Sample records for flow measurement techniques

  1. RESEARCH ARTICLE An optical flow MTV based technique for measuring microfluidic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garbe, Christoph S.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE An optical flow MTV based technique for measuring microfluidic flow for accurately measuring flow fields in microfluidic flows from molecular tagging velocimetry (MTV). Limited optical access is frequently encountered in microfluidic systems. Therefore, in this contribution we

  2. RESEARCH ARTICLE Optical plume velocimetry: a new flow measurement technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    hydrothermal systems Timothy J. Crone Ã? Russell E. McDuff Ã? William S. D. Wilcock Received: 5 November 2007 that fluid flow rates in mid- ocean ridge hydrothermal systems may be strongly influ- enced by mechanical that are transitioning between jet-like and plume-like behavior. List of symbols A area of jet nozzle, m2 B initial

  3. Two-phase air-water stratified flow measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan, Shiwei; Yan, Tinghu; Yeung, Hoi [School of Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield, Bedfordshire MK43 0AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a time resolved ultrasound system was developed for investigating two-phase air-water stratified flow. The hardware of the system includes a pulsed wave transducer, a pulser/receiver, and a digital oscilloscope. The time domain cross correlation method is used to calculate the velocity profile along ultrasonic beam. The system is able to provide velocities with spatial resolution of around 1mm and the temporal resolution of 200?s. Experiments were carried out on single phase water flow and two-phase air-water stratified flow. For single phase water flow, the flow rates from ultrasound system were compared with those from electromagnetic flow (EM) meter, which showed good agreement. Then, the experiments were conducted on two-phase air-water stratified flow and the results were given. Compared with liquid height measurement from conductance probe, it indicated that the measured velocities were explainable.

  4. Innovative Coal Solids-Flow Monitoring and Measurement Using Phase-Doppler and Mie Scattering Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Seong Lee

    2010-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Fuel flow to individual burners is complicated and difficult to determine on coal fired boilers, since coal solids were transported in a gas suspension that is governed by the complex physics of two-phase flow. The objectives of the project were the measurements of suspended coal solids-flows in the simulated test conditions. Various extractive methods were performed manually and can give only a snapshot result of fuel distribution. In order to measure particle diameter & velocity, laser based phase-Doppler particle analyzer (PDPA) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) were carefully applied. Statistical methods were used to analyze particle characteristics to see which factors have significant effect. The transparent duct model was carefully designed and fabricated for the laser-based-instrumentation of solids-flow monitoring (LISM). The experiments were conducted with two different kinds of particles with four different particle diameters. The particle types were organic particles and saw dust particles with the diameter range of 75-150 micron, 150-250 micron, 250-355 micron and 355-425 micron. The densities of the particles were measured to see how the densities affected the test results. Also the experiment was conducted with humid particles and fog particles. To generate humid particles, the humidifier was used. A pipe was connected to the humidifier to lead the particle flow to the intersection of the laser beam. The test results of the particle diameter indicated that, the mean diameter of humid particles was between 6.1703 microns and 6.6947 microns when the humid particle flow was low. When the humid particle flow was high, the mean diameter was between 6.6728 microns and 7.1872 microns. The test results of the particle mean velocity indicated that the mean velocity was between 1.3394 m/sec and 1.4556 m/sec at low humid particle flow. When the humid particle flow was high, the mean velocity was between 1.5694 m/sec and 1.7856 m/sec. The Air Flow Module, TQ AF 17 and shell ondina oil were used to generate fog particles. After the oil was heated inside the fog generator, the blower was used to generate the fog. The fog flew along the pipe to the intersection of the laser beam. The mean diameter of the fog particles was 5.765 microns. Compared with the humid particle diameter, we observed that the mean diameter of the fog particles was smaller than the humid particles. The test results of particle mean velocity was about 3.76 m/sec. Compared with the mean velocity of the humid particles, we can observed the mean velocity of fog particles were greater than humid particles. The experiments were conducted with four different kinds of particles with five different particle diameters. The particle types were organic particles, coal particles, potato particles and wheat particles with the diameter range of 63-75 micron, less than 150 micron, 150-250 micron, 250-355 micron and 355-425 micron. To control the flow rate, the control gate of the particle dispensing hopper was adjusted to 1/16 open rate, 1/8 open rate and 1/4 open rate. The captured image range was 0 cm to 5 cm from the control gate, 5 cm to 10 cm from the control gate and 10 cm to 15 cm from the control gate. Some of these experiments were conducted under both open environment conditions and closed environment conditions. Thus these experiments had a total of five parameters which were type of particles, diameter of particles, flow rate, observation range, and environment conditions. The coal particles (diameter between 63 and 75 microns) tested under the closed environment condition had three factors that were considered as the affecting factors. They were open rate, observation range, and environment conditions. In this experiment, the interaction of open rate and observation range had a significant effect on the lower limit. On the upper limit, the open rate and environment conditions had a significant effect. In addition, the interaction of open rate and environment conditions had a significant effect. The coal particles tested (diameter between 63 and 75

  5. Structural power flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falter, K.J.; Keltie, R.F.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous investigations of structural power flow through beam-like structures resulted in some unexplained anomalies in the calculated data. In order to develop structural power flow measurement as a viable technique for machine tool design, the causes of these anomalies needed to be found. Once found, techniques for eliminating the errors could be developed. Error sources were found in the experimental apparatus itself as well as in the instrumentation. Although flexural waves are the carriers of power in the experimental apparatus, at some frequencies longitudinal waves were excited which were picked up by the accelerometers and altered power measurements. Errors were found in the phase and gain response of the sensors and amplifiers used for measurement. A transfer function correction technique was employed to compensate for these instrumentation errors.

  6. The attribute measurement technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macarthur, Duncan W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langner, Diana [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Smith, Morag [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thron, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Razinkov, Sergey [RFNC-VNIIEF; Livke, Alexander [RFNC-VNIIEF

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Any verification measurement performed on potentially classified nuclear material must satisfy two seemingly contradictory constraints. First and foremost, no classified information can be released. At the same time, the monitoring party must have confidence in the veracity of the measurement. An information barrier (IB) is included in the measurement system to protect the potentially classified information while allowing sufficient information transfer to occur for the monitoring party to gain confidence that the material being measured is consistent with the host's declarations, concerning that material. The attribute measurement technique incorporates an IB and addresses both concerns by measuring several attributes of the nuclear material and displaying unclassified results through green (indicating that the material does possess the specified attribute) and red (indicating that the material does not possess the specified attribute) lights. The attribute measurement technique has been implemented in the AVNG, an attribute measuring system described in other presentations at this conference. In this presentation, we will discuss four techniques used in the AVNG: (1) the 1B, (2) the attribute measurement technique, (3) the use of open and secure modes to increase confidence in the displayed results, and (4) the joint design as a method for addressing both host and monitor needs.

  7. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  8. Experimental techniques and measurement accuracies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, E.F.; Yule, T.J.; DiIorio, G.; Nakamura, T.; Maekawa, H.

    1985-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief description of the experimental tools available for fusion neutronics experiments is given. Attention is paid to error estimates mainly for the measurement of tritium breeding ratio in simulated blankets using various techniques.

  9. Liquid measurement - Techniques and problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caffey, B.R.

    1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reviews a few liquid measurement techniques and their associated problems. In measuring liquid petroleum gas, the first obstacle to overcome is accomodating some form of volumetric measurement. This is usually accomplished by orifice, positive displacement, or turbine meters. Each of the three established methods is covered extensively by industry standards in the API Manual of Petroleum Standards. If the operator follows these standards, very accurate results can be achieved.

  10. Geologic flow characterization using tracer techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klett, R. D.; Tyner, C. E.; Hertel, Jr., E. S.

    1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new tracer flow-test system has been developed for in situ characterization of geologic formations. This report describes two sets of test equipment: one portable and one for testing in deep formations. Equations are derived for in situ detector calibration, raw data reduction, and flow logging. Data analysis techniques are presented for computing porosity and permeability in unconfined isotropic media, and porosity, permeability and fracture characteristics in media with confined or unconfined two-dimensional flow. The effects of tracer pulse spreading due to divergence, dispersion, and porous formations are also included.

  11. Comparison of Holdup Measurement Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lousteau, Angela L [ORNL] [ORNL; Stooksbury, John C [ORNL] [ORNL; Cleveland, Steven L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurement of uranium holdup, the residual material left in process equipment such as pipes or ducts, is an integral element of material control and accountability. Not only are the measurements important for accountability, they are also important for criticality safety. The goal in measuring holdup is to quantify the amount of material in the pipes to verify that all material is accounted for (inventory in [inventory out + holdup] = 0) and to ensure that the amount of material heldup is not a criticality risk. There are a number of ways to measure holdup in process equipment; however, this paper will evaluate only two methods (i.e., Holdup Measurement System 4 (HMS-4) and In Situ Object Counting Software (ISOCS)) for specific measurement scenarios. The comparison will use measurements of well-known reference materials in various configurations and will examine the results, uncertainties, repeatability, time required, portability, and cost of each system.

  12. A laser Doppler method for noninvasive measurement of flow velocity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biggs, G.L.

    1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Doppler velocimetry is a powerful optical technique for noninvasively obtaining experimental flow-velocity data. This paper describes the principle of operation and various optical configurations of the laser Doppler velocimeter. As a sample application, we describe an experimental apparatus for measuring the velocity flow field around a cylinder, and give our experimental results.

  13. TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING CIRCUMSOLAR RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3°. An active solar guider keeps the tracking A fused silicathrough the solar disc are desired, the tracking accuracycircum- solar measurement is the accuracy of tracking the

  14. Catalyst immobilization techniques for continuous flow synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Kevin David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Catalytic processes are ubiquitous in both research and industrial settings. As continuous flow processes continue to gain traction in research labs and fine and pharmaceutical chemical processes, new opportunities exist ...

  15. Mechanical property measurement by indentation techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janakiraman, Balasubramanian

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    optic sensing technique is developed. An incident light beam from a semiconductor laser is coupled back into an optical fiber upon reflection from the metal surface. By measuring the diffused light power reflected from the metal surface, the diameter...

  16. Mechanical property measurement by indentation techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janakiraman, Balasubramanian

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    optic sensing technique is developed. An incident light beam from a semiconductor laser is coupled back into an optical fiber upon reflection from the metal surface. By measuring the diffused light power reflected from the metal surface, the diameter...

  17. Continuous flow separation techniques for microchemical synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kralj, Jason G

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performing multistep microchemical synthesis requires many techniques from combining micromixers in series to the development of continuous microfluidic separation tools. Safety, high heat and mass transfer rates, and cost ...

  18. Review of air flow measurement techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Jennifer

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and ventilation effectiveness in large industrial premisesventilation of the room would cause discomfort to the occupants. (They accepted as a premise

  19. REVIEW OF AIR FLOW MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Foundenhancer activity than FINAL Progress ReportRECOVERY9747

  20. Measurements of Gas Bubble Size Distributions in Flowing Liquid Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wendel, Mark W [ORNL; Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Pressure waves created in liquid mercury pulsed spallation targets have been shown to induce cavitation damage on the target container. One way to mitigate such damage would be to absorb the pressure pulse energy into a dispersed population of small bubbles, however, measuring such a population in mercury is difficult since it is opaque and the mercury is involved in a turbulent flow. Ultrasonic measurements have been attempted on these types of flows, but the flow noise can interfere with the measurement, and the results are unverifiable and often unrealistic. Recently, a flow loop was built and operated at Oak Ridge National Labarotory to assess the capability of various bubbler designs to deliver an adequate population of bubbles to mitigate cavitation damage. The invented diagnostic technique involves flowing the mercury with entrained gas bubbles in a steady state through a horizontal piping section with a glass-window observation port located on the top. The mercury flow is then suddenly stopped and the bubbles are allowed to settle on the glass due to buoyancy. Using a bright-field illumination and a high-speed camera, the arriving bubbles are detected and counted, and then the images can be processed to determine the bubble populations. After using this technique to collect data on each bubbler, bubble size distributions were built for the purpose of quantifying bubbler performance, allowing the selection of the best bubbler options. This paper presents the novel procedure, photographic technique, sample visual results and some example bubble size distributions. The best bubbler options were subsequently used in proton beam irradiation tests performed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The cavitation damage results from the irradiated test plates in contact with the mercury are available for correlation with the bubble populations. The most effective mitigating population can now be designed into prototypical geometries for implementation into an actual SNS target.

