to minimize or eliminate these errors. Many factors which influence the overall measurement uncertainty are associated with the orifice meter application. Major contributors to measurement uncertainty include the predictability of flow profile, fluid properties at flowing condition, precision of empirical equation for discharge coefficient, manufacturing tolerances in meter components, and the uncertainty associated with secondary devices monitoring the static line pressure, differential pressure across the orifice plate, flowing temperature, etc. Major factors contributing to the measurement uncertainty for a thin, concentric, square-edged orifice flowmeter are as follows: (a) Tolerances in prediction of coefficient of discharge, (b) Predictability in defining the physical properties of the flowing fluid, (c) Fluid flow condition, (d) Construction tolerances in meter components, (e) Uncertainty of secondary devices/instrumentation, and (f) Data reduction and computation. Different factors under each of the above areas are discussed with precautionary measures and installation procedures to minimize or eliminate measurement uncertainty.

  4. Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow 1.0 Introduction and notation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Security Constrained Optimal Power Flow 1.0 Introduction and notation Figure 1 below compares the optimal power flow (OPF) with the security-constrained optimal power flow (SCOPF). Fig. 1 Some comments normal flow moves from just 100% of continuous rating. SCOPF differs from an OPF solution

  5. TRACKING ELEPHANT FLOWS IN INTERNET BACKBONE TRAFFIC WITH AN FPGA-BASED CACHE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haddadi, Hamed

    TRACKING ELEPHANT FLOWS IN INTERNET BACKBONE TRAFFIC WITH AN FPGA-BASED CACHE Martin Zadnik an FPGA-friendly approach to track- ing elephant flows in network traffic. Our approach, Single Step elephant flows: con- servatively promoting potential elephants and evicting low- rate flows in LRU manner

  6. Heart Rate Artifact Suppression.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Christopher

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Motion artifact strongly corrupts heart rate measurements in current pulse oximetry systems. In many, almost any motion will greatly diminish the system’s ability to extract… (more)

  7. Residential Solar Valuation Rates

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Solar Valuation Rates Karl R. Rbago Rbago Energy LLC 1 The Ideal Residential Solar Tariff Fair to the utility and non-solar customers Fair compensation to...

  8. Effective Rate Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    charges or credits associated with the creation, termination, or modification to any tariff, contract, or rate schedule accepted or approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory...

  9. LCC Guidance Rates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Notepad text file provides the LCC guidance rates in a numbered format for the various regions throughout the U.S.

  10. Investigating the stability of viscoelastic stagnation flows in T-shaped microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soulage, Johannes

    We investigate the stability of steady planar stagnation flows of a dilute polyethylene oxide (PEO) solution using T-shaped microchannels. The precise flow rate control and well-defined geometries achievable with microfluidic ...

  11. Energy Efficient Process Heating: Managing Air Flow Kevin Carpenter and Kelly Kissock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kissock, Kelly

    temperature and decreased combustion gas mass flow rate. The method for calculating savings from preheating flow include minimizing combustion air, preheating combustion air, minimizing ventilation air from minimizing combustion air accounts for improvement in efficiency from increased combustion

  12. Molecular dynamics simulations of oscillatory Couette flows with slip boundary conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikolai V. Priezjev

    2012-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of interfacial slip on steady-state and time-periodic flows of monatomic liquids is investigated using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The fluid phase is confined between atomically smooth rigid walls, and the fluid flows are induced by moving one of the walls. In steady shear flows, the slip length increases almost linearly with shear rate. We found that the velocity profiles in oscillatory flows are well described by the Stokes flow solution with the slip length that depends on the local shear rate. Interestingly, the rate dependence of the slip length obtained in steady shear flows is recovered when the slip length in oscillatory flows is plotted as a function of the local shear rate magnitude. For both types of flows, the friction coefficient at the liquid-solid interface correlates well with the structure of the first fluid layer near the solid wall.

  13. Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist in cross section and the channel flows along a boundary between the t

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Results Geology. Most of the Guadalupe River flows through either Glen Rose Limestone, or Fluviatile Terrace Deposits. Combined geologic categories are designated where two geologic units exist length. The highest percentage of bedrock coverage per geologic type appears in combined categories (Fig

  14. Previous Power Rates (rates/current)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar Home DesignPresentations Presentations SortConferences PreviousRates

  15. Power Rate Cases (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

  16. Power Rates Announcements (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006PhotovoltaicSeptember 22,ReactorAbout Power > FinancialPowerRates

  17. Rates Meetings and Workshops (pbl/rates)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. |INCIDENCET3PACI-T3Rate

  18. Flow Split Venturi, Axially-Rotated Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walrath, David E. (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY); Burgess, Robert K. (Sheridan, WY); LaBelle, James (Murrieta, CA)

    2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides an axially-rotated valve which permits increased flow rates and lower pressure drop (characterized by a lower loss coefficient) by using an axial eccentric split venturi with two portions where at least one portion is rotatable with respect to the other portion. The axially-rotated valve typically may be designed to avoid flow separation and/or cavitation at full flow under a variety of conditions. Similarly, the valve is designed, in some embodiments, to produce streamlined flow within the valve. An axially aligned outlet may also increase the flow efficiency. A typical cross section of the eccentric split venturi may be non-axisymmetric such as a semicircular cross section which may assist in both throttling capabilities and in maximum flow capacity using the design of the present invention. Such a design can include applications for freeze resistant axially-rotated valves and may be fully-opened and fully-closed in one-half of a complete rotation. An internal wide radius elbow typically connected to a rotatable portion of the eccentric venturi may assist in directing flow with lower friction losses. A valve actuator may actuate in an axial manner yet be uniquely located outside of the axial flow path to further reduce friction losses. A seal may be used between the two portions that may include a peripheral and diametrical seal in the same plane. A seal separator may increase the useful life of the seal between the fixed and rotatable portions.

  19. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Marcos G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Boucher, Timothy J. (Helena, MT)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit.

  20. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

  1. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mauseth, Jason A. (Pocatello, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  2. On Thermonuclear Reaction Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. J. Haubold; A. M. Mathai

    1996-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reactions govern major aspects of the chemical evolution od galaxies and stars. Analytic study of the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals is attempted here. Exact expressions for the reaction rates and reaction probability integrals for nuclear reactions in the case of nonresonant, modified nonresonant, screened nonresonant and resonant cases are given. These are expressed in terms of H-functions, G-functions and in computable series forms. Computational aspects are also discussed.

  3. Modelling macroeconomic flows related to large ensembles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schellekens, Michel P.

    , including, say, oil prices, interest rates, etc; dynamics of shares markets are governed by information are illustrated by flows of a liquid between interconnected reservoirs, where the heights of different reservoirs is changing with time, and movement of the liquid between the reservoirs is governed by gravity, see Figure 1

  4. Air Flow Distribution in the Sales Area of a Supermarket

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, X.; Song, C.; Zhao, J.; Wang, Z.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many kinds of goods are displayed in a supermarket, which have their own particularities. The consumer flow rate is great and the type of shelved goods varies significantly, thereby influencing the objects that generate heat, and the demands of air...

  5. Contraction/expansion flow of dilute elastic solutions in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott, Timothy Peter, 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study is conducted on the nature of extensional flows of mobile dilute polymer solutions in microchannel. By observing such fluids on the microscale it is possible to generate large strain rates ([approximately] ...

  6. Composition Pulse Time-Of-Flight Mass Flow Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mosier, Bruce P. (San Francisco, CA); Crocker, Robert W. (Fremont, CA); Harnett, Cindy K. (Livermore, CA) l

    2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 10,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined

  7. A MEMS BODY FLUID FLOW SENSOR Ellis Meng1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meng, Ellis

    for its stability, accuracy, and high temperature coefficient of resistivity (TCR). Additional packaging the device using compressed air. The flow rate is adjusted by a metering valve and calibrated using

  8. THE STATE OF THE ART OF NUMERICAL MODELING OF THERMOHYDROLOGIC FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At normal rates of geothermal wells, turbulent flow is fullyeffects in two- phase geothermal well tests were studied (of salt precipitation around geothermal wells and of methane

  9. A New Approach to Computing Max Flows using Electrical Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rajamani, Sriram K.

    A New Approach to Computing Max Flows using Electrical Flows Yin Tat Lee (MIT) Satish Rao (UC-Kelner-Madry-Spielman-Teng'11]: approximate flow in time Uses electrical flows. 7 #12;Electrical Flows 3 1 S t 8 #12;Electrical Flows Identify Graph with Resistor Network R(e)=1/w(e) 1/3 S t 1 9 #12;Electrical Flows Electrical flow

  10. Low flow fume hood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Geoffrey C. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Feustel, Helmut E. (Albany, CA); Dickerhoff, Darryl J. (Berkeley, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  11. Quantitative tomographic measurements of opaque multiphase flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; O'HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,STEVEN L.

    2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) system has been developed for quantitative measurements of radial phase distribution profiles in two-phase and three-phase vertical column flows. The EIT system is described along with the computer algorithm used for reconstructing phase volume fraction profiles. EIT measurements were validated by comparison with a gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) system. The EIT system was used to accurately measure average solid volume fractions up to 0.05 in solid-liquid flows, and radial gas volume fraction profiles in gas-liquid flows with gas volume fractions up to 0.15. In both flows, average phase volume fractions and radial volume fraction profiles from GDT and EIT were in good agreement. A minor modification to the formula used to relate conductivity data to phase volume fractions was found to improve agreement between the methods. GDT and EIT were then applied together to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions within several vertical three-phase flows. For average solid volume fractions up to 0.30, the gas distribution for each gas flow rate was approximately independent of the amount of solids in the column. Measurements made with this EIT system demonstrate that EIT may be used successfully for noninvasive, quantitative measurements of dispersed multiphase flows.

  12. Experimental on two sensors combination used in horizontal pipe gas-water two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hao; Dong, Feng [Tianjin Key Laboratory of Process Measurement and Control, School of Electrical Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, Tianjin (China)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas-water two phase flow phenomenon widely exists in production and living and the measurement of it is meaningful. A new type of long-waist cone flow sensor has been designed to measure two-phase mass flow rate. Six rings structure of conductance probe is used to measure volume fraction and axial velocity. The calibration of them have been made. Two sensors have been combined in horizontal pipeline experiment to measure two-phase flow mass flow rate. Several model of gas-water two-phase flow has been discussed. The calculation errors of total mass flow rate measurement is less than 5% based on the revised homogeneous flow model.

  13. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015 Rates

  14. Method and system for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and system for measuring a multiphase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multiphase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The method for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes certain steps. The first step is calculating a gas density for the gas flow. The next two steps are finding a normalized gas mass flow rate through the venturi and computing a gas mass flow rate. The following step is estimating the gas velocity in the venturi tube throat. The next step is calculating the pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase between the upstream pressure measuring point and the pressure measuring point in the venturi throat. Another step is estimating the liquid velocity in the venturi throat using the calculated pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase. Then the friction is computed between the liquid phase and a wall in the venturi tube. Finally, the total mass flow rate based on measured pressure in the venturi throat is calculated, and the mass flow rate of the liquid phase is calculated from the difference of the total mass flow rate and the gas mass flow rate.

  15. Flow and axial dispersion in a sinusoidal-walled tube: Effects of inertial and unsteady flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Lambert, Adam; Wood, Brian D.

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersion in porous media flows has been the subject of much experimental, theoretical and numerical study. Here we consider a wavy-walled tube (a three-dimensional tube with sinusoidally-varying diameter) as a simplified conceptualization of flow in porous media, where constrictions represent pore throats and expansions pore bodies. A theoretical model for effective (macroscopic) longitudinal dispersion in this system has been developed by volume averaging the microscale velocity field. Direct numerical simulation using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods was used to compute velocity fields by solving the Navier-Stokes equations, and also to numerically solve the volume averaging closure problem, for a range of Reynolds numbers (Re) spanning the low-Re to inertial flow regimes, including one simulation at Re = 449 for which unsteady flow was observed. Dispersion values were computed using both the volume averaging solution and a random walk particle tracking method, and results of the two methods were shown to be consistent. Our results are compared to experimental measurements of dispersion in porous media and to previous theoretical results for the low-Re, Stokes flow regime. In the steady inertial regime we observe an power-law increase in effective longitudinal dispersion (DL) with Re, consistent with previous results. This rapid rate of increase is caused by trapping of solute in expansions due to flow separation (eddies). For the unsteady case (Re = 449), the rate of increase of DL with Re was smaller than that observed at lower Re. Velocity fluctuations in this regime lead to increased rates of solute mass transfer between the core flow and separated flow regions, thus diminishing the amount of tailing caused by solute trapping in eddies and thereby reducing longitudinal dispersion.

  16. Heating Rate Profiles in Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward C. D. Pope; Georgi Pavlovski; Christian R. Kaiser; Hans Fangohr

    2006-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years evidence has accumulated suggesting that the gas in galaxy clusters is heated by non-gravitational processes. Here we calculate the heating rates required to maintain a physically motived mass flow rate, in a sample of seven galaxy clusters. We employ the spectroscopic mass deposition rates as an observational input along with temperature and density data for each cluster. On energetic grounds we find that thermal conduction could provide the necessary heating for A2199, Perseus, A1795 and A478. However, the suppression factor, of the clasical Spitzer value, is a different function of radius for each cluster. Based on the observations of plasma bubbles we also calculate the duty cycles for each AGN, in the absence of thermal conduction, which can provide the required energy input. With the exception of Hydra-A it appears that each of the other AGNs in our sample require duty cycles of roughly $10^{6}-10^{7}$ yrs to provide their steady-state heating requirements. If these duty cycles are unrealistic, this may imply that many galaxy clusters must be heated by very powerful Hydra-A type events interspersed between more frequent smaller-scale outbursts. The suppression factors for the thermal conductivity required for combined heating by AGN and thermal conduction are generally acceptable. However, these suppression factors still require `fine-tuning` of the thermal conductivity as a function of radius. As a consequence of this work we present the AGN duty cycle as a cooling flow diagnostic.

  17. Turbulent flow in graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

    2010-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

  18. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  19. Nonlinear elasto-plastic model for dense granular flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ken Kamrin

    2009-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This work proposes a model for granular deformation that predicts the stress and velocity profiles in well-developed dense granular flows. Recent models for granular elasticity (Jiang and Liu 2003) and rate-sensitive plastic flow (Jop et al. 2006) are reformulated and combined into one universal granular continuum law, capable of predicting flowing regions and stagnant zones simultaneously in any arbitrary 3D flow geometry. The unification is performed by justifying and implementing a Kroner-Lee elasto-plastic decomposition, with care taken to ensure certain continuum physical principles are necessarily upheld. The model is then numerically implemented in multiple geometries and results are compared to experiments and discrete simulations.

  20. Measurement of steam quality in two-phase critical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, John William

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    through a venturi for subczitical flow of steam-water 45 13 Steam quality as a function of vapor-phase Reynolds number for subczitical flow of steam-water 46 14 Steam quality as a function of Collins and Gacesa parameter for subcritical flow of steam... high degree of accuracy. He suggested that the following correlation may be used to calculate two-phase flow rates through orifices to within an error of 1. 5 percent 339 K 3 9 9' J 9 v v a v w f + [ 1. 26 (1-f ) K Y /K ] ~p p where V and L...

  1. Flow and evaporation in single micrometer and nanometer scale pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velasco, A. E.; Yang, C.; Siwy, Z. S.; Taborek, P. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine 92697 (United States); Toimil-Molares, M. E. [Department of Materials Science, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fur Schwerionenforschung GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We report measurements of pressure driven flow of fluids entering vacuum through a single pipe of micrometer or nanometer scale diameter. Nanopores were fabricated by etching a single ion track in polymer or mica foils. A calibrated mass spectrometer was used to measure the flow rates of nitrogen and helium through pipes with diameter ranging from 10??m to 31?nm. The flow of gaseous and liquid nitrogen was studied near 77?K, while the flow of helium was studied from the lambda point (2.18?K) to above the critical point (5.2?K). Flow rates were controlled by changing the pressure drop across the pipe in the range 0–31 atm. When the pressure in the pipe reached the saturated vapor pressure, an abrupt flow transition was observed. A simple viscous flow model is used to determine the position of the liquid/vapor interface in the pipe. The observed mass flow rates are consistent with no slip boundary conditions.

  2. Investigation of the rate sensitivity of pseudo relative permeabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brittain, Charles Finney

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of hypothetical reservoir stratifications were considered. Cross-sectional simulation runs were made using each stratification case for a range of waterflood injection rates and endpoint mobility ratios. Dynamic pseudo relative permeabilities were calculated... , These dynamic pseudo relative permeabilities were developed for those reservoirs that do not satisfy the assumptions of the vertical equilibrium or viscous-dominated pKr models. For waterflooding a stratified oil reservoir, fluid flow rate (velocity...

  3. Nonlinear model-based control of two-phase flow in risers by feedback linearization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    conditions at offshore oilfields. The slugging flow constitutes an unstable and highly nonlinear system and flow rates (Storkaas (2005), Storkaas and Skogestad (2007)). The oscillatory flow condition in offshore disturbances or plant changes. We aim to find a robust control solution for anti-slug control systems

  4. Productivity & Energy Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Randall J.

    1 Productivity & Energy Flow Ecosystem approach, focuses: on flow of energy, water, and nutrients (capture) of energy by autotrophs Gross (total) Net (total ­ costs) Secondary productivity- capture of energy by herbivores http://sciencebitz.com/?page_id=204 What Controls the Primary Productivity

  5. Heat transfer and flow characteristics of cooling channels in turbine blades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saxena, Amit

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    /mass transfer distributions were determined for straight flow' through a pin fin channel (H/D = 1, S/D = X/D = 2. 5) and a flow through the pin fin channel with trailing edge flow ejection. The overall friction factor and local pressure drop results were... obtained for various configurations and lengths (L/d = 2 and 20) of the trailing edge ejection holes, From the pressure drop data, the radial mass flow rate and the mass flow rates through trailing edge ejection holes were calculated. The results show...

  6. Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco, John

    Graduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application REGISTRAR'S OFFICE University of Cincinnati PO Box Kentucky counties are able to attend UC at an established metropolitan tuition rate. Non Kentucky residency, these students are not eligible for the graduate metropolitan rate. Kentucky counties

  7. Solar rotation rate and its gradients during cycle 23

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu; S. M. Chitre

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Available helioseismic data now span almost the entire solar activity cycle 23 making it possible to study solar-cycle related changes of the solar rotation rate in detail. In this paper we study how the solar rotation rate, in particular, the zonal flows change with time. In addition to the zonal flows that show a well known pattern in the solar convection zone, we also study changes in the radial and latitudinal gradients of the rotation rate, particularly in the shear layer that is present in the immediate sub-surface layers of the Sun. In the case of the zonal-flow pattern, we find that the band indicating fast rotating region close to the equator seems to have bifurcated around 2005. Our investigation of the rotation-rate gradients show that the relative variation in the rotation-rate gradients is about 20% or more of their average values, which is much larger than the relative variation in the rotation rate itself. These results can be used to test predictions of various solar dynamo models.

  8. Fluid breakup during simultaneous two-phase flow through a three-dimensional porous medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sujit S. Datta; Jean-Baptiste Dupin; David A. Weitz

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We use confocal microscopy to directly visualize the simultaneous flow of both a wetting and a non-wetting fluid through a model three-dimensional (3D) porous medium. We find that, for small flow rates, both fluids flow through unchanging, distinct, connected 3D pathways; in stark contrast, at sufficiently large flow rates, the non-wetting fluid is broken up into discrete ganglia. By performing experiments over a range of flow rates, using fluids of different viscosities, and with porous media having different geometries, we show that this transition can be characterized by a state diagram that depends on the capillary numbers of both fluids, suggesting that it is controlled by the competition between the viscous forces exerted on the flowing oil and the capillary forces at the pore scale. Our results thus help elucidate the diverse range of behaviors that arise in two-phase flow through a 3D porous medium.

  9. Money versus Time: Evaluation of Flow Control in Terms of Energy Consumption and Convenience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frohnapfel, Bettina; Quadrio, Maurizio

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow control with the goal of reducing the skin friction drag on the fluid-solid interface is an active fundamental research area, motivated by its potential for significant energy savings and reduced emissions in the transport sector. Customarily, the performance of drag reduction techniques in internal flows is evaluated under two alternative flow conditions, i.e. at constant mass flow rate or constant pressure gradient. Successful control leads to reduction of drag and pumping power within the former approach, whereas the latter leads to an increase of the mass flow rate and pumping power. In practical applications, however, money and time define the flow control challenge: a compromise between the energy expenditure (money) and the corresponding convenience (flow rate) achieved with that amount of energy has to be reached so as to accomplish a goal which in general depends on the specific application. Based on this idea, we derive two dimensionless parameters which quantify the total energy consumption an...

  10. Elliptic flow phenomenon at ATLAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin Spousta

    2014-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize measurements of elliptic flow and higher order flow harmonics performed by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC. Results on event-averaged flow measurements and event-plane correlations in Pb+Pb collisions are discussed along with the event-by-event flow measurements. Further, we summarize results on flow in p+Pb collisions.

  11. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates and

  12. Rates and Repayment Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1PrincipalRare Iron Oxide in AncientRates

  13. Rating Agency Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor.Tariff Rates FY 2015

  14. BCP Annual Rate Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAboutScience Program CumulusA t i o nLiquids Reserve2015 BCP Annual Rate

  15. Sustainable systems rating program: Marketing Green'' Building in Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four major resource issues for home construction were identified: water, energy, materials, and waste. A systems flow model was then developed that tracked the resource issues through interactive matrices in the areas of sourcing, processing, using, and disposing or recycling. This model served as the basis for a rating system used in an educational and marketing tool called the Eco-Home Guide.

