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1

Property:Available Sensors | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sensors Sensors Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Available Sensors Property Type Text Pages using the property "Available Sensors" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1.5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 10-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 11-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 2 2-ft Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 3 3-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 5 5-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... 6 6-ft Wave Flume Facility + Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, ... A Alden Large Flume + Pressure Range(psi), Velocity, Displacement, ...

2

Precision Flow Table | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Table Table Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Flow Table Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flow Table Length(m) 2.4 Beam(m) 1.2 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe Data Generation Capability Real-Time No Test Services Test Services Yes Past Pertinent Test Experience Users are District Engineers, Planners, and Engineering Consultants

3

Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

Dacus, Michael W. (Gilbert, AR); Cole, Jack H. (Fayetteville, AR)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

Dacus, M.W.; Cole, J.H.

1980-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

5

System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

High differential pressure, radial flow characteristics of gun perforations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tubing conveyed completion techniques are being utilized more frequently than in the past, because of the apparent advantages derived from underbalanced perforating. These advantages include cleaner perforations, reductions of additional stimulation treatments and reduced completion times. This paper presents the results of a laboratory study of gun perforations made under high differential pressure, radial flow conditions. In this study, Berea sandstone cores, modified to permit radial flow, are used to determine the relationship between perforation characteristics and the time-dependent pressure differential between pore pressure (i.e. formation pressure) and ''well bore'' pressure during the completion process. The primary perforation characteristic investigated (Radial Flow Ratio) is defined as the ratio of the perforated flow rate to the flow rate of the unperforated core under identical conditions. The perforated flow rate is measured in radial flow after the perforation has been made under various time-dependent pressure differentials.

Regalbuto, J.A.; Riggs, R.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Pressure boundary conditions for computing incompressible flows with SPH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) methods for fluid flow, incompressibility may be imposed by a projection method with an artificial homogeneous Neumann boundary condition for the pressure Poisson equation. This is often inconsistent with physical ... Keywords: Boundary conditions, Flow around obstacle, Incompressibility, Open-boundary flows, Pressure Poisson equation, Projection scheme, Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics

S. Majid Hosseini; James J. Feng

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Air flow and pressure inside a pressure-swirl spray and their effects on spray development  

SciTech Connect

Air flow and pressure inside a pressure-swirl spray for direct injection (DI) gasoline engines and their effects on spray development have been analyzed at different injector operating conditions. A simulation tool was utilized and the static air pressure at the centerline of the spray was measured to investigate the static pressure and flow structure inside the swirl spray. To investigate the effect of static air pressure on swirl spray development, a liquid film model was applied and the Mie-scattered images were captured. The simulation and experiment showed that recirculation vortex and air pressure drop inside the swirl spray were observable and the air pressure drop was greater at high injection pressure. At high fuel temperature, the air pressure at the nozzle exit showed higher value compared to the atmospheric pressure and then continuously decreased up to few millimeters distance from the nozzle exit. The pressure drop at high fuel temperatures was more than that of atmospheric temperature. This reduced air pressure was recovered to the atmospheric pressure at further downstream. The results from the liquid film model and macroscopic spray images showed that the air pressure started to affect the liquid film trajectory about 3 mm from the nozzle exit and this effect was sustained until the air pressure recovered to the atmospheric pressure. However, the entrained air motion and droplet size have more significant influence on the spray development after the most of the liquid sheet is broken-up and the spray loses its initial momentum. (author)

Moon, Seoksu; Bae, Choongsik [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejon 305-701 (Korea); Abo-Serie, Essam [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Design, Coventry University, Priory Street, Coventry CV1 5FB (United Kingdom)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Heat transfer and pressure drop in tape generated swirl flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of water in tape generated swirl flow were investigated. The test sections were electrically heated small diameter nickel tubes with tight fitting full length Inconel ...

Lopina, Robert F.

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Fluid-structure interaction for a pressure driven flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article we discuss the application of a Lagrange multiplier based fictitious domain method for the simulation of the motion of two rigid flaps in an unsteady flow generated by pressure gradients. The distributed Lagrange multiplier technique ... Keywords: Distributed Lagrange multiplier method, Fluid-structure interaction, Marchuk-Yanenko splitting scheme, Pulse pressure

Arati Nanda Pati

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Monitoring downhole pressures and flow rates critical for underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

True underbalanced drilling, and not just flow drilling, requires thorough engineering and monitoring of downhole pressures and flow rates to ensure the formations are drilled without formation damage. Underbalanced drilling involves intentionally manipulating the bottom hole circulating pressure so that it is less than static reservoir pressure. This underbalanced pressure condition allows reservoir fluids to enter the well bore while drilling continues, preventing fluid loss and many causes of formation damage. Applied correctly, this technology can address problems of formation damage, lost circulation, and poor penetration rates. Another important benefit of drilling underbalanced is the ability to investigate the reservoir in real time. The paper discusses the reasons for under balanced drilling, creating underbalance, well site engineering, fluids handling, rotating flow divertor injection gas, survey techniques, data acquisition, operations, maintaining under-balance, routine drilling, rate of penetration, misconceptions, and economics.

Butler, S.D.; Rashid, A.U.; Teichrob, R.R. [Flow Drilling Engineering Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

1996-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

12

Subcooled and saturated water flow boiling pressure drop in small diameter helical coils at low pressure  

SciTech Connect

Experimental pressure drop results on boiling water flow through three helical coils of tube inner diameter of 4.03 mm and 4.98 mm and coil diameter to tube diameter ratio of 26.1, 64.1 and 93.3 are presented. Both subcooled and saturated flow boiling are investigated, covering operating pressures from 120 to 660 kPa, mass fluxes from 290 to 690 kg m{sup -2} s{sup -1} and heat fluxes from 50 to 440 kW m{sup -2}. Existing correlations for subcooled flow pressure drop are found not capable to fit the present subcooled database, while the measurements in saturated flow conditions are successfully reproduced by existing correlations for both straight and coiled pipe two-phase flow. The experimental database is included in tabular form. (author)

Cioncolini, Andrea; Santini, Lorenzo; Ricotti, Marco E. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Politecnico di Milano, via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

13

Flowing Bottomhole Pressure Calculation for a Pumped Well under Multiphase Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ability to monitore bottomhole flowing pressure in pumping oil wells provides important information regarding both reservoir and artificial lift performance. Converting surface pressure measurements to bottomhole is currently accomplished by locating the fluid level in the annulus using a sonic device and then applying a correlation to estimate the density of the gas-cut liquid column above the perforations. This work proposes a flowing bottomhole pressure calculation procedure from fluid level measurements. The model is developed from experimental work and from theoretical arguments. The calculation procedure developed allows to calculate BHP without shutting the well, which is common for fluid level casinghead pressure measurements. Also this method allows to take into account real geometry of the The comparison of the calculated and measured pump intake pressure shows good accuracy of a technique. It allows to draw a conclusion for an opportunity to use this method in practice.

Bikbulatov, S; Zagurenko, A

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Evaluation and Performance Enhancement of a Pressure Transducer under Flows, Waves, and a Combination of Flows and Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of a pressure transducer, with its inlet attached to differing hydromechanical front ends, has been evaluated in flow flume and wave flume experiments in which laminar and turbulent flows, and regular progressive gravity waves and ...

Antony Joseph; J. A. Erwin Desa; Peter Foden; Kevin Taylor; Jim McKeown; Ehrlich Desa

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Influence of Cooling Circulating Water Flow on Back Pressure Variation of Thermal Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under certain conditions, condenser pressure can be considered as back pressure of the steam turbine, which has great influence on the unit power. Based on the back pressure calculation model, influence on back pressure variation by adjusting circulating ... Keywords: Cold-end system, back pressure, cooling water flow, unit power

Nian Zhonghua, Liu Jizhen, Liu Guangjian

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Oblique inlet pressure loss for swirling flow entering a catalyst substrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This experimental study investigates the oblique inlet pressure loss for the entry of an annular swirling flow into an automotive catalyst substrate. The results are applicable to a wide range of compact heat exchangers. For zero swirl, the total pressure loss agrees with established expressions for pressure loss in developing laminar flow in parallel channels with finite wall thickness. For positive swirl, the additional pressure loss due to oblique flow entry is correlated to the tangential velocity upstream of the catalyst, measured using laser-Doppler anemometry. The obtained oblique inlet pressure loss correlation can improve the accuracy of numerical calculations of the flow distribution in catalysts. (author)

Persoons, T.; Vanierschot, M.; Van den Bulck, E. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Celestijnenlaan 300A, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Pressure Driven Flow of Polymer Solutions in Nanoscale Slit Pores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer solutions subject to pressure driven flow and in nanoscale slit pores are systematically investigated using the dissipative particle dynamics approach. We investigated the effect of molecular weight, polymer concentration and flow rate on the profiles across the channel of the fluid and polymer velocities, polymers density, and the three components of the polymers radius of gyration. We found that the mean streaming fluid velocity decreases as the polymer molecular weight or/and polymer concentration is increased, and that the deviation of the velocity profile from the parabolic profile is accentuated with increase in polymer molecular weight or concentration. We also found that the distribution of polymers conformation is highly anisotropic and non-uniform across the channel. The polymer density profile is also found to be non-uniform, exhibiting a local minimum in the center-plane followed by two symmetric peaks. We found a migration of the polymer chains either from or towards the walls. For relatively long chains, as compared to the thickness of the slit, a migration towards the walls is observed. However, for relatively short chains, a migration away from the walls is observed.

J. A. Millan; W. Jiang; M. Laradji; Y. Wang

2006-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

18

Method and system for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method and system for measuring a multiphase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multiphase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The method for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes certain steps. The first step is calculating a gas density for the gas flow. The next two steps are finding a normalized gas mass flow rate through the venturi and computing a gas mass flow rate. The following step is estimating the gas velocity in the venturi tube throat. The next step is calculating the pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase between the upstream pressure measuring point and the pressure measuring point in the venturi throat. Another step is estimating the liquid velocity in the venturi throat using the calculated pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase. Then the friction is computed between the liquid phase and a wall in the venturi tube. Finally, the total mass flow rate based on measured pressure in the venturi throat is calculated, and the mass flow rate of the liquid phase is calculated from the difference of the total mass flow rate and the gas mass flow rate.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Biblarz, Oscar (Swampscott, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Downstream hydraulic transients in combined free-surface, pressurized flow pipelines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The purpose of this research was to evaluate hydraulic transients in a combined free-surface, pressurized flow system with free-surface supercritical flow. This research focused… (more)

Faber, Nathan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Parametric System Curves: Correlations Between Fan Pressure Rise and Flow for Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distribution, duct design, system curve, fans, leakage iiifan pressure rise and flow measurements over a range of operating conditions. During design,

Sherman, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Experimental Analysis of the Flow, Pressure, Speed, and Torque Characteristics of Two Eaton Geroler Hydraulic Motors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper presents data collected examining the flow, pressure, speed, and torque characteristics of two Eaton Geroler hydraulic motors. A test installation was designed and… (more)

Cazaban, Philip M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Application of the pseudolinear flow model to the pressure transient analysis of fractured wells  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical basis for the pseudolinear flow model is established. It is demonstrated by using an analytical model that the linear flow graph (p vs ..sqrt..t) can be extended to the analysis of pressure data of fractured wells intersected by an intermediate or a high conductivity fracture ((k /SUB f/ b /SUB f/ greater than or equal to 15). It appears that the fracture conductivity effect during the pseudolinear flow period can be handled as a pseudo skin pressure drop which is additive to the pressure drop caused by fluid loss damage. The combination of the pseudolinear flow analysis with other interpretation techniques is illustrated through examples of field cases.

Cinco-Ley, H.; Rodriguez, F.; Samaniego, F.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes  

SciTech Connect

Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Energy Technology, Division of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Brinellvaegen 68, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

25

Analytical Surface Pressure and Drag for Linear Hydrostatic Flow over Three-Dimensional Elliptical Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear hydrostatic model of the flow of stably stratified air over a three-dimensional mountain with an elliptical horizontal cross section is considered. Analytical expressions for the surface pressure perturbation are used to study the ...

Doug S. Phillips

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process. 2 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; Biblarz, O.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

27

Application of the pseudolinear-flow model to the pressure-transient analysis of fractured wells  

SciTech Connect

The theoretical basis for the pseudolinear-flow model is established. In this paper it is demonstrated by use of an analytical model that the linear-flow graph (rho vs. {Lambda}tau) can be extended to the analysis of pressure data of fractured wells intersected by an intermediate- or high-conductivity fracture (C/sub fD/ > 5{pi}). It appears that the fracture-conductivity effect during the pseudolinear-flow period can be handled as pseudoskin pressure drop that adds to the pressure drop caused by fluid-loss damage. The combination of the pseudolinear-flow analysis with other interpretation techniques is illustrated through examples of field cases.

Cinco-Ley, H.; Samanlego, V.F. (Univ. of Mexico/Pemex (MX)); Rodriguez, F. (Univ. of Mexico/IMP (MX))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Estimation of fracture flow parameters through numerical analysis of hydromechanical pressure pulses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flow parameters of a natural fracture were estimated by modeling in situ pressure pulses. The pulses were generated in two horizontal boreholes spaced 1 m apart vertically and intersecting a near-vertical highly permeable fracture located within a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir. Fracture hydromechanical response was monitored using specialized fiber-optic borehole equipment that could simultaneously measure fluid pressure and fracture displacements. Measurements indicated a significant time lag between the pressure peak at the injection point and the one at the second measuring point, located 1 m away. The pressure pulse dilated and contracted the fracture. Field data were analyzed through hydraulic and coupled hydromechanical simulations using different governing flow laws. In matching the time lag between the pressure peaks at the two measuring points, our hydraulic models indicated that (1) flow was channeled in the fracture, (2) the hydraulic conductivity tensor was highly anisotropic, and (3) the radius of pulse influence was asymmetric, in that the pulse travelled faster vertically than horizontally. Moreover, our parametric study demonstrated that the fluid pressure diffusion through the fracture was quite sensitive to the spacing and orientation of channels, hydraulic aperture, storativity and hydraulic conductivity. Comparison between hydraulic and hydromechanical models showed that the deformation significantly affected fracture permeability and storativity, and consequently, the fluid pressure propagation, suggesting that the simultaneous measurements of pressure and mechanical displacement signals could substantially improve the interpretation of pulse tests during reservoir characterization.

Cappa, F.; Guglielmi, Y.; Rutqvist, J.; Tsang, C.-F.; Thoraval, A.

2008-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

Interfacial Pressures and Shocks in a Multiphase Flow mix Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiphase flow models have been proposed for use in situations which have combined Rayleigh-Taylor (RTI) and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RMI) instabilities [2, 3]. Such an approach works poorly for the case of a heavy to light shock incidence on a developed interface. I suggest that this difficulty can be overcome by adding an additional source to the turbulence kinetic energy equation. A variety of constraints on such a source are considered. In this context it is observed that a new constraint on closures arises. This occurs because of the discontinuity within the shock responsible for the RMI. The proposed model (Shock Scattering) is shown to give useful results.

Klem, D E

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Parametric System Curves: Correlations Between Fan Pressure Rise and Flow for Large Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect

A substantial fraction of HVAC energy use in large commercial buildings is due to fan operation. Fan energy use depends in part on the relationship between system pressure drop and flow through the fan, which is commonly called a "system curve." As a step toward enabling better selections of air-handling system components and analyses of common energy efficiency measures such as duct static pressure reset and duct leakage sealing, this paper shows that a simple four-parameter physical model can be used to define system curves. Our model depends on the square of the fan flow, as is commonly considered. It also includes terms that account for linear-like flow resistances such as filters and coils, and for supply duct leakage when damper positions are fixed or are changed independently of static pressure or fan flow. Only two parameters are needed for systems with variable-position supply dampers (e.g., VAV box dampers modulating to control flow). For these systems, reducing or eliminating supply duct leakage does not change the system curve. The parametric system curve may be most useful when applied to field data. Non-linear techniques could be used to fit the curve to fan pressure rise and flow measurements over a range of operating conditions. During design, when measurements are unavailable, one could use duct design calculation tools instead to determine the coefficients.

Sherman, Max; Wray, Craig

2010-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

31

Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Heat transfer and pressure drop for air flow through enhanced passages  

SciTech Connect

An extensive experimental investigation was carried out to determine the pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics for laminar, transitional and turbulent flow of air through a smooth passage and twenty-three enhanced passages. The internal surfaces of all enhanced passages had spirally shaped geometries; these included fluted, finned/ribbed and indented surfaces. The Reynolds number (Re) was varied between 400 and 50000. The effect of heat transfer (wall cooling or fluid heating) on pressure drop is most significant within the transition region; the recorded pressure drop with heat transfer is much higher than that without heat transfer. The magnitude of this effect depends markedly on the average surface temperature and, to a lesser extent, on the geometric characteristics of the enhanced surfaces. When the pressure drop data are reduced as values of the Fanning friction factor(f), the results are about the same with and without heat transfer for turbulent flow, with moderate differences in the laminar and transition regions.

Obot, N.T.; Esen, E.B.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal well temperature and pressure distributions can be measured by production logging or downhole permanent sensors, such as fiber optic distributed temperature sensors (DTS). Correct interpretation of temperature and pressure data can be used to obtain downhole flow conditions, which is key information to control and optimize horizontal well production. However, the fluid flow in the reservoir is often multiphase and complex, which makes temperature and pressure interpretation very difficult. In addition, the continuous measurement provides transient temperature behavior which increases the complexity of the problem. To interpret these measured data correctly, a comprehensive model is required. In this study, an interpretation model is developed to predict flow profile of a horizontal well from downhole temperature and pressure measurement. The model consists of a wellbore model and a reservoir model. The reservoir model can handle transient, multiphase flow and it includes a flow model and a thermal model. The calculation of the reservoir flow model is based on the streamline simulation and the calculation of reservoir thermal model is based on the finite difference method. The reservoir thermal model includes thermal expansion and viscous dissipation heating which can reflect small temperature changes caused by pressure difference. We combine the reservoir model with a horizontal well flow and temperature model as the forward model. Based on this forward model, by making the forward calculated temperature and pressure match the observed data, we can inverse temperature and pressure data to downhole flow rate profiles. Two commonly used inversion methods, Levenberg- Marquardt method and Marcov chain Monte Carlo method, are discussed in the study. Field applications illustrate the feasibility of using this model to interpret the field measured data and assist production optimization. The reservoir model also reveals the relationship between temperature behavior and reservoir permeability characteristic. The measured temperature information can help us to characterize a reservoir when the reservoir modeling is done only with limited information. The transient temperature information can be used in horizontal well optimization by controlling the flow rate until favorite temperature distribution is achieved. With temperature feedback and inflow control valves (ICVs), we developed a procedure of using DTS data to optimize horizontal well performance. The synthetic examples show that this method is useful at a certain level of temperature resolution and data noise.

Li, Zhuoyi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

CFD analysis of the effect of elbow radius on pressure drop in multiphase flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed in four different 90 degree elbows with air-water two-phase flows. The inside diameters of the elbows were 6.35mm and 12.7mm with radius to diameter ratios (r/D) of 1.5 to 3. The pressure drops ...

Quamrul H. Mazumder

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Contribution of Boussinesq pressure and bottom roughness terms for open channel flows with shocks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For high-velocity flows accompanied with hydraulic jump, this paper attempts to evaluate the contribution of non-hydrostatic (i.e., Boussinesq) pressure term and the bottom roughness coefficient. To perform this analysis, we have solved the one-dimensional ... Keywords: high resolution, hydraulic jump, hydrostatic, modeling, shocks

Prasada Rao

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Gridded retarding pressure sensor for ion and neutral particle analysis in flowing plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

configuration can be used to measure the ion energy distribution. Preliminary data from this probe were takenGridded retarding pressure sensor for ion and neutral particle analysis in flowing plasmas Lyon B. Kinga) and Alec D. Gallimoreb) Plasmadynamics and Electric Propulsion Laboratory, Department

King, Lyon B.

37

Transient growth mechanisms of low Reynolds number flow over a low-pressure turbine blade  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A direct transient growth analysis for three-dimensional perturbations to flow past a periodic array of T-106/300 low-pressure turbine fan blades is presented. The methodology is based on a singular value decomposition of the flow evolution operator, linearised about a steady or periodic base flow. This analysis yields the optimal growth modes. Previous work on global mode stability analysis of this flow geometry showed the flow is asymptotically stable, indicating a non-modal explanation of transition may be more appropriate. The present work extends previous investigations into the transient growth around a steady base flow, to higher Reynolds numbers and periodic base flows. It is found that the notable transient growth of the optimal modes suggests a plausible route to transition in comparison to modal growth for this configuration. The spatial extent and localisation of the optimal modes is examined and possible physical triggering mechanisms are discussed. It is found that for longer times and longer sp...

Sharma, AS; Sherwin, SJ; Theofilis, V; 10.1007/s00162-010-0183-9

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows during Normal Operation and Pressurized Conduction Cooldown  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. The present document addresses experimental modeling of flow and thermal mixing phenomena of importance during normal or reduced power operation and during a loss of forced reactor cooling (pressurized conduction cooldown) scenario. The objectives of the experiments are, 1), provide benchmark data for assessment and improvement of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, and, 2), obtain a better understanding of related phenomena, behavior and needs. Physical models of VHTR vessel upper and lower plenums which use various working fluids to scale phenomena of interest are described. The models may be used to both simulate natural convection conditions during pressurized conduction cooldown and turbulent lower plenum flow during normal or reduced power operation.

Glenn E McCreery; Keith G Condie

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Constant-pressure production in solution-gas-drive reservoirs; Transient flow  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents procedures to obtain reservoir parameters from constant-pressure drawdown data in solution-gas-drive reservoirs. A novel procedure to determine the mechanical skin factor is introduced. Examples, including a field case, illustrate the use of this procedure. An estimate of the drainage area can be obtained with the derivative of rate data. A theoretical basis for analyzing data by the pressure-squared, p{sup 2}, approach is presented; this procedure permits the approximate determination of sandface effective permeabilities in the transient flow period. For damaged wells, it is possible to obtain rough estimates of the size of the skin zone and the ratio of reservoir/skin-zone permeability when early transient data are available. The expression of the appropriate dimensionless rate in terms of physical properties for solution-gas-drive systems is presented. Finally, this paper presents a procedure to obtain an estimate of the change in sandface saturation during the transient flow period.

Camacho, R.G. (National Univ. of Mexico/PEMEX (MX))

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Effect of Pressure Difference Control on Hydraulic Stability in a Variable Flow Air Conditioning System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes the effects of different pressure difference control methods on hydraulic stability in a variable flow air conditioning system when it is applied to different air conditioning water systems. According to control method and water system, it can be divided into direct return system pass-by control, direct return system terminal control, reversed return system pass-by control and reversed return system terminal control. The results indicate that reversed return system terminal control has the best hydraulic stability.

Zhang, Z.; Fu, Y.; Chen, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Endogenous and exogenous dynamics of pressure fluctuations in an impinging entrained-flow gasifier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On a laboratory-scale testing platform of impinging entrained-flow gasifier with two opposed burners, the pressure fluctuation signals were measured with a stainless steel water-cooled probe. Phenomenological investigations of the endogenous and exogenous dynamics in the fluctuations of pressure were carried out by performing the mean-variance analysis and separating the endogenous and exogenous components of the signals. Non-universal dynamics with power-law behaviors have been found not only in the original signals but also in their components. A new inequality was obtained showing that the exogenous exponent is smallest while the overall dynamic exponent is the largest. The results highlight that the dynamics of pressure fluctuations in the first fifteen minutes of the gasification process is driven dominantly by the ignition process. The method can be readily applied to the other multiphase systems like bubble column, fluidized bed, etc.

Niu, Miao-Ren; Zhou, Wei-Xing; Wang, Fu-Chen; Yu, Zun-Hong

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

An experimental investigation of pressure drop of aqueous foam in laminar tube flow  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report is the first of two detailing pressure-drop and heat-transfer measurements made at the Foam Flow Heat Transfer Loop. The work was motivated by a desire to extend the application of aqueous foam from petroleum drilling to geothermal drilling. Pressure-drop measurements are detailed in this report; a forthcoming report (SAND85-1922) will describe the heat-transfer measurements. The pressure change across a 2.4-m (8-ft) length of the 2.588-cm (1.019-in.) ID test section was measured for liquid volume fractions between 0.05 and 0.35 and average velocities between 0.12 and 0.80 m/s (0.4 and 2.6 ft/s). The resulting pressure-drop/flow-rate data were correlated to a theoretical model for a Bingham plastic. Simple expressions for the dynamic viscosity and the yield stress as a function of liquid volume fraction were estimated.

Blackwell, B.F.; Sobolik, K.B.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Effective slip in pressure-driven flow past super-hydrophobic stripes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Super-hydrophobic array of grooves containing trapped gas (stripes), have the potential to greatly reduce drag and enhance mixing phenomena in microfluidic devices. Recent work has focused on idealized cases of stick-perfect slip stripes, with limited guidance. Here, we analyze the experimentally relevant situation of a pressure-driven flow past striped slip-stick surfaces with arbitrary local slip at the gas sectors. We derive analytical formulas for maximal (longitudinal) and minimal (transverse) directional effective slip lengths that can be used for any surface slip fraction (validated by numerical calculations). By representing eigenvalues of the slip length-tensor, they allow us to obtain the effective slip for any orientation of stripes with respect to the mean flow. Our results imply that flow past stripes is controlled by the ratio of the local slip length to texture size. In case of a large (compared to the texture period) slip at the gas areas, surface anisotropy leads to a tensorial effective slip, by attaining the values predicted earlier for a perfect local slip. Both effective slip lengths and anisotropy of the flow decrease when local slip becomes of the order of texture period. In the case of small slip, we predict simple surface-averaged, isotropic flows (independent of orientation). These results provide a framework for the rational design of super-hydrophobic surfaces and devices.

Aleksey V. Belyaev; Olga I. Vinogradova

2009-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

44

Force interaction of high pressure glow discharge with fluid flow for active separation control  

SciTech Connect

Radio frequency based discharges at atmospheric pressures are the focus of increased interest in aerodynamics because of the wide range of potential applications including, specifically, actuation in flows at moderate speeds. Recent literature describing promising experimental observations, especially on separation control, has spurred efforts in the development of parallel theoretical modeling to lift limitations in the current understanding of the actuation mechanism. The present effort demonstrates higher fidelity first-principle models in a multidimensional finite-element framework to predict surface discharge-induced momentum exchange. The complete problem of a dielectric barrier discharge at high pressure with axially displaced electrodes is simulated in a self-consistent manner. Model predictions for charge densities, the electric field, and gas velocity distributions are shown to mimic trends reported in the experimental literature. Results show that a residual of electrons remains deposited on the dielectric surface downstream of the exposed powered electrode for the entire duration of the cycle and causes a net electric force in the direction from the electrode to the downstream surface. For the first time, results document the mitigation process of a separation bubble formed due to flow past a flat plate inclined at 12 degree sign angle of attack. This effort sets the basis for extending the formulation further to include polyphase power input in multidimensional settings, and to apply the simulation method to flows past common aerodynamic configurations.

Roy, Subrata; Gaitonde, Datta V. [Computational Plasma Dynamics Laboratory, Mechanical Engineering, Kettering University, Flint, Michigan 48504 (United States); Computational Sciences Branch, Air Vehicles Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright Patterson AFB, Ohio 45433 (United States)

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

45

Flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in a horizontal circular micro-channel  

SciTech Connect

Adiabatic two-phase air-water flow characteristics, including the two-phase flow pattern as well as the void fraction and two-phase frictional pressure drop, in a circular micro-channel are experimentally studied. A fused silica channel, 320 mm long, with an inside diameter of 0.53 mm is used as the test section. The test runs are done at superficial velocity of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-16 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow pattern map is developed from the observed flow patterns i.e. slug flow, throat-annular flow, churn flow and annular-rivulet flow. The flow pattern map is compared with those of other researchers obtained from different working fluids. The present single-phase experiments also show that there are no significant differences in the data from the use of air or nitrogen gas, and water or de-ionized water. The void fraction data obtained by image analysis tends to correspond with the homogeneous flow model. The two-phase pressure drops are also used to calculate the frictional multiplier. The multiplier data show a dependence on flow pattern as well as mass flux. A new correlation of two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical application. (author)

Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Laboratory (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

SciTech Connect

Industrial-scale storage of CO{sub 2} in saline sedimentary basins will cause zones of elevated pressure, larger than the CO{sub 2} plume itself. If permeable conduits (e.g., leaking wells) exist between the injection reservoir and overlying shallow aquifers, brine could be pushed upwards along these conduits and mix with groundwater resources. This paper discusses the potential for such brine leakage to occur in temperature- and salinity-stratified systems. Using static mass-balance calculations as well as dynamic well flow simulations, we evaluate the minimum reservoir pressure that would generate continuous migration of brine up a leaking wellbore into a freshwater aquifer. Since the brine invading the well is denser than the initial fluid in the wellbore, continuous flow only occurs if the pressure perturbation in the reservoir is large enough to overcome the increased fluid column weight after full invasion of brine into the well. If the threshold pressure is exceeded, brine flow rates are dependent on various hydraulic (and other) properties, in particular the effective permeability of the wellbore and the magnitude of pressure increase. If brine flow occurs outside of the well casing, e.g., in a permeable fracture zone between the well cement and the formation, the fluid/solute transfer between the migrating fluid and the surrounding rock units can strongly retard brine flow. At the same time, the threshold pressure for continuous flow to occur decreases compared to a case with no fluid/solute transfer.

Birkholzer, J.T.; Nicot, J.-P.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Zhou, Q.; Kraemer, S.; Bandilla, K.W.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Simplified configuration for the combustor of an oil burner using a low pressure, high flow air-atomizing nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion of oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The improved fuel burner uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle that does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design. Inventors:

Butcher, Thomas A. (Port Jefferson, NY); Celebi, Yusuf (Middle Island, NY); Fisher, Leonard (Colrain, MA)

2000-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

48

Development of a new dynamic gas flow-control system in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new flow-control system (FCS-705) has been developed at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science. The system is intended for calibration of vacuum gauges in the pressure range of 1 Pa-133 Pa by comparison method. This paper describes some basic characteristics of the system including; (1) the design and construction of the system, (2) the generation of stable pressures in the chamber, (3) achieving high upstream pressure limit by installing a short duct in the by-pass pumping line, and (4) investigation of the gas flow regimes within the short duct.

Hong, S. S.; Chung, J. W. [Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Khan, Wakil [Pakistan Vacuum Society, street 17, Islamabad (Pakistan)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels in a high pressure flow reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines the premixed urn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, we must understand the chemical kinetic processes which lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and isooctane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine-like conditions in a high pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and at 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments and comparisons of experimentally measures and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690- 1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed method.

Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Callahan, C.V.; Dryer, F.L. [Princeton Univ., Areospace Engineering. NJ (United States)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization and radial flow through permeability tests for cementitous materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Saturated permeability is likely a good method for characterizing the susceptibility of portland cement concrete to various forms of degradation; although no widely accepted test exists to measure this property. The hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization test is a potential solution for measuring concrete permeability. The hollow cylinder dynamic pressurization (HDP) test is compared with the radial flow through (RFT) test and the solid cylinder dynamic pressurization (SDP) test to assess the accuracy and reliability of the HDP test. The three test methods, mentioned above, were used to measure the permeability of Vycor glass and portland cement paste and the results of the HDP test were compared with the results from the SDP and RFT tests. When the HDP and RFT test results were compared, the measured difference between the mean values of the two tests was 40% for Vycor glass and 47% for cement paste. When the HDP and SDP tests results were compared, the measured difference with Vycor glass was 53%. The cement paste permeability values could not be compared in the same manner since they were tested at various ages to show the time dependency of permeability in cement paste. The results suggest good correlation between the HDP test and both the SDP and RFT tests. Furthermore, good repeatability was shown with low coefficients of variation in all test permutations. Both of these factors suggest that the new HDP test is a valid tool for measuring the permeability of concrete materials.

Jones, Christopher Andrew

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Compressible Shear Flow Transition and Turbulence: Enhancement of GKM Numerical Scheme and Simulation/Analysis of Pressure Effects on Flow Stabilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Despite significant advancements in the understanding of fluid flows, combustion and material technologies, hypersonic flight still presents numerous technological challenges. In hypersonic vehicles turbulence is critical in controlling heat generation in the boundary layer, mixing inside the combustor, generation of acoustic noise, and mass flow in the intake. The study of turbulence in highly compressible flows is challenging compared to incompressible due to a drastic change in the behavior of pressure and a relaxation of the incompressibility constraint. In addition fluid flow inside a flight vehicle is complicated by wall-effects, heat generation and complex boundary conditions. Homogeneous shear flow contains most of the relevant physics of boundary and mixing layers without the aforementioned complicating effects. In this work we aim to understand and characterize the role of pressure, velocity-pressure interaction, velocity-thermodynamics interaction in the late-stage transition-to-turbulence regime in a high speed shear dominated flow by studying the evolution of perturbations in in a high Mach number homogeneous shear flow. We use a modal-analysis based approach towards understanding the statistical behavior of turbulence. Individual Fourier waves constituting the initial flow field are studied in isolation and in combination to understand collective statistical behavior. We demonstrate proof of concept of novel acoustic based strategies for controlling the onset of turbulence. Towards this goal we perform direct numerical simulations (DNS) in three studies: (a) development and evaluation of gas kinetic based numerical tool for DNS of compressible turbulence, and perform detailed evaluation of the efficacy of different interpolation schemes in capturing solenoidal and dilatational quantities, (b) modal investigation in the behavior of pressure and isolation of linear, non-linear, inertial and pressure actions, and (c) modal investigation in the possible acoustic based control strategies in homogeneously sheared compressible flows. The findings help to understand the manifestation of the effects of compressibility on transition and turbulence via the velocity-pressure interactions and the action of individual waves. The present study helps towards the design of control mechanisms for compressible turbulence and the development of physically consistent pressure strain correlation models.

Kumar, Gaurav 1984-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Pressure drop of two-phase plug flow in round mini-channels: Influence of surface wettability  

SciTech Connect

In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of two-phase plug flows in round mini-channels was investigated for three different tube materials, i.e., glass, polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. Air and water were used as the test fluids. In the wet-plug flow regime (wet wall condition at the gas portions), the pressure drop was reasonably predicted by the homogeneous flow model or by the correlations of Mishima and Hibiki [K. Mishima, T. Hibiki, Some characteristics of air-water two-phase flow in small diameter vertical tubes, Int. J. Multiphase Flow 22 (1996) 703-712] and Chisholm [D. Chisholm, A theoretical basis for the Lockhart-Martinelli correlation for two-phase flow, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer 10 (1967) 1767-1778]. On the other hand, in the dry-plug flow regime (dry wall condition at the gas portions), the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. To take into account the effect of the moving contact lines, a modified Lockhart-Martinelli type correlation was proposed, which fitted the measured pressure-drop data within the mean deviation of 6%. (author)

Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Science Town, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

53

A study of pressure drop in a Capillary tube-viscometer for a two-phase flow  

SciTech Connect

The analysis of pipeline transportation of highly concentrated suspensions such as coal-water slurries, can exhibit several flow characteristics depending on the concentration and the physical parameters of the dispersed phase. Experiments were conducted for coal-water slurries flows in a series of horizontal capillary tubes of diameters 0.8, 1.5 and 3.0 mm and 100 mm in length, in order to investigate the effect of concentration, pressure drop, and the transitional Reynolds number from laminar to turbulent flow in a homogeneous slurry. The solid concentration was varied from 15% to 63% in 0.1% xanthum gum solution. Pressure drop and the volume flow measurement were made using HVA-6 Capillary viscometer. The Reynolds numbers obtained were found to be dependent on the slurry concentration and the viscosity of the slurry mixture, but independent of the capillary diameter.

