National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for flow orders ofos

  1. Charge flow model for atomic ordering in nonisovalent alloys...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Charge flow model for atomic ordering in nonisovalent alloys Title: Charge flow model for atomic ordering in nonisovalent alloys Authors: Wang, Shuzhi ; Wang, Lin-Wang Publication ...

  2. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) expanded an existing operational flow order (OFO) into a system-wide stage-3 high-inventory OFO on Thursday, September 28, 2006. The company will...

  3. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Gas & Electric Company (PG&E) expanded an existing operational flow order (OFO) into a system-wide stage-3 high-inventory OFO on Thursday, September 28, 2006. The company will...

  4. Nanoparticle flow, ordering and self-assembly.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schunk, Peter Randall; Brown, William Michael; Plimpton, Steven James; Lechman, Jeremy B.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Petersen, Matthew K.; in't Veld, Pieter J.

    2008-10-01

    Nanoparticles are now more than ever being used to tailor materials function and performance in differentiating technologies because of their profound effect on thermo-physical, mechanical and optical properties. The most feasible way to disperse particles in a bulk material or control their packing at a substrate is through fluidization in a carrier, followed by solidification through solvent evaporation/drying/curing/sintering. Unfortunately processing particles as concentrated, fluidized suspensions into useful products remains an art largely because the effect of particle shape and volume fraction on fluidic properties and suspension stability remains unexplored in a regime where particle-particle interaction mechanics is prevalent. To achieve a stronger scientific understanding of the factors that control nanoparticle dispersion and rheology we have developed a multiscale modeling approach to bridge scales between atomistic and molecular-level forces active in dense nanoparticle suspensions. At the largest length scale, two 'coarse-grained' numerical techniques have been developed and implemented to provide for high-fidelity numerical simulations of the rheological response and dispersion characteristics typical in a processing flow. The first is a coupled Navier-Stokes/discrete element method in which the background solvent is treated by finite element methods. The second is a particle based method known as stochastic rotational dynamics. These two methods provide a new capability representing a 'bridge' between the molecular scale and the engineering scale, allowing the study of fluid-nanoparticle systems over a wide range of length and timescales as well as particle concentrations. To validate these new methodologies, multi-million atoms simulations explicitly including the solvent have been carried out. These simulations have been vital in establishing the necessary 'subgrid' models for accurate prediction at a larger scale and refining the two coarse

  5. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Update: Pacific Gas and Electric Company imposed a systemwide Stage 2 high-inventory operational flow order (OFO) from Friday, June 1, through Sunday, June 3, and...

  6. First-order particle acceleration in magnetically driven flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Beresnyak, Andrey; Li, Hui

    2016-03-02

    In this study, we demonstrate that particles are regularly accelerated while experiencing curvature drift in flows driven by magnetic tension. Some examples of such flows include spontaneous turbulent reconnection and decaying magnetohydrodynamic turbulence, where a magnetic field relaxes to a lower-energy configuration and transfers part of its energy to kinetic motions of the fluid. We show that this energy transfer, which normally causes turbulent cascade and heating of the fluid, also results in a first-order acceleration of non-thermal particles. Since it is generic, this acceleration mechanism is likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal particle distribution inmore » magnetically dominant environments such as the solar chromosphere, pulsar magnetospheres, jets from supermassive black holes, and γ-ray bursts.« less

  7. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Transportation Update: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) extended a Stage 2 high-inventory operational flow order (OFO) from Friday, June 8, through Wednesday, June 13,...

  8. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Transportation Update: Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) extended a Stage 2 high-inventory operational flow order (OFO) from Friday, June 8, through Wednesday, June 13,...

  9. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    declared an operational flow order (OFO), October 9 through 15, because of a shut-in test. The test is located at the Muldon Storage Field in Mississippi. The company will...

  10. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    declared an operational flow order (OFO), October 9 through 15, because of a shut-in test. The test is located at the Muldon Storage Field in Mississippi. The company will...

  11. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    operational flow orders (OFOs) in anticipation of marketers looking for a place to park surplus gas. By Friday, prices at Chicago and New York citygates were down 0.20 and...

  12. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    operational flow orders (OFOs) in anticipation of marketers looking for a place to park surplus gas. By Friday, prices at Chicago and New York citygates were down 0.20 and...

  13. ORDER

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PP&L EnergyPlus Company Order No. EA-210 I. BACKGROUND Exports of electricity from the United States to a foreign country are regulated and require authorization under section 202(e) of the Federal Power Act (FPA) (16 U.S.C. §824a(e)). On May 4, 1999, PP&L EnergyPlus Company (PP&L EnergyPlus) applied to the Office of Fossil Energy (FE) of the Department of Energy (DOE) for authorization to transmit electric energy to Canada as a power marketer. PP&L EnergyPlus, a limited

  14. A low order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation using 3D adaptive hybrid grids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallinderis, Yannis; Vitsas, Panagiotis A.; Menounou, Penelope

    2012-07-15

    A low-order flow/acoustics interaction method for the prediction of sound propagation and diffraction in unsteady subsonic compressible flow using adaptive 3-D hybrid grids is investigated. The total field is decomposed into the flow field described by the Euler equations, and the acoustics part described by the Nonlinear Perturbation Equations. The method is shown capable of predicting monopole sound propagation, while employment of acoustics-guided adapted grid refinement improves the accuracy of capturing the acoustic field. Interaction of sound with solid boundaries is also examined in terms of reflection, and diffraction. Sound propagation through an unsteady flow field is examined using static and dynamic flow/acoustics coupling demonstrating the importance of the latter.

  15. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linear reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.

  16. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linearmore » reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.« less

  17. A Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting diffuse correlation spectroscopy blood flow indices in heterogeneous tissues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang

    2014-09-29

    Conventional semi-infinite analytical solutions of correlation diffusion equation may lead to errors when calculating blood flow index (BFI) from diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements in tissues with irregular geometries. Very recently, we created an algorithm integrating a Nth-order linear model of autocorrelation function with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon migrations in homogenous tissues with arbitrary geometries for extraction of BFI (i.e., αD{sub B}). The purpose of this study is to extend the capability of the Nth-order linear algorithm for extracting BFI in heterogeneous tissues with arbitrary geometries. The previous linear algorithm was modified to extract BFIs in different types of tissues simultaneously through utilizing DCS data at multiple source-detector separations. We compared the proposed linear algorithm with the semi-infinite homogenous solution in a computer model of adult head with heterogeneous tissue layers of scalp, skull, cerebrospinal fluid, and brain. To test the capability of the linear algorithm for extracting relative changes of cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in deep brain, we assigned ten levels of αD{sub B} in the brain layer with a step decrement of 10% while maintaining αD{sub B} values constant in other layers. Simulation results demonstrate the accuracy (errors < 3%) of high-order (N ≥ 5) linear algorithm in extracting BFIs in different tissue layers and rCBF in deep brain. By contrast, the semi-infinite homogenous solution resulted in substantial errors in rCBF (34.5% ≤ errors ≤ 60.2%) and BFIs in different layers. The Nth-order linear model simplifies data analysis, thus allowing for online data processing and displaying. Future study will test this linear algorithm in heterogeneous tissues with different levels of blood flow variations and noises.

  18. Higher-order compositional modeling of three-phase flow in 3D fractured porous media based on cross-flow equilibrium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moortgat, Joachim Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2013-10-01

    Numerical simulation of multiphase compositional flow in fractured porous media, when all the species can transfer between the phases, is a real challenge. Despite the broad applications in hydrocarbon reservoir engineering and hydrology, a compositional numerical simulator for three-phase flow in fractured media has not appeared in the literature, to the best of our knowledge. In this work, we present a three-phase fully compositional simulator for fractured media, based on higher-order finite element methods. To achieve computational efficiency, we invoke the cross-flow equilibrium (CFE) concept between discrete fractures and a small neighborhood in the matrix blocks. We adopt the mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to approximate convective Darcy fluxes and the pressure equation. This approach is the most natural choice for flow in fractured media. The mass balance equations are discretized by the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method, which is perhaps the most efficient approach to capture physical discontinuities in phase properties at the matrix-fracture interfaces and at phase boundaries. In this work, we account for gravity and Fickian diffusion. The modeling of capillary effects is discussed in a separate paper. We present the mathematical framework, using the implicit-pressure-explicit-composition (IMPEC) scheme, which facilitates rigorous thermodynamic stability analyses and the computation of phase behavior effects to account for transfer of species between the phases. A deceptively simple CFL condition is implemented to improve numerical stability and accuracy. We provide six numerical examples at both small and larger scales and in two and three dimensions, to demonstrate powerful features of the formulation.

  19. Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    In order to avoid an OFO, Northwest will use its limited storage flexibility at Jackson Prairie and Clay Basin to offset possible OFOs at the Kemmerer station by withdrawing...

  20. Natural Gas Weekly Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    In order to avoid an OFO, Northwest will use its limited storage flexibility at Jackson Prairie and Clay Basin to offset possible OFOs at the Kemmerer station by withdrawing...

  1. Extraction of diffuse correlation spectroscopy flow index by integration of Nth-order linear model with Monte Carlo simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shang, Yu; Lin, Yu; Yu, Guoqiang; Li, Ting; Chen, Lei; Toborek, Michal

    2014-05-12

    Conventional semi-infinite solution for extracting blood flow index (BFI) from diffuse correlation spectroscopy (DCS) measurements may cause errors in estimation of BFI (αD{sub B}) in tissues with small volume and large curvature. We proposed an algorithm integrating Nth-order linear model of autocorrelation function with the Monte Carlo simulation of photon migrations in tissue for the extraction of αD{sub B}. The volume and geometry of the measured tissue were incorporated in the Monte Carlo simulation, which overcome the semi-infinite restrictions. The algorithm was tested using computer simulations on four tissue models with varied volumes/geometries and applied on an in vivo stroke model of mouse. Computer simulations shows that the high-order (N ≥ 5) linear algorithm was more accurate in extracting αD{sub B} (errors < ±2%) from the noise-free DCS data than the semi-infinite solution (errors: −5.3% to −18.0%) for different tissue models. Although adding random noises to DCS data resulted in αD{sub B} variations, the mean values of errors in extracting αD{sub B} were similar to those reconstructed from the noise-free DCS data. In addition, the errors in extracting the relative changes of αD{sub B} using both linear algorithm and semi-infinite solution were fairly small (errors < ±2.0%) and did not rely on the tissue volume/geometry. The experimental results from the in vivo stroke mice agreed with those in simulations, demonstrating the robustness of the linear algorithm. DCS with the high-order linear algorithm shows the potential for the inter-subject comparison and longitudinal monitoring of absolute BFI in a variety of tissues/organs with different volumes/geometries.