  16. Sustainable systems rating program: Marketing ``Green`` Building in Austin, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four major resource issues for home construction were identified: water, energy, materials, and waste. A systems flow model was then developed that tracked the resource issues through interactive matrices in the areas of sourcing, processing, using, and disposing or recycling. This model served as the basis for a rating system used in an educational and marketing tool called the Eco-Home Guide.

  17. Shroud leakage flow discouragers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeremy Clyde (Middle Grove, NY); Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  18. Bypass Flow Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schultz

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the fluid dynamics experiments in the MIR (Matched Index of-Refraction) flow system at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is to develop benchmark databases for the assessment of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) solutions of the momentum equations, scalar mixing, and turbulence models for the flow ratios between coolant channels and bypass gaps in the interstitial regions of typical prismatic standard fuel element (SFE) or upper reflector block geometries of typical Modular High-temperature Gas-cooled Reactors (MHTGR) in the limiting case of negligible buoyancy and constant fluid properties. The experiments use Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) to measure the velocity fields that will populate the bypass flow study database.

  19. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  20. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todd, Richard A. (Powell, TN)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for counting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensated circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  1. Compensated count-rate circuit for radiation survey meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Todd, R.A.

    1980-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A count-rate compensating circuit is provided which may be used in a portable Geiger-Mueller (G-M) survey meter to ideally compensate for couting loss errors in the G-M tube detector. In a G-M survey meter, wherein the pulse rate from the G-M tube is converted into a pulse rate current applied to a current meter calibrated to indicate dose rate, the compensation circuit generates and controls a reference voltage in response to the rate of pulses from the detector. This reference voltage is gated to the current-generating circuit at a rate identical to the rate of pulses coming from the detector so that the current flowing through the meter is varied in accordance with both the frequency and amplitude of the reference voltage pulses applied thereto so that the count rate is compensated ideally to indicate a true count rate within 1% up to a 50% duty cycle for the detector. A positive feedback circuit is used to control the reference voltage so that the meter output tracks true count rate indicative of the radiation dose rate.

  2. Energy Management Through Innovative Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, M. L.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of energy efficiency in the industrial sector and specific rate design alternatives for doing so....

  3. Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, G. W.

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

  4. Application Study of the Pump Water Flow Station for Building Energy Consumption Monitoring and Control Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, G.; Liu, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . For example, the Venturi meter is commonly used for steam flow measurement, but it is less commonly used for water flow measurement because of the poor accuracy at low flow rates and high installation cost. 2) Displacement flow meter: The meter works... by using the fluid to rotate or displace a device inserted into the flow stream, e.g., a turbine flow meter, tangential paddlewheel meter, etc. It causes extra pressure drop. The bearing wears out and calibration is often needed to ensure accuracy...

  5. Optical flow switching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Vincent W. S.

    Present-day networks are being challenged by dramatic increases in bandwidth demand of emerging applications. We will explore a new transport, ldquooptical flow switchingrdquo, that will enable significant growth and ...

  6. Olefin Autoxidation in Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuenschwander, Ulrich

    Handling hazardous multiphase reactions in flow brings not only safety advantages but also significantly improved performance, due to better mass transfer characteristics. In this paper, we present a continuous microreactor ...

  7. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  8. Composition pulse time-of-flight mass flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Harnett, Cindy K. (Livermore, CA); Crocker, Robert W. (Fremont, CA); Mosier, Bruce P. (San Francisco, CA); Caton, Pamela F. (Berkeley, CA); Stamps, James F. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 2,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined. A pair of spaced apart electrodes can be used to produce the electrochemical pulse. In those instances where it is desired to measure a wide range of fluid flow rates a three electrode configuration in which the electrodes are spaced at unequal distances has been found to be desirable.

  9. New sensor for measurement of low air flow velocity. Phase I final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Hashemian, M.; Riggsbee, E.T. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project described here is the Phase I feasibility study of a two-phase program to integrate existing technologies to provide a system for determining air flow velocity and direction in radiation work areas. Basically, a low air flow sensor referred to as a thermocouple flow sensor has been developed. The sensor uses a thermocouple as its sensing element. The response time of the thermocouple is measured using an existing in-situ method called the Loop Current Step Response (LCSR) test. The response time results are then converted to a flow signal using a response time-versus-flow correlation. The Phase I effort has shown that a strong correlation exists between the response time of small diameter thermocouples and the ambient flow rate. As such, it has been demonstrated that thermocouple flow sensors can be used successfully to measure low air flow rates that can not be measured with conventional flow sensors. While the thermocouple flow sensor developed in this project was very successful in determining air flow velocity, determining air flow direction was beyond the scope of the Phase I project. Nevertheless, work was performed during Phase I to determine how the new flow sensor can be used to determine the direction, as well as the velocity, of ambient air movements. Basically, it is necessary to use either multiple flow sensors or move a single sensor in the monitoring area and make flow measurements at various locations sweeping the area from top to bottom and from left to right. The results can then be used with empirical or physical models, or in terms of directional vectors to estimate air flow patterns. The measurements can be made continuously or periodically to update the flow patterns as they change when people and objects are moved in the monitoring area. The potential for using multiple thermocouple flow sensors for determining air flow patterns will be examined in Phase II.

  10. Viability of the diagonal implicit algorithm for hypersonic flowfields with finite rate chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Christopher John

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The diagonal implicit algorithm has been examined for high speed, moderate density flows. In this flight regime, nonequilibrium thermal, chemical, and radiative effects are important and the determination of these finite rate processes, coupled...

  11. A Novel Approach for the Rapid Estimation of Drainage Volume, Pressure and Well Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Neha 1986-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    For effective reservoir management and production optimization, it is important to understand drained volumes, pressure depletion and reservoir well rates at all flow times. For conventional reservoirs, this behavior is based on the concepts...

  12. Tables for solution of the heat-conduction equation with a time-dependent heating rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles A. E.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tables are presented for the solution of the transient onedimensional heat flow in a solid body of constant material properties with the heating rate at one boundary dependent on time. These tables allow convenient and ...

  13. Dissipative flows of 2D foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabelle Cantat; Renaud Delannay

    2005-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the flow of a liquid foam between two plates separated by a gap of the order of the bubble size (2D foam). We concentrate on the salient features of the flow that are induced by the presence, in an otherwise monodisperse foam, of a single large bubble whose size is one order of magnitude larger than the average size. We describe a model suited for numerical simulations of flows of 2D foams made up of a large number of bubbles. The numerical results are successfully compared to analytical predictions based on scaling arguments and on continuum medium approximations. When the foam is pushed inside the cell at a controlled rate, two basically different regimes occur: a plug flow is observed at low flux whereas, above a threshold, the large bubble migrates faster than the mean flow. The detailed characterization of the relative velocity of the large bubble is the essential aim of the present paper. The relative velocity values, predicted both from numerical and from analytical calculations that are discussed here in great detail, are found to be in fair agreement with experimental results.

  14. Section 13: Flow control 1 Section 13: Flow control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    Geometries for Energyefficient Flow Around Bodies Abstract 14:30 ­ 14:50: Elfriede Friedmann (Universität

  15. Characterization of secondary collection system flows beneath synthetic composite liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groenleer, M.E. [Wenck Associates, Inc., Grand Rapids, MI (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Secondary liner systems for landfills are becoming more common. Subtitle D may be construed to require secondary liners to meet monitorability requirements for new units. Michigan requires secondary liners in many situations, most commonly at previously contaminated sites to allow for differential monitoring of the new cell(s). Much work has been done in characterizing the flow of liquids through FML/clay composite liners but less is known about flows through FML/geosynthetic clay liner (GCL) composite liners or through isolated FMLs. Flow and chemical data are examined from two Michigan landfills employing different configurations of all synthetic primary and secondary liners. The data is examined for apparent trends. Conclusions are drawn about the application of generic action flow rates as a regulatory standard to these systems and the chemical characteristics of the liquids in secondary systems. Calculations are presented to achieve a realistic action leakage rate for these systems.

  16. Damage-induced nonassociated inelastic flow in rock salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, K.S.; Bodner, S.R. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States); Brodsky, N.S.; Fossum, A.F. [RE/SPEC, Inc., Rapid City, SD (United States); Munson, D.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The multi-mechanism deformation coupled fracture model recently developed by CHAN, et al. (1992), for describing time-dependent, pressure-sensitive inelastic flow and damage evolution in crystalline solids was evaluated against triaxial creep experiments on rock salt. Guided by experimental observations, the kinetic equation and the flow law for damage-induced inelastic flow in the model were modified to account for the development of damage and inelastic dilatation in the transient creep regime. The revised model was then utilized to obtain the creep response and damage evolution in rock salt as a function of confining pressure and stress difference. Comparison between model calculation and experiment revealed that damage-induced inelastic flow is nonassociated, dilatational, and contributes significantly to the macroscopic strain rate observed in rock salt deformed at low confining pressures. The inelastic strain rate and volumetric strain due to damage decrease with increasing confining pressures, and all are suppressed at sufficiently high confining pressures.

  17. National Utility Rate Database: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; McKeel, R.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When modeling solar energy technologies and other distributed energy systems, using high-quality expansive electricity rates is essential. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed a utility rate platform for entering, storing, updating, and accessing a large collection of utility rates from around the United States. This utility rate platform lives on the Open Energy Information (OpenEI) website, OpenEI.org, allowing the data to be programmatically accessed from a web browser, using an application programming interface (API). The semantic-based utility rate platform currently has record of 1,885 utility rates and covers over 85% of the electricity consumption in the United States.

  18. Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry using energy flow method Azimuthal angle distribution at Q2 >100 GeV2 Energy flow method.Ukleja on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration #12; Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I

  19. Evaluation of flow hood measurements for residential register flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, I.S.; Wray, C.P.; Dickerhoff, D.J.; Sherman, M.H.

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow measurement at residential registers using flow hoods is becoming more common. These measurements are used to determine if the HVAC system is providing adequate comfort, appropriate flow over heat exchangers and in estimates of system energy losses. These HVAC system performance metrics are determined by using register measurements to find out if individual rooms are getting the correct airflow, and in estimates of total air handler flow and duct air leakage. The work discussed in this paper shows that commercially available flow hoods are poor at measuring flows in residential systems. There is also evidence in this and other studies that flow hoods can have significant errors even when used on the non-residential systems they were originally developed for. The measurement uncertainties arise from poor calibrations and the sensitivity of exiting flow hoods to non-uniformity of flows entering the device. The errors are usually large--on the order of 20% of measured flow, which is unacceptably high for most applications. Active flow hoods that have flow measurement devices that are insensitive to the entering airflow pattern were found to be clearly superior to commercially available flow hoods. In addition, it is clear that current calibration procedures for flow hoods may not take into account any field application problems and a new flow hood measurement standard should be developed to address this issue.

  20. Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

  1. Pressurized tundish for controlling a continuous flow of molten metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, T.W.; Hamill, P.E. Jr.; Ozgu, M.R.; Padfield, R.C.; Rego, D.N.; Brita, G.P.

    1990-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized tundish for controlling a continuous flow of molten metal is characterized by having a pair of principal compartments, one being essentially unpressurized and receiving molten metal introduced thereto, and the other being adapted for maintaining a controlled gaseous pressure over the surface of the fluid metal therein, whereby, by controlling the pressure within the pressurized chamber, metal exiting from the tundish is made to flow continually and at a controlled rate. 1 fig.

  2. Pressurized tundish for controlling a continuous flow of molten metal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lewis, Thomas W. (964 Cork Dr., Bethel Park, PA 15102); Hamill, Jr., Paul E. (R.D. #1, Box 173A1, Jeannette, PA 15644); Ozgu, Mustafa R. (790 Yorkshire Rd., Bethlehem, PA 18017); Padfield, Ralph C. (1918 Paul Ave., Bethlehem, PA 18018); Rego, Donovan N. (1703 W. Brown St., Allentown, PA 18104); Brita, Guido P. (3225 Edna Terrace Ave., Bethlehem, PA 18017)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pressurized tundish for controlling a continous flow of molten metal characterized by having a pair of principal compartments, one being essentially unpressurized and receiving molten metal introduced thereto, and the other being adapted for maintaining a controlled gaseous pressure over the surface of the fluid metal therein, whereby, by controlling the pressure within the pressurized chamber, metal exiting from the tundish is made to flow continually and at a controlled rate.

  3. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules : 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  4. Flow Characteristics Analysis of Widows' Creek Type Control Valve for Steam Turbine Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoo, Yong H.; Sohn, Myoung S.; Suh, Kune Y. [PHILOSOPHIA, Inc., Seoul National University, San 56-1 Sillim-dong, Gwanak-gu, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam turbine converts the kinetic energy of steam to mechanical energy of rotor blades in the power conversion system of fossil and nuclear power plants. The electric output from the generator of which the rotor is coupled with that of the steam turbine depends on the rotation velocity of the steam turbine bucket. The rotation velocity is proportional to the mass flow rate of steam entering the steam turbine through valves and nozzles. Thus, it is very important to control the steam mass flow rate for the load following operation of power plants. Among various valves that control the steam turbine, the control valve is most significant. The steam flow rate is determined by the area formed by the stem disk and the seat of the control valve. While the ideal control valve linearly controls the steam mass flow rate with its stem lift, the real control valve has various flow characteristic curves pursuant to the stem lift type. Thus, flow characteristic curves are needed to precisely design the control valves manufactured for the operating conditions of nuclear power plants. OMEGA (Optimized Multidimensional Experiment Geometric Apparatus) was built to experimentally study the flow characteristics of steam flowing inside the control valve. The Widows' Creek type control valve was selected for reference. Air was selected as the working fluid in the OMEGA loop to exclude the condensation effect in this simplified approach. Flow characteristic curves were plotted by calculating the ratio of the measured mass flow rate versus the theoretical mass flow rate of the air. The flow characteristic curves are expected to be utilized to accurately design and operate the control valve for fossil as well as nuclear plants. (authors)

  5. Electrocapturing flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow cell for electrophoretically-assisted capturing analytes from a flow. The flow cell includes a specimen chamber, a first membrane, a second membrane, a first electrode chamber, and a second electrode chamber. The specimen chamber may have a sample inlet and a sample outlet. A first portion of the first membrane may be coupled to a first portion of the specimen chamber. A first portion of the second membrane may be coupled to a second portion of the specimen chamber. The first electrode chamber may be configured to accept a charge. A portion of the first electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the first membrane. A second electrode chamber may be configured to accept an opposite charge. A portion of the second electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the second membrane.

  6. The magnetic flywheel flow meter: Theoretical and experimental contributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buchenau, D., E-mail: d.buchenau@hzdr.de; Galindo, V.; Eckert, S. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf, Institute of Fluid Dynamics, Bautzner Landstraße 400, 01328 Dresden (Germany)

    2014-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of contactless flow meters is an important issue for monitoring and controlling of processes in different application fields, like metallurgy, liquid metal casting, or cooling systems for nuclear reactors and transmutation machines. Shercliff described in his book “The Theory of Electromagnetic Flow Measurement, Cambridge University Press, 1962” a simple and robust device for contact-less measurements of liquid metal flow rates which is known as magnetic flywheel. The sensor consists of several permanent magnets attached on a rotatable soft iron plate. This arrangement will be placed closely to the liquid metal flow to be measured, so that the field of the permanent magnets penetrates into the fluid volume. The flywheel will be accelerated by a Lorentz force arising from the interaction between the magnetic field and the moving liquid. Steady rotation rates of the flywheel can be taken as a measure for the mean flow rate inside the fluid channel. The present paper provides a detailed theoretical description of the sensor in order to gain a better insight into the functional principle of the magnetic flywheel. Theoretical predictions are confirmed by corresponding laboratory experiments. For that purpose, a laboratory model of such a flow meter was built and tested on a GaInSn-loop under various test conditions.

  7. Noninvasive Characterization Of A Flowing Multiphase Fluid Using Ultrasonic Interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  8. Noninvasive characterization of a flowing multiphase fluid using ultrasonic interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N.

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  9. Noninvasive characterization of a flowing multiphase fluid using ultrasonic interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  10. The Flow of Newtonian Fluids in Axisymmetric Corrugated Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taha Sochi

    2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This article deals with the flow of Newtonian fluids through axially-symmetric corrugated tubes. An analytical method to derive the relation between volumetric flow rate and pressure drop in laminar flow regimes is presented and applied to a number of simple tube geometries of converging-diverging nature. The method is general in terms of fluid and tube shape within the previous restrictions. Moreover, it can be used as a basis for numerical integration where analytical relations cannot be obtained due to mathematical difficulties.

  11. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, Chiranjit (Miami, FL); Steinkamp, John A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated cw laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  13. Multiphase cooling flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter A. Thomas

    1996-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss the multiphase nature of the intracluster medium whose neglect can lead to overestimates of the baryon fraction of clusters by up to a factor of two. The multiphase form of the cooling flow equations are derived and reduced to a simple form for a wide class of self-similar density distributions. It is shown that steady-state cooling flows are \\emph{not} consistent with all possible emissivity profiles which can therefore be used as a test of the theory. In combination, they provide strong constraints on the mass distribution within the cooling radius.

  14. Air-flow regulation system for a coal gasifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E. (Morgantown, WV)

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved air-flow regulator for a fixed-bed coal gasifier is provided which allows close air-flow regulation from a compressor source even though the pressure variations are too rapid for a single primary control loop to respond. The improved system includes a primary controller to control a valve in the main (large) air supply line to regulate large slow changes in flow. A secondary controller is used to control a smaller, faster acting valve in a secondary (small) air supply line parallel to the main line valve to regulate rapid cyclic deviations in air flow. A low-pass filter with a time constant of from 20 to 50 seconds couples the output of the secondary controller to the input of the primary controller so that the primary controller only responds to slow changes in the air-flow rate, the faster, cyclic deviations in flow rate sensed and corrected by the secondary controller loop do not reach the primary controller due to the high frequency rejection provided by the filter. This control arrangement provides at least a factor of 5 improvement in air-flow regulation for a coal gasifier in which air is supplied by a reciprocating compressor through a surge tank.

  15. Assessments of fluid friction factors for use in leak rate calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chivers, T.C. [Berkeley Technology Centre, Glos (United Kingdom)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leak before Break procedures require estimates of leakage, and these in turn need fluid friction to be assessed. In this paper available data on flow rates through idealized and real crack geometries are reviewed in terms of a single friction factor k It is shown that for {lambda} < 1 flow rates can be bounded using correlations in terms of surface R{sub a} values. For {lambda} > 1 the database is less precise, but {lambda} {approx} 4 is an upper bound, hence in this region flow calculations can be assessed using 1 < {lambda} < 4.

  16. An analysis of an application of radioactive ionization for gas flow metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lam, Carroll Frank

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    fulfillment of the requirements for ths legree of MASTER OF SC1ENCE May 1959 Major Subject: Electrical Engines x ing AN ANALYSIS OF AN APPLICATION OF RADIOACTIVE IONIZATION FOR l 1 '~, '1 1 ', '1 ' 1 1 "1 g 1 n \\ '& \\ GAS FLOW METERING A...'s Apparatus Z. An Ezperimental Flow Meter . 3. Mark I Meter and Test Equipment 4. Electrical Circuit 5. Current vs. Flow Rate Curve for Mark I Meter. . . . . . . . . . . . . 6. Current vs. Flow Rate for DifferentSource Spacings. . . . . . . . . . 7...

  17. The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative to Flat Rate Billing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hughes, Larry

    The Inverted Block Rate:The Inverted Block Rate: An Alternative to Flat Rate BillingAn Alternative;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 22 IntroductionIntroduction ·· Modern societies rely on electrical collectionMetering and Rate Models facilitate collection #12;Inverted Block RateInverted Block Rate 33 Rate

  18. Asymptotic Cellular Growth Rate as the Effective Information Utilization Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pugatch, Rami; Tlusty, Tsvi

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the average asymptotic growth rate of cells in randomly fluctuating environments. Using a game-theoretic perspective, we show that any response strategy has an asymptotic growth rate, which is the sum of: (i) the maximal growth rate at the worst possible distribution of environments, (ii) relative information between the actual distribution of environments to the worst one, and (iii) information utilization rate which is the information rate of the sensory devices minus the "information dissipation rate", the amount of information not utilized by the cell for growth. In non-stationary environments, the optimal strategy is the time average of the instantaneous optimal strategy and the optimal switching times are evenly spaced in the statistical (Fisher) metric.

  19. ENERGY FLOWS CLIMATE CHANGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schwartz, Stephen E.

    ENERGY FLOWS FORCINGS CLIMATE CHANGE A REALLY TOUGH PROBLEM Stephen E. Schwartz, BNL, 7-20-11 www average temperature 15°C or 59°F #12;ATMOSPHERIC RADIATION Power per area Energy per time per area Unit" temperature to radiative flux. #12;GLOBAL ENERGY BALANCE Global and annual average energy fluxes in watts per

  20. AGN and Cooling Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2001-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. For two decades the steady-state cooling-flow model has dominated the literature of cluster and elliptical-galaxy X-ray sources. For ten years this model has been in severe difficulty from a theoretical point of view, and it is now coming under increasing pressure observationally. A small number of enthusiasts have argued for a radically different interpretation of the data, but had little impact on prevailing opinion because the unsteady heating picture that they advocate is extremely hard to work out in detail. Here I explain why it is difficult to extract robust observational predictions from the heating picture. Major problems include the variability of the sources, the different ways in which a bi-polar flow can impact on X-ray emission, the weakness of synchrotron emission from sub-relativistic flows, and the sensitivity of synchrotron emission to a magnetic field that is probably highly localized.