Ohene, F.; Livingston, C.; Matthews, C.; Rhone, Y.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The University of Utah's project 'Investigation of Pressurized Entrained-Flow Kraft Black Liquor Gasification in an Industrially Relevant Environment' (U.S. DOE Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-04NT42261) was a response to U.S. DOE/NETL solicitation DE-PS36-04GO94002, 'Biomass Research and Development Initiative' Topical Area 4-Kraft Black Liquor Gasification. The project began September 30, 2004. The objective of the project was to improve the understanding of black liquor conversion in high pressure, high temperature reactors that gasify liquor through partial oxidation with either air or oxygen. The physical and chemical characteristics of both the gas and condensed phase were to be studied over the entire range of liquor conversion, and the rates and mechanisms of processes responsible for converting the liquor to its final smelt and syngas products were to be investigated. This would be accomplished by combining fundamental, lab-scale experiments with measurements taken using a new semi-pilot scale pressurized entrained-flow gasifier. As a result of insufficient availability of funds and changes in priority within the Office of Biomass Programs of the U.S. Department of Energy, the research program was terminated in its second year. In total, only half of the budgeted funding was made available for the program, and most of this was used during the first year for construction of the experimental systems to be used in the program. This had a severe impact on the program. As a consequence, most of the planned research was unable to be performed. Only studies that relied on computational modeling or existing experimental facilities started early enough to deliver useful results by the time to program was terminated Over the course of the program, small scale (approx. 1 ton/day) entrained-flow gasifier was designed and installed at the University of Utah's off-campus Industrial Combustion and Gasification Research Facility. The system is designed to operate at pressures as high as 32 atmospheres, and at temperatures as high as 1500 C (2730 F). Total black liquor processing capacity under pressurized, oxygen-blown conditions should be in excess of 1 ton black liquor solids per day. Many sampling ports along the conversion section of the system will allow detailed analysis of the environment in the gasifier under industrially representative conditions. Construction was mostly completed before the program was terminated, but resources were insufficient to operate the system. A system for characterizing black liquor sprays in hot environments was designed and constructed. Silhouettes of black liquor sprays formed by injection of black liquor through a twin fluid (liquor and atomizing air) nozzle were videoed with a high-speed camera, and the resulting images were analyzed to identify overall characteristics of the spray and droplet formation mechanisms. The efficiency of liquor atomization was better when the liquor was injected through the center channel of the nozzle, with atomizing air being introduced in the annulus around the center channel, than when the liquor and air feed channels were reversed. Atomizing efficiency and spray angle increased with atomizing air pressure up to a point, beyond which additional atomizing air pressure had little effect. Analysis of the spray patterns indicates that two classifications of droplets are present, a finely dispersed 'mist' of very small droplets and much larger ligaments of liquor that form at the injector tip and form one or more relatively large droplets. This ligament and subsequent large droplet formation suggests that it will be challenging to obtain a narrow distribution of droplet sizes when using an injector of this design. A model for simulating liquor spray and droplet formation was developed by Simulent, Inc. of Toronto. The model was able to predict performance when spraying water that closely matched the vendor specifications. Simulation of liquor spray indicates that droplets on the order 200-300 microns can be expected, and that higher liquor flow will result in be

Kevin Whitty

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Two-Phase Frictional Pressure Drop Multipliers for SUVA R-134a Flowing in a Rectangular Duct  

SciTech Connect

The adiabatic two-phase frictional multipliers for SUVA, R-134a flowing in a rectangular duct (with D{sub H} = 4.8 mm) have been measured for 3 nominal system pressures (0.9 MPa, 1.38 MPa and 2.41 MPa) and 3 nominal mass fluxes (510, 1020 and 2040 kg/m{sup 2}/s). The data is compared with several classical correlations to assess their predictive capabilities. The Lockhart-Martinelli model gives reasonable results at the lowest pressure and mass flux, near the operating range of most refrigeration systems, but gives increasingly poor comparisons as the pressure and mass flux is increased. The Chisholm B-coefficient model is found to best predict the data over the entire range of test conditions; however, there is significant disagreement at the highest pressure tested (with the model over predicting the data upwards of 100% for some cases). The data shows an increased tendency toward homogeneous flow as the pressure and flow rate are increased, and in fact the homogeneous model best predicts the bulk of the data at the highest pressure tested.

P Vassallo; K Keller

2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

56

A Comparison of Methods for Computing the Sigma-Coordinate Pressure Gradient Force for Flow over Sloped Terrain in a Hybrid Theta-Sigma Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Five methods for computing the pressure gradient force within a sigma domain of a hybrid model are compared for flow over a steeply sloped terrain. The comparison includes pressure gradient calculations determined from a direct transformation to ...

Donald R. Johnson; Louis W. Uccellini

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Simplified Configuration for the Combustor of an oil Burner using a low Pressure, high flow air-atomizing Nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to clean burning of fuel oil with air. More specifically, to a fuel burning combustion head using a low-pressure, high air flow atomizing nozzle so that there will be a complete combustion oil resulting in a minimum emission of pollutants. The inventors have devised a fuel burner that uses a low pressure air atomizing nozzle. The improved fuel burner does not result in the use of additional compressors or the introduction of pressurized gases downstream, nor does it require a complex design.

Butcher, Thomas; Celebi, Yusuf; Fisher, Leonard

1998-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

58

Lateral steam flow revealed by a pressure build-up test at the Matsukawa vapor-dominated geothermal field, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results and discussion of a pressure build-up test at the Matsukawa vapor-dominated geothermal field in north-east Japan are reported. Pressure build-up behavior of three dry steam wells was monitored at the wellhead in October 1986. The observed pressure gradient clearly shows the existence of a lateral steam flow from south-west to north-east in the reservoir. This result suggests that the vapor-dominated reservoir extends further south-west than it is currently being developed. These conclusions are supported by production records and chemical data.

Hanano, M. Sakagawa, Y. (Japan Metals and Chemicals Co. Ltd., 24-Ukai, Takizawa-mura, Iwate 020-01 (JP))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Development of Advanced Flow-Through External Pressure-Balanced Reference Electrode for Temperatures up to 400 degrees C.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of an advanced flow-through external pressure-balanced reference electrode opens the door for more accurate measurements of corrosion potential, redox potential, and pH in power plant waters at temperatures up to 400 degrees C. Such measurements allow a more accurate assessment of an environment's corrosivity and promote more effective corrosion control.

1998-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

60

Downward two-phase flow effects in heat-loss and pressure-drop modeling of steam injection wells  

SciTech Connect

Modelling of the pressure drop and heat loss in steam injection wells has undergone a gradual evolution since the heavy interest in enhanced oil recovery by steam injection in the mid-60's. After briefly reviewing the evolution of steam models this paper presents a model which advances the state-of-the-art of steam modelling. The main advance presented in this paper is modelling the effects of the various flow regimens that occur during steam injection. The paper describes the formulation of a two-phase downward vertical flow pressure drop model which is not limited by the ''no-slip'' homogeneous flow assumptions in most previously published models. By using different correlations for mist, bubble, and slug flow, improved pressure drop calculations result, which in turn improve temperature predictions. The paper describes how the model handles temperature predictions differently in the single and two-phase steam flow situations. The paper also describes special features in the model to account for layered soil properties, soil dry out, cyclic injection, coupling heat losses, and reflux boiling in wet annuli. Two examples problems are presented which illustrate some of these features.

Galate, J.W.; Mitchell, R.F.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Virtual Measurement in Pipes, Part 1: Flowing Bottom Hole Pressure Under Multi-Phase Flow and Inclined Wellbore Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the utmost importance in maximizing the reservoir energy in naturally flowing and artificial lift wells as the number of variables increases. Many parameters could be involved in these types of problems, such as gas information such as oil, gas and water flow rates, temperature, oil and gas gravity, pipe length, surface

Mohaghegh, Shahab

62

X-ray evidence for capillary pressure driven flow in preserved core from The Geysers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Improved understanding of fluid storage and transport mechanisms relevant to The Geysers reservoir is fundamental to efficient and economic long term production of steam. X-ray computed tomographs of core from research borehole SB-15D made within 72 hours of drilling show characteristic x-ray attenuation profiles that can only be explained by imbibition of drilling fluid at reservoir conditions. The shape of the profile is highly diagnostic. Early time scans, when interpreted taking into account independent measurements of pore size distribution, permeabilities and capillary pressures for the rock matrix sampled by SB-15D, are consistent with strong capillary suctions for the recovered rocks. This indirect indication of imbibition under reservoir conditions, along with detailed analysis of x-ray attenuation in recovered core, suggests that water content was low in much of the preserved core. These measurements are part of a series of laboratory experiments monitored by x-ray methods intended to evaluate movement of various fluids to determine the relative importance capillarity, Darcy flow and vapor phase diffusion.

Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Schneberk, D.J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Pressure drop of two-phase dry-plug flow in round mini-channels: Effect of moving contact line  

SciTech Connect

In the present experimental study, the pressure drop of the two-phase dry-plug flow (dry wall condition at the gas portions) in round mini-channels was investigated. The air-water mixtures were flowed through the round mini-channels made of polyurethane and Teflon, respectively, with their inner diameters ranging from 1.62 to 2.16 mm. In the dry-plug flow regime, the pressure drop measured became larger either by increasing the liquid superficial velocity or by decreasing the gas superficial velocity due to the increase of the number of the moving contact lines in the test section. In such a case, the role of the moving contact lines turned out to be significant. Therefore, a pressure drop model of dry-plug flow was proposed through modification of the dynamic contact angle analysis taking account of the energy dissipation by the moving contact lines, which represents the experimental data within the mean deviation of 4%. (author)

Lee, Chi Young; Lee, Sang Yong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, KAIST, Science Town, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

64

Design of a high-pressure research flow loop for the experimental investigation of liquid loading in gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Liquid loading in producing gas wells is the inability of the produced gas to remove produced liquids from the wellbore. A review of existing flow loops worldwide revealed that specialized areas of research such as liquid loading in gas wells are still lacking dedicated test facilities. This project presents the design of a new dedicated facility to be located at the TowerLab at the Richardson building with adequate operating conditions to reproduce the flow regimes encountered prior to and after the onset of liquid loading in gas wells. The facility consists of a compressed air system, pipelines for air and water, a pressure vessel containing glass beads, an injection manifold, and flow control and monitoring devices. Our results show that three compressors working in parallel is the most technical and economic configuration for the TowerLab based on the overall costs provided by the supplier, the footprint but most importantly the flexibility. The design of the pressure vessel required a cylindrical body with top and bottom welded-flat head covers with multiple openings to minimize its weight. The pipelines connecting major equipment and injection manifold located at the pressure vessel were selected based on the superficial velocities for air and water. These values also showed the need for independent injection using two manifolds instead of commingling flow through a tee joint. The use of digital pressure gauges with an accuracy of 0.05 to 25% and coriolis or vortex meters to measure air flowrate is also suggested. For the water line, installation of turbine meters results in the most economic approach.

Fernandez Alvarez, Juan Jose

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Parametric System Curves: Correlations Between Fan Pressure Rise and Flow for Large Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Filter Pressure Loss Model for Fan Energy Calculation in Air2010. “Selecting Efficient Fans”. ASHRAE Journal, Vol. 52,Equipment: Chapter 20 – Fans”. Atlanta, GA: American Society

Sherman, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

CFD Analysis for Flow Behavior Characteristics in the Upper Plenum during low flow/low pressure transients for the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas coolant at low pressure exhibits poor heat transfer characteristics. This is an area of concern for the passive response targeted by the Generation IV GCFR design. For the first 24 hour period, the decay heat removal for the GCFR design is dependent on an actively powered blower, which also would reduce the temperature in the fuel during transients, before depending on the passive operation. Natural circulation cooling initiates when the blower is stopped for the final phase of the decay heat removal, as under forced convection the core decay heat is adequately cooled by the running blower. The ability of the coolant to flow in the reverse direction or having recirculation, when the blowers are off, necessitates more understanding of the flow behavior characteristics in the upper plenum. The work done here focuses primarily on the period after the blower has been turned off, as the core is adequately cooled when the blowers are running, thus there was no need to carry out the analysis for the first 24 hours. In order to understand the plume behavior for the GCFR upper plenum several cases were run, with air, helium and helium-air mixture. For each case, the FLUENT was used to characterize the steady state velocity vectors and corresponding temperature in the upper plenum under passive decay heat removal conditions. This study will provide better insight into the plume interaction in the upper plenum at low flow and low pressure conditions.

Piyush Sabharwall; Theron Marshall; Kevan Weaver; Hans Gougar

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Prediction of Severe Accident Counter Current Natural Circulation Flows in the Hot Leg of a Pressurized Water Reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During certain phases of a severe accident in a pressurized water reactor (PWR), the core becomes uncovered and steam carries heat to the steam generators through natural circulation. For PWR's with U-tube steam generators and loop seals filled with water, a counter current flow pattern is established in the hot leg. This flow pattern has been experimentally observed and has been predicted using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Predictions of severe accident behavior are routinely carried out using severe accident system analysis codes such as SCDAP/RELAP5 or MELCOR. These codes, however, were not developed for predicting the three-dimensional natural circulation flow patterns during this phase of a severe accident. CFD, along with a set of experiments at 1/7. scale, have been historically used to establish the flow rates and mixing for the system analysis tools. One important aspect of these predictions is the counter current flow rate in the nearly 30 inch diameter hot leg between the reactor vessel and steam generator. This flow rate is strongly related to the amount of energy that can be transported away from the reactor core. This energy transfer plays a significant role in the prediction of core failures as well as potential failures in other reactor coolant system piping. CFD is used to determine the counter current flow rate during a severe accident. Specific sensitivities are completed for parameters such as surge line flow rates, hydrogen content, as well as vessel and steam generator temperatures. The predictions are carried out for the reactor vessel upper plenum, hot leg, a portion of the surge line, and a steam generator blocked off at the outlet plenum. All predictions utilize the FLUENT V6 CFD code. The volumetric flow in the hot leg is assumed to be proportional to the square root of the product of normalized density difference, gravity, and hydraulic diameter to the 5. power. CFD is used to determine the proportionality constant in the range from 0.11 to 0.13 and termed a discharge coefficient. The value is relatively unchanged for typical surge line flow rates as well as the hydrogen content in the flow. Over a significant range of expected temperature differences for the steam generator and reactor vessel upper plenum, the discharge coefficient also remained consistent. The discharge coefficient is a suitable model for determining the hot leg counter current flow rates during this type of severe accident. (author)

Boyd, Christopher F. [United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Toroids as NMR detectors in metal pressure probes and in flow systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear magnetic resonance probe to measure the properties of a sample under high pressure conditions. The apparatus employs a free standing, elongated toroidal coil as the RF transmitter and receiver.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Toroids as NMR detectors in metal pressure probes and in flow systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear magnetic resonance probe to measure the properties of a sample under high pressure conditions. The apparatus employs a free standing, elongated toroidal coil as the RF transmitter and receiver. 3 figs.

Rathke, J.W.

1990-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

70

TWO PROPERTIES OF TWO-VELOCITY TWO-PRESSURE MODELS FOR TWO-PHASE FLOWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for many applications, for instance for water flows in some components of nuclear power plants, it is possible to provide a wave-by-wave study, in spite of its nonconservative structure, and obtain some

71

Gas-phase chemistry during the conversion of cyclohexane to carbon: Flow reactor studies at low and intermediate pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase branching during the conversion of cyclohexane to solid carbon has been measured in a high-temperature-flow reactor. The experiments show that cyclohexane decomposes into a broad distribution of hydrocarbons that further decompose into the more kinetically stable products hydrogen, methane, acetylene, ethylene, benzene, and PAH. At 1363 K, the evolution to these species occurs quickly. We also observe the buildup of significant amounts of aromatic molecules at later stages in the decomposition, with as much as 15% of the total carbon in PAH and 25% in benzene. At later stages, the gas-phase molecules react slowly, even though the system is not at equilibrium, because of their kinetic stability and the smaller radical pool. The decomposition does not appear to depend sensitively on pressure in the regime of 25 to 250 torr. Thus, to a first approximation, these results can be extrapolated to atmospheric pressure.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Larson, R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Development of Correlations for Pressure Loss/Drop Coefficients Obtained From Flow Testing of Fuel Assemblies in Framatome ANP's PHTF  

SciTech Connect

Thermal-hydraulic analyses of pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel assemblies are generally performed for either assembly thermal-hydraulic design, thermal-hydraulic compatibility evaluation, or cycle licensing thermal-hydraulic characterization. A key issue in all cases is the hydraulic resistance characterization of the assembly in which the assembly, its components and support plates, etc., are represented by their respective pressure loss and pressure drop coefficients. These hydraulic coefficients can be determined by single-phase flow testing in an experimental facility such as the Framatome ANP Portable Hydraulic Test Facility (PHTF) located at Richland Test Facilities (RTF) in Richland, WA. The goal of this paper is to present a uniform and consistent methodology for the development of coefficient correlations from data obtained from single phase pressure drop testing of PWR and BWR fuel assemblies and their components performed in the PHTF. This methodology reflects the years of accumulated experience from an existing facility with an ongoing test program. (authors)

Madni, Imtiaz K.; Stephens, Lance G.; Turner, Dave M. [Framatome ANP Inc. (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Scrape-off Layer Flows With Pressure Gradient Scale Length ~ {rho}{sub p}  

SciTech Connect

A heuristic model for the plasma scrape-off width balances magnetic drifts against parallel loss at c{sub s} /2, resulting in a SOL width ~ {rho}{sub p}. T{sub sep} is calculated from Spitzer–Härm parallel thermal conduction. This results in a prediction for the power scrape-off width in quantitative agreement both in magnitude and scaling with recent experimental data. To achieve the ~ c{sub s} /2 flow assumed in this model and measured experimentally sets requirements on the ratio of upstream to total SOL particle sources, relative to the square-root of the ratio of target to upstream temperature. The Pfisch-Schlüter model for equilibrium flows has been modified to allow near-sonic flows, appropriate for gradient scale lengths of order {rho}{sub p}, resulting in a new quadrupole radial flow pattern. The strong parallel flows and plasma charging implied by this model suggest a mechanism for H-mode transition, consistent with many observations

Robert J. Goldston

2013-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

74

Flow and heat transfer in gas turbine disk cavities subject to nonuniform external pressure field  

SciTech Connect

Ingestion of hot gas from the main-stream gas path into turbine disk cavities, particularly the first-stage disk cavity, has become a serious concern for the next-generation industrial gas turbines features high rotor inlet temperature. Fluid temperature in the cavities increases further due to windage generated by fluid drag at the rotating and stationary surfaces. The resulting problem of rotor disk heat-up is exacerbated by the high disk rim temperature due to adverse (relatively flat) temperature profile of the mainstream gas in the annular flow passage of the turbine. This describes an investigation into local convective heat transfer coefficient and cooling effectiveness of the rotor disk, flow field in the disk cavity, computation of the flow field and heat transfer in the disk cavity, and mainstream gas injection and rotor disk cooling effectiveness by mass transfer analogy.

Roy, R.P.; Kim, Y.W.; Tong, T.W. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

75

Numerical modeling of two-phase flow in heterogeneous permeable media with different capillarity pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, CA, USA b Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA Received 8 February 2007; received in revised form 15 in application to flow in per- meable media with capillary heterogeneity. In this work, we propose a new gradient is in terms of the total mobility which is smoother than the wetting mobility. We combine the MFE

Firoozabadi, Abbas

76

Low Speed Nano/Micro/Meso-Scale Rarefied Flows Driven by Temperature and Pressure Gradients  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

no moving parts and is driven by thermal creep flow, which in one version is generated by applying/meso-scale solid state compressor or vacuum pump, now relatively well known as the Knudsen Compressor. It has-equilibrium because of rarefaction effects. Consequently the constitutive relations for the stress tensor and the heat

Alexeenko, Alina

77

Dissecting the Pressure Field in Tidal Flow past a Headland: When Is Form Drag “Real”?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the few previous measurements of topographic form drag in the ocean, drag that is much larger than a typical bluff body drag estimate has been consistently found. In this work, theory combined with a numerical model of tidal flow around a ...

Sally J. Warner; Parker MacCready

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

A numerical study of fluids with pressure dependent viscosity flowing through a rigid porous media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we consider modifications to Darcy's equation wherein the drag coefficient is a function of pressure, which is a realistic model for technological applications like enhanced oil recovery and geological carbon sequestration. We first outline the approximations behind Darcy's equation and the modifications that we propose to Darcy's equation, and derive the governing equations through a systematic approach using mixture theory. We then propose a stabilized mixed finite element formulation for the modified Darcy's equation. To solve the resulting nonlinear equations we present a solution procedure based on the consistent Newton-Raphson method. We solve representative test problems to illustrate the performance of the proposed stabilized formulation. One of the objectives of this paper is also to show that the dependence of viscosity on the pressure can have a significant effect both on the qualitative and quantitative nature of the solution.

Nakshatrala, K B

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion cold flow model tests of Phase 2 carbonizer  

SciTech Connect

Under US Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023, Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) is developing a second-generation pressurized fulidized bed (PFB) combustion system. The second-generation system is an improvement over first-generation pressurized systems because higher gas turbine inlet temperatures, and thus greater system efficiencies can be achieved. In first-generation systems, the gas turbine operates at temperatures lower than those in the PFB combusting bed, with the latter being limited to approximately 1600{degree}F to control alkali release/gas turbine hot corrosion. The second-generation system overcomes this temperature restriction by including a carbonizer and a topping combustor in the system. The carbonizer is a PFB combustion unit that converts coal to a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The char is transferred to a PFB combustor (PFBC), where it is burned. The flue gas from the PFBC and the fuel gas from the carbonizer go to the topping combustor, where the fuel gas is burned and gas turbine inlet temperatures in excess of 2100{degree}F are generated. The PFBC can be operated with or without coal fed along with the char. Steam is generated in the PFBC, and additional coal fed to the PFBC with the char will result in more steam generation. However, excess air must be kept at a level sufficient to support combustion of the fuel gas in the topping combustor.

Shenker, J.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Analyses and applications of pressure, flow rate, and temperature measurements during a perforating run. [Measurement while perforating  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Perforating technology has undergone significant advances during the last decade. Tubing-conveyed perforating, underbalanced perforating, high-shot-density guns, better shaped charges, and improved gun systems have contributed to safer operations and improved productivity of the perforated completions. A recent development described in this paper is a perforating tool that makes real-time downhole measurements (including pressure, flow rate, temperature, gamma ray, casing-collar locator (CCL), and cable tension) during a perforating run and can selectively fire a number of guns at different depths or times. In addition to providing better control of the perforating process, the simultaneous downhole measurements can provide in a single trip a production log, conventional well tests before and after perforating, and a fill-up or slug test soon after perforating for underbalanced conditions. Thus, the completion can be evaluated in real time and any needed remedial reperforating can be performed while the gun is still in the hole. Other applications include limited-entry perforating, monitoring of bottomhole pressure (BHP) during minifracture jobs, better depth control with a gamma ray detector, fluid-level monitoring, and underbalance control. The applications of these measurements, with field data obtained with the Measurement While Perforating (MWP{sup SM}) tool, are the subject of this paper. Examples show the capabilities and the versatility of the MWP tool.

Tariq, S.M. (Schlumberger Perforating and Testing Center (US)); Ayestaran, L.C. (Schlumberger Well Services (US))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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81

Computational and experimental investigation of the drag reduction and the components of pressure drop in horizontal slug flow using liquids of different viscosities  

SciTech Connect

Computational and experimental investigation in 10-cm ID horizontal pipes have been carried out utilizing carbon dioxide as the gas phase and two types of oil with different viscosities; namely 0.0025Pas and 0.05Pas, as the liquid phase. The influence of oil viscosity on the magnitude of total pressure drop and each of its components as well as the effectiveness of a drag reducing additive (DRA, CDR WS 500M flow improver) in decreasing the pressure loss was investigated in two-phase oil-gas slug flow. The effects of changing oil viscosity on the contribution of frictional and accelerational components to total pressure drop in slug flow were also examined and analyzed. Computations of accelerational and frictional components of pressure drop were performed. The accelerational component of pressure drop was dominant in the 0.0025Pas oil while the frictional component had significant contributions in the 0.05Pas oil. Despite the fact that the magnitude of drag reduction was higher in the 0.05Pas oil, the DRA was more effective in reducing the total pressure drop and its components in the 0.0025Pas oil. (author)

Daas, Mutaz [Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology, Florida International University, 10555 West Flagler Street, Suite 2100, Miami, FL 33174 (United States); Bleyle, Derek [Ohio University, 9933 State Route 682 Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Gas pressure reduction circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes passive pressure reduction devices for use with sensitive instruments. Two gas circuits are developed which not only provide a pressure reduction under flow demand

D. W. Guillaume; D. DeVries

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Entrained-flow gasification at elevated pressure: Volume 1: Final technical report, March 1, 1985-April 30,1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general purpose of this research program was to develop a basic understanding of the physical and chemical processes in entrained coal gasification and to use the results to improve and evaluate an entrained gasification computer model. The first task included the collection and analysis of in-situ gasifier data at elevated pressures with three coal types (North Dakota lignite, Wyoming subbituminous and Illinois bituminous), the design, construction, and testing of new coal/oxygen/steam injectors with a fourth coal type (Utah bituminous), the collection of supporting turbulent fluid dynamic (LDV) data from cold-flow studies, and the investigation of the feasibility of using laser-based (CARS) daignostic instruments to make measurements in coal flames. The second task included improvements to the two-dimensional gasifier submodels, tabulation and evaluation of new coal devolatilization and char oxidation data for predictions, fundamental studies of turbulent particle dispersion, the development of improved numerical methods, and validation of the comprehensive model through comparison of predictions with experimental results. The third task was to transfer technical advances to industry and to METC through technical seminars, production of a detailed data book, code placement, and publication of results. Research results for these three tasks are summarized briefly here and presented in detail in the body of the report and in supporting references. 202 refs., 73 figs., 23 tabs.

Hedman, P.O.; Smoot, L.D.; Smith, P.J.; Blackham, A.U.

1987-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

84

The characterization of flow regimes with power spectral density distributions of pressure fluctuations during condensation in smooth and micro-fin tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an objective predictor of the prevailing flow regime during refrigerant condensation inside smooth-, micro-fin and herringbone tubes. The power spectral density (PSD) distribution of the fluctuating condensing pressure signal was used to predict the prevailing flow regime, as opposed to the traditional (and subjective) use of visual-only methods, and/or smooth-tube flow regime maps. The prevailing flow regime was observed by using digital cameras and was validated with the use of the conventional smooth-tube flow regime transition criteria, Froude rate criteria, as well as a new flow regime map that was developed for micro-fin tube condensation. Experimental work was conducted for condensing R-22, R-407C, and R-134a at an average saturation temperature of 40{sup o}C with mass fluxes ranging from 300 to 800kg/m{sup 2}s, and with vapour qualities ranging from 0.85-0.95 at condenser inlet to 0.05-0.15 at condenser outlet. Tests were conducted with one smooth-tube condenser and three micro-fin tube condensers (with helix angles of 10{sup o}, 18{sup o}, and 37{sup o}, respectively). It is shown that the micro-fin tubes cause a delay in the transition from annular to intermittent flow by at least 19% (compared to the smooth tube), thus significantly contributing to the enhancement of heat transfer. (author)

Liebenberg, Leon; Meyer, Josua P. [Department of Mechanical and Aeronautical Engineering, University of Pretoria, Pretoria 0002 (South Africa)

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

85

The effects of channel diameter on flow pattern, void fraction and pressure drop of two-phase air-water flow in circular micro-channels  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase air-water flow characteristics are experimentally investigated in horizontal circular micro-channels. Test sections are made of fused silica. The experiments are conducted based on three different inner diameters of 0.53, 0.22 and 0.15 mm with the corresponding lengths of 320, 120 and 104 mm, respectively. The test runs are done at superficial velocities of gas and liquid ranging between 0.37-42.36 and 0.005-3.04 m/s, respectively. The flow visualisation is facilitated by systems mainly including stereozoom microscope and high-speed camera. The flow regime maps developed from the observed flow patterns are presented. The void fractions are determined based on image analysis. New correlation for two-phase frictional multiplier is also proposed for practical applications. (author)

Saisorn, Sira [Energy Division, The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment (JGSEE), King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab. (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

CFD Predictions of Severe Accident Steam Generator Flows in a 1/7. Scale Pressurized Water Reactor  

SciTech Connect

Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) is applied to steam generator inlet plenum mixing as part of a larger plan covering steam generator tube integrity. The technique is verified by comparing predicted results with severe accident natural circulation data from a 1/7. scale Westinghouse facility. This exercise demonstrates that the technique can predict the natural circulation and mixing phenomena relevant to steam generator tube integrity issues. The model includes primary side flow paths for a single hot leg and steam generator. Qualitatively, the experimentally observed flow phenomena are predicted. The paths of the natural circulation flows and the relative flow proportions are correctly predicted. Quantitatively, comparisons are made with temperatures, mass flows, and other parameters. All predictions are generally within 10% of the experimental values. Overall, there is a high degree of confidence in the CFD technique for prediction of the relevant flow phenomena associated with this type of severe accident sequence. (authors)

Boyd, Christopher; Hardesty, Kelly [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001 (United States)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry ...

Gardner, Alan T.

88

Influence of Atmospheric Pressure and Water Table Fluctuations on Gas Phase Flow and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Unsaturated Zones  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the gas phase flow and transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in unsaturated zones is indispensable to develop effective environmental remediation strategies, to create precautions for fresh water protection, and to provide guidance for land and water resources management. Atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations are two important natural processes at the upper and lower boundaries of the unsaturated zone, respectively. However, their significance has been neglected in previous studies. This dissertation systematically investigates their influence on the gas phase flow and transport of VOCs in soil and ground water remediation processes using analytically and numerically mathematical modeling. New semi-analytical and numerical solutions are developed to calculate the subsurface gas flow field and the gas phase transport of VOCs in active soil vapor extraction (SVE), barometric pumping (BP) and natural attenuation taking into account the atmospheric pressure and the water table fluctuations. The accuracy of the developed solutions are checked by comparing with published analytical solutions under extreme conditions, newly developed numerical solutions in COMSOL Multiphysics and field measured data. Results indicate that both the atmospheric pressure and the tidal-induced water table fluctuations significantly change the gas flow field in active SVE, especially when the vertical gas permeability is small (less than 0.4 Darcy). The tidal-induced downward moving water table increases the depth-averaged radius of influence (ROI) for the gas pumping well. However, this downward moving water table leads to a greater vertical pore gas velocity away from the gas pumping well, which is unfavorable for removing VOCs. The gas flow rate to/from the barometric pumping well can be accurately calculated by our newly developed solutions in both homogeneous and multi-layered unsaturated zones. Under natural unsaturated zone conditions, the time-averaged advective flux of the gas phase VOCs induced by the atmospheric pressure and water table fluctuations is one to three orders of magnitude less than the diffusive flux. The time-averaged advective flux is comparable with the diffusive flux only when the gas-filled porosity is very small (less than 0.05). The density-driven flux is negligible.

You, Kehua

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Brine flow up a borehole caused by pressure perturbation from CO2 storage: Static and dynamic evaluations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flow model for carbon dioxide and brine, in Proceedings 9 thGeological Storage of Carbon Dioxide, in: S.J. Baines andGeological Storage of Carbon Dioxide, Geological Society,

Birkholzer, J.T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Pressure drop, heat transfer, critical heat flux, and flow stability of two-phase flow boiling of water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures - final report for project "Efficent cooling in engines with nucleate boiling."  

SciTech Connect

Because of its order-of-magnitude higher heat transfer rates, there is interest in using controllable two-phase nucleate boiling instead of conventional single-phase forced convection in vehicular cooling systems to remove ever increasing heat loads and to eliminate potential hot spots in engines. However, the fundamental understanding of flow boiling mechanisms of a 50/50 ethylene glycol/water mixture under engineering application conditions is still limited. In addition, it is impractical to precisely maintain the volume concentration ratio of the ethylene glycol/water mixture coolant at 50/50. Therefore, any investigation into engine coolant characteristics should include a range of volume concentration ratios around the nominal 50/50 mark. In this study, the forced convective boiling heat transfer of distilled water and ethylene glycol/water mixtures with volume concentration ratios of 40/60, 50/50, and 60/40 in a 2.98-mm-inner-diameter circular tube has been investigated in both the horizontal flow and the vertical flow. The two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux of the test fluids were determined experimentally over a range of the mass flux, the vapor mass quality, and the inlet subcooling through a new boiling data reduction procedure that allowed the analytical calculation of the fluid boiling temperatures along the experimental test section by applying the ideal mixture assumption and the equilibrium assumption along with Raoult's law. Based on the experimental data, predictive methods for the two-phase pressure drop, the forced convective boiling heat transfer coefficient, and the critical heat flux under engine application conditions were developed. The results summarized in this final project report provide the necessary information for designing and implementing nucleate-boiling vehicular cooling systems.

Yu, W.; France, D. M.; Routbort, J. L. (Energy Systems)

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

91

Improved Fluid Flow Measurements: Feedwater Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the combined results of a utility survey and site visits concerning feedwater flow measurement in fossil-fueled power plants. In addition, a summary is provided of the technologies available to measure the volumetric feedwater flow rate in plants. This volumetric flow rate can be converted to a mass flow rate by knowing the pressure and temperature of the flow media. Velocity meters, differential pressure meters, and other closed-conduit flowmeters are discussed along with ...

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Multiphase flow calculation software  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

94

Portable wastewater flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Reactor pressure vessel nozzle  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nozzle for joining a pool of water to a nuclear reactor pressure vessel includes a tubular body having a proximal end joinable to the pressure vessel and a distal end joinable in flow communication with the pool. The body includes a flow passage therethrough having in serial flow communication a first port at the distal end, a throat spaced axially from the first port, a conical channel extending axially from the throat, and a second port at the proximal end which is joinable in flow communication with the pressure vessel. The inner diameter of the flow passage decreases from the first port to the throat and then increases along the conical channel to the second port. In this way, the conical channel acts as a diverging channel or diffuser in the forward flow direction from the first port to the second port for recovering pressure due to the flow restriction provided by the throat. In the backflow direction from the second port to the first port, the conical channel is a converging channel and with the abrupt increase in flow area from the throat to the first port collectively increase resistance to flow therethrough. 2 figs.

Challberg, R.C.; Upton, H.A.

1994-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

96

Investigating capillary pressure and interfacial area for multiphase flow in porous media using pore-scale imaging and lattice-Boltzmann modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent advances in imaging technology and numerical modeling have greatly enhanced pore-scale investigations of multiphase flow and transport in porous media. It is now feasible… (more)

[No author

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Miniaturized pressurization system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to pressurization systems and liquid rocket propulsion systems, and particularly to those used to attitude control or maneuvering of small space vehicles or airborne vehicles where the requirement for thrust is intermittent rather than continuous, and must be available rapidly upon demand. This invention also relates to increasing performance of such propulsion systems, by way of eliminating inert mass from the propulsion system. The invention uses a fluid stored at a low pressure and provides the fluid at a high pressure. The invention allows the low pressure fluid to flow to a fluid bore of a differential pump and from the pump to a fluid pressure regulator. After flowing through the regulator the fluid is converted to a gas which is directed to a gas bore of the differential pump. By controlling the flow of gas entering and being exhausted from the gas bore, the invention provides pressure to the fluid. By setting the regulator, the high pressure fluid can be set at predetermined values. Because the invention only needs a low pressure fluid, the inventive apparatus has a low mass, and therefore would be useful in rocket propulsion systems.