  1. Measurement and characterization techniques for thermoelectric materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tritt, T.M.

    1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization of thermoelectric materials can pose many problems. A temperature difference can be established across these materials as an electrical current is passed due to the Peltier effect. The thermopower of these materials is quite large and thus large thermal voltages can contribute to many of the measurements necessary to investigate these materials. This paper will discuss the chracterization techniques necessary to investigate these materials and provide an overview of some of the potential systematic errors which can arise. It will also discuss some of the corrections one needs to consider. This should provide an introduction to the characterization and measurement of thermoelectric materials and provide references for a more in depth discussion of the concepts. It should also serve as an indication of the care that must be taken while working with thermoelectric materials.

  2. Uncertainty Analysis Technique for OMEGA Dante Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, M J; Widmann, K; Sorce, C; Park, H; Schneider, M

    2010-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Dante is an 18 channel X-ray filtered diode array which records the spectrally and temporally resolved radiation flux from various targets (e.g. hohlraums, etc.) at X-ray energies between 50 eV to 10 keV. It is a main diagnostics installed on the OMEGA laser facility at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester. The absolute flux is determined from the photometric calibration of the X-ray diodes, filters and mirrors and an unfold algorithm. Understanding the errors on this absolute measurement is critical for understanding hohlraum energetic physics. We present a new method for quantifying the uncertainties on the determined flux using a Monte-Carlo parameter variation technique. This technique combines the uncertainties in both the unfold algorithm and the error from the absolute calibration of each channel into a one sigma Gaussian error function. One thousand test voltage sets are created using these error functions and processed by the unfold algorithm to produce individual spectra and fluxes. Statistical methods are applied to the resultant set of fluxes to estimate error bars on the measurements.

  3. Measuring and interpreting charge dependent anisotropic flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei A. Voloshin; Ronald Belmont

    2014-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Chiral Magnetic Wave (CMW) [1] predicts a dependence of the positive and negative particle elliptic flow on the event charge asymmetry. Such a dependence has been observed by the STAR Collaboration [2]. However, it is rather difficult to interpret the results of this measurement, as well as to perform cross-experiment comparisons, due to the dependence of the observable on experimental inefficiencies and the kinematic acceptance used to determine the net asymmetry. We propose another observable that is free from these deficiencies. It also provides possibilities for differential measurements clarifying the interpretation of the results. We use this new observable to study the effect of the local charge conservation that can mimic the effect of the CMW in charge dependent flow measurements.

  4. Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Advanced Turbulence Measurements and Signal Processing for Hydropower Flow Characterization and flow characterization within full scale conventional hydropower systems, at marine and hydrokinetic

  5. Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Atrazine on Vermiculite Using a Stirred-flow Technique. L. TANG* and D. L.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Adsorption-Desorption Kinetics of Atrazine on Vermiculite Using a Stirred-flow Technique. L. TANG* and D. L. SPARKS, Univ. of Delaware. The rates of atrazine adsorption-desorption on a Llano-vermiculite were measured using a stirred-low technique. Both adsorption and desorption followed a two

  6. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, Apostolos C. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions.

  7. Method and apparatus for measuring flow velocity using matched filters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Raptis, A.C.

    1983-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring the flow velocities of individual phase flow components of a multiphase flow utilizes matched filters. Signals arising from flow noise disturbance are extracted from the flow, at upstream and downstream locations. The signals are processed through pairs of matched filters which are matched to the flow disturbance frequency characteristics of the phase flow component to be measured. The processed signals are then cross-correlated to determine the transit delay time of the phase flow component between sensing positions. 8 figs.

  8. Uncertainty Analysis on the Design of Thermal Conductivity Measurement by a Guarded Cut-Bar Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeff Phillips; Changhu Xing; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban1

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique adapted from the guarded-comparative-longitudinal heat flow method was selected for the measurement of the thermal conductivity of a nuclear fuel compact over a temperature range characteristic of its usage. This technique fulfills the requirement for non-destructive measurement of the composite compact. Although numerous measurement systems have been created based on the guarded comparative method, comprehensive systematic (bias) and measurement (precision) uncertainty associated with this technique have not been fully analyzed. In addition to the geometric effect in the bias error, which has been analyzed previously, this paper studies the working condition which is another potential error source. Using finite element analysis, this study showed the effect of these two types of error sources in the thermal conductivity measurement process and the limitations in the design selection of various parameters by considering their effect on the precision error. The results and conclusions provide valuable reference for designing and operating an experimental measurement system using this technique.

  9. Technique for Measuring Hybrid Electronic Component Reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, C.C.; Hernandez, C.L.; Hosking, F.M.; Robinson, D.; Rutherford, B.; Uribe, F.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Materials compatibility studies of aged, engineered materials and hardware are critical to understanding and predicting component reliability, particularly for systems with extended stockpile life requirements. Nondestructive testing capabilities for component reliability would significantly enhance lifetime predictions. For example, if the detection of crack propagation through a solder joint can be demonstrated, this technique could be used to develop baseline information to statistically determine solder joint lifelengths. This report will investigate high frequency signal response techniques for nondestructively evaluating the electrical behavior of thick film hybrid transmission lines.

  10. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible. 3 figures.

  11. Ultrasonic fluid flow measurement method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (108 Independent Blvd., Aiken, SC 29801)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for measuring the flow of a fluid in a pipe using ultrasonic waves. The apparatus comprises an ultrasonic generator, a lens for focusing the sound energy produced by the generator, and means for directing the focused energy into the side of the pipe through an opening and in a direction close to parallel to the long axis of the pipe. A cone carries the sound energy to the lens from the generator. Depending on the choice of materials, there may be a quarter-wave, acoustic impedance matching section between the generator and the cone to reduce the reflections of energy at the cone boundary. The lens material has an acoustic impedance similar to that of the cone material but a different sonic velocity so that the lens can converge the sound waves in the fluid. A transition section between the lens and the fluid helps to couple the energy to the fluid and assures it is directed as close to parallel to the fluid flow direction as possible.

  12. Enhanced Oil Recovery: Aqueous Flow Tracer Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Rovani; John Schabron

    2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A low detection limit analytical method was developed to measure a suite of benzoic acid and fluorinated benzoic acid compounds intended for use as tracers for enhanced oil recovery operations. Although the new high performance liquid chromatography separation successfully measured the tracers in an aqueous matrix at low part per billion levels, the low detection limits could not be achieved in oil field water due to interference problems with the hydrocarbon-saturated water using the system's UV detector. Commercial instrument vendors were contacted in an effort to determine if mass spectrometry could be used as an alternate detection technique. The results of their work demonstrate that low part per billion analysis of the tracer compounds in oil field water could be achieved using ultra performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry.

  13. Vector Network Analyzer Techniques to measure WR340 Waveguide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6 Vector Network Analyzer Techniques to Measure WR340 Waveguide Windows T. L. Smith ASD RF Group Advanced Photon Source Argonne National Laboratory June 26, 2002 Table of...

  14. System for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and system for measuring a multi-phase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multi-phase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The system for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes taking into account a pressure drop experienced by the gas phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase.

  15. C-III flow measurements with a coherence imaging spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, T. R.; Allen, S. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Howard, J. [Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work describes a coherence imaging spectrometer capable of making spatially resolved CIII flow measurements in the DIII-D lower divertor. The spectrometer exploits a periscope view of the plasma to produce line-of-sight averaged velocity measurements of CIII. From these chord averaged flow measurements, a 2D poloidal cross section of the CIII flow is tomographically reconstructed. Details of the diagnostic setup, acquired data, and data analysis will be presented, along with prospects for future applications.

  16. Measurement and simulation of a droplet population in a turbulent flow field Rbert Bords a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John, Volker

    online 30 May 2012 Keywords: Two-phase turbulent flow Disperse droplet population Non-intrusive are determined by non-intrusive measurements. A direct discretization of the 4D equation for the droplet size deter- mined by means of non-intrusive measurement techniques. In this way, suitable time

  17. Development of Tools for Measuring Temperature, Flow, Pressure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3 4.4.3 Development of Tools for Measuring Temperature, Flow, Pressure, and Seismicity of EGS Reservoirs - 300 C Capable Electronics Platform and Temperature Sensor System for...

  18. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment's final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  19. Remote measurement of corrosion using ultrasonic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garcia, K.M.; Porter, A.M.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) technology has the potential of meeting the US Department of Energy`s treatment requirements for mixed radioactive waste. A major technical constraint of the SCWO process is corrosion. Safe operation of a pilot plant requires monitoring of the corrosion rate of the materials of construction. A method is needed for measurement of the corrosion rate taking place during operation. One approach is to directly measure the change in wall thickness or growth of oxide layer at critical points in the SCWO process. In FY-93, a brief survey of the industry was performed to evaluate nondestructive evaluation (NDE) methods for remote corrosion monitoring in supercritical vessels. As a result of this survey, it was determined that ultrasonic testing (UT) methods would be the most cost-effective and suitable method of achieving this. Therefore, the objective for FY-94 was to prove the feasibility of using UT to monitor corrosion of supercritical vessels remotely during operation without removal of the insulation.

  20. Study of microfluidic measurement techniques using novel optical imaging diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Jaesung

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    is applied for a 3-D vector field mapping in a microscopic flow and a Brownian motion tracking of nanoparticles. This technique modifies OSSM system for a micro-fluidic experiment, and the imaging system captures a diffracted particle image having numerous...

  1. NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NIST Measurement Services: Natural Gas Flow Calibration Service (NGFCS) NIST Special Publication of Standards and Technology #12;i Table of Contents for the Natural Gas Flowmeter Calibration Service (NGFCS;1 Abstract This document describes NIST's high pressure natural gas flow calibration service (NGFCS). Flow

  2. Measurement of thermodynamics using gradient flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masakiyo Kitazawa; Masayuki Asakawa; Tetsuo Hatsuda; Takumi Iritani; Etsuko Itou; Hiroshi Suzuki

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze bulk thermodynamics and correlation functions of the energy-momentum tensor in pure Yang-Mills gauge theory using the energy-momentum tensor defined by the gradient flow and small flow time expansion. Our results on thermodynamic observables are consistent with those obtained by the conventional integral method. The analysis of the correlation function of total energy supports the energy conservation. It is also addressed that these analyses with gradient flow require less statistics compared with the previous methods. All these results suggest that the energy-momentum tensor can be successfully defined and observed on the lattice with moderate numerical costs with the gradient flow.