  1. Designing an enzymatic oscillator: Bistability and feedback controlled oscillations with glucose oxidase in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    oxidase in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor Vladimir K. Vanag,a David G. Míguez,b and Irving R as the flow rate is varied in a continuous flow stirred tank reactor. Oscillations in pH can be obtained

  2. Two dimensional flow of a compressible gas in a thin passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Anantkumar Ratanji

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Experimental Results Nasa Flow Rates at 2 atm. Nasa Flow Rates at 3 atm. Temperature Profiles at 2 atm. Temperature Profiles at 3 atm. Pressure Profiles at U=+300 ft/sec. Pressure Profiles at U -300 ft/sec. Page 12 14 16 17 18 19 21 22 Various... Non-Isentropic -300 -200 -100 0 100 200 300 U ft/sec. FIGURE 4 MASS FLOW RATES AT 3 atm. 18 85o O T R 800 P ~ 2atm 1 T % 700' 1 U ft/sec. -300 T'R 750 700 -100 -10 650 +10 +300 600 10 Diatance x in 10 ft. -3 FIGURE 5 TEMPERATURE...

  3. Colloidal particle deposition in turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morton, D.S.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A theoretical analysis is presented which describes the initial deposition of monodispersed spherical colloidal particles from a steady fully developed turbulent flow onto conduit walls. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential is attractive, particle deposition is shown to be often governed by turbulent hydrodynamics. When the net particle-conduit electrical interaction potential possess a repulsive maximum, particle deposition to first order is uniform and depends solely on electrical interaction effects. The developed theoretical model specialized to orifice deposition with the use of Harwell Flow3D turbulence modelling software qualitatively described the deposition of 0.5 {mu}m silica particles onto glass orifices from an aqueous suspension. The effect of the electrical double layer on the rate of colloidal particle deposition in laminar flow has been described by Spielman and Friedlander (1), Dahneke (2), Bowen et al. (3) and Bowen and Epstein (4). This article describes the extension of their work to colloidal particle deposition under steady fully developed turbulent flow conditions. This article also reports the results of orifice particle deposition experiments which were conducted to qualitatively investigate the developed theoretical model.

  4. Analysis of Refrigerant Flow and Deformation for a Flexible Short-Tube using a Finite Element Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neal, D.L.; Bassiouny, R.

    reliability. Short-tubes have either a constant inner dia- meter flow channel or a tapered channel with a smallAbstract A finite element model was used to simulate single-phase flow of R-22 through flexible short-tubes. The numerical model included the fluid... in the flow area. The more flexible (5513 kPa) short-tube restricted the mass flow rate more than the most rigid (9889 kPa) short-tube used in this study. The mass flow rates estimated with the finite element model were as much as 14% higher than those from...

  5. Dynamic estimation of specific growth rates and concentrations of bacteria for the anaerobic digestion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    by microorganisms into biogas (methane and carbon dioxide) and digestate (natural manure) in the absence of oxygen digestion S. Diop1 and I. Simeonov2 Abstract-- The paper proposes an observability anal- ysis and estimation measured quantities ­ the dilution rate and the flow rates of methane and carbon dioxide in the biogas

  6. Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eicken, Hajo

    Tracer studies of pathways and rates of meltwater transport through Arctic summer sea ice H. Eicken) program's field site in the northern Chukchi Sea, snow and ice meltwater flow was found to have a strong impact on the heat and mass balance of sea ice during the summer of 1998. Pathways and rates of meltwater

  7. Two-dimensional flows of foam: drag exerted on circular obstacles and dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Dollet; Florence Elias; Catherine Quilliet; Arnaud Huillier; Miguel Aubouy; Francois Graner

    2004-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A Stokes experiment for foams is proposed. It consists in a two-dimensional flow of a foam, confined between a water subphase and a top plate, around a fixed circular obstacle. We present systematic measurements of the drag exerted by the flowing foam on the obstacle, \\emph{versus} various separately controlled parameters: flow rate, bubble volume, solution viscosity, obstacle size and boundary conditions. We separate the drag into two contributions, an elastic one (yield drag) at vanishing flow rate, and a fluid one (viscous coefficient) increasing with flow rate. We quantify the influence of each control parameter on the drag. The results exhibit in particular a power-law dependence of the drag as a function of the solution viscosity and the flow rate with two different exponents. Moreover, we show that the drag decreases with bubble size, increases with obstacle size, and that the effect of boundary conditions is small. Measurements of the streamwise pressure gradient, associated to the dissipation along the flow of foam, are also presented: they show no dependence on the presence of an obstacle, and pressure gradient depends on flow rate, bubble volume and solution viscosity with three independent power laws.

  8. Theoretical and experimental studies of churn flow in vertical tubes. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The pattern known as churn flow is a highly unsteady pattern with stochastic features and is extremely complex. However, calculations show that for many geothermal wells the condition of churn flow consists over much of the length of the two phase zone. Furthermore, it frequently exists at the surface so that design of separation equipment and surface piping depends on the accurate modelling of this type of flow. It has been the long term purpose of this project to develop physically based models for churn flow which can be used as a basis for predicting holdup, frictional loss and heat transfer rates for this flow pattern in geothermal systems. To achieve this end, it was necessary to develop new methods for measuring the time dependent characteristics of the flow and thus be able to uncover the basic physics of the flow. Models can then be developed based on this understanding which characterizes the flow and equations for holdup, friction and heat transfer evolved.

  9. Evaluation of a CFD-model for simulation of simplified flow conditioners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdal, A. [Statoil/K-LAB, Haugesund (Norway); Torbergsen, L.E.; Rimestad, S.; Krogstad, P.A. [Norwegian Inst. of Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Perforated plate flow conditioners are used to generate a fully developed turbulent flow profile upstream of an orifice meter. It is very time-consuming to measure the effect of a flow conditioner for different upstream flow profiles. Therefore a project is initiated to evaluate the performance of a computational fluid computer code for this purpose. If the code correctly predicts the flow characteristics downstream of more complex flow conditioners. In this study a k-{var_epsilon} CFD-model was used to predict the flow downstream of obstruction plates having one large or nine small holes. Both mean velocity, turbulent kinetic energy, k, and the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy, {var_epsilon}, were calculated and compared against measured data. The results indicate that it is possible to predict the mean velocity well and that the accuracy of the predicted k and {var_epsilon} depends on the complexity of the flow.

  10. A simple model of gas flow in a porous powder compact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shugard, Andrew D.; Robinson, David B.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a simple model for ideal gas flow from a vessel through a bed of porous material into another vessel. It assumes constant temperature and uniform porosity. Transport is treated as a combination of viscous and molecular flow, with no inertial contribution (low Reynolds number). This model can be used to fit data to obtain permeability values, determine flow rates, understand the relative contributions of viscous and molecular flow, and verify volume calibrations. It draws upon the Dusty Gas Model and other detailed studies of gas flow through porous media.

  11. The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reynolds, E. B. (Elbert Brunner); Langley, B. C. (Bryon Caldwell); Johnson, P. R. (Paul Rufus)

    1934-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TEXAS AGRICULTURAL EXPERIHENT STATIDJ A. R. CONNER, DIRECTOR COLLEGE STATION, BRAZOS COUNTY. TEXAS BULLETIN NO. 490 MARCH, 1934 .--' --7 , The Effect of Time and Rate of Application of Nitrate of Soda on the Yield of Cotton - AGRICULTURAL... of nitrate of soda on yield, length and percentage of lint, size of boll, shedding, and other characters of the cotton plant on the sandy soils of eastern Texas, as a basis for developing a more intelligent and profitable fertilizer practice for cotton...

  12. The effect of two deletion schemes upon the comprehension and reading rate of five levels of telegraphic prose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pantalion, Charles Adrian

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    between the two deletion schemes that would involve a relative increase in comprehension, reading rate, and efficiency for the subject generated scheme with 1ncreasing percentages of deletion. (5) The index of agreement among subjects on the rank... Reduced Version of the Passage Based on 50% Deletion (S5) Randomly Reduced Version of the Passage Based on IOX Deletion (Rl) Randomly Reduced Version of the Passage Based on 20% Deletion (R2) Randomly Reduced Version of the Passage Based on 30K...

  13. X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy under flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrei Fluerasu; Abdellatif Moussaid; Henri Gleyzolle; Peter Falus; Anders Madsen

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy was used to probe the diffusive dynamics of colloidal particles in a shear flow. Combining X-ray techniques with microfluidics is an experimental strategy that reduces the risk of x-ray induced beam damage and also allows time-resolved studies of processes taking place in flowcells. The experimental results and theoretical predictions presented here, show that in the low shear limit, for a ``transverse flow'' scattering geometry (scattering wave vector q perpendicular to the direction of flow) the measured relaxation times are independent of the flow rate and determined only by the diffusive motion of the particles. This is not generally valid and in particular, for a ``longitudinal flow'' (q || flow) scattering geometry, the relaxation times are strongly affected by the flow-induced motion of the particles. Our results show that the Brownian diffusion of colloidal particles can be measured in a flowing sample and that, up to flux limitations, the experimental conditions under which this is possible are easier to achieve at higher values of q.

  14. Flow-controlled magnetic particle manipulation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J [Richland, WA; Holman, David A [Las Vegas, NV

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Inventive methods and apparatus are useful for collecting magnetic materials in one or more magnetic fields and resuspending the particles into a dispersion medium, and optionally repeating collection/resuspension one or more times in the same or a different medium, by controlling the direction and rate of fluid flow through a fluid flow path. The methods provide for contacting derivatized particles with test samples and reagents, removal of excess reagent, washing of magnetic material, and resuspension for analysis, among other uses. The methods are applicable to a wide variety of chemical and biological materials that are susceptible to magnetic labeling, including, for example, cells, viruses, oligonucleotides, proteins, hormones, receptor-ligand complexes, environmental contaminants and the like.

  15. Analysis of flow patterns and flow mechanisms in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analysis of flow patterns and flow mechanisms in soils Dissertation Co-directed by the University of paths, varying flow mechanism or changing soil physical properties (stratification). Thus, in stratified-28Jan2010 #12;This doctoral thesis was prepared at the Department of Soil Physics, University

  16. Wall recession rates in cavity-growth modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grens, E.A. II; Thorsness, C.B.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The predictions of resource utilization obtained from cavity-growth models depend on the methods used to represent the recession rates of the walls of the cavity. Under many circumstances the cavity is largely filled with a bed char rubble. Examination of the mechanisms for recession at walls adjacent to these char beds indicates that the recession rates are controlled by convective heat transfer from the bed to the walls coupled with the thermomechanical breakdown of the walls. A recession-rate representation has been developed, based on this concept, for use in cavity-growth simulation programs. This representation characterizes wall breakdown by either a failure temperature or by a thickness of char layer at failure, and determines rates from a model of heat transfer under these conditions. It gives recession rates that are functions of gas temperature and mass flow rate in the cavity, and depend on effective particle size in the char bed. Wall recession rates calculated for WIDCO, Hoe Creek, and Hanna coals are in the range of 0.1 to 0.8 m/day at a 1300 K cavity temperature, and are consistent with the general rates observed for field tests. 27 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  17. In-Situ Calibration for Feedwater Flow Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peyvan, David [Entergy Nuclear Generating Company (United States); Gurevich, Yuri [Advanced Measurement and Analysis Group, Mississauga, ON (Canada); French, Charles T. [Westinghouse Electric Company (United States)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the approval by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), of the Appendix K power up-rates, it has become important to provide an accurate measurement of the feedwater flow. Failure to meet documented requirements can now more easily lead to plant operations above their analyzed safety limits. Thus, the objective of flow instrumentation used in Appendix K up-rates, becomes one of providing precise measurements of the feedwater mass flow that will not allow the plant to be overpowered, but will still assure that maximum licensed thermal output is achieved. The NRC has licensed two technologies that meet these standards. Both are based on ultrasonic measurements of the flow. The first of these technologies, which is referred to as transit-time, relies on the measurement of differences in time for multiple ultrasonic beams to pass up and downstream in the fluid stream. These measurements are then coupled with a numerical integration scheme to compensate for distortions in the velocity profile due to upstream flow disturbances. This technology is implemented using a spool piece that is inserted into the feedwater pipe. The second technology relies on the measurement of the velocity of eddies within the fluid using a numerical process called cross-correlation. This technology is implemented by attaching the ultrasonic flow meter to the external surface of the pipe. Because of the ease in installation, for atypical situations, distortions in the velocity profile can be accounted for by attaching a second ultrasonic flow meter to the same pipe or multiple meters to a similar piping configuration, where the flow is fully developed. The additional meter readings are then used for the calibration of the initial set-up. Thus, it becomes possible to provide an in-situ calibration under actual operating conditions that requires no extrapolation of laboratory calibrations to compensate for distortions in the velocity profile. This paper will focus on the cross-correlation method of flow measurement, starting with the theoretical bases for the velocity profile correction factor and its reliance on only the Reynolds number to produce an accurate measurement of the flow, when the flow is fully developed. The method of laboratory calibration and the verification of these calibrations under actual plant operating conditions will be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion of how this technology is being used today to support the Appendix K up-rates. Various examples will be presented of piping configurations, where in-situ calibrations have or will be used to provide an accurate measurement of the feedwater flow at a specific location. (authors)

  18. Heat transfer to a fluid flowing in an annulus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Logan, Earl

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    . ii I ~ DIMENSIONS AND SYMBOLS o ~ ~ ~ . ~ ~ ~ ~ I II e INTRODUCTION AND THEORY ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 3 IXI e APPARATUS AND PROCEDURES ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ 7 XV o RESULTS ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ e ~ ~ ~ ~ 17 V, DXSCUSSION OF RESULTS... of times 0 Prandtl nnnber~ e~& dimensionless initial temperature oi' surfaoe and fluids% D equivalent diameter& Di g~ L Q - volume flow rate~ L3/T V~ mass velooity, FT/L3 6 mass floe rate~ FT/L IMTRODUCTIOR AND THEORY This thesis comprises heat tz...

  19. DSMC predictions of non-equilibrium reaction rates.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) chemical-reaction models recently proposed by Bird and based solely on the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels of the species involved is applied to calculate nonequilibrium chemical-reaction rates for atmospheric reactions in hypersonic flows. The DSMC non-equilibrium model predictions are in good agreement with theoretical models and experimental measurements. The observed agreement provides strong evidence that modeling chemical reactions using only the collision energy and the vibrational energy levels provides an accurate method for predicting non-equilibrium chemical-reaction rates.

  20. Temporal variations of the rotation rate in the solar interior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. M. Antia; Sarbani Basu

    2000-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The temporal variations of the rotation rate in the solar interior are studied using frequency splittings from Global Oscillations Network Group (GONG) data obtained during the period 1995-99. We find alternating latitudinal bands of faster and slower rotation which appear to move towards the equator with time - similar to the torsional oscillations seen at the solar surface. This flow pattern appears to persist to a depth of about 0.1R_sun and in this region its magnitude is well correlated with solar activity indices. We do not find any periodic or systematic changes in the rotation rate near the base of the convection zone.

  1. Sustainable Building Rating Systems Summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to offer information that could be used to compare and contrast sustainable building rating systems.

  2. Data Bias in Rate Transient Analysis of Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnia, Ammar Khalifa Mohammed

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ......................................................................................................... 10 6 Rate and time relationship developed by Gentry (1972) ............................ 11 7 Fetkovich type-curves ................................................................................ 13 8 Gas type-curves developed by Carter (1985... the production data analyst to the proper use of superposition diagnostic plots ? To program a VBA program that performs proper use of superposition time functions according to the proposed work flow. 5 1.4 Organization of the thesis This report...

  3. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  4. Flow-Induced Crystallization of PB-1: From the Low Shear Rate Region up to Processing Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Croylaan 46, B-3001, LeuVen, Belgium Florentin Langouche* SolVay Central Laboratory, Neder OVer Heembeek

  5. Forced convective flow and heat transfer of upward cocurrent air-water slug flow in vertical plain and swirl tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Shyy Woei [Thermal Fluids Laboratory, National Kaohsiung Marine University, No. 142, Haijhuan Road, Nanzih District, Kaohsiung City 81143 (China); Yang, Tsun Lirng [Department of Marine Engineering, National Kaohsiung Marine University, No. 142, Haijhuan Road, Nanzih District, Kaohsiung City 81143 (China)

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This experimental study comparatively examined the two-phase flow structures, pressured drops and heat transfer performances for the cocurrent air-water slug flows in the vertical tubes with and without the spiky twisted tape insert. The two-phase flow structures in the plain and swirl tubes were imaged using the computerized high frame-rate videography with the Taylor bubble velocity measured. Superficial liquid Reynolds number (Re{sub L}) and air-to-water mass flow ratio (AW), which were respectively in the ranges of 4000-10000 and 0.003-0.02 were selected as the controlling parameters to specify the flow condition and derive the heat transfer correlations. Tube-wise averaged void fraction and Taylor bubble velocity were well correlated by the modified drift flux models for both plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition. A set of selected data obtained from the plain and swirl tubes was comparatively examined to highlight the impacts of the spiky twisted tape on the air-water interfacial structure and the pressure drop and heat transfer performances. Empirical heat transfer correlations that permitted the evaluation of individual and interdependent Re{sub L} and AW impacts on heat transfer in the developed flow regions of the plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition were derived. (author)

  6. The Big Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sikivie

    2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The late infall of cold dark matter onto an isolated galaxy, such as our own, produces streams and caustics in its halo. The outer caustics are topological spheres whereas the inner caustics are rings. The self-similar model of galactic halo formation predicts that the caustic ring radii $a_n$ follow the approximate law $a_n \\sim 1/n$. In a study of 32 extended and well-measured external galactic rotation curves evidence was found for this law. In the case of the Milky Way, the locations of eight sharp rises in the rotation curve fit the prediction of the self-similar model at the 3% level. Moreover, a triangular feature in the IRAS map of the galactic plane is consistent with the imprint of a ring caustic upon the baryonic matter. These observations imply that the dark matter in our neighborhood is dominated by a single flow. Estimates of that flow's density and velocity vector are given.

  7. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  8. Neutrino Factory Mercury Flow Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    Neutrino Factory Mercury Flow Loop V. GravesV. Graves C. Caldwell IDS-NF Videoconference March 9, 2010 #12;Flow Loop Review · 1 cm dia nozzle, 20 m/s jet requires 1.57 liter/sec mercury flow (94 2 liter/min 24 9 gpm)mercury flow (94.2 liter/min, 24.9 gpm). · MERIT experiment showed that a pump

  9. Orifice flow measurement uncertainty

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samples, C.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A computer program is now available from Union Carbide that evaluates the total flow uncertainty of orifice flowmeter systems. Tolerance values for every component in the system and the sensitivity of the measured flowrate to each component can be established using historical data and published hardware specifications. Knowing the tolerance and sensitivity values, a total measurement uncertainty can be estimated with a 95% confidence level. This computer program provides a powerful design tool to ensure correct component matching and total metering system optimization.

  10. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  11. Numerical Investigations of Magnetohydrodynamic Hypersonic Flows.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guarendi, Andrew N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??Numerical simulations of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) hypersonic flow are presented for both laminar and turbulent flow over a cylinder and flow entering a scramjet inlet. ANSYS… (more)

  12. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1993-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

  13. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, John C. (212 Lakeside Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for monitoring and controlling the injection rate of fluid by an injection well of an in-situ remediation system for treating a contaminated groundwater plume. The well is fitted with a gated insert, substantially coaxial with the injection well. A plurality of openings, some or all of which are equipped with fluid flow sensors and gates, are spaced along the insert. The gates and sensors are connected to a surface controller. The insert may extend throughout part of, or substantially the entire length of the injection well. Alternatively, the insert may comprise one or more movable modules which can be positioned wherever desired along the well. The gates are opened part-way at the start of treatment. The sensors monitor and display the flow rate of fluid passing through each opening on a controller. As treatment continues, the gates are opened to increase flow in regions of lesser flow, and closed to decrease flow in regions of greater flow, thereby approximately equalizing the amount of fluid reaching each part of the plume.

  14. Gas Bubble Formation in Stagnant and Flowing Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL] [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL] [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL] [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations in the area of two-phase flow at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL) Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility are progressing. It is expected that the target vessel lifetime could be extended by introducing gas into the liquid mercury target. As part of an effort to validate the two-phase computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model, simulations and experiments of gas injection in stagnant and flowing mercury have been completed. The volume of fluid (VOF) method as implemented in ANSYS-CFX, was used to simulate the unsteady two-phase flow of gas injection into stagnant mercury. Bubbles produced at the upwards-oriented vertical gas injector were measured with proton radiography at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. The comparison of the CFD results to the radiographic images shows good agreement for bubble sizes and shapes at various stages of the bubble growth, detachment, and gravitational rise. Although several gas flows were measured, this paper focuses on the case with a gas flow rate of 8 cc/min through the 100-micron-diameter injector needle. The acoustic waves emitted due to the detachment of the bubble and during subsequent bubble oscillations were recorded with a microphone, providing a precise measurement of the bubble sizes. As the mercury flow rate increases, the drag force causes earlier bubble detachment and therefore smaller bubbles.

  15. Strain rate sensitive constitutive equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Charles Edward

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Computed Constants For Far'ous . Baterials 47 LIST OF FIGURFS Pace Figure I Comparison of Rate Data For Commercially Pure Aluminum Figure 2 Dynamic Loading Regimes 17 Figure 3 Yield Criteria 32 Figure 4 Uni-axial Stress-Strain Rate...