Whitehead, J.C.; Swink, D.G.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

98

5-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5-ft Wave Flume Facility 5-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 63.4 Beam(m) 1.5 Depth(m) 1.5 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.5 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

99

Conte Large Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Conte Large Flume Conte Large Flume Overseeing Organization United States Geological Survey, LSC Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 6.1 Depth(m) 5.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and other data acquisition systems Number of channels 12 Bandwidth(kHz) 44 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types Conventional underwater video, 4; high speed (1000 fps), 1 Available Sensors Displacement, Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability

100

Conte Small Flume | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Small Flume Small Flume Overseeing Organization United States Geological Survey, LSC Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 38.1 Beam(m) 3.0 Depth(m) 5.2 Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and other data acquisition systems Number of channels 12 Bandwidth(kHz) 44 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types Conventional underwater video, 4; high speed (1000 fps), 1 Available Sensors Displacement, Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Thermal, Turbulence, Velocity Data Generation Capability

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

3-ft Wave Flume Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-ft Wave Flume Facility 3-ft Wave Flume Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 45.1 Beam(m) 0.9 Depth(m) 0.9 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.2 Maximum Wave Height(m) at Wave Period(s) 10.0 Wave Period Range(s) 10.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking Yes Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

102

Breakwater Research Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Breakwater Research Facility Breakwater Research Facility Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Breakwater Research Facility Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Wave Basin Length(m) 121.9 Beam(m) 55.5 Depth(m) 0.8 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume None Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

103

Sectional Model Flume Facilities | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sectional Model Flume Facilities Sectional Model Flume Facilities Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Sectional Model Flume Facilities Overseeing Organization United States Army Corp of Engineers (ERDC) Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 21.3 Beam(m) 1.4 Depth(m) 2.4 Water Type Freshwater Cost(per day) Contact POC Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes Maximum Wave Height(m) 0.0 Wave Period Range(s) 0.0 Current Velocity Range(m/s) 0.0 Programmable Wavemaking No Simulated Beach No Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description Automated data acquisition and control system Cameras None Available Sensors Flow, Pressure Range(psi), Turbulence, Velocity, Wave Probe

104

DeFrees Flume 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DeFrees Flume 2 DeFrees Flume 2 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Flume 2 Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 8.0 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and Mathworks Matlab DAQ systems Number of channels 64+ Bandwidth(kHz) 1000 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types 1024 x 1024 x 12 bit to 60 fps, 491 x 656 x 8-bit to 100 fps, others Available Sensors Thermal, Ultrasonic Wave Height, Displacement, Acceleration, Turbulence, Pressure Range(psi), Flow, Acoustics, Velocity

105

DeFrees Flume 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flume 1 Flume 1 Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Flume 1 Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 4.5 Beam(m) 0.6 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and Mathworks Matlab DAQ systems Number of channels 64+ Bandwidth(kHz) 1000 Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types 1024 x 1024 x 12 bit to 60 fps, 491 x 656 x 8-bit to 100 fps, others Available Sensors Flow, Turbulence, Ultrasonic Wave Height, Acceleration, Pressure Range(psi), Acoustics, Velocity, Displacement, Thermal

106

DeFrees Flume 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Basic Specifications Basic Specifications Facility Name DeFrees Flume 3 Overseeing Organization Cornell University Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Flume Length(m) 15.0 Beam(m) 2.0 Depth(m) 0.6 Water Type Freshwater Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities None Channel/Tunnel/Flume Channel/Tunnel/Flume Yes Velocity(m/s) 2 Recirculating No Wind Capabilities Wind Capabilities None Control and Data Acquisition Description National Instruments LabView and Mathworks Matlab DAQ systems Number of channels 64+ Cameras Yes Number of Color Cameras 5 Description of Camera Types 1024 x 1024 x 12 bit to 60 fps, 491 x 656 x 8-bit to 100 fps, others Available Sensors Acceleration, Acoustics, Pressure Range(psi), Velocity, Displacement, Turbulence, Flow, Ultrasonic Wave Height, Thermal

107

Elbow mass flow meter  

SciTech Connect

Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

McFarland, Andrew R. (College Station, TX); Rodgers, John C. (Santa Fe, NM); Ortiz, Carlos A. (Bryan, TX); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Microwave fluid flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

Billeter, Thomas R. (Richland, WA); Philipp, Lee D. (Richland, WA); Schemmel, Richard R. (Lynchburg, VA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

111

SALTSTONE OSMOTIC PRESSURE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H{sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

Nichols, R.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

112

SALTSTONE OSMOTIC PRESSURE  

SciTech Connect

Recent research into the moisture retention properties of saltstone suggest that osmotic pressure may play a potentially significant role in contaminant transport (Dixon et al., 2009 and Dixon, 2011). The Savannah River Remediation Closure and Disposal Assessments Group requested the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct a literature search on osmotic potential as it relates to contaminant transport and to develop a conceptual model of saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. This report presents the findings of the literature review and presents a conceptual model for saltstone that incorporates osmotic potential. The task was requested through Task Technical Request HLW-SSF-TTR- 2013-0004. Simulated saltstone typically has very low permeability (Dixon et al. 2008) and pore water that contains a large concentration of dissolved salts (Flach and Smith 2013). Pore water in simulated saltstone has a high salt concentration relative to pore water in concrete and groundwater. This contrast in salt concentration can generate high osmotic pressures if simulated saltstone has the properties of a semipermeable membrane. Estimates of osmotic pressure using results from the analysis of pore water collected from simulated saltstone show that an osmotic pressure up to 2790 psig could be generated within the saltstone. Most semi-permeable materials are non-ideal and have an osmotic efficiency <1 and as a result actual osmotic pressures are less than theoretical pressures. Observations from laboratory tests of simulated saltstone indicate that it may exhibit the behavior of a semi-permeable membrane. After several weeks of back pressure saturation in a flexible wall permeameter (FWP) the membrane containing a simulated saltstone sample appeared to have bubbles underneath it. Upon removal from the FWP the specimen was examined and it was determined that the bubbles were due to liquid that had accumulated between the membrane and the sample. One possible explanation for the accumulation of solution between the membrane and sample is the development of osmotic pressure within the sample. Osmotic pressure will affect fluid flow and contaminant transport and may result in the changes to the internal structure of the semi-permeable material. B?nard et al. 2008 reported swelling of wet cured Portland cement mortars containing salts of NaNO{sub 3}, KNO{sub 3}, Na{sub 3}PO{sub 4}x12H{sub 2}O, and K{sub 3}PO{sub 4} when exposed to a dilute solution. Typically hydraulic head is considered the only driving force for groundwater in groundwater models. If a low permeability material containing a concentrated salt solution is present in the hydrogeologic sequence large osmotic pressures may develop and lead to misinterpretation of groundwater flow and solute transport. The osmotic pressure in the semi-permeable material can significantly impact groundwater flow in the vicinity of the semi-permeable material. One possible outcome is that groundwater will flow into the semi-permeable material resulting in hydrologic containment within the membrane. Additionally, hyperfiltration can occur within semi-permeable materials when water moves through a membrane into the more concentrated solution and dissolved constituents are retained in the lower concentration solution. Groundwater flow and transport equations that incorporate chemical gradients (osmosis) have been developed. These equations are referred to as coupled flow equations. Currently groundwater modeling to assess the performance of saltstone waste forms is conducted using the PORFLOW groundwater flow and transport model. PORFLOW does not include coupled flow from chemico-osmotic gradients and therefore numerical simulation of the effect of coupled flow on contaminant transport in and around saltstone cannot be assessed. Most natural semi-permeable membranes are non-ideal membranes and do not restrict all movement of solutes and as a result theoretical osmotic potential is not realized. Osmotic efficiency is a parameter in the coupled flow equation that accounts for the

Nichols, R.

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic pump for manipulating fluids in capillary-based systems. The pump uses electro-osmotic flow to provide a high pressure hydraulic system, having no moving mechanical parts, for pumping and/or compressing fluids, for providing valve means and means for opening and closing valves, for controlling fluid flow rate, and manipulating fluid flow generally and in capillary-based systems (Microsystems), in particular. The compact nature of the inventive high pressure hydraulic pump provides the ability to construct a micro-scale or capillary-based HPLC system that fulfills the desire for small sample quantity, low solvent consumption, improved efficiency, the ability to run samples in parallel, and field portability. Control of pressure and solvent flow rate is achieved by controlling the voltage applied to an electrokinetic pump.

Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA); Arnold, Don W. (Livermore, CA); Hencken, Kenneth R. (Pleasanton, CA); Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Neyer, David W. (Castro Valley, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Maple Sap Flow  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

I know a little about this topic even though I am from Illinois which is far from the heart of maple syrup country. Sap flows from a maple tree by internal pressure caused by the...

115

Estimation of steady-state and transcient power distributions for the RELAP analyses of the 1963 loss-of-flow and loss-of-pressure tests at BR2.  

SciTech Connect

To support the safety analyses required for the conversion of the Belgian Reactor 2 (BR2) from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, the simulation of a number of loss-of-flow tests, with or without loss of pressure, has been undertaken. These tests were performed at BR2 in 1963 and used instrumented fuel assemblies (FAs) with thermocouples (TC) imbedded in the cladding as well as probes to measure the FAs power on the basis of their coolant temperature rise. The availability of experimental data for these tests offers an opportunity to better establish the credibility of the RELAP5-3D model and methodology used in the conversion analysis. In order to support the HEU to LEU conversion safety analyses of the BR2 reactor, RELAP simulations of a number of loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure tests have been undertaken. Preliminary analyses showed that the conservative power distributions used historically in the BR2 RELAP model resulted in a significant overestimation of the peak cladding temperature during the transient. Therefore, it was concluded that better estimates of the steady-state and decay power distributions were needed to accurately predict the cladding temperatures measured during the tests and establish the credibility of the RELAP model and methodology. The new approach ('best estimate' methodology) uses the MCNP5, ORIGEN-2 and BERYL codes to obtain steady-state and decay power distributions for the BR2 core during the tests A/400/1, C/600/3 and F/400/1. This methodology can be easily extended to simulate any BR2 core configuration. Comparisons with measured peak cladding temperatures showed a much better agreement when power distributions obtained with the new methodology are used.

Dionne, B.; Tzanos, C. P. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

116

CC Pressure Test  

SciTech Connect

The inner vessel heads including bypass and beam tubes had just been welded into place and dye penetrant checked. The vacuum heads were not on at this time but the vacuum shell was on covering the piping penetrating into the inner vessel. Signal boxes with all feed through boards, the instrumentation box, and high voltage boxes were all installed with their pump outs capped. All 1/4-inch instrumentation lines were terminated at their respective shutoff valves. All vacuum piping used for pumping down the inner vessel was isolated using o-ring sealed blind flanges. PV215A (VAT Series 12), the 4-inch VRC gate valve isolating the cyropump, and the rupture disk had to be removed and replaced with blind flanges before pressurizing due to their pressure limitations. Stresses in plates used as blind flanges were checked using Code calcualtions. Before the CC test, vacuum style blanks and clamps were hydrostatically pressure tested to 150% of the maximum test pressure, 60 psig. The Code inspector and Research Division Safety had all given their approval to the test pressure and procedure prior to filling the vessel with argon. The test was a major success. Based on the lack of any distinguishable pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages, the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 3 hrs.). A major leak in the instrumentation tubing was discovered at half of the maximum test pressure and was quickly isolated by crimping and capping with a compression fitting. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The 44 psig relief valve located just outside the cleanroom had to be capped until the pressure in the vessel indicated 38 psi. This was to allow higher supply pressures and hence, higher flows through the pressurizing line. Also, in order to get pressure readings at the cryostat without exposing any personnel to the potentially dangerous stored energy near the maximum test pressure, a camera was installed at the top of the vessel to view the indicator mounted there. The monitor was viewed at the ante room adjacent to the cleanroom. The holding pressure of 32 psig (4/5 of the maximum test pressure) was only maintained for about 20 minutes instead of the half hour recommendation in the procedure. We felt that this was sufficient time to Snoop test and perform the pressure drop test. After the test was completed, the inspector for CBI Na-Con and the Research Divison Safety Officer signed all of required documentation.

Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

1990-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

117

Elbow mass flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Electrokinetic high pressure hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high pressure hydraulic pump having no moving mechanical parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force. The electrokinetic pump, which can generate hydraulic pressures greater than 2500 psi, can be employed to compress a fluid, either liquid or gas, and manipulate fluid flow. The pump is particularly useful for capillary-base systems. By combining the electrokinetic pump with a housing having chambers separated by a flexible member, fluid flow, including high pressure fluids, is controlled by the application of an electric potential, that can vary with time.

Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Shroud leakage flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bailey, Jeremy Clyde (Middle Grove, NY); Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Pressure Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Specifications for carbon and alloy steel pressure tubes (ASTM)...medium-strength carbon-molybdenum alloy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Dynamic Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The higher pressure range will cover the important application of gas turbine engine testing. Gas turbines are used for propulsion on aircraft and ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

122

Lattice Boltzmann modeling of microchannel flow in slip flow regime  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the lattice Boltzmann equation (LBE) with multiple relaxation times (MRT) to simulate pressure-driven gaseous flow in a long microchannel. We obtain analytic solutions of the MRT-LBE with various boundary conditions for the incompressible ... Keywords: Gas flow through microchannel, Lattice Boltzmann equation with multiple relaxation times, Slip flow

Frederik Verhaeghe; Li-Shi Luo; Bart Blanpain

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

124

Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Flow Test Details Activities (38) Areas (33) Regions (1) NEPA(3) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Flow tests provide information on permeability, recharge rates, reservoir pressures, fluid chemistry, and scaling. Thermal: Flow tests can measure temperature variations with time to estimate characteristics about the heat source. Dictionary.png Flow Test: Flow tests are typically conducted shortly after a well has been drilled to test its productivity. The well is opened and fluids are released, the

125

Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Managed Pressure Drilling now at the pinnacle of the 'Oil Well Drilling' evolution tree, has itself been coined in 2003. It is an umbrella term for a few new drilling techniques and some preexisting drilling techniques, all of them aiming to solve several drilling problems, including non-productive time and/or drilling flat time issues. These techniques, now sub-classifications of Managed Pressure Drilling, are referred to as 'Variations' and 'Methods' of Managed Pressure Drilling. Although using Managed Pressure Drilling for drilling wells has several benefits, not all wells that seem a potential candidate for Managed Pressure Drilling, need Managed Pressure Drilling. The drilling industry has numerous simulators and software models to perform drilling hydraulics calculations and simulations. Most of them are designed for conventional well hydraulics, while some can perform Underbalanced Drilling calculations, and a select few can perform Managed Pressure Drilling calculations. Most of the few available Managed Pressure Drilling models are modified Underbalanced Drilling versions that fit Managed Pressure Drilling needs. However, none of them focus on Managed Pressure Drilling and its candidate selection alone. An 'Managed Pressure Drilling Candidate Selection Model and software' that can act as a preliminary screen to determine the utility of Managed Pressure Drilling for potential candidate wells are developed as a part of this research dissertation. The model and a flow diagram identify the key steps in candidate selection. The software performs the basic hydraulic calculations and provides useful results in the form of tables, plots and graphs that would help in making better engineering decisions. An additional Managed Pressure Drilling worldwide wells database with basic information on a few Managed Pressure Drilling projects has also been compiled that can act as a basic guide on the Managed Pressure Drilling variation and project frequencies and aid in Managed Pressure Drilling candidate selection.

Nauduri, Anantha S.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

High-Compression-Ratio; Atkinson-Cycle Engine Using Low-Pressure Direct Injection and Pneumatic-Electronic Valve Actuation Enabled by Ionization Current and Foward-Backward Mass Air Flow Sensor Feedback  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the work completed over a two and one half year effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy. The goal was to demonstrate the technology needed to produce a highly efficient engine enabled by several technologies which were to be developed in the course of the work. The technologies included: (1) A low-pressure direct injection system; (2) A mass air flow sensor which would measure the net airflow into the engine on a per cycle basis; (3) A feedback control system enabled by measuring ionization current signals from the spark plug gap; and (4) An infinitely variable cam actuation system based on a pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation These developments were supplemented by the use of advanced large eddy simulations as well as evaluations of fuel air mixing using the KIVA and WAVE models. The simulations were accompanied by experimental verification when possible. In this effort a solid base has been established for continued development of the advanced engine concepts originally proposed. Due to problems with the valve actuation system a complete demonstration of the engine concept originally proposed was not possible. Some of the highlights that were accomplished during this effort are: (1) A forward-backward mass air flow sensor has been developed and a patent application for the device has been submitted. We are optimistic that this technology will have a particular application in variable valve timing direct injection systems for IC engines. (2) The biggest effort on this project has involved the development of the pneumatic-hydraulic valve actuation system. This system was originally purchased from Cargine, a Swedish supplier and is in the development stage. To date we have not been able to use the actuators to control the exhaust valves, although the actuators have been successfully employed to control the intake valves. The reason for this is the additional complication associated with variable back pressure on the exhaust valves when they are opened. As a result of this effort, we have devised a new design and have filed for a patent on a method of control which is believed to overcome this problem. The engine we have been working with originally had a single camshaft which controlled both the intake and exhaust valves. Single cycle lift and timing control was demonstrated with this system. (3) Large eddy simulations and KIVA based simulations were used in conjunction with flow visualizations in an optical engine to study fuel air mixing. During this effort we have devised a metric for quantifying fuel distribution and it is described in several of our papers. (4) A control system has been developed to enable us to test the benefits of the various technologies. This system used is based on Opal-RT hardware and is being used in a current DOE sponsored program.

Harold Schock; Farhad Jaberi; Ahmed Naguib; Guoming Zhu; David Hung

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

127

Designing Axial Flow Fan for Flow and Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive finite element methodology is developed to predict the compressible flow performance of a non-symmetric 7-blade axial flow fan, and to quantify the source strength and sound pressure levels at any location in the system. The acoustic and flow performances of the fan are predicted simultaneously using a computational aero-acoustic technique combining transient flow analysis and noise propagation. The calculated sound power levels compare favorably with the measured sound power data per AMCA 300-96 code.

Subrata Roy; Phillip Cho; Fred Périé; International Off-highway

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

PRESSURE TRANSDUCER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure or mechanical force transducer particularly adaptable to miniature telemetering systems is described. Basically the device consists of a transistor located within a magnetic field adapted to change in response to mechanical force. The conduction characteristics of the transistor in turn vary proportionally with changes in the magnetic flux across the transistor such that the output (either frequency of amplitude) of the transistor circuit is proportional to mechanical force or pressure.

Sander, H.H.

1959-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Continuous Flow Differential Pressure Rotary Transport ...  

This patent-pending active material transport system design concept provides solutions to several process challenges associated with moving materials ...

130

Self pressuring HTP feed systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen peroxide tanks can be pressurized with decomposed HTP (high test hydrogen peroxide) originating in the tank itself. In rocketry, this offers the advantage of eliminating bulky and heavy inert gas storage. Several prototype self-pressurizing HTP systems have recently been designed and tested. Both a differential piston tank and a small gas-driven pump have been tried to obtain the pressure boost needed for flow through a gas generator and back to the tank. Results include terrestrial maneuvering tests of a prototype microsatellite, including warm gas attitude control jets.

Whitehead, J.

1999-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

131

Low pressure turbine installation  

SciTech Connect

Low-pressure turbine installation is described comprising a casing, at least two groups of turbine stages mounted in said casing, each turbine stage having blades so arranged that a flow of steam passes through the respective turbine stages in contraflow manner, partition means in said casing for separating the opposed final stages of said turbine stages from each other, and steam exhausting means opened in the side walls of said casing in a direction substantially perpendicular to the axis of said turbine, said steam exhausting means being connected to condensers.

Iizuka, N.; Hisano, K.; Ninomiya, S.; Otawara, Y.

1976-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Liquid hydrogen flow problems in Kiwi reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Kiwi series of reactors were the first ones tested in the US Rover Program in the development of nuclear rocket engines for space propulsion. The early experiments with liquid hydrogen showed that parallel flow systems were prone to uneven flow distributions and violent fluctuations in pressure and flow that were capable of destroying a reactor core. Kiwi flow distribution problems were solved by using multiple feed lines into the nozzle cooling system and carefully balancing impedance among them. The violent pressure and flow fluctuations were eliminated after their cause was identified as resonance phenomena driven by the response to flow disturbances of heat transfer through a superheated hydrogen layer. Smooth flow operations were assured by rapidly bringing operating pressures beyond several times the critical pressure of hydrogen. After this initial rough start, solid core nuclear rocket engines successfully passed milestones of achievements during the remainder of the Rover program.

Thurston, R.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.Pressure Loss in Flexible HVAC Ducts Bass Abushakra, Ph.D.to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Pore-scale modeling of the impact of surrounding flow behavior on multiphase flow properties.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Accurate predictions of macroscopic multiphase flow properties, such as relative permeability and capillary pressure, are necessary for making key decisions in reservoir engineering. These properties… (more)

Petersen, Robert Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Absolute permeability as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature  

SciTech Connect

This work is an investigation of the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand and consolidated sandstone cores to distilled water as a function of the temperature of the system, confining pressure on the core and the pore pressure of the flowing liquid. The results of this study indicate that temperatures is not an important variable that needs to be reproduced in the laboratory. Confining pressure and pore pressure affect permeability in a predictable manner. This allows measurements at a lower pressure level to be extrapolated to higher pressure conditions. 21 refs.

Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

Sheppard, John D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Tong, Long S. (Gaithersburg, MD)

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Turbine blade tip flow discouragers  

SciTech Connect

A turbine assembly comprises a plurality of rotating blade portions in a spaced relation with a stationery shroud. The rotating blade portions comprise a root section, a tip portion and an airfoil. The tip portion has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall. A number of flow discouragers are disposed on the blade tip portion. In one embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. In an alternative embodiment, the flow discouragers extend circumferentially from the pressure side wall to the suction side wall so as to be aligned at an angle in the range between about 0.degree. to about 60.degree. with respect to a reference axis aligned generally parallel to the direction of rotation. The flow discouragers increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the blade tip portion so as to improve overall turbine efficiency.

Bunker, Ronald Scott (Niskayuna, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method for pressure modulation of turbine sidewall cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for controlling cooling air flow for pressure modulation of turbine components, such as the turbine outer sidewall cavities. The pressure at which cooling and purge air is supplied to the turbine outer side wall cavities is modulated, based on compressor discharge pressure (Pcd), thereby to generally maintain the back flow margin (BFM) so as to minimize excessive leakage and the consequent performance deterioration. In an exemplary embodiment, the air pressure within the third stage outer side wall cavity and the air pressure within the fourth stage outer side wall cavity are each controlled to a respective value that is a respective prescribed percentage of the concurrent compressor discharge pressure. The prescribed percentage may be determined from a ratio of the respective outer side wall pressure to compressor discharge pressure at Cold Day Turn Down (CDTD) required to provide a prescribed back flow margin.

Leone, Sal Albert (Scotia, NY); Book, Matthew David (Altamont, NY); Banares, Christopher R. (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

System for pressure modulation of turbine sidewall cavities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method are provided for controlling cooling air flow for pressure modulation of turbine components, such as the turbine outer sidewall cavities. The pressure at which cooling and purge air is supplied to the turbine outer side wall cavities is modulated, based on compressor discharge pressure (Pcd), thereby to generally maintain the back flow margin (BFM) so as to minimize excessive leakage and the consequent performance deterioration. In an exemplary embodiment, the air pressure within the third stage outer side wall cavity and the air pressure within the fourth stage outer side wall cavity are each controlled to a respective value that is a respective prescribed percentage of the concurrent compressor discharge pressure. The prescribed percentage may be determined from a ratio of the respective outer side wall pressure to compressor discharge pressure at Cold Day Turn Down (CDTD) required to provide a prescribed back flow margin.

Leone, Sal Albert (Scotia, NY); Book, Matthew David (Altamont, NY); Banares, Christopher R. (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Predicting enhanced mass flow rates in gas microchannels using nonkinetic models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Different nonkinetic approaches are adopted in this paper towards theoretically predicting the experimentally observed phenomenon of enhanced mass flow rates accompanying pressure-driven rarefied gas flows through ...

Dadzie, S. Kokou

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High fidelity field simulations using density and pressure based approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Density-based and pressure-based approaches in solving the Navier-Stokes equations for computational field simulations for compressible and incompressible flows have been presented. For the density-based flow solver, a generalized grid based framework ... Keywords: CFD, Density-based method, Pressure-based method

Gary C. Cheng; Roy P. Koomullil; Bharat K. Soni

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell.

Sawabe, James K. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

143

Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Development of a low density jet flow apparatus.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An apparatus was designed and constructed to study supersonic fluid flow in a low temperature and low pressure environment similar to the same conditions associated… (more)

Smith, Nicholas Edward

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Towards improved methods for determining porous media multiphase flow functions.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The mathematical modeling and simulation of the flow of fluid through porous media are important in many areas. Relative permeability and capillary pressure functions are… (more)

Xue, Song

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microfluidic gas flow profiling using remote detection NMR  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The amount of axial dispersion as the gas flows within thetimes; A, three dispersion curves for gas originating atdispersion measurements. Pressurized hyperpolarized xenon gas

Hilty, Christian; McDonnell, Erin; Granwehr, Josef; Pierce, Kimberly; Han, Song-I Han; Pines, Alexander

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

In Natural Gas Pipelines, NIST Goes with the Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... flows from producers to consumers through a complex pipeline network totaling ... pressures an order of magnitude smaller than pipelines used in ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Fluid Flow Within Fractured Porous Media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fractures provide preferential flow paths to subterranean fluid flows. In reservoir scale modeling of geologic flows fractures must be approximated by fairly simple formulations. Often this is accomplished by assuming fractures are parallel plates subjected to an applied pressure gradient. This is known as the cubic law. An induced fracture in Berea sandstone has been digitized to perform numerical flow simulations. A commercially available computational fluid dynamics software package has been used to solve the flow through this model. Single phase flows have been compared to experimental works in the literature to evaluate the accuracy with which this model can be applied. Common methods of fracture geometry classification are also calculated and compared to experimentally obtained values. Flow through regions of the fracture where the upper and lower fracture walls meet (zero aperture) are shown to induce a strong channeling effect on the flow. This model is expanded to include a domain of surrounding porous media through which the flow can travel. The inclusion of a realistic permeability in this media shows that the regions of small and zero apertures contribute to the greatest pressure losses over the fracture length and flow through the porous media is most prevalent in these regions. The flow through the fracture is shown to be the largest contributor to the net flow through the media. From this work, a novel flow relationship is proposed for flow through fractured media.

Crandall, D.M.; Ahmadi, G. (Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY); Smith, D.H.; Bromhal, G.S.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Pressure responsive perforating and testing system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In accordance with an illustrative embodiment of the present invention, a well perforating and testing system includes packer and test valve means for respectively isolating a well bore interval and controlling flow of well fluids therefrom, a perforating gun connected below the packer means, and firing means responsive to a greater pressure in the well annulus above the packer means than in said isolated interval for actuating the perforating gun so theat the casing can be perforated at underbalanced pressure conditions.

Upchurch, J. M.

1985-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

150

Measurement of the differential pressure of liquid metals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to an improved means for measuring the differential pressure between any two points in a process liquid metal coolant loop, wherein the flow of liquid metal in a pipe is opposed by a permanent magnet liquid metal pump until there is almost zero flow shown by a magnetic type flowmeter. The pressure producing the liquid metal flow is inferred from the rate of rotation of the permanent magnet pump. In an alternate embodiment, a differential pressure transducer is coupled to a process pipeline by means of high-temperature bellows or diaphragm seals, and a permanent magnet liquid metal pump in the high-pressure transmission line to the pressure transducer can be utilized either for calibration of the transducer or for determining the process differential pressure as a function of the magnet pump speed. (auth)

Metz, H.J.

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

pressure_measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... piston gauges, ball gages, pressure transducers, pressure gauges, non-mercurial barometers, and manometers in both gas and oil media using ...

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

152

Chemistry Effects on Flow-Accelerated Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes an investigation into the accuracy of the hydrazine and oxygen factors used for predicting flow-accelerated corrosion (FAC) in pressurized water reactors (PWRs) using the CHECWORKS Steam/Feedwater Application (SFA).

2005-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

153

HYDROGEN ELECTROLYZER FLOW DISTRIBUTOR MODEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hybrid sulfur process (HyS) hydrogen electrolyzer consists of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) sandwiched between two porous graphite layers. An aqueous solution of sulfuric acid with dissolved SO{sub 2} gas flows parallel to the PEM through the porous graphite layer on the anode side of the electrolyzer. A flow distributor, consisting of a number of parallel channels acting as headers, promotes uniform flow of the anolyte fluid through the porous graphite layer. A numerical model of the hydraulic behavior of the flow distributor is herein described. This model was developed to be a tool to aid the design of flow distributors. The primary design objective is to minimize spatial variations in the flow through the porous graphite layer. The hydraulic data from electrolyzer tests consists of overall flowrate and pressure drop. Internal pressure and flow distributions are not measured, but these details are provided by the model. The model has been benchmarked against data from tests of the current electrolyzer. The model reasonably predicts the viscosity effect of changing the fluid from water to an aqueous solution of 30 % sulfuric acid. The permeability of the graphite layer was the independent variable used to fit the model to the test data, and the required permeability for a good fit is within the range literature values for carbon paper. The model predicts that reducing the number of parallel channels by 50 % will substantially improve the uniformity of the flow in the porous graphite layer, while maintaining an acceptable pressure drop across the electrolyzer. When the size of the electrolyzer is doubled from 2.75 inches square to 5.5 inches square, the same number of channels as in the current design will be adequate, but it is advisable to increase the channel cross-sectional flow area. This is due to the increased length of the channels.

Shadday, M

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Effects of confining pressure, pore pressure and temperature on absolute permeability. SUPRI TR-27  

SciTech Connect

This study investigates absolute permeability of consolidated sandstone and unconsolidated sand cores to distilled water as a function of the confining pressure on the core, the pore pressure of the flowing fluid and the temperature of the system. Since permeability measurements are usually made in the laboratory under conditions very different from those in the reservoir, it is important to know the effect of various parameters on the measured value of permeability. All studies on the effect of confining pressure on absolute permeability have found that when the confining pressure is increased, the permeability is reduced. The studies on the effect of temperature have shown much less consistency. This work contradicts the past Stanford studies by finding no effect of temperature on the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand or sandstones to distilled water. The probable causes of the past errors are discussed. It has been found that inaccurate measurement of temperature at ambient conditions and non-equilibrium of temperature in the core can lead to a fictitious permeability reduction with temperature increase. The results of this study on the effect of confining pressure and pore pressure support the theory that as confining pressure is increased or pore pressure decreased, the permeability is reduced. The effects of confining pressure and pore pressure changes on absolute permeability are given explicitly so that measurements made under one set of confining pressure/pore pressure conditions in the laboratory can be extrapolated to conditions more representative of the reservoir.

Gobran, B.D.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.; Brigham, W.E.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

HDR reservoir flow impedance and potentials for impedance reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data from flow tests which employed two different production zones in a well at Fenton Hill indicates the flow impedance of a wellbore zone damaged by rapid depressurization was altered, possibly by pressure spallation, which appears to have mechanically propped the joint apertures of outlet flow paths intersecting the altered wellbore. The rapid depressurization and subsequent flow test data derived from the damaged well has led to the hypothesis that pressure spallation and the resultant mechanical propping of outlet flow paths reduced the outlet flow impedance of the damaged wellbore. Furthermore, transient pressure data shows the largest pressure drop between the injection and production wellheads occurs near the production wellbore, so lowering the outlet impedance by increasing the apertures of outlet flow paths will have the greatest effect on reducing the overall reservoir impedance. Fenton Hill data also reveals that increasing the overall reservoir pressure dilates the apertures of flow paths, which likewise serves to reduce the reservoir impedance. Data suggests that either pressure dilating the wellbore connected joints with high production wellhead pressure, or mechanically propping open the outlet flow paths will increase the near-wellbore permeability. Finally, a new method for calculating and comparing near-wellbore outlet impedances has been developed. Further modeling, experimentation, and engineered reservoir modifications, such as pressure dilation and mechanical propping, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the productivity of HDR reservoirs.

DuTeau, R.; Brown, D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

HDR reservoir flow impedance and potentials for impedance reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data from flow tests which employed two different production zones in a well at Fenton Hill indicates the flow impedance of a wellbore zone damaged by rapid depressurization was altered, possibly by pressure spallation, which appears to have mechanically propped the joint apertures of outlet flow paths intersecting the altered wellbore. The rapid depressurization and subsequent flow test data derived from the damaged well has led to the hypothesis that pressure spallation and the resultant mechanical propping of outlet flow paths reduced the outlet flow impedance of the damaged wellbore. Furthermore, transient pressure data shows the largest pressure drop between the injection and production wellheads occurs near the production wellbore, so lowering the outlet impedance by increasing the apertures of outlet flow paths will have the greatest effect on reducing the overall reservoir impedance. Fenton Hill data also reveals that increasing the overall reservoir pressure dilates the apertures of flow paths, which likewise serves to reduce the reservoir impedance. Data suggests that either pressure dilating the wellbore connected joints with high production wellhead pressure, or mechanically propping open the outlet flow paths will increase the near-wellbore permeability. Finally, a new method for calculating and comparing near-wellbore outlet impedances has been developed. Further modeling, experimentation, and engineered reservoir modifications, such as pressure dilation and mechanical propping, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the productivity of HDR reservoirs.

DuTeau, R.; Brown, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Fluid flow monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

158

The Michigan Prandtl System: An Instrument for Accurate Pressure Measurements in Convective Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a Prandtl tube system developed at the University of Michigan to measure the static pressure, the total (or stagnation) pressure, and the velocity in flows whose direction and intensity change rapidly. The ever-changing wind ...

Douglas G. Halleaux; Jeffery M. Sussman; Nilton O. Rennó

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Reactor pressure vessel vented head  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A head for closing a nuclear reactor pressure vessel shell includes an arcuate dome having an integral head flange which includes a mating surface for sealingly mating with the shell upon assembly therewith. The head flange includes an internal passage extending therethrough with a first port being disposed on the head mating surface. A vent line includes a proximal end disposed in flow communication with the head internal passage, and a distal end disposed in flow communication with the inside of the dome for channeling a fluid therethrough. The vent line is fixedly joined to the dome and is carried therewith when the head is assembled to and disassembled from the shell. 6 figures.

Sawabe, J.K.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

160

Electokinetic high pressure hydraulic system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact high pressure hydraulic system having no moving parts for converting electric potential to hydraulic force and for manipulating fluids. Electro-osmotic flow is used to provide a valve and means to compress a fluid or gas in a capillary-based system. By electro-osmotically moving an electrolyte between a first position opening communication between a fluid inlet and outlet and a second position closing communication between the fluid inlet and outlet the system can be configured as a valve. The system can also be used to generate forces as large as 2500 psi that can be used to compress a fluid, either a liquid or a gas.

Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Rakestraw, David J. (Fremont, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Reconstruction of Pressure Profile Evolution during  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of plasma current and plasma pressure profiles from external measurements of the equilibrium magnetic field currents, eddy currents flowing in the vacuum vessel, constant magnetic flux linking the superconductor, and new flux loops located near the hot plasma in order to closely couple to plasma current and dipole

162

Method and apparatus for determining quality and mass flow rate of flowing steam  

SciTech Connect

An apparatus is described for determining the quality and the two-phase mass flow rate of steam containing both liquid and vapor components and flowing in an orifice-containing steam line. The apparatus consists of: steam sampling means for drawing off through an orifice-containing sample conduit from the steam line a sample of the steam having substantially the same quality as the line steam, means for measuring the temperature in the sample conduit, means for measuring the static pressure in the sample conduit, means for measuring the differential pressure across the sample conduit orifice, means connected to the sample conduit for measuring the two-phase mass flow rate of the drawn off sample of steam, such that the sample steam quality may be determined by means of an equation relating the measured sample conduit temperature, static pressure, differential pressure, and two-phase mass flow rate, the determined sample steam quality being substantially the same as the desired line steam quality, means for measuring the temperature in the steam line, means for measuring the static pressure in the steam line, and means for measuring the differential pressure across the steam line orifice, such that the line steam two-phase mass flow rate may be determined by means of an equation relating the measured steam line temperature, static pressure, and differential pressure, and the line steam quality which is substantially the same as the determined sample steam quality.

Huang, W.-S.; Mims, D.S.; Allen, R.S.

1986-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

PressurePressure Indiana Coal Characteristics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TimeTime PressurePressure · Indiana Coal Characteristics · Indiana Coals for Coke · CoalTransportation in Indiana · Coal Slurry Ponds Evaluation · Site Selection for Coal Gasification · Coal-To-Liquids Study, CTL · Indiana Coal Forecasting · Under-Ground Coal Gasification · Benefits of Oxyfuel Combustion · Economic

Fernández-Juricic, Esteban

164

flow_loop.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLOW ASSURANCE TEST LOOP FLOW ASSURANCE TEST LOOP Objective O ver a decade ago, RMOTC began cooperatively building a full-scale facility to test new fl ow assurance technology, mainly in the areas of hydrates and paraffi ns. Today, RMOTC's test facility consists of fi ve individual loop sections, including chilling and heated pipe-in-pipe water sections, bare lines, and a mixing section. The facility was designed to represent typical deepwater production systems in order to simulate full-scale tests and apply the results to fl ow assurance fi eld applications and technology. The current facility design consists of a 6" x 3,600 maximum allowable operating pressure test pipeline in fi ve separate loops. The test loops begin and ter- minate at a central location just north

165

Method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow. [PWR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for monitoring two-phase flow is provided that is particularly related to the monitoring of transient two-phase (liquid-vapor) flow rates such as may occur during a pressurized water reactor core blow-down. The present invention essentially comprises the use of flanged wire screens or similar devices, such as perforated plates, to produce certain desirable effects in the flow regime for monitoring purposes. One desirable effect is a measurable and reproducible pressure drop across the screen. The pressure drop can be characterized for various known flow rates and then used to monitor nonhomogeneous flow regimes. Another useful effect of the use of screens or plates in nonhomogeneous flow is that such apparatus tends to create a uniformly dispersed flow regime in the immediate downstream vicinity. This is a desirable effect because it usually increases the accuracy of flow rate measurements determined by conventional methods.