  3. Measurement uncertainty analysis techniques applied to PV performance measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, C.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this presentation is to provide a brief introduction to measurement uncertainty analysis, outline how it is done, and illustrate uncertainty analysis with examples drawn from the PV field, with particular emphasis toward its use in PV performance measurements. The uncertainty information we know and state concerning a PV performance measurement or a module test result determines, to a significant extent, the value and quality of that result. What is measurement uncertainty analysis? It is an outgrowth of what has commonly been called error analysis. But uncertainty analysis, a more recent development, gives greater insight into measurement processes and tests, experiments, or calibration results. Uncertainty analysis gives us an estimate of the I interval about a measured value or an experiment`s final result within which we believe the true value of that quantity will lie. Why should we take the time to perform an uncertainty analysis? A rigorous measurement uncertainty analysis: Increases the credibility and value of research results; allows comparisons of results from different labs; helps improve experiment design and identifies where changes are needed to achieve stated objectives (through use of the pre-test analysis); plays a significant role in validating measurements and experimental results, and in demonstrating (through the post-test analysis) that valid data have been acquired; reduces the risk of making erroneous decisions; demonstrates quality assurance and quality control measures have been accomplished; define Valid Data as data having known and documented paths of: Origin, including theory; measurements; traceability to measurement standards; computations; uncertainty analysis of results.

  4. Comparison of Numerical Techniques Used for Simulating Variable-Density Flow and Transport Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clement, Prabhakar

    Comparison of Numerical Techniques Used for Simulating Variable-Density Flow and Transport code by simulating two new variable-density-flow and transport experimental data sets. The experiments transport of a sinking groundwater plume and a rising groundwater plume. The numerical techniques used

  5. Multivortex micromixing: novel techniques using Dean flows for passive microfluidic mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sudarsan, Arjun Penubolu

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    MULTIVORTEX MICROMIXING: NOVEL TECHNIQUES USING DEAN FLOWS FOR PASSIVE MICROFLUIDIC MIXING A Dissertation by ARJUN PENUBOLU SUDARSAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2006 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering MULTIVORTEX MICROMIXING: NOVEL TECHNIQUES USING DEAN FLOWS FOR PASSIVE MICROFLUIDIC MIXING A...

  6. Flow Measurement with Tangential Paddlewheel Flow Meters: Analysis of Experimental Results and in-situ Diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, J. B.; Haberl, J. S.

    the premature drop-out of magnetic-type tangential paddlewheel sensors, as well as several in-situ diagnostic measures for ascertaining whether or not a flow meter is experiencing turbulent conditions or if a flow sensor's output signal is suffering a degraded... per second for magnetic-type, and 0.5 to 2 feet per second for non-magnetic-type flow sensors deviated from the actual flow by 20% or more which makes the measurement of flow and thermal energy use in this regime highly suspect. Figure 4 also indicates...

  7. Optical Fiber Technique for In-Reactor Mechanical Properties Measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Schley; Zilong Hua; David H. Hurley; Heng Ban

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In-reactor measurement of material properties is required for a better understanding of radiation effects on materials. We present an optical fiber based technique for measuring changes in elastic properties which involves exciting and measuring flexural vibrations in a thin cantilever beam. By exciting the beam and measuring the natural frequency, changes in the modulus of elasticity can be monitored. The technique is demonstrated by monitoring the elastic property changes of a beam fabricated from copper, as the copper undergoes recrystallization at elevated temperature.

  8. Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements for flowing particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deka, C.; Steinkamp, J.A.

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved fluorescence decay measurements are disclosed for flowing particles. An apparatus and method for the measurement and analysis of fluorescence for individual cells and particles in flow are described, wherein the rapid measurement capabilities of flow cytometry and the robust measurement and analysis procedures of time-domain fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy are combined. A pulse-modulated CW laser is employed for excitation of the particles. The characteristics and the repetition rate of the excitation pulses can be readily adjusted to accommodate for fluorescence decays having a wide range of lifetimes. 12 figs.

  9. A pattern matching technique for measuring sediment displacement levels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalziel, Stuart

    of a vortex ring with a glass ballotini particle layer as the resuspension mechanism are described to test-intrusive measurements of changes in the depth of a layer of sedi- ment due to a resuspension event. The key focus here is on the measurement technique itself, rather than the dynamics of the resuspension event that motivated

  10. First fusion proton measurements in TEXTOR plasmas using activation technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonheure, G.; Wassenhove, G. Van [ERM-KMS, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, B-1000 Brussels (Belgium); Mlynar, J. [Association Euratom-IPP.CR, Institute of Plasma Physics AS CR, v.v.i., Za Slovankou 3, CZ-182 00 Praha 8 (Czech Republic); Hult, M.; Gonzalez de Orduna, R.; Lutter, G. [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements (IRMM), Retieseweg 111, B-2440 Geel (Belgium); Vermaercke, P. [SCK-CEN, Boeretang, B-2400 Mol (Belgium); Huber, A.; Schweer, B.; Esser, G.; Biel, W. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, EURATOM-Assoziation, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    MeV particle loss measurements from fusion plasmas, in particular alpha particles, remain difficult in large fusion devices and further R and D is needed for ITER. This paper describes the first attempt to measure 3 MeV escaping fusion protons emitted from TEXTOR tokamak plasmas using activation technique. This technique was successfully demonstrated, initially, in 2006 on the JET tokamak. An ion camera equipped with a collimator and several types of activation detectors was installed inside the TEXTOR vacuum vessel to perform these measurements. After irradiation, the detectors were analyzed using ultra low level gamma-ray spectrometry at the HADES underground laboratory. 3 MeV escaping fusion protons were detected in larger number -{approx}6 times more - compared to earlier measurements using this technique on JET. Another major progress was the reduction of the cooling time by a factor of 50, which made possible to detect radionuclides with half-life of less than 90 min.

  11. The Measurement, interpretation and use of unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yih, Tien Sieh

    1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a two-phase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe by means of an impulse technique using a turning tee and beam. Different electrical filters have ...

  12. MEASUREMENTS AND COMPUTATIONS OF FUEL DROPLET TRANSPORT IN TURBULENT FLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Katz and Omar Knio

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to study the dynamics of fuel droplets in turbulent water flows. The results are essential for development of models capable of predicting the dispersion of slightly light/heavy droplets in isotropic turbulence. Since we presently do not have any experimental data on turbulent diffusion of droplets, existing mixing models have no physical foundations. Such fundamental knowledge is essential for understanding/modeling the environmental problems associated with water-fuel mixing, and/or industrial processes involving mixing of immiscible fluids. The project has had experimental and numerical components: 1. The experimental part of the project has had two components. The first involves measurements of the lift and drag forces acting on a droplet being entrained by a vortex. The experiments and data analysis associated with this phase are still in progress, and the facility, constructed specifically for this project is described in Section 3. In the second and main part, measurements of fuel droplet dispersion rates have been performed in a special facility with controlled isotropic turbulence. As discussed in detail in Section 2, quantifying and modeling the of droplet dispersion rate requires measurements of their three dimensional trajectories in turbulent flows. To obtain the required data, we have introduced a new technique - high-speed, digital Holographic Particle Image Velocimetry (HPIV). The technique, experimental setup and results are presented in Section 2. Further information is available in Gopalan et al. (2005, 2006). 2. The objectives of the numerical part are: (1) to develop a computational code that combines DNS of isotropic turbulence with Lagrangian tracking of particles based on integration of a dynamical equation of motion that accounts for pressure, added mass, lift and drag forces, (2) to perform extensive computations of both buoyant (bubbles) and slightly buoyant (droplets) particles in turbulence conditions relevant to the experiments, and (3) to explore whether the corresponding predictions can explain the experimentally-observed behavior of the rise and dispersion of oil droplets in isotropic turbulence. A brief summary of results is presented in Section 4.

  13. Measurement of steam quality in two-phase critical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, John William

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow orifice meter 4 Vapor-phase orifice meter 5 Steam quality adjustment valves 6 Critical flow test section 12 13 15 17 7 Two-phase mixture vent to atmosphere passage through test section 8 Fluke data logger 9 Condenser apparatus 18 21...-water 15 Steam quality as a function of vapor-phase Reynolds number for critical flow of steam-water . . . . . . . . , . . . . 48 16 Steam quality as a function of pressure measured upstream from critical flow orifice 17 Steam quality as a function...

  14. Stereoscopic PIV measurements of swirling flow entering a catalyst substrate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Persoons, T. [Trinity College Dublin, Mechanical Engineering Department, Parsons Building, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Vanierschot, M.; Van den Bulck, E. [Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This experimental study investigates the stagnation region of a swirling flow entering an automotive catalyst substrate. A methodology is established using stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (PIV) to determine three-component velocity distributions up to 0.2 mm from the catalyst entrance face. In adverse conditions of strong out-of-plane velocity, PIV operating parameters are adjusted for maximum spatial correlation strength. The measurement distance to the catalyst is sufficiently small to observe radial flow spreading. A scaling analysis of the stagnation flow region provides a model for the flow uniformization as a function of the catalyst pressure drop. (author)

  15. Flight test measurements and theoretical lift prediction for flow energizers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pradhan, Amit Aravind

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering FLIGHT TEST MEASUREMENTS AND THEORETICAL LIFT PREDICTION FOR FLOW ENERGIZERS A Thesis by AHIT ARAVIND PRADHAN Approved as to style and content by: Donald T. Mard (Chairman of Committee...) Howard L. Chevalier (Member) Garng H. Huang (Member) gg~j(EC( C, Clogs' Malter E. Haisler (Head of Department) Hay 1986 ABSTRACT Flight Test Measurements and Theoretical Lift prediction for Flow Energizers. (May 1986) Amit Aravind Pradhan, B...

  16. Measuring water velocity using DIDSON and image cross-correlation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Mueller, Robert P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To design or operate hydroelectric facilities for maximum power generation and minimum ecological impact, it is critical to understand the biological responses of fish to different flow structures. However, information is still lacking on the relationship between fish behavior and flow structures despite many years of research. Existing field characterization approaches conduct fish behavior studies and flow measurements separately and coupled later using statistical analysis. These types of studies, however, lack a way to determine the specific hydraulic conditions or the specific causes of the biological response. The Dual-Frequency Identification Sonar (DIDSON) has been in wide use for fish behavior studies since 1999. The DIDSON can detect acoustic targets at long ranges in dark or turbid dark water. PIV is a state-of-the-art, non-intrusive, whole-flow-field technique, providing instantaneous velocity vector measurements in a whole plane using image cross-correlating techniques. There has been considerable research in the development of image processing techniques associated with PIV. This existing body of knowledge is applicable and can be used to process the images taken by the DIDSON. This study was conducted in a water flume which is 9 m long, 1.2 m wide, and 1.2 m deep when filled with water. A lab jet flow was setup as the benchmark flow to calibrate DIDSON images. The jet nozzle was 6.35 cm in diameter and core jet velocity was 1.52 m/s. Different particles were used to seed the flow. The flow was characterized based on the results using Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV). A DIDSON was mounted about 5 meters away from the jet nozzle. Consecutive DIDSON images with known time delay were divided into small interrogation spots after background was subtracted. Across-correlation was then performed to estimate the velocity vector for each interrogation spot. The estimated average velocity in the core zone was comparable to that obtained using a LDV. This proof-of-principle project demonstrated the feasibility of extracting water flow velocity information from underwater DIDSON images using image cross-correlation techniques.