  16. RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    NATIONAL RECYCLING RATE STUDY Prepared by: Smith, Bucklin and Associates, Inc. Market Research and Statistics Division Chicago, Illinois July 2003 PRINTED ON RECYCLED PAPER #12;BCI RECYCLING RATE STUDY TABLE ....................................................................................................1 II. METHODOLOGY A. Total Pounds of Lead Recycled from Batteries

  17. Computations of high-pressure steam flow in the turbine bypass valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amano, R.S.; Draxler, G.R.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the steam flow behavior through the high-pressure turbine bypass valve. Efforts have mainly been directed at investigating the process of steam flow and property variations aforementioned bypass valve as well as to obtain correlations between the flow rate and the valve opening ratio. Modeling of the high-pressure turbulent steam flow was performed on a three-dimensional non-staggered grid system by employing the finite volume method and by solving the three-dimensional, turbulent, compressible Navier-Stokes, and energy equations. Through this research, numerous data have been acquired and analyzed. These efforts enable one to obtain a correlation data set for the valve opening versus flow rate coefficient of the valve. One of the significant accomplishments is to use the model presented here to further improve a design of a turbine bypass flow valve.

  18. Innovative Rates Program. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Title II of the Energy Conservation and Production Act (ECPA) as amended by the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) provided financial assistance to state utility regulatory commissions, nonregulated electric utilities, and the Tennessee Valley Authority through the Innovative Rates Program. The financial assistance was to be used to plan or carry out electric utility regulatory rate reform initiatives relating to innovative rate structures that encourage conservation of energy, electric utility efficiency and reduced costs, and equitable rates to consumers. The Federal and local objectives of the project are described. Activities planned and accomplishments are summarized for the following: project management, data collection, utility bill evaluation, billing enclosure/mailing evaluation, media program evaluation, display evaluation, rate study sessions evaluation, speakers bureau evaluation, and individual customer contacts. A timetable/milestone chart and financial information are included. (MHR)

  19. A Holistic Framework for Environmental Flows Determination in Hydropower Contexts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Among the ecological science community, the consensus view is that the natural flow regime sustains the ecological integrity of river systems. This prevailing viewpoint by many environmental stakeholders has progressively led to increased pressure on hydropower dam owners to change plant operations to affect downstream river flows with the intention of providing better conditions for aquatic biological communities. Identifying the neccessary magnitude, frequency, duration, timing, or rate of change of stream flows to meet ecological needs in a hydropower context is challenging because the ecological responses to changes in flows may not be fully known, there are usually a multitude of competing users of flow, and implementing environmental flows usually comes at a price to energy production. Realistically, hydropower managers must develop a reduced set of goals that provide the most benefit to the identified ecological needs. As a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) Water Power Program, the Instream Flow Project (IFP) was carried out by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and Argon National Laboratory (ANL) as an attempt to develop tools aimed at defining environmental flow needs for hydropower operations. The application of these tools ranges from national to site-specific scales; thus, the utility of each tool will depend on various phases of the environmental flow process. Given the complexity and sheer volume of applications used to determine environmentally acceptable flows for hydropower, a framework is needed to organize efforts into a staged process dependent upon spatial, temporal, and functional attributes. By far, the predominant domain for determining environmental flows related to hydropower is within the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) relicensing process. This process can take multiple years and can be very expensive depending on the scale of each hydropower project. The utility of such a framework is that it can expedite the environmental flow process by 1) organizing data and applications to identify predictable relationships between flows and ecology, and 2) suggesting when and where tools should be used in the environmental flow process. In addition to regulatory procedures, a framework should also provide the coordination for a comprehensive research agenda to guide the science of environmental flows. This research program has further reaching benefits than just environmental flow determination by providing modeling applications, data, and geospatial layers to inform potential hydropower development. We address several objectives within this document that highlight the limitations of existing environmental flow paradigms and their applications to hydropower while presenting a new framework catered towards hydropower needs. Herein, we address the following objectives: 1) Provide a brief overview of the Natural Flow Regime paradigm and existing environmental flow frameworks that have been used to determine ecologically sensitive stream flows for hydropower operations. 2) Describe a new conceptual framework to aid in determining flows needed to meet ecological objectives with regard to hydropower operations. The framework is centralized around determining predictable relationships between flow and ecological responses. 3) Provide evidence of how efforts from ORNL, PNNL, and ANL have filled some of the gaps in this broader framework, and suggest how the framework can be used to set the stage for a research agenda for environmental flow.

  20. Flow monitoring and control system for injection wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Corey, J.C.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a system for monitoring and controlling the rate of fluid flow from an injection well used for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  1. RESEARCH ARTICLE Optical plume velocimetry: a new flow measurement technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    hydrothermal systems Timothy J. Crone Ã? Russell E. McDuff Ã? William S. D. Wilcock Received: 5 November 2007 that fluid flow rates in mid- ocean ridge hydrothermal systems may be strongly influ- enced by mechanical that are transitioning between jet-like and plume-like behavior. List of symbols A area of jet nozzle, m2 B initial

  2. Dilatancy in the flow and fracture of stretched colloidal suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. I. Smith; R. Besseling; M. E. Cates; V. Bertola

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Concentrated particulate suspensions, commonplace in the pharmaceutical, cosmetic and food industries, display intriguing rheology. In particular, the dramatic increase in viscosity with strain rate (shear thickening and jamming) which is often observed at high volume fractions, is of strong practical and fundamental importance. Yet manufacture of these products and their subsequent dispensing often involves flow geometries substantially different from that of simple shear flow experiments. Here we show that the elongation and breakage of a filament of a colloidal fluid under tensile loading is closely related to the jamming transition seen in its shear rheology. However, the modified flow geometry reveals important additional effects. Using a model system with nearly hard-core interactions, we provide evidence of surprisingly strong viscoelasticity in such a colloidal fluid under tension. With high speed photography we also directly observe dilatancy and granulation effects, which lead to fracture above a critical elongation rate.

  3. Piezoelectric Microvalve for Flow Control in Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bucci, B.A. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Vipperman, J.S. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Clark, W. (Univ. of Pittsburgh); Hensel, J.P.; Thornton, J.D.; Kim. S. (LG Electronics Inc.)

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Maldistribution of fuel across the cells of a fuel cell stack is an issue that can contribute to poor cell performance and possible cell failure. It has been proposed that an array of microvalves could promote even distribution of fuel across a fuel cell stack. A piezoelectric microvalve has been developed for this purpose. This valve can be tuned to a nominal flow rate (and failure position) from which the actuator would either increase or decrease the flow rate and fuel. The valve can successfully regulate the flow of fuel from 0.7 to 1.1 slpm of hydrogen in the range of temperatures from 80° to 100°C and has been tested over pressure drops from 0.5 to 1 psi. A bank of these valves is currently being tested in a four-cell stack at the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.

  4. Plastic flow of foams and emulsions in a channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dollet, B; Sbragaglia, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to understand the flow profiles of complex fluids, a crucial issue concerns the emergence of spatial correlations among plastic rearrangements exhibiting cooperativity flow behaviour at the macroscopic level. In this paper, the rate of plastic events in a Poiseuille flow is experimentally measured on a confined foam in a Hele-Shaw geometry. The correlation with independently measured velocity profiles is quantified. To go beyond a limitation of the experiments, namely the presence of wall friction which complicates the relation between shear stress and shear rate, we compare the experiments with simulations of emulsion droplets based on the lattice-Boltzmann method, which are performed both with, and without, wall friction. Our results indicate a correlation between the localisation length of the velocity profiles and the localisation length of the number of plastic events. Finally, unprecedented results on the distribution of the orientation of plastic events show that there is a non-trivial correla...

  5. Relationship Between Soil Moisture Storage and Deep Percolation and Subsurface Return Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nieber, J. L.

    A simulation study was performed to analyze the relationship between the volume of moisture stored in a soil profile and the rate of percolation and subsurface return flow. The simulation study was derived on the basis of the Richards equation...

  6. Tradeoffs among Free-flow Speed, Capacity, Cost, and Environmental Footprint in Highway Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ng, Chen Feng; Small, Kenneth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    heavy vehicles (a car has 1 pce). Our calculations are basedequivalents per hour per lane (pce/h/ln) and is used laterfunction of the flow rate v p (pce/h/ln). We consider free-

  7. Two-Phase Flow of HCFC-22 and HFC-134a through Short Tube Orifices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yongchan, K.

    2008-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressure conditions were those typically found in air-conditioner and heat pump applications. Effects of each operating parameters and short tube geometry on the flow rate were discussed and included in the modeling. Both an analytical and semi...

  8. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 Media Contact: Rick FordMarketing

  9. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001 Media Contact: Rick FordMarketing

  10. RATES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, and 323 K.Office ofMay 8, 2012IndustrialRAPIDDRATES

  11. Flow Control of Real Time Multimedia Applications Using Model Predictive Control with a Feed Forward Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duong, Thien Chi

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . In this research, the flow accumulation is the signal used in feedback for flow control. It has the advantage of reflecting both packet losses and delays; therefore, it is a better choice. Using network simulations, the accumulations of real-time audio... based on ARX predictor and utilizes sending bit rate as input and accumulation as output signal. The control effort is to remain the accumulations of real-time multimedia flows at a certain reference. From network simulation results, he concluded...

  12. Supernova rates and stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mannucci

    2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

  13. The effect of anchoring on nematic flow in channels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. M. O. Batista; M. L. Blow; M. M. Telo da Gama

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the flow of liquid crystals in microfluidic environments plays an important role in many fields, including device design and microbiology. We perform hybrid lattice-Boltzmann simulations of a nematic liquid crystal flowing under an applied pressure gradient in two-dimensional channels with various anchoring boundary conditions at the substrate walls. We investigate the relation between flow rate and pressure gradient and the corresponding profile of the nematic director, and find significant departures from the linear Poiseuille relation. We also identify a morphological transition in the director profile and explain this in terms of an instability in the dynamical equations. We examine the qualitative and quantitative effects of changing the type and strength of the anchoring. Understanding such effects may provide a useful means of quantifying the anchoring of a substrate by measuring its flow properties.

  14. Unsaturated flow and transport through a fault embedded in fractured welded tuff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Qinhong "Max"

    -matrix interactions, the nonlinearity of unsat- urated flow, and the heterogenities in the hydrological properties of lithium bromide)) was released along the fault over a period of 9 days, 7 months after the start of water- rated fractured rock (i.e., matrix and fracture flow, and fracture-matrix interactions) is of interest

  15. MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMICS Vol. 45 (2009), No. 2, pp. 233238 EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF MHD FLOWS IN A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    distribution and collection manifold relevant to the Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) blanket concept. A series lines. First flow rate data show that for a relatively high interaction parameter (N > 90), a uniform that are established. The magnetohydrodynamic flow patterns and their associated transport properties that result from

  16. Using Euler-Lagrange Variational Principle to Obtain Flow Relations for Generalized Newtonian Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taha Sochi

    2013-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Euler-Lagrange variational principle is used to obtain analytical and numerical flow relations in cylindrical tubes. The method is based on minimizing the total stress in the flow duct using the fluid constitutive relation between stress and rate of strain. Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluid models; which include power law, Bingham, Herschel-Bulkley, Carreau and Cross; are used for demonstration.

  17. Energy-Efficient Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling in 3D Stacked Architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simunic, Tajana

    1 Energy-Efficient Variable-Flow Liquid Cooling in 3D Stacked Architectures Ayse K. Coskun , David not fully utilized. Thus, it is not energy-efficient to adjust the coolant flow rate based on the worst-case conditions, as this would cause an excess in pump power. For energy-efficient cooling, we propose a novel

  18. Viscous flow lobes in central Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Origin as remnant buried glacial ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marchant, David R.

    its terminus, the ESL flows at a rate of 2.4 to 6.7 mm a-1 . The loose drift that caps the buried ice temperatures show that intermittent melting is most likely possible during summer months where buried ice is 35Viscous flow lobes in central Taylor Valley, Antarctica: Origin as remnant buried glacial ice Kate

  19. Estimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    -independent estimate of the total heat output of Cenozoic seafloor is 18.6 to 20.5 TW, which leads to a global output: Oceanic heat flow; Global heat budget; Subsidence rate 1. Introduction The total heat output of the EarthEstimates of heat flow from Cenozoic seafloor using global depth and age data Meng Wei , David

  20. Groundwater flow and groundwater-stream interaction in fractured and dipping sedimentary rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toran, Laura

    detailed numerical models to evaluate the effects of various factors that influence groundwater flow. Introduction [2] The rate and direction of groundwater flow at a given location is driven by hydraulic gradient], where groundwater occurs in tilted, fractured beds. A simple con- ceptual model of the hydrogeology

  1. Interaction of a surface glow discharge with a gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aleksandrov, A. L., E-mail: a_alex@itam.nsc.ru; Schweigert, I. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Khristianovich Institute of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Siberian Branch (Russian Federation)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A surface glow discharge in a gas flow is of particular interest as a possible tool for controlling the flow past hypersonic aircrafts. Using a hydrodynamic model of glow discharge, two-dimensional calculations for a kilovolt surface discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.5 Torr are carried out in a stationary gas, as well as in a flow with a velocity of 1000 m/s. The discharge structure and plasma parameters are investigated near a charged electrode. It is shown that the electron energy in a cathode layer reaches 250-300 eV. Discharge is sustained by secondary electron emission. The influence of a high-speed gas flow on the discharge is considered. It is shown that the cathode layer configuration is flow-resistant. The distributions of the electric field and electron energy, as well as the ionization rate profile in the cathode layer, do not change qualitatively under the action of the flow. The basic effect of the flow's influence is a sharp decrease in the region of the quasineutral plasma surrounding the cathode layer due to fast convective transport of ions.

  2. Some parametric flow analyses of a particle bed fuel element

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobranich, D.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parametric calculations are performed, using the SAFSIM computer program, to investigate the fluid mechanics and heat transfer performance of a particle bed fuel element. Both steady-state and transient calculations are included, addressing such issues as flow stability, reduced thrust operation, transpiration drag, coolant conductivity enhancement, flow maldistributions, decay heat removal, flow perturbations, and pulse cooling. The calculations demonstrate the dependence of the predicted results on the modeling assumptions and thus provide guidance as to where further experimental and computational investigations are needed. The calculations also demonstrate that both flow instability and flow maldistribution in the fuel element are important phenomena. Furthermore, results are encouraging that geometric design changes to the element can significantly reduce problems related to these phenomena, allowing improved performance over a wide range of element power densities and flow rates. Such design changes will help to maximize the operational efficiency of space propulsion reactors employing particle bed fuel element technology. Finally, the results demonstrate that SAFSIM is a valuable engineering tool for performing quick and inexpensive parametric simulations addressing complex flow problems.

  3. Microfluidic velocimetry reveals spatial cooperativity in soft glassy flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Goyon; A. Colin; G. Ovarlez; A. Ajdari; L. Bocquet

    2008-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Amorphous glassy materials of diverse nature -- concentrated emulsions, granular materials, pastes, molecular glasses -- display complex flow properties, intermediate between solid and liquid, which are at the root of their use in many applications. A classical feature, well documented yet not really understood, is the very non-linear nature of the flow rule relating stresses and strain rates. Using a microfluidic velocimetry technique, we characterize the flow of thin layers of concentrated emulsions, confined in gaps of different thicknesses by surfaces of different roughness. Beyond the classical non-linearities of the rheological behaviour, we evidence finite size effects in the flow behaviour and the absence of an intrinsic local flow rule. In contrast, a rather simple non-local flow rule is shown to account for all the velocity profiles. This non-locality of the dynamics is quantified by a length, characteristic of the cooperativity of the flow at these scales, that is unobservable in the liquid state (lower concentrations) and that increases with concentration in the jammed state. Beyond its practical importance for applications involving thin layers, e.g. coatings, our assessment of non-locality and cooperativity echoes observations on other glassy, jammed and granular systems, suggesting a possible fundamental universality.

  4. High repetition rate fiber lasers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jian, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis reports work in high repetition rate femtosecond fiber lasers. Driven by the applications including optical arbitrary waveform generation, high speed optical sampling, frequency metrology, and timing and frequency ...

  5. Electric Rate Alternatives to Cogeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandberg, K. R. Jr.

    "ELECTRIC RATE ALTERNATIVES TO COGENERATION" K. R. SANDBERG, JR. INDUSTRIAL ACCOUNTS MANAGER - TEXAS GULF STATES UTILITIES COMPANY BEAUMONT, TEXAS ABSTRACT This paper discusses electric rate slternatives to cogeneration for the industrisl... PERSPECTIVE Gulf States Utilities was incorporated in 1925 and is primarily in the business of generating. transmitting and distributing electricity to 555.000 customers in southeast Texas and south Louisiana. The service area extends 350 miles westward...

  6. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200?s. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  7. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  8. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  9. Radial flow heat exchanger

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Valenzuela, Javier (Hanover, NH)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

  10. Annular flow diverter valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rider, Robert L. (Walkersville, MD)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A valve for diverting flow from the center of two concentric tubes to the annulus between the tubes or, operating in the reverse direction, for mixing fluids from concentric tubes into a common tube and for controlling the volume ratio of said flow consists of a toroidal baffle disposed in sliding engagement with the interior of the inner tube downstream of a plurality of ports in the inner tube, a plurality of gates in sliding engagement with the interior of the inner tube attached to the baffle for movement therewith, a servomotor having a bullet-shaped plug on the downstream end thereof, and drive rods connecting the servomotor to the toroidal baffle, the servomotor thereby being adapted to move the baffle into mating engagement with the bullet-shaped plug and simultaneously move the gates away from the ports in the inner tube and to move the baffle away from the bullet-shaped plug and simultaneously move the gates to cover the ports in the inner tube.

  11. Uncertainty Analysis for a Virtual Flow Meter Using an Air-Handling Unit Chilled Water Valve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Li; Wang, Gang; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A virtual water flow meter is developed that uses the chilled water control valve on an air-handling unit as a measurement device. The flow rate of water through the valve is calculated using the differential pressure across the valve and its associated coil, the valve command, and an empirically determined valve characteristic curve. Thus, the probability of error in the measurements is significantly greater than for conventionally manufactured flow meters. In this paper, mathematical models are developed and used to conduct uncertainty analysis for the virtual flow meter, and the results from the virtual meter are compared to measurements made with an ultrasonic flow meter. Theoretical uncertainty analysis shows that the total uncertainty in flow rates from the virtual flow meter is 1.46% with 95% confidence; comparison of virtual flow meter results with measurements from an ultrasonic flow meter yielded anuncertainty of 1.46% with 99% confidence. The comparable results from the theoretical uncertainty analysis and empirical comparison with the ultrasonic flow meter corroborate each other, and tend to validate the approach to computationally estimating uncertainty for virtual sensors introduced in this study.

  12. Flow Components in a NaK Test Loop Designed to Simulate Conditions in a Nuclear Surface Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polzin, Kurt A.; Godfroy, Thomas J. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Research and Technology Applications Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

    2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A test loop using NaK as the working fluid is presently in use to study material compatibility effects on various components that comprise a possible nuclear reactor design for use on the lunar surface. A DC electromagnetic (EM) pump has been designed and implemented as a means of actively controlling the NaK flow rate through the system and an EM flow sensor is employed to monitor the developed flow rate. These components allow for the matching of the flow rate conditions in test loops with those that would be found in a full-scale surface-power reactor. The design and operating characteristics of the EM pump and flow sensor are presented. In the EM pump, current is applied to a set of electrodes to produce a Lorentz body force in the fluid. A measurement of the induced voltage (back-EMF) in the flow sensor provides the means of monitoring flow rate. Both components are compact, employing high magnetic field strength neodymium magnets thermally coupled to a water-cooled housing. A vacuum gap limits the heat transferred from the high temperature NaK tube to the magnets and a magnetically-permeable material completes the magnetic circuit. The pump is designed to produce a pressure rise of 34.5 kPa, and the flow sensor's predicted output is roughly 20 mV at the loop's nominal flow rate of 0.114 m{sup 3}/hr.

  13. Systematic characterization of degas-driven flow for poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic devices

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lee, Luke P.; Liang, David Y.; Tentori, Augusto M.; Dimov, Ivan K. [Universidad de Valparaiso (Chile)

    2011-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Degas-driven flow is a novel phenomenon used to propel fluids in poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-based microfluidic devices without requiring any external power. This method takes advantage of the inherently high porosity and air solubility of PDMS by removing air molecules from the bulk PDMS before initiating the flow. The dynamics of degas-driven flow are dependent on the channel and device geometries and are highly sensitive to temporal parameters. These dependencies have not been fully characterized, hindering broad use of degas-driven flow as a microfluidic pumping mechanism. Here, we characterize, for the first time, the effect of various parameters on the dynamics of degas-driven flow, including channel geometry, PDMS thickness, PDMS exposure area, vacuum degassing time, and idle time at atmospheric pressure before loading. We investigate the effect of these parameters on flow velocity as well as channel fill time for the degas-driven flow process. Using our devices, we achieved reproducible flow with a standard deviation of less than 8% for flow velocity, as well as maximum flow rates of up to 3 nL/s and mean flow rates of approximately 1-1.5 nL/s. Parameters such as channel surface area and PDMS chip exposure area were found to have negligible impact on degas-driven flow dynamics, whereas channel cross-sectional area, degas time, PDMS thickness, and idle time were found to have a larger impact. In addition, we develop a physical model that can predict mean flow velocities within 6% of experimental values and can be used as a tool for future design of PDMS-based microfluidic devices that utilize degas-driven flow.