  2. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at s NN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using ?sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 ?b-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistentmorewith similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ?2 and ?3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with ?m-?n correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.less

  3. TASK ORDER

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    NA0000XXX Task Order No: DE-DT000XXXX Statement of Work August 7, 2015 Task Order Title: Design, Integration, Construction, Communications, and Engineering (DICCE) Services for Port of Cat Lai, Vietnam. Scope: The Contractor shall design, construct, and integrate fully functional portal monitor and communications systems at designated sites in Vietnam. * Port of Cat Lai Requirements Documents: The following task order requirements describe key milestones and deliverables. For a more complete

  4. Ordering Information

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    coal industry Natural gas trade (Table 4.3) Ordering Information This publication and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be purchased from the...

  5. 1982 Orders

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOCKET FE CITE DATE NUMBER APPLICANT NAME ORDER NO. 70116.ERA 121482 82-04-LNG PhillipsMarathon 49 70552.ERA 113082 82-09-NG Northern Natural Gas 48 70541.ERA 110182...

  6. A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    flow with Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A consistent second order projection scheme for simulating transient viscous flow with ...

  7. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using √sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 μb-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistent with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ε2 and ε3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with εmn correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.

  8. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at √sNN = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aad, G.

    2015-09-14

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using √sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 μb-1. The vm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistentmore » with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ε2 and ε3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with εm-εn correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.« less

  9. In Situ SAXS Studies of Structural Relaxation of an Ordered Block...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flow Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In Situ SAXS Studies of Structural Relaxation of an Ordered Block Copolymer Melt Following Cessation of Uniaxial Extensional Flow ...

  10. Implementing Executive Order 13423

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Guide describes the instructions on the requirements and how fleets should implement the Executive Order 13423.

  11. Polymers with increased order

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sawan, Samuel P.; Talhi, Abdelhafid; Taylor, Craig M.

    1998-08-25

    The invention features polymers with increased order, and methods of making them featuring a dense gas.

  12. Compliance Order on Consent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance Order on Consent Compliance Order on Consent The Compliance Order on Consent provides the requirements for environmental cleanup of hazardous constituents for LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email What is the Compliance Order on Consent? The Compliance Order on Consent between the State of New Mexico Environment Department and the United States Department of Energy and Los Alamos National

  13. Stochastic models for turbulent reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerstein, A.

    1993-12-01

    The goal of this program is to develop and apply stochastic models of various processes occurring within turbulent reacting flows in order to identify the fundamental mechanisms governing these flows, to support experimental studies of these flows, and to further the development of comprehensive turbulent reacting flow models.

  14. Consent Order public meeting

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consent Order public meeting Consent Order public meeting WHEN: Apr 28, 2016 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM WHERE: Los Alamos County Council Chambers CATEGORY: Community TYPE: Meeting INTERNAL: Calendar Login Event Description On March 1, 2005, NMED, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Regents of the University of California entered into the 2005 Consent Order that prescribed fence-to-fence cleanup requirements for the Laboratory. The public comment period on the Consent Order closes May 16, 2016

  15. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  16. HSI Tape Ordering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tape Ordering HSI Tape Ordering General Procedure If you are retrieving multiple files from HPSS, it is best to order your retrieval requests in a way that makes sense for the HPSS system. In HPSS, files initially go onto a disk cache and migrate to tape as time passes. This means that files that were put into HPSS at the same time could end up spread across multiple tapes. Since each tape must by loaded into the reader, it will be fastest if you order your requests so that you are pulling all

  17. Microsoft Word - Wind Industry Work Order Information Flow Survey...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... summarizes the findings of a preliminary survey of wind turbine maintenance management. ... With current mobile technology CMMS can solve many of the challenges associated with ...

  18. Directives System Order

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1995-10-16

    The order prescribes the process for development of Policy Statements, Orders, Notices, Manuals and Guides, which are intended to guide, inform, and instruct employees in the performance of their jobs, and enable them to work effectively within the Department and with agencies, contractors, and the public.

  19. RedFlow | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in order to 'commercialise the proprietary flowing electrolyte battery and the integrated energy storage systems'. Coordinates: -27.46888, 153.022827 Show Map Loading map......

  20. URS Consent Order

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... requires the written consent of both Parties. 10. URS waives any and all rights to appeal or otherwise seek judicial or administrative review of the terms of this Consent Order. ...

  1. Consent Order Update

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the September 24, 2014 Board meeting Pete Maggiore DOE, Provided Information on the Consent Order Work that Needs to be Completed. Information on the Fiscal Year Work Plan was also Provided.

  2. Flow battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lipka, Stephen M.; Swartz, Christopher R.

    2016-02-23

    An electrolyte system for a flow battery has an anolyte including [Fe(CN).sub.6].sup.3- and [Fe(CN).sub.6].sup.4- and a catholyte including Fe.sup.2+ and Fe.sup.3+.

  3. Order 13287, Preserve America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    4 In response to requirements of Executive Order 13287, Preserve America Office of History and Heritage Resources Office of the Executive Secretariat U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Part I. Background and Overview

  4. NMED Consent Order

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    begins environmental sampling in townsite September 25, 2008 Vicinity of Upper LA Canyon Investigated as Part of NMED Consent Order LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, September 25, 2008-Environmental sampling, conducted on behalf of Los Alamos National Laboratory in the town of Los Alamos near upper Los Alamos Canyon, has begun. Known as the Upper Los Alamos Canyon Project, this effort is an environmental assessment of areas that have been or could have been affected by Laboratory operations from the days

  5. High Order Seismic Simulations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Order Seismic Simulations on the Intel Xeon Phi Processor (Knights Landing) Alexander Heinecke 1 , Alexander Breuer 2 , Michael Bader 3 , and Pradeep Dubey 1 1 Intel Corporation, 2200 Mission College Blvd., Santa Clara 95054, CA, USA 2 University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., La Jolla 92093, CA, USA 3 Technische Universit¨ at M¨ unchen, Boltzmannstr. 3, D-85748 Garching, Germany Abstract. We present a holistic optimization of the ADER-DG finite element software SeisSol targeting

  6. Flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    van den Engh, Ger

    1995-01-01

    A Faraday cage enclosing the flow chamber of a cytometer and ground planes associated with each field deflection plate in concert therewith inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates and increases forces applied to a charged event passing therethrough for accurate focus thereof while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard.

  7. Flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, G.

    1995-11-07

    A Faraday cage is described which encloses the flow chamber of a cytometer. Ground planes associated with each field deflection plate inhibit electric fields from varying the charge on designated events/droplets and further concentrates. They also increase forces applied to a passing charged event for accurate focus while concomitantly inhibiting a potential shock hazard. 4 figs.

  8. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  9. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  10. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  11. Paperclips Etc. Special Order Form

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ...... Date: ... ALL SPECIAL ORDERS ARE SUBJECT TO FULL PAYMENT OR A RESTOCKING FEE WHEN ITEMS ORDERED ARE RETURNED TO THE SUPPLIER DUE TO THE ...

  12. Executive Order 13423 Implementing Instructions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR IMPLEMENTING EXECUTIVE ORDER 13423“Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management”

  13. Competition Advocates and Task-Order and Delivery Order Ombudsman |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA) Acquisition Management Competition Advocates and Task-Order and Delivery Order Ombudsman There are two senior agency positions dedicated to ensuring full and open competition as a part of the federal contracting process: Competition Advocates and Task-Order and Delivery Order Ombudsman. Competition Advocates are responsible for: Promoting full and open competition; Promoting the acquisition of commercial items; Removing barriers to full and

  14. Recurrent flow analysis in spatiotemporally chaotic 2-dimensional Kolmogorov flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucas, Dan Kerswell, Rich R.

    2015-04-15

    Motivated by recent success in the dynamical systems approach to transitional flow, we study the efficiency and effectiveness of extracting simple invariant sets (recurrent flows) directly from chaotic/turbulent flows and the potential of these sets for providing predictions of certain statistics of the flow. Two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow (the 2D Navier-Stokes equations with a sinusoidal body force) is studied both over a square [0, 2?]{sup 2} torus and a rectangular torus extended in the forcing direction. In the former case, an order of magnitude more recurrent flows are found than previously [G. J. Chandler and R. R. Kerswell, Invariant recurrent solutions embedded in a turbulent two-dimensional Kolmogorov flow, J. Fluid Mech. 722, 554595 (2013)] and shown to give improved predictions for the dissipation and energy pdfs of the chaos via periodic orbit theory. Analysis of the recurrent flows shows that the energy is largely trapped in the smallest wavenumbers through a combination of the inverse cascade process and a feature of the advective nonlinearity in 2D. Over the extended torus at low forcing amplitudes, some extracted states mimic the statistics of the spatially localised chaos present surprisingly well recalling the findings of Kawahara and Kida [Periodic motion embedded in plane Couette turbulence: Regeneration cycle and burst, J. Fluid Mech. 449, 291 (2001)] in low-Reynolds-number plane Couette flow. At higher forcing amplitudes, however, success is limited highlighting the increased dimensionality of the chaos and the need for larger data sets. Algorithmic developments to improve the extraction procedure are discussed.

  15. Paperclips Etc. Special Order Form

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    PSS-02.2 (March 7, 2011) Replaces PSS-02.1 PAPERCLIPS Etc. SPECIAL Orders Form This form is used to order supplies that are not readily available in the DOE HQ self-service supply...

  16. Price Quotes and Isotope Ordering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ordering Price Quotes and Isotope Ordering Isotopes produced at Los Alamos National Laboratory are saving lives, advancing cutting-edge research and keeping the U.S. safe. Isotope...

  17. DOE - Fossil Energy: Orders-2013

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Order Granting Blanket Authority to Export Natural Gas to Mexico 3366 13-146-NG 121213 Iberdrola Energy Services, LLC Order Granting Blanket Authority to ImportExport Natural ...

  18. ORDER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    rack or container with the firing chamber empty. During normal operations, long guns (e.g., rifles, shotguns, submachine guns) must not be carried with a round in the...

  19. Low volume flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meixler, Lewis D.

    1993-01-01

    The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

  20. Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels The ...

  1. Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Flow distribution channels to control flow in process channels You are ...