  17. Solids flow control and measurement in the PEATGAS pilot-plant program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wohadlo, S.J.; Biljetina, R.; Laurens, R.M.; Bachta, R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a pilot plant gasification program, the measurement and control of major process variables such as flow, temperature, pressure, density and level are essential to develop accurate material balance and reliable scale-up data. Of these, solids mass flow metering and control usually present the most difficult application. Problems are encountered because of (a) solids characteristics, which can cause erosion and plugging; (b) measurement requirements, which are often at elevated pressures and temperatures; and (c) changes in stream characteristics, such as density, viscosity and solids concentration. This paper reviews the approaches used to measure and control solid-liquid and solid-gas mixtures and elaborates on the design, installation and operating experiences of a lockhopper dry feed system commissioned to control solids feed to the gasifier. Accurate and reliable solids flow measurement and control was achieved during the operation of the PEATGAS pilot plant. Standard instrumentation, modified to meet process requirements, was used to measure multi-component flows of solid-gas and solid-liquid mixtures. In addition, a lockhopper feed system using an innovative solids rate control and measurement technique was installed, commissioned and operated. IGT as a process developer will continue to look for new or improved instrumentation that might be better suited to measure important process variables such as the solids mass flow applications discussed herein.

  18. Short communication A new technique to measure micromotion distribution around

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerraoui, Rachid

    locally the relative interfacial micromotions between the metallic stem and the surrounding femoral bone arthro- plasty (THA). Animal experiments have indeed reported bone ingrowth for micromotion below 28 mmShort communication A new technique to measure micromotion distribution around a cementless femoral

  19. Forward-illumination light-extinction technique for soot measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Yi; Lee, Chiafon F

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A forward-illumination light-extinction (FILE) soot volume fraction measurement technique was developed and tested. By using a camera and a point light source in front of the flame and a diffuser behind the flame, with this technique one can achieve a two-dimensional soot concentration measurement with only one window when one is studying confined combustion. The line-of-sight quantitative soot volume fraction is obtained by calculation of the reflected light intensity with or without the presence of soot cloud. Verification of this technique was accomplished by measurement of an axisymmetric ethylene diffusion flame. The field distribution obtained by Abel inversion is presented and matched well with previous point measurements. The FILE technique has high time resolution when a high-speed camera and a copper vapor laser are adopted. All these advantages of FILE make it suitable for line-of-sight integrated, two-dimensional soot distribution of transient combustion, e.g., in the case of in-cylinder Diesel combustion.

  20. Enhanced Algorithm for Traceability Measurements in UF6 Flow Pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copinger, Thomas E [ORNL; March-Leuba, Jose A [ORNL; Upadhyaya, Belle R [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Blend Down Monitoring System (BDMS) is used to continually assess the mixing and downblending of highly enriched uranium (HEU) with low-enriched uranium (LEU). This is accomplished by measuring the enrichment and the fissile mass flow rate of the UF{sub 6} gas located in each process pipe of the system by inducing the fission of the {sup 235}U contained in the gas. Measurements are taken along this process route to trace the HEU content all the way to the product stream, ensuring that HEU was down blended. A problem associated with the current traceability measuring algorithm is that it does not account for the time-varying background that is introduced to the system by the movement of the shutter located at the HEU leg of the process. The current way of dealing with that problem is to discard the data for periods when the HEU shutter is open (50% of overall data) because it correlates with the same timeframe in which the direct contribution to background from the HEU shutter was seen. The advanced algorithm presented in this paper allows for continuous measurement of traceability (100%) by accurately accounting for the varying background during the shutter-movement cycle. This algorithm utilizes advanced processing techniques that identify and discriminate the different sources of background radiation, instead of grouping them into one background group for the whole measurement cycle. By using this additional information, the traceability measurement statistics can achieve a greater number of values, thus improving the overall usefulness of these measurements in the BDMS. The effectiveness of the new algorithm was determined by modeling it in a simulation and ensuring that it retained its integrity through a large number of runs, including various shutter-failure conditions. Each run was performed with varying amounts of background radiation from each individual source and with varying traceability counts. The simulations documented in this paper prove that the algorithm can stand up to various transients introduced into the system, such as failure of shutter movement.

  1. Fuel Cell Manufacturing Diagnostic Techniques: IR Thermography with Reactive Flow through Excitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manak, A. J.; Ulsh, M.; Bender, G.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While design and material considerations for PEMFCs have a large impact on cost, it is also necessary to consider a transition to high volume production of fuel cell systems, including MEA components, to enable economies of scale and reduce per unit cost. One of the critical manufacturing tasks is developing and deploying techniques to provide in?process measurement of fuel cell components for quality control. This effort requires a subsidiary task: The study of the effect of manufacturing defects on performance and durability with the objective to establish validated manufacturing tolerances for fuel cell components. This work focuses on the development of a potential quality control method for gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). The method consists of infrared (IR) thermography combined with reactive flow through (RFT) excitation. Detection of catalyst loading reduction defects in GDE catalyst layers will be presented.

  2. Precision electron flow measurements in a disk transmission line.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Waylon T.; Pelock, Michael D.; Martin, Jeremy Paul; Jackson, Daniel Peter Jr.; Savage, Mark Edward; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Mendel, Clifford Will, Jr.; Pointon, Timothy David

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An analytic model for electron flow in a system driving a fixed inductive load is described and evaluated with particle in cell simulations. The simple model allows determining the impedance profile for a magnetically insulated transmission line given the minimum gap desired, and the lumped inductance inside the transition to the minimum gap. The model allows specifying the relative electron flow along the power flow direction, including cases where the fractional electron flow decreases in the power flow direction. The electrons are able to return to the cathode because they gain energy from the temporally rising magnetic field. The simulations were done with small cell size to reduce numerical heating. An experiment to compare electron flow to the simulations was done. The measured electron flow is {approx}33% of the value from the simulations. The discrepancy is assumed to be due to a reversed electric field at the cathode because of the inductive load and falling electron drift velocity in the power flow direction. The simulations constrain the cathode electric field to zero, which gives the highest possible electron flow.

  3. Study atom-vacuum interaction by the weak measurement technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Zhang; S. Y. Zhu

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum weak measurement attracts much interests recently [Rev. Mod. Phys. 86, 307 (2014)], as it could amplify some weak signals and provide a technique to observe the nonclassical phenomenons. Here, we apply this technique to study the interaction between the free atoms and the vacuum in a cavity. Due to the gradient field in the vacuum cavity, the external orbital motions and the internal electronic states of the atoms can be weakly coupled via the atom-field electric-dipole interaction. We show an interesting phenomenon that, within the properly post-selected internal states, the weak atom-vacuum interaction could generate a large change to the external motions of atoms.

  4. System and method measuring fluid flow in a conduit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Marcos German (Idaho Falls, ID); Kidd, Terrel G. (Blackfoot, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring fluid mass flow in a conduit in which there exists a pressure differential in the fluid between at least two spaced-apart locations in the conduit. The system includes a first pressure transducer disposed in the side of the conduit at a first location for measuring pressure of fluid at that location, a second or more pressure transducers disposed in the side of the conduit at a second location, for making multiple measurements of pressure of fluid in the conduit at that location, and a computer for computing the average pressure of the multiple measurements at the second location and for computing flow rate of fluid in the conduit from the pressure measurement by the first pressure transducer and from the average pressure calculation of the multiple measurements.

  5. Device for measuring the flow of a gas containing particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, R.G.; Hofer, P.H.

    1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an apparatus for continuously measuring the flow of a gas containing entrained particulates. It comprises: a flow channel, through which the gas flows; an orifice disposed within the flow channel, including at least a first surface and a second surface; means for causing the first surface and second surface independently to move in directions perpendicular to lines normal to the surfaces; scraping means, for intimately contacting at least a portion of the first surface and of the second surface, at all times while the surfaces are moving, whereby particulates which adhere to the first and second surfaces are removed by the movement of the surfaces past the scraping means; pressure taps, positioned so as to communicate with the flow channel upstream and downstream from the orifice, the pressure taps additionally in communication with pressure-measuring means, for measuring the pressure differential in the flow channel resulting from the passage of the gas through the orifice; and thermophoretic heaters, positioned so as to heat the gas within the pressure taps, and thereby excluding particulates therefrom.

  6. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

  7. Investigation of grid embedment techniques as applied to subcritical flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to provide detailed flowfield solutions near the leading edge of an airfoil, two techniques of embedding a subgr1d within an overall computational gr1d have been stud1ed. These embedded grids cons1st of a Cartesian system and a body fitted system...ng airfoil characterist1cs through the use of numerical methods has 1ncreased s1gnificantly in recent years due to improved computers and increased wind tunnel testing costs. Typ1cal examples of these methods are the programs TRANDES and TRANSCON...

  8. Evaluation of bubbler/diaphragm techniques to measure surface level in the waste storage tanks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.J.; Hickman, B.J.; Colson, J.B.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the results of tests conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to determine if a bubbler technique can be used to determine the surface level in the waste tanks. Two techniques were evaluated. The first technique is a standard bubbler system in which a tube is placed below the surface of the liquid to be measured and air pressure inside a tube is increased until bubbles begin to become emitted from the tube. The air pressure then is a function of the pressure at the bottom of the tube. The second technique involves a system similar to the standard bubbler technique, but instead of bubbles being released into the material to be gauged, air pressure is increased against a diaphragm until enough pressure is applied to overcome the pressure of the liquid at the given depth, at which time the air then flows in a return loop back to a vent. The advantage of the diaphragm system is that it is a sealed system; thus no air is released into the waste tank materials, and it is not possible for the waste tank materials to get into the air flow. Based on the results of the tests conducted in this program, it appears that the bubbler and diaphragm systems that were tested could not be used for accurate measurements of the level in the waste tanks. Both exhibited deposits of simulated waste tank material at the end of the devices which affected the ability of the gauge to accurately determine changes in the surface level even though the measured value of the level was inaccurate. Further investigations into the cause of this inaccuracy may be warranted. Alternate diaphragm materials may improve the performance of this gauge.

  9. Top-quark mass measurements: Alternative techniques (LHC + Tevatron)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanie Adomeit

    2014-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of the top-quark mass employing alternative techniques are presented, performed by the D0 and CDF collaborations at the Tevatron as well as the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC. The alternative methods presented include measurements using the lifetime of $B$-hadrons, the transverse momentum of charged leptons and the endpoints of kinematic distributions in top quark anti-quark pair ($t\\bar{t}$) final states. The extraction of the top-quark pole mass from the $t\\bar{t}$ production cross-section and the normalized differential $t\\bar{t}$ + 1-jet cross-section are discussed as well as the top-quark mass extraction using fixed-order QCD predictions at detector level. Finally, a measurement of the top-quark mass using events enhanced in single top t-channel production is presented.

  10. Damage detection technique by measuring laser-based mechanical impedance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Hyeonseok; Sohn, Hoon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (Daehak-ro 291, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701) (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This study proposes a method for measurement of mechanical impedance using noncontact laser ultrasound. The measurement of mechanical impedance has been of great interest in nondestructive testing (NDT) or structural health monitoring (SHM) since mechanical impedance is sensitive even to small-sized structural defects. Conventional impedance measurements, however, have been based on electromechanical impedance (EMI) using contact-type piezoelectric transducers, which show deteriorated performances induced by the effects of a) Curie temperature limitations, b) electromagnetic interference (EMI), c) bonding layers and etc. This study aims to tackle the limitations of conventional EMI measurement by utilizing laser-based mechanical impedance (LMI) measurement. The LMI response, which is equivalent to a steady-state ultrasound response, is generated by shooting the pulse laser beam to the target structure, and is acquired by measuring the out-of-plane velocity using a laser vibrometer. The formation of the LMI response is observed through the thermo-mechanical finite element analysis. The feasibility of applying the LMI technique for damage detection is experimentally verified using a pipe specimen under high temperature environment.