  14. The Impact of Retail Rate Structures on the Economics of Commercial Photovoltaic Systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-minute interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05/kWh to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when commercial PV systems represent a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  15. The impact of retail rate structures on the economics of commercial photovoltaic systems in California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Barbose, Galen; Golove, William

    2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines the impact of retail electricity rate design on the economic value of grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) systems, focusing on commercial customers in California. Using 15-min interval building load and PV production data from a sample of 24 actual commercial PV installations, we compare the value of the bill savings across 20 commercial-customer retail electricity rates currently offered in the state. Across all combinations of customers and rates, we find that the annual bill savings from PV, per kWh generated, ranges from $0.05 to $0.24/kWh. This sizable range in rate-reduction value reflects differences in rate structures, revenue requirements, the size of the PV system relative to building load, and customer load shape. The most significant rate design issue for the value of commercial PV is found to be the percentage of total utility bills recovered through demand charges, though a variety of other factors are also found to be of importance. The value of net metering is found to be substantial, but only when energy from commercial PV systems represents a sizable portion of annual customer load. Though the analysis presented here is specific to California, our general results demonstrate the fundamental importance of retail rate design for the customer-economics of grid-connected, customer-sited PV.

  16. October 2001 - September 2006 Wholesale Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY

  17. October 2002 - March 2003 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY6 A2

  18. October 2003 - March 2004 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY6

  19. October 2004 - March 2005 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY64 -

  20. October 2005 - March 2006 Power Rates (rates/previous)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002 Wholesale Power Rate Schedules (base rates) for the FY64

  1. Detection and effects of pump low-flow operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casada, D.A.; Greene, R.H.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operating experience and previous studies have shown that a significant cause of pump problems and failures can result from low- flow operation. Operation at low-flow rates can create unstable flows within the pump impeller and casing. This condition can result in an increased radial and axial thrust on the rotor, which in turn causes higher shaft stresses, increased shaft deflection, and potential bearing and mechanical seal problems. Two of the more serious results of low-flow pump operation are cavitation and recirculation. Cavitation is the formation and subsequent collapse of vapor bubbles in any flow that is at an ambient pressure less than the vapor pressure of the liquid medium. It is the collapse of these vapor bubbles against the metal surfaces of the impeller or casing that causes surface pitting, erosion, and deterioration. Pump recirculation more damaging than cavitation. If located at the impeller eye, recirculation damages the inlet areas of the casing. At the impeller tips, recirculation alters the outside diameter of the impeller. If recirculation occurs around impeller shrouds, it damages thrust bearings. Recirculation also erodes impellers, diffusers, and volutes and causes failure of mechanical seals and bearings. This paper reports on a utility pump failure caused by low-flow induced phenomena. ORNL is investigating the results of low-flow pump operations by evaluating the types of measurements and diagnostic techniques that are currently used by licensees to detect pump degradation. A new, enhanced application of motor current and power data analysis has been developed that uses a signal comparison methodology to produce an instability ratio indicative of normal or unstable flow conditions. Examples of this type of low-flow detection technique are presented in this paper along with a brief discussion of the various types of technologies currently being used by licensees to evaluate pump operation and determine possible degradation.

  2. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  3. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  4. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and volume flow measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining volume flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the volume flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  5. INTERNAL FORCED iquid or gas flow through pipes or ducts is commonly used in heating and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghajar, Afshin J.

    to flow by a fan or pump through a flow section that is sufficiently long to accomplish the desired heat. Then the logarithmic mean temperature difference and the rate of heat loss from the air become Tln 15.2°C Q · hAs Tln (13.5 W/m2 °C)(6.4 m2 )( 15.2°C) 1313 W Therefore, air will lose heat at a rate of 1313 W as it flows

  6. Differential probes aid flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mesnard, D.R.

    1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonconstricting differential pressure flow probes which help solve the problems of clogging, wear, and pressure loss at the Seawater Filtration Facility in Saudi Arabia are described. Treated seawater is pumped into oil-bearing formations for secondary recovery. Figures showing principle of operation for probes, installation schematic and long-term accuracy results (flow probes vs. orifice meters) are presented. The new diamond-shaped design flow sensor offers accurate flow measurement with low permanent pressure loss, which translates into cost savings for the operator.

  7. LEED for Homes Rating System affordablemarket rate multi-family

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zaferatos, Nicholas C.

    for Future Comfort Load Reduction 50% 60%20% 30% 40% Energy Savings Cost System Intensive Building Envelo pe;Rating System www.usgbc.org/leed/homes #12;LEED for Homes Project Checklist or Scorecard #12;LEED for Homes Project Checklist or Scorecard #12;How the Credit Structure Works Credit #2: Landscaping Intent

  8. Computational Fluid Dynamics Modeling of the Bonneville Project: Tailrace Spill Patterns for Low Flows and Corner Collector Smolt Egress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cynthia L.; Serkowski, John A.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Perkins, William A.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2003, an extension of the existing ice and trash sluiceway was added at Bonneville Powerhouse 2 (B2). This extension started at the existing corner collector for the ice and trash sluiceway adjacent to Bonneville Powerhouse 2 and the new sluiceway was extended to the downstream end of Cascade Island. The sluiceway was designed to improve juvenile salmon survival by bypassing turbine passage at B2, and placing these smolt in downstream flowing water minimizing their exposure to fish and avian predators. In this study, a previously developed computational fluid dynamics model was modified and used to characterized tailrace hydraulics and sluiceway egress conditions for low total river flows and low levels of spillway flow. STAR-CD v4.10 was used for seven scenarios of low total river flow and low spill discharges. The simulation results were specifically examined to look at tailrace hydraulics at 5 ft below the tailwater elevation, and streamlines used to compare streamline pathways for streamlines originating in the corner collector outfall and adjacent to the outfall. These streamlines indicated that for all higher spill percentage cases (25% and greater) that streamlines from the corner collector did not approach the shoreline at the downstream end of Bradford Island. For the cases with much larger spill percentages, the streamlines from the corner collector were mid-channel or closer to the Washington shore as they moved downstream. Although at 25% spill at 75 kcfs total river, the total spill volume was sufficient to "cushion" the flow from the corner collector from the Bradford Island shore, areas of recirculation were modeled in the spillway tailrace. However, at the lowest flows and spill percentages, the streamlines from the B2 corner collector pass very close to the Bradford Island shore. In addition, the very flow velocity flows and large areas of recirculation greatly increase potential predator exposure of the spillway passed smolt. If there is concern for egress issues for smolt passing through the spillway, the spill pattern and volume need to be revisited.

  9. Section 11: Interfacial flows 1 Section 11: Interfacial flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohlenbach, Ulrich

    Abstract 15:10 ­ 15:30: Martin Lübke, Olaf Wünsch (Universität Kassel): Two-Phase Flow in Single- Screw Extruders Abstract S11.4: Capillary Flows Wed, 16:00­18:00 Chair: Dieter Bothe S1|03­123 16:00 ­ 16:20: K

  10. Analysis of flow patterns and flow mechanisms in soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Avignon et des Pays de Vaucluse, Université de

    Analysis of flow patterns and flow mechanisms in soils Dissertation Co-directed by the University mechanism or changing soil physical properties (stratification). Thus, in stratified soil, we restricted was prepared at the Department of Soil Physics, University of Bayreuth, and at the Hydrogeological Laboratory

  11. Effect of electron flow on the ordinary-extraordinary mode conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia Guozhang [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China); Gao Zhe [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China) and Center for Magnetic Fusion Theory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ordinary-extraordinary mode conversion in the electron cyclotron frequency range is revisited in the presence of a flowing electron component. The analytical expressions of optimal parallel refraction index and conversion efficiency are obtained from a one-dimensional cold plasma model. The presence of flowing electrons leads to an outward shift of the conversion layer and therefore increases the optimal value of parallel refraction index. If this effect is not considered, the efficiency of mode conversion degenerates. In typical tokamak plasmas, this degeneration is about a few percentages, which may induce the reflection of several tens of kilowatts of power from the cutoff layer when injecting megawatts of ECRF power into fusion plasma.

  12. Incentive Rates- At What Cost?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaeffer, S. C.

    with interruptible services. Instead, I filed "ISB" which was priced slightly above the marginal fuel cost on a time of use basis. Many of the periods of the year the first year that I proposed that rate, the cost of interruptible would have been higher than... forms centers on four issues; cost scope of the topic, so let me describe what I feel based pricing, discrimination, competition between is an incentive rate. My view is likely to strike utilities, and effectiveness. You've already some of you...

  13. Direct estimation of decoherence rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vladimír Bužek; Peter Rapcan; Jochen Rau; Mario Ziman

    2012-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The decoherence rate is a nonlinear channel parameter that describes quantitatively the decay of the off-diagonal elements of a density operator in the decoherence basis. We address the question of how to experimentally access such a nonlinear parameter directly without the need of complete process tomography. In particular, we design a simple experiment working with two copies of the channel, in which the registered mean value of a two-valued measurement directly determines the value of the average decoherence rate. No prior knowledge of the decoherence basis is required.

  14. Effect of flow fluctuations and nonflow on elliptic flow methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ollitrault, Jean-Yves; Poskanzer, Arthur M.; Voloshin, Sergei A.

    2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss how the different estimates of elliptic flow are influenced by flow fluctuations and nonflow effects. It is explained why the event-plane method yields estimates between the two-particle correlation methods and the multiparticle correlation methods. It is argued that nonflow effects and fluctuations cannot be disentangled without other assumptions. However, we provide equations where, with reasonable assumptions about fluctuations and nonflow, all measured values of elliptic flow converge to a unique mean v_2,PP elliptic flow in the participant plane and, with a Gaussian assumption on eccentricity fluctuations, can be converted to the mean v_2,RP in the reaction plane. Thus, the 20percent spread in observed elliptic flow measurements from different analysis methods is no longer mysterious.

  15. A turbulence model for buoyant flows based on vorticity generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domino, Stefan Paul; Nicolette, Vernon F.; O'Hern, Timothy John; Tieszen, Sheldon R.; Black, Amalia Rebecca

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbulence model for buoyant flows has been developed in the context of a k-{var_epsilon} turbulence modeling approach. A production term is added to the turbulent kinetic energy equation based on dimensional reasoning using an appropriate time scale for buoyancy-induced turbulence taken from the vorticity conservation equation. The resulting turbulence model is calibrated against far field helium-air spread rate data, and validated with near source, strongly buoyant helium plume data sets. This model is more numerically stable and gives better predictions over a much broader range of mesh densities than the standard k-{var_epsilon} model for these strongly buoyant flows.

  16. A study on the flow of molten iron in the hearth of blast furnace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suh, Y.K.; Lee, Y.J.; Baik, C.Y. [Pohang Iron and Steel Co., Ltd. (Korea, Republic of). Technical Research Labs.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The flow of molten iron in the hearth of blast furnace was investigated by using a water model test and a numerical simulation. The water model apparatus was set up in order to evaluate the effects of coke size, coke bed structure, drain rate, and coke free space on the fluidity of molten iron through measurement of residence time and visualization of flow pattern. In addition, the flow was calculated by solving momentum equation in porous media using finite element method. The residence time increased with the coke size decrease, but decreased with the drain rate increase. If small coke was placed in the center of deadman, peripheral flow was enhanced. The flow path was changed due to the coke free space.

  17. Two-phase flow characteristics in multiple orifice valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alimonti, Claudio [Sapienza University of Rome, Department ICMA, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma (Italy); Falcone, Gioia; Bello, Oladele [The Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3116 TAMU, Richardson Building, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents an experimental investigation on the characteristics of two-phase flow through multiple orifice valve (MOV), including frictional pressure drop and void fraction. Experiments were carried out using an MOV with three different sets of discs with throat thickness-diameter ratios (s/d) of 1.41, 1.66 and 2.21. Tests were run with air and water flow rates ranging between 1.0 and 3.0 m{sup 3}/h, respectively. The two-phase flow patterns established for the experiment were bubbly and slug. Two-phase frictional multipliers, frictional pressure drop and void fraction were analyzed. The determined two-phase multipliers were compared against existing correlations for gas-liquid flows. None of the correlations tested proved capable of predicting the experimental results. The large discrepancy between predicted and measured values points at the role played by valve throat geometry and thickness-diameter ratio in the hydrodynamics of two-phase flow through MOVs. A modification to the constants in the two-phase multiplier equation used for pipe flow fitted the experimental data. A comparison between computed frictional pressure drop, calculated with the modified two-phase multiplier equation and measured pressure drop yielded better agreement, with less than 20% error. (author)

  18. Fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A fast repetition rate (FRR) flasher is described suitable for high flash photolysis including kinetic chemical and biological analysis. The flasher includes a power supply, a discharge capacitor operably connected to be charged by the power supply, and a flash lamp for producing a series of flashes in response to discharge of the discharge capacitor. A triggering circuit operably connected to the flash lamp initially ionizes the flash lamp. A current switch is operably connected between the flash lamp and the discharge capacitor. The current switch has at least one insulated gate bipolar transistor for switching current that is operable to initiate a controllable discharge of the discharge capacitor through the flash lamp. Control means connected to the current switch for controlling the rate of discharge of the discharge capacitor thereby to effectively keep the flash lamp in an ionized state between successive discharges of the discharge capacitor. Advantageously, the control means is operable to discharge the discharge capacitor at a rate greater than 10,000 Hz and even up to a rate greater than about 250,000 Hz. 14 figs.

  19. Instability statistics and mixing rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberto Artuso; Cesar Manchein

    2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We claim that looking at probability distributions of \\emph{finite time} largest Lyapunov exponents, and more precisely studying their large deviation properties, yields an extremely powerful technique to get quantitative estimates of polynomial decay rates of time correlations and Poincar\\'e recurrences in the -quite delicate- case of dynamical systems with weak chaotic properties.

  20. Undergraduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franco, John

    Undergraduate Kentucky Metropolitan Rate Application REGISTRAR'S OFFICE University of Cincinnati PO@ucmail.uc.edu Undergraduate residents of specified counties in Kentucky, who are matriculated in degree or certificate requirement to establish Kentucky residency, these students are not eligible for the undergraduate

  1. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly.

  2. Sink Flow Deforms the Interface Between a Viscous Liquid and Air into a Tip Singularity S. Courrech du Pont and J. Eggers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eggers, Jens

    further, the opening angle of the cone vanishes like h2. No evidence for air entrainment was found, exceptSink Flow Deforms the Interface Between a Viscous Liquid and Air into a Tip Singularity S. Courrech between a viscous liquid and air is deformed by a sink flow of constant flow rate to form a sharp tip

  3. Network Flow Optimization under Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tesfatsion, Leigh

    Network model in words Minimize the cost of satisfying demands for electric energy By: imports, exports and electricity Subject to: conservation of energy flows (net after losses), lower and upper bounds on flows is a reactive approach: how would the optimal solution have changed if I'd only known? · Proactive approaches

  4. Redox Flow Batteries, a Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U. Tennessee Knoxville; U. Texas Austin; McGill U; Weber, Adam Z.; Mench, Matthew M.; Meyers, Jeremy P.; Ross, Philip N.; Gostick, Jeffrey T.; Liu, Qinghua

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Redox flow batteries are enjoying a renaissance due to their ability to store large amounts of electrical energy relatively cheaply and efficiently. In this review, we examine the components of redox flow batteries with a focus on understanding the underlying physical processes. The various transport and kinetic phenomena are discussed along with the most common redox couples.

  5. Investigation on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan, Yassin

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Uncertainties associated with the core bypass flow are some of the key issues that directly influence the coolant mass flow distribution and magnitude, and thus the operational core temperature profiles, in the very high-temperature reactor (VHTR). Designers will attempt to configure the core geometry so the core cooling flow rate magnitude and distribution conform to the design values. The objective of this project is to study the bypass flow both experimentally and computationally. Researchers will develop experimental data using state-of-the-art particle image velocimetry in a small test facility. The team will attempt to obtain full field temperature distribution using racks of thermocouples. The experimental data are intended to benchmark computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes by providing detailed information. These experimental data are urgently needed for validation of the CFD codes. The following are the project tasks: • Construct a small-scale bench-top experiment to resemble the bypass flow between the graphite blocks, varying parameters to address their impact on bypass flow. Wall roughness of the graphite block walls, spacing between the blocks, and temperature of the blocks are some of the parameters to be tested. • Perform CFD to evaluate pre- and post-test calculations and turbulence models, including sensitivity studies to achieve high accuracy. • Develop the state-of-the art large eddy simulation (LES) using appropriate subgrid modeling. • Develop models to be used in systems thermal hydraulics codes to account and estimate the bypass flows. These computer programs include, among others, RELAP3D, MELCOR, GAMMA, and GAS-NET. Actual core bypass flow rate may vary considerably from the design value. Although the uncertainty of the bypass flow rate is not known, some sources have stated that the bypass flow rates in the Fort St. Vrain reactor were between 8 and 25 percent of the total reactor mass flow rate. If bypass flow rates are on the high side, the quantity of cooling flow through the core may be considerably less than the nominal design value, causing some regions of the core to operate at temperatures in excess of the design values. These effects are postulated to lead to localized hot regions in the core that must be considered when evaluating the VHTR operational and accident scenarios.

  6. Vertical flow chemical detection portal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Linker, K.L.; Hannum, D.W.; Conrad, F.J.

    1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A portal apparatus is described for screening objects or persons for the presence of trace amounts of chemical substances such as illicit drugs or explosives. The apparatus has a test space, in which a person may stand, defined by two generally upright sides spanned by a horizontal transom. One or more fans in the transom generate a downward air flow (uni-directional) within the test space. The air flows downwardly from a high pressure upper zone, past the object or person to be screened. Air moving past the object dislodges from the surface thereof both volatile and nonvolatile particles of the target substance. The particles are entrained into the air flow which continues flowing downward to a lower zone of reduced pressure, where the particle-bearing air stream is directed out of the test space and toward preconcentrator and detection components. The sides of the portal are specially configured to partially contain and maintain the air flow. 3 figs.

  7. Wavy flow cooling concept for turbine airfoils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, George (Palm City, FL)

    2010-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An airfoil including an outer wall and a cooling cavity formed therein. The cooling cavity includes a leading edge flow channel located adjacent a leading edge of the airfoil and a trailing edge flow channel located adjacent a trailing edge of the airfoil. Each of the leading edge and trailing edge flow channels define respective first and second flow axes located between pressure and suction sides of the airfoil. A plurality of rib members are located within each of the flow channels, spaced along the flow axes, and alternately extending from opposing sides of the flow channels to define undulating flow paths through the flow channels.

  8. Observing and modeling Earths energy flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens B.; Schwartz S.

    2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reviews, from the authors perspective, progress in observing and modeling energy flows in Earth's climate system. Emphasis is placed on the state of understanding of Earth's energy flows and their susceptibility to perturbations, with particular emphasis on the roles of clouds and aerosols. More accurate measurements of the total solar irradiance and the rate of change of ocean enthalpy help constrain individual components of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere to within {+-}2 W m{sup -2}. The measurements demonstrate that Earth reflects substantially less solar radiation and emits more terrestrial radiation than was believed even a decade ago. Active remote sensing is helping to constrain the surface energy budget, but new estimates of downwelling surface irradiance that benefit from such methods are proving difficult to reconcile with existing precipitation climatologies. Overall, the energy budget at the surface is much more uncertain than at the top of the atmosphere. A decade of high-precision measurements of the energy budget at the top of the atmosphere is providing new opportunities to track Earth's energy flows on timescales ranging from days to years, and at very high spatial resolution. The measurements show that the principal limitation in the estimate of secular trends now lies in the natural variability of the Earth system itself. The forcing-feedback-response framework, which has developed to understand how changes in Earth's energy flows affect surface temperature, is reviewed in light of recent work that shows fast responses (adjustments) of the system are central to the definition of the effective forcing that results from a change in atmospheric composition. In many cases, the adjustment, rather than the characterization of the compositional perturbation (associated, for instance, with changing greenhouse gas concentrations, or aerosol burdens), limits accurate determination of the radiative forcing. Changes in clouds contribute importantly to this adjustment and thus contribute both to uncertainty in estimates of radiative forcing and to uncertainty in the response. Models are indispensable to calculation of the adjustment of the system to a compositional change but are known to be flawed in their representation of clouds. Advances in tracking Earth's energy flows and compositional changes on daily through decadal timescales are shown to provide both a critical and constructive framework for advancing model development and evaluation.

  9. Turbine blade tip flow discouragers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationery shroud. The rotating blade portions comprise a root section, a tip portion and an airfoil. The tip portion has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall. A number of flow discouragers are disposed on the blade tip portion. In one embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. In an alternative embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned at an angle in the range between about 0.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a reference axis aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. The flow discouragers increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  10. Flow metering valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaedel, Kenneth L. (Dublin, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for metering fluids at high pressures of about 20,000 to 60,000 psi is disclosed. The apparatus includes first and second plates which are positioned adjacent each other to form a valve chamber. The plates are made of materials which have substantially equal elastic properties. One plate has a planar surface area, and the other a recessed surface area defined by periphery and central lips. When the two plates are positioned in adjacent contacting relationship, a valve chamber is formed between the planar surface area and the recessed surface area. Fluid is introduced into the chamber and exits therefrom when a deformation occurs at positions where they no longer form a valve seat. This permits the metering of fluids at high pressures and at slow variable rates. Fluid then exits from the chamber until an applied external force becomes large enough to bring the valve seats back into contact.

  11. Flow metering valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Blaedel, K.L.

    1983-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for metering fluids at high pressures of about 20,000 to 60,000 psi is disclosed. The apparatus includes first and second plates which are positioned adjacent each other to form a valve chamber. The plates are made of materials which have substantially equal elastic properties. One plate has a planar surface area, and the other a recessed surface area defined by periphery and central lips. When the two plates are positioned in adjacent contacting relationship, a valve chamber is formed between the planar surface area and the recessed surface area. Fluid is introduced into the chamber and exits therefrom when a deformation occurs at positions where they no longer form a valve seat. This permits the metering of fluids at high pressures and at slow variable rates. Fluid then exits from the chamber until an applied external force becomes large enough to bring the valve seats back into contact.