Sheppard, J.D.; Tong, L.S.

1975-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Atomic Layer Deposition of Al2O3 and ZnO at Atmospheric Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... a unique flow tube ALD reactor that operates at pressures between ~1 and 760 Torr. .... Scaling Theory of Continuum Dislocation Dynamics in Two and Three ...

167

Pressure transient analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New ideas are presented for the interpretation of pressure transient tests for wells in naturally fractured reservoirs. This work is based on the transient matrix flow model formulated by de Swaan. The differences between this model and the Warren and Root model occur during the transition flow period. It is demonstrated that the behavior of a naturally fractured reservoir can be correlated by using three dimensionless parameters. It is established that regardless of matrix geometry the transition period might exhibit a straight line whose slope is equal to half the slope of the classical parallel semilog straight lines, provided the transient matrix linear flow is present. In addition, information is provided on the estimation of fracture area per unit matrix volume or matrix parameters from the transition period semilog straight line. It is shown that matrix geometry might be identified when pressure data are smooth. Field examples are included to illustrate the application and the validity of the theoretical results of this study.

Cinco-ley, H.; Samaniego, F.V.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Absolute permeability as a function of confining pressure, pore pressure, and temperature  

SciTech Connect

This is an investigation of the absolute permeability of unconsolidated sand and consolidated sandstone cores to distilled water as a function of the temperature of the system, confining pressure on the core, and the pore pressure of the flowing fluid. The effects of flow rate and throughput are also discussed. In contrast to some previous investigations, no effect of temperature on permeability was found beyond experimental errors and effects caused by volumetric throughput. The probable causes of differing results in previous studies are also presented.

Gobran, B.D.; Brigham, W.E.; Ramey, H.J. Jr.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalystes to Poisons form High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Janet ChakkamadathilMohandas; Wilson Shafer

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

171

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The successful adaptation of conventional cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis catalysts for use in converting biomass-derived syngas hinges in part on understanding their susceptibility to byproducts produced during the biomass gasification process. With the possibility that oil production will peak in the near future, and due to concerns in maintaining energy security, the conversion of biomass-derived syngas and syngas derived from coal/biomass blends to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products to liquid fuels may provide a sustainable path forward, especially considering if carbon sequestration can be successfully demonstrated. However, one current drawback is that it is unknown whether conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt will be suitable without proper development because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using an entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier) than solely from coal, other byproducts may be present in higher concentrations. The current project examines the impact of a number of potential byproducts of concern from the gasification of biomass process, including compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the second year, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities.

Burtron Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Khalid Azzam; Dennis Sparks; Wilson Shafer

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

172

PRESSURE WELDING--BIBLIOGRAPHY  

SciTech Connect

A bibliography containing 117 references from the years 1944 to 1961 on pressure welding is presented. (N.W.R.)

1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Lubricants under high local pressure: Liquids act like solids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

it is confined between two walls at large normal pressures. The atomic scale motion that occurs when the two, atomic- scale details of the plastic flow mechanism are investigated by means of molecular dynamics- city v over a broad velocity range. Under non-extreme condi- tions (intermediate pressures

Müser, Martin H.

174

Measurement of Tidal Form Drag Using Seafloor Pressure Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As currents flow over rough topography, the pressure difference between the up- and downstream sides results in form drag—a force that opposes the flow. Measuring form drag is valuable because it can be used to estimate the loss of energy from ...

Sally J. Warner; Parker MacCready; James N. Moum; Jonathan D. Nash

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

FLOW GATING  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

BS>This invention is a fast gating system for eiectronic flipflop circuits. Diodes connect the output of one circuit to the input of another, and the voltage supply for the receiving flip-flop has two alternate levels. When the supply is at its upper level, no current can flow through the diodes, but when the supply is at its lower level, current can flow to set the receiving flip- flop to the same state as that of the circuit to which it is connected. (AEC)

Poppelbaum, W.J.

1962-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Flow Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... extends from 0.125 m 3 /s (7.5 x 10 3 L/min or 1.6 x 10 4 acfh) to 9 m 3 /s (2.7 x 10 5 L/min or 5.7 x 10 5 acfh) at a nominal pipeline pressure of 7 ...

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

177

High Rate Plasticity under Pressure using a Windowed Pressure-Shear Impact Experiment  

SciTech Connect

An experimental technique has been developed to study the strength of materials under conditions of moderate pressures and high shear strain rates. The technique is similar to the traditional pressure-shear plate-impact experiments except that window interferometry is used to measure both the normal and transverse particle velocities at a sample-window interface. Experimental and simulation results on vanadium samples backed with a sapphire window show the utility of the technique to measure the flow strength under dynamic loading conditions. The results show that the strength of the vanadium is 600 MPa at a pressure of 4.5 GPa and a plastic strain of 1.7%.

Florando, J N; Jiao, T; Grunschel, S E; Clifton, R J; Ferranti, L; Becker, R C; Minich, R W; Bazan, G

2009-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Sensitivity of Fischer-Tropsch Synthesis and Water-Gas Shift Catalysts to Poisons from High-Temperature High-Pressure Entrained-Flow (EF) Oxygen-Blown Gasifier Gasification of Coal/Biomass Mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There has been a recent shift in interest in converting not only natural gas and coal derived syngas to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis products, but also converting biomass-derived syngas, as well as syngas derived from coal and biomass mixtures. As such, conventional catalysts based on iron and cobalt may not be suitable without proper development. This is because, while ash, sulfur compounds, traces of metals, halide compounds, and nitrogen-containing chemicals will likely be lower in concentration in syngas derived from mixtures of coal and biomass (i.e., using entrained-flow oxygen-blown gasifier gasification gasification) than solely from coal, other compounds may actually be increased. Of particular concern are compounds containing alkali chemicals like the chlorides of sodium and potassium. In the first year, University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) researchers completed a number of tasks aimed at evaluating the sensitivity of cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts and a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to alkali halides. This included the preparation of large batches of 0.5%Pt-25%Co/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 100Fe: 5.1Si: 3.0K: 2.0Cu (high alpha) catalysts that were split up among the four different entities participating in the overall project; the testing of the catalysts under clean FT and WGS conditions; the testing of the Fe-Cr WGS catalyst under conditions of co-feeding NaCl and KCl; and the construction and start-up of the continuously stirred tank reactors (CSTRs) for poisoning investigations. In the second and third years, researchers from the University of Kentucky Center for Applied Energy Research (UK-CAER) continued the project by evaluating the sensitivity of a commercial iron-chromia high temperature water-gas shift catalyst (WGS) to a number of different compounds, including KHCO{sub 3}, NaHCO{sub 3}, HCl, HBr, HF, H{sub 2}S, NH{sub 3}, and a combination of H{sub 2}S and NH{sub 3}. Cobalt and iron-based Fischer-Tropsch synthesis (FT) catalysts were also subjected to a number of the same compounds in order to evaluate their sensitivities at different concentration levels of added contaminant.

Burton Davis; Gary Jacobs; Wenping Ma; Dennis Sparks; Khalid Azzam; Janet Chakkamadathil Mohandas; Wilson Shafer; Venkat Ramana Rao Pendyala

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

Heuristic optimality criterion algorithm for shape design of fluid flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a heuristic optimality criterion algorithm for shape design of fluid flow. In this algorithm, the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM) is utilized to calculate the flow field of a fluid domain which is divided into elemental cells. A heuristic ... Keywords: Fluid flow, Heuristic optimality criterion, Lattice Boltzmann method, Pressure drop, Shape design

Limin Wang; Yilin Fan; Lingai Luo

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS) NIST Special Publication of Standards and Technology #12;i Table of Contents for the Natural Gas Flowmeter Calibration Service (NGFCS;1 Abstract This document describes NIST's high pressure natural gas flow calibration service (NGFCS). Flow

Magee, Joseph W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Pressure reducing regulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

1995-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

182

Flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Faraday cage enclosing the flow chamber of a cytometer and ground planes associated with each field deflection plate in concert therewith inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates and increases forces applied to a charged event passing therethrough for accurate focus thereof while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard.

van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Faraday cage is described which encloses the flow chamber of a cytometer. Ground planes associated with each field deflection plate inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates. They also increase forces applied to a passing charged event for accurate focus while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard. 4 figs.

Van den Engh, G.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

184

Update on the Long-Term Flow Testing Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Preliminary flow and pressure testing of the Phase II Hot Dry Rock (HDR) reservoir at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, as part of the preparations for the initial 90-day segment of the Long-Term Flow Test, has revealed several significant features concerning the hydraulic behavior of this reservoir as a function of injection and production pressure levels. Of most significance to the future operation of HDR power plants is the influence of elevated production backpressure on the effective reservoir flow impedance (i.e., the difference between injection and production pressures, divided by the production flow rate). It has been found that the effective flow impedance at high backpressure is significantly lower than the corresponding impedance at low backpressure. At an injection pressure of 3700 psi and a back-pressure of 2210 psi, the effective flow impedance for the present reservoir is 20 psi/gpm--less than 40% of the effective flow impedance for similar injection conditions, but at low backpressure (about 170 psi). Recently, a 10-day reservoir flow test was conducted at a somewhat lower backpressure of 1500 psi, and at a slightly higher injection pressure of 3750 psi. At these new conditions, there was an increase in the effective reservoir flow impedance to 23.6 psi/gpm, but also a significant increase in the production flow rate and temperature--from 74 gpm to 95 gpm, and from 154 C to 180 C. The net reservoir water loss rate averaged over the last 5 days of this latest flow test was 7.3 gpm, which corresponds to a net recovery of 93% of the injected water--a very significant result that has been obtained from our preliminary reservoir flow testing. Under both of these high backpressure flow conditions, the reservoir was not extending, as evidenced by a very low rate of water loss and the absence of microseismic activity.

Brown, Donald W.

1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hydrostatic Pressure Retainment.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??There is a great deal of attention being concentrated on reducing the weight of pressure vessels and fuel/oxidizer tanks (tankage) by 10% to 20%. Most… (more)

Setlock, Robert J., Jr.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Experiment DTA report for semiscale transparent vessel countercurrent flow tests  

SciTech Connect

Steady state air-water tests were performed as part of the Semiscale Blowdown and Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) Project to investigate downcomer countercurrent flow and downcomer bypass flow phenomena. These tests were performed in a plexiglass representation of the Semiscale pressure vessel which allowed changes to be madein the geometry of the upper annulus and downcomer for the purpose of investigating the sensitivity of downcomer and bypass flow to changes in system geometry. Tests were also performed to investigate the effects of two-phase inlet flows and different initial system pressures on countercurrent and bypass flow. Results for each test are presented in the form of computer printout of the measurements and of a summary of the pertinent calculated flow rates, pressures, and dimensionless volumetric fluxes. Descriptions of the test facility, instrumentation, operating procedures, and test conditions are also presented. An error analysis is presented for selected volumetric flux calculations. 10 references. (auth)

Hanson, D.J.

1975-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Laboratory investigations of steam pressure-transient behavior in porous materials  

SciTech Connect

Transient flow of noncondensable gas in porous materials has been thoroughly investigated, and good agreement between the gas-flow equation and experiments has been reported in the petroleum-engineering literature. This theory has been widely used in computer simulations of pressure-transient behavior in vapor-dominated geothermal steam reservoirs. However, few laboratory experiments involving steam flow in porous materials have been reported. In order to test the applicability of the gas-flow theory to steam flow, they developed a laboratory system to investigate the transient flow of steam through unconsolidated porous materials. Pressure-transient experiments were carried out by imposing a step change in gas pressure at one end of a cylinder of porous material, and measuring the pressure as a function of time at the other end.

Herkelrath, W.N.; Moench, A.F.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

PRESSURE ACTIVATED SEALANT TECHNOLOGY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to develop new, efficient, cost effective methods of internally sealing natural gas pipeline leaks through the application of differential pressure activated sealants. In researching the current state of the art for gas pipeline sealing technologies we concluded that if the project was successful, it appeared that pressure activated sealant technology would provide a cost effective alternative to existing pipeline repair technology. From our analysis of current field data for a 13 year period from 1985 to 1997 we were able to identify 205 leaks that were candidates for pressure activated sealant technology, affirming that pressure activated sealant technology is a viable option to traditional external leak repairs. The data collected included types of defects, areas of defects, pipe sizes and materials, incident and operating pressures, ability of pipeline to be pigged and corrosion states. This data, and subsequent analysis, was utilized as a basis for constructing applicable sealant test modeling.

Michael A. Romano

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Multi-bottle, no compressor, mean pressure control system for a Stirling engine  

SciTech Connect

The invention relates to an apparatus for mean pressure control of a Stirling engine without the need for a compressor. The invention includes a multi-tank system in which there is at least one high pressure level tank and one low pressure level tank wherein gas flows through a maximum pressure and supply line from the engine to the high pressure tank when a first valve is opened until the maximum pressure of the engine drops below that of the high pressure tank opening an inlet regulator to permit gas flow from the engine to the low pressure tank. When gas flows toward the engine it flows through the minimum pressure supply line 2 when a second valve is opened from the low pressure tank until the tank reaches the engine's minimum pressure level at which time the outlet regulator opens permitting gas to be supplied from the high pressure tank to the engine. Check valves between the two tanks prevent any backflow of gas from occurring.

Corey, John A. (Melrose, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Multi-bottle, no compressor, mean pressure control system for a Stirling engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to an apparatus for mean pressure control of a Stirling engine without the need for a compressor. The invention includes a multi-tank system in which there is at least one high pressure level tank and one low pressure level tank wherein gas flows through a maximum pressure and supply line from the engine to the high pressure tank when a first valve is opened until the maximum pressure of the engine drops below that of the high pressure tank opening an inlet regulator to permit gas flow from the engine to the low pressure tank. When gas flows toward the engine it flows through the minimum pressure supply line 2 when a second valve is opened from the low pressure tank until the tank reaches the engine's minimum pressure level at which time the outlet regulator opens permitting gas to be supplied from the high pressure tank to the engine. Check valves between the two tanks prevent any backflow of gas from occurring.

Corey, John A. (Melrose, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Design and fabrication of a MEMS-array pressure sensor system for passive underwater navigation inspired by the lateral line  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An object within a fluid flow generates local pressure variations that are unique and characteristic to the object's shape and size. For example, a three-dimensional object or a wall-like obstacle obstructs flow and creates ...

Hou, Stephen Ming-Chang, 1981-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Flow simulation in industrial cyclone separator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The problem of ash settling on super-heater tube bank, due to improper velocity distribution, in the cyclone separator used at Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (CFBC) has been investigated by means of computational fluid dynamic techniques. With ... Keywords: CAD model, CFD - finite volume technique, Circulating fluidized bed combustion, Flow recirculation - geometry modification, Particle Trajectories, Partition plates, Pressure based algorithms, Pressure drop, Recycle cyclone collector, Structured multi-block grids

C. Bhasker

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Rotationally Augmented Flow Structures and Time Varying Loads on Turbine Blades: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To better understand wind turbine flow physics, time dependent blade surface pressure data were acquired from the NREL Unsteady Aerodynamics Experiment.

Schreck, S. J.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Columbia University flow instability experimental program: Volume 3. Single tube parallel flow tests  

SciTech Connect

The coolant in the Savannah River Site (SRS) production nuclear reactor assemblies is circulated as a subcooled liquid under normal operating conditions. This coolant is evenly distributed throughout multiple annular flow channels with a uniform pressure profile across each coolant flow channel. During the postulated Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA), which is initiated by a hypothetical guillotine pipe break, the coolant flow through the reactor assemblies is significantly reduced. The flow reduction and accompanying power reduction (after shutdown is initiated) occur in the first 1--2 seconds of the LOCA. This portion of the LOCA is referred to as the Flow Instability phase. A series of down flow experiments have been conducted on three different size single tubes. The objective of these experiments was to determine the effect of a parallel flow path on the occurrence of flow instability. In all cases, it has been shown that the point of flow instability (OFI) determined under controlled flow operation does not change when operating in a controlled pressure drop mode (parallel path operation).

Dougherty, T.; Maciuca, C.; McAssey, E.V. Jr.; Reddy, D.G.; Yang, B.W.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

High Temperature Electrolysis Pressurized Experiment Design, Operation, and Results  

SciTech Connect

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate planar cells with dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. It is also suitable for testing other cell and stack geometries including tubular cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. Pressurized operation of a ten-cell internally manifolded solid oxide electrolysis stack has been successfully demonstrated up 1.5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this report. Results of initial testing showed the expected increase in open-cell voltage associated with elevated pressure. However, stack performance in terms of area-specific resistance was enhanced at elevated pressure due to better gas diffusion through the porous electrodes of the cells. Some issues such as cracked cells and seals were encountered during testing. Full resolution of these issues will require additional testing to identify the optimum test configurations and protocols.

J.E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G.K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Underbalanced perforation characteristics as affected by differential pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Underbalanced, tubing-conveyed completions are increasing because of the apparent advantages of cleaner perforations, reduced completion times, and stimulation treatments. Radial-flow Berea sandstone core specimens are used to determine the perforation characteristics resulting from time-dependent pressure differentials between core pressure and wellbore pressure during the completion process. The primary perforation characteristic studied (radial flow ratio (RFR)) is defined as the ratio of the perforated flow rate to the flow rate of the unperforated core. The perforation flow tests included pressure differentials from 500 psi (3450 kPa) overbalanced to 1,000 psi (6900 kPa) underbalanced, with immediate or delayed surging. The RFR was affected most by the 500-psi and 1,000-psi (3450- and 6900-kPa) underbalance. The surged RFR's were from 50 to 58% greater than the no-surge RFR's. Perforation hole volumes were increased as much as 55% by the surge, indicating some elimination of the compacted, damaged-zone material. Underbalanced surge conditions (1,000 psi (6900 kPa)) increased hole volume to four times that resulting from 500 psi (3450 kPa) overbalanced, no-surge conditions. Underbalanced surging, either at the instant of perforation or subsequently, appears to improve the flow characteristics of shaped-charge perforations by simultaneously reducing the thickness of the low-permeability crushed zone and increasing the perforation surface area.

Regalbuto, J.A.; Riggs, R.S.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

JAERI instrumented spool piece performance in two-phase flow  

SciTech Connect

Instrumented spool pieces to be installed in horizontal piping on the Cylindrical Core Test Facility (CCTF) at the Japanese Atomic Energy Institute (JAERI) have been designed and tested. The instrumented spool pieces will provide measurements from which mass flow rates can be computed. The primary instruments included in the spool pieces are a full-flow turbine, a full-flow perforated drag plate, and a low energy three-beam photon densitometer. Secondary instruments are provided to measured absolute pressure, fluid temperature, and differential pressure across the full-flow perforated drag plate.

Colson, J.B.; Gilbert, J.V.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Pressure Perturbations and Upslope Flow over a Heated, Isolated Mountain  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Surface and upper-air data, collected as part of the Cumulus Photogrammetric, In Situ, and Doppler Observations (CuPIDO) experiment during the 2006 monsoon season around the Santa Catalina Mountains in southeast Arizona, are used to study the ...

Bart Geerts; Qun Miao; J. Cory Demko

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Nuclear Feedwater Flow Measurement Applications Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the technologies available to measure the feedwater mass flow rate in nuclear power plants. Differential pressure meters, three types of ultrasonic flow meters (UFMs) (external transit time, chordal transit time, and cross-correlation), and tracer tests are discussed. For each technology, the report describes operating principles, installation, maintenance requirements, measurement errors, uncertainties, and the results of an industry survey.

1999-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

200

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90[degree] intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure. 10 figures.

Baker, T.H.; Ott, H.L.

1994-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Pressurizer tank upper support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurizer tank in a pressurized water nuclear reactor is mounted between structural walls of the reactor on a substructure of the reactor, the tank extending upwardly from the substructure. For bearing lateral loads such as seismic shocks, a girder substantially encircles the pressurizer tank at a space above the substructure and is coupled to the structural walls via opposed sway struts. Each sway strut is attached at one end to the girder and at an opposite end to one of the structural walls, and the sway struts are oriented substantially horizontally in pairs aligned substantially along tangents to the wall of the circular tank. Preferably, eight sway struts attach to the girder at 90.degree. intervals. A compartment encloses the pressurizer tank and forms the structural wall. The sway struts attach to corners of the compartment for maximum stiffness and load bearing capacity. A valve support frame carrying the relief/discharge piping and valves of an automatic depressurization arrangement is fixed to the girder, whereby lateral loads on the relief/discharge piping are coupled directly to the compartment rather than through any portion of the pressurizer tank. Thermal insulation for the valve support frame prevents thermal loading of the piping and valves. The girder is shimmed to define a gap for reducing thermal transfer, and the girder is free to move vertically relative to the compartment walls, for accommodating dimensional variation of the pressurizer tank with changes in temperature and pressure.

Baker, Tod H. (O' Hara Township, Allegheny County, PA); Ott, Howard L. (Kiski Township, Armstrong County, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Six Well Flow Test Six Well Flow Test Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Dixie Valley Six Well Flow Test Abstract A six well flow test was conducted during 1986 at the Dixie Valley geothermal field. Flow duration lasted from 40 to 74 days with a maximum rate of 5.9 million pounds/hour. During the test, downhole pressures were monitored in eight surrounding wells. Downhole pressure and temperature surveys were run in each of the flowing wells,usually in conjunction with productivity tests. Results from the flow test and earlier interference tests indicate that six wells are capable of providing in excess of the 4.5 million pounds/hour required for a 62 mw (gross) power plant. Author William L. Desormier Published Journal Geothermal Resources Council, TRANSACTIONS, 1987

203

ARM - Measurement - Atmospheric pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

pressure pressure ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Atmospheric pressure The pressure exerted by the atmosphere as a consequence of gravitational attraction exerted upon the "column" of air lying directly above the point in question. Categories Atmospheric State Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments SONDE : Balloon-Borne Sounding System CO2FLX : Carbon Dioxide Flux Measurement Systems ECOR : Eddy Correlation Flux Measurement System

204

Giraffe blood pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thing that happens to you when you raise or lower your head. The arteries serving your heart (carotids) constrict when you lower your head, and that lowers the blood pressure...

205

Capacitance pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Critical CRBR core pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

Ju, F.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Transient Steam Flow in Porous Media - Theory and Experiment  

SciTech Connect

The adsorption of steam in porous media, leading to a delay in steam pressure breakthrough, has been incorporated into a revised model of steam flow in a porous medium.

Herkelrath, W.N.; Moench, A.F.

1980-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

208

Baroclinic Abyssal Flow in the Presence of a Peninsula  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of abyssal, subthermocline flow is presented for a basin in which a peninsula intrudes into the basin. The effect of the peninsula is to provide two “eastern” boundaries for the total basin. The latitude-independent baroclinic pressure ...

Joseph Pedlosky

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

On Long-Term Net Flow over Great Bahama Bank  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 398-day time series of middepth current measurements is combined with available wind and bottom pressure measurements and historical salinity data to characterize long-term net flow patterns over Great Bahama Bank between the Tongue of the ...

Ned P. Smith

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Do Breaking Mountain Waves Deceierate the Local Mean Flow?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are examined in order to determine the local mean flow response to the generation, propagation, and breakdown of two-dimensional mountain waves. Realistic and idealized cases are considered, and in all instances the pressure ...

Dale R. Durran

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Pressure multiplying dispenser  

SciTech Connect

A pressure multiplying dispenser for delivering fluid, preferably as a spray to the atmosphere, from a source of fluid, preferably a spray bottle, is described. The dispenser includes in combination a hollow cylindrical member, a nozzle delivery tube within the cylindrical member and a hollow actuator piston slideable within the cylindrical member which acts to multiply the pressure of a squeeze applied to the spray bottle.

DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA); Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

ECN Pressure Test  

SciTech Connect

This note describes: the rationale for the test pressure of the inner ECN cryostat vessel, the equipment to be used in this test, the test procedure, the status of the vessel prior to the test, the actual test results, and a schematic diagram of the testing set up and the pressure testing permit. The test, performed in the evening of July 17, 1991, was a major success. Based on a neglible pressure drop indicated on the pressure gages (1/4 psi), the vessel appeared to be structurally sound throughout the duration of the test (approx. 1.5 hrs.). No pressure increases were observed on the indicators looking at the beam tube bellows volumes. There was no indication of bubbles form the soap test on the welds and most of the fittings that were checked. There were some slight deviations in the actual procedure used. The UO filter was removed after the vessel had bled down to about 18 psig in order to speed up that aspect of the test. The rationale was that the higher velocity gas had already passed through at the higher pressures and there was no visible traces of the black uo particles. The rate of 4 psi/10 minutes seemed incredibly slow and often that time was reduced to just over half that rate. The testing personnel was allowed to stay in the pit throughout the duration of the test; this was a slight relaxation of the rules.

Dixon, K.; /Fermilab

1991-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

213

Ionization based multi-directional flow sensor  

SciTech Connect

A method, system, and apparatus for conducting real-time monitoring of flow (airflow for example) in a system (a hybrid power generation system for example) is disclosed. The method, system and apparatus measure at least flow direction and velocity with minimal pressure drop and fast response. The apparatus comprises an ion source and a multi-directional collection device proximate the ion source. The ion source is configured to generate charged species (electrons and ions for example). The multi-directional collection source is configured to determine the direction and velocity of the flow in real-time.

Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Casleton, Kent H. (Morgantown, WV)

2009-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

214

Pressure balance at the magnetopause: Experimental studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pressure balance at the magnetopause is formed by magnetic field and plasma in the magnetosheath, on one side, and inside the magnetosphere, on the other side. In the approach of dipole earth's magnetic field configuration and gas-dynamics solar wind flowing around the magnetosphere, the pressure balance predicts that the magnetopause distance R depends on solar wind dynamic pressure Pd as a power low R ~ Pd^alpha, where the exponent alpha=-1/6. In the real magnetosphere the magnetic filed is contributed by additional sources: Chapman-Ferraro current system, field-aligned currents, tail current, and storm-time ring current. Net contribution of those sources depends on particular magnetospheric region and varies with solar wind conditions and geomagnetic activity. As a result, the parameters of pressure balance, including power index alpha, depend on both the local position at the magnetopause and geomagnetic activity. In addition, the pressure balance can be affected by a non-linear transfer of the solar ...

Suvorova, A V

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Dual pressure-dual temperature isotope exchange process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid and a gas stream, each containing a desired isotope, flow countercurrently through two liquid-gas contacting towers maintained at different temperatures and pressures. The liquid is enriched in the isotope in one tower while the gas is enriched within the other and a portion of at least one of the enriched streams is withdrawn from the system for use or further enrichment. The tower operated at the lower temperature is also maintained at the lower pressure to prevent formation of solid solvates. Gas flow between the towers passes through an expander-compressor apparatas to recover work from the expansion of gas to the lower pressure and thereby compress the gas returning to the tower of higher pressure. (Official Gazette)

Babcock, D.F.

1974-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

216

Controlled differential pressure system for an enhanced fluid blending apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for producing a controlled blend of two or more fluids. Thermally-induced permeation through a permeable tube is used to mix a first fluid from outside the tube with a second fluid flowing through the tube. Mixture ratios may be controlled by adjusting the temperature of the first fluid or by adjusting the pressure drop through the permeable tube. The combination of a back pressure control valve and a differential regulator is used to control the output pressure of the blended fluid. The combination of the back pressure control valve and differential regulator provides superior flow control of the second dry gas. A valve manifold system may be used to mix multiple fluids, and to adjust the volume of blended fluid produced, and to further modify the mixture ratio.

Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN)

2009-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

217

Pressurized reactor system and a method of operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for operating a pressurized reactor system in order to precisely control the temperature within a pressure vessel in order to minimize condensation of corrosive materials from gases on the surfaces of the pressure vessel or contained circulating fluidized bed reactor, and to prevent the temperature of the components from reaching a detrimentally high level, while at the same time allowing quick heating of the pressure vessel interior volume during start-up. Superatmospheric pressure gas is introduced from the first conduit into the fluidized bed reactor and heat derived reactions such as combustion and gassification are maintained in the reactor. Gas is exhausted from the reactor and pressure vessel through a second conduit. Gas is circulated from one part of the inside volume to another to control the temperature of the inside volume, such as by passing the gas through an exterior conduit which has a heat exchanger, control valve, blower and compressor associated therewith, or by causing natural convection flow of circulating gas within one or more generally vertically extending gas passages entirely within the pressure vessel (and containing heat exchangers, flow rate control valves, or the like therein). Preferably, inert gas is provided as a circulating gas, and the inert gas may also be used in emergency shut-down situations. In emergency shut-down reaction gas being supplied to the reactor is cut off, while inert gas from the interior gas volume of the pressure vessel is introduced into the reactor.

Isaksson, Juhani M. (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Pressurized reactor system and a method of operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are provided for operating a pressurized reactor system in order to precisely control the temperature within a pressure vessel in order to minimize condensation of corrosive materials from gases on the surfaces of the pressure vessel or contained circulating fluidized bed reactor, and to prevent the temperature of the components from reaching a detrimentally high level, while at the same time allowing quick heating of the pressure vessel interior volume during start-up. Super-atmospheric pressure gas is introduced from the first conduit into the fluidized bed reactor and heat derived reactions such as combustion and gasification are maintained in the reactor. Gas is exhausted from the reactor and pressure vessel through a second conduit. Gas is circulated from one part of the inside volume to another to control the temperature of the inside volume, such as by passing the gas through an exterior conduit which has a heat exchanger, control valve, blower and compressor associated therewith, or by causing natural convection flow of circulating gas within one or more generally vertically extending gas passages entirely within the pressure vessel (and containing heat exchangers, flow rate control valves, or the like therein). Preferably, inert gas is provided as a circulating gas, and the inert gas may also be used in emergency shut-down situations. In emergency shut-down reaction gas being supplied to the reactor is cut off, while inert gas from the interior gas volume of the pressure vessel is introduced into the reactor. 2 figs.

Isaksson, J.M.

1996-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

219

Pressure testing of a high temperature naturally fractured reservoir  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Los Alamos National Laboratory has conducted a number of pumping and flow-through tests at the Hot Dry Rock (HDR) test site at Fenton Hill, New Mexico. These tests consisted of injecting fresh water at controlled rates up to 12 BPM (32 l/s) and surface pressures up to 7000 psi (48 MPa) into the HDR formation at depths from 10,000 to 13,180 feet (3050 to 4000 m). The formation is a naturally fractured granite at temperatures of about 250/sup 0/C. The matrix porosity is <1% and permeability is on the order of 1 nD. Hence most of the injected fluid is believed to move through fractures. There has been no evidence of fracture breakdown phenomena, and hence it is believed that preexisting joints in the formation are opened by fluid injection. Water losses during pumping are significant, most likely resulting from flow into secondary fractures intersecting the main fluid conducting paths. The pressure-time response observed in these tests can be interpreted in terms of non-isothermal, fracture-dominated flow. As the fluid pressure increases from small values to those comparable to fracturing pressures, the formation response changes from linear fracture flow to the highly nonlinear situation where fracture lift-off occurs. A numerical heat and mass flow model was used to match the observed pressure response. Good matches were obtained for pressure buildup and shut-in data by assigning pressure dependent fracture and leak-off permeabilities. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Kelkar, S.M.; Zyvoloski, G.A.; Dash, Z.V.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Pressurized feed-injection spray-forming apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A spray apparatus and method for injecting a heated, pressurized liquid in a first predetermined direction into a pressurized gas flow that is flowing in a second predetermined direction, to provide for atomizing and admixing the liquid with the gas to form a two-phase mixture. A valve is also disposed within the injected liquid conduit to provide for a pulsed injection of the liquid and timed deposit of the atomized gas phase. Preferred embodiments include multiple liquid feed ports and reservoirs to provide for multiphase mixtures of metals, ceramics, and polymers.

Berry, Ray A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); McHugh, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Capillary toroid cavity detector for high pressure NMR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A Toroid Cavity Detector (TCD) is provided for implementing nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of chemical reactions under conditions of high pressures and temperatures. A toroid cavity contains an elongated central conductor extending within the toroid cavity. The toroid cavity and central conductor generate an RF magnetic field for NMR analysis. A flow-through capillary sample container is located within the toroid cavity adjacent to the central conductor to subject a sample material flowing through the capillary to a static magnetic field and to enable NMR spectra to be recorded of the material in the capillary under a temperature and high pressure environment.

Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Chen, Michael J. (Downers Grove, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Glenview, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Honer Glen, IL); ter Horst, Marc (Chapel Hill, NC)

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

222

New Way To Realize Pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ever since then, civilization has used the toxic liquid metal to measure pressure. ... The pressure and temperature of a gas are directly related to its ...

2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

223

Passive blast pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Downhole pressure, temperature and flowrate measurements in steam wells at the Geysers field  

SciTech Connect

Recently developed pressure-temperature-spinner (PTS) tools are used to collect reliable downhole measurements in geothermal systems, such as at The Geysers. PTS surveys in several flowing Geysers steam wells were used to quantify steam entry location and magnitude, wellbore heat loss, pressure drop due to friction, thermodynamic properties of the steam, and maximum rock temperature. Interwell cross flow/interference was identified in one well. Finally, a single-phase saturated steam wellbore model used to compare calculated to measured downhole values, was found to adequately predict the flowing pressure versus depth curves in vapor filled holes.

Enedy, Kathleen L.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pressure measurements in low permeability formations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the performance requirements and identifies candidate hardware implementations for pressure instrumentation that is needed to provide well test data in low permeability formations. Low permeability values are typically defined to be less than 1 microdarcy and are usually encountered in hard rock formations, such as granite, that are of interest in hot dry rock geothermal, deep exploration drilling, and fluid waste disposal. Groundwater flow in these tight formations has been shown to be dominated by flow-through fractures rather than through the formation's intrinsic permeability. In these cases, we cannot use Darcy's law or the usual dimensionless coefficients to estimate the expected scale factors and dynamic responses necessary to properly select and setup the wellbore pressure instrument. This paper shows that the expected instrument responses can be estimated using some recent work by Wang, Narasimhan, and Witherspoon. This paper further describes the minimum electronic capability that the downhole pressure instrument must have in order to provide the required measurement resolution, dynamic range, and transient response. Three specific hardware implementations are presented based on the following transducers: a quartz resonator, a capacitance gauge, and a resistance strain gauge.

Veneruso, A.F.; McConnell, T.D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

PRESSURE SENSING DEVICE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This device is primarily useful as a switch which is selectively operable to actuate in response to either absolute or differential predetermined pressures. The device generally comprises a pressure-tight housing divided by a movable impermeable diaphragm into two chambers, a reference pressure chamber and a bulb chamber containing the switching means and otherwise filled with an incompressible non-conducting fluid. The switch means comprises a normally collapsed bulb having an electrically conductive outer surface and a vent tube leading to the housing exterior. The normally collapsed bulb is disposed such that upon its inflation, respensive to air inflow from the vent, two contacts fixed within the bulb chamber are adapted to be electrically shorted by the conducting outer surface of the bulb.

Pope, K.E.

1959-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA); Townsend, Harold E. (San Jose, CA)

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pressure suppression containment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression containment system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The wetwell pool includes a plenum for receiving the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant-accident (LOCA). The wetwell plenum is vented to a plenum above the GDCS pool following the LOCA for suppressing pressure rise within the containment vessel. A method of operation includes channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the wetwell pool for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith. The GDCS pool is then drained by gravity, and the wetwell plenum is vented into the GDCS plenum for channeling the non-condensable gas thereto. 6 figures.