  11. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McGrail, Bernard P. (Pasco, WA); Martin, Paul F. (Richland, WA); Lindenmeier, Clark W. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  12. Real-time planar flow velocity measurements using an optical flow algorithm implemented on GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gautier, N

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a high speed implementation of an optical flow algorithm which computes planar velocity fields in an experimental flow. Real-time computation of the flow velocity field allows the experimentalist to have instantaneous access to quantitative features of the flow. This can be very useful in many situations: fast evaluation of the performances and characteristics of a new setup, design optimization, easier and faster parametric studies, etc. It can also be a valuable measurement tool for closed-loop flow control experiments where fast estimation of the state of the flow is needed. The algorithm is implemented on a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU). The accuracy of the computation is shown. Computation speed and scalability are highlighted along with guidelines for further improvements. The system architecture is flexible, scalable and can be adapted on the fly in order to process higher resolutions or achieve higher precision. The set-up is applied on a Backward-Facing Step (BFS) flow in a hydro...

  13. Radiation Pattern Reconstruction Techniques for Antenna Measurement using Chebyshev Polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou Du; Minwook Kwon; Dongsun Choi; Jinhwan Koh

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of antenna radiation pattern reconstruction using Chebyshev polynomials was presented in this paper. The analysis starts from the data measured in the frequency domain, and it corresponds to a direct propagating between two antennas and reflected propagating waves from the copper plate. The accuracy of this technique is evaluated at the frequency of 3.35GHz by the anechoic conditions. As a result, the Chebyshev method shows us a good performance in the E-plane in the range of -70{\\deg} ~0{\\deg}.

  14. Modeling the reactive inorganic solute distributions in the groundwater flow systems of the Hanford Site using inverse analytical modeling techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adamski, Mark Robert

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverse analytical techniques were used to model solute distributions and determine transport parameters for two flow systems in the Yakima Basalt subgroup at the Hanford Site in Washington state. Previous studies of these flow systems used...

  15. An inkjet vision measurement technique for high-frequency jetting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwon, Kye-Si, E-mail: kskwon@sch.ac.kr; Jang, Min-Hyuck; Park, Ha Yeong [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Soonchunhyang University 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Hyun-Seok [Department of Electrical and Robot Engineering, Soonchunhyang University, 22, Soonchunhyang-Ro, Shinchang, Asan Chungnam 336-745 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inkjet technology has been used as manufacturing a tool for printed electronics. To increase the productivity, the jetting frequency needs to be increased. When using high-frequency jetting, the printed pattern quality could be non-uniform since the jetting performance characteristics including the jetting speed and droplet volume could vary significantly with increases in jet frequency. Therefore, high-frequency jetting behavior must be evaluated properly for improvement. However, it is difficult to measure high-frequency jetting behavior using previous vision analysis methods, because subsequent droplets are close or even merged. In this paper, we present vision measurement techniques to evaluate the drop formation of high-frequency jetting. The proposed method is based on tracking target droplets such that subsequent droplets can be excluded in the image analysis by focusing on the target droplet. Finally, a frequency sweeping method for jetting speed and droplet volume is presented to understand the overall jetting frequency effects on jetting performance.

  16. Applications of in-situ measurement techniques of absorption Volker Mellert1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    techniques to measure sound absorption or the acoustic surface impedance in-situ is given and an applicationApplications of in-situ measurement techniques of absorption Volker Mellert1 , Christian Nocke2. Abstract Two in-situ measurement techniques for sound absorption are compared, a subtraction technique

  17. Measurement techniques for the verification of excess weapons materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tape, J.W.; Eccleston, G.W.; Yates, M.A.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The end of the superpower arms race has resulted in an unprecedented reduction in stockpiles of deployed nuclear weapons. Numerous proposals have been put forward and actions have been taken to ensure the irreversibility of nuclear arms reductions, including unilateral initiatives such as those made by President Clinton in September 1993 to place fissile materials no longer needed for a deterrent under international inspection, and bilateral and multilateral measures currently being negotiated. For the technologist, there is a unique opportunity to develop the technical means to monitor nuclear materials that have been declared excess to nuclear weapons programs, to provide confidence that reductions are taking place and that the released materials are not being used again for nuclear explosive programs. However, because of the sensitive nature of these materials, a fundamental conflict exists between the desire to know that the bulk materials or weapon components in fact represent evidence of warhead reductions, and treaty commitments and national laws that require the protection of weapons design information. This conflict presents a unique challenge to technologists. The flow of excess weapons materials, from deployed warheads through storage, disassembly, component storage, conversion to bulk forms, and disposition, will be described in general terms. Measurement approaches based on the detection of passive or induced radiation will be discussed along with the requirement to protect sensitive information from release to unauthorized parties. Possible uses of measurement methods to assist in the verification of arms reductions will be described. The concept of measuring attributes of items rather than quantitative mass-based inventory verification will be discussed along with associated information-barrier concepts required to protect sensitive information.

  18. Flow cytometric measurement of total DNA and incorporated halodeoxyuridine

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.

    1983-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for the simultaneous flow cylometric measurement of total cellular DNA content and of the uptake of DNA precursors as a measure of DNA synthesis during various phases of the cell cycle in normal and malignant cells in vitro and in vivo is described. The method comprises reacting cells with labelled halodeoxyuridine (HdU), partially denaturing cellular DNA, adding to the reaction medium monoclonal antibodies (mabs) reactive with HdU, reacting the bound mabs with a second labelled antibody, incubating the mixture with a DNA stain, and measuring simultaneously the intensity of the DNA stain as a measure of the total cellular DNA and the HdU incorporated as a measure of DNA synthesis. (ACR)

  19. Comparison of electrical capacitance tomography and gamma densitometer measurement in viscous oil-gas flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archibong Eso, A.; Zhao, Yabin; Yeung, Hoi [Department of Offshore Process and Energy Systems Engineering, Cranfield University, Cranfield (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow is a common occurrence in industries such as nuclear, process, oil and gas, food and chemical. A prior knowledge of its features and characteristics is essential in the design, control and management of such processes due to its complex nature. Electrical Capacitance Tomography (ECT) and Gamma Densitometer (Gamma) are two promising approaches for multiphase visualization and characterization in process industries. In two phase oil and gas flow, ECT and Gamma are used in multiphase flow monitoring techniques due to their inherent simplicity, robustness, and an ability to withstand wide range of operational temperatures and pressures. High viscous oil (viscosity > 100 cP) is of interest because of its huge reserves, technological advances in its production and unlike conventional oil (oil viscosity < 100 cP) and gas flows where ECT and Gamma have been previously used, high viscous oil and gas flows comes with certain associated concerns which include; increased entrainment of gas bubbles dispersed in oil, shorter and more frequent slugs as well as oil film coatings on the walls of flowing conduits. This study aims to determine the suitability of both devices in the visualization and characterization of high-viscous oil and gas flow. Static tests are performed with both devices and liquid holdup measurements are obtained. Dynamic experiments were also conducted in a 1 and 3 inch facility at Cranfield University with a range of nominal viscosities (1000, 3000 and 7500 cP). Plug, slug and wavy annular flow patterns were identified by means of Probability Mass Function and time series analysis of the data acquired from Gamma and ECT devices with high speed camera used to validate the results. Measured Liquid holdups for both devices were also compared.

  20. advanced measurement techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Advanced Techniques for the Creation and Propagation of Modules in Cartesian Genetic Programming) advanced techniques for module creation and propagation...

  1. Verifying a Simplified Fuel Oil Flow Field Measurement Protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, H.; Dentz, J.; Doty, C.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Better Buildings program is a U.S. Department of Energy program funding energy efficiency retrofits in buildings nationwide. The program is in need of an inexpensive method for measuring fuel oil consumption that can be used in evaluating the impact that retrofits have in existing properties with oil heat. This project developed and verified a fuel oil flow field measurement protocol that is cost effective and can be performed with little training for use by the Better Buildings program as well as other programs and researchers.

  2. A Method for Measuring Elliptic Flow Fluctuations in PHOBOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alver; for the PHOBOS Collaboration

    2007-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce an analysis method to measure elliptic flow (v_2) fluctuations using the PHOBOS detector for Au+Au collisions at sqrt(s) = 200 GeV. In this method, v_2 is determined event-by-event by a maximum likelihood fit. The non-statistical fluctuations are determined by unfolding the contribution of statistical fluctuations and detector effects using Monte Carlo simulations(MC). Application of this method to measure dynamical fluctuations embedded in special MC are presented. It is shown that the input fluctuations are reconstructed successfully for >= 0.03.

  3. Measurement of Flow Phenomena in a Lower Plenum Model of a Prismatic Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.; Doanld M. McEligot; Robert J. Pink

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mean-velocity-field and turbulence data are presented that measure turbulent flow phenomena in an approximately 1:7 scale model of a region of the lower plenum of a typical prismatic gas-cooled reactor (GCR) similar to a General Atomics Gas-Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GTMHR) design. The data were obtained in the Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and are offered for assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. This experiment has been selected as the first Standard Problem endorsed by the Generation IV International Forum. Results concentrate on the region of the lower plenum near its far reflector wall (away from the outlet duct). The flow in the lower plenum consists of multiple jets injected into a confined cross flow - with obstructions. The model consists of a row of full circular posts along its centerline with half-posts on the two parallel walls to approximate geometry scaled to that expected from the staggered parallel rows of posts in the reactor design. The model is fabricated from clear, fused quartz to match the refractive-index of the working fluid so that optical techniques may be employed for the measurements. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages in and around objects to be obtained without locating intrusive transducers that will disturb the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. An advantage of the INL system is its large size, leading to improved spatial and temporal resolution compared to similar facilities at smaller scales. A three-dimensional (3-D) Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) system was used to collect the data. Inlet jet Reynolds numbers (based on the jet diameter and the time-mean bulk velocity) are approximately 4,300 and 12,400. Uncertainty analyses and a discussion of the standard problem are included. The measurements reveal developing, non-uniform, turbulent flow in the inlet jets and complicated flow patterns in the model lower plenum. Data include three-dimensional vector plots, data displays along the coordinate planes (slices) and presentations that describe the component flows at specific regions in the model. Information on inlet conditions is also presented.

  4. An efficient permeability scaling-up technique applied to the discretized flow equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urgelli, D.; Ding, Yu [Institut Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid-block permeability scaling-up for numerical reservoir simulations has been discussed for a long time in the literature. It is now recognized that a full permeability tensor is needed to get an accurate reservoir description at large scale. However, two major difficulties are encountered: (1) grid-block permeability cannot be properly defined because it depends on boundary conditions; (2) discretization of flow equations with a full permeability tensor is not straightforward and little work has been done on this subject. In this paper, we propose a new method, which allows us to get around both difficulties. As the two major problems are closely related, a global approach will preserve the accuracy. So, in the proposed method, the permeability up-scaling technique is integrated in the discretized numerical scheme for flow simulation. The permeability is scaled-up via the transmissibility term, in accordance with the fluid flow calculation in the numerical scheme. A finite-volume scheme is particularly studied, and the transmissibility scaling-up technique for this scheme is presented. Some numerical examples are tested for flow simulation. This new method is compared with some published numerical schemes for full permeability tensor discretization where the full permeability tensor is scaled-up through various techniques. Comparing the results with fine grid simulations shows that the new method is more accurate and more efficient.

  5. Two Rossi-[alpha] techniques for measuring the effective delayed neutron fraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two techniques for measuring the effective delayed neutron fraction have been developed. The techniques are based on a combination of the Rossi-[alpha]technique and the source-multiplication technique. They require minimal knowledge of the assembly, use variables that can be measured, and are independent of the detector efficiency and the neutron lifetime.

  6. michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques p-induced reaction measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    measurements · Measure low cross section reactions with low RIB intensities in fine energy steps! · Use each, 128 channels Commissioned ~ 1995 #12;michael smith ornlradioactive beams: equipment & techniques

  7. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, Marcos G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Boucher, Timothy J. (Helena, MT)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit.