  12. Progress with multigrid schemes for hypersonic flow problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radespiel, R. [DLR, Braunschweig (Germany)] [DLR, Braunschweig (Germany); Swanson, R.C. [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)] [NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA (United States)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several multigrid schemes are considered for the numerical computation of viscous hypersonic flows. For each scheme, the basic solution algorithm employs upwind spatial discretization with explicit multistage time stepping. Two-level versions of the various multigrid algorithms are applied to the two-dimensional advection equation, and Fourier analysis is used to determine their damping properties. The capabilities of the multigrid methods are assessed by solving three different hypersonic flow problems. Some new multigrid schemes based on semicoarsening strategies are shown to be quite effective in relieving the stiffness caused by the high-aspect-ratio cells required to resolve high Reynolds number flows. These schemes exhibit good convergence rates for Reynolds numbers up to 200 X 10{sup 6} and Mach numbers up to 25. 32 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Cost and Performance Model for Redox Flow Batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Crawford, Aladsair J.; Stephenson, David E.; Kim, Soowhan; Wang, Wei; Li, Bin; Coffey, Greg W.; Thomsen, Edwin C.; Graff, Gordon L.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Sprenkle, Vincent L.

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cost model was developed for all vanadium and iron-vanadium redox flow batteries. Electrochemical performance modeling was done to estimate stack performance at various power densities as a function of state of charge. This was supplemented with a shunt current model and a pumping loss model to estimate actual system efficiency. The operating parameters such as power density, flow rates and design parameters such as electrode aspect ratio, electrolyte flow channel dimensions were adjusted to maximize efficiency and minimize capital costs. Detailed cost estimates were obtained from various vendors to calculate cost estimates for present, realistic and optimistic scenarios. The main drivers for cost reduction for various chemistries were identified as a function of the energy to power ratio of the storage system. Levelized cost analysis further guided suitability of various chemistries for different applications.

  14. Using NMR to Validate First-Principles Granular Flow Equations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Candela; C. Huan; K. Facto; R. Wang; R. W. Mair; R. L. Walsworth

    2005-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments are described for two granular-flow systems, the vibrofluidized bed and the gas-fluidized bed. Using pulsed field gradient, magnetic resonance imaging, and hyperpolarized gas NMR, detailed information is obtained for the density and motions of both grains and interstitial gas. For the vibrofluidized bed, the granular temperature profile is measured and compared with a first-principles formulation of granular hydrodynamics. For the gas-fluidized bed, dynamic correlations in the grain density are used to measure the bubble velocity and hyperpolarized xenon gas NMR is used to measure the bubble-emulsion exchange rate. A goal of these measurements is to verify in earth gravity first-principles theories of granular flows, which then can be used to make concrete predictions for granular flows in reduced gravity.

  15. Speed-up of combustion fronts in shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamel, Francois

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the analysis of speed-up of reaction-diffusion-advection traveling fronts in infinite cylinders with periodic boundary conditions. The advection is a shear flow with a large amplitude and the reaction is nonnegative, with either positive or zero ignition temperature. The unique or minimal speeds of the traveling fronts are proved to be asymptotically linear in the flow amplitude as the latter goes to infinity, solving an open problem from \\cite{b}. The asymptotic growth rate is characterized explicitly as the unique or minimal speed of traveling fronts for a limiting degenerate problem, and the convergence of the regular traveling fronts to the degenerate ones is proved for positive ignition temperatures under an additional H{\\"{o}}rmander-type condition on the flow.

  16. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, A.; Swift, G.W.

    1984-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable porportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005/sup 0/C at a flow rate of 50 cm/sup 3//sec with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  17. Feedback regulated induction heater for a flowing fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM); Swift, Gregory W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A regulated induction heater for heating a stream of flowing fluid to a predetermined desired temperature. The heater includes a radiofrequency induction coil which surrounds a glass tube through which the fluid flows. A heating element consisting of a bundle of approximately 200 stainless steel capillary tubes located within the glass tube couples the output of the induction coil to the fluid. The temperature of the fluid downstream from the heating element is sensed with a platinum resistance thermometer, the output of which is applied to an adjustable proportional and integral feedback control circuit which regulates the power applied to the induction coil. The heater regulates the fluid temperature to within 0.005.degree. C. at a flow rate of 50 cm.sup.3 /second with a response time of less than 0.1 second, and can accommodate changes in heat load up to 1500 watts.

  18. Interviewer's ratings of personality: can these ratings predict job performance?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archuleta, Kathryn Diane

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ; Goldberg, 1993a; Guastello, 1993; McCrae k Costa, 1985; McCrae & John, 1992) has been about the validity of the five-factor model as a measure of personality; in other words, does the model truly capture all traits of personality? The five-factor model...; Goldberg, 1981; McCrae & Costa, 1987; McCrae & John, 1992; Peabody & Goldberg, 1989). Tupes and Christal (1958, 1992) were the first to look at peer ratings of personality in a variety of samples. Although these samples varied in length and kind...

  19. WP-07 Rate Case Workshops (rates/meetings)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500IIVasudhaSurface.Laboratory30,WP-07 power rates On July

  20. Multiscale Simulations for Polymeric Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahiro Murashima; Takashi Taniguchi; Ryoichi Yamamoto; Shugo Yasuda

    2011-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiscale simulation methods have been developed based on the local stress sampling strategy and applied to three flow problems with different difficulty levels: (a) general flow problems of simple fluids, (b) parallel (one-dimensional) flow problems of polymeric liquids, and (c) general (two- or three-dimensional) flow problems of polymeric liquids. In our multiscale methods, the local stress of each fluid element is calculated directly by performing microscopic or mesoscopic simulations according to the local flow quantities instead of using any constitutive relations. For simple fluids (a), such as the Lenard-Jones liquid, a multiscale method combining MD and CFD simulations is developed based on the local equilibrium assumption without memories of the flow history. (b), the multiscale method is extended to take into account the memory effects that arise in hydrodynamic stress due to the slow relaxation of polymer-chain conformations. The memory of polymer dynamics on each fluid element is thus resolved by performing MD simulations in which cells are fixed at the mesh nodes of the CFD simulations.For general (two- or three-dimensional) flow problems of polymeric liquids (c), it is necessary to trace the history of microscopic information such as polymer-chain conformation, which carries the memories of past flow history, along the streamline of each fluid element. A Lagrangian-based CFD is thus implemented to correctly advect the polymer-chain conformation consistently with the flow. On each fluid element, coarse-grained polymer simulations are carried out to consider the dynamics of entangled polymer chains that show extremely slow relaxation compared to microscopic time scales.

  1. The transition from two phase bubble flow to slug flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radovcich, Nick A.

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of transition from bubble to slug flow in a vertical pipe has been studied analytically and experimentally. An equation is presented which gives the agglomeration time as a function of void fraction, channel ...

  2. Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Arora, Ravi; Kilanowski, David

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention describes features that can be used to control flow to an array of microchannels. The invention also describes methods in which a process stream is distributed to plural microchannels.

  3. Dynamic and rate-dependent yielding in model cohesive suspensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richard Buscall; Peter J Scales; Anthony D Stickland; Hui-En Teo; Tiara E Kusuma; Daniel R Lester

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental system has been found recently, a coagulated CaCO3 suspension, that shows very different yield behaviour depending upon how it is tested and at what rate it is strained. At P\\'eclet number Pe > 1 it behaves as a simple Herschel Bulkley liquid, whereas at Pe it shows hysteresis and shear-banding and in the usual type of sweep used to measure flow curves in controlled stress mode routinely, it shows very erratic and irreproducible behaviour. All of these features can be attributed to a dependence of yield stress on rate of strain. Stress growth curves obtained from step strain-rate testing showed that the rate-dependence of the yield stress was a consequence of rate-dependent strain-softening. At very low Pe yield was cooperative and the yield strain was order-one, whereas as the Pe approached unity, the yield strain reduced to that needed to break interparticle bonds and the yield stress decayed to a minimal value. For example, at 40%v/v it dropped from ca. 200 Pa to It is suspected that the rich behaviour seen for the CaCO3 system could well be the rule rather than the exception for cohesive suspensions, the importance or otherwise of the rate dependence being a matter of scale or degree. If so, then the Herschel-Bulkley equation could usefully be generalised to read (in simple shear). The proposition that rate-dependent yield might be general, for cohesive suspensions at least, is amenable to further rigorous experimental testing by a range of means and along lines suggested.

  4. Gas flow characterization of restrictive flow orifice devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shrouf, R.G. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Safety Engineering Dept.; Page, S.R. [Albuquerque Valve and Fitting Co., NM (United States)

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A restrictive flow orifice (RFO) can be used to limit the uncontrolled release of system media upon component or line failure in a gas handling system and can thereby enhance the system safety. This report describes a new RFO product available from the Swagelok Companies and specifies the gas flow characteristics of this device. A family of four different sizes of RFO devices is documented.

  5. Insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, Daniel O. (Glenville, NV)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid flow passage bridgepiece for insertion into an open-face fluid flow channel of a fluid flow plate is provided. The bridgepiece provides a sealed passage from a columnar fluid flow manifold to the flow channel, thereby preventing undesirable leakage into and out of the columnar fluid flow manifold. When deployed in the various fluid flow plates that are used in a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell, bridgepieces of this invention prevent mixing of reactant gases, leakage of coolant or humidification water, and occlusion of the fluid flow channel by gasket material. The invention also provides a fluid flow plate assembly including an insertable bridgepiece, a fluid flow plate adapted for use with an insertable bridgepiece, and a method of manufacturing a fluid flow plate with an insertable fluid flow passage bridgepiece.

  6. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindquist, W Brent

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

  7. Cash Flow and Discount Rate news estimation: which method to choose?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khimich, Natalya V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    form the VAR method . Implied Cost of Capital estimates byt+1 . TABLE 3: Cost of Capital Estimates by Year Year Numberdifferent estimates of the implied cost of capital. See

  8. Fw: RESPONSE: New Support Request -Estimating Flow Rate -hand off of coordination duties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    , Michael; 'steven.aoki@nnsa.doe.gov'; 'steve.binkley@science.doe.gov'; Labson, Victor F Subject: RE@pnl.gov>. " steven.aoki@nnsa.doe.goV- nnsa.doe.gov>. ~steve.binkley@science.doe.gov'" ' "Oarren.Mollol@HQ.OOE.GOV", "Kluse. Michael" . ·"steven.aoki@nnsa

  9. National Incident Command's Flow Rate Technical Group Membership List as of 5.27.10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    as Lead Engineer for the Reserves Section Unit 1 in reservoir analyses, reserves inventory, and training Section in resolving issues related to reservoir analyses, reserves inventory, and assignments of new producible leases to fields. He has also authored a report on oil and gas reserves in the Gulf. Austin Gould

  10. Flow routing with unknown rating curves using a state-space reservoir-cascade-type formulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Jozsef Szilagyi*,1 , Gabor Balint, Balazs Gauzer, Peter Bartha National Hydrological Forecasting Center. Szilagyi). 1 On leave from the Conservation and Survey Division, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, 113) and Szilagyi (2003), respectively, both in a state-space formulation. The state-space description of the linear

  11. One-dimensional fluid diffusion induced by constant-rate flow injection: Theoretical analysis and application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is essential in the exploitation of natural fluid resources, such as water, steam, petroleum, and natural gas advantages of our method are the reliability of the testing method, its economy of time, and the flexibility wastes. [3] In general, the nature of fluids in reservoir rocks can be characterized in terms of quantity

  12. The measurement of heat transfer rates in contaminated, high enthalpy flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muniz, Edelmiro

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    &' platinum "as suspe:;idedi conic. o:=id I&', c. &. ni, & & le;v'n;, a film of plati&&um m ta . . The fi &. i&s t1&, , t &'iere obta$ n?cd us! ]&g thc a&cove m. . -: t 1'&on wn re f au?d to bc stron&g'I y bnn, "cd to the pyt'cv. ba c&1il...

  13. Impacts of increased outdoor air flow rates on annual HVAC energy costs in office environment.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Destrez, Adrien

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The use of different ventilation systems has an important impact on the energy cost of office buildings. This paper examines the relationship between heating and… (more)

  14. Mean reaction rate closures for nanoparticle formation in turbulent reacting flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akroyd, Jethro

    2012-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    growth, demand and capacity for titania. . . . . . . . . . . 8 2.4 Chloride process for titania manufacture. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 3.1 DQMoM-IEM micromixing and diffusion source terms, N=2 fields. 41 3.2 DQMoM-IEM diffusion source term, N=3... are commercially available in two crystal phases: anatase and rutile. Both phases have high refractive indices, making them effective pigments. 6 2.1 Titania nanoparticles 2.1.1 Applications Titania pigments are used in paints, paper, plastics and textiles. Figure...

  15. EFFECT OF STRAIN RATE ON PLASTIC FLOW AND FAILURE IN POLYCRYSTALLINE TUNGSTEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Marc A.

    - ation of kinetic energy penetrators: they were made of depleted uranium which has the desired density (r and analysis of such applications. Although the principal (non-uranium) technological materials developed

  16. U-Sr isotopic speedometer: Fluid flow and chemical weathering rates inaquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, Kate; DePaolo, Donald J.; Christensen, John N.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J.R. Serne, H.T. Schaef, B.N. Bjornstad, B.A. Williams, D.C.Geological Survey (1990) WRIR 88-4108. Bjornstad et al. ,2001 B.N. Bjornstad, K.R. Fecht and C.J. Pluhar, Long

  17. Detecting single-particle insulating collisions in microfluidics as a function of flow rate.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nettleton, Elizabeth Grace

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??This work presents the first electrochemical observation of single polystyrene microbead collisions with an electrode within a microchannel. We have observed that detecting single microbead… (more)

  18. SciTech Connect: Flow rate--pressure drop relation for deformable shallow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) Sr (2) Ca (2) Cu (3) Oheavy-ionmicrofluidic channels

  19. TI 176C Flow Rate Audits and Adjustment TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Emily V.

    AND APPLICABILITY This standard operating procedure (SOP) describes the procedures for performing initial and final. The procedures followed in this situation are similar to those followed during site set up or annual maintenance, except that they are performed by the site operator rather than by field technicians. The procedure

  20. Flow Analysis on a Limited Volume Chilled Water System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Lin [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    LANL Currently has a limited volume chilled water system for use in a glove box, but the system needs to be updated. Before we start building our new system, a flow analysis is needed to ensure that there are no high flow rates, extreme pressures, or any other hazards involved in the system. In this project the piping system is extremely important to us because it directly affects the overall design of the entire system. The primary components necessary for the chilled water piping system are shown in the design. They include the pipes themselves (perhaps of more than one diameter), the various fitting used to connect the individual pipes to form the desired system, the flow rate control devices (valves), and the pumps that add energy to the fluid. Even the most simple pipe systems are actually quite complex when they are viewed in terms of rigorous analytical considerations. I used an 'exact' analysis and dimensional analysis considerations combined with experimental results for this project. When 'real-world' effects are important (such as viscous effects in pipe flows), it is often difficult or impossible to use only theoretical methods to obtain the desired results. A judicious combination of experimental data with theoretical considerations and dimensional analysis are needed in order to reduce risks to an acceptable level.

  1. Effect of flow leakage on the benchmarking of FLOWTRAN with Mark-22 mockup flow excursion test data from Babcock and Wilcox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Kuo-Fu.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a revised analysis of the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) downflow flow excursion tests that accounts for leakage between flow channels in the test assembly. Leak rates were estimated by comparing results from the downflow tests with those for upflow tests conducted using an identical assembly with some minor modifications. The upflow test assembly did not contain leaks. This revised analyses shows that FLOWTRAN with the SRS working criterion conservatively predicts onset of flow instability without using a local peaking factor to model heat transfer variations near the ribs.

  2. Two-dimensional flow of foam around an obstacle: force measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Dollet; Florence Elias; Catherine Quilliet; Christophe Raufaste; Miguel Aubouy; Francois Graner

    2004-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A Stokes experiment for foams is proposed. It consists in a two-dimensional flow of a foam, confined between a water subphase and a top plate, around a fixed circular obstacle. We present systematic measurements of the drag exerted by the flowing foam on the obstacle, \\emph{versus} various separately controlled parameters: flow rate, bubble volume, bulk viscosity, obstacle size, shape and boundary conditions. We separate the drag into two contributions, an elastic one (yield drag) at vanishing flow rate, and a fluid one (viscous coefficient) increasing with flow rate. We quantify the influence of each control parameter on the drag. The results exhibit in particular a power-law dependence of the drag as a function of the bulk viscosity and the flow rate with two different exponents. Moreover, we show that the drag decreases with bubble size, and increases proportionally to the obstacle size. We quantify the effect of shape through a dimensioned drag coefficient, and we show that the effect of boundary conditions is small.

  3. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier3Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate

  4. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier5Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This is aInformation Rate

  5. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/EnergyRateStructure/Tier6Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscotInformation Max Jump to: navigation, search This isInformation Rate Jump

  6. Real-Time Measurement of Rates of Outdoor Airflow into HVACSystems: A Field Study of Three Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, William J.; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Faulkner, David

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Technologies for real-time continuous measurement of the flow rates of outdoor air (OA) into HVAC systems are now available commercially. Our prior papers reported on laboratory-based evaluations of these measurement technologies and this document describes the methods and results of a field study of the accuracy of three of these technologies. From the field study data, we determined that neither wind speed nor wind direction have an important adverse impact on measurement accuracy. The field study confirmed that these three measurement technologies can provide reasonably accurate measurements of outdoor air intake rates in field settings, if the pressure signals are measured with high accuracy. Some of the pressure transducers marketed for use with commercial HVAC systems were determined to be sufficiently accurate for this application. Given the significant impact of OA flow rates on both energy use and occupant health, more widespread use of technologies that provide for real time measurements of OA flow rates seems warranted.

  7. Capillary flows in flexible structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoberg, Theresa B. (Theresa Blinn)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between capillary and elastic effects are relevant to a variety of applications, from micro- and nano-scale manufacturing to biological systems. In this thesis, we investigate capillary flows in extremely ...

  8. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  9. particle flow for nonlinear filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobigeon, Nicolas

    particle flow for nonlinear filters Fred Daum 19 June 2012 Copyright © 2012 Raytheon Company. All rights reserved. Customer Success Is Our Mission is a trademark of Raytheon Company. 1 #12;discrete time

  10. Fluid Flow Modeling in Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we study fluid flow in fractures using numerical simulation and address the challenging issue of hydraulic property characterization in fractures. The methodology is based on Computational Fluid Dynamics, ...

  11. Mechanical design of flow batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopkins, Brandon J. (Brandon James)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to investigate the design of low-cost, high-efficiency flow batteries. Researchers are searching for next-generation battery materials, and this thesis presents a systems analysis encompassing ...

  12. Field Flows of Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cahn, Robert N.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Field Flows of Dark Energy Robert N. Cahn, Roland de Putter,July 8, 2008) Scalar ?eld dark energy evolving from a longthe key aspects of the dark energy evolution during much of

  13. Longitudinal dispersion in vegetated flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Enda

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vegetation is ubiquitous in rivers, estuaries and wetlands, strongly influencing both water conveyance and mass transport. The plant canopy affects both mean and turbulent flow structure, and thus both advection and ...

  14. Pipe Flow System Holly Guest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    numbers #12;Pipe Flow System Form #12;Components Form Fitting Loss Coefficient, k Globe valve, fully open 10 Angle valve, fully open 5 Swing check valve, fully open 2.5 Gate valve, fully open .2 Shortradius

  15. Multiscale modeling in granular flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rycroft, Christopher Harley

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Granular materials are common in everyday experience, but have long-resisted a complete theoretical description. Here, we consider the regime of slow, dense granular flow, for which there is no general model, representing ...

  16. Subcooled flow boiling of fluorocarbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Richard Walter

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study was conducted of heat transfer and hydrodynamic behavior for subcooled flow boiling of Freon-113, one of a group of fluorocarbons suitable for use in cooling of high-power-density electronic components. Problems ...

  17. Minimum Stream Flow Standards (Connecticut)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to all dams and structures which impound or divert waters on rivers or their tributaries, with some exceptions. The regulations set standards for minimum flow (listed in the...

  18. Automation of radiochemical analysis by applying flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, David

    of detection systems, including scintillation counting, a-spectrometers, proportional counters, mass spectrometry and spectrophotometry. ª 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: Flow-analysis technique; Flow

  19. MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lahey, Richard T.

    MODERN DEVELOPMENTS IN MULTIPHASE FLOW & HEAT TRANSFER "ENGINEERING APPLICATIONS OF FRACTAL and multiphase flow & heat transfer will be stressed. This paper will begin by reviewing some important concepts

  20. Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer, Longer-lasting Batteries Colorado: Isothermal Battery Calorimeter Quantifies Heat Flow, Helps Make Safer,...

  1. Influence of flow regime on U(VI) sorption kinetics in fine sediments at the Hanford site, Washington, USA.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moser, Jessa V.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The effect of flow rate on U(VI) sorption kinetics was investigated by a series of column tests using the reactive mass fraction (<2mm) of sediments… (more)

  2. Upper Great Plains Rates information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption by sectorlongUpdates by Diane Johnson Email Alerts SubscribeRates

  3. Rate Adjustments and Public Involvement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -the Mid-Infrared at 278, 298, andEpidermal Growth Factor. | EMSLusingRate

  4. Previous Announcements (rates/fc)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - SeptemberMicroneedles for4-16 FOR IMMEDIATEPreviewing the 2011 RenewableRates >

  5. Equidistribution results for geodesic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdelhamid Amroun

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the works of Ma\\~n\\'e \\cite{Ma} and Paternain \\cite{Pat} we study the distribution of geodesic arcs with respect to equilibrium states of the geodesic flow on a closed manifold, equipped with a $\\mathcal{C}^{\\infty}$ Riemannian metric. We prove large deviations lower and upper bounds and a contraction principle for the geodesic flow in the space of probability measures of the unit tangent bundle. We deduce a way of approximating equilibrium states for continuous potentials.