Gluntz, D.M.; Townsend, H.E.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Einstein's Gravity Under Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mysterious `dark energy' needed to explain the current observations, poses a serious confrontation between fundamental physics and cosmology. The present crisis may be an outcome of the (so far untested) prediction of the general theory of relativity that the pressure of the matter source also gravitates. In this view, a theoretical analysis reveals some surprising inconsistencies and paradoxes faced by the energy-stress tensor (in the presence of pressure) which is used to model the matter content of the universe, including dark energy.

Ram Gopal Vishwakarma

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

230

Wellbore pressure transducer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Subterranean earth formations containing energy values are subjected to hydraulic fracturing procedures to enhance the recovery of the energy values. These fractures are induced in the earth formation by pumping liquid into the wellbore penetrating the earth formation until the pressure of the liquid is sufficient to fracture the earth formation adjacent to the wellbore. The present invention is directed to a transducer which is positionable within the wellbore to generate a signal indicative of the fracture initiation useful for providing a timing signal to equipment for seismic mapping of the fracture as it occurs and for providing a measurement of the pressure at which the fracture is initiated.

Shuck, Lowell Z. (Morgantown, WV)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Capillary instability in models for three-phase flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard models for immiscible three-phase flow in porous media exhibit unusual behavior associated with loss of strict hyperbolicity. Anomalies were at one time thought to be confined to the region of nonhyperbolicity, where the purely convective form ... Keywords: capillary pressure instability, flow in porous media, nonunique Riemann solution

A. V. Azevedo; D. Marchesin; B. Plohr; K. Zumbrun

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Hydro-Pac Inc., A High Pressure Company  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydro-Pac Hydro-Pac Inc. A High Pressure Company * Founded in 1972 * Manufacturer of Hydraulically Driven Intensifiers * High Pressure Hydrogen Compressors Hydrogen Compressor Cost Reduction Topics * Standardize Configuration and Fueling Strategy * Simple Designs and Proven Technologies * Identify Economical Hydrogen Compatible Materials * Specify Well Ventilated Sites with Remote Controls Standardize Configuration and Fueling Strategy * Limit the number of compressors and stages * Narrow the range of supply and discharge pressures * Select a flow and standardize Simple Designs and Proven Technologies * Variable speed drives * Double ended intensifiers * Water cooled cylinders * Flexible operational envelopes * Stop and start under load . Material Research / Installation Requirements

233

High pressure drilling system triples ROPS, stymies bit wear  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent West Texas field tests of an experiental high-pressure drilling system have nearly tripled typical penetration rates in hard dolomite while putting virtually no visible wear on the bits, even those designed for much softer formations. With this drilling system, developed by FlowDril Corp. of Kent, Wash., and their joint-venture partner Grace Drilling Co., clarified drilling fluids (minimum solids) are pressurized to nearly 30,000 psi and directed to the bottom of the hole through a special nozzle attached to the drill bit. The action of this high pressure stream augments the bit's job, resulting in higher ROPs and decreased bit wear.

Killalea, M.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Pressure swing adsorption process  

SciTech Connect

An adiabatic pressure swing adsorption process is described for the separation of gas mixtures by adsorbing at least one gas component in each of at least 8 phase staggered operated adsorbent beds, which can continue to be operated without any stoppage of installation even if one adsorbent bed is removed from operation due to a defective valve. 6 claims.

De Meyer, H.; Doclo, R.; Seynaeve, J.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

235

Interpretation of underbalanced surge pressure data by rate-time convolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Well test analysis of pressure response data from either underbalanced perforating or backsurge perforation washing is accomplished by rate-time convolution. The presented method allows closed chamber test analysis of reservoir transmissivity and wellbore skin by a straight line graph analogous to a Horner plot. As a well test analysis method, the closed chamber test has the benefit of avoiding surface pressure buildup, which often prohibits conventional drill stem testing. Pressure measurement is required at the top of the surge air chamber and at the sand face. A linear plot is generated by convolution with respect to time of flowrate, which is derived from the air chamber pressure, and plotting the bottom hole pressure versus the rate-time superposition function. Transmissivity is obtained from the slope of the pressure data during the period when afterflow is minimal and pressure is not sensitive to skin. An estimate of initial reservoir pressure results from extrapolation of the pressure trend. Subsequent forced fitting of the flow period data to the expected linear plot of bottom-hole pressure versus the rate-time superposition function yields wellbore skin. Unique to the convolution method, wellbore skin may be calculated for each flowing pressure measurement. Therefore in addition to final skin determination, the effectiveness of the perforation cleaning mechanism may be observed by noting the trend of skin as a function of time during the flow period.

Simmons, J.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

HIGH PRESSURE COAL COMBUSTON KINETICS PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

As part of the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) initiative to improve the efficiency of coal-fired power plants and reduce the pollution generated by these facilities, DOE has funded the High-Pressure Coal Combustion Kinetics (HPCCK) Projects. A series of laboratory experiments were conducted on selected pulverized coals at elevated pressures with the specific goals to provide new data for pressurized coal combustion that will help extend to high pressure and validate models for burnout, pollutant formation, and generate samples of solid combustion products for analyses to fill crucial gaps in knowledge of char morphology and fly ash formation. Two series of high-pressure coal combustion experiments were performed using SRI's pressurized radiant coal flow reactor. The first series of tests characterized the near burner flame zone (NBFZ). Three coals were tested, two high volatile bituminous (Pittsburgh No.8 and Illinois No.6), and one sub-bituminous (Powder River Basin), at pressures of 1, 2, and 3 MPa (10, 20, and 30 atm). The second series of experiments, which covered high-pressure burnout (HPBO) conditions, utilized a range of substantially longer combustion residence times to produce char burnout levels from 50% to 100%. The same three coals were tested at 1, 2, and 3 MPa, as well as at 0.2 MPa. Tests were also conducted on Pittsburgh No.8 coal in CO2 entrainment gas at 0.2, 1, and 2 MPa to begin establishing a database of experiments relevant to carbon sequestration techniques. The HPBO test series included use of an impactor-type particle sampler to measure the particle size distribution of fly ash produced under complete burnout conditions. The collected data have been interpreted with the help of CFD and detailed kinetics simulation to extend and validate devolatilization, char combustion and pollutant model at elevated pressure. A global NOX production sub-model has been proposed. The submodel reproduces the performance of the detailed chemical reaction mechanism for the NBFZ tests.

Stefano Orsino

2005-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

flow_measurements_cryogenic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... A dynamic weighing system is used to measure ... using liquid nitrogen at flow rates of 1 ... For volumetric flow rate measurement, the uncertainty in fluid ...

2013-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

238

Multiphase Flow Modeling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Chris Guenther, Director Computational Science Division RUA Spring Meeting, Morgantown, WV March 2013 2 NETL's Multiphase Flow Science Team * The Multiphase Flow Science...

239

Physical effects in rock under negative effective pressures: sound speeds and hydraulic diffusivity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for creating negative effective pressure in the laboratory has been developed and longitudinal sound speed and gas diffusivity under these conditions have been measured. The pressure field is created inside an annulus of fluid injection holes in a cylindrical sample; fluid flows radially outward down the pore pressure gradient to the sample's exterior. Pore pressure is monitored through capillary probes and the pressure field is uniform inside the injection ring. With pore fluid pressures to 1.2 MPa, decreases in both acoustic velocity and amplitude in an unconfined sample of fine-grained granite are observed. The velocity decrease is about 1.5% per MPa while amplitude decreases by approximately 10% per MPa. By measuring pressure relaxation after stepwise pore pressure increases, increases in gas diffusivity of approximately a factor of three between 0 and -1 MPa effective pressure are determined.

Shankland, T.J.; Halleck, P.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper will address the following. 1. Factors that determine the feasibility of reducing the plant steam operating pressure. 2. The operating advantages and disadvantages associated with the decreased steam pressure. 3. The economics of steam pressure reduction. Appropriate visual aids will be utilized as part of the discussion.

Sylva, D. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock  

SciTech Connect

We present a fully coupled model of fluid flow in jointed rock, where the fluid flow depends on the joint openings and the joint openings depend on the fluid pressure. The joints and rock blocks are modeled discretely using the finite element method. Solutions for the fluid and rock are obtained and iteration is performed until both solutions converge. Example applications include an examination of the effects of back-pressure on flow in a geothermal reservoir and transient fluid injection into a reservoir.

Swenson, Daniel; Martineau, Rick; James, Mark; Brown, Don

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Apparatus for unloading pressurized fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for unloading fluid, preferably pressurized gas, from containers in a controlled manner that protects the immediate area from exposure to the container contents. The device consists of an unloading housing, which is enclosed within at least one protective structure, for receiving the dispensed contents of the steel container, and a laser light source, located external to the protective structure, for opening the steel container instantaneously. The neck or stem of the fluid container is placed within the sealed interior environment of the unloading housing. The laser light passes through both the protective structure and the unloading housing to instantaneously pierce a small hole within the stem of the container. Both the protective structure and the unloading housing are specially designed to allow laser light passage without compromising the light's energy level. Also, the unloading housing allows controlled flow of the gas once it has been dispensed from the container. The external light source permits remote operation of the unloading device. 2 figures.

Rehberger, K.M.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

243

Atmospheric pressure scanning transmission electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect

Scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) images of gold nanoparticles (2.1 nm average diameter) at atmospheric pressure have been recorded through a 0.36 mm thick mixture of CO, O2 and He. This was accomplished using a reaction cell consisting of two electron-transparent silicon nitride membranes mounted on a specially designed specimen rod. Gas flow occurred through plastic tubing from the outside of the microscope to the specimen region and back. Gold nanoparticles of a full width half maximum diameter of 1.0 nm were visible above the background noise and the achieved resolution was 0.5 nm in accordance with calculations of the beam broadening.

De Jonge, Niels [ORNL; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL; Bigelow, Wilbur C [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Multiphase flow analysis of oil shale retorting  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Several multiphase phenomena occur during oil shale retorting. An analysis is presented of two of these processes including condensation of oil shale vapor and oscillations of pressure in oil shale blocks through cracked bedding planes. Energy conservation equations for oil shale retorting, which include the effects associated with condensation of oil, are derived on the basis of two phase flow theory. It is suggested that an effective heat capacity associated with the latent heat of condensation should be included in the modeling of simulated modified in-situ oil shale retorting. A pressure propagation equation for fast transients in oil shale cracks has been derived and examined in view of existing experimental data. For slow processes, a limiting solution for maximum pressure in oil shale rocks has been obtained. Generation of high pressures in rocks by thermal or other means may lead to rock fracture which may be taken advantage of in modified in-situ oil shale processing.

Gidaspow, D.; Lyczkowski, R.W.

1978-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

245

Aerothermodynamics of low pressure steam turbines and condensers  

SciTech Connect

This book presents papers on steam turbines and steam condensers. Topics considered include the design of modern low pressure steam turbines, throughflow design methods, three-dimensional flow calculations, the calculation of wet steam stages, aerodynamic development of turbine blades, turbine performance measurement, turbine exhaust system design, and condensers for large turbines.

Moore, M.J.; Sieverding, C.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Modifying Char Dustcake Pressure Drop Using Particulate Additives  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coal gasification produces residual particles of coal char, coal ash, and sorbent that are suspended in the fuel gas stream exiting the gasifier. In most cases, these particles (referred to, hereafter, simply as char) must be removed from the stream prior to sending the gas to a turbine, fuel cell, or other downstream device. Currently, the most common approach to cleaning the gas stream at high temperature and pressure is by filtering the particulate with a porous ceramic or metal filter. However, because these dusts frequently have small size distributions, irregular morphology, and high specific surface areas, they can have very high gas flow resistance resulting in hot-gas filter system operating problems. Typical of gasification chars, the hot-gas filter dustcakes produced at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) during recent coal gasification tests have had very high flow resistance (Martin et al, 2002). The filter system has been able to successfully operate, but pressure drops have been high and filter cleaning must occur very frequently. In anticipation of this problem, a study was conducted to investigate ways of reducing dustcake pressure drop. This paper will discuss the efficacy of adding low-flow-resistance particulate matter to the high-flow-resistance char dustcake to reduce dustcake pressure drop. The study had two parts: a laboratory screening study and confirming field measurements at the PSDF.

Landham, C.; Dahlin, R.S.; Martin, R.A.; Guan, X.

2002-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

247

On the Pressure Field in the Slope Wind Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It has been suggested by some authors that the momentum equation for thermally driven slope flow should contain a horizontal pressure gradient term, in addition to the buoyancy term. It is shown that this suggestion is incorrect and leads to a ...

T. Haiden

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Two phase pressure drop in inclined and vertical pipes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A method of calculating the pressure drop in inclined and vertical oil-gas wells is proposed. The data used to establish the method is from a variety of sources but is largely from air and water flowing in systems close ...

Griffith, P.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

High-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high-bandwidth continuous-flow arc furnace for stream welding applications includes a metal mass contained in a crucible having an orifice. A power source charges an electrode for generating an arc between the electrode and the mass. The arc heats the metal mass to a molten state. A pressurized gas source propels the molten metal mass through the crucible orifice in a continuous stream. As the metal is ejected, a metal feeder replenishes the molten metal bath. A control system regulates the electrode current, shielding gas pressure, and metal source to provide a continuous flow of molten metal at the crucible orifice. Independent control over the electrode current and shield gas pressure decouples the metal flow temperature and the molten metal flow rate, improving control over resultant weld characteristics. 4 figs.

Hardt, D.E.; Lee, S.G.

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

The influence of return bends on the downstream pressure drop and condensation heat transfer in tubes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The influence of return bends on the downstream pressure drop and heat transfer coefficient of condensing refrigerant R-12 was studied experimentally. Flow patterns in glass return bends of 1/2 to 1 in. radius and 0.315 ...

Traviss, Donald P.

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Pressure suppression system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure suppression system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and an enclosed gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel. The GDCS pool includes a plenum for receiving through an inlet the non-condensable gas carried with steam from the drywell following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). A condenser is disposed in the GDCS plenum for condensing the steam channeled therein and to trap the non-condensable gas therein. A method of operation includes draining the GDCS pool following the LOCA and channeling steam released into the drywell following the LOCA into the GDCS plenum for cooling along with the non-condensable gas carried therewith for trapping the gas therein.

Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized, the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 5 figs.

Morris, D.E.

1992-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

254

High pressure oxygen furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure oxygen furnace having a hybrid partially externally heated construction is disclosed. A metallic bar fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 inch bar stock and has a length of about 17 inches. This bar stock is gun drilled for over 16 inches of its length with 0.400 inch aperture to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the bar is provided with a small support aperture into which both a support and a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the gun drilled bar is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior.

Morris, Donald E. (Kensington, CA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

High pressure furnace  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature high pressure furnace has a hybrid partially externally heated construction. A metallic vessel fabricated from an alloy having a composition of at least 45% nickel, 15% chrome, and 10% tungsten is utilized (the preferred alloy including 55% nickel, 22% chrome, 14% tungsten, 2% molybdenum, 3% iron (maximum) and 5% cobalt (maximum)). The disclosed alloy is fabricated into 11/4 or 2 inch, 32 mm or 50 mm bar stock and has a length of about 22 inches, 56 cm. This bar stock has an aperture formed therein to define a closed high temperature, high pressure oxygen chamber. The opposite and closed end of the vessel is provided with a small blind aperture into which a thermocouple can be inserted. The closed end of the vessel is inserted into an oven, preferably heated by standard nickel chrome electrical elements and having a heavily insulated exterior. 19 figures.

Morris, D.E.

1993-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

256

Analysis of pressure tests through the use of instantaneous source response concepts  

SciTech Connect

A general method of analysis for pressure transient tests is presented. This technique is based on the pressure response of an instantaneous source and it provides a mean to compute the first and second derivatives of the influence function (unit flow rate response) of the well-reservoir system. This information is basic in identifying the flow regimes occurring during the test. This method eliminates the effect of producing time on pressure buildup data. An explicit and stable procedure is discussed to compute both the derivatives of the influence function and the initial reservoir pressure. This technique is suitable for DST and Repeat Formation Tests as well as for pressure buildup and fall off tests with long shut in period; variable flow rate before shut in can be taken into account. Examples of application are presented.

Cinco-Ley, H.; Kuchuk, F.; Ayoub, J.; Ayestaran, L.; Samaniego, V.F.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

High pressure storage vessel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein is a composite pressure vessel with a liner having a polar boss and a blind boss a shell is formed around the liner via one or more filament wrappings continuously disposed around at least a substantial portion of the liner assembly combined the liner and filament wrapping have a support profile. To reduce susceptible to rupture a locally disposed filament fiber is added.

Liu, Qiang

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

258

Heat transfer and pressure drop data for high heat flux densities to water at high subcritical pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Local surface ooeffioients of heat t-ansfer, overall pressure drop data and mean friction factor are presented for heat flamms up to 3.52106 BtuAr ft2 for water flowing in a nickel tabe isder the following conditions: mass ...

Rohsenow, Warren M.

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

The effects between two slotted plate flow meter under single, two, three components flow condition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In previous work on the slotted flow meter, repeatibility and reproducibility were studied under different flow conditions and different configurations. In accordance with previous work, the effects of the distance between the slotted plate were identified as an area requring further investigation. The preset 5D distance is expanded to the 10D distance. The flow coefficient KY, the pressure drop, and the uncertainty analysis is conducted. There were definite deference in the results between the 5D distance and the 10D distance in many aspects. As a base line, the flow coefficient KY showed 0.8% ~ 2% difference between the 5D and the 10D distance case. Depending upon the upstream flow conditions, the reproducibility of the slotted flow meter was affected. The pressure drop increased as the upstream Reynolds number increased. The result from the analysis of the water cut meter showed that there are definite relationships between the parameteres of the water cut meter and the parameters of the flow.

Park, Sang Hyan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description This raw data reflects readings from instruments mounted on or near a 82 meter meteorological tower located at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), approximately 5 miles south of Boulder, CO (specifically: 39.9107 N, 105.2348 W, datum WGS84). The base elevation at the site is 1,855 meters AMSL. Source NREL Date Released Unknown Date Updated March 10th, 2011 (3 years ago) Keywords DOE humidity irrandiance NREL NWTC pressure temperature turbulence wind wind direction wind speed Data text/plain icon Raw data (8/24/2001 - 3/10/2011) (txt, 681 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon Field IDs for above .txt file (xls, 69.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Scientists and Technicians are notified real-time via email of instruments outside the above min/max or delta comparisons (http://www.nrel.gov/midc/nwtc_m2/) Data have not been reviewed for accuracy or completeness; disclaimer available (http://www.nrel.gov/disclaimer.html).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Degassing and two-phase flow pilot hole test report  

SciTech Connect

A pilot hole test was conducted to support the design of the Degassing of Groundwater and Two-Phase Flow experiments planned for the Hard Rock Laboratory, Aespoe, Sweden. The test consisted of a sequence of constant pressure borehole inflow tests (CPTs) and pressure recovery tests (PRTs) in borehole KA2512A. The test sequence was designed to detect degassing effects from the change in transmissivity, or hydraulic conductivity, and storativity when the borehole pressure is lowered below the groundwater bubble pressure. The entire 37.3m of the borehole section was tested without packers. Flow response to pressure changes in CPTs occurred rapidly. Flowrates fluctuated before attaining a steady trend, probably due to effective stress changes when borehole pressure was reduced for the first time. These factors decreased the sensitivity of type-curve fits to values of specific storage. The relationship between borehole pressure and steady-state flowrates was linear over borehole pressures of 1500 kPa (abs) down to 120 kPa (abs) during testing in December 1994, indicating that processes that may change hydraulic conductivity at low borehole pressures, such as degassing, calcite precipitation or turbulence, did not occur to a measurable degree. Test results during January and February of 1995 suggest that degassing may have occurred. The hydraulic conductivity measured at a borehole pressure equal to 120 kPa (abs) was 20% lower than the hydraulic conductivity measured at a borehole pressure of 1500 kPa (abs); the latter value was 10% lower than the hydraulic conductivity measured in December, 1994. The volumetric gas content measured during this time was 1% v/v. Pressures in monitoring well KA2511A responded to the testing in KA2512A. Step-changes in flowrates coincided with blasting at 3300-3400 m tunnel length. The magnitude of these changes was greater at the lower borehole pressures. Step increases in pressures in KA2511A also coincided with the blasts.

Geller, J.T. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Jarsjoe, J. [Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden). Water Resource Engineering

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Anomalous fracture-extension pressure in granitic rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fracture-extension pressures appreciably higher than the least principal earth-stress were observed in hydraulic fractures formed in a pair of 3 km (9600 ft) deep boreholes drilled near the Valles Caldera in northern New Mexico. Pressurization of open wellbores in rock containing preexisting fractures may open these fractures, instead of creating new fractures at right angles to the least principal stress. The pressure necessary to flow into these fractures may be appreciably higher than the least principal stress. Upon sand-propping one such pre-existing fracture, a lower fracture extension pressure was observed. A second fracture in a parallel well-bore 92 m (300 ft) away, at the same depth of 2 km (6500 ft) exhibited the lower fracture extension pressure without propping, but with about 90/sup 0/ difference in fracture direction. Fractures created through perforations at a depth of 3 km (9600 ft) not only exhibited breakdown pressures upon initial pressurization, but sometimes even higher ''breakdown'' pressures upon repressurization. These phenomena may be of interest in the interpretation of earth stress measurements made by hydraulic fracturing.

Aamodt, R.L.; Potter, R.M.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Fluid flow through a vertical to horizontal 90 elbow bend III three phase flow  

SciTech Connect

Three phase water/oil/air flow was studied around a vertical upward to horizontal 90 elbow bend of R/d = 0.654. The results were more complex than corresponding two phase data. The pressure drop recorded for the two tangent legs sometimes showed significant variations to the straight pipe data. In most cases this variation was caused by differences in the flow regimes between the two systems. The elbow bend tended to constrict the flow presented by the vertical inlet tangent leg while sometimes acting as a wave and droplet generator for the horizontal outlet tangent leg. It could be argued that the inclusion of the elbow bend altered the flow regime map transitional boundaries but it also is possible that insufficient settling length was provided in the apparatus design. The elbow bend pressure drop was best presented as l{sub e}/d the equivalent length to diameter ratio using the actual total pressure drop in the vertical inlet tangent leg. Generally l{sub e}/d values rose with gas rate, but exhibited an increasingly complex relation with f{sub o} the oil to liquid volumetric ratio as liquid rate was increased. A significant maximum in l{sub e}/d was in evidence around the inversion from water dominated to oil dominated flows. Several models are presented to predict the data. (author)

Spedding, P.L.; Benard, E.; Crawford, N.M. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Queen's University Belfast, Ashby Building, Belfast BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

Second law analysis for a variable viscosity plane Poiseuille flow with asymmetric convective cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A second-law analysis of a pressure-driven variable viscosity fluid flow through a channel with asymmetric convective cooling at the walls is investigated. Flow is assumed to be steady, laminar and fully-developed. The effect of heat generation due to ... Keywords: Asymmetric convective cooling, Entropy generation analysis, Poiseuille flow, Variable viscosity

O. D. Makinde; A. Aziz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pressure Data Within BOP- ODS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file describes the components within the BOP and the pressure readings taken during diagnostic operations on May 25.

266

Pressure Data Within BOP- XLS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This file describes the components within the BOP and the pressure readings taken during diagnostic operations on May 25.

267

Technical Guidance for Detection of Oil-Loss Failure of Rosemount Pressure Transmitters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rosemount pressure transmitters, used to measure pressure, level, and flow have a failure mode that is not detectable by instantaneous instrument readings. This report explains how this failure mode can be detected by a trending program before acceptance limits have been exceeded.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

268

Engine with hydraulic fuel injection and ABS circuit using a single high pressure pump  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An engine system comprises a hydraulically actuated fuel injection system and an ABS circuit connected via a fluid flow passage that provides hydraulic fluid to both the fuel injection system and to the ABS circuit. The hydraulically actuated system includes a high pressure pump. The fluid control passage is in fluid communication with an outlet from the high pressure pump.

Bartley, Bradley E. (Manito, IL); Blass, James R. (Bloomington, IL); Gibson, Dennis H. (Chillicothe, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Designing cyclic pressure pulsing in naturally fractured reservoirs using an inverse looking recurrent neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an inverse looking approach is presented to efficiently design cyclic pressure pulsing (huff 'n' puff) with N"2 and CO"2, which is an effective improved oil recovery method in naturally fractured reservoirs. A numerical flow simulation ... Keywords: Big Andy Field, CO2, Cyclic pressure pulsing, Huff 'n' puff, N2, Recurrent neural networks

E. Artun; T. Ertekin; R. Watson; B. Miller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Uplift Pressures in Cracks in Concrete Gravity Dams--An Experimental Study: Volume 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Uplift pressure distribution in cracks in concrete dams is affected by a combination of several factors, such as crack properties, drain dimensions, and the type of flow in the crack. This study shows that most uplift pressure distributions can be controlled using a vertical drain system with diameters from two to four inches and spacing of about ten feet.

1992-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

271

NETL: Gasifipedia - Entrained Flow Gasifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Entrained Flow Gasifiers Entrained Flow Gasifiers Uhde - Prenflo PRENFLO(tm) is a pressurized (>40 bar), entrained-flow gasification technology first demonstrated in the late 1980s, and currently offered by Uhde (Krupp Koppers merged with Uhde in 1997). Notably, PRENFLO(tm) is the gasification technology used at the world's largest solid feedstock-based gasifier at ELCOGAS's Puertollano IGCC plant in Spain (which is fueled with a 50%/50% mix of petcoke and coal). PRENFLO(tm) is offered in two varieties, the PRENFLO(tm) PSG (with steam generation) depicted in Figures 1 & 2, and PRENFLO(tm) PDQ (direct quench) as depicted in Figures 3 & 4. The gasifier conditions and feed characteristics are similar, but PRENFLO(tm) PSG includes an integrated waste heat boiler and uses compressed recirculated quench gas as illustrated in Figure 2, resulting in relatively low moisture raw syngas at relatively high exit temperature. PRENFLO(tm) PDQ uses direct quench, resulting in considerably lower raw syngas exit temperature (200-250°C) which is saturated. Uhde notes that PDQ has lower investment cost and shorter construction and supply schedule than PSG, though this would be at the performance expense of somewhat lower thermal efficiency and slightly higher concentration of CO2 in raw syngas.

272

Pressurized Testing of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Stacks with Advanced Electrode-Supported Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new facility has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for pressurized testing of solid oxide electrolysis stacks. Pressurized operation is envisioned for large-scale hydrogen production plants, yielding higher overall efficiencies when the hydrogen product is to be delivered at elevated pressure for tank storage or pipelines. Pressurized operation also supports higher mass flow rates of the process gases with smaller components. The test stand can accommodate cell dimensions up to 8.5 cm x 8.5 cm and stacks of up to 25 cells. The pressure boundary for these tests is a water-cooled spool-piece pressure vessel designed for operation up to 5 MPa. The stack is internally manifolded and operates in cross-flow with an inverted-U flow pattern. Feed-throughs for gas inlets/outlets, power, and instrumentation are all located in the bottom flange. The entire spool piece, with the exception of the bottom flange, can be lifted to allow access to the internal furnace and test fixture. Lifting is accomplished with a motorized threaded drive mechanism attached to a rigid structural frame. Stack mechanical compression is accomplished using springs that are located inside of the pressure boundary, but outside of the hot zone. Initial stack heatup and performance characterization occurs at ambient pressure followed by lowering and sealing of the pressure vessel and subsequent pressurization. Pressure equalization between the anode and cathode sides of the cells and the stack surroundings is ensured by combining all of the process gases downstream of the stack. Steady pressure is maintained by means of a backpressure regulator and a digital pressure controller. A full description of the pressurized test apparatus is provided in this paper.

J. E. O'Brien; X. Zhang; G. K. Housley; K. DeWall; L. Moore-McAteer; G. Tao

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fiber-optic pressure sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressure wave sensor utilizing fiber optic interferometry techniques to determine pressure in a bar. Light from a fiber optic coil around the bar is mixed with light from a reference optical fiber to produce interference fringes as a function of time. These fringes over time are related to the pressure versus time existing in the bar. 2 figs.

Dingus, R.S.

1989-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

274

PRESTRESSING A TWO-LAYER PRESSURE VESSEL BY CONTROLLED YIELDING OF THE INNER LAYER  

SciTech Connect

A method of designing a two-layer pressure vessel is presented wherein contact between the layers is produced by controlled yielding of the inner vessel by internal pressure. The amount of prestress depends upon the dimensions of the vessel, the properties of the material of construction, and the prestressing pressure. The method takes into account the actual stress-strain curve of the material and satisfies the rales of plastic flow with work hardening. (auth)

Schneider, R.W.

1964-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

PRESTRESSING A TWO-LAYER PRESSURE VESSEL BY CONTROLLED YIELDING OF THE INNER LAYER  

SciTech Connect

A method is presented for designing a two-layer pressure vessel wherein contact between the layers is produced by controlled yielding of the inner vessel by internal pressure. The amount of prestress depends upon the dimensions of the vessel, the properties of the material of construction, and the prestressing pressure. The method takes into account the actual stress-strain curve of the material and satisfies the rules of plastic flow with work hardening. (auth)

Schneider, R.W.

1964-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

276

Non-Darcy flow analysis through tight sand formations  

SciTech Connect

An experimental setup was designed and constructed to measure the flow parameters through tight sand porous media. The two kinds of coreholders being used are Hassler-type and one in which the core sample is encapsulated in layers of epoxy resin and metal alloy. A gas flow measuring system was also developed for accurately measuring very low gas flow rates. Using Darcy's Law as a tool for analysis of the experimental data, we obtained that the gas permeability of the SFE No. 3 (Staged Field Experiment No. 3) core samples is a linear function of reciprocal mean pressure, and decreases with overburden pressure. The water permeability is also decreased with overburden pressure and is about 6 times smaller than gas permeability for the samples that we have tested. No significant hysteresis effect was obtained for dry gas permeability after several two phase flow runs. We successfully tested our encapsulated coreholder and measured gas flow rate through a tight sand core sample at different pressure drops. The results showed that the experimental runs using Hassler-type coreholder at overburden pressures higher than 2000 psig will probably give us the reliable experimental data. The experimental data obtained from the two different types of tight sandstones were analyzed using the Non-Darcy flow equation. The results showed the importance and reliability of the Non-Darcy formulation for describing the flow behavior under different overburden and system pressures. Non-Darcy's velocity for both gas and liquid phase were incorporated into an existing FORTRAN code for simulation of the tight gas reservoirs. The modified program was tested to compare the initial production data of SFE No. 2 well. Our simulation showed in the case of local turbulence and non-uniformities in the tight sand formation, the value of [beta] increases and Non-Darcy effect becomes important.

Wang, Ching-Huei.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Laboratory Measurements of Axial Pressures in Two-Celled Tornado-like Vortices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study of two-celled vortex flows was conducted in a Ward-type tornado vortex chamber (TVC). Time-averaged, stream-static pressure measurements on the vortex axis and observations of the visualized flow in two-celled vortices are ...

Randal L. Pauley

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Iterative methods for solving the pressure problem at multiphase filtration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applied problems of oil and gas recovery are studied numerically using the mathematical models of multiphase fluid flows in porous media. The basic model includes the continuity equations and the Darcy laws for each phase, as well as the algebraic expression for the sum of saturations. Primary computational algorithms are implemented for such problems using the pressure equation. In this paper, we highlight the basic properties of the pressure problem and discuss the necessity of their fulfillment at the discrete level. The resulting elliptic problem for the pressure equation is characterized by a non-selfadjoint operator. Possibilities of approximate solving the elliptic problem are considered using the iterative methods. Special attention is given to the numerical algorithms for calculating the pressure on parallel computers.

Vabishchevich, P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Unsteady flow volumes  

SciTech Connect

Flow volumes are extended for use in unsteady (time-dependent) flows. The resulting unsteady flow volumes are the 3 dimensional analog of streamlines. There are few examples where methods other than particle tracing have been used to visualize time varying flows. Since particle paths can become convoluted in time there are additional considerations to be made when extending any visualization technique to unsteady flows. We will present some solutions to the problems which occur in subdivision, rendering, and system design. We will apply the unsteady flow volumes to a variety of field types including moving multi-zoned curvilinear grids.

Becker, B.G.; Lane, D.A.; Max, N.L.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Combustor oscillation pressure stabilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In accordance with the objective of the present invention, the active control of unsteady combustion induced oscillations in a combustion chamber fired by a suitable fuel and oxidizer mixture, such as a hydrocarbon fuel and air mixture, is provided by restructuring and moving the position of the main flame front and thereby increasing the transport time and displacing the pressure wave further away from the in-phase relationship with the periodic heat release. The restructuring and repositioning of the main flame are achieved by utilizing a pilot flame which is pulsed at a predetermined frequency corresponding to less than about one-half the frequency of the combustion oscillation frequency with the duration of each pulse being sufficient to produce adequate secondary thermal energy to restructure the main flame and thereby decouple the heat release from the acoustic coupling so as to lead to a reduction in the dynamic pressure amplitude. The pulsating pilot flame produces a relatively small and intermittently existing flame front in the combustion zone that is separate from the oscillating main flame front but which provides the thermal energy necessary to effectively reposition the location of the oscillating main flame front out of the region in the combustion zone where the acoustic coupling can occur with the main flame and thereby effectively altering the oscillation-causing phase relationship with the heat of combustion.

Gemmen, R.S.; Richards, G.A.; Yip, M.T.J.; Robey, E.; Cully, S.R.; Addis, R.E.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Two-phase flow characteristics in multiple orifice valves  

SciTech Connect

This work presents an experimental investigation on the characteristics of two-phase flow through multiple orifice valve (MOV), including frictional pressure drop and void fraction. Experiments were carried out using an MOV with three different sets of discs with throat thickness-diameter ratios (s/d) of 1.41, 1.66 and 2.21. Tests were run with air and water flow rates ranging between 1.0 and 3.0 m{sup 3}/h, respectively. The two-phase flow patterns established for the experiment were bubbly and slug. Two-phase frictional multipliers, frictional pressure drop and void fraction were analyzed. The determined two-phase multipliers were compared against existing correlations for gas-liquid flows. None of the correlations tested proved capable of predicting the experimental results. The large discrepancy between predicted and measured values points at the role played by valve throat geometry and thickness-diameter ratio in the hydrodynamics of two-phase flow through MOVs. A modification to the constants in the two-phase multiplier equation used for pipe flow fitted the experimental data. A comparison between computed frictional pressure drop, calculated with the modified two-phase multiplier equation and measured pressure drop yielded better agreement, with less than 20% error. (author)

Alimonti, Claudio [Sapienza University of Rome, Department ICMA, Via Eudossiana 18, 00184 Roma (Italy); Falcone, Gioia; Bello, Oladele [The Harold Vance Department of Petroleum Engineering, Texas A and M University, 3116 TAMU, Richardson Building, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Interwell pressure testing for field pilots  

SciTech Connect

Procedures are described, and results are compared with core analyses, for a number of transient pressure experiments that were carried out between wells in a small chemical flood pilot. Tests include: a standard pulse test, a simultaneous pressure buildup and falloff of wells in a five-spot pattern, a reverse pulse test, in which response from a producer was measured at a nearby injector during injection, and production drawdown tests from normally shut-in observation wells during polymer injection and during subsequent waterflood in a nearby injector. Flowing these observation wells provided an effective way to measure in-situ mobilities of injected fluids. For pulse tests, a simplified method for design and interpretation of single pulses is derived from basic equations. Dimensionless functions, representing directional permeability and geometrical mean permeability, are shown to be functions of a single dimensionless time lag of the maximum pressure response. For large dimensionless time lags, the ratio of dimensionless permeabilities approaches the value ..pi..e and simple geometric relationships may be used to predict either compressibility or formation thickness.