  8. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit using an elbow flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1997-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit. The system utilizes pressure transducers disposed generally in line upstream and downstream of the flow of fluid in a bend in the conduit. Data from the pressure transducers is transmitted to a microprocessor or computer. The pressure differential measured by the pressure transducers is then used to calculate the fluid flow rate in the conduit. Control signals may then be generated by the microprocessor or computer to control flow, total fluid dispersed, (in, for example, an irrigation system), area of dispersal or other desired effect based on the fluid flow in the conduit. 2 figs.

  9. Measurements of sideward flow around the balance energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INDRA collaboration; D. Cussol; T. Lefort; J. Péter

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Sideward flow values have been determined with the INDRA multidetector for Ar+Ni, Ni+Ni and Xe+Sn systems studied at GANIL in the 30 to 100 A.MeV incident energy range. The balance energies found for Ar+Ni and Ni+Ni systems are in agreement with previous experimental results and theoretical calculations. Negative sideward flow values have been measured. The possible origins of such negative values are discussed. They could result from a more important contribution of evaporated particles with respect to the contribution of promptly emitted particles at mid-rapidity. But effects induced by the methods used to reconstruct the reaction plane cannot be totally excluded. Complete tests of these methods are presented and the origins of the ``auto-correlation'' effect have been traced back. For heavy fragments, the observed negative flow values seem to be mainly due to the reaction plane reconstruction methods. For light charged particles, these negative values could result from the dynamics of the collisions and from the reaction plane reconstruction methods as well. These effects have to be taken into account when comparisons with theoretical calculations are done.

  10. Analytic technique measures aromatics in soil and water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy, K.A.

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on a technique for detecting aromatic compounds in soil and water. The technique traces its roots to a chemical reaction discovered in 1877. The reaction is an organic synthesis process that has been harnessed for the production of high-octane gasoline, synthetic rubber, plastics and synthetic detergents. More than a century later the same chemistry is used as the basis for an analytical technique that quantifies contamination caused by products.

  11. Acute Increase in Hepatic Arterial Flow During TIPS Identified by Intravascular Flow Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radeleff, Boris, E-mail: Boris_Radeleff@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Sommer, Christof-Matthias; Heye, Tobias; Lopez-Benitez, Ruben [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany); Sauer, Peter [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Department of Internal Medicine IV, Gastroenterology, Hepatology, Infectious Diseases, and Intoxications (Germany); Schmidt, Jan [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, General, Visceral, and Accident Surgery (Germany); Kauczor, Haus-Ulrich; Richter, Goetz Martin [University of Heidelberg Medical Center, Department of Diagnostic Radiology (Germany)

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to investigate alterations of hepatic arterial flow during transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic stent shunt (TIPS) applying intravascular Doppler sonography. This prospective monocenter study included 25 patients with liver cirrhosis (alcohol induced [n = 19], chronic hepatitis associated [n = 3], primary biliary cirrhosis associated [n = 1], and cryptogenic [n = 2]) successfully treated with TIPS. All patients underwent intravascular hepatic arterial flow measurements during TIPS using an endoluminal flow sensor. The average arterial peak velocity (APV) and the maximum arterial peak velocity (MPV) were registered. Twenty-two patients (88%) showed increased APV, one patient (4%) showed unaffected APV, and two patients (8%) showed decreased APV after TIPS. The average portosystemic pressure gradient decreased significantly, from 22.0 {+-} 5.1 mmHg before TIPS to 11.0 {+-} 4.1 mmHg after TIPS (-50.0%; p < 0.0001). The average APV increased significantly, from 41.9 {+-} 17.8 cm/s before TIPS to 60.7 {+-} 19.0 cm/s after TIPS (+44.9%; p < 0.0001). The average MPV increased significantly, from 90.8 {+-} 31.7 cm/s before TIPS to 112.6 {+-} 34.9 cm/s after TIPS (+24.0%; p = 0.0002). These changes in perfusion set in within seconds after TIPS tract formation in all the patients with increased APV. We conclude that TIPS-induced portosystemic decompression leads to a significant increase in hepatic arterial flow. The changes occurred within seconds, suggesting a reflex-like mechanism.

  12. Proxies and Measurement Techniques for Mineral Dust in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    and laser-sensing particle detector), soluble ion analysis (ion chromatography and continuous flow analysis. All methods correlate very well among each other, but the ratios of glacial age to Holocene fluxes. Projects dedicated to this, such as DIRTMAP (7), rely on modeling studies and on dust

  13. Transient Water Age Distributions in Environmental Flow Systems: The Time-Marching Laplace Transform Solution Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cornaton, F J

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental fluid circulations are very often characterized by analyzing the fate and behavior of natural and anthropogenic tracers. Among these tracers, age is taken as an ideal tracer which can yield interesting diagnoses, as for example the characterization of the mixing and renewal of water masses, of the fate and mixing of contaminants, or the calibration of hydro-dispersive parameters used by numerical models. Such diagnoses are of great interest in atmospheric and ocean circulation sciences, as well in surface and subsurface hydrology. The temporal evolution of groundwater age and its frequency distributions can display important changes as flow regimes vary due to natural change in climate and hydrologic conditions and/or human induced pressures on the resource to satisfy the water demand. Steady-state age frequency distributions can be modelled using standard numerical techniques, since the general balance equation describing age transport under steady-state flow conditions is exactly equivalent to...

  14. Measurement Of The Fluid Flow Load On A Globe Valve Stem Under Various Cavitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Measurement Of The Fluid Flow Load On A Globe Valve Stem Under Various Cavitation Conditions)" #12;Measurement Of The Fluid Flow Load On A Globe Valve Stem Under Various Cavitation Conditions, cavitation, fluid flow load, CFD. Abstract: The evaluation of fluid forces on the stem is important for wear

  15. Review of geochemical measurement techniques for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knauss, K.G.; Steinborn, T.L.

    1980-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A broad, general review is presented of geochemical measurement techniques that can provide data necessary for site selection and repository effectiveness assessment for a radioactive waste repository in bedded salt. The available measurement techniques are organized according to the parameter measured. The list of geochemical parameters include all those measurable geochemical properties of a sample whole values determine the geochemical characteristics or behavior of the system. For each technique, remarks are made pertaining to the operating principles of the measurement instrument and the purpose for which the technique is used. Attention is drawn to areas where further research and development are needed.

  16. Measurement of laser frequency response through heterodyne technique using optical modulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Syed Faisal

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical modulation technique for measuring the parasitic-free frequency response of high frequency semiconductor lasers is demonstrated. In this technique, we heterodyne light from two continuously tunable external cavity travelling wave ring...

  17. Virtual Measurement in Pipes, Part 1: Flowing Bottom Hole Pressure Under Multi-Phase Flow and Inclined Wellbore Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    SPE 30975 Virtual Measurement in Pipes, Part 1: Flowing Bottom Hole Pressure Under Multi-Phase Flow, 163245 SPEUT. Abstract Pressure drop prediction in pipes is an old petroleum engineering problem. There is a long history of attempts to develop empirical correlations to predict the pressure drop in pipes. Some

  18. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, James Wayne

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large scale test rig is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance properties and flow characteristics of labyrinth seals. A novel test facility with multiple cavities that provides 2D, planar flow at a scale...

  19. Flow visualization and leakage measurements of worn labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, Brian Frank

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A large-scale flow visualization test facility is used to conduct an experimental investigation into the leakage resistance and flow characteristics of worn labyrinth seals. Wear in labyrinth seals is a consequence of contact between the rotating...

  20. Measurement of non-flow correlations and elliptic flow fluctuations in Au+Au collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alver, Burak Han

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements of collective flow and two-particle correlations have proven to be effective tools for understanding the properties of the system produced in ultrarelativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions at the Relativistic ...

  1. Experiments using non-intrusive particle tracing techniques for granular chute flows. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosato, A.D.; Dave, R.N.; Fischer, I.S.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this contract was to develop a system capable of non-intrusively tracking the motion of an individual particle for the study of granular flows down inclined chutes. The result of the project is a system capable of following the three-dimensional translational and rotational motion of an individual particle embedded with a flowing granular material. The basic system consists of a sphere embedded with three orthogonal transmitters emitting at different frequencies which induce voltages in an antenna array surrounding the flow regime. Analysis of the induced voltage signals within the framework of a derived model yields both the position and orientation of the sphere. Tests were performed in a small scale model chute as well as in a cylindrical vibrated granular bed, which clearly demonstrates the capability of the system. As a result of discussions at meetings held semi-annually for the Granular Flow Advanced Research Objectives (GFARO) contractors, it was deemed necessary to pursue an additional experimental program as part of this contract related to the measurement of sphere collision properties. The outcome of the work (reported in Appendix C) is the determination of certain properties which are needed for use in computer simulations and theory.

  2. Identification of cross-formation flow in multireservoir systems using isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpakiewicz, M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to add quantitative solutions to the problem of undesirable hydraulic communication which results in active fluid flow between productive horizons. Transfer of novel geochemical methods, based on effective, economic, and environmentally acceptable isotopic techniques for identification of leaking hydrocarbon reservoirs, is a major objective of this study. The effectiveness of a continuous trap's seal depends on an equilibrium between the capillary forces holding formation water in pore spaces of the seal and the buoyancy forces of the oil and gas column in a system. Therefore, some seals may leak selectively at changing pressure and temperature conditions with respect to different fluid phases (oil, gas, and water). A break in continuity of confining layers will promote relatively fast interreservoir migration of fluids. It may intensify in reservoirs subjected to high pressures during implementation of secondary and tertiary processes of recovery. Such fluid flow should result in identifiable chemical, isotopic, and often thermal anomalies in the area of an open flow path. Quantitative hydrodynamic reservoir modeling based on geochemical/isotopic and other evidence of fluid migration in a system require, however, more systematic methodological study. Such a study is being recommended in addition to a field demonstration of the method in a selected oil/gas reservoir where geochemical and production anomalies have been documented. 62 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Measurement of surface tension and viscosity by open capillary techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rye,Robert R. (Albuquerque, NM), Yost,Frederick G. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An open-channel capillary is provided, having preferably a v-shaped groove in a flat wettable surface. The groove has timing marks and a source marker in which the specimen to be tested is deposited. The time of passage between the timing marks is recorded, and the ratio of surface tension .gamma. to viscosity .mu. is determined from the equation given below: ##EQU1## where h.sub.0 is the groove depth, .alpha. is the groove angle, .theta. is the liquid/solid contact angle, and t is the flow time. It has been shown by the

  4. Oscillatory motion based measurement method and sensor for measuring wall shear stress due to fluid flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Armstrong, William D. (Laramie, WY); Naughton, Jonathan (Laramie, WY); Lindberg, William R. (Laramie, WY)

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A shear stress sensor for measuring fluid wall shear stress on a test surface is provided. The wall shear stress sensor is comprised of an active sensing surface and a sensor body. An elastic mechanism mounted between the active sensing surface and the sensor body allows movement between the active sensing surface and the sensor body. A driving mechanism forces the shear stress sensor to oscillate. A measuring mechanism measures displacement of the active sensing surface relative to the sensor body. The sensor may be operated under periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor measurably changes the amplitude or phase of the motion of the active sensing surface, or changes the force and power required from a control system in order to maintain constant motion. The device may be operated under non-periodic excitation where changes in the nature of the fluid properties or the fluid flow over the sensor change the transient motion of the active sensor surface or change the force and power required from a control system to maintain a specified transient motion of the active sensor surface.