  6. Evolution of flow disturbances in cocurrent gas-liquid flows. Progress report, November 1, 1992--October 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCready, M.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of interfacial waves in horizontal gas-liquid flows, close to neutral stability, suggest that the rate of evolution of the interface may be linked to nonlinear interactions between the fundamental mode and the subharmonic -- even if the subharmonic is linearly stable. The rate of evolution increases as the subharmonic becomes more unstable. A comparison of linear stability techniques used to predict the initial behavior of waves reveals similar predictions of growth rates and almost identical speeds between a two layer laminar Orr-Sommerfeld theory and an Orr-Sommerfeld theory when the effect of the (turbulent) gas flow enters as boundary conditions on the liquid layer. However, there is disagreement at small wavenumbers as to the point at which the growth curve crosses 0. This is a significant problem because longwave disturbances, in our case roll waves, form by growth of (initially) small amplitude waves that have frequencies which are 0.5 to 1 Hz, which is in the range where the two theories disagree about the sign of the growth rate. While nonlinear effects are probably involved in the formation of the peak (at least while its amplitude is small), the linear growth rate must play an important role when the amplitude is small.

  7. Instrumented home energy rating and commissioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wray, Craig P.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the orifice. The manufacturer reports that its accuracy isaccuracy of this method. Flow Plate and Grid: This new device uses a calibrated multiple-orifice

  8. Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martín, Pino

    Effect of Finite-rate Chemical Reactions on Turbulence in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layers Lian on future air-breathing hypersonic cruise vehicles will be turbulent and chemically reacting. To aid the design of such vehicles, a greater understanding of turbulent hypersonic flows is needed. Although

  9. Strain rate and temperature dependence of Omori law scaling constants of AE data: Implications for earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -value decreases systematically with increasing deformation rate suggesting a greater proportion of small cracks: Fracture and flow; 5134 Physical Properties of Rocks: Thermal properties. Citation: Ojala, I. O., I. G] of AE events follows a power law, just as it is commonly observed for earthquakes [Frohlich and Davis

  10. Interfacial plasticity governs strain rate sensitivity and ductility in nanostructured metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suresh, Subra

    Interfacial plasticity governs strain rate sensitivity and ductility in nanostructured metals Ting-controlling mechanisms of plastic flow. We attribute the relatively high ductility of nano- twinned copper to the hardening of twin boundaries as they gradually lose coherency during plastic deformation. These find- ings

  11. Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Macrophyte Decomposition Rates in the Tres Rios Constructed Treatment Wetland: Preliminary Results wetland. Plant Ecology 200:69-82. Literature Cited! Figure 1A: Aerial photo of the treatment flow cell, such as those associated with municipal wastewater treatment.! Constructed treatment wetlands perform important

  12. Subcritical dynamos in shear flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Rincon; G. I. Ogilvie; M. R. E. Proctor; C. Cossu

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Identifying generic physical mechanisms responsible for the generation of magnetic fields and turbulence in differentially rotating flows is fundamental to understand the dynamics of astrophysical objects such as accretion disks and stars. In this paper, we discuss the concept of subcritical dynamo action and its hydrodynamic analogue exemplified by the process of nonlinear transition to turbulence in non-rotating wall-bounded shear flows. To illustrate this idea, we describe some recent results on nonlinear hydrodynamic transition to turbulence and nonlinear dynamo action in rotating shear flows pertaining to the problem of turbulent angular momentum transport in accretion disks. We argue that this concept is very generic and should be applicable to many astrophysical problems involving a shear flow and non-axisymmetric instabilities of shear-induced axisymmetric toroidal velocity or magnetic fields, such as Kelvin-Helmholtz, magnetorotational, Tayler or global magnetoshear instabilities. In the light of several recent numerical results, we finally suggest that, similarly to a standard linear instability, subcritical MHD dynamo processes in high-Reynolds number shear flows could act as a large-scale driving mechanism of turbulent flows that would in turn generate an independent small-scale dynamo.

  13. 1066 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER DELIVERY, VOL. 18, NO. 3, JULY 2003 P Characteristics for the Unified Power Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lehn, Peter W.

    for the Unified Power Flow Controller--Analysis Inclusive of Equipment Ratings and Line Limits J. Z. Bebic, Member curves, power system dynamic stability, UPFC. I. INTRODUCTION THE UNIFIED power flow controller (UPFC) enables in- dependent and simultaneous control of a transmission line voltage, impedance, and phase angle

  14. Regional neurohypophysial and hypothalamic blood flow in rats during hypercapnia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, R.M. Jr.; Myers, C.L.; Page, R.B.

    1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) was measured in the neurohypophysis and hypothalamus in normocapnic and hypercapnic rats using (/sup 14/C)isopropyliodoamphetamine. Rats were surgically prepared using nitrous oxide and halothane and placed in plaster restraining casts. Hypercapnia was produced by increasing the fractional concentration of inspired CO/sub 2/ (FICO/sub 2/). rCBF in normocapnic rats was higher in the paraventricular nucleus, supraoptic nucleus, median eminence, and neural lobe than rates previously measured by use of diffusible tracers. During hypercapnia blood flow increased linearly with arterial PCO/sub 2/ (PACO/sub 2/) in all regions except the median eminence and neural lobe, which were not affected by hypercapnia. When rats were pretreated with phentolamine (1 mg/kg) to block the alpha-adrenergic receptors, blood flow in the median eminence and neural lobe increased significantly during hypercapnia. We conclude that blood flow in the cell bodies of the paraventricular nucleus and supraoptic nucleus is regulated differently during hypercapnia than blood flow in the nerve terminals in the median eminence and neural lobe. Furthermore, vasodilation produced by increased CO/sub 2/ is offset by alpha-receptor stimulation in the median eminence and neural lobe.

  15. Intermittent dry granular flow in a vertical pipe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yann Bertho; Frederique Giorgiutti-Dauphine; Jean-Pierre Hulin

    2005-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The intermittent compact flow of glass beads in a vertical glass pipe of small diameter is studied experimentally by combining particle fraction, pressure, and air and grain flow rates measurements with a spatio-temporal analysis of the flow. At the onset of the flow, a decompaction front is observed to propagate from the bottom to the top of the tube at a velocity much larger than that of the grains. The blockage front also propagates upwards and at a still higher velocity. The decompaction induces a decreasing pressure wave strongly amplified as it propagates upwards towards the top of the tube. Pressure variations of 3000 Pa or more are detected in this region while particle fraction variations are of the order of 0.02. Grain velocities during the flow period also increase strongly at the top of the tube while the corresponding fraction of total time decreases. A 1D numerical model based on a simple relation between the effective acceleration of the grains and the particle fraction variations reproduces the amplification effect and provides predictions for its dependence on the permeability of the packing.

  16. Three-dimensional jamming and flows of soft glassy materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillaume Ovarlez; Quentin Barral; Philippe Coussot

    2011-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Various disordered dense systems such as foams, gels, emulsions and colloidal suspensions, exhibit a jamming transition from a liquid state (they flow) to a solid state below a yield stress. Their structure, thoroughly studied with powerful means of 3D characterization, exhibits some analogy with that of glasses which led to call them soft glassy materials. However, despite its importance for geophysical and industrial applications, their rheological behavior, and its microscopic origin, is still poorly known, in particular because of its nonlinear nature. Here we show from two original experiments that a simple 3D continuum description of the behaviour of soft glassy materials can be built. We first show that when a flow is imposed in some direction there is no yield resistance to a secondary flow: these systems are always unjammed simultaneously in all directions of space. The 3D jamming criterion appears to be the plasticity criterion encountered in most solids. We also find that they behave as simple liquids in the direction orthogonal to that of the main flow; their viscosity is inversely proportional to the main flow shear rate, as a signature of shear-induced structural relaxation, in close similarity with the structural relaxations driven by temperature and density in other glassy systems.

  17. Inhibition of slug front corrosion in multiphase flow conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, H.J. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); Jepson, W.P. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion at the slug front at the bottom of a pipeline is identified as one of the worst cases of corrosion occurring in the pipeline which carries unprocessed multiphase production with a high level of CO{sub 2} gas. One objective of the study in recommending a subsea completion to shore was to determine if commercial corrosion inhibitors can control this type of corrosion using carbon steel pipeline. Thus, inhibitors which showed excellent performance in the lab using the Rotating Cylinder Electrode system (RCE) were further evaluated to confirm their performance in a flow loop simulating the test conditions predicted from the flow modeling for the proposed pipeline. The performance profile of two commercial inhibitors were determined in a 4 in. flow loop at 7O C, 100 psig CO{sub 2} partial pressure in corrosive brines with or without ethylene glycol and/or light hydrocarbon. Results showed that the carbon steel pipeline could be adequately protected at low temperature using a commercial corrosion inhibitor to meet the designed life of the pipeline. Ethylene glycol, which is used in the pipeline to prevent hydrate formation, reduces the corrosivity of the brine and gives no effect on inhibitor performance under the slug flow conditions. A good agreement in inhibitor performance was observed between the flow loop and the RCE testing. The uninhibited corrosion rate of the test brine in this study is in good agreement with the predicted value using deWaard and Williams correlation for CO{sub 2} corrosion.

  18. SOLAR ROTATION RATE DURING THE CYCLE 24 MINIMUM IN ACTIVITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antia, H. M. [Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Homi Bhabha Road, Mumbai 400005 (India); Basu, Sarbani, E-mail: antia@tifr.res.i, E-mail: sarbani.basu@yale.ed [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven CT 06520-8101 (United States)

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The minimum of solar cycle 24 is significantly different from most other minima in terms of its duration as well as its abnormally low levels of activity. Using available helioseismic data that cover epochs from the minimum of cycle 23 to now, we study the differences in the nature of the solar rotation between the minima of cycles 23 and 24. We find that there are significant differences between the rotation rates during the two minima. There are differences in the zonal-flow pattern too. We find that the band of fast rotating region close to the equator bifurcated around 2005 and recombined by 2008. This behavior is different from that during the cycle 23 minimum. By autocorrelating the zonal-flow pattern with a time shift, we find that in terms of solar dynamics, solar cycle 23 lasted for a period of 11.7 years, consistent with the result of Howe et al. (2009). The autocorrelation coefficient also confirms that the zonal-flow pattern penetrates through the convection zone.

  19. Flow tests of the Gladys McCall well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Randolph, P.L.; Hayden, C.G.; Rogers, L.A. (Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report pulls together the data from all of the geopressured-geothermal field research conducted at the Gladys McCall well. The well produced geopressured brine containing dissolved natural gas from the Lower Miocene sands at a depth of 15,150 to 16,650 feet. More than 25 million barrels of brine and 727 million standard cubic feet of natural gas were produced in a series of flow tests between December 1982 and October 1987 at various brine flow rates up to 28,000 barrels per day. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 9 Sand found the permeability to be 67 to 85 md (millidarcies) for a brine volume of 85 to 170 million barrels. Initial short-term flow tests for the Number 8 Sand found a permeability of 113 to 132 md for a reservoir volume of 430 to 550 million barrels of brine. The long-term flow and buildup test of the Number 8 Sand found that the high-permeability reservoir connected to the wellbore (measured by the short-term flow test) was connected to a much larger, low-permeability reservoir. Numerical simulation of the flow and buildup tests required this large connected reservoir to have a volume of about 8 billion barrels (two cubic miles of reservoir rock) with effective permeabilities in the range of 0.2 to 20 md. Calcium carbonate scale formation in the well tubing and separator equipment was a problem. During the first 2 years of production, scale formation was prevented in the surface equipment by injection of an inhibitor upstream of the choke. Starting in 1985, scale formation in the production tubing was successfully prevented by injecting inhibitor pills'' directly into the reservoir. Corrosion and/or erosion of surface piping and equipment, as well as disposal well tubing, was also significant.

  20. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two- phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and its mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. Particularly, there is virtually no data base for the local interfacial area concentration in spite of its necessary in multi-dimensional two-fluid model analysis. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of cocurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5%. The local local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void fraction, interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe well, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can to up to 1000 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200/s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency.

  1. Interfacial characteristic measurements in horizontal bubbly two-phase flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Z.; Huang, W.D.; Srinivasmurthy, S.; Kocamustafaogullari, G.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the study of two-phase flow increasingly require detailed internal structure information upon which theoretical models can be formulated. The void fraction and interfacial area are two fundamental parameters characterizing the internal structure of two-phase flow. However, little information is currently available on these parameters, and it is mostly limited to vertical flow configurations. In view of the above, the internal phase distribution of cocurrent, air-water bubbly flow in a 50.3 mm diameter transparent pipeline has been experimentally investigated by using a double-sensor resistivity probe. Liquid and gas volumetric superficial velocities ranged from 3.74 to 5.60 m/s and 0.25 to 1.59 m/s, respectively, and average void fractions ranged from 2.12 to 22.5%. The local values of void fractions, interfacial area concentration, mean bubble diameter, bubble interface velocity, bubble chord-length and bubble frequency distributions were measured. The experimental results indicate that the void faction, interfacial area concentration and bubble frequency have local maxima near the upper pipe wall, and the profiles tend to flatten with increasing void fraction. The observed peak void fraction can reach 0.65, the peak interfacial area can go up to 900 {approx} 1000 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}, and the bubble frequency can reach a value of 2200/s. These ranges of values have never been reported for vertical bubbly flow. It is found that either decreasing the liquid flow rate or increasing the gas flow would increase the local void fraction, the interfacial area concentration and the bubble frequency. 85 refs., 124 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier1Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URI JumpEnergyInformation Rate

  3. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier2Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformation Rate Jump to:

  4. Property:OpenEI/UtilityRate/DemandRateStructure/Tier4Rate | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2NumberOfPrograms Jump to:URIInformationInformation Rate

  5. 7, 29612989, 2007 Predicting arene rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    software or computing power. Measured gas-phase rate coefficients for the reaction of aromatic hydrocarbons

  6. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Feng, Zhe

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  7. Composite Fringe Benefit Rates Nancy R. Lewis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Marcelo A.

    January 1, 2015 Retirement Eligible FY 2014-15 Rate FY 2015-16 Rate FY 2016-17 Rate B Healthcomp Faculty of Research #12;New Rates · Provided by the Budget Office for use when planning proposal budgets for contract and grants · Effective for use in proposals submitted to sponsors January 1, 2015 and thereafter · Title

  8. Combined Retrieval, Microphysical Retrievals and Heating Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, Zhe

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Microphysical retrievals and heating rates from the AMIE/Gan deployment using the PNNL Combined Retrieval.

  9. Numerical modeling of deep groundwater flow and heat transport in the Williston Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garven, G.; Vigrass, L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A numerical modeling approach has been used to evaluate quantitatively the effects of fluid flow on contemporary heat flow in an intracratonic basin. The authors have selected the Williston basin for this hydrodynamic study because of the opportunity it presents to assess the relation of deep groundwater flow to basin geothermics and the associated features of diagenesis and petroleum accumulation. The finite element method is used to solve the coupled equations of fluid flow and heat transport in two-dimensional sections of the basin. Both the fluid- and heat-flow regime are assumed to be at steady state, and the fluid flow is driven primarily by the water-table relief which is taken to be a subdued replica of land-surface topography. Buoyancy forces may also affect flow through fluid density gradients created by temperature and salinity effects. Three southwest-northwest oriented sections across the basin were modeled using available and estimated parameter data. The predicted flow patterns are most strongly affected by the topography, but the Devonian salt unit and Cretaceous shale unit exert some control. Cross-formational flow is especially important near the downdip, solution edge of the salt beds. Flow rates rarely exceed 0.5 m/year in the deep-central part of the basin, yet there does exist a marked effect on heat flow, albeit subdued by the blanket effect of the low-permeability Cretaceous shales. The regional effect of the topography-driven flow system is reflected in present-day salinity patterns and heat-flow data.

  10. Stability of the steady three-dimensional lid-driven flow in a cube and the supercritical flow dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuhlmann, Hendrik C., E-mail: h.kuhlmann@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Vienna University of Technology, Resselgasse 3, 1040 Vienna (Austria); Albensoeder, Stefan [Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Ammerländer Heerstraße 136, 26129 Oldenburg (Germany)] [Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Ammerländer Heerstraße 136, 26129 Oldenburg (Germany)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of the steady flow in a lid-driven cube is investigated by a collocation method making use of asymptotic solutions for the singular edges of the cavity up- and downstream of the moving wall. Owing to the rapid convergence of the method high-accuracy critical data are obtained. To determine the critical point subcritical growth rates of small perturbations are extrapolated to zero. We find the bifurcation to be of Hopf-type and slightly subcritical. Above the critical point, the oscillatory flow is symmetric with respect to the symmetric midplane of the cavity and characterized by nearly streamwise vortices in the boundary layer on the wall upstream of the moving wall. The oscillation amplitude grows slowly and seems to saturate. On a long time scale, however, the constant-amplitude oscillations are unstable. The periodic oscillations are interrupted by short bursts during which the oscillation amplitude grows substantially and the spatial structure of the oscillating streamwise vortices changes. Towards the end of each burst the mirror symmetry of the oscillatory flow is lost, the flow returns to the vicinity of the unstable steady state and the growth of symmetric oscillations starts again leading to an intermittent chaotic flow.

  11. Bypass valve and coolant flow controls for optimum temperatures in waste heat recovery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meisner, Gregory P

    2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Implementing an optimized waste heat recovery system includes calculating a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a heat exchanger of a waste heat recovery system, and predicting a temperature and a rate of change in temperature of a material flowing through a channel of the waste heat recovery system. Upon determining the rate of change in the temperature of the material is predicted to be higher than the rate of change in the temperature of the heat exchanger, the optimized waste heat recovery system calculates a valve position and timing for the channel that is configurable for achieving a rate of material flow that is determined to produce and maintain a defined threshold temperature of the heat exchanger, and actuates the valve according to the calculated valve position and calculated timing.

  12. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

    1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

  13. Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Anthony, Brian W. (Clearfield, PA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

  14. Statistics of polymer adsorption under shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gui-Li He; René Messina; Hartmut Löwen

    2009-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Using non-equilibrium Brownian dynamics computer simulations, we have investigated the steady state statistics of a polymer chain under three different shear environments: i) linear shear flow in the bulk (no walls), ii) shear vorticity normal to the adsorbing wall, iii) shear gradient normal to the adsorbing wall. The statistical distribution of the chain end-to-end distance and its orientational angles are calculated within our monomer-resolved computer simulations. Over a wide range of shear rates, this distribution can be mapped onto a simple theoretical finite-extensible-nonlinear-elastic dumbbell model with fitted anisotropic effective spring constants. The tails of the angular distribution functions are consistent with scaling predictions borrowed from the bulk dumbbell model. Finally, the frequency of the characteristic periodic tumbling motion has been investigated by simulation as well and was found to be sublinear with the shear rate for the three set-ups, which extends earlier results done in experiments and simulations for free and tethered polymer molecules without adsorption.

  15. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerstein, A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  16. SHORT-TUBE SUBCRITICAL FLOW Enerag Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    #12;SHORT-TUBE SUBCRITICAL FLOW Y. C. Mei Enerag Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge-tube subcritical flow. For short tubes used as refrigerant expansion devices, the orifice model is found inadequate-TUBE SUBCRITICAL FLOW INTRODUCTION Much theoretical and experimental work regarding short tube fluid flow has

  17. Mach flow angularity probes for scramjet engine flow path diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jalbert, P.A.; Hiers, R.S. Jr. [Sverdrup Technology, Inc., Arnold AFS, TN (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Mach-flow angularity (MFA) probes were developed for use in scramjet flow path probe rakes. Prototype probes were fabricated to demonstrate the assembly processes (numerical control machining, furnace brazing, and electron beam welding). Tests of prototype probes confirmed the thermal durability margins and life cycle. Selected probes were calibrated in air at Mach numbers from 1.75 to 6.0. Acceptance criteria for the production probes stressed thermal durability and pressure (and, consequently, Mach number) measurement quality. This new water-cooled MFA probe has 0.397-cm shaft diameter and is capable of withstanding heat fluxes of 2.724 kW/sq cm.

  18. Laser velocimetry study of the flow field in a centrifugal pump with a shrouded impeller

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moran, Michael Kevin

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    was measured using taps located at the flanges. Flow straighteners were placed twelve diameters upstream and five diameters downstream of the orifice plate. The accuracy of the orifice meter was verified by comparison with measurements of the flow rate made... L2F MCA N N, N, NOMENCLATURE Cross-sectional area of the inlet pipe Area of orifice Best efficiency point Coefficient of discharge for orifice meter Constant fraction discriminator in the L2F processor Beam diameter at probe volume...