Stegemeier, G.L.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Single- and Two-Phase Diversion Cross-Flows Between Triangle Tight Lattice Rod Bundle Subchannels - Data on Flow Resistance and Interfacial Friction Coefficients for the Cross-Flow  

SciTech Connect

Single- and two-phase diversion cross-flows arising from the pressure difference between tight lattice subchannels are our concern in this study. In order to obtain a correlation of the diversion cross-flow, we conducted adiabatic experiments using a vertical multiple-channel with two subchannels simplifying the triangle tight lattice rod bundle for air-water flows at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. In the experiments, data were obtained on the axial variations in the pressure difference between the subchannels, the ratio of flow rate in one subchannel to the whole channel, the void fraction in each subchannel for slug-churn and annular flows in two-phase flow case. These data were analyzed by use of a lateral momentum equation based on a two-fluid model to determine both the cross-flow resistance coefficient between liquid phase and channel wall and the gas-liquid interfacial friction coefficient. The resulting coefficients have been correlated in a way similar to that developed for square lattice subchannel case by Kano et al. (2002); the cross-flow resistance coefficient data can be well correlated with a ratio of the lateral velocity due to the cross-flow to the axial one irrespective of single- and two-phase flows; the interfacial friction coefficient data were well correlated with a Reynolds number, which is based on the relative velocity between gas and liquid cross-flows as the characteristic velocity. (authors)

Tatsuya Higuchi; Akimaro Kawahara; Michio Sadatomi; Hiroyuki Kudo [Kumamoto University, 39-1, Kurokami 2-chome, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Structure of Offshore Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The horizontal and vertical structure of the mean flow and turbulent fluxes are examined using aircraft observations taken near a barrier island on the east coast of the United States during offshore flow periods. The spatial structure is ...

Dean Vickers; L. Mahrt; Jielun Sun; Tim Crawford

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Design strategies for optically-accessible, high-temperature, high-pressure reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Design Strategies for Optically-Accessible, High-Temperature, High-Pressure Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The authors have developed two optical cell designs for high-pressure and high-temperature fluid research: one for flow systems, and the other for larger batch systems. The flow system design uses spring washers to balance the unequal thermal expansions of the reactor and the window materials. A typical design calculation is presented showing the relationship between system pressure, operating temperature, and torque applied to the window-retaining nut. The second design employs a different strategy more appropriate for larger windows. This design uses two seals: one for the window that benefits from system pressure, and a second one that relies on knife-edge, metal-to-metal contact.

S. F. Rice; R. R. Steeper; C. A. LaJeunesse; R. G. Hanush; J. D. Aiken

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

From Single-Phase To Compositional Flow: Applicability Of Mixed Finite Elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In this paper we discuss the formulation of the governing equations that describe flow of fluids in porous media. Various types of fluid flow, ranging from single-phase flow to compositional flow, are considered. It is shown that all the differential equations governing these types of flow can be effectively rewritten in a fractional flow formulation; i.e., in terms of a global pressure and saturation (or saturations), and that mixed finite element methods can be accurately exploited to solve the pressure equation. Extensive numerical results are presented to see the performance of the mixed methods for the flow equations using different mixed finite elements. 1. Introduction Multiphase flow of fluids in porous media is physically and chemically complex. It involves heterogeneities in the porous media at many different length scales and complicated processes such as diffusion and dispersion. Numerical simulation of these phenomena is a critical step in understanding multicom...

Zhangxin Chen; Richard E. Ewing

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ultrasonic flow metering system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mauseth, Jason A. (Pocatello, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Numerical analysis of vapor flow in a micro heat pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The vapor flow in a flat plate micro heat pipe with both uniform and linear heat flux boundary conditions has been numerically analyzed. For both types of boundary conditions, the Navier-Stokes equations with steady incompressible two-dimensional flow were solved using the SIMPLE method. The results indicate that the pressure, shear stress, and friction factor under linear heat flux boundary conditions are considerably smoother, and hence, more closely approximate the real situation. As the heat flux increases, the pressure drop increases, but the friction factor demonstrates only a slight change for different heat flux conditions. The size and shape of the micro heat pipe vapor space was shown to have a significant influence on the vapor flow behavior for micro heat pipes. When the vapor space area decreases, the pressure drop, shear stress, and friction factor all significantly increase.

Liu, Xiaoqin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Identification of Boiling Two-phase Flow Patterns in Water Wall Tube Based on BP Neural Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the boiling phenomena of steam boiler under atmospheric pressure are simulated by using the UDF program of CFD software. Characteristics including pressure, temperature and vapor fraction respectively for bubble, slug and annular flow ... Keywords: Boiling heat transfer, BP neural network, flow pattern, coefficient of heat transfer

Lei Guo; Shusheng Zhang; Yaqun Chen; Lin Cheng

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Original article: Analytical solution of gaseous slip flow between two parallel plates described by the Oseen equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is focused on the derivation of analytical solution describing the development of gas pressure driven microflow in a gap between two parallel plates. The gas flow is assumed to be steady, laminar and incompressible. For the mathematical description ... Keywords: Analytical solution, Oseen equation, Pressure driven microflow, Slip flow regime, Velocity profile development

Jan Vimmr; Hynek KlášTerka; Marek Hajman

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

The Streaming Potential Generated by Flow of Wet Steam in Capillary Tubes  

SciTech Connect

For a constant pressure differential, the flow of wet steam generated electric potentials which increased with time and did not reach equilibrium values. These potentials were found to increase to values greater than 100 volts. The reason for this kind of potential build-up behavior was the presence of tiny flowing water slugs which were interspersed with electrically nonconductive steam vapor slugs. The measured electric potential for wet steam increased with pressure differential, but the relationship was not linear. The increase in potential with pressure drop was attributed both to an increase in fluid flow rate and changes in the wet steam quality.

Marsden, S.S. Jr.; Tyran, Craig K.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

293

Redox Flow Batteries: a Review  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1137-1164 Date Published 102011 ISSN 1572-8838 Keywords Flow battery, Flow cell, Redox, Regenerative fuel cell, Vanadium Abstract Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are enjoying a...

294

Lateral flow strip assay  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

Miles, Robin R. (Danville, CA); Benett, William J. (Livermore, CA); Coleman, Matthew A. (Oakland, CA); Pearson, Francesca S. (Livermore, CA); Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L. (Livermore, CA)

2011-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

295

Nucleate boiling pressure drop in an annulus: Book 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of the work described in this report is the production reactors at the Savannah River Site, and the context is nuclear reactor safety. The Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) scenario considered involves a double-ended break of a primary coolant pipe in the reactor. During a LOCA, the flow through portions of the reactor may reverse direction or be greatly reduced, depending upon the location of the break. The reduced flow rate of coolant (D{sub 2}O) through the fuel assembly channels of the reactor -- downflow in this situation -- can lead to boiling and to the potential for flow instabilities which may cause some of the fuel assembly channels to overheat and melt. That situation is to be avoided. The experimental approach is to provide a test annulus which simulates geometry, materials, and flow conditions in a Mark-22 fuel assembly (Coolant Channel 3) to the extent possible. The key analysis approaches are: To compare the minima in the measured demand curves with analytical criteria, in particular the Saha-Zuber (1974) model; and to compare the pressure and temperature as a function of length in the annulus with an integral model for flow boiling in a heated channel. Nineteen test series and a total of 178 tests were performed. Testing addressed the effects of: Heat flux; pressure; helium gas; power tilt; ribs; asymmetric heat flux. This document consists solely of the plato file index from 11/87 to 11/90.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

NETL: Gasifipedia - Entrained Flow Gasifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Siemens Gasifier Siemens Gasifier (source: Siemens) Siemens Gasifiers Siemens gasification technology was originally developed by Deutsches Brennstoffinstitut (DBI) in Freiberg, Germany for the gasification of pulverized local brown coal and other solid feedstocks in 1975. The Noell group acquired the technology in 1991 and developed it further to handle liquid residues and wastes. The gasifier also operated under the name of Babcock Borsig and Future Energy before being acquired by Siemens in 2006. Operation The Siemens gasifier is a dry-feed, pressurized, entrained-flow reactor, which can be supplied with either a refractory lining for low ash feedstocks or with a cooling screen in the gasification section of the gasifier. The cooling screen consists of a gas-tight membrane wall

297

CDIAC Atmospheric Pressure Data Sets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Atmospheric Pressure Atmospheric Pressure CDIAC Climate Holdings Containing Atmospheric Pressure Data Global Data Sets Data Set Name Investigators Data Type/Format Period of Record Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 1 (CDIAC NDP-041) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; through 1990 Extended Edited Synoptic Cloud Reports from Ships and Land Stations Over the Globe, 1952-2009 (CDIAC NDP-026C) C.J. Hahn, S.G. Warren, and R. Eastman Six-hourly synoptic observations of sea-level pressure Land 1971-2009; Ocean 1952-2008 Global Historical Climatology Network (GHCN); Vs. 2 (Note: the above link takes you to NOAA's National Climatic Data Center website.) R.S. Vose et al. Surface stations; monthly mean sea-level pressure Varies by station; some through most recent month

298

Bubble Pump Design for Single Pressure Absorption Refrigeration Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model has been developed for the design and optimization of a small bubble pump to be used in a single pressure absorption refrigeration cycle to lift the working fluid mixture against gravity and overcome flow friction. This analytical model is developed from two-phase flow fundamentals and incorporates the design parameters of the bubble pump. Parametric studies are carried out and a design optimization for maximum efficiency is performed for various operating conditions. Optimum efficiency is defined as the liquid pumped per unit of bubble pump heat input. The results show the optimum bubble pump tube diameter over a range of operating conditions.

Sam V. Shelton; Susan White Stewart

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Two-phase gas-liquid flow characteristics inside a plate heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the air-water two-phase flow characteristics including flow pattern and pressure drop inside a plate heat exchanger are experimentally investigated. A plate heat exchanger with single pass under the condition of counter flow is operated for the experiment. Three stainless steel commercial plates with a corrugated sinusoidal shape of unsymmetrical chevron angles of 55 and 10 are utilized for the pressure drop measurement. A transparent plate having the same configuration as the stainless steel plates is cast and used as a cover plate in order to observe the flow pattern inside the plate heat exchanger. The air-water mixture flow which is used as a cold stream is tested in vertical downward and upward flow. The results from the present experiment show that the annular-liquid bridge flow pattern appeared in both upward and downward flows. However, the bubbly flow pattern and the slug flow pattern are only found in upward flow and downward flow, respectively. The variation of the water and air velocity has a significant effect on the two-phase pressure drop. Based on the present data, a two-phase multiplier correlation is proposed for practical application. (author)

Nilpueng, Kitti [Department of Mechanical Engineering, South East Asia University, Bangkok 10160 (Thailand); Wongwises, Somchai [Fluid Mechanics, Thermal Engineering and Multiphase Flow Research Lab (FUTURE), Department of Mechanical Engineering, King Mongkut's University of Technology Thonburi, Bangmod, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Flow Test At Coso Geothermal Area (1978) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 1978 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Flow tests of well CGEH No. 1 were conducted. LBL performed eight temperature surveys after completion of the well to estimate equilibrium reservoir temperatures. Downhole fluid samples were obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), and a static pressure profile was obtained. The first test began September 5, 1978 using nitrogen stimulation to initiate flow; this procedure resulted in small flow and subsequent filling of the bottom hole with drill cuttings. The second test, on November 2, 1978, utilized a nitrogen-foam-water mixture to clean residual particles from bottom hole,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Evaluation of a slotted orifice plate flow meter using horizontal two phase flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past several years, the slotted orifice plate has been evaluated for its performance as a single phase flow meter using air and as a two-phase flow meter using water and air. These previous studies have both shown superior performance to that of the standard orifice plate flow meter. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the slotted orifice plate two-phase flow meter with water and steam as the working fluids and compare this data with previous data taken from other test facilities to further develop the calibration of this new two-phase flow meter. Tests for repeatability will be shown for beta ratios of 0.430, 0.467, and 0.500. Reproducibility will also be evaluated between a water and steam facility and three water and air facilities. This includes comparing data obtained using a set of brass slotted orifice plates and a set of stainless steel slotted orifice plates. The brass plates were tested in one water and air facility in a previous study and the stainless steel plates were tested using two phase data from air and water and also from steam and water. Differential pressure effects using water and steam as a mixture will be considered since there is a change in fluid quality as the fluid drops in pressure across an orifice plate. Reproducibility from six different data sets found using different facilities, different slotted orifice plates, and different working fluids were shown to converge to the same relationship. This relationship contained non-dimensional variables which included the calibration coefficient (KY= flow coefficient (K) multiplied by the expansion factor (Y)), the Euler number, and the beta ratio. These results were analyzed to develop a calibration for the slotted orifice plate two-phase flow meter which can ultimately be used to determine the flow rate of a two-phase mixture.

Flores, Anita Elena

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Computer Based Training: Pressure Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ETTM Pressure Measurement is a computer based training module that allows users to access training when desired and review it at their own pace. It provides graphics and limited interactive features to enhance learning. The purpose of this training module is to provide an understanding of the engineering principles associated with pressure measurement through the review of: Definitions and laws, Operation of some typical plant pressure instruments and, Installation and correction considerations that will...

2010-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

303

Wall-pressure and PIV analysis for microbubble drag reduction investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of microbubbles injection in the boundary layer of a turbulent channel flow are investigated. Electrolysis demonstrated to be an effective method to produce microbubbles with an average diameter of 30 ??m and allowed the placement of microbubbles at desired locations within the boundary layer. Measurement of velocity fluctuations and the instantaneous wall shear stress were carried out in a channel flow facility. The wall shear stress is an important parameter that can help with the characterization of the boundary layer. This parameter can be obtained indirectly by the measurement of the flow pressure at the wall. The wall shear stress in the channel was measured by means of three different independent methods: measurement of the pressure gradient by a differential pressure transducer, Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV), and an optical wall shear stress sensor. The three methods showed reasonable agreement of the wall shear stress values for single-phase flow. However, differences as skin friction reductions were observed when the microbubbles were injected. Several measurements of wall-pressure were taken at various Reynolds numbers that ranged from 300 up to 6154. No significant drag reduction was observed for flows in the laminar range; however, a drag reduction of about 16% was detected for turbulent Reynolds numbers. The wall-pressure measurements were shown to be a powerful tool for the measurement of drag reduction, which could help with the design of systems capable of controlling the skin friction based on feedback given by the wall-pressure signal. The proposed measurement system designed in this work has capabilities for application in such diverse fields as multiphase flows, drag reduction, stratified flows, heat transfer among others. The synchronization between independent systems and apparatus has the potential to bring insight about the complicated phenomena involved in the nature of fluid flows.

Dominguez Ontiveros, Elvis Efren

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Deep-Sea Differential Pressure Gauge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pressure gauge configured to respond to the difference between the ocean pressure and the pressure within a confined volume of compressible oil is found to be especially useful for detecting pressure fluctuations in the frequency range from a ...

Charles Cox; Thomas Deaton; Spahr Webb

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Intercooler flow path for gas turbines: CFD design and experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Turbine Systems (ATS) program was created by the U.S. Department of Energy to develop ultra-high efficiency, environmentally superior, and cost competitive gas turbine systems for generating electricity. Intercooling or cooling of air between compressor stages is a feature under consideration in advanced cycles for the ATS. Intercooling entails cooling of air between the low pressure (LP) and high pressure (HP) compressor sections of the gas turbine. Lower air temperature entering the HP compressor decreases the air volume flow rate and hence, the compression work. Intercooling also lowers temperature at the HP discharge, thus allowing for more effective use of cooling air in the hot gas flow path.

Agrawal, A.K.; Gollahalli, S.R.; Carter, F.L. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

306

High Pressure Studies of Superconductivity.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Superconductivity has been studied extensively since it was first discovered over 100 years ago. High pressure studies, in particular, have been vital in furthering our… (more)

Hillier, Narelle Jayne

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

CONTAM Libraries - Appendix B: CONTAM Wind Pressure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Appendix B: CONTAM Wind Pressure Profile Library. The table below contains information on the wind pressure profiles ...

308

High pressure heterogeneous catalysis in a low pressure UHV environment  

SciTech Connect

The major thrust of our research is to carry out for the first time a heterogeneous catalytic reaction that normally is observed only at high pressures (>1 atm) of reactant gas at low pressures (<10{sup {minus}4} Torr) in an ultrahigh vacuum environment. The reaction we have chosen is the steam reforming of methane on a Ni(111) crystal.

Ceyer, S.T.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Performance assessment of mass flow rate measurement capability in a large scale transient two-phase flow test system  

SciTech Connect

Mass flow is an important measured variable in the Loss-of-Fluid Test (LOFT) Program. Large uncertainties in mass flow measurements in the LOFT piping during LOFT coolant experiments requires instrument testing in a transient two-phase flow loop that simulates the geometry of the LOFT piping. To satisfy this need, a transient two-phase flow loop has been designed and built. The load cell weighing system, which provides reference mass flow measurements, has been analyzed to assess its capability to provide the measurements. The analysis consisted of first performing a thermal-hydraulic analysis using RELAP4 to compute mass inventory and pressure fluctuations in the system and mass flow rate at the instrument location. RELAP4 output was used as input to a structural analysis code SAPIV which is used to determine load cell response. The computed load cell response was then smoothed and differentiated to compute mass flow rate from the system. Comparison between computed mass flow rate at the instrument location and mass flow rate from the system computed from the load cell output was used to evaluate mass flow measurement capability of the load cell weighing system. Results of the analysis indicate that the load cell weighing system will provide reference mass flows more accurately than the instruments now in LOFT.

Nalezny, C.L.; Chapman, R.L.; Martinell, J.S.; Riordon, R.P.; Solbrig, C.W.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

System for generating power with top pressure of blast furnaces  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating power with the top pressure of a plurality of blast furnaces by leading a gas from the top of the furnaces into turbines, corresponding in number to the furnaces, to convert the pressure of the gas into rotational energy and generate power by a generator coupled to the turbines. The turbines connected to the furnaces by main gas channels individually are aligned with their rotor shafts connected together into a single shaft which is connected to the generator. Preferably each pair of the adjacent turbines are arranged with their intake ends positioned in the center of the arrangement so that the gas flows toward the exhaust ends at both sides, or with their intake ends positioned at both sides to cause the gas to flow toward the exhaust ends in the center. The single shaft connecting the pair of turbines together has no intermediate bearing between these turbines.

Kihara, H.; Mizota, T.; Ohmachi, M.; Takao, K.; Toki, K.; Tomita, Y.

1983-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

311

Scaled Experimental Modeling of VHTR Plenum Flows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Abstract The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is the leading candidate for the Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project in the U.S. which has the goal of demonstrating the production of emissions free electricity and hydrogen by 2015. Various scaled heated gas and water flow facilities were investigated for modeling VHTR upper and lower plenum flows during the decay heat portion of a pressurized conduction-cooldown scenario and for modeling thermal mixing and stratification (“thermal striping”) in the lower plenum during normal operation. It was concluded, based on phenomena scaling and instrumentation and other practical considerations, that a heated water flow scale model facility is preferable to a heated gas flow facility and to unheated facilities which use fluids with ranges of density to simulate the density effect of heating. For a heated water flow lower plenum model, both the Richardson numbers and Reynolds numbers may be approximately matched for conduction-cooldown natural circulation conditions. Thermal mixing during normal operation may be simulated but at lower, but still fully turbulent, Reynolds numbers than in the prototype. Natural circulation flows in the upper plenum may also be simulated in a separate heated water flow facility that uses the same plumbing as the lower plenum model. However, Reynolds number scaling distortions will occur at matching Richardson numbers due primarily to the necessity of using a reduced number of channels connected to the plenum than in the prototype (which has approximately 11,000 core channels connected to the upper plenum) in an otherwise geometrically scaled model. Experiments conducted in either or both facilities will meet the objectives of providing benchmark data for the validation of codes proposed for NGNP designs and safety studies, as well as providing a better understanding of the complex flow phenomena in the plenums.

ICONE 15

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine  

SciTech Connect

The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

Eldrid, Sacheverel Q. (Saratoga Springs, NY); Salamah, Samir A. (Niskayuna, NY); DeStefano, Thomas Daniel (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Forced convective flow and heat transfer of upward cocurrent air-water slug flow in vertical plain and swirl tubes  

SciTech Connect

This experimental study comparatively examined the two-phase flow structures, pressured drops and heat transfer performances for the cocurrent air-water slug flows in the vertical tubes with and without the spiky twisted tape insert. The two-phase flow structures in the plain and swirl tubes were imaged using the computerized high frame-rate videography with the Taylor bubble velocity measured. Superficial liquid Reynolds number (Re{sub L}) and air-to-water mass flow ratio (AW), which were respectively in the ranges of 4000-10000 and 0.003-0.02 were selected as the controlling parameters to specify the flow condition and derive the heat transfer correlations. Tube-wise averaged void fraction and Taylor bubble velocity were well correlated by the modified drift flux models for both plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition. A set of selected data obtained from the plain and swirl tubes was comparatively examined to highlight the impacts of the spiky twisted tape on the air-water interfacial structure and the pressure drop and heat transfer performances. Empirical heat transfer correlations that permitted the evaluation of individual and interdependent Re{sub L} and AW impacts on heat transfer in the developed flow regions of the plain and swirl tubes at the slug flow condition were derived. (author)

Chang, Shyy Woei [Thermal Fluids Laboratory, National Kaohsiung Marine University, No. 142, Haijhuan Road, Nanzih District, Kaohsiung City 81143 (China); Yang, Tsun Lirng [Department of Marine Engineering, National Kaohsiung Marine University, No. 142, Haijhuan Road, Nanzih District, Kaohsiung City 81143 (China)

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Schoeniger, Luke (Pittsford, NY)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Electrokinetically pumped high pressure sprays  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrokinetic pump capable of producing high pressure is combined with a nozzle having a submicron orifice to provide a high pressure spray device. Because of its small size, the device can be contained within medical devices such as an endoscope for delivering biological materials such as DNA, chemo therapeutic agents, or vaccines to tissues and cells.

Schoeniger, Joseph S. (Oakland, CA); Paul, Phillip H. (Livermore, CA); Schoeniger, Luke (Pittsford, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title High Temperature, High Pressure Devices for Zonal Isolation in Geothermal Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and Development/Analysis Project Type / Topic 2 Zonal Isolation Project Description For Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), high-temperature high-pressure zonal isolation tools capable of withstanding the downhole environment are needed. In these wells the packers must withstand differential pressures of 5,000 psi at more than 300°C, as well as pressures up to 20,000 psi at 200°C to 250°C. Furthermore, when deployed these packers and zonal isolation tools must form a reliable seal that eliminates fluid loss and mitigates short circuiting of flow from injectors to producers. At this time, general purpose open-hole packers do not exist for use in geothermal environments, with the primary technical limitation being the poor stability of existing elastomeric seals at high temperatures.

317

History matching pressure response functions from production data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation presents several new techniques for the analysis of the long-term production performance of tight gas wells. The main objectives of this work are to determine pressure response function for long-term production for a the slightly compressible liquid case, to determine the original gas in place (OGIP) during pseudosteady state (PSS), to determine OGIP in the transient period, and to determine the effects of these parameters on linear flow in gas wells. Several methods are available in the industry to analyze the production performance of gas wells. One common method is superposition time. This method has the advantage of being able to analyze variable-rate and variable-pressure data, which is usually the nature of field data. However, this method has its shortcomings. In this work, simulation and field cases illustrate the shortcomings of superposition. I present a new normalized pseudotime plotting function for use in the superposition method to smooth field data and more accurately calculate OGIP. The use of this normalized pseudotime is particularly important in the analysis of highly depleted reservoirs with large change in total compressibility where the superposition errors are largest. The new tangent method presented here can calculate the OGIP with current reservoir properties for both constant rate and bottomhole flowing pressure (pwf) production. In this approach pressure-dependent permeability data can be integrated into a modified real gas pseudopressure,m(p), which linearizes the reservoir flow equations and provides correct values for permeability and skin factor. But if the customary real-gas pseudopressure, m(p) is used instead, erroneous values for permeability and skin factor will be calculated. This method uses an exponential equation form for permeability vs. pressure drop. Simulation and field examples confirm that the new correction factor for the rate dependent problem improves the linear model for both PSS and transient period, whether plotted on square-root of time or superposition plots.

Ibrahim, Mazher Hassan

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

NETL: Pressure Swing Absorption Device  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Pressure Swing Absorption Device and Process for Separating CO2 from Shifted Syngas and its Capture for Subsequent Storage Project No.: DE-FE0001323 New Jersey Institute of Technology is developing an advanced pressure swing absorption-based (PSAB) device via laboratory-based experiments. The device will be used to accomplish a cyclic process to process low temperature post-shift-reactor synthesis gas resulting from the gasification process into purified hydrogen at high pressure for use by the combustion turbine of an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant. The overall goal of the proposed work is to develop an advanced PSAB device and cyclic process for use in a coal-fired IGCC plant to produce purified hydrogen at high pressure and a highly purified CO2 stream suitable for use or sequestration.

319

High-Pressure Hydrogen Tanks  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

February 8 February 8 th , 2005 Mark J. Warner, P.E. Principal Engineer Quantum Technologies, Inc. Irvine, CA Low Cost, High Efficiency, Low Cost, High Efficiency, High Pressure Hydrogen Storage High Pressure Hydrogen Storage This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information. 70 MPa Composite Tanks Vent Line Ports Defueling Port (optional) Fill Port Filter Check Valve Vehicle Interface Bracket with Stone Shield In Tank Regulator with Solenoid Lock-off Pressure Relief Device Manual Valve Compressed Hydrogen Storage System In-Tank Regulator Pressure Sensor (not visible here) Pressure Relief Device (thermal) In Tank Gas Temperature Sensor Carbon Composite Shell (structural) Impact Resistant Outer Shell (damage resistant) Gas Outlet Solenoid Foam Dome (impact protection)

320

Fundamentals of high pressure adsorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-pressure adsorption attracts research interests following the world's attention to alternative fuels, and it exerts essential effect on the study of hydrogen/methane storage and the development of novel materials addressing to the storage. However, theoretical puzzles in high-pressure adsorption hindered the progress of application studies. Therefore, the present paper addresses the major theoretical problems that challenged researchers: i.e., how to model the isotherms with maximum observed in high-pressure adsorption; what is the adsorption mechanism at high pressures; how do we determine the quantity of absolute adsorption based on experimental data. Ideology and methods to tackle these problems are elucidated, which lead to new insights into the nature of high-pressure adsorption and progress in application studies, for example, in modeling multicomponent adsorption, hydrogen storage, natural gas storage, and coalbed methane enrichment, was achieved.

Zhou, Y.P.; Zhou, L. [Tianjin University, Tianjin (China). High Pressure Adsorption Laboratory

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

atmospheric pressure | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

pressure pressure Dataset Summary Description (Abstract):Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)NASA Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Release 6.0 Data Set (Nov 2007)22-year Monthly & Annual Average (July 1983 - June 2005)Parameter: Atmospheric Pressure (kPa)Internet: http://eosweb.larc.nasa.gov/sse/Note 1: SSE Methodology & Accuracy sections onlineNote 2: Lat/Lon values indicate the lower left corner of a 1x1 degree region. Negative values are south and west; positive values are north and east. Boundaries of the -90/-180 region Source U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Surface meteorology and Solar Energy (SSE) Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords atmospheric pressure climate NASA SWERA UNEP Data text/csv icon Download Data (csv, 46 MiB)

322

Solids mass flow determination  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

Macko, Joseph E. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Turbulent flow in graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We demonstrate the possibility of a turbulent flow of electrons in graphene in the hydrodynamic region, by calculating the corresponding turbulent probability density function. This is used to calculate the contribution of the turbulent flow to the conductivity within a quantum Boltzmann approach. The dependence of the conductivity on the system parameters arising from the turbulent flow is very different from that due to scattering.

Kumar S. Gupta; Siddhartha Sen

2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

324

Adiabatic two-phase frictional pressure drops in microchannels  

SciTech Connect

Two-phase pressure drops were measured over a wide range of experimental test conditions in two sizes of microchannels (sight glass tubes 0.509 and 0.790 mm) for two refrigerants (R-134a and R-245fa). Similar to the classic Moody diagram in single-phase flow, three zones were distinguishable when plotting the variation of the two-phase friction factor versus the two-phase Reynolds number: a laminar regime for Re{sub TP} < 2000, a transition regime for 2000 {<=} Re{sub TP} < 8000 and a turbulent regime for Re{sub TP} {>=} 8000. The laminar zone yields a much sharper gradient than in single-phase flow. The transition regime is not predicted well by any of the prediction methods for two-phase frictional pressure drops available in the literature. This is not unexpected since only a few data are available for this region in the literature and most methods ignore this regime, jumping directly from laminar to turbulent flow at Re{sub TP} = 2000. The turbulent zone is best predicted by the Mueller-Steinhagen and Heck correlation. Also, a new homogeneous two-phase frictional pressure drop has been proposed here with a limited range of application. (author)

Revellin, Remi; Thome, John R. [EPFL, STI ISE LTCM, ME Gl 464, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

Multiple sort flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA); Esposito, Richard J. (Seattle, WA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Droplet Laden Flow Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Flow Past a Heated Cylinder, Atomization and Sprays, 2006, 16(6 ... Numerical Modeling and Experimental Measurements of Water Spray Impact and ...

2013-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Black String Flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give an exact description of the steady flow of a black string into a planar horizon. The event horizon is out of equilibrium and provides a simple, exact instance of a `flowing black funnel' in any dimension D>=5. It is also an approximation to a smooth intersection between a black string and a black hole, in the limit in which the black hole is much larger than the black string thickness. The construction extends easily to more general flows, in particular charged flows.

Emparan, Roberto

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Visualization of Fluid Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Goujon and J. Devaney, Large Scale Simulations of Single and Multi- Component Flow in Porous Media in Proceedings of SPIE: The International ...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Annual Evolution of Geostrophic Flow in the Gulf of Maine: 1986–1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual evolution of the geostrophic flow structure in the Gulf of Maine was studied with a combined set of moored pressure time-series measurements and five hydrographic surveys from August 1986 through September 1987. A series of quasi-...

Wendell S. Brown; James D. Irish

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

An Automobile Platform for the Measurement of Foehn and Gap Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An instrument package to measure temperature, pressure, humidity, and position was designed to be quickly deployable on any automobile to be used for the study of gap and other orographically influenced flows. Differential GPS (global positioning ...

Georg J. Mayr; Johannes Vergeiner; Alexander Gohm

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

The Hydraulics of an Evolving Upwelling Jet Flowing around a Cape  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upwelling jets flow alongshore in approximate geostrophic balance with the onshore pressure gradient induced by coastal upwelling. Observations of such jets have shown that they often move offshore downstream of capes, leaving a pool of upwelled ...

Andrew C. Dale; John A. Barth

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Gap Flows through Idealized Topography. Part II: Effects of Rotation and Surface Friction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations are conducted of geostrophically balanced flow over an isolated mountain cut by a horizontal gap. The relative importance of the along-gap synoptic-scale pressure gradient and terrain-induced mesoscale circulations for the ...

Saša Gaberšek; Dale R. Durran

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Transition from film boiling to nucleate boiling in forced convection vertical flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanism of collapse of forced cnnvection annular vertical flow film boiling, with liquid core, is investigated using liquid nitrogen at low pressures. The report includes the effect of heat flux from the buss bar. ...

Iloeje, Onwuamaeze C.

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Correlations to predict frictional pressure loss of hydraulic-fracturing slurry in coiled tubing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compared with conventional-tubing fracturing, coiled-tubing (CT) fracturing has several advantages. CT fracturing has become an effective stimulation technique for multizone oil and gas wells. It is also an attractive production-enhancement method for multiseam coalbed-methane wells, and wells with bypassed zones. The excessive frictional pressure loss through CT has been a concern in fracturing. The small diameter of the string limits the cross-sectional area open to flow. Furthermore, the tubing curvature causes secondary flow and results in extra flow resistance. This increased frictional pressure loss results in high surface pumping pressure. The maximum possible pump rate and sand concentration, therefore, have to be reduced. To design a CT fracturing job properly, it is essential to predict the frictional pressure loss through the tubing accurately. This paper presents correlations for the prediction of frictional pressure loss of fracturing slurries in straight tubing and CT. They are developed on the basis of full-scale slurry-flow tests with 11/2-in. CT and slurries prepared with 35 lbm/1,000 gal of guar gel. The extensive experiments were conducted at the full-scale CT-flow test facility. The proposed correlations have been verified with the experimental data and actual field CT-fracturing data. Case studies of wells recently fractured are provided to demonstrate the application of the correlations. The correlations will be useful to the CT engineers in their hydraulics design calculations.

Shah, S.; Zhoi, Y.X.; Bailey, M.; Hernandez, J. [University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

Nuclear reactor pressure vessel support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for nuclear reactor pressure vessels which can withstand all possible combinations of stresses caused by a postulated core disrupting accident during reactor operation. The nuclear reactor pressure vessel is provided with a flange around the upper periphery thereof, and the flange includes an annular vertical extension formed integral therewith. A support ring is positioned atop of the support ledge and the flange vertical extension, and is bolted to both members. The plug riser is secured to the flange vertical extension and to the top of a radially outwardly extension of the rotatable plug. This system eliminates one joint through which fluids contained in the vessel could escape by making the fluid flow path through the joint between the flange and the support ring follow the same path through which fluid could escape through the plug risers. In this manner, the sealing means to prohibit the escape of contained fluids through the plug risers can also prohibit the escape of contained fluid through the securing joint.

Sepelak, George R. (McMurray, PA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A Laboratory Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Laboratory Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution A Laboratory Study of Pressure Losses in Residential Air Distribution Systems Speaker(s): Bass Abushakra Date: March 7, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Duo Wang An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the pressure drop of residential air distribution system components that are either not available or poorly described in existing duct design literature. The tests were designed to imitate cases normally found in typical residential and light commercial installations. The study included three different sizes of flexible ducts, under different compression configurations, splitter boxes, supply boots, and a fresh air intake hood. The experimental tests apparatus followed ASHRAE Standard 120P - Methods of Testing to Determine Flow

337

NETL: Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Low-Pressure Membrane Contactors for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0007553 Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. (MTR) is developing a new type of membrane contactor (or mega-module) to separate carbon dioxide (CO2) from power plant flue gas. This module's membrane area is 500 square meters, 20 to 25 times larger than that of current modules used for CO2 capture. A 500-MWe coal power plant requires 0.5 to 1 million square meters of membrane to achieve 90 percent CO2 capture. The new mega-modules can drastically reduce the cost, complexity, and footprint of commercial-scale membrane module integration. Energy savings due to low-pressure drops for gases circulated through the modules, as well as improved countercurrent flow, are additional benefits. The feasibility of using mega-modules in several different hybrid process designs is being evaluated for future development potential.

338

Flow dynamics and solute transport in unsaturated rock fractures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rock fractures play an important role in flow and contaminant transport in fractured aquifers, production of oil from petroleum reservoirs, and steam generation from geothermal reservoirs. In this dissertation, phenomenological aspects of flow in unsaturated fractures were studied in visualization experiments conducted on a transparent replica of a natural, rough-walled rock fracture for inlet conditions of constant pressure and flow rate over a range of angles of inclination. The experiments demonstrated that infiltrating liquid proceeds through unsaturated rock fractures along non-uniform, localized preferential flow paths. Even in the presence of constant boundary conditions, intermittent flow was a persistent flow feature observed, where portions of the flow channel underwent cycles of snapping and reforming. Two modes of intermittent flow were observed, the pulsating blob mode and the rivulet snapping mode. A conceptual model for the rivulet snapping mode was proposed and examined using idealized, variable-aperture fractures. The frequency of intermittent flow events was measured in several experiments and related to the capillary and Bond numbers to characterize this flow behavior.

Su, G. W.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Charecterization of inertial and pressure effects in homogeneous turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of the thesis is to characterize the linear and nonlinear aspects of inertial and pressure effects in turbulent flows. In the first part of the study, computations of Navier-Stokes and 3D Burgers equations are performed in the rapid distortion (RD) limit to analyze the inviscid linear processes in homogeneous turbulence. By contrasting the results of Navier- Stokes RD equations and Burgers RD equations, the effect of pressure can be isolated. The evolution of turbulent kinetic energy and anisotropy components and invariants are examined. In the second part of the thesis, the velocity gradient dynamics in turbulent flows are studied with the help of inviscid 3D Burgers equations and restricted Euler equations. The analytical asymptotic solutions of velocity gradient tensor are obtained for both Burgers and restricted Euler equations. Numerical computations are also performed to identify the stable solutions. The results are compared and contrasted to identify the effect of pressure on nonlinear velocity gradient dynamics. Of particular interest are the sign of the intermediate principle strain-rate and tendency of vorticity to align with the intermediate principle strain-rate. These aspects of velocity gradients provide valuable insight into the role of pressure in the energy cascade process.