  2. Public Order and Safety Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    | Activity Subcategories | Energy Use Public Order and Safety Buildings... Volunteer fire stations tend not to be government owned, which probably explains why 33 percent of...

  3. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R.

    2003-04-15

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  4. EIN Cash Flow Model

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EIN Cash Flow Model Energy Independence Now (EIN) Objectives Identify financial risks in early hydrogen infrastructure systems and illustrate hydrogen station cash flows under a ...

  5. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... ETC.) ...... 20 1C IMPACT OF PHYSICS ON THE FLOW (RADIATION, MOISTURE, ETC.) ... shear across scales, global scale physics, flow forcing, coupling kilometer-scale ...

  6. High-Order/Low-Order methods for ocean modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, Christopher; Womeldorff, Geoff; Chacón, Luis; Knoll, Dana A.

    2015-06-01

    We examine a High Order/Low Order (HOLO) approach for a z-level ocean model and show that the traditional semi-implicit and split-explicit methods, as well as a recent preconditioning strategy, can easily be cast in the framework of HOLO methods. The HOLO formulation admits an implicit-explicit method that is algorithmically scalable and second-order accurate, allowing timesteps much larger than the barotropic time scale. We demonstrate how HOLO approaches, in particular the implicit-explicit method, can provide a solid route for ocean simulation to heterogeneous computing and exascale environments.

  7. ESPC ENABLE Draft Task Order

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Document provides a draft for an agency to use when forming an ESPC ENABLE contract and making a task order award. This draft task order provides the framework for a contract that agencies and energy service companies can tailor to the particular needs of each site or project.

  8. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M.

    1999-02-02

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  9. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M.

    1990-01-01

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  10. ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SH P VIA 8. TYPE OF ORDER b. COMPANY NAME c. STREET ADDRESS d. CITY e. STATE f. Z P CODE 9. ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA a. PURCHASE b. DELIVERY REFERENCE YOUR: Please furnish the following on the terms and conditions specified on both sides of this order and on the attached sheet, if any including delivery as indicated. Except for billing instructions on the reverse, this delivery order is subject to instructions contained on this side only of this form and is issued subject to the terms

  11. Perlick: Order (2013-SE-14002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Perlick Corporation to pay a $60,725 civil penalty after finding Perlick had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 347 units of basic model HP48RR, a noncompliant refrigerator.

  12. Satco: Order (2013-CE-2702)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Satco Products, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Satco had failed to certify that certain models of general service fluorescent lamps comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  13. LG: Order (2015-CE-14022)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered LG Electronics USA, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding LG had failed to certify that various refrigerator-freezer basic models comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  14. Maxlite: Order (2015-CE-27018)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Maxlite, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Maxlite had failed to certify that certain models of general service fluorescent lamps comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  15. Electrolux: Order (2015-CE-14020)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Electrolux North America, Inc. to pay a $20,000 civil penalty after finding Electrolux had failed to certify that certain models of refrigerator-freezers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. Eurodib: Order (2014-CE-45001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Eurodib Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Eurodib had failed to certify that certain models of automatic commercial ice makers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  17. Barron: Order (2013-CE-48004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Barron Lighting Group, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Barron had failed to certify that certain models of illuminated exit signs comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  18. Keystone: Order (2013-CE-2601)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE ordered Keystone Technologies, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Keystone had failed to certify that certain models of fluorescent lamp ballasts comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. Smeg: Order (2014-CE-23003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Smeg USA, Inc. to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding Smeg had failed to certify that certain models of refrigerators/refrigerator-freezers/freezers, dishwashers, and cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Leer: Order (2013-CE-5325)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Leer, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Leer had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer (WICF) components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  1. Dacor: Order (2014-CE-23010)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Dacor to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Dacor had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. Whirlpool: Order (2014-CE-21010)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE ordered Whirlpool Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Whirlpool had failed to certify that certain models of residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  3. DHI: Order (2014-CE-32004)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE ordered DHI Corp. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding DHI had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Vaxcel: Order (2014-CE-32006)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE ordered Vaxcel International Co., Ltd. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Vaxcel had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  5. ETL: Order (2015-CW-29003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered ETL, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding ETL had failed to certify that certain models of showerheads comply with the applicable water conservation standards.

  6. TMP: Order (2013-CE-5334)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered TMP Manufacturing Company, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding TMP had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  7. Sylvane: Order (2013-CE-36005)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Sylvane, Inc. to pay a $4,000 civil penalty after finding Sylvane had failed to certify that certain models of dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  8. Morris: Order (2013-SE-5403)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Morris Products, Inc. to pay a $170,720 civil penalty after finding Morris had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. a large quantity of noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures.

  9. Trastar: Order (2013-CE-49003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Trastar Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Trastar had failed to certify that certain basic models of traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  10. Emerson: Order (2014-CE-54001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Emerson Electric Co. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Emerson had failed to certify that certain models of metal halide lamp fixtures comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  11. Sunpentown: Order (2012-CE-1505)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Sunpentown International Inc. to pay a $12,160 civil penalty after finding Sunpentown had failed to certify that certain models of room air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  12. Daewoo: Order (2010-CE-0410)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Daewoo International, Inc. to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding Daewoo had failed to certify that certain models of residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  13. Simkar: Order (2012-SE-5408)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Simkar Corporation to pay a $28,193 civil penalty after finding Simkar had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 326 units of a variety of noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures basic models.

  14. Sears: Order (2012-CE-3606)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Sears, Roebuck & Co. to pay an $8,000 civil penalty after finding Sears had failed to certify that Sears dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  15. Quorum: Order (2014-CE-32013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Davoil, Inc. d/b/a Quorum International, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Quorum had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. Electrolux: Order (2014-CE-23015)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Electrolux North America, Inc. to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding Electrolux had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  17. Electrolux: Order (2012-CE-1901)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Electrolux North America to pay a $6,500 civil penalty after finding Electrolux had failed to certify that certain dishwashers comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  18. Aircooler: Order (2013-CE-5338)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Aircooler Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Aircooler had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. Litex: Order (2014-CE-32011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Litex Industries, Limited to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Litex had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  20. Hydac: Order (2012-SE-4107)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Hydac Technology Corporation to pay a $29,000 civil penalty after finding Hydac had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. noncompliant electric motors.

  1. TCP: Order (2011-CE-3501)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Technical Consumer Products, Inc. to pay a $3,000 civil penalty after finding TCP had failed to certify that a certain model of medium base compact fluorescent lamp (CFL) complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. Perlick: Order (2011-SE-1401)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Perlick Corporation to pay a $400 civil penalty after finding Perlick had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least two noncompliant model HP48RO, electric refrigerators.

  3. Acuity: Order (2013-CE-4802)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Acuity Brands Lighting to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Acuity had failed to certify that certain models of illuminated exit signs comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Leotek: Order (2013-CE-4903)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Leotek Electronics USA Corp. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Leotek had failed to certify that certain models of traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  5. Amerikooler: Order (2013-CE-5307)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Amerikooler, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Amerikooler had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  6. Legacy: Order (2015-CE-14025)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered The Legacy Companies to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Legacy had failed to certify that refrigerator Maxx-Ice brand basic model MCR3U complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  7. Avanti: Order (2013-CE-2105)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Avanti Products, LLC to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Avanti had failed to certify that certain models of residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  8. Dialight: Order (2013-CE-4902)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Dialight Corporation to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Dialight had failed to certify that certain models of traffic signal modules and pedestrian modules comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Averen: Order (2010-CW-0711)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Averen, Inc. to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding Averen had failed to certify that certain models of faucets comply with the applicable water conservation standards.

  10. Danco: Order (2015-CW-28006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Danco, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Danco had failed to certify that certain models of faucets comply with the applicable water conservation standards.

  11. Kohler: Order (2014-CW-30003)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Kohler Co. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Kohler had failed to certify that certain models of water closets comply with the applicable water conservation standards.

  12. Perlick: Order (2013-SE-14001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Perlick Corporation to pay a $168,200 civil penalty after finding Perlick had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 841 units of basic model HP24F, a noncompliant freezer.

  13. Northland: Order (2014-CE-23002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Northland Corporation d/b/a AGA Marvel to pay a $16,000 civil penalty after finding Northland had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  14. Harrington: Order (2014-SW-28011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Harrington Brass Works to pay a $10,000 civil penalty after finding Harrington had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 832 units of individual model 20-210-026, a noncompliant faucet.

  15. Nicor: Order (2014-CE-32016)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Nicor, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Nicor had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  16. Haier: Order (2011-CE-2104)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Haier to pay an $20,000 civil penalty after finding Haier had failed to certify that Haier residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  17. Amerisink: Order (2010-CW-0710)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Amerisink, Inc. to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding Amerisink had failed to certify that certain models of faucets comply with the applicable water conservation standards.

  18. Winix: Order (2012-CE-3607)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Cloud 9 Marketing, Inc. d/b/a Winix, Inc., to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Winix had failed to certify that certain models of dehumidifiers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  19. BSH: Order (2013-CE-2001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered BSH Home Appliances Corp. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding BSH had failed to certify that certain models of residential clothes washers comply with the applicable energy/water conservation standards.

  20. Almo: Order (2012-CE-1416)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Almo Corporation to pay a $6,500 civil penalty after finding Almo had failed to certify that certain models of residential refrigerators comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  1. Curtis: Order (2015-CE-14021)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Curtis International, Ltd. to pay a $5,800 civil penalty after finding Curtis had failed to certify that refrigerator-freezer basic model FR9211 complies with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  2. DOE Order on Quality Assurance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AVAILABLE ONLINE AT: INITIATED BY: www.directives.doe.gov Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy ORDER Washington, D.C. Approved: 4-25-2011 SUBJECT: QUALITY ASSURANCE 1. PURPOSE. a. To ensure that Department of Energy (DOE), including National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), products and services meet or exceed customers' requirements and expectations. b. To achieve quality for all work based upon the following principles: (1) All work, as defined in this Order,

  3. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  4. CASL - Lift Forces in Bubbly Flows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lift Forces in Bubbly Flows The dynamics of two-phase (gas/liquid) bubbly flows are complex: bubbles deform and disperse; large latent heats and heat capacity differentials influence local boiling; and relatively small changes in heated surface temperatures yield order of magnitude changes in boiling complexity. Because the local void volume has a direct feedback effect on reactor neutron flux and fuel rod power production, prediction of local boiling rates and bulk boiling effects in nuclear

  5. Universal: Order (2013-SE-26004)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Universal Lighting Technologies, Inc. to pay a $7,264 civil penalty after finding Universal had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 454 units of model B140R277HP, a noncompliant fluorescent lamp ballast.