  19. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  20. Downward flow of water with entrained air in a nonuniformaly heated subdivided annulus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, B.S.; May, C.P.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an experimental study in which water was fed to a vertical annulus, entraining air in downward flow. The annulus was subdivided by longitudinal fins into four subchannels and was heated with an azimuthally varying heat flux. A bypass was provided to simulate flow in parallel channels. For steady liquid flow, inlet temperature, and pressure boundary conditions, the power was increased until critical heat flux was reached. Overheating characteristics were grouped according to the prevailing flow pattern. In annular flows (j{sub L} < 0.3 m/s) overheating of the whole test section occurs when steam production causes countercurrent flooding. In intermittent flows (0.3 < j{sub L} < 0.9 m/s) the overheating is confined to a portion of the hot subchannel. The mechanism is postulated to be stagnation of a large bubble. In bubble flows (0.9 m/s < j{sub L}) overheating occurs by diverting inlet flow to the bypass and again involves the whole test section. Except at the very lowest flow rates, critical heat flux occurs when the effluent liquid temperature is below saturation.

  1. Statistical theory of turbulent incompressible multimaterial flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B.

    1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpenetrating motion of incompressible materials is considered. ''Turbulence'' is defined as any deviation from the mean motion. Accordingly a nominally stationary fluid will exhibit turbulent fluctuations due to a single, slowly moving sphere. Mean conservation equations for interpenetrating materials in arbitrary proportions are derived using an ensemble averaging procedure, beginning with the exact equations of motion. The result is a set of conservation equations for the mean mass, momentum and fluctuational kinetic energy of each material. The equation system is at first unclosed due to integral terms involving unknown one-point and two-point probability distribution functions. In the mean momentum equation, the unclosed terms are clearly identified as representing two physical processes. One is transport of momentum by multimaterial Reynolds stresses, and the other is momentum exchange due to pressure fluctuations and viscous stress at material interfaces. Closure is approached by combining careful examination of multipoint statistical correlations with the traditional physical technique of kappa-epsilon modeling for single-material turbulence. This involves representing the multimaterial Reynolds stress for each material as a turbulent viscosity times the rate of strain based on the mean velocity of that material. The multimaterial turbulent viscosity is related to the fluctuational kinetic energy kappa, and the rate of fluctuational energy dissipation epsilon, for each material. Hence a set of kappa and epsilon equations must be solved, together with mean mass and momentum conservation equations, for each material. Both kappa and the turbulent viscosities enter into the momentum exchange force. The theory is applied to (a) calculation of the drag force on a sphere fixed in a uniform flow, (b) calculation of the settling rate in a suspension and (c) calculation of velocity profiles in the pneumatic transport of solid particles in a pipe.

  2. Mirrored serpentine flow channels for fuel cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rock, Jeffrey Allan (Rochester, NY)

    2000-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A PEM fuel cell having serpentine flow field channels wherein the input/inlet legs of each channel border the input/inlet legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field, and the output/exit legs of each channel border the output/exit legs of the next adjacent channels in the same flow field. The serpentine fuel flow channels may be longer, and may contain more medial legs, than the serpentine oxidant flow channels.

  3. Pressure compensated flow control valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Minteer, Daniel J. (West Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an air flow control valve which is capable of maintaining a constant flow at the outlet despite changes in the inlet or outlet pressure. The device consists of a shell assembly with an inlet chamber and outlet chamber separated by a separation plate. The chambers are connected by an orifice. Also located within the inlet chamber is a port controller assembly. The port controller assembly consists of a differential pressure plate and port cap affixed thereon. The cap is able to slide in and out of the orifice separating the inlet and outlet chambers. When the pressure differential is sufficient, the differential pressure plate rises or falls to maintain a constant air flow. Movement of the port controller assembly does not require the use of seals, diaphragms, tight tolerances, bushings, bearings, hinges, guides, or lubricants.

  4. Non-Invasive Characterization Of A Flowing Multi-Phase Fluid Using Ultrasonic Interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for noninvasively monitoring the flow and/or the composition of a flowing liquid using ultrasound is described. The position of the resonance peaks for a fluid excited by a swept-frequency ultrasonic signal have been found to change frequency both in response to a change in composition and in response to a change in the flow velocity thereof. Additionally, the distance between successive resonance peaks does not change as a function of flow, but rather in response to a change in composition. Thus, a measurement of both parameters (resonance position and resonance spacing), once calibrated, permits the simultaneous determination of flow rate and composition using the apparatus and method of the present invention.

  5. Connectivity due to preferential flow controls water flow and solute transport at the hillslope scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiler, Markus

    feedback, flow through the fractured bedrock, kinematic wave routing and flow through discrete preferentialConnectivity due to preferential flow controls water flow and solute transport at the hillslope the major controls on water flow and solute transport at the hillslope scale remains a major topic

  6. Rheo-optical determination of flow birefringence and flow dichroism with the pulsed laser method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheo-optical determination of flow birefringence and flow dichroism with the pulsed laser method online 29 August 2006 Rheo-optical measurements of the flow birefringence, flow dichroism systems under flow. However, the standard setup of an optical train, using phase modulation for the rheo-optical

  7. Interfacial flows in corrugated microchannels: flow regimes, transitions and hysteresis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, James J.

    , 1266-1276 (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijmultiphaseflow.2011.08.003 #12;model, microfluidics, porous media 1 of displacing oil by water in enhanced oil recovery (Marle, 1981; Lenormand et al., 1988). More recently on hy- drodynamic principles and concrete flow mechanisms. In fact, conflicting assumptions have been

  8. Mechanical and microstructural response of Ni sub 3 Al at high strain rate and elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sizek, H.W.; Gray, G.T. III.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the effect of strain rate and temperature on the substructure evolution and mechanical response of Ni{sub 3}Al will be presented. The strain rate response of Ni{sub 3}Al was studied at strain rates from 10{sup {minus}3} s{sup {minus}1} (quasi-static) to 10{sup 4} s{sup {minus}1} using a Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar. The Hopkinson Bar tests were conducted at temperatures ranging from 77K to 1273K. At high strain rates the flow strength increased significantly with increasing temperature, similar to the behavior observed at quasi-static rates. The work hardening rates increased with strain rate and varied with temperatures. The work hardening rates, appeared to be significantly higher than those found for Ni270. The substructure evolution was characterized utilizing TEM. The defect generation and rate sensitivity of Ni{sub 3}Al are also discussed as a function of strain rate and temperature. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  9. The Streaming Potential Generated by Flow of Wet Steam in Capillary Tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marsden, S.S. Jr.; Tyran, Craig K.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    For a constant pressure differential, the flow of wet steam generated electric potentials which increased with time and did not reach equilibrium values. These potentials were found to increase to values greater than 100 volts. The reason for this kind of potential build-up behavior was the presence of tiny flowing water slugs which were interspersed with electrically nonconductive steam vapor slugs. The measured electric potential for wet steam increased with pressure differential, but the relationship was not linear. The increase in potential with pressure drop was attributed both to an increase in fluid flow rate and changes in the wet steam quality.

  10. Nuclear reactor downcomer flow deflector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Charles B. (Greensburg, PA); Altman, David A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Singleton, Norman R. (Murrysville, PA)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A nuclear reactor having a coolant flow deflector secured to a reactor core barrel in line with a coolant inlet nozzle. The flow deflector redirects incoming coolant down an annulus between the core barrel and the reactor vessel. The deflector has a main body with a front side facing the fluid inlet nozzle and a rear side facing the core barrel. The rear side of the main body has at least one protrusion secured to the core barrel so that a gap exists between the rear side of the main body adjacent the protrusion and the core barrel. Preferably, the protrusion is a relief that circumscribes the rear side of the main body.

  11. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, R.D.; Bounds, J.A.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.W.

    1996-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors. 4 figs.

  12. High gas flow alpha detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bolton, Richard D. (Los Alamos, NM); Bounds, John A. (Los Alamos, NM); Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alpha detector for application in areas of high velocity gas flows, such as smokestacks and air vents. A plurality of spaced apart signal collectors are placed inside an enclosure, which would include smokestacks and air vents, in sufficient numbers to substantially span said enclosure so that gas ions generated within the gas flow are electrostatically captured by the signal collector means. Electrometer means and a voltage source are connected to the signal collectors to generate an electrical field between adjacent signal collectors, and to indicate a current produced through collection of the gas ions by the signal collectors.

  13. Non-Newtonian fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osinski, Charles Anthony

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    zero and unity. The Ostwald- de Waele Equation (4), commonly known as the power law, is sometimes used to describe fluid behavior of this type. The rheological equation is (4) where the parameters "k" and "n" are constant for a particular fluid... be extended to include Reynolds numbers and the type of flow determined to be laminar and/or turbulent. It is assumed that the transition from laminar to turbulent flow occurs at a Reynolds number of 2100, the numeric distribution of Reynolds numbers...

  14. Dynamo action in flows with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yi

    Dynamo action in flows with cat's eyes A l i c e C o u r v o i s i e r A n d r e w G i l b e r t Y of k for R = 500 and the flow (2.4) and (2.5). nts k = 2.5 and k = 5 are highlighted. Magnetic field). In (a) k = 2.5 and we have 0.5 max Bz (with max Bz 0.6 max |B|), and in (b) k = 5 and the levels .65 max

  15. Analytical solution for two-phase flow in a wellbore using the drift-flux model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, L.; Webb, S.W.; Oldenburg, C.M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents analytical solutions for steady-state, compressible two-phase flow through a wellbore under isothermal conditions using the drift flux conceptual model. Although only applicable to highly idealized systems, the analytical solutions are useful for verifying numerical simulation capabilities that can handle much more complicated systems, and can be used in their own right for gaining insight about two-phase flow processes in wells. The analytical solutions are obtained by solving the mixture momentum equation of steady-state, two-phase flow with an assumption that the two phases are immiscible. These analytical solutions describe the steady-state behavior of two-phase flow in the wellbore, including profiles of phase saturation, phase velocities, and pressure gradients, as affected by the total mass flow rate, phase mass fraction, and drift velocity (i.e., the slip between two phases). Close matching between the analytical solutions and numerical solutions for a hypothetical CO{sub 2} leakage problem as well as to field data from a CO{sub 2} production well indicates that the analytical solution is capable of capturing the major features of steady-state two-phase flow through an open wellbore, and that the related assumptions and simplifications are justified for many actual systems. In addition, we demonstrate the utility of the analytical solution to evaluate how the bottomhole pressure in a well in which CO{sub 2} is leaking upward responds to the mass flow rate of CO{sub 2}-water mixture.

  16. Numerical simulations of aggregate breakup in bounded and unbounded turbulent flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthaus U. Babler; Luca Biferale; Luca Brandt; Ulrike Feudel; Ksenia Guseva; Alessandra S. Lanotte; Cristian Marchioli; Francesco Picano; Gaetano Sardina; Alfredo Soldati; Federico Toschi

    2015-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Breakup of small aggregates in fully developed turbulence is studied by means of direct numerical simulations in a series of typical bounded and unbounded flow configurations, such as a turbulent channel flow, a developing boundary layer and homogeneous isotropic turbulence. The simplest criterion for breakup is adopted, whereas aggregate breakup occurs when the local hydrodynamic stress $\\sigma\\sim \\varepsilon^{1/2}$, with $\\varepsilon$ being the energy dissipation at the position of the aggregate, overcomes a given threshold $\\sigma_\\mathrm{cr}$, which is characteristic for a given type of aggregates. Results show that the breakup rate decreases with increasing threshold. For small thresholds, it develops a universal scaling among the different flows. For high thresholds, the breakup rates show strong differences between the different flow configurations, highlighting the importance of non-universal mean-flow properties. To further assess the effects of flow inhomogeneity and turbulent fluctuations, theresults are compared with those obtained in a smooth stochastic flow. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations and applicability of a set of independent proxies.

  17. Second law analysis of water flow through smooth microtubes under adiabatic conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parlak, Nezaket; Guer, Mesut; Ari, Vedat; Kuecuek, Hasan; Engin, Tahsin [The University of Sakarya, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Esentepe Campus, 54187 Sakarya (Turkey)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In the study, a second law analysis for a steady-laminar flow of water in adiabatic microtubes has been conducted. Smooth microtubes with the diameters between 50 and 150 {mu}m made of fused silica were used in the experiments. Considerable temperature rises due to viscous dissipation and relatively high pressure losses of flow were observed in experiments. To identify irreversibility of flow, rate of entropy generation from the experiments have been determined in the laminar flow range of Re = 20-2200. The second law of thermodynamics was applied to predict the entropy generation. The results of model taken from the literature, proposed to predict the temperature rise caused by viscous heating, correspond well with the experimental data. The second law analysis results showed that the flow characteristics in the smooth microtubes distinguish substantially from the conventional theory for flow in the larger tubes with respect to viscous heating/dissipation (temperature rise of flow) total entropy generation rate and lost work. (author)

  18. Simulation of heavy oil reservoir performance using a non-Newtonian flow model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narahara, Gene Masao

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . This reduction of viscosity as a function of shear rate has a significant effect on rates and other parameters when simulating reservoir performance. The objective of this study is to compare the simulation results of Newtonian and non-Newtonian oils under...)ected to increasing shear rate, the viscosity decreases. This behavior implies that the oil viscosity varies as a function of not only pressure, but also shear rate. This behavior is important when simulating heavy-oil reservoir performance. To simulate the flow...

  19. Shear flow effects on ion thermal transport in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tajima, T.; Horton, W.; Dong, J.Q. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States). Institute for Fusion Studies; Kishimoto, Y. [JAERI (Japan). Naka Fusion Research

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From various laboratory and numerical experiments, there is clear evidence that under certain conditions the presence of sheared flows in a tokamak plasma can significantly reduce the ion thermal transport. In the presence of plasma fluctuations driven by the ion temperature gradient, the flows of energy and momentum parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field are coupled with each other. This coupling manifests itself as significant off-diagonal coupling coefficients that give rise to new terms for anomalous transport. The authors derive from the gyrokinetic equation a set of velocity moment equations that describe the interaction among plasma turbulent fluctuations, the temperature gradient, the toroidal velocity shear, and the poloidal flow in a tokamak plasma. Four coupled equations for the amplitudes of the state variables radially extended over the transport region by toroidicity induced coupling are derived. The equations show bifurcations from the low confinement mode without sheared flows to high confinement mode with substantially reduced transport due to strong shear flows. Also discussed is the reduced version with three state variables. In the presence of sheared flows, the radially extended coupled toroidal modes driven by the ion temperature gradient disintegrate into smaller, less elongated vortices. Such a transition to smaller spatial correlation lengths changes the transport from Bohm-like to gyrobohm-like. The properties of these equations are analyzed. The conditions for the improved confined regime are obtained as a function of the momentum-energy deposition rates and profiles. The appearance of a transport barrier is a consequence of the present theory.

  20. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  1. Home Energy Ratings and Building Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, J.C.

    climate as they affect the rating score of a proposed or completed structure. The rating is used to determine the most cost effective mechanical systems, building envelope design including window and door types, effect of various roofing materials...

  2. 2012 Wholesale Power and Transmission Rate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the meaning given such term in section 3.3.5. "COU Parties' PF Rate" means any BPA wholesale power rate for service to COUs' "general requirements" (as defined in section...

  3. Kiwifruitsize influences softening rate during storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crisosto, Carlos H.

    fruit size and the rate of softening under air and CA conditions will help cold storage managerssafelyparts per billion induce rapid kiwifruit softening during cold storage, we investigated the rate

  4. ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CONVERGENCE RATES OF ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Q-rates in terms of the di erential properties of v and in terms of the ... schemes of this kind is to assure that they converge at a provably fast rate to a point.

  5. Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Alaska Housing Finance Corporation (AHFC) offers interest rate reductions to home buyers purchasing new and existing homes with 5 Star and 5 Star Plus energy ratings. All homes constructed on...

  6. Variable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ang-Olson, Jeffrey; Wachs, Martin; Taylor, Brian D.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J Bradshaw, "SLate ’F~es’ Gasoline Tax So ~t Wdl Rise," TheVarlable-Rate State Gasoline Taxers Jeffrey Ang-Olson MartinVariable-Rate State Gasoline Taxes Jeffrey Ang-Olson

  7. Data Flow Testing Neelam Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Rajiv

    Data Flow Testing Neelam Gupta The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona and Rajiv Gupta The University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona Software testing techniques are designed to execute a program on a set of test cases that provide suÃ?cient coverage under some speci#12;c well-de#12;ned test coverage criterion

  8. Rinse trough with improved flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    O`Hern, T.J.; Grasser, T.W.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The troughs are suitable for one or more essentially planar objects having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs provide uniform rinse fluid flow over the objects` surfaces to accomplish a more thorough rinse than prior art troughs. 5 figs.

  9. Comments on "Microscale flow visualization"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kwang-Hua Chu

    2005-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We make comments on the presentation of Sinton's paper (Microfluidics and Nanofluidics {\\bf 1}: 2, 2004) about the microscale flow visualization since the effects of the roughness along the microfabricated wall upon the current macroflow visualization methods could be significant and cannot be neglected in microdomain and even nanodomain.

  10. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, V.M.; Martens, J.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs) are disclosed. Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics. 8 figs.

  11. Superconducting flux flow digital circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hietala, Vincent M. (Placitas, NM); Martens, Jon S. (Sunnyvale, CA); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A NOR/inverter logic gate circuit and a flip flop circuit implemented with superconducting flux flow transistors (SFFTs). Both circuits comprise two SFFTs with feedback lines. They have extremely low power dissipation, very high switching speeds, and the ability to interface between Josephson junction superconductor circuits and conventional microelectronics.

  12. Flow preconditioner for electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honacker, H.; Drlik, R.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow preconditioner for an electrostatic precipitator removes particulate matter from a stream of polluted gas immediately after it passes through a tangential inlet at the lower end of a vertical cylindrical housing and straightens and divides the stream into laminations parallel to the axis of the housing. It comprises an annular ledge or choke ring extending inwardly from said housing above the inlet and an assembly of vanes above said ledge extending radially from the axis of the housing and angularly spaced apart. Each of said vanes has a flow receiving edge directed toward said inlet, a curved portion extending upwardly and away from said inlet, and a flat portion extending upwardly from said curved portion in a plane parallel to the housing axis. The curved portion of each vane defines a trough having a camber which gradually decreases along its span from the outer end of the vane towards the axis of the housng, together with means to vary the centrifugal flow distribution relative to the housing to render the preconditioner adjustable for various flow capacities.

  13. A Simple Heat-Flow Quality Function And Appraisal Of Heat-Flow...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Simple Heat-Flow Quality Function And Appraisal Of Heat-Flow Measurements And Heat-Flow Estimates From The Uk Geothermal Catalogue Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  14. Spontaneous Emission Rate Enhancement Using Optical Antennas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, Nikhil

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of  Spontaneous  Emission  in  a  Semiconductor  nanoLED,”  emission  rate  enhancement  using  the  Fluorescent  Emission  by  Lattice   Resonances  in  

  15. Optimization Online - Faster convergence rates of relaxed ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damek Davis

    2014-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Jul 19, 2014 ... Faster convergence rates of relaxed Peaceman-Rachford and ADMM under regularity assumptions. Damek Davis (damek ***at*** ...

  16. On the management of variable bit-rate traffic streams in packet-switched networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoo, Byeongki

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in GPS Example of GPS when 2Wt = Ws PGPS service sequence of the jobs in the arrival pattern of Fig. 1 . . 7 Example of VC Unfair behavior of VC 10 Arrival and service rates of Fig. 5 Unfair behavior of SCFQ 13 Concept of time window in grouping... the over-service flow 31 18 Snapshot of packet transmission in GSF 32 FIGURE Page 19 Comparison of arrival and transmission of flow 1 in GSF 33 20 21 Example of GOP in MPEG Functions for traffic smoothing 39 39 22 Autocorrelation of lecture...

  17. 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Case Initial Proposal : 2007 Wholesale Power Rate Schedule and General Rate Schedule Provisions.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This schedule is available for the contract purchase of Firm Power to be used within the Pacific Northwest (PNW). Priority Firm (PF) Power may be purchased by public bodies, cooperatives, and Federal agencies for resale to ultimate consumers, for direct consumption, and for Construction, Test and Start-Up, and Station Service. Rates in this schedule are in effect beginning October 1, 2006, and apply to purchases under requirements Firm Power sales contracts for a three-year period. The Slice Product is only available for public bodies and cooperatives who have signed Slice contracts for the FY 2002-2011 period. Utilities participating in the Residential Exchange Program (REP) under Section 5(c) of the Northwest Power Act may purchase Priority Firm Power pursuant to the Residential Exchange Program. Rates under contracts that contain charges that escalate based on BPA's Priority Firm Power rates shall be based on the three-year rates listed in this rate schedule in addition to applicable transmission charges. This rate schedule supersedes the PF-02 rate schedule, which went into effect October 1, 2001. Sales under the PF-07 rate schedule are subject to BPA's 2007 General Rate Schedule Provisions (2007 GRSPs). Products available under this rate schedule are defined in the 2007 GRSPs. For sales under this rate schedule, bills shall be rendered and payments due pursuant to BPA's 2007 GRSPs and billing process.

  18. Reducing Your Leak Rate Without Repairing Leaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beals, C.

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It discusses how pressure/flow controllers, variable speed and variable displacement compressors, automation, and addressing critical plant pressures allow plant personnel to lower the header pressure, which eliminates artificial demand and controls the leak...

  19. WAGES, FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATES, AND MACROECONOMIC POLICY*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WAGES, FLEXIBLE EXCHANGE RATES, AND MACROECONOMIC POLICY* JEFFREY SACHS In an open economy with a floaLing exchange rate, the efficacy of fiscal and monetary policy depends fundamentally on the wage rate depreciation, while fiscal expansion has no output effect. These results hold only when real wages

  20. AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    AUXILIARY RATE CALCULATION The Budget Office #12;AGENDA Guiding Principles Rate Proposal Building Office supplies for budget manager reconciliationOffice supplies for budget manager reconciliation: Equipment Compensated Leave #12;CALCULATING A RATE Budgeted Expenses Budgeted Usage BaseBudgeted Usage Base