  5. Shaped hole effects on film cooling effectiveness and a comparison of multiple effectiveness measurement techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varvel, Trent Alan

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This experimental study consists of two parts. For the first part, the film cooling effectiveness for a single row of seven cylindrical holes with a compound angle is measured on a flat surface using five different measurement techniques: steady...

  6. Spirometer techniques for measuring molar composition in argon carbon dioxide mixtures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chonde, Daniel Burje

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper examines a new technique for measuring gas composition through the use of a spirometer. A spirometer is high precision pressure transducer which measures the speed of sound in a gas through the emission and ...

  7. A new technique for non-intrusive in situ measurements of symbiotic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ilan, Micha

    A new technique for non-intrusive in situ measurements of symbiotic photosynthesis Symbiotic algae the Diving-PAM for underwater photosynthetic measurements lies in the method's non-intrusive nature

  8. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling. In this research, infrared cameras have been used to visualize liquefied natural gas (LNG) plumes from LNG spills on water. The analyses of the thermograms showed that the apparent temperatures were different from the thermocouple measurement...

  9. Infrared Optical Imaging Techniques for Gas Visualization and Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safitri, Anisa

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement in infrared imaging technology has allowed the thermal imaging to detect and visualize several gases, mostly hydrocarbon gases. In addition, infrared cameras could potentially be used as a non-contact temperature measurement for gas...

  10. Ultrasonic techniques for measuring rheological properties of rice slurries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howell, Terry Allen

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    systems during food processing, resulting in poorly processed foods or production delays in processing plants. This research describes the development of a ultrasonic sensor to measure viscoelastic properties of rice slurries and dough. This inexpensive...

  11. A laboratory demonstration of an LQG technique for correcting frozen flow turbulence in adaptive optics systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudy, Alexander; Srinath, Srikar; Ammons, S Mark; Gavel, Donald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the laboratory verification of a method for re- moving the effects of frozen-flow atmospheric turbulence using a Linear Quadratic Gaussian (LQG) controller, also known as a Kalman Filter. This method, which we term "Predictive Fourier Control," can identify correlated atmospheric motions due to layers of frozen flow turbulence, and can predictively remove the effects of these correlated motions in real-time. Our laboratory verification suggests a factor of 3 improvement in the RMS residual wavefront error and a 10% improvement in measured Strehl of the system. We found that the RMS residual wavefront error was suppressed from 35.0 nm to 11.2 nm due to the use of Predictive Fourier Control, and that the far field Strehl improved from 0.479 to 0.520.

  12. Calculation and measurement of a neutral air flow velocity impacting a high voltage capacitor with asymmetrical electrodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malík, M., E-mail: michal.malik@tul.cz; Primas, J.; Kopecký, V.; Svoboda, M. [Faculty of Mechatronics, Informatics and Interdisciplinary Studies, Technical University of Liberec, Liberec, 461 17 (Czech Republic)] [Faculty of Mechatronics, Informatics and Interdisciplinary Studies, Technical University of Liberec, Liberec, 461 17 (Czech Republic)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with the effects surrounding phenomenon of a mechanical force generated on a high voltage asymmetrical capacitor (the so called Biefeld-Brown effect). A method to measure this force is described and a formula to calculate its value is also given. Based on this the authors derive a formula characterising the neutral air flow velocity impacting an asymmetrical capacitor connected to high voltage. This air flow under normal circumstances lessens the generated force. In the following part this velocity is measured using Particle Image Velocimetry measuring technique and the results of the theoretically calculated velocity and the experimentally measured value are compared. The authors found a good agreement between the results of both approaches.

  13. Electron Beam Polarization Measurement Using Touschek Lifetime Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, Changchun; /Duke U., DFELL; Li, Jingyi; /Duke U., DFELL; Mikhailov, Stepan; /Duke U., DFELL; Popov, Victor; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Wenzhong; /Duke U., DFELL; Wu, Ying; /Duke U., DFELL; Chao, Alex; /SLAC; Xu, Hong-liang; /Hefei, NSRL; Zhang, Jian-feng; /Hefei, NSRL

    2012-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron beam loss due to intra-beam scattering, the Touschek effect, in a storage ring depends on the electron beam polarization. The polarization of an electron beam can be determined from the difference in the Touschek lifetime compared with an unpolarized beam. In this paper, we report on a systematic experimental procedure recently developed at Duke FEL laboratory to study the radiative polarization of a stored electron beam. Using this technique, we have successfully observed the radiative polarization build-up of an electron beam in the Duke storage ring, and determined the equilibrium degree of polarization and the time constant of the polarization build-up process.

  14. Method and system for measuring multiphase flow using multiple pressure differentials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method and system for measuring a multiphase flow in a pressure flow meter. An extended throat venturi is used and pressure of the multiphase flow is measured at three or more positions in the venturi, which define two or more pressure differentials in the flow conduit. The differential pressures are then used to calculate the mass flow of the gas phase, the total mass flow, and the liquid phase. The method for determining the mass flow of the high void fraction fluid flow and the gas flow includes certain steps. The first step is calculating a gas density for the gas flow. The next two steps are finding a normalized gas mass flow rate through the venturi and computing a gas mass flow rate. The following step is estimating the gas velocity in the venturi tube throat. The next step is calculating the pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase in accelerating the liquid phase between the upstream pressure measuring point and the pressure measuring point in the venturi throat. Another step is estimating the liquid velocity in the venturi throat using the calculated pressure drop experienced by the gas-phase due to work performed by the gas phase. Then the friction is computed between the liquid phase and a wall in the venturi tube. Finally, the total mass flow rate based on measured pressure in the venturi throat is calculated, and the mass flow rate of the liquid phase is calculated from the difference of the total mass flow rate and the gas mass flow rate.

  15. New Technique for the Measurement of the Scintillation Efficiency of Nuclear Recoils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jelena Ninkovic; Peter Christ; Godehard Angloher; Dieter Hauff; Partick Huff; Emilija Pantic; Federica Petricca; Franz Proebst; Wolfgang Seidel

    2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique developed for the measurement of the scintillation efficiency of nuclear recoils in solid scintillators. Using this technique we measured the quenching of the scintillation efficiency for the various recoiling nuclei in CaWO4 crystals which are used in direct Dark Matter searches.

  16. Technique for Real-Time Measurements of Endothelial Permeability in a Microfluidic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simmons, Craig A.

    Technique for Real-Time Measurements of Endothelial Permeability in a Microfluidic Membrane Chip microfluidic platform to measure real-time perme- ability of endothelial cell monolayers on porous mem- branes of cell-free and cell-bound mem- brane layers. This technique is a highly sensitive, novel microfluidic

  17. Bernoulli Applications A Venturi meter is used to measure the flow rate through a tube.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijgaert, Rien van de

    04/03/2014 1 Bernoulli Applications A Venturi meter is used to measure the flow rate through a tube: as the flow is horizontal, we do not have to take into account the gravity term. 2) Continuity equation-1822), an Italian physicist. Look at the construction in figure: - we assume the flow is smooth and effectively

  18. ATTEMPT OF ALPINE GLACIER FLOW MODELING BASED ON CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR IMAGES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ATTEMPT OF ALPINE GLACIER FLOW MODELING BASED ON CORRELATION MEASUREMENTS OF HIGH RESOLUTION SAR In this paper, an attempt of Alpine glacier flow modeling is performed based on a series of high resolution TerraSAR-X SAR images and a Digital Elevation Model. First, a glacier flow model is established

  19. Sandia Energy - Measuring Inflow and Wake Flow Turbulence Using...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    that characterizes inflow and wake flow velocity and turbulence around a vertical axis turbine deployed at the Roza Canal, Yakima, Washington. The ADV was mounted on a...

  20. Computer aided analysis for residual stress measurement using ultrasonic techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kypa, Jagan Mohan

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to detect travel-times with a precision of 0. l nanoseconds and an accuracy of less than 2.5 nanoseconds. A residual stress reference standard developed for previous research was used as the sample to measure travel-times. The sample was designed...

  1. Techniques for measuring atmospheric aerosols at the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The HiRes Collaboration

    2005-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe several techniques developed by the High Resolution Fly's Eye experiment for measuring aerosol vertical optical depth, aerosol horizontal attenuation length, and aerosol phase function. The techniques are based on measurements of side-scattered light generated by a steerable ultraviolet laser and collected by an optical detector designed to measure fluorescence light from cosmic-ray air showers. We also present a technique to cross-check the aerosol optical depth measurement using air showers observed in stereo. These methods can be used by future air fluorescence experiments.

  2. Development of Millimeter-Wave Velocimetry and Acoustic Time-of-Flight Tomography for Measurements in Densely Loaded Gas-Solid Riser Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fort, James A.; Pfund, David M.; Sheen, David M.; Pappas, Richard A.; Morgen, Gerald P.

    2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The MFDRC was formed in 1998 to advance the state-of-the-art in simulating multiphase turbulent flows by developing advanced computational models for gas-solid flows that are experimentally validated over a wide range of industrially relevant conditions. The goal was to transfer the resulting validated models to interested US commercial CFD software vendors, who would then propagate the models as part of new code versions to their customers in the US chemical industry. Since the lack of detailed data sets at industrially relevant conditions is the major roadblock to developing and validating multiphase turbulence models, a significant component of the work involved flow measurements on an industrial-scale riser contributed by Westinghouse, which was subsequently installed at SNL. Model comparisons were performed against these datasets by LANL. A parallel Office of Industrial Technology (OIT) project within the consortium made similar comparisons between riser measurements and models at NETL. Measured flow quantities of interest included volume fraction, velocity, and velocity-fluctuation profiles for both gas and solid phases at various locations in the riser. Some additional techniques were required for these measurements beyond what was currently available. PNNL’s role on the project was to work with the SNL experimental team to develop and test two new measurement techniques, acoustic tomography and millimeter-wave velocimetry. Acoustic tomography is a promising technique for gas-solid flow measurements in risers and PNNL has substantial related experience in this area. PNNL is also active in developing millimeter wave imaging techniques, and this technology presents an additional approach to make desired measurements. PNNL supported the advanced diagnostics development part of this project by evaluating these techniques and then by adapting and developing the selected technology to bulk gas-solids flows and by implementing them for testing in the SNL riser testbed.

  3. Aerosol-measurement techniques developed for nuclear-reactor-accident simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novick, V.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to investigate and develop techniques for sampling aerosols from a high temperature, high pressure environment. As such, much of this research can be applied to any high temperature, high pressure sampling problem. There are four parts that must be considered in any reactor sampling system: First, the sampling tip is important from the standpoint of (1) representatively sampling the ambient particles, (2) withstanding the high temperatures in the near core region, (3) rapidly reducing the temperature of the sampled gas without causing severe thermophoretic losses or condensing gases onto existing aerosols. The second part of the system is the aerosol transport. The dynamics that must be considered include diffusion, thermophoresis, setting and impaction. The third part involves the collection or analysis of the aerosols. Finally, the ability to control the flow rate through the sampling system affects the first three parts. All four areas are analyzed theoretically for general applications. Experiments were performed on various aspects of the problem that were not dealt with by other researchers or were specific to the experiments performed in the Loss of Fluid Test (LOFT) reactor and the Power Burst Facility (PBF) reactor. Specifically this work includes (1) sampling tip analysis, (2) experimental and theoretical aerosol transport analysis, (3) the development and testing of a new multistage virtual impactor, (4) the analysis and development of a new method of measuring particle concentration using series light extinction cells, and (5) analysis and experimentally determined capabilities and usefulness of a flow control system for experimentally decreasing pressures and changing argon-steam-hydrogen gas compositions.