  6. LG: Order (2014-SE-15011)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered LG Electronics USA, Inc. to pay a $1,479,860 civil penalty after finding LG had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 7,438 units of basic model LT143CNR, a noncompliant room air conditioner.

  7. Watermark: Order (2011-SW-2908)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Watermark Designs, Ltd. to pay a $4,200 civil penalty after finding Watermark Designs, Ltd. had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. sixty-three units of basic model SH-FAL90, a noncompliant showerhead.

  8. Kichler: Order (2014-CE-32007)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE ordered The L.D. Kichler Co. d/b/a Kichler Lighting to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Kichler had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Yosemite: Order (2014-CE-32015)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE ordered Northern Central Distributing, Inc. d/b/a Yosemite Home Dcor to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Yosemite had failed to certify that certain models of ceiling fans comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  10. Hicon: Order (2013-SE-1426)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Ningbo Hicon International Industry Company, Ltd. to pay a $1,912,714 civil penalty after finding Hicon had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 115,126 units of basic model BD-200, a noncompliant freezer.

  11. Teddico: Order (2012-SE-5409)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered The Electrical Design, Development and Implementation Company d/b/a Teddico to pay a $18,994 civil penalty after finding Teddico had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 218 units of a variety of noncompliant metal halide lamp fixtures basic models.

  12. Topaz: Order (2014-CE-35005)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Topaz Lighting Corp. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Topaz had failed to certify that certain basic models of medium base compact fluorescent lamps, general service fluorescent lamps, and illuminated exit signs comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  13. PQL: Order (2013-CE-27001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered P.Q.L., Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding PQL had failed to certify that various basic models of medium base compact fluorescent lamps, general service fluorescent lamps, fluorescent lamp ballasts, and illuminated exit signs comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  14. Philips: Order (2012-SE-2605)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Philips Lighting Electronics N. A. to pay a $82,478 civil penalty after finding Philips had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 7,498 units of basic model VEL-1S40-SC, noncompliant fluorescent lamp ballasts.

  15. ELCO: Order (2014-SE-54005)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered ELCO Lighting to pay a $14,000 civil penalty after finding ELCO had failed to certify that certain models of illuminated exit signs and metal halide lamp fixtures comply with the applicable energy conservation standards and had failed to provide requested test data.

  16. Midea: Order (2013-SE-1505)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered GD Midea Air-Conditioning Equipment Co. Ltd. to pay a $416,800 civil penalty after finding Midea had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. atleast 14,968 units of basic model MWJ1-08ERN1-BI8, a noncompliant room air conditioner.

  17. Philips: Order (2014-SE-48006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Philips Lighting North America Corp. to pay a $75,000 civil penalty after finding Philips had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 12,275 units of a variety of illuminated exit sign models.

  18. Order 430.1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 In response to requirements of Executive Order 13287, Preserve America Office of History and Heritage Resources Office of the Executive Secretariat U.S. Department of Energy September 2014 An Assessment of Historic Properties and Preservation Activities at the U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents Introduction ............................................................................................................................................ 3 Part I. Background and Overview

  19. Order 580.1D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    580.1D Title: PERSONAL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Owner: Thomas Wilson, Jr., Office of Institutional Operations Approving Official: Bradley J. Tomer, Chief Operating Officer, Office of the Director {signature} /s/ Bradley J. Tomer Approval Date: 8/3/12 Last Reviewed Date: 8/3/12 Cancellation: Order 580.1C, Personal Property Management TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. PURPOSE ..................................................................................................................................... 2 2.

  20. Versonel: Order (2014-CE-21009)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Smart Surplus, Inc. d/b/a Versonel to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Versonel had failed to certify that certain models of refrigerators and residential clothes dryers comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  1. Whirlpool: Order (2013-SE-1420)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Whirlpool Corporation to pay a $5,329,800 civil penalty after finding Whirlpool had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 26,649 units of basic model 8TAR81 noncompliant refrigerator-freezer.

  2. Traulsen: Order (2015-SE-42002)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Traulsen – ITW Food Group LLC to pay a $52,600 civil penalty after finding Traulsen had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 284 units of commercial refrigerator-freezer basic model RDT132DUT-HHS, a noncompliant product.

  3. Bigwall: Order (2014-SE-15006)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Bigwall Enterprises, Inc. to abide by the terms of the Notice of Noncompliance Determination, issued on February 11, 2014, after finding Bigwall Enterprises, Inc. had privately labeled and distributed in commerce in the U.S. at least 600 units of PerfectAire brand room air conditioner model PACH8000.

  4. Midea: Order (2014-SW-20001)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Hefei Rongshida Washing Equipment Manufacturing Co., Ltd. ("Hefei Rongshida"), a subsidiary of Midea Group, to pay a $64,780 civil penalty after finding Hefei Rongshida had manufactured and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 324 units of MAE80-S1702GPS, a noncompliant residential clothes washer.

  5. Non-axisymmetric Flows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to be different than the classical Sweet-Parker picture with symmetric inward flows. ... . 60 5 Reconnection Flow Patterns 64 5.1 Sweet-Parker and tearing reconnection . . . . . ...

  6. Measurement of the correlation between flow harmonics of different order in lead-lead collisions at sNN=2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

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F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. 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C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Engelmann, R.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. 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H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; St. Denis, R. D.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-09-01

    Correlations between the elliptic or triangular flow coefficients vm (m=2 or 3) and other flow harmonics vn (n=2 to 5) are measured using √sNN=2.76 TeV Pb+Pb collision data collected in 2010 by the ATLAS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 7 μb-1. Thevm-vn correlations are measured in midrapidity as a function of centrality, and, for events within the same centrality interval, as a function of event ellipticity or triangularity defined in a forward rapidity region. For events within the same centrality interval, v3 is found to be anticorrelated with v2 and this anticorrelation is consistent with similar anticorrelations between the corresponding eccentricities, ε2 and ε3. However, it is observed that v4 increases strongly with v2, and v5 increases strongly with both v2 and v3. The trend and strength of the vm-vn correlations for n=4 and 5 are found to disagree with εm-εn correlations predicted by initial-geometry models. Instead, these correlations are found to be consistent with the combined effects of a linear contribution to vn and a nonlinear term that is a function of v22 or of v2v3, as predicted by hydrodynamic models. A simple two-component fit is used to separate these two contributions. The extracted linear and nonlinear contributions to v4 and v5 are found to be consistent with previously measured event-plane correlations.

  7. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J.; Kraft, Nancy C.; Mauseth, Jason A.; Phelps, Larry D.; Taylor, Steven C.

    2002-01-01

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  8. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, Andrew R.; Rodgers, John C.; Ortiz, Carlos A.; Nelson, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Elbow mass flow meter. The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity.

  9. YMGI: Order (2011-SCE-1605)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered YMGI Group LLC to pay a $31,400 civil penalty after finding (1) YMGI had failed to certify that certain models of residential central air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standards and (2) YMGI had distributed in commerce model TTWC-18K-31B, a through-the-wall air conditioner that does not meet the applicable energy conservation standard.

  10. Cooper: Order (2012-SE-4701)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Cooper Power Systems, LLC to abide by the Compromise Agreement, which waived the civil penalty after finding Cooper had inadvertently distributed in commerce in the U.S. three models (total of five units) of distribution transformers. Cooper agrees to abide by the terms of a Notice of Noncompliance Determination to be issued pursuant to 10 C.F.R. § 429.114.

  11. Lateral flow strip assay

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miles, Robin R.; Benett, William J.; Coleman, Matthew A.; Pearson, Francesca S.; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz L.

    2011-03-08

    A lateral flow strip assay apparatus comprising a housing; a lateral flow strip in the housing, the lateral flow strip having a receiving portion; a sample collection unit; and a reagent reservoir. Saliva and/or buccal cells are collected from an individual using the sample collection unit. The sample collection unit is immersed in the reagent reservoir. The tip of the lateral flow strip is immersed in the reservoir and the reagent/sample mixture wicks up into the lateral flow strip to perform the assay.

  12. International Refrigeration: Order (2012-CE-1510) | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Refrigeration: Order (2012-CE-1510) International Refrigeration: Order (2012-CE-1510) July 20, 2012 DOE ordered International Refrigeration Products to pay an 8,000 ...

  13. Low flow fume hood

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bell, Geoffrey C.; Feustel, Helmut E.; Dickerhoff, Darryl J.

    2002-01-01

    A fume hood is provided having an adequate level of safety while reducing the amount of air exhausted from the hood. A displacement flow fume hood works on the principal of a displacement flow which displaces the volume currently present in the hood using a push-pull system. The displacement flow includes a plurality of air supplies which provide fresh air, preferably having laminar flow, to the fume hood. The displacement flow fume hood also includes an air exhaust which pulls air from the work chamber in a minimally turbulent manner. As the displacement flow produces a substantially consistent and minimally turbulent flow in the hood, inconsistent flow patterns associated with contaminant escape from the hood are minimized. The displacement flow fume hood largely reduces the need to exhaust large amounts of air from the hood. It has been shown that exhaust air flow reductions of up to 70% are possible without a decrease in the hood's containment performance. The fume hood also includes a number of structural adaptations which facilitate consistent and minimally turbulent flow within a fume hood.

  14. Subsurface Flow and Contaminant Transport

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2000-09-19

    FACT is a transient three-dimensional, finite element code for simulating isothermal groundwater flow, moisture movement, and solute transport in variably and/or fully saturated subsurface porous media. Both single and dual-domain transport formulations are available. Transport mechanisms considered include advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear adsorption, mobile/immobile mass transfer and first-order degradation. A wide range of acquifier conditions and remediation systems commonly encountered in the field can be simulated. Notable boundary condition (BC) options include, a combined rechargemore » and drain BC for simulating recirculation wells, and a head dependent well BC that computes flow based on specified drawdown. The code is designed to handle highly heterogenous, multi-layer, acquifer systems in a numerically efficient manner. Subsurface structure is represented with vertically distorted rectangular brick elements in a Cartesian system. The groundwater flow equation is approximated using the Bubnov-Galerkin finite element method in conjunction with an efficient symmetric Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) ICCG matrix solver. The solute transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual finite element method designed to alleviate numerical oscillation. An efficient asymmetric PCG (ORTHOMIN) matrix solver is employed for transport. For both the flow and transport equations, element matrices are computed from either influence coefficient formulas for speed, or two point Gauss-Legendre quadrature for accuracy. Non-linear flow problems can be solved using either Newton-Ralphson linearization or Picard iteration, with under-relaxation formulas to further enhance convergence. Dynamic memory allocation is implemented using Fortran 90 constructs. FACT coding is clean and modular.« less

  15. Sandia Higher Order Elements (SHOE) v 0.5 alpha

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-09-24

    SHOE is research code for characterizing and visualizing higher-order finite elements; it contains a framework for defining classes of interpolation techniques and element shapes; methods for interpolating triangular, quadrilateral, tetrahedral, and hexahedral cells using Lagrange and Legendre polynomial bases of arbitrary order; methods to decompose each element into domains of constant gradient flow (using a polynomial solver to identify critical points); and an isocontouring technique that uses this decomposition to guarantee topological correctness. Please notemore » that this is an alpha release of research software and that some time has passed since it was actively developed; build- and run-time issues likely exist.« less

  16. ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 DE-DT0004203 12EM002688 EMCBC U.S. Department of Energy EM Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5th Street, Suite 500 DEBRA MARKELONIS VISIONARY SOLUTIONS, LLC 111 UNION VALLEY ROAD, SUITE B OAK RIDGE TN 378308036 See Schedule 12. F.O.B. POINT Destination 1 Days After Award EMCBC - Carlsbad US Department of Energy Carlsbad Project Office Carlsbad NM 88221 EMCBC - Carlsbad ITEM NO. (a) SUPPLIES OR SERVICES (b) QUANTITY ORDERED (c) UNIT (d) UNIT PRICE (e) AMOUNT (f) QUANTITY ACCEPTED (g) X X 2

  17. ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 DE-DT0005972 13EM002307 EMCBC U.S. Department of Energy EM Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5th Street, Suite 500 DEBRA MARKELONIS VISIONARY SOLUTIONS, LLC 2553 QUALITY LANE KNOXVILLE TN 37931 See Schedule 12. F.O.B. POINT Destination 1 Days After Award EMCBC - Carlsbad US Department of Energy Carlsbad Project Office Carlsbad NM 88221 EMCBC - Carlsbad ITEM NO. (a) SUPPLIES OR SERVICES (b) QUANTITY ORDERED (c) UNIT (d) UNIT PRICE (e) AMOUNT (f) QUANTITY ACCEPTED (g) X 2 Destination

  18. ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2/12/2016 DE-DT0010705 16EM000994 EMCBC U.S. Department of Energy EM Consolidated Business Center 250 E. 5th Street, Suite 500 GILBERT TORRES SIGMA SCIENCE INC 500 MARQUETTE AVE. NW SUITE 1200 ALBUQUERQUE NM 87102 12. F.O.B. POINT Destination 0682/15/505460/01 ITEM NO. (a) SUPPLIES OR SERVICES (b) QUANTITY ORDERED (c) UNIT (d) UNIT PRICE (e) AMOUNT (f) QUANTITY ACCEPTED (g) X X 14 Destination Destination Cincinnati OH 45202 DE-EM0003878/ NET 30 f. SERVICE-DISABLED e. HUBZone g. WOMEN-OWNED SMALL

  19. Executive Order 13423: Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Executive Order 13423: Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management Executive Order 13423: Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and ...

  20. Solids mass flow determination

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Macko, Joseph E.

    1981-01-01

    Method and apparatus for determining the mass flow rate of solids mixed with a transport fluid to form a flowing mixture. A temperature differential is established between the solids and fluid. The temperature of the transport fluid prior to mixing, the temperature of the solids prior to mixing, and the equilibrium temperature of the mixture are monitored and correlated in a heat balance with the heat capacities of the solids and fluid to determine the solids mass flow rate.

  1. Polyoxometalate flow battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Travis M.; Pratt, Harry D.

    2016-03-15

    Flow batteries including an electrolyte of a polyoxometalate material are disclosed herein. In a general embodiment, the flow battery includes an electrochemical cell including an anode portion, a cathode portion and a separator disposed between the anode portion and the cathode portion. Each of the anode portion and the cathode portion comprises a polyoxometalate material. The flow battery further includes an anode electrode disposed in the anode portion and a cathode electrode disposed in the cathode portion.

  2. Method and apparatus for controlling fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, J.R.

    1980-06-27

    A method and apparatus for precisely controlling the rate (and hence amount) of fluid flow are given. The controlled flow rate is finely adjustable, can be extremely small (on the order of microliter-atmospheres per second), can be adjusted to zero (flow stopped), and is stable to better than 1% with time. The dead volume of the valve can be made arbitrarily small, in fact essentially zero. The valve employs no wearing mechanical parts (including springs, stems, or seals). The valve is finely adjustable, has a flow rate dynamic range of many decades, can be made compatible with any fluid, and is suitable for incorporation into an open or closed loop servo-control system.

  3. Multi-material incompressible flow simulation using the moment-of-fluid method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garimella, R V; Schofield, S P; Lowrie, R B; Swartz, B K; Christon, M A; Dyadechko, V

    2009-01-01

    The Moment-of-Fluid interface reconstruction technique is implemented in a second order accurate, unstructured finite element variable density incompressible Navier-Stokes solver. For flows with multiple materials, MOF significantly outperforms existing first and second order interface reconstruction techniques. For two material flows, the performance of MOF is similar to other interface reconstruction techniques. For strongly driven bouyant flows, the errors in the flow solution dominate and all the interface reconstruction techniques perform similarly.

  4. New Mexico Heat Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    This is an updated and simplified version of the New Mexico heat flow data already on the NGDS that was used for Play Fairway analysis.

  5. Excess flow shutoff valve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiffer, Micah S.; Tentarelli, Stephen Clyde

    2016-02-09

    Excess flow shutoff valve comprising a valve body, a valve plug, a partition, and an activation component where the valve plug, the partition, and activation component are disposed within the valve body. A suitable flow restriction is provided to create a pressure difference between the upstream end of the valve plug and the downstream end of the valve plug when fluid flows through the valve body. The pressure difference exceeds a target pressure difference needed to activate the activation component when fluid flow through the valve body is higher than a desired rate, and thereby closes the valve.

  6. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Engh, G. van den; Esposito, R.J.

    1996-01-09

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane. 8 figs.

  7. Multiple sort flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger (Seattle, WA); Esposito, Richard J. (Seattle, WA)

    1996-01-01

    A flow cytometer utilizes multiple lasers for excitation and respective fluorescence of identified dyes bonded to specific cells or events to identify and verify multiple events to be sorted from a sheath flow and droplet stream. Once identified, verified and timed in the sheath flow, each event is independently tagged upon separation from the flow by an electrical charge of +60, +120, or +180 volts and passed through oppositely charged deflection plates with ground planes to yield a focused six way deflection of at least six events in a narrow plane.

  8. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution from which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.

  9. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution frommore » which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.« less

  10. Executive Order 13673 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    673 Executive Order 13673 Executive Order 13673, proposed Federal Acquisition Regulation rule, and proposed Department of Labor guidance are available at: Executive Order 13673 Proposed Federal Acquisition Regulation Rule Proposed Department of Labor Guidance Informational slides about the Executive Order are available below: Executive Order 13673 (176.38 KB)

  11. Elbow mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McFarland, A.R.; Rodgers, J.C.; Ortiz, C.A.; Nelson, D.C.

    1994-08-16

    The present invention includes a combination of an elbow pressure drop generator and a shunt-type mass flow sensor for providing an output which gives the mass flow rate of a gas that is nearly independent of the density of the gas. For air, the output is also approximately independent of humidity. 3 figs.

  12. Microelectromechanical flow control apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat

    2009-06-02

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) flow control apparatus is disclosed which includes a fluid channel formed on a substrate from a first layer of a nonconducting material (e.g. silicon nitride). A first electrode is provided on the first layer of the nonconducting material outside the flow channel; and a second electrode is located on a second layer of the nonconducting material above the first layer. A voltage applied between the first and second electrodes deforms the fluid channel to increase its cross-sectional size and thereby increase a flow of a fluid through the channel. In certain embodiments of the present invention, the fluid flow can be decreased or stopped by applying a voltage between the first electrode and the substrate. A peristaltic pumping of the fluid through the channel is also possible when the voltage is applied in turn between a plurality of first electrodes and the substrate. A MEM flow control assembly can also be formed by providing one or more MEM flow control devices on a common substrate together with a submicron filter. The MEM flow control assembly can optionally include a plurality of pressure sensors for monitoring fluid pressure and determining flow rates through the assembly.

  13. Development of the T+M coupled flow-geomechanical simulator to...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    which the domain description changes from single continuum to double or multiple continua in order to rigorously model both flow and geomechanics for fracture-rock matrix systems. ...

  14. Executive Order 12123 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2123 Executive Order 12123 Document covers the extracted pages of Executive Order 12123. PDF icon eo13123.pdf More Documents & Publications EO 13123-Greening the Government Through ...

  15. Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions: Final Guideline (DOE, 1981) Implementation of Executive Order 12114 Environmental ...

  16. Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Consent Order, November...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Consent Order, November 1, 1995 State Idaho Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Resolve LDR storage violations. Approve the modified "INEL Site...

  17. Order - DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Order by Website Administrator application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document icon order template.docx - application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.wordprocessingml.document, 48 KB (49165

  18. Public Order and Safety | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Safety Jump to: navigation, search Building Type Public Order and Safety Definition Buildings used for the preservation of law and order or public safety. Sub Categories police...

  19. West Valley Demonstration Project Administrative Consent Order...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Adminstrative Consent Order, August 27, 1996 State New York Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) FFCAct Scope Summary Establish ...

  20. Tank depletion flow controller

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Georgeson, Melvin A.

    1976-10-26

    A flow control system includes two bubbler tubes installed at different levels within a tank containing such as radioactive liquid. As the tank is depleted, a differential pressure transmitter monitors pressure differences imparted by the two bubbler tubes at a remote, shielded location during uniform time intervals. At the end of each uniform interval, balance pots containing a dense liquid are valved together to equalize the pressures. The resulting sawtooth-shaped signal generated by the differential pressure transmitter is compared with a second sawtooth signal representing the desired flow rate during each time interval. Variations in the two signals are employed by a control instrument to regulate flow rate.

  1. Shroud leakage flow discouragers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bailey, Jeremy Clyde; Bunker, Ronald Scott

    2002-01-01

    A turbine assembly includes a plurality of rotor blades comprising a root portion, an airfoil having a pressure sidewall and a suction sidewall, and a top portion having a cap. An outer shroud is concentrically disposed about said rotor blades, said shroud in combination with said tip portions defining a clearance gap. At least one circumferential shroud leakage discourager is disposed within the shroud. The leakage discourager(s) increase the flow resistance and thus reduce the flow of hot gas flow leakage for a given pressure differential across the clearance gap to improve overall turbine efficiency.

  2. Equivalent Relaxations of Optimal Power Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bose, S; Low, SH; Teeraratkul, T; Hassibi, B

    2015-03-01

    Several convex relaxations of the optimal power flow (OPF) problem have recently been developed using both bus injection models and branch flow models. In this paper, we prove relations among three convex relaxations: a semidefinite relaxation that computes a full matrix, a chordal relaxation based on a chordal extension of the network graph, and a second-order cone relaxation that computes the smallest partial matrix. We prove a bijection between the feasible sets of the OPF in the bus injection model and the branch flow model, establishing the equivalence of these two models and their second-order cone relaxations. Our results imply that, for radial networks, all these relaxations are equivalent and one should always solve the second-order cone relaxation. For mesh networks, the semidefinite relaxation and the chordal relaxation are equally tight and both are strictly tighter than the second-order cone relaxation. Therefore, for mesh networks, one should either solve the chordal relaxation or the SOCP relaxation, trading off tightness and the required computational effort. Simulations are used to illustrate these results.

  3. Reduced order modeling of fluid/structure interaction.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barone, Matthew Franklin; Kalashnikova, Irina; Segalman, Daniel Joseph; Brake, Matthew Robert

    2009-11-01

    This report describes work performed from October 2007 through September 2009 under the Sandia Laboratory Directed Research and Development project titled 'Reduced Order Modeling of Fluid/Structure Interaction.' This project addresses fundamental aspects of techniques for construction of predictive Reduced Order Models (ROMs). A ROM is defined as a model, derived from a sequence of high-fidelity simulations, that preserves the essential physics and predictive capability of the original simulations but at a much lower computational cost. Techniques are developed for construction of provably stable linear Galerkin projection ROMs for compressible fluid flow, including a method for enforcing boundary conditions that preserves numerical stability. A convergence proof and error estimates are given for this class of ROM, and the method is demonstrated on a series of model problems. A reduced order method, based on the method of quadratic components, for solving the von Karman nonlinear plate equations is developed and tested. This method is applied to the problem of nonlinear limit cycle oscillations encountered when the plate interacts with an adjacent supersonic flow. A stability-preserving method for coupling the linear fluid ROM with the structural dynamics model for the elastic plate is constructed and tested. Methods for constructing efficient ROMs for nonlinear fluid equations are developed and tested on a one-dimensional convection-diffusion-reaction equation. These methods are combined with a symmetrization approach to construct a ROM technique for application to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations.

  4. Physician Treatment Order | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Physician Treatment Order Physician Treatment Order FEDERAL OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Physician Treatment Orders - FOH-24 Form (formerly 229-B) FOH-24 Physician Treatment Orders.pdf (14.87 KB) More Documents & Publications Allergy Injection Policy Handicapped Parking Guidance Before the House Foreign Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific and the Global Environment

  5. Low pressure stagnation flow reactor with a flow barrier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vosen, Steven R.

    2001-01-01

    A flow barrier disposed at the periphery of a workpiece for achieving uniform reaction across the surface of the workpiece, such as a semiconductor wafer, in a stagnation flow reactor operating under the conditions of a low pressure or low flow rate. The flow barrier is preferably in the shape of annulus and can include within the annular structure passages or flow channels for directing a secondary flow of gas substantially at the surface of a semiconductor workpiece. The flow barrier can be constructed of any material which is chemically inert to reactive gases flowing over the surface of the semiconductor workpiece.

  6. Pressure and flow characteristics of restrictive flow orifice...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    an RFO to limit the maximum system flow to acceptable limits within the flow capacity of the relief valve, thereby enhancing the overpressure protection of laboratory equipment. ...

  7. Complex Flow Workshop Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-05-01

    This report documents findings from a workshop on the impacts of complex wind flows in and out of wind turbine environments, the research needs, and the challenges of meteorological and engineering modeling at regional, wind plant, and wind turbine scales.

  8. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  9. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  10. Electrochemical flow capacitors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gogotsi, Yury; Presser, Volker; Kumbar, Emin Caglan

    2015-11-05

    The present invention generally relates to devices for energy storage technologies, and more particularly to electrochemical flow capacitor systems and applications. In some aspects, these flow capacitors have at least one electrode comprising a non-stationary solid or semi-solid composition comprising supercapacitive particles and an electrolytic solvent in electrical communication with at least one current collector, and energy is stored and/or released by charging and/or discharging the electrode(s).

  11. Electrochemical flow capacitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gogotsi, Yury; Presser, Volker; Kumbur, Emin Caglan

    2015-10-27

    The present invention generally relates to devices for energy storage technologies, and more particularly to electrochemical flow capacitor systems and applications. In some aspects, these flow capacitors have at least one electrode comprising a non-stationary solid or semi-solid composition comprising supercapacitive particles and an electrolytic solvent in electrical communication with at least one current collector, and energy is stored and/or released by charging and/or discharging the electrode(s).

  12. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-03-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  13. Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

    2014-08-06

    Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

  14. Flow cytometer jet monitor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Van den Engh, Ger

    1997-01-01

    A direct jet monitor illuminates the jet of a flow cytometer in a monitor wavelength band which is substantially separate from the substance wavelength band. When a laser is used to cause fluorescence of the substance, it may be appropriate to use an infrared source to illuminate the jet and thus optically monitor the conditions within the jet through a CCD camera or the like. This optical monitoring may be provided to some type of controller or feedback system which automatically changes either the horizontal location of the jet, the point at which droplet separation occurs, or some other condition within the jet in order to maintain optimum conditions. The direct jet monitor may be operated simultaneously with the substance property sensing and analysis system so that continuous monitoring may be achieved without interfering with the substance data gathering and may be configured so as to allow the front of the analysis or free fall area to be unobstructed during processing.

  15. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  16. Piezoelectric axial flow microvalve

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gemmen, Randall; Thornton, Jimmy; Vipperman, Jeffrey S.; Clark, William W.

    2007-01-09

    This invention is directed to a fuel cell operable with a quantity of fuel and a quantity of an oxidizer to produce electrical power, the fuel cell including a fuel cell body including a labyrinth system structured to permit the fuel and the oxidizer to flow therethrough; at least a first catalyst in fluid communication with the labyrinth; and at least a first microvalve operably disposed within at least a portion of the labyrinth. The microvalve utilizes a deflectable member operable upon the application of a voltage from a voltage source. The microvalve includes an elongated flow channel formed therein and extending substantially longitudinally between the first and second ends to permit substantially longitudinal flow of the fluid therethrough and between the first and second ends; and the deflectable member disposed on the valve body, the deflectable member including at least a first piezoelectric portion that is piezoelectrically operable to deflect the deflectable member between an open position and a closed position upon the application of a voltage, the deflectable member in the closed position being operable to resist the flow of the fluid through the flow channel.

  17. An approximation technique for jet impingement flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najafi, Mahmoud; Fincher, Donald; Rahni, Taeibi; Javadi, KH.; Massah, H.

    2015-03-10

    The analytical approximate solution of a non-linear jet impingement flow model will be demonstrated. We will show that this is an improvement over the series approximation obtained via the Adomian decomposition method, which is itself, a powerful method for analysing non-linear differential equations. The results of these approximations will be compared to the Runge-Kutta approximation in order to demonstrate their validity.

  18. Consent Order EA-2005-01

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... Final Order upon receipt of said amount referenced in Item 1, above. 4. Bechtel Hanford waives any and all rights to appeal or otherwise seek judicial review of this Consent Order. ...

  19. GreenOrder | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    York Zip: 10016 Product: Founded in 2000, GreenOrder is a sustainability strategy and marketing firm References: GreenOrder1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  20. West Valley Demonstration Project Administrative Consent Order...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Administrative Order on Consent DOCKET No. II RCRA-3008(h)-I 92-0202 State New York Agreement Type Consent Order Legal Driver(s) RCRA Scope Summary Protect human health and the ...

  1. Surface photoabsorption transients and ordering in GaInP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hsu, T.C.; Stringfellow, G.B.; Kim, J.H.; Seong, T.Y.

    1998-03-01

    Heterostructures and quantum wells can be produced in GaInP without changing the solid composition by simply varying the order parameter. Since CuPt ordering reduces the band-gap energy, changes in the order parameter induced by changes in growth conditions result in heterostructures with band-gap energy discontinuities as large as 160 meV. The most convenient growth parameter to change is the flow rate of the P precursor. However, previous work has shown that under some conditions the change in order parameter is sluggish, giving rise to graded heterostructures. The cause of the slow change in order parameter is the topic of this article. CuPt ordering has been shown to be driven by the formation of [{bar 1}10] P dimers, characteristic of the (2{times}4) surface reconstruction. Thus, this study of the transient in the degree of order induced by changing the flow rate of the P precursor has relied on the use of surface photoabsorption (SPA) to monitor the surface reconstruction during the period after the partial pressure of the P precursor was reduced. The SPA transient has then been correlated with the abruptness of the heterostructure interface, determined from the transmission electron microscopy images and the photoluminescence spectra, for organometallic vapor phase epitaxial (OMVPE) growth at temperatures of 620 and 670{degree}C using the P precursors phosphine (PH{sub 3}) and tertiarybutylphosphine (TBP). For TBP at both 620 and 670{degree}C, the SPA reflectance transient is extremely short, with a time constant of less than 10 s, corresponding to the time response of the OMVPE growth system. Abrupt interfaces are produced using these conditions. For PH{sub 3}, the SPA reflectance transient is abrupt at 670{degree}C; however, at 620{degree}C the SPA response is extremely sluggish, with a time constant of approximately 6.5 min. The effect is tentatively attributed to a surfactant effect due to H on the surface. Corresponding heterostructures were abrupt at

  2. Electrocapturing flow cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-04-05

    A flow cell for electrophoretically-assisted capturing analytes from a flow. The flow cell includes a specimen chamber, a first membrane, a second membrane, a first electrode chamber, and a second electrode chamber. The specimen chamber may have a sample inlet and a sample outlet. A first portion of the first membrane may be coupled to a first portion of the specimen chamber. A first portion of the second membrane may be coupled to a second portion of the specimen chamber. The first electrode chamber may be configured to accept a charge. A portion of the first electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the first membrane. A second electrode chamber may be configured to accept an opposite charge. A portion of the second electrode chamber may be coupled to a second portion of the second membrane.