Bikkani, Ravi Kiran

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Determination of Coal Permeability Using Pressure Transient Methods  

SciTech Connect

Coalbed methane is a significant natural resource in the Appalachian region. It is believed that coalbed methane production can be enhanced by injection of carbon dioxide into coalbeds. However, the influence of carbon dioxide injection on coal permeability is not yet well understood. Competitive sorption of carbon dioxide and methane gases onto coal is a known process. Laboratory experiments and limited field experience indicate that coal will swell during sorption of a gas and shrink during desorption of a gas. The swelling and shrinkage may change the permeability of the coal. In this study, the permeability of coal was determined by using carbon dioxide as the flowing fluid. Coal samples with different dimensions were prepared for laboratory permeability tests. Carbon dioxide was injected into the coal and the permeability was determined by using pressure transient methods. The confining pressure was variedto cover a wide range of depths. The permeability was also determined as a function of exposure time of carbon dioxide while the confining stress was kept constant. CT scans were taken before and after the introduction of carbon dioxide. Results show that the porosity and permeability of the coal matrix was very low. The paper presents experimental data and theoretical aspects of the flow of carbon dioxide through a coal sample during pressure transient tests. The suitability of the pressure transient methods for determining permeability of coal during carbon dioxide injection is discussed in the paper.

McLendon, T.R.; Siriwardane, H. (West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV); Haljasmaa, I.V.; Bromhal, G.S.; Soong, Y.; Irdi, G.A.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Blade-Vortex Interactions in High Pressure Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed experimental and numerical investigation of the transport of streamwise (passage) vortices in high-pressure axial turbines and their interaction with the downstream blade rows was performed. The results indicate large variations in the downstream flow field, notably the development of the secondary flows. The mechanism of passage vortex transport was studied in two differently configured high-pressure turbine stages. In the first configuration, the blades are radially stacked while the second configuration features three-dimensionally stacked high-pressure steam turbine blading. The stator hub passage vortex is chopped by the downstream blade row in a similar way to the wake. The bowed vortex tube near the inlet to the rotor appeared to develop two counter-rotating legs extending back to the leading edges of the adjacent blades. These were termed the suction side leg and the pressure side leg. The two legs of the incoming passage vortex then convect with the respective velocities on the blade surfaces. The results are discussed for the radially stacked turbine and the 3-D turbine separately.

Venkata Siva Prasad Chaluvadi

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Evaluation of uncertainties due to hydrogeological modeling and groundwater flow analysis: Steady flow, transient flow, and thermal studies  

SciTech Connect

Starting with regional geographic, geologic, surface and subsurface hydrologic, and geophysical data for the Tono area in Gifu, Japan, we develop an effective continuum model to simulate subsurface flow and transport in a 4 km by 6 km by 3 km thick fractured granite rock mass overlain by sedimentary layers. Individual fractures are not modeled explicitly. Rather, continuum permeability and porosity distributions are assigned stochastically, based on well-test data and fracture density measurements. Lithologic layering and one major fault, the Tsukiyoshi Fault, are assigned deterministically. We conduct three different studies: (1) the so-called base case, in which the model simulates the steady-state groundwater flow through the site, and then stream trace analysis is used to calculate travel times to the model boundary from specified release points; (2) simulations of transient flow during long term pump tests (LTPT) using the base-case model; and (3) thermal studies in which coupled heat flow and fluid flow are modeled, to examine the effects of the geothermal gradient on groundwater flow. The base-case study indicates that the choice of open or closed lateral boundaries has a strong influence on the regional groundwater flow patterns produced by the models, but no field data exist that can be used to determine which boundary conditions are more realistic. The LTPT study cannot be used to distinguish between the alternative boundary conditions, because the pumping rate is too small to produce an analyzable pressure response at the model boundaries. In contrast, the thermal study shows that the temperature distributions produced by the open and closed models differ greatly. Comparison with borehole temperature data may be used to eliminate the closed model from further consideration.

Doughty, Christine; Karasaki, Kenzi

2002-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Ceramic Cross Flow Recuperator Design Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GTE Products Corporation has developed a compact ceramic cross flow recuperator for high temperature industrial heat recovery applications. They recently completed a jointly funded project with the DOE, (Contract #EX-76-C-0 1-2162) to demonstrate the performance of the ceramic recuperator in various industrial furnaces. The ceramic cross flow recuperator core has multiple rectangular flow passages (perpendicular to each other) for the air and gas. Various flow passages are available contingent upon requirements of the particular application. In selecting and sizing a matrix for a given application, one may design a recuperator on the basis of a minimum for one or more of the following parameters; frontal area, length, volume, weight, pressure drop and cost. This paper discusses how the designer can select an optimum design from the various heat exchanger surfaces available and then predict the performance of a recuperator in any given application. The results of wind tunnel tests utilizing a single blow technique, determining a heat transfer parameter, the Colburn factor (j), and a flow friction parameter, Fanning Friction factor (f) are presented and discussed. Methods that illustrate how the (j) and (f) data can be used to compare the relative merits of two or more heat exchanger surface are presented. A typical furnace recuperation example is presented and calculations are detailed to illustrate the design procedures.

Gonzalez, J. M.; Rebello, W. J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Pressure drop and heat transfer characteristics of boiling water in sub-hundred micron channel  

SciTech Connect

The current work focuses on the pressure drop, heat transfer and stability in two phase flow in microchannels with hydraulic diameter of less than one hundred microns. Experiments were conducted in smooth microchannels of hydraulic diameter of 45, 65 {mu}m, and a rough microchannel of hydraulic diameter of 70 {mu}m, with deionised water as the working fluid. The local saturation pressure and temperature vary substantially over the length of the channel. In order to correctly predict the local saturation temperature and subsequently the heat transfer characteristics, numerical techniques have been used in conjunction with the conventional two phase pressure drop models. The Lockhart-Martinelli (liquid-laminar, vapour-laminar) model is found to predict the two phase pressure drop data within 20%. The instability in two phase flow is quantified; it is found that microchannels of smaller hydraulic diameter have lesser instabilities as compared to their larger counterparts. The experiments also suggest that surface characteristics strongly affect flow stability in the two phase flow regime. The effect of hydraulic diameter and surface characteristics on the flow characteristics and stability in two phase flow is seldom reported, and is of considerable practical relevance. (author)

Bhide, R.R.; Singh, S.G.; Sridharan, Arunkumar; Duttagupta, S.P.; Agrawal, Amit [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Powai, Mumbai 400 076 (India)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

345

Permeability prediction and drainage capillary pressure simulation in sandstone reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of reservoir porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure is essential to exploration and production of hydrocarbons. Although porosity can be interpreted fairly accurately from well logs, permeability and capillary pressure must be measured from core. Estimating permeability and capillary pressure from well logs would be valuable where cores are unavailable. This study is to correlate permeability with porosity to predict permeability and capillary pressures. Relationships between permeability to porosity can be complicated by diagenetic processes like compaction, cementation, dissolution, and occurrence of clay minerals. These diagenetic alterations can reduce total porosity, and more importantly, reduce effective porosity available for fluid flow. To better predict permeability, effective porosity needs to be estimated. A general equation is proposed to estimate effective porosity. Permeability is predicted from effective porosity by empirical and theoretical equations. A new capillary pressure model is proposed. It is based on previous study, and largely empirical. It is tested with over 200 samples covering a wide range of lithology (clean sandstone, shaly sandstone, and carbonates dominated by intergranular pores). Parameters in this model include: interfacial tension, contact angle, shape factor, porosity, permeability, irreducible water saturation, and displacement pressure. These parameters can be measured from routine core analysis, estimated from well log, and assumed. An empirical equation is proposed to calculate displacement pressure from porosity and permeability. The new capillary-pressure model is applied to evaluate sealing capacity of seals, calculate transition zone thickness and saturation above free water level in reservoirs. Good results are achieved through integration of well log data, production data, core, and geological concepts.

Wu, Tao

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Hydro-flow supra-turbine engine  

SciTech Connect

A turbine engine operates at high pressure and at relatively low temperatures and revolutions per minute through the use of special carburetion, compressor, combustion unit, and turbine arrangements. The system is characterized by the use of water which is vaporized and concurrently reduces the temperature of the vaporized fuel and air mixture as compression occurs, and is not physically intermixed with the combustion gases until after initial combustion takes place. The compressor includes a pair of back-to-back, four stage composite compressors to which synchronized dual carburetion or meter-flow arrangements separately supply water and gasoline or other fuel, along with air. The water absorbs heat from the compression of both of the two compressors, and the resultant vaporous product gases are routed to the jacket of a combustion chamber in which the compressed fuel and air mixture is burned. Following initial ignition and some burning of the fuel, the superheated steam and combustion products are combined, and the combination is supplied to a multistage transverse flow turbine having in the order of 17 pressure stages. The turbine includes arrangements for directing the high pressure gases back and forth through the rotor blades at different radial distances from the axis of the turbine. Exhaust gases from the turbine are applied to a ''floating'' muffler, including a rotatable inner chamber to facilitate mixing exhaust gases with the ambient air, and to disperse the high moisture content of the exhaust gases.

Neale, A.B.

1981-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

Controlling annular gas flow in deep wells  

SciTech Connect

This article reports on the phenomenon of annular gas channeling. It can occur during primary cementing in wells with formations containing gas. Such channeling may lead to interzonal communication down hole, or even gas migration to the surface. Formation gas is normally contained by the cement slurry's hydrostatic pressure. Annular gas channeling usually results from volumetric changes associated with: cement hydration and fluid loss, poor cement placement techniques, high cement free water, cementing gelling properties, and excessive thickening times. Initially, the cement slurry acts as a true fluid, transmitting hydrostatic pressure to the formation gas and preventing its flow into the cement matrix. However, as the cement begins to set, changing from a fluid state to a rigid state, it gradually begins to lose its ability to transmit hydrostatic pressure. This period of change is usually referred to as the ''transition period.'' Shrinkage of the cement volume compounds the problem and eventually can lead to poor binding between the cement and formation, thereby allowing gas to flow through gaps at the formation-cement interface.

Matthews, S.M.; Copeland, J.C.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Capabilities for information flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a capability-based mechanism for permissive yet secure enforcement of information-flow policies. Language capabilities have been studied widely, and several popular implementations, such as Caja and Joe-E, are available. By making ... Keywords: capabilities, information flow control

Arnar Birgisson; Alejandro Russo; Andrei Sabelfeld

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Flow control optimization in a jet engine serpentine inlet duct  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computational investigations were carried out on an advanced serpentine jet engine inlet duct to understand the development and propagation of secondary flow structures. Computational analysis which went in tandem with experimental investigation was required to aid secondary flow control required for enhanced pressure recovery and decreased distortion at the engine face. In the wake of earlier attempts with modular fluidic actuators used for this study, efforts were directed towards optimizing the actuator configurations. Backed by both computational and experimental resources, many variations in the interaction of fluidic actuators with the mainstream flow were attempted in the hope of best controlling secondary flow formation. Over the length of the studies, better understanding of the flow physics governing flow control for 3D curved ducts was developed. Blowing tangentially, to the wall at the bends of the S-duct, proved extremely effective in enforcing active flow control. At practical jet momentum coefficients, significant improvements characterized by an improved pressure recove ry of 37% and a decrease in distortion close to 90% were seen.

Kumar, Abhinav

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Review of air flow measurement techniques  

SciTech Connect

Airflow measurement techniques are necessary to determine the most basic of indoor air quality questions: ''Is there enough fresh air to provide a healthy environment for the occupants of the building?'' This paper outlines airflow measurement techniques, but it does not make recommendations for techniques that should be used. The airflows that will be discussed are those within a room or zone, those between rooms or zones, such as through doorways (open or closed) or passive vents, those between the building and outdoors, and those through mechanical air distribution systems. Techniques that are highlighted include particle streak velocimetry, hot wire anemometry, fan pressurization (measuring flow at a given pressure), tracer gas, acoustic methods for leak size determination, the Delta Q test to determine duct leakage flows, and flow hood measurements. Because tracer gas techniques are widely used to measure airflow, this topic is broken down into sections as follows: decay, pulse injection, constant injection, constant concentration, passive sampling, and single and multiple gas measurements for multiple zones.

McWilliams, Jennifer

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

CFD Simulation and Experimental Testing of Multiphase Flow Inside the MVP Electrical Submersible Pump  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The MVP is a special type of Electrical Submersible Pumps (ESPs) manufactured by Baker Hughes, model no. G470, and is capable of handling multiphase flow up to 70% Gas Volume Fraction (GVF). Flows at high GVF cause conventional ESPs to surge. However, the special design of the impeller blades of the MVP ESP enables it to handle higher GVF. Dynamic behavior of the multiphase flow is studied experimentally and theoretically for this pump for the first time. In this work, a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) simulation of an entire pump and detailed experimental analysis are performed. Meshing and CFD simulations are performed using the commercially available software ANSYS Fluent. An experimental facility has been designed and constructed to test the pump at different operating conditions. The pump is modeled and tested at two speeds; 3300 and 3600 rpm, using air-water mixtures with GVFs of 0, 5, 10, 25, 32 and 35%. The flow loop is controlled to produce different suction pressures up to 300psi. Pump pressure head is used to validate the CFD model for both single and two phase flows. Single phase CFD model was validated at 100 psi inlet pressure, while two phase models were validated at 200 psi inlet pressure. CFD simulations can predict the behavior of the pump at different speeds, flow rates, GVFs, and inlet pressures. Different diffuser designs are studied and simulated to improve the multistage pump performance. Enhanced diffuser designs increased the pump pressure head to up to 3.2%.

Rasmy Marsis, Emanuel 1983-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gas-liquid two phase flow through a vertical 90 elbow bend  

SciTech Connect

Pressure drop data are reported for two phase air-water flow through a vertical to horizontal 90 elbow bend set in 0.026 m i.d. pipe. The pressure drop in the vertical inlet tangent showed some significant differences to that found for straight vertical pipe. This was caused by the elbow bend partially choking the inflow resulting in a build-up of pressure and liquid in the vertical inlet riser and differences in the structure of the flow regimes when compared to the straight vertical pipe. The horizontal outlet tangent by contrast gave data in general agreement with literature even to exhibiting a drag reduction region at low liquid rates and gas velocities between 1 and 2 m s{sup -1}. The elbow bend pressure drop was best correlated in terms of l{sub e}/d determined using the actual pressure loss in the inlet vertical riser. The data showed a general increase with fluid rates that tapered off at high fluid rates and exhibited a negative pressure region at low rates. The latter was attributed to the flow being smoothly accommodated by the bend when it passed from slug flow in the riser to smooth stratified flow in the outlet tangent. A general correlation was presented for the elbow bend pressure drop in terms of total Reynolds numbers. A modified Lockhart-Martinelli model gave prediction of the data. (author)

Spedding, P.L.; Benard, E. [School of Aeronautical Engineering, Queen's University Belfast, BT9 5AH (United Kingdom)

2007-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ionization-Based Multi-directional Flow Sensor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ionization-Based Multi-directional Flow Sensor Ionization-Based Multi-directional Flow Sensor Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implementing United States Patent Number 7,523,673 entitled "Ionization Based Multi-directional Flow Sensor." Disclosed in this patent is NETL's sensor system and process for multi- directional, real-time monitoring of the flow direction and velocity of a gas stream, with minimal pressure drop, such as air flow in a hybrid power generation system. The sensor comprises an ion source accom- panied by a multidirectional ion collection device near the ion source. Possible applications include power generation and weather monitoring. Overview To optimize the performance of certain industrial processes or apparatus,

354

Myocardial blood flow during induced aortic hypertension in dogs  

SciTech Connect

Myocardial blood flow was measured in anesthetized dogs during control conditions and under conditions where the aortic pressure was increased due to aortic constriction or during infusion. Blood flow was measured using the radioactive microsphere technique. Radioactive microspheres (15 m Ce-141, Sr-85, and Sc-46) were injected under control, aortic constriction and arterenol infusion in four dogs and under control conditions in two others. All microsphere injections were performed under stabilized conditions. It was found that coronary blood flow rose by 80% during aortic constriction and by 158% during arterenol infusion (P < 0.05). This increase in blood flow was not uniform throughout the heart, and higher increases were observed in the middle and apex regions of the left ventricle. Furthermore, under hypertension the increase in blood flow in LAD (left anterior descending) perfused territories was slightly higher than that in CFX (left circumflex) perfused territories.

Thai, B.N.; Levesque, M.J.; Nerem, R.M.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Low-Pressure Sodium Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Low-pressure sodium lighting provides more energy-efficient outdoor lighting than high-intensity discharge lighting, but it has very poor color rendition. Typical applications include highway and...

356

Low pressure carbonylation of heterocycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterocycles, e.g., epoxides, are carbonylated at low pressure with high percentage conversion to cyclic, ring expanded products using the catalyst ##STR00001## where L is tetrahydrofuran (THF).

Coates, Geoffrey W. (Lansing, NY); Kramer, John W. (Mt. Pleasant, MI); Schmidt, Joseph A. R. (Sylvania, OH)

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Low pressure carbonylation of heterocycles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterocycles, e.g., epoxides, are carbonylated at low pressure with high percentage conversion to cyclic, ring expanded products using the catalyst ##STR00001## where L is tetrahydrofuran (THF).

Coates, Geoffrey W. (Ithaca, NY); Kramer, John (Ithaca, NY)

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

358

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Studying Materials Under Extreme Pressure Coupling undulator radiation from Advanced Photon Source (APS) beamlines 3-ID and 13-ID to nuclear resonant inelastic scattering techniques, researchers have determined the phonon density of states for iron under pressures up to 153 gigapascals, equivalent to those found at the Earth's core. Image of the Earth's core. Although indirect measurements and theory have, since the early 1950s, produced an informed picture of the structure and composition of the materials that make up the core of the Earth, direct proof and the answers to some intriguing questions remain unanswered. Previously, ultrahigh-pressure experiments using nuclear resonant inelastic scattering have been difficult to carry out due the tiny samples required.

359

High pressure synthesis gas fermentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The construction of the high pressure gas phase fermentation system has been completed. Photographs of the various components of the system are presented, along with an operating procedure for the equipment.

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Design and Fabrication of a Vertical Pump Multiphase Flow Loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new centrifugal pump has been devised to handle two-phase flow. However, it requires full scale testing to allow further development. Testing is required to verify performance and to gain information needed to apply this design in the field. Further, testing will allow mathematical models to be validated which will allow increased understanding of the pump's behavior. To perform this testing, a new facility was designed and constructed. This facility consists of a closed flow loop. The pump is supplied by separate air and water inlet flows that mix just before entering the pump. These flows can be controlled to give a desired gas volume fraction and overall flow rate. The pump outlet flows into a tank which separates the fluids allowing them to re-circulate. Operating inlet pressures of up to three hundred PSIG will be used with a flow rate of twelve hundred gallons per minute. A two-hundred fifty horsepower electric motor is used to power the pump. The loop is equipped with instrumentation to measure temperature, pressure, flow rate, pump speed, pump shaft horsepower, shaft torque, and shaft axial load. The pump itself has a clear inlet section and a clear section allowing visualization of the second stage volute interior as well as numerous pressure taps along the second stage volute. This instrumentation is sufficient to completely characterize the pump. Design and construction details are provided as well as a history of the initial operating experiences and data collected. A discussion of lessons learned is given in the conclusions. Future projects intended to use this facility are also given. Finally, detailed design drawings are supplied as well as operating instructions and checklists.

Kirkland, Klayton 1965-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Cryogenic & Gas System Piping Pressure Tests (A Collection of PT Permits)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This engineering note is a collection of pipe pressure testing documents for various sections of piping for the D-Zero cryogenic and gas systems. High pressure piping must conform with FESHM chapter 5031.1. Piping lines with ratings greater than 150 psig have a pressure test done before the line is put into service. These tests require the use of pressure testing permits. It is my intent that all pressure piping over which my group has responsibility conforms to the chapter. This includes the liquid argon and liquid helium and liquid nitrogen cryogenic systems. It also includes the high pressure air system, and the high pressure gas piping of the WAMUS and MDT gas systems. This is not an all inclusive compilation of test documentation. Some piping tests have their own engineering note. Other piping section test permits are included in separate safety review documents. So if it isn't here, that doesn't mean that it wasn't tested. D-Zero has a back up air supply system to add reliability to air compressor systems. The system includes high pressure piping which requires a review per FESHM 5031.1. The core system consists of a pressurized tube trailer, supply piping into the building and a pressure reducing regulator tied into the air compressor system discharge piping. Air flows from the trailer if the air compressor discharge pressure drops below the regulator setting. The tube trailer is periodically pumped back up to approximately 2000 psig. A high pressure compressor housed in one of the exterior buildings is used for that purpose. The system was previously documented, tested and reviewed for Run I, except for the recent addition of piping to and from the high pressure compressor. The following documents are provided for review of the system: (1) Instrument air flow schematic, drg. 3740.000-ME-273995 rev. H; (2) Component list for air system; (3) Pressure testing permit for high pressure piping; (4) Documentation from Run I contained in D-Zero Engineering note 3740.214-EN-268, John Urbin 11120/90; (5) Pressure test procedure; (6) Schematic for pressure test; and (7) List of component pressure ratings. The goal of this independent review is to: (1) Reviewer makes recommendation to the Division/Section Safety Officer to approve the testing permit; and (2) Reviewer is satisfied the FESHM 5031 is met, and recommends to the division head that approval to operate be granted.

Rucinski, Russell A.; /Fermilab

2002-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

362

Heat flow of Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive new heat flow and geothermal gradient data set for the State of Oregon is presented on a contour map of heat flow at a scale of 1:1,000,000 and is summarized in several figures and tables. The 1:1,000,000 scale heat flow map is contoured at 20 mW/m/sup 2/ (0.5 HFU) intervals. Also presented are maps of heat flow and temperature at a depth of 1 km averaged for 1/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ intervals. Histograms and averages of geothermal gradient and heat flow for the State of Oregon and for the various physiographic provinces within Oregon are also included. The unweighted mean flow for Oregon is 81.3 +- 2.7 mW/m/sup 2/ (1.94 +- 0.06 HFU). The average unweighted geothermal gradient is 65.3 +- 2.5/sup 0/C/km. The average heat flow value weighted on the basis of geographic area is 68 +- 5 mW/m/sup 2/ (1.63 +- 0.12 HFU) and the average weighted geothermal gradient is 55.0 +- 5/sup 0/C/km.

Blackwell, D.D.; Hull, D.A.; Bowen, R.G.; Steele, J.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Numerical calculations of wind flow in a full-scale wind test facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Numerical studies on wind flow around the Texas Tech University (TTU) Wind Engineering Research Field Laboratory (WERFL) building were conducted. The main focus of this paper is wind loads on the TTU building in the INEEL proposed Windstorm Simulation Center. The results are presented in the form of distributions of static pressure, dynamic pressure, pressure coefficients, and velocity vectors on the surface and the vicinity of the TTU building.

C.H. Oh; J.M. Lacey

1999-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

364

Compression effects on pressure loss in flexible HVAC ducts  

SciTech Connect

A study was conducted to evaluate the effect of compression on pressure drop in flexible, spiral wire helix core ducts used in residential and light commercial applications. Ducts of 6 inches, 8 inches and 10 inches (150, 200 and 250 mm) nominal diameters were tested under different compression configurations following ASHRAE Standard 120-1999--Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings. The results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression. The study demonstrated that moderate compression in flexible ducts, typical of that often seen in field installations, could increase the pressure drop by a factor of four, while further compression could increase the pressure drop by factors close to ten. The results proved that the pressure drop correction factor for compressed ducts cannot be independent of the duct size, as suggested by ASHRAE Fundamentals, and therefore a new relationship was developed for better quantification of the pressure drop in flexible ducts. This study also suggests potential improvements to ASHRAE Standard 120-1999 and provides new data for duct design.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A study of pressure losses in residential air distribution systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the pressure drop characteristics of residential duct system components that are either not available or not thoroughly (sometimes incorrectly) described in existing duct design literature. The tests were designed to imitate cases normally found in typical residential and light commercial installations. The study included three different sizes of flexible ducts, under different compression configurations, splitter boxes, supply boots, and a fresh air intake hood. The experimental tests conformed to ASHRAE Standard 120P--''Methods of Testing to Determine Flow Resistance of HVAC Air Ducts and Fittings''. The flexible duct study covered compressibility and bending effects on the total pressure drop, and the results showed that the available published references tend to underestimate the effects of compression in flexible ducts that can increase pressure drops by up to a factor of nine. The supply boots were tested under different configurations including a setup where a flexible duct elbow connection was considered as an integral part of the supply boot. The supply boots results showed that diffusers can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of two in exit fittings, and the installation configuration can increase the pressure drop by up to a factor of five. The results showed that it is crucial for designers and contractors to be aware of the compressibility effects of the flexible duct, and the installation of supply boots and diffusers.

Abushakra, Bass; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

PRESSURE DROP EVALUATION OF THE HYDROGEN CIRCULATION SYSTEM FOR JSNS  

SciTech Connect

In J-PARC, an intense spallation neutron source (JSNS) driven by a proton beam of 1 MW has selected supercritical hydrogen with a temperature of around 20 K and the pressure of 1.5 MPa as a moderator material. A hydrogen-circulation system, which consists of two pumps, an ortho-para hydrogen converter, a heater, an accumulator and a helium-hydrogen heat exchanger, has been designed to provide supercritical hydrogen to the moderators and remove the nuclear heating there. A hydrogen-circulation system is cooled through the heat exchanger by a helium refrigerator with the refrigeration power of 6.45 kW at 15.5 K. It is important for the cooling design of the hydrogen-circulation system to understand the pressure drops through the equipments. In this work, the pressure drop through each component was analyzed by using a CFD code, STAR-CD. The correlation of the pressure drops through the components that can describe the analytical results within 14% differences has been derived. It is confirmed that the pressure drop in the hydrogen circulation system would be estimated to be 37 kPa for the circulation flow rate of 160 g/s by using the correlations derived here, and is sufficiently lower than the allowable pump head of 100 kPa.

Tatsumoto, H.; Aso, T.; Ohtsu, K.; Kato, T.; Futakawa, M. [J-PARC Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai, Ibaraki, 319-1195 (Japan)

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal Instability and Magnetic Pressure in the Turbulent Interstellar Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent results on the nonlinear development of thermal instability (TI) in the context of the turbulent atomic interstellar medium (ISM). First, we discuss the growth of entropy perturbations in isolation, as a function of the ratio \\eta of the cooling time to the dynamical crossing time. For \\eta~ 0.3) and occurs at scales with \\eta>1. We then consider the behavior of magnetic pressure in turbulent regimes. We propose that the reported lack of correlation between the magnetic pressure and the density is a consequence of the different scaling of the magnetic pressure with density for the slow and fast modes of nonlinear MHD waves. This implies that magnetic ``pressure'' is not a suitable candidate for supplementing thermal pressure in the presence of TI, and that polytropic descriptions of it are probably not adequate in the fully turbulent regime. Finally, we consider TI in a turbulent ISM-like medium. We find that the flow does not exhibit sharp phase transitions, as would be expected in classical...

Vázquez-Semadeni, E; Passot, T; Sánchez-Salcedo, F J; Vazquez-Semadeni, Enrique; Gazol, Adriana; Passot, Thierry; Sanchez-Salcedo, Javier

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Wind-induced Ground-surface Pressures Around a Single-Family House  

SciTech Connect

Wind induces a ground-surface pressure field around a building that can substantially affect the flow of soil gas and thereby the entry of radon and other soil-gas contaminants into the building. To quantify the effect of the wind-induced groundsurface pressure field on contaminant entry rates, the mean ground-surface pressure field was experimentally measured in a wind tunnel for several incidence angles of the wind, two atmospheric boundary layers, and two house geometries. The experimentally measured ground-surface pressure fields are compared with those predicted by a k-e turbulence model. Despite the fundamental limitations in applying a k-e model to a system with flow separation, predictions from the numerical simulations were good for the two wind incidence angles tested.

Riley, W.J.; Gadgil, A.J.; Nazaroff, W.W.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

Ortiz, M.G.

1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

370

Single-phase Flow in Composite Poro-elastic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The mathematical formulation and analysis of the Barenblatt-Biot model of elastic deformation and laminar flow in a heterogeneous porous medium is discussed. This describes consolidation processes in a fluid-saturated double-diffusion model of fractured rock. The model includes various degenerate cases, such as incompressible constituents or totally fissured components, and it is extended to include boundary conditions arising from partially exposed pores. The quasi-static initial-boundary problem is shown to have a unique weak solution, and this solution is strong when the data are smoother. 1. Introduction Any model of fluid flow through a deformable solid matrix must account for the coupling between the mechanical behavior of the matrix and the fluid dynamics. For example, compression of the medium leads to increased pore pressure, if the compression is fast relative to the fluid flow rate. Conversely, an increase in pore pressure induces a dilation of the matrix in response to t...

R. E. Showalter; Bahareh Momken

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Multiphase Flow Modeling Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Science Science Chris Guenther, Director Computational Science Division RUA Spring Meeting, Morgantown, WV March 2013 2 NETL's Multiphase Flow Science Team * The Multiphase Flow Science Team develops physics-based simulation models to conduct applied scientific research. - Development of new theory - Extensive on-site and collaborative V&V efforts and testing - Engages in technology transfer - Applies the models to industrial scale problems. 3 Why is Multiphase Flow Science Needed? * Industry is increasingly relying on multiphase technologies to produce clean and affordable energy with carbon capture. * Unfortunately, the presence of a solid phase reduces the operating capacity of a typical energy device from its original design on average by 40% [1].

372

Effect of flow topology on the calculation of two-phase frictional multipliers in uniformly heated flow of R-134a in a rectangular duct  

SciTech Connect

The two-phase frictional multipliers for SUVA R-134a flowing in a rectangular duct (with D{sub H} = 4.8 mm) have been measured for three nominal system pressures (0.88, 1.34 and 2.34 MPa) and four nominal mass fluxes (510, 1020 and 1740, 2040 kg/m{sup 2}/s) under uniform heat flux conditions. The data is compared with adiabatic data previously taken at similar flow conditions, as well as with several classical multiplier correlations. The comparisons reveal a strong effect of pressure and mass flux on the flow topology and, by extension, a large effect on the calculation of acceleration and frictional pressure drop components. For this fluid and this geometry, entrainment and fluid separation is enhanced at higher pressures and mass flux such that most of the liquid exists in the test section edges and as dispersed droplets in the core. For these cases, the classical simplified approach to calculate acceleration pressure drop fails to adequately predict the acceleration component and leads to erroneous calculations of frictional pressure drop from the measured total pressure drop. Best estimates of the true acceleration component are given, based on void profiles measured with a gamma densitometer system, comparisons to the adiabatic data, and recasting the data in terms of the total pressure drop multiplier as a function of the Martinelli parameter, X{sub tt}. (author)

Vassallo, Peter; Kevin Cope, W.; Smith, Walter C. [Bechtel Marine Propulsion Corporation, Niskayuna, NY 12309 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

373

Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer  

SciTech Connect

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it.

Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Sample introduction system for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning, HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removing of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

Engh, G. van den

1997-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Sample introduction apparatus for a flow cytometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sample introduction system for a flow cytometer allows easy change of sample containers such as test tubes and facilitates use in high pressure environments. The sample container includes a cap having a pressure supply chamber and a sample container attachment cavity. A sample container may be automatically positioned into the attachment cavity so as to sealably engage the end of the sample container as its outer surface. This positioning may be accomplished through some sample introduction mechanism. To facilitate cleaning HPLC tubing and fittings may be used in a manner which facilitates removable of the entire tubing from both the nozzle container and other sample container cap to permit its replacement to avoid contamination. The sample container support may include horizontal stops which loosely limit the movement of the sample container and thus avoid further stresses upon it. 3 figs.

Van den Engh, G.

1998-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

377

Dynamics of the ion flow in a discharge with crossed E and H fields  

SciTech Connect

The experimental and theoretical results of the investigation of an ion flow in a low-pressure discharge in crossed E and H fields are presented. It is shown that two quasi-stationary current states can be realized in a transonic collisionless flow of ions in a cold plasma.

Movsesyants, Yu. B., E-mail: yumovsesyants@gmail.com; Tyuryukanov, P. M. [All-Russian Electrotechnical Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

A model for stratified gas-liquid turbulent flow in ducts of arbitrary cross-section  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

93 A model for stratified gas-liquid turbulent flow in ducts of arbitrary cross-section J. M the pressure gradient and the liquid fraction in two-phase gas- liquid fully developed stratified flow.60 Nomenclature. - TWO-PHASE VARIABLES. Definition densities statistical average (gas, liquid) mass average phase

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

379

Preventing numerical errors generated by interface-capturing schemes in compressible multi-material flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present work, errors generated in computations of compressible multi-material flows using shock-capturing schemes are examined, specifically pressure oscillations (when the specific heats ratio is variable), but also temperature spikes and species ... Keywords: High-order accurate schemes, Interface capturing, Material discontinuities, Multi-material flows, Multifluid algorithms, Shock capturing, WENO

Eric Johnsen; Frank Ham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

A variational multiscale finite element method for multiphase flow in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a stabilized finite element method for the numerical solution of multiphase flow in porous media, based on a multiscale decomposition of pressures and fluid saturations into resolved (or grid) scales and unresolved (or subgrid) scales. The ... Keywords: Conservation laws, Finite elements, Multiphase flow, Porous media, Shocks, Stabilized methods, Variational multiscale, Waterflood

Ruben Juanes

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

A variational multiscale finite element method for multiphase flow in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a stabilized finite element method for the numerical solution of multiphase flow in porous media, based on a multiscale decomposition of pressures and fluid saturations into resolved (or grid) scales and unresolved (or subgrid) scales. The ... Keywords: conservation laws, finite elements, multiphase flow, porous media, shocks, stabilized methods, variational multiscale, waterflood

Ruben Juanes

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Experimental studies of adiabatic flow boiling in fractal-like branching microchannels  

SciTech Connect

Experimental results of adiabatic boiling of water flowing through a fractal-like branching microchannel network are presented and compared to numerical model simulations. The goal is to assess the ability of current pressure loss models applied to a bifurcating flow geometry. The fractal-like branching channel network is based on channel length and width ratios between adjacent branching levels of 2{sup -1/2}. There are four branching sections for a total flow length of 18 mm, a channel height of 150 {mu}m and a terminal channel width of 100 {mu}m. The channels were Deep Reactive Ion Etched (DRIE) into a silicon disk. A Pyrex disk was anodically bonded to the silicon to form the channel top to allow visualization of the flow within the channels. The flow rates ranged from 100 to 225 g/min and the inlet subcooling levels varied from 0.5 to 6 C. Pressure drop along the flow network and time averaged void fraction in each branching level were measured for each of the test conditions. The measured pressure drop ranged from 20 to 90 kPa, and the measured void fraction ranged from 0.3 to 0.9. The measured pressure drop results agree well with separated flow model predictions accounting for the varying flow geometry. The measured void fraction results followed the same trends as the model; however, the scatter in the experimental results is rather large. (author)

Daniels, Brian J.; Liburdy, James A.; Pence, Deborah V. [Mechanical Engineering, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR 97330 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

On the subcooled critical flow model in RELAP5/MOD3  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of an anomaly in the subcooled critical flow model in the RELAP5/MOD3 computer code is presented. Specifically, the code produces a discontinuity in going from unchoked subcooled liquid flow (i.e., subsonic flow) to subcooled choked flow (i.e., sonic flow). The same anomaly has been reported elsewhere. The root cause for this anomaly has been analyzed, and it is found that the user-supplied junction loss coefficient and discharge coefficient play an important role in the occurrence of this anomaly. The analysis is verified by assessment against a test problem simulating single-phase liquid flow through a convergent nozzle with a fixed upstream pressure and a varying downstream pressure. A corrective measure to eliminate the discontinuity is suggested.

Yeung, W.S.; Shirkov, J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Seafloor Pressure Measurements of Nonlinear Internal Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly resolved pressure measurements on the seafloor over New Jersey’s continental shelf reveal the pressure signature of nonlinear internal waves of depression as negative pressure perturbations. The sign of the perturbation is determined by ...