  4. Heat transfer in katabatic flow Measurements on the Morteratsch glacier, Switzerland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graaf, Martin de

    Heat transfer in katabatic flow Measurements on the Morteratsch glacier, Switzerland M. de Graaf #12;Heat transfer in katabatic flow Measurements on the Morteratsch glacier, Switzerland Martin de is used to calculate surface heat fluxes over glaciers. As determination of surface fluxes still

  5. Critical issues in measuring the mechanical properties of hard films on soft substrates by nanoindentation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, J.C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Pharr, G.M. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Materials Science

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the difficulties encountered when using conventional nanoindentation techniques to measure the Young`s modulus and hardness of hard films on soft substrates. In general, the indentation measurement of film/substrate systems is affected by four material properties: the Young`s modulus and hardness of the film, and the Young`s modulus and hardness of the substrate. For the particular case of a hard film on a soft substrate, there is a tendency for the material around the hardness impression to sink-in which results from the large difference in yielding of the two materials. In this study, a model system consisting of NiP on annealed Cu was used to explore the behavior. This system is interesting because the film and substrate have similar Young`s moduli, minimizing the elastic behavior as a variable. In contrast, the hardness of NiP is approximately 7--8 GPa, and that of the annealed copper is less than 1 GPa, providing a factor of 10 difference in the plastic flow characteristics. Experimental results indicate that standard analytical methods for determining the contact depth, hardness and Young`s modulus do not work well for the case of a hard film on a soft substrate. At shallow contact depths, the measured indentation modulus is close to that of the film, but at larger depths sink-in phenomena result in an overestimation of the contact area, and an indentation modulus which is less than the Young`s modulus of both the film and substrate. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) provide critical details of the physical processes involved, and illustrate how the standard data analyses overestimate the true contact area.

  6. Measurement and evaluation techniques for automated demand response demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motegi, Naoya; Piette, Mary Ann; Watson, David S.; Sezgen, Osman; ten Hope, Laurie

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recent electricity crisis in California and elsewhere has prompted new research to evaluate demand response strategies in large facilities. This paper describes an evaluation of fully automated demand response technologies (Auto-DR) in five large facilities. Auto-DR does not involve human intervention, but is initiated at a facility through receipt of an external communications signal. This paper summarizes the measurement and evaluation of the performance of demand response technologies and strategies in five large facilities. All the sites have data trending systems such as energy management and control systems (EMCS) and/or energy information systems (EIS). Additional sub-metering was applied where necessary to evaluate the facility's demand response performance. This paper reviews the control responses during the test period, and analyzes demand savings achieved at each site. Occupant comfort issues are investigated where data are available. This paper discusses methods to estimate demand savings and results from demand response strategies at five large facilities.

  7. Advanced Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Improved SOFC Cathodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart Adler; L. Dunyushkina; S. Huff; Y. Lu; J. Wilson

    2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to develop an improved understanding of factors governing performance and degradation of mixed-conducting SOFC cathodes. Two new diagnostic tools were developed to help achieve this goal: (1) microelectrode half-cells for improved isolation of cathode impedance on thin electrolytes, and (2) nonlinear electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (NLEIS), a variant of traditional impedance that allows workers to probe nonlinear rates as a function of frequency. After reporting on the development and efficacy of these tools, this document reports on the use of these and other tools to better understand performance and degradation of cathodes based on the mixed conductor La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}CoO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSC) on gadolinia or samaria-doped ceria (GDC or SDC). We describe the use of NLEIS to measure O{sub 2} exchange on thin-film LSC electrodes, and show that O{sub 2} exchange is most likely governed by dissociative adsorption. We also describe parametric studies of porous LSC electrodes using impedance and NLEIS. Our results suggest that O{sub 2} exchange and ion transport co-limit performance under most relevant conditions, but it is O{sub 2} exchange that is most sensitive to processing, and subject to the greatest degradation and sample-to-sample variation. We recommend further work that focuses on electrodes of well-defined or characterized geometry, and probes the details of surface structure, composition, and impurities. Parallel work on primarily electronic conductors (LSM) would also be of benefit to developers, and to improved understanding of surface vs. bulk diffusion.

  8. Two microphone technique for ground impedance measurements: Uncertainties and their reduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vormann, Matthias

    is not specific to in-situ measurements but also applies to impedance tube measurements [8]. The common solutionTwo microphone technique for ground impedance measurements: Uncertainties and their reduction-microphone (level difference) method is a well-known procedure for the in-situ determination of surface impedances

  9. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and mass flow measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2003-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining mass flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the mass flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  10. Apparatus for passive removal of subsurface contaminants and volume flow measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jackson, Dennis G. (Augusta, GA); Rossabi, Joseph (Aiken, SC); Riha, Brian D. (Augusta, GA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for improving the Baroball valve and a method for retrofitting an existing Baroball valve. This invention improves upon the Baroball valve by reshaping the interior chamber of the valve to form a flow meter measuring chamber. The Baroball valve sealing mechanism acts as a rotameter bob for determining volume flow rate through the Baroball valve. A method for retrofitting a Baroball valve includes providing static pressure ports and connecting a measuring device, to these ports, for measuring the pressure differential between the Baroball chamber and the well. A standard curve of nominal device measurements allows the volume flow rate to be determined through the retrofitted Baroball valve.

  11. An evaluation of pressure and flow measurement in the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, David Dennis; Kolb, William J.; Briggs, Ronald J.

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories has a unique test capability called the Molten Salt Test Loop (MSTL) system. MSTL allows customers and researchers to test components in flowing, molten nitrate salt at plant-like conditions for pressure, flow, and temperature. An important need in thermal storage systems that utilize molten salts is for accurate flow and pressure measurement at temperatures above 535%C2%B0C. Currently available flow and pressure instrumentation for molten salt is limited to 535%C2%B0C and even at this temperature the pressure measurement appears to have significant variability. It is the design practice in current Concentrating Solar Power plants to measure flow and pressure on the cold side of the process or in dead-legs where the salt can cool, but this practice won't be possible for high temperature salt systems. For this effort, a set of tests was conducted to evaluate the use of the pressure sensors for flow measurement across a device of known flow coefficient Cv. To perform this task, the pressure sensors performance was evaluated and was found to be lacking. The pressure indicators are severely affected by ambient conditions and were indicating pressure changes of nearly 200psi when there was no flow or pressure in the system. Several iterations of performance improvement were undertaken and the pressure changes were reduced to less than 15psi. The results of these pressure improvements were then tested for use as flow measurement. It was found that even with improved pressure sensors, this is not a reliable method of flow measurement. The need for improved flow and pressure measurement at high temperatures remains and will need to be solved before it will be possible to move to high temperature thermal storage systems with molten salts.

  12. Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

  13. Why Insertion Turbine Meters are Replacing Orifice Plates for Steam Flow Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusnak, J. J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WHY INSERTION TURBINE MBTBRS A E REPLACING ORIFICE PLATES FOR STEAM FLOW MEASURE ENT J. J. Rusnak Engineering Measurements Company Longmont, Colorado ABSTRACT Flow measurement is a complex and application related discipline. It borders... to be instrumented quickly, economically and without dis rupting production; and further, these meters had to be accurate in order to be useful in making energy saving decisions. Thus, the entry of the insertion turbine meter for steam in 1975. Since then it has...

  14. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  15. Development of algorithms for capacitance imaging techniques for fluidized bed flow fields. 1990 Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loudin, W.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to provide support for the instrumentation concept of a High Resolution Capacitance Imaging System (HRCIS). The work involves the development and evaluation of the mathematical theory and associated models and algorithms which reduce the electronic measurements to valid physical characterizations. The research and development require the investigation of techniques to solve large systems of equations based on capacitance measurements for various electrode configurations in order to estimate densities of materials in a cross-section of a fluidized bed. Capacitance measurements are made for 400 connections of the 32-electrode system; 400 corresponding electric-field curves are constructed by solving a second order partial differential equation. These curves are used to partition the circular disk into 193 regions called pixels, and the density of material in each pixel is to be estimated. Two methods of approximating densities have been developed and consideration of a third method has been initiated. One method (Method 1) is based on products of displacement currents for intersecting electric-field curves on a cross section. For each pixel one point of intersection is chosen, and the product of the capacitance measurements is found. Both the product and the square-root-of-product seem to yield good relative distribution of densities.

  16. Experimental techniques for measurement of available potential energy as applied to the Drake Passage region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessen, Paul Frederik

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENT OF AVAILABLE POTENTIAL ENERGY AS APPLIED TO THE DRAKE PASSAGE REGION A Thesis by PAUL FREDERIK JESSEN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A6M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1986 Major Subject: Oceanography EXPERIMENTAL TECHNIQUES FOR MEASUREMENT OF AVAILABLE POTENTIAL ENERGY AS APPLIED TO THE DRAKE PASSAGE REGION A Thesis by PAUL FREDERIK JESSEN Approved as to style and content by...

  17. The application of a scintillation flask technique for the measurement of radon emanation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Martha

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE APPLICATION OF A SCINTILLATION FLASK TECHNIQUE FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF RADON EMANATION A Thesis by MARTHA CHARLES Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering THE APPLICATION OF A SCINTILLATION FLASK TECHNIQUE FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF RADON EMANATION A Thesis by MARTHA CHARLES Approved as to style and content by: chard Dea (Chairman of C m ittee...

  18. CASCADE CONTROL EXPERIMENTS OF RISER SLUG FLOW USING TOPSIDE MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    1. INTRODUCTION Riser slugging is a flow regime that can develop in multiphase production systems production facilities (Havre et al., 2000) and (Godhavn et al., 2005a). #12;The above applications use subsea of the system. Both the pipeline and the riser was made of a 20mm diameter transpar- ent rubber hose, which

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring the mass flow rate of a fluid

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Evans, Robert P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wilkins, S. Curtis (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Blotter, Jonathan D. (Pocatello, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A non invasive method and apparatus is provided to measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid. An accelerometer is attached to a pipe carrying a multi-phase fluid. Flow related measurements in pipes are sensitive to random velocity fluctuations whose magnitude is proportional to the mean mass flow rate. An analysis of the signal produced by the accelerometer shows a relationship between the mass flow of a fluid and the noise component of the signal of an accelerometer. The noise signal, as defined by the standard deviation of the accelerometer signal allows the method and apparatus of the present invention to non-intrusively measure the mass flow rate of a multi-phase fluid.

  20. USING TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MEASUREMENTS TO IMPROVE FLOW MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marly. The EOR process in the RCP section of the Weyburn Field uses CO2 and water injection to displaceUSING TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC MEASUREMENTS TO IMPROVE FLOW MODELING OF CO2 INJECTION IN THE WEYBURN, particularly CO2. Time lapse seismic monitoring has motivated changes to the reservoir description in a flow

  1. Identifiability of Flow Distributions from Link Measurements with Applications to Computer Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michailidis, George

    Identifiability of Flow Distributions from Link Measurements with Applications to Computer Networks Abstract We study the problem of identifiability of distributions of flows on a graph from aggregate by recent developments in computer networks. In this paper (i) we introduce a number of models for multi

  2. Quantitative blood flow measurements in the small animal cardiopulmonary system using digital subtraction angiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin Mingde; Marshall, Craig T.; Qi, Yi; Johnston, Samuel M.; Badea, Cristian T.; Piantadosi, Claude A.; Johnson, G. Allan [Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine and Center for Hyperbaric Medicine and Environmental Physiology, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3823, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States); Department of Radiology, Center for In Vivo Microscopy and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Duke University Medical Center, Box 3302, Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The use of preclinical rodent models of disease continues to grow because these models help elucidate pathogenic mechanisms and provide robust test beds for drug development. Among the