  3. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  4. DNA Clone Ordering from Shotgun Clone Libraries

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1995-11-28

    CORD is an implementation of an algorithm for determining the order of clones from shotgun clone libraries.

  5. Executive Order 13423- Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management Executive Order 13423- Strengthening Federal Environmental, Energy, and Transportation Management It is the policy of ...

  6. LLNS Beryllium Consent Order Fact Sheet

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - LLNS Beryllium Consent Order SUMMARY OF CONSENT ORDER In November 2010, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) issued a consent order to Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS) for deficiencies related to LLNS's implementation of DOE's Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program (CBDPP) regulation at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The consent order requires LLNS to implement corrective actions that will ensure LLNS meets

  7. Antenna factorization in strongly ordered limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosower, David A.

    2005-02-15

    When energies or angles of gluons emitted in a gauge-theory process are small and strongly ordered, the emission factorizes in a simple way to all orders in perturbation theory. I show how to unify the various strongly ordered soft, mixed soft-collinear, and collinear limits using antenna factorization amplitudes, which are generalizations of the Catani-Seymour dipole factorization function.

  8. Flow line sampler

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nicholls, Colin I.

    1992-07-14

    An on-line product sampling apparatus and method for measuring product samples from a product stream (12) in a flow line (14) having a sampling aperture (11), includes a sampling tube (18) for containing product samples removed from flow line (14). A piston (22) removes product samples from the product stream (12) through the sampling aperture (11) and returns samples to product stream (12). A sensor (20) communicates with sample tube (18), and senses physical properties of samples while the samples are within sample tube (18). In one embodiment, sensor (20) comprises a hydrogen transient nuclear magnetic resonance sensor for measuring physical properties of hydrogen molecules.

  9. STANDING ORDER 1. Standing Order Number: EP-DIV-S0-20222, R.O

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CC;K CLEAR FORM

    STANDING ORDER 1. Standing Order Number: EP-DIV-S0-20222, R.O 2. Standing Order Type: (check one) [8J Division D Facility 3. Applicable Facilities: All EWMO Facilities 4. Standing Order Title: EWMO Legacy TRU Waste Pause 5. Distribution List: (By Functional Title) TA-54 Timely Order Book, Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility (WCRRF) Timely Order Book, Radioassay and Nondestructive Testing (RANT) Facility Timely Order Book, and Environmental Programs

  10. US energy flow, 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borg, I.Y.; Briggs, C.K.

    1992-06-01

    Trends in energy consumption and assessment of energy sources are discussed. Specific topics discussed include: energy flow charts; comparison of energy use with 1990 and earlier years; supply and demand of fossil fuels (oils, natural gas, coal); electrical supply and demand; and nuclear power.

  11. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, Daniel

    1991-01-01

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the construction directs flat cells near to the area of one dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates.

  12. Flow cytometry apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pinkel, D.

    1987-11-30

    An obstruction across the flow chamber creates a one-dimensional convergence of a sheath fluid. A passageway in the obstruction directs flat cells near to the area of one-dimensional convergence in the sheath fluid to provide proper orientation of flat cells at fast rates. 6 figs.

  13. Two variants of minimum discarded fill ordering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Azevedo, E.F. ); Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, Wei-Pai . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that the ordering of the unknowns can have a significant effect on the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) methods. There has been considerable experimental work on the effects of ordering for regular finite difference problems. In many cases, good results have been obtained with preconditioners based on diagonal, spiral or natural row orderings. However, for finite element problems having unstructured grids or grids generated by a local refinement approach, it is difficult to define many of the orderings for more regular problems. A recently proposed Minimum Discarded Fill (MDF) ordering technique is effective in finding high quality Incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioners, especially for problems arising from unstructured finite element grids. Testing indicates this algorithm can identify a rather complicated physical structure in an anisotropic problem and orders the unknowns in the preferred'' direction. The MDF technique may be viewed as the numerical analogue of the minimum deficiency algorithm in sparse matrix technology. At any stage of the partial elimination, the MDF technique chooses the next pivot node so as to minimize the amount of discarded fill. In this work, two efficient variants of the MDF technique are explored to produce cost-effective high-order ILU preconditioners. The Threshold MDF orderings combine MDF ideas with drop tolerance techniques to identify the sparsity pattern in the ILU preconditioners. These techniques identify an ordering that encourages fast decay of the entries in the ILU factorization. The Minimum Update Matrix (MUM) ordering technique is a simplification of the MDF ordering and is closely related to the minimum degree algorithm. The MUM ordering is especially for large problems arising from Navier-Stokes problems. Some interesting pictures of the orderings are presented using a visualization tool. 22 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  14. High Fidelity Simulation of Complex Suspension Flow for Practical Rheometry

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension A visualization of the flow of concrete, a complex suspension. In this snapshot of the simulation, the stress on each suspended particle is shown color-coded with its specific value drawn on its surface. Suspended particles that have a stress value below a specific threshold value are shown in outline form in order to better view those particles that are carrying the majority of the stress

  15. NPS Director's Order | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NPS Director's Order Author NPS Recipient NPS Published Publisher Not Provided, 02232010 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet...

  16. Resonant radiation from oscillating higher order solitons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Driben, R.; Yulin, A. V.; Efimov, A.

    2015-07-15

    We present radiation mechanism exhibited by a higher order soliton. In a course of its evolution the higher-order soliton emits polychromatic radiation resulting in formation of multipeak frequency comb-like spectral band. The shape and spectral position of this band can be effectively controlled by the relative strength of the third order dispersion. An analytical description is corroborated by numerical simulations. Research showed that for longer pulses the described effect persists also under the action of higher order perturbations such as Raman and self-steepening.

  17. Executive Order 13583, Establishing a Coordinated Government...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    13583, Establishing a Coordinated Government-Wide Initiative to Promote Diversity and Inclusion in the Federal Workforce Executive Order 13583, Establishing a Coordinated...

  18. President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Photo Gallery Jobs Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home About Us Our History NNSA Timeline President Truman Orders Development of Thermonuclear Weapon...

  19. Executive Order 13514: Comprehensive Federal Fleet Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Handbook offers guidance on meeting the fleet management requirements outlined in section 12 of Executive Order 13514: Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and Economic ...

  20. Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 Consent Order, Lawrence Livermore National National Security, LLC - WCO-2010-01 October 29, 2010 Issued to Lawrence ...

  1. Engineered Solutions: Order (2010-CE-2112)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order after entering into a Compromise Agreement with Engineered Solutions, Inc. to resolve a case involving the failure to certify dehumidifier basic model SD109.

  2. NMED Presentation on Revised Consent Order

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    At the November 12, 2015 Special NNMCAB Meeting NMED Secretary Ryan Flynn provided a presentation on the Revisions to the 2005 Order on Consent.

  3. West Valley Demonstration Project Administrative Consent Order...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy (DOE) enter into this Order regarding ... C. In the event that the terms and conditions of this ... EM HOME | DOE HOME | SEARCH | WEBSITE OUTLINE FEEDBACK ...

  4. Hexagonal Ordering of Nanoparticles | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electron microscope, researchers can see the hexagonal ordering of nanoparticles in a gold nanoparticle membranes (right). This configuration helps researchers to simulate their...

  5. Consent Order, Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Consent Order issued to Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC relating to an electrical shock event that occurred at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. On November 23,...

  6. Oahu Groundwater Flow Model

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nicole Lautze

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater flow model for the island of Oahu. Data is from the following sources: Rotzoll, K., A.I. El-Kadi. 2007. Numerical Ground-Water Flow Simulation for Red Hill Fuel Storage Facilities, NAVFAC Pacific, Oahu, Hawaii - Prepared TEC, Inc. Water Resources Research Center, University of Hawaii, Honolulu.; Whittier, R.B., K. Rotzoll, S. Dhal, A.I. El-Kadi, C. Ray, G. Chen, and D. Chang. 2004. Hawaii Source Water Assessment Program Report – Volume VII – Island of Oahu Source Water Assessment Program Report. Prepared for the Hawaii Department of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. University of Hawaii, Water Resources Research Center. Updated 2008.; and Whittier, R. and A.I. El-Kadi. 2009. Human and Environmental Risk Ranking of Onsite Sewage Disposal Systems – Final. Prepared by the University of Hawaii, Dept. of Geology and Geophysics for the State of Hawaii Dept. of Health, Safe Drinking Water Branch. December 2009.

  7. TEP process flow diagram

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilms, R Scott; Carlson, Bryan; Coons, James; Kubic, William

    2008-01-01

    This presentation describes the development of the proposed Process Flow Diagram (PFD) for the Tokamak Exhaust Processing System (TEP) of ITER. A brief review of design efforts leading up to the PFD is followed by a description of the hydrogen-like, air-like, and waterlike processes. Two new design values are described; the mostcommon and most-demanding design values. The proposed PFD is shown to meet specifications under the most-common and mostdemanding design values.

  8. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Xiaolin

    2012-12-13

    In this report, we present the research efforts made by our group at UCLA in the SciDAC project Simulations of turbulent flows with strong shocks and density variations. We use shock-fitting methodologies as an alternative to shock-capturing schemes for the problems where a well defined shock is present. In past five years, we have focused on development of high-order shock-fitting Navier-Stokes solvers for perfect gas flow and thermochemical non-equilibrium flow and simulation of shock-turbulence interaction physics for very strong shocks. Such simulation has not been possible before because the limitation of conventional shock capturing methods. The limitation of shock Mach number is removed by using our high-order shock-fitting scheme. With the help of DOE and TeraGrid/XSEDE super computing resources, we have obtained new results which show new trends of turbulence statistics behind the shock which were not known before. Moreover, we are also developing tools to consider multi-species non-equilibrium flows. The main results are in three areas: (1) development of high-order shock-fitting scheme for perfect gas flow, (2) Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of interaction of realistic turbulence with moderate to very strong shocks using super computing resources, and (3) development and implementation of models for computation of mutli-species non-quilibrium flows with shock-fitting codes.

  9. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  10. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, James C.; Hardee, Harry C.; Striker, Richard P.

    1985-01-01

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packer-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  11. Order, chaos and nuclear dynamics: An introduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiatecki, W.J.

    1990-08-01

    This is an introductory lecture illustrating by simple examples the anticipated effect on collective nuclear dynamics of a transition from order to chaos in the motions of nucleons inside an idealized nucleus. The destruction of order is paralleled by a transition from a rubber-like to a honey-like behaviour of the independent-particle nuclear model. 10 refs., 6 figs.

  12. Virtual Flow Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2015-10-05

    Virtual Flow Simulator (VFS) is a state-of-the-art computational fluid mechanics (CFD) package that is capable of simulating multi-physics/multi-phase flows with the most advanced turbulence models (RANS, LES) over complex terrains. The flow solver is based on the Curvilinear Immersed Boundary (CURVIB) method to handle geometrically complex and moving domains. Different modules of the VFS package can provide different simulation capabilities for specific applications ranging from the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) of solid and deformable bodies, themore » two-phase free surface flow solver based on the level set method for ocean waves, sediment transport models in rivers and the large-scale models of wind farms based on actuator lines and surfaces. All numerical features of VFS package have been validated with known analytical and experimental data as reported in the related journal articles. VFS package is suitable for a broad range of engineering applications within different industries. VFS has been used in different projects with applications in wind and hydrokinetic energy, offshore and near-shore ocean studies, cardiovascular and biological flows, and natural streams and river morphodynamics. Over the last decade, the development of VFS has been supported and assisted with the help of various United States companies and federal agencies that are listed in the sponsor lists. In this version, VFS-Wind contains all the necessary modeling tools for wind energy applications, including land-based and offshore wind farms. VFS is highly scalable to run on either desktop computers or high performance clusters (up to 16,000 CPUs). This released version comes with a detailed user’s manual and a set of case studies designed to facilitate the learning of the various aspects of the code in a comprehensive manner. The included documentation and support material has been elaborated in a collaboration effort with Sandia National Labs under the contract DE-EE0005482

  13. Plasma flow in the DIII-D divertor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boedo, J.A.; Porter, G.D.; Schaffer, M.J.

    1998-07-01

    Indications that flows in the divertor can exhibit complex behavior have been obtained from 2-D modeling but so far remain mostly unconfirmed by experiment. An important feature of flow physics is that of flow reversal. Flow reversal has been predicted analytically and it is expected when the ionization source arising from neutral or impurity ionization in the divertor region is large, creating a high pressure zone. Plasma flows arise to equilibrate the pressure. A radiative divertor regime has been proposed in order to reduce the heat and particle fluxes to the divertor target plates. In this regime, the energy and momentum of the plasma are dissipated into neutral gas introduced in the divertor region, cooling the plasma by collisional, radiative and other atomic processes so that the plasma becomes detached from the target plates. These regimes have been the subject of extensive studies in DIII-D to evaluate their energy and particle transport properties, but only recently it has been proposed that the energy transport over large regions of the divertor must be dominated by convection instead of conduction. It is therefore important to understand the role of the plasma conditions and geometry on determining the region of convection-dominated plasma in order to properly control the heat and particle fluxes to the target plates and hence, divertor performance. The authors have observed complex structures in the deuterium ion flows in the DIII-D divertor. Features observed include reverse flow, convective flow over a large volume of the divertor and stagnant flow. They have measured large gradients in the plasma potential across the separatrix in the divertor and determined that these gradients induce poloidal flows that can potentially affect the particle balance in the divertor.

  14. Radial flow pulse jet mixer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    VanOsdol, John G.

    2013-06-25

    The disclosure provides a pulse jet mixing vessel for mixing a plurality of solid particles. The pulse jet mixing vessel is comprised of a sludge basin, a flow surface surrounding the sludge basin, and a downcoming flow annulus between the flow surface and an inner shroud. The pulse jet mixing vessel is additionally comprised of an upper vessel pressurization volume in fluid communication with the downcoming flow annulus, and an inner shroud surge volume separated from the downcoming flow annulus by the inner shroud. When the solid particles are resting on the sludge basin and a fluid such as water is atop the particles and extending into the downcoming flow annulus and the inner shroud surge volume, mixing occurs by pressurization of the upper vessel pressurization volume, generating an inward radial flow over the flow surface and an upwash jet at the center of the sludge basin.

  15. Flowing effects in gas lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhi, G.

    1984-05-01

    Currently accepted theory states that saturation intensity and gain (or optical power density) increase without limit with the increase of the flow speed. These conclusions are not true. It is shown instead that they tend to be limiting values with the increase of flow speed. The variations of the parameters mentioned above with flow speed are presented.

  16. Modeling shrouded stator cavity flows in axial-flow compressors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wellborn, S.R.; Tolchinsky, I.; Okiishi, T.H.

    2000-01-01

    Experiments and computational analyses were completed to understand the nature of shrouded stator cavity flows. From this understanding, a one-dimensional model of the flow through shrouded stator cavities was developed. This model estimates the leakage mass flow, temperature rise, and angular momentum increase through the cavity, given geometry parameters and the flow conditions at the interface between the cavity and primary flow path. This cavity model consists of two components, one that estimates the flow characteristics through the labyrinth seals and the other that predicts the transfer of momentum due to windage. A description of the one-dimensional model is given. The incorporation and use of the one-dimensional model in a multistage compressor primary flow analysis tool is described. The combination of this model and the primary flow solver was used to reliably simulate the significant impact on performance of the increase of hub seal leakage in a twelve-stage axial-flow compressor. Observed higher temperatures of the hub region fluid, different stage matching, and lower overall efficiencies and core flow than expected could be correctly linked to increased hub seal clearance with this new technique. The importance of including these leakage flows in compressor simulations is shown.

  17. A Reduced-Order Model of Transport Phenomena for Power Plant Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Cizmas; Brian Richardson; Thomas Brenner; Raymond Fontenot

    2009-09-30

    A reduced-order model based on proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) has been developed to simulate transient two- and three-dimensional isothermal and non-isothermal flows in a fluidized bed. Reduced-order models of void fraction, gas and solids temperatures, granular energy, and z-direction gas and solids velocity have been added to the previous version of the code. These algorithms are presented and their implementation is discussed. Verification studies are presented for each algorithm. A number of methods to accelerate the computations performed by the reduced-order model are presented. The errors associated with each acceleration method are computed and discussed. Using a combination of acceleration methods, a two-dimensional isothermal simulation using the reduced-order model is shown to be 114 times faster than using the full-order model. In the pursue of achieving the objectives of the project and completing the tasks planned for this program, several unplanned and unforeseen results, methods and studies have been generated. These additional accomplishments are also presented and they include: (1) a study of the effect of snapshot sampling time on the computation of the POD basis functions, (2) an investigation of different strategies for generating the autocorrelation matrix used to find the POD basis functions, (3) the development and implementation of a bubble detection and tracking algorithm based on mathematical morphology, (4) a method for augmenting the proper orthogonal decomposition to better capture flows with discontinuities, such as bubbles, and (5) a mixed reduced-order/full-order model, called point-mode proper orthogonal decomposition, designed to avoid unphysical due to approximation errors. The limitations of the proper orthogonal decomposition method in simulating transient flows with moving discontinuities, such as bubbling flows, are discussed and several methods are proposed to adapt the method for future use.

  18. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  19. cd ordering | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CD-DVD Ordering System Please complete the following information so the National Energy Technology Lab (NETL) can promptly process your order. Below is a sample of the fields required to order a CD or DVD. If any fields are left blank you may not receive your disk. Data gathered by this form will be used only by the NETL. and will not be distributed for any other purpose. Data transferred via the Internet to this database should not be considered secure. Last Name: Doe First Name: John Middle

  20. Incompressible Flows Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    NASA-VOF3D is a three-dimensional, transient, free surface, incompressible fluid dynamics program. It is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low gravity environment in which surface physics must be accurately treated. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion and includes a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. Variable mesh spacing is permitted in all three coordinate directions. Boundary conditions available are rigid free-slip wall, rigid no-slipmore » wall, continuative, periodic, and specified pressure outflow boundary.« less

  1. Plug Flow Reactor Simulator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-07-30

    PLUG is a computer program that solves the coupled steady state continuity, momentum, energy, and species balance equations for a plug flow reactor. Both homogeneous (gas-phase) and heterogenous (surface) reactions can be accommodated. The reactor may be either isothermal or adiabatic or may have a specified axial temperature or heat flux profile; alternatively, an ambient temperature and an overall heat-transfer coefficient can be specified. The crosssectional area and surface area may vary with axial position,more » and viscous drag is included. Ideal gas behavior and surface site conservation are assumed.« less

  2. Orders Granting Natural Gas, LNG & CNG Authorizations Issued...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Orders Granting Natural Gas, LNG & CNG Authorizations Issued in 2014 Orders Granting Natural Gas, LNG & CNG Authorizations Issued in 2014 Order 3378 - Encana Natural Gas Inc. Order...

  3. Imperial Manufacturing: Order (2013-CE-5322)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Imperial Manufacturing, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Imperial Manufacturing had failed to certify that certain models of walk-in cooler and freezer components comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  4. Elmira Stove Works: Order (2011-CE-1407)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Elmira Stove Works to pay a $6,000 civil penalty after finding Elmira Stove Works had failed to certify that certain models of refrigerator-freezers comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  5. Engineered Products: Order (2012-SE-5401)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Engineered Products Company to pay a $480 civil penalty after finding EPCO had manufactured/privately labeled and distributed in commerce in the U.S. 19 units of basic model 15701, a metal halide lamp fixture.

  6. Allen Co: Order (2010-CW-0715)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Allen Co. to pay a $5,000 civil penalty after finding Allen Co. had failed to certify that certain models of faucets comply with the applicable water conservation standards.

  7. National Comfort Products: Order (2010-SE-0307)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered National Comfort Products to pay an $8,000 civil penalty after finding NCP had failed to conduct the required testing to certify that certain models of central air conditioners comply with the applicable energy conservation standard.

  8. Capital Cooking: Order (2014-CE-23008)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE ordered Capital Cooking Equipment, Inc. to pay a $8,000 civil penalty after finding Capital Cooking had failed to certify that certain models of cooking products comply with the applicable energy conservation standards.

  9. Executive Order 11990: Protection Of Wetlands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In order to avoid to the extent possible the long and short term adverse impacts associated with the destruction or modification of wetlands and to avoid direct or indirect support of new...

  10. Aero-Tech: Order (2010-CE-1012)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE issued an Order and closed this case against Aero-Tech Light Bulb Co., without civil penalty, after DOE found that Aero-Tech manufactured and/or privately labeled incandescent reflector lamps, but did not violate DOE regulations.