J. N. Moum; J. D. Nash

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Spray bottle apparatus with pressure multiplying pistons  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises a spray bottle in which the pressure resulting from the gripping force applied by the user is amplified and this increased pressure used in generating a spray such as an aerosol or fluid stream. In its preferred embodiment, the invention includes a high pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is operative for driving fluid out of this chamber at high pressure through a spray nozzle and a low pressure chamber and a corresponding piston which is acted upon the hydraulic pressure within the bottle resulting from the gripping force. The low pressure chamber and piston are of larger size than the high pressure chamber and piston. The pistons are rigidly connected so that the force created by the pressure acting on the piston in the low pressure chamber is transmitted to the piston in the high pressure chamber where it is applied over a more limited area thereby generating greater hydraulic pressure for use in forming the spray.

Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA); Gordon, Norman R. (Kennewick, WA); DeFord, Henry S. (Kennewick, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Two-phase pressure drop across a hydrofoil-based micro pin device using R-123  

SciTech Connect

The two-phase pressure drop in a hydrofoil-based micro pin fin heat sink has been investigated using R-123 as the working fluid. Two-phase frictional multipliers have been obtained over mass fluxes from 976 to 2349 kg/m{sup 2} s and liquid and gas superficial velocities from 0.38 to 1.89 m/s and from 0.19 to 24 m/s, respectively. It has been found that the two-phase frictional multiplier is strongly dependent on flow pattern. The theoretical prediction using Martinelli parameter based on the laminar fluid and laminar gas flow represented the experimental data fairly well for the spray-annular flow. For the bubbly and wavy-intermittent flow, however, large deviations from the experimental data were recorded. The Martinelli parameter was successfully used to determine the flow patterns, which were bubbly, wavy-intermittent, and spray-annular flow in the current study. (author)

Kosar, Ali [Mechatronics Engineering Program, Sabanci University, Orhanli, Tuzla, 34956 Istanbul (Turkey)

2008-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Deformation of Olivine at Mantle Pressure using D-DIA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Knowledge of the rheological properties of mantle materials is critical in modeling the dynamics of the Earth. The high-temperature flow law of olivine defined at mantle conditions is especially important since the pressure dependence of rheology may affect our estimation of the strength of olivine in the Earth's interior. In this study, steady-state high-temperature (up to 1473 K) deformation experiments of polycrystalline olivine (average grain size ? 10 ?m) at pressure up to 9.6 GPa, were conducted using a Deformation-DIA (D-DIA) high-pressure apparatus and synchrotron X-ray radiation. The oxygen fugacity (fo2) during the runs was in-between the iron-wustite and the Ni/NiO buffers' fo2. The water content of the polycrystalline samples was generally about 150 to 200 wt. ppm but was as low as 35 wt ppm. Typically, 30 % strain was generated during the uniaxial compression. Sample lengths during the deformation process as well as the differential stresses were monitored in situ by X-ray radiography and diffraction, respectively. The strain rate was derived with an accuracy of 10?6 s?1. Differential stress was measured at constant strain rate (?10?5 s?1) using a multi-element solid-state detector combined with a conical slit. Recovered specimens were investigated by optical and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM shows that dislocation glide was the dominant deformation mechanism throughout the experiment. Evidence of dislocation climb and cross-slip as active mechanisms are also reported. Deformation data show little or no dependence of the dislocation creep flow with pressure, yielding to an activation volume V* of 0 {+-} 5 cm3/mol. These new data are consistent with the high-temperature rheological laws at lower pressures, as reported previously.

Li,L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

RMOTC - Testing - Flow Assurance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flow Assurance Flow Assurance RMOTC Flow Loop Facility Layout Notice: As of July 15th 2013, the Department of Energy announced the intent to sell Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 3 (NPR3). The sale of NPR-3 will also include the sale of all equipment and materials onsite. A decision has been made by the Department of Energy to complete testing at RMOTC by July 1st, 2014. RMOTC will complete testing in the coming year with the currently scheduled testing partners. For more information on the sale of NPR-3 and sale of RMOTC equipment and materials please join our mailing list here. Over a decade ago, RMOTC began cooperatively building a full-scale facility to test new flow assurance technology, mainly in the areas of hydrates and paraffins. Today, RMOTC's test facility consists of five individual loop

389

Modons in Shear Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modons in shear flow are computed as equilibrium solutions of the equivalent barotropic vorticity equation using a numerical Newton–Kantorovich iterative technique with double Fourier spectral expansion. The model is given a first guess of an ...

Sue Ellen Haupt; James C. McWilliams; Joseph J. Tribbia

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Stochastically scalable flow control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent advances in the mathematical analysis of flow control have prompted the creation of the Scalable TCP (STCP) and Exponential RED (E-RED) algorithms. These are designed to be scalable under the popular deterministic delay ...

Thomas Voice

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

RG flows and instantons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In these two lectures I discuss RG flow solutions in (1,0) six dimensional supergravity involving SU(2) Yang-Mills instantons. in the conformally flat part of the 6D metric. The solutions interpolate between two (4,0) supersymmetric AdS{sub 3} Multiplication-Sign S{sup 3} backgrounds with different values of AdS{sub 3} and S{sup 3} radii and describe RG flows in the dual 2D SCFT. The flows described are of v.e.v. type, driven by a vacuum expectation value of a (not exactly) marginal operator of dimension 2 in the UV. We give an interpretation of the supergravity solution in terms of the D1/D5 system in type I string theory on K3, whose effective field theory is expected to flow to a (4,0) SCFT in the infrared.

Gava, Edi [INFN, Trieste (Italy)

2012-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

392

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, Hsu-Chi (Albuquerque, NM); Cheng, Yung-Sung (Albuquerque, NM)

1984-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

Islands in Zonal Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of a meridional gradient in sea surface temperature (warm toward the equator, cold toward the pole) on the circulation around an island is investigated. The upper-ocean eastward geostrophic flow that balances such a meridional gradient ...

Michael A. Spall

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Parallel flow diffusion battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Casting Flow Chart  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Figure: ...Fig. 1 Simplified flow diagram of the basic operations for producing a steel casting. Similar diagrams can be applied to other ferrous and nonferrous alloys produced by sand

396

Three dimensional flow processor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The 3D-flow processor is a general purpose programmable data stream pipelined device that allows fast data movement in six directions for digital signal processing applications such as identifying objects in a matrix in a programmable form. The 3D-flow processor can be used in one dimensional, two dimensional, and three dimensional topologies capable of sustaining an input data rate of up to 100 million data (or frames) per second in a parallel processing system.

Crosetto, D.B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Increased Power Flow Guidebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Increased Power Flow (IPF) Guidebook is a state-of-the-art and best practices guidebook on increasing power flow capacities of existing overhead transmission lines, underground cables, power transformers, and substation equipment without compromising safety and reliability. The Guidebook discusses power system concerns and limiting conditions to increasing capacity, reviews available technology options and methods, illustrates alternatives with case studies, and analyzes costs and benefits of differe...

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

398

Cryogenic Pressure Vessels: Progress and Plans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pressure Vessel workshop, LLNL, February 15, 2011, p. 1 Cryogenic Pressure Vessels: Progress and Plans Salvador Aceves, Gene Berry, Francisco Espinosa, Ibo Matthews, Guillaume...

399

Analytical modeling of core hydraulics and flow management in breeder reactors  

SciTech Connect

An analytical model representing the hydraulic behavior of the primary system of fast breeder nuclear reactors is discussed. A computer code capable of detailing the core flow distribution and characterizing the flow and pressure drop in each reactor component is presented. Application of this method to the reactor core thermal-hydraulic design has allowed optimization of the flow management with consequent upgrading in performance, reduction of unnecessary conservatism and very substantial cost savings. Typical quantitative examples are presented.

Carelli, M.D.; Willis, J.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system with directed internal gas flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an inlet adapted to introduce gas into the interior of the vessel, an outlet adapted to withdraw gas from the interior of the vessel, and an axis; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region; and (c) one or more gas flow control partitions disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and adapted to change a direction of gas flow within the vessel.

Holmes, Michael Jerome (Thompson, ND); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh (Allentown, PA)

2010-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flow pressure rangepsi" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The effect of longitudinal spacer ribs on the minimum pressure drop in a heated annulus  

SciTech Connect

When evaluating a heated flow passage for vulnerability to static flow excursions, special note should be taken of flow restrictions which might allow premature vapor generation. In this study, measurements of steady state pressure drop were made for the downward flow of water in a vertical annulus. The outer wall was uniformly heated to allow subcooled boiling. Minima in the pressure drop characteristics were compared for test sections with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. For a given power and inlet temperature, the minimum occurred at a higher flow rate in the ribbed test section. This is attributed to vapor generation at the ribs. The work cited in this document show how a restriction in a heated channel can produce vapor which would not be observed in the absence of the restriction. In the present study, the effect of a flow restriction on the tendency to flow excursion is explored by finding demand curves for a heated annulus in subcooled boiling flow. The annulus is heated from the outside, and alternately equipped with and without longitudinal spacer ribs. These ribs separate the heated and unheated walls; in pressing against the heated wall they provide a means for premature vapor production.

Johnston, B.S.; Neff, J.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Advanced Flow-Battery Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Advanced Flow-Battery Systems ... Abstract Scope, Flow- battery systems (FBS) were originally developed over 30 years ago and have since ...

403

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow. Water Flow Calibrations 18020C. ... NIST provides calibration services for water flow meters. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task II. Fracture permeability of crystalline rocks as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrothermal alteration. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pore-fluid chemical interactions on both short and long time scales can significantly change the permeability of a rock. Measurement of the permeability variations requires adaption and modification on standard measurement systems, with special attention given to pore-fluid flow rates and metal corrosion of system components. In this report, system requirements and capabilities are reviewed, analyzed, and recommendations made. Special attention is given to the choice of corrosion resistant metals, fluid-flow systems, back-pressure systems, jacketing materials, and flow-rate measurement. On the basis of this study, an economical, highly flexible, permeability system was designed and built. The system allows measurement of permeability over the darcy to nanodarcy range, using geologically meaningful, chemically reactive, pore fluids under constant volume flow rates as small as 0.2 ml/day at temperatures in excess of 300C, fluid pressures to 20 MPa, and confining pressures to 100 MPa. 7 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

Johnson, B.

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Method of and apparatus for preheating pressurized fluidized bed combustor and clean-up subsystem of a gas turbine power plant  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a gas turbine power plant having a pressurized fluidized bed combustor, gas turbine-air compressor subsystem and a gas clean-up subsystem interconnected for fluid flow therethrough, a pipe communicating the outlet of the compressor of the gas turbine-air compressor subsystem with the interior of the pressurized fluidized bed combustor and the gas clean-up subsystem to provide for flow of compressed air, heated by the heat of compression, therethrough. The pressurized fluidized bed combustor and gas clean-up subsystem are vented to atmosphere so that the heated compressed air flows therethrough and loses heat to the interior of those components before passing to the atmosphere.

Cole, Rossa W. (E. Rutherford, NJ); Zoll, August H. (Cedar Grove, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Downhole steam generator using low pressure fuel and air supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a spiral, tubular heat exchanger is used in the combustion chamber to isolate the combustion process from the water being superheated for conversion into steam. The isolation allows combustion of a relatively low pressure oxidant and fuel mixture for generating high enthalpy steam. The fuel is preheated by feedback of combustion gases from the top of the combustion chamber through a fuel preheater chamber. The hot exhaust gases of combustion at the bottom of the combustion chamber, after flowing over the heat exchanger enter an exhaust passage and pipe. The exhaust pipe is mounted inside the water supply line heating the water flowing into the heat exchanger. After being superheated in the heat exchanger, the water is ejected through an expansion nozzle and converts into steam prior to penetration into the earth formation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at a steam outlet downstream of the nozzle and close when the steam pressure is lost due to flameout.

Fox, Ronald L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

High pressure liquid level monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid level monitor for tracking the level of a coal slurry in a high-pressure vessel including a toroidal-shaped float with magnetically permeable bands thereon disposed within the vessel, two pairs of magnetic field generators and detectors disposed outside the vessel adjacent the top and bottom thereof and magnetically coupled to the magnetically permeable bands on the float, and signal processing circuitry for combining signals from the top and bottom detectors for generating a monotonically increasing analog control signal which is a function of liquid level. The control signal may be utilized to operate high-pressure control valves associated with processes in which the high-pressure vessel is used.

Bean, Vern E. (Frederick, MD); Long, Frederick G. (Ijamsville, MD)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Melting of Ice under Pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

Pressure oscillations caused by momentum on shut in of a high rate well in a fractured formation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pressure transient testing techniques are an important part of reservoir and production testing procedures. These techniques are frequently used to determine practical information about underground reservoirs such as the permeability, porosity, liquid content, reservoir and liquid discontinuities and other related data. This information is valuable in helping to analyze, improve and forecast reservoir performance. This report is concerned with developing models for pressure transient well testing in high permeability, high flow rate, naturally fractured reservoirs. In the present work, a study was made of the effects of liquid inertia in the fractures and the wellbore on the pressure response obtained during a well test. The effects of turbulent flow and multi-phase flow effects such as gravitational segregation or anisotropic porous media effects were not considered. The scope of the study was limited to studying inertial effects on the pressure response of a fractured reservoir.

Bhatnagar, S.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Analysis and Design Significance of A-11 Flow-Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III  

SciTech Connect

Comparisons of the experimental data on seal pressure distributions obtained from the A-11 Flow Induced Vibration Test, Phases I and III, with analytical results including porous flow through the unimpregnated inner reflector cylinder for the same operating conditions show generally very good agreement. The principal deviations between analysis and experiment occurs when high pressure ratios exist across the last seal. Additional investigation, both in the relationship used in the analytical model and in the experimental area, are required to determine the cause of the deviation found between analysis and experiment when the pressure ratio across the last seal is near critical. As a result of this comparison, it appears that the analytical methods and assumtions made in predicting unheated seal pressure distributions are resonable, and may be used with confidence in the test prediction of the NRX-A1 cold flow test.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Vacuum chamber with a supersonic flow aerodynamic window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic flow aerodynamic window, whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

Hanson, Clark L. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.

Hanson, C.L.

1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

413

On fluid flow in a heterogeneous medium under nonisothermal conditions  

SciTech Connect

An asymptotic technique, valid in the presence of smoothly-varying heterogeneity, provides explicit expressions for the velocity of a propagating pressure and temperature disturbance. The governing equations contain nonlinear terms due to the presence of temperature-dependent coefficients and due to the advection of fluids with differing temperatures. Two cases give well-defined expressions in terms of the parameters of the porous medium: the uncoupled propagation of a pressure disturbance and the propagation of a fully coupled temperature and pressure disturbance. The velocity of the coupled disturbance or front, depends upon the medium parameters and upon the change in temperature and pressure across the front. For uncoupled flow, the semi-analytic expression for the front velocity reduces to that associated with a linear diffusion equation. A comparison of the asymptotic travel time estimates with calculations from a numerical simulator indicates reasonably good agreement for both uncoupled and coupled disturbances.

D.W., Vasco

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Comparison of calculated results from two analytical models with measured data from a heat-exchanger flow test  

SciTech Connect

Predicted results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model were compared with measured results from an air flow test on a half-scale model of the auxiliary heat exchanger for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. Measurements of both velocity and pressure were made within the heat exchanger shell side flow field. These measurements were compared with calculated results from both a network flow model and a turbulent flow model. Both analytical models predicted early identical results which, except for some minor anomalies, compared favorably with the measured data.

Carosella, D.P.; Pavlics, P.N.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Meridional Flow Field of Axisymmetric Flows in a Rotating Annulus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements of the flow field were made of the axisymmetric flow in a differentially heated rotating fluid annulus by using a long-term tracking of a tracer particle. Its meridional flow profile is composed of a flow circulating in a large ...

T. Tajima; T. Nakamura

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

SNAP: the Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer at...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer at SNS Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer. Spallation Neutrons and Pressure Diffractometer. The SNAP Diffractometer...

417

Fluid Dynamical Prediction of Changed v1-flow at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Substantial collective flow is observed in collisions between Lead nuclei at LHC as evidenced by the azimuthal correlations in the transverse momentum distributions of the produced particles. Our calculations indicate that the Global v1-flow, which at RHIC peaked at negative rapidities (named as 3rd flow component or anti-flow), now at LHC is going to turn toward forward rapidities (to the same side and direction as the projectile residue). Potentially this can provide a sensitive barometer to estimate the pressure and transport properties of the Quark-Gluon Plasma. Our calculations also take into account the initial state Center of Mass rapidity fluctuations, and demonstrate that these are crucial for v1 simulations. In order to better study the transverse momentum flow dependence we suggest a new "symmetrized" v1S flow component; and we also propose a new method to disentangle Global v1 flow from the contribution generated by the random fluctuations in the initial state. This will enhance the possibilities of studying the collective Global v1 flow both at the STAR Beam Energy Scan program and at LHC.

L. P. Csernai; V. K. Magas; H. Stöcker; D. D. Strottman

2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

418

Pressure Profiles in Two-Phase Geothermal Wells: Comparison of Field Data and Model Calculations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased confidence in the predictive power of two-phase correlations is a vital part of wellbore deliverability and deposition studies for geothermal wells. Previously, the Orkiszewski (1967) set of correlations has been recommended by many investigators to analyze geothermal wellbore performance. In this study, we use measured flowing pressure profile data from ten geothermal wells around the world, covering a wide range of flowrate, fluid enthalpy, wellhead pressure and well depth. We compare measured and calculated pressure profiles using the Orkiszewski (1967) correlations.

Ambastha, A.K.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

419

Microhole High-Pressure Jet Drill for Coiled Tubing  

SciTech Connect

Tempress Small Mechanically-Assisted High-Pressure Waterjet Drilling Tool project centered on the development of a downhole intensifier (DHI) to boost the hydraulic pressure available from conventional coiled tubing to the level required for high-pressure jet erosion of rock. We reviewed two techniques for implementing this technology (1) pure high-pressure jet drilling and (2) mechanically-assisted jet drilling. Due to the difficulties associated with modifying a downhole motor for mechanically-assisted jet drilling, it was determined that the pure high-pressure jet drilling tool was the best candidate for development and commercialization. It was also determined that this tool needs to run on commingled nitrogen and water to provide adequate downhole differential pressure and to facilitate controlled pressure drilling and descaling applications in low pressure wells. The resulting Microhole jet drilling bottomhole assembly (BHA) drills a 3.625-inch diameter hole with 2-inch coil tubing. The BHA consists of a self-rotating multi-nozzle drilling head, a high-pressure rotary seal/bearing section, an intensifier and a gas separator. Commingled nitrogen and water are separated into two streams in the gas separator. The water stream is pressurized to 3 times the inlet pressure by the downhole intensifier and discharged through nozzles in the drilling head. The energy in the gas-rich stream is used to power the intensifier. Gas-rich exhaust from the intensifier is conducted to the nozzle head where it is used to shroud the jets, increasing their effective range. The prototype BHA was tested at operational pressures and flows in a test chamber and on the end of conventional coiled tubing in a test well. During instrumented runs at downhole conditions, the BHA developed downhole differential pressures of 74 MPa (11,000 psi, median) and 90 MPa (13,000 psi, peaks). The median output differential pressure was nearly 3 times the input differential pressure available from the coiled tubing. In a chamber test, the BHA delivered up to 50 kW (67 hhp) hydraulic power. The tool drilled uncertified class-G cement samples cast into casing at a rate of 0.04 to 0.17 m/min (8 to 33 ft/hr), within the range projected for this tool but slower than a conventional PDM. While the tool met most of the performance goals, reliability requires further improvement. It will be difficult for this tool, as currently configured, to compete with conventional positive displacement downhole motors for most coil tubing drill applications. Mechanical cutters on the rotating nozzle head would improve cutting. This tool can be easily adapted for well descaling operations. A variant of the Microhole jet drilling gas separator was further developed for use with positive displacement downhole motors (PDM) operating on commingled nitrogen and water. A fit-for-purpose motor gas separator was designed and yard tested within the Microhole program. Four commercial units of that design are currently involved in a 10-well field demonstration with Baker Oil Tools in Wyoming. Initial results indicate that the motor gas separators provide significant benefit.

Ken Theimer; Jack Kolle

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

420

A Dynamical Systems Approach Towards Modeling the Rapid Pressure Strain Correlation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the behavior of pressure in the Rapid Distortion Limit, along with its concomitant modeling, are addressed. In the first part of the work, the role of pressure in the initiation, propagation and suppression of flow instabilities for quadratic flows is analyzed. The paradigm of analysis considers the Reynolds stress transport equations to govern the evolution of a dynamical system, in a state space composed of the Reynolds stress tensor components. This dynamical system is scrutinized via the identification of the invariant sets and the bifurcation analysis. The changing role of pressure in quadratic flows, viz. hyperbolic, shear and elliptic, is established mathematically and the underlying physics is explained. Along the maxim of "understanding before prediction", this allows for a deeper insight into the behavior of pressure, thus aiding in its modeling. The second part of this work deals with Rapid Pressure Strain Correlation modeling in earnest. Based on the comprehension developed in the preceding section, the classical pressure strain correlation modeling approaches are revisited. Their shortcomings, along with their successes, are articulated and explained, mathematically and from the viewpoint of the governing physics. Some of the salient issues addressed include, but are not limited to, the requisite nature of the model, viz. a linear or a nonlinear structure, the success of the extant models for hyperbolic flows, their inability to capture elliptic flows and the use of RDT simulations to validate models. Through this analysis, the schism between mathematical and physical guidelines and the engineering approach, at present, is substantiated. Subsequently, a model is developed that adheres to the classical modeling framework and shows excellent agreement with the RDT simulations. The performance of this model is compared to that of other nominations prevalent in engineering simulations. The work concludes with a summary, pertinent observations and recommendations for future research in the germane field.

Mishra, Aashwin A.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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421

Formation flow channel blocking  

SciTech Connect

A method is claimed for selectively blocking high permeability flow channels in an underground hydrocarbon material bearing formation having flow channels of high permeability and having flow channels of lesser permeability. The method includes the following steps: introducing a blocking material fluid comprising a blocking material in a carrier into the flow channels through an injection well in communication with the formation; introducing a buffer fluid into the formation through the injection well for the buffer fluid to displace the blocking material fluid away from the injection well; allowing the blocking material to settle in the channels to resist displacement by fluid flowing through the channels; introducing a quantity of an activating fluid into the channels through the injection well at a sufficient rate for the activating fluid to displace the buffer fluid and finger into the high permeability channels to reach the blocking material in the high permeability channels without reaching the blocking material in the low permeability channels, the activating fluid being adapted to activate the blocking material which it reaches to cause blocking of the high permeability channels.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

422

Flow meter evaluation for U.S. Navy Public Works Center, San Diego, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Navy Public Works Center San Diego (PWCSD) was concerned about the accuracy of various flow meters on steam and compressed air lines serving Naval facilities in San Diego, California. The flow meters had experienced various inconsistencies that had not been resolved prior to July 1993. Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, Washington, evaluated the operation of 10 out of 79 steam and compressed air flow meters at PWCSD. The evaluation was limited to analysis of historical information and review of existing operating procedures. On-site investigation of the flow meters was limited to external observations of the flow-sensing equipment and a check of the flow computer program. PNL did not remove installed sensing equipment (i.e., flow meters or temperature or pressure sensors) to evaluate existing condition or check calibration. Although many of the flow meter errors can be traced to improperly normalized readings and to meters improperly compensated for temperature and pressure, lack of regular maintenance, including proper calibration, was evidenced throughout this study. A strict calibration schedule should be established for all steam and air flow meters, including calibration of the temperature sensor, pressure sensor, and flow turbine. It is recommended that the most crucial flow meters (such as the 10 evaluated in this study) be calibrated yearly. The remaining 69 flow meters could be placed on a staggered, biyearly calibration schedule. Calibration should be done by qualified personnel only. Improper calibration is often worse than no calibration at all. An outside firm is recommended to be contracted with to perform all maintenance and calibration on flow meters at the Naval facilities. Use of an outside firm would better facilitate regular, reliable calibration while removing liability for damaged parts.

Chvala, W.D. Jr.; McMordie, K.L.; Szydlowski, R.F.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Stirling engine with pressurized crankcase  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A two piston Stirling engine wherein the pistons are coupled to a common crankshaft via bearing means, the pistons include pad means to minimize friction between the pistons and the cylinders during reciprocation of the pistons, means for pressurizing the engine crankcase, and means for cooling the crankshaft and the bearing means eliminating the need for oil in the crankcase.

Corey, John A. (Melrose, NY)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Interface effects on multiphase flows in porous media  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Most models for multiphase flows in a porous medium are based on the straightforward extension of Darcy's law, in which each fluid phase is driven by its own pressure gradient. The pressure difference between the phases is thought to be an effect of surface tension and is called capillary pressure. Independent of Darcy's law, for liquid imbibition processes in a porous material, diffusion models are sometime used. In this paper, an ensemble phase averaging technique for continuous multi phase flows is applied to derive averaged equations and to examine the validity of the commonly used models. The closure for the averaged equations is quite complicated for general multiphase flows in a porous material. For flows with a small ratio of the characteristic length of the phase interfaces to the macroscopic length, the closure relations can be simplified significantly by an approximation with a second order error in the length ratio. The approximation reveals the information of the length scale separation obscured during the ensemble averaging process, and leads to an equation system similar to Darcy's law, but with additional terms. Based on interactions on phase interfaces, relations among closure quantities are studied.

Zhang, Duan Z [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Fissile Flow and Enrichment Monitor for GCEP Advanced Safeguards Application  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental data that demonstrate a concept for a {sup 235}U flow and enrichment monitor (FEMO) based on passive measurements of process equipment in gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs). The primary goal of the FEMO is to prevent, without using pipe penetrations or active interrogation with external sources, the production and diversion of undeclared nuclear material. This FEMO concept utilizes: (1) calibrated measurements of {sup 235}U density in cascade headers, and (2) measurements of pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate, which are correlated to the electrical power consumed by the GCEP pumps that transport UF{sub 6} from the cascade to the condensation cylinders. The {sup 235}U density is measured by counting 186 keV emissions using a NaI gamma detector located upstream of the pump. The pump inlet pressure and volumetric flow rate are determined using a correlation that is a function of the measured pump operational parameters (e.g., electric power consumption and rotational frequency) and the pumping configuration. The concept has been demonstrated in a low-pressure flow loop at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL; Uckan, Taner [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Two-phase flow studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The two-phase flow program is directed at understanding the hydrodynamics of two-phase flows. The two-phase flow regime is characterized by a series of flow patterns that are designated as bubble, slug, churn, and annular flow. Churn flow has received very little scientific attention. This lack of attention cannot be justified because calculations predict that the churn flow pattern will exist over a substantial portion of the two-phase flow zone in producing geothermal wells. The University of Houston is experimentally investigating the dynamics of churn flow and is measuring the holdup over the full range of flow space for which churn flow exists. These experiments are being conducted in an air/water vertical two-phase flow loop. Brown University has constructed and is operating a unique two-phase flow research facility specifically designed to address flow problems of relevance to the geothermal industry. An important feature of the facility is that it is dedicated to two-phase flow of a single substance (including evaporation and condensation) as opposed to the case of a two-component two-phase flow. This facility can be operated with horizontal or vertical test sections of constant diameter or with step changes in diameter to simulate a geothermal well profile.

Hanold, R.J.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Confined superadiabatic premixed flame-flow interaction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laminar premixed unity-Lewis number flames are studied numerically, to examine flow-flame interaction in a two-dimensional closed domain. Two opposed planar flame fronts are perturbed sinusoidally and allowed to develop by consuming premixed reactants. Combustion heat release leads to global pressure and temperature rise in the domain, due to confinement. A superadiabatic condition, with products temperature rising with distance behind the flame front, is observed due to stagnation pressure rise. Variations in tangential strain rate behind the perturbed flame fronts, due to flame curvature and heat release, result in a modified local superadiabatic temperature gradient in the products. These variations in temperature gradients are shown to determine the net local confinement-heating rate in the products, leading to corresponding deviations in products temperature, and the local reaction rate along the flame front. These observations, which are not consistent with one-dimensional superadiabatic stagnation flame behavior, are a direct result of the unrestrained unsteady nature of two-dimensional flame-flow interaction.

Najm, H.N.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale? Can We Accurately Model Fluid Flow in Shale? Print Thursday, 03 January 2013 00:00 Over 20 trillion cubic meters of natural gas are trapped in shale, but many shale oil and gas producers still use models of underground fluid flow that date back to the heyday of easy-to-tap gas and liquid crude. The source of shale oil and gas is kerogen, an organic material in the shale, but until now kerogen hasn't been incorporated in mathematical models of shale gas reservoirs. Paulo Monteiro, Chris Rycroft, and Grigory Isaakovich Barenblatt, with the Computational Research Division and the Advanced Light Source, recently modeled how pressure gradients in the boundary layer between kerogen inclusions and shale matrices affect productivity and can model reservoir longevity.

429

Flow-induced channelization in a porous medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a theory for erosional channelization induced by fluid flow in a saturated granular porous medium. When the local fluid flow-induced stress is larger than a critical threshold, grains are dislodged and carried away so that the porosity of the medium is altered by erosion. This in turn affects the local hydraulic conductivity and pressure in the medium and results in the growth and development of channels that preferentially conduct the flow. Our multiphase model involves a dynamical porosity field that evolves along with the volume fraction of the mobile and immobile grains in response to fluid flow that couples the spatiotemporal dynamics of the three phases. Numerical solutions of the resulting initial boundary value problem show how channels form in porous media and highlights how heterogeneity in the erosion threshold dictates the form of the patterns and thus the ability to control them.

Mahadevan, Amala

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

A simplified sizing and mass model for axial flow turbines  

SciTech Connect

An axial flow turbine mass model has been developed and used to study axial flow turbines for space power systems. Hydrogen, helium-xenon, hydrogen-water vapor, air, and potassium vapor working fluids have been investigated to date. The impact of construction material, inlet temperature, rotational speed, pressure ratio, and power level on turbine mass and volume has been analyzed. This paper presents the turbine model description and results of parametric studies showing general design trends characteristic of any axial flow machine. Also, a comparison of axial flow turbine designs using helium-xenon mixtures and potassium vapor working fluids, which are used in Brayton and Rankine space power systems, respectively, is presented. 9 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Hudson, S.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Three principal results from recent Fenton Hill flow testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of recent flow testing at Fenton Hill, New Mexico, have been examined in light of their applicability to the development of commercial-scale hot dry rock (HDR) reservoirs at other sites. These test results, obtained during the cumulative 11 months of reservoir flow testing between 1992 and 1995, show that there was no significant production temperature drawdown during this time and that the reservoir flow became more dispersed as flow testing proceeded. Based on these test results together with previous HDR research at Fenton Hill and elsewhere, it is concluded that a three-well geometry, with one centrally located injection well and two production wells -- one at each end of the pressure-stimulated reservoir region -- would provide a much more productive system for future HDR development than the two-well system tested at Fenton Hill.

Brown, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DuTeaux, R. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Composition Pulse Time-Of-Flight Mass Flow Sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for measuring fluid flow rates over a wide range of flow rates (<1 nL/min to >10 .mu.L/min) and at pressures at least as great as 10,000 psi. The invention is particularly adapted for use in microfluidic systems. The device operates by producing compositional variations in the fluid, or pulses, that are subsequently detected downstream from the point of creation to derive a flow rate. Each pulse, comprising a small fluid volume, whose composition is different from the mean composition of the fluid, can be created by electrochemical means, such as by electrolysis of a solvent, electrolysis of a dissolved species, or electrodialysis of a dissolved ionic species. Measurements of the conductivity of the fluid can be used to detect the arrival time of the pulses, from which the fluid flow rate can be determined

Mosier, Bruce P. (San Francisco, CA); Crocker, Robert W. (Fremont, CA); Harnett, Cindy K. (Livermore, CA) l

2004-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

433

Transient foam flow in porous media with CAT Scanner  

SciTech Connect

Transient behavior is likely to dominate over most of the duration of a foam injection field project. Due to the lack of date, little is presently known about transient foam flow behavior. Foam flow does not follow established models such as the Buckley-Leverett theory, and no general predictive model has been derived. Therefore, both experimental data and a foam flow theory are needed. In this work, foam was injected at a constant mass rate into one-dimensional sandpacks of 1-in diameter and 24-in or 48-in length that had initially been saturate with distilled water. The system was placed in a cat Scanner. Data, obtained at room temperature and low pressure at various times, include both the pressure and saturation distributions. Pressure profiles showed that the pressure gradient is much greater behind the foam front than ahead of it. Moreover, the pressure gradients keep changing as the foam advances in the sandpack. This behavior differs from Buckley-Leverett theory. The CT scan results demonstrated gas channeling near the front, but eventually the foam block all these channels and sweeps the entire cross section after many pore volumes of injection. Three series of experiments were run: (1) surfactant adsorption measurements; (2) gas displacements of surfactant-laden solutions and (3) foam displacements. The first two series of experiments were made to provide the necessary parameters required to match the foam displacements. To this end, it was necessary to smooth the saturation history data, using a Langmuir-type formula. A theory was proposed based on the principles of the fractional flow curve construction method. This foam theory treats the foam as composed of infinitesimal slugs of gas of varying viscosities. The foam front has the lowest viscosity and foam at the injection end has the highest.

Liu, Dianbin; Brigham, W.E.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor and a method of operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine.

Isaksson, Juhani (Karhula, FI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Pressurized fluidized bed reactor and a method of operating the same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fluid bed reactor power plant includes a fluidized bed reactor contained within a pressure vessel with a pressurized gas volume between the reactor and the vessel. A first conduit supplies primary gas from the gas volume to the reactor, passing outside the pressure vessel and then returning through the pressure vessel to the reactor, and pressurized gas is supplied from a compressor through a second conduit to the gas volume. A third conduit, comprising a hot gas discharge, carries gases from the reactor, through a filter, and ultimately to a turbine. During normal operation of the plant, pressurized gas is withdrawn from the gas volume through the first conduit and introduced into the reactor at a substantially continuously controlled rate as the primary gas to the reactor. In response to an operational disturbance of the plant, the flow of gas in the first, second, and third conduits is terminated, and thereafter the pressure in the gas volume and in the reactor is substantially simultaneously reduced by opening pressure relief valves in the first and third conduits, and optionally by passing air directly from the second conduit to the turbine. 1 fig.

Isaksson, J.

1996-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Mass-Loaded Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key process within astronomy is the exchange of mass, momentum, and energy between diffuse plasmas in many types of astronomical sources (including planetary nebulae, wind-blown bubbles, supernova remnants, starburst superwinds, and the intracluster medium) and dense, embedded clouds or clumps. This transfer affects the large scale flows of the diffuse plasmas as well as the evolution of the clumps. I review our current understanding of mass-injection processes, and examine intermediate-scale structure and the global effect of mass-loading on a flow. I then discuss mass-loading in a variety of diffuse sources.

J. M. Pittard

2006-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

437

Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I.Skillicorn 1 Azimuthal asymmetry using energy flow method Azimuthal angle distribution at Q2 >100 GeV2 Energy flow method.Ukleja on behalf of the ZEUS Collaboration #12; Energy Flow Energy Flow Energy Flow A.Ukleja, T.Tymieniecka, I

438

Development of a method for measuring the density of liquid sulfur at high pressures using the falling-sphere technique  

SciTech Connect

We describe a new method for the in situ measurement of the density of a liquid at high pressure and high temperature using the falling-sphere technique. Combining synchrotron radiation X-ray radiography with a large-volume press, the newly developed falling-sphere method enables the determination of the density of a liquid at high pressure and high temperature based on Stokes' flow law. We applied this method to liquid sulfur and successfully obtained the density at pressures up to 9 GPa. Our method could be used for the determination of the densities of other liquid materials at higher static pressures than are currently possible.

Funakoshi, Ken-ichi; Nozawa, Akifumi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

439

Calculation of two-phase dispersed droplet-in-vapor flows including normal shock waves  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for calculating quasi-one-dimensional, steady-state, two-phase dispersed droplet-in-vapor flow has been developed. The technique is applicable to both subsonic and supersonic single component flow in which normal shock waves may occur, and is the basis for a two-dimensional model. The flow is assumed to be inviscid except for droplet drag. Temperature and pressure equilibrium between phases is assumed, although this is not a requirement of the technique. Example calculations of flow in one-dimensional nozzles with and without normal shocks are given and compared with experimentally measured pressure profiles for both low quality and high quality two-phase steam/water flow.

Comfort, W.J.; Alger, T.W.; Giedt, W.H.; Crowe, C.T.

1976-07-28T23:59:59.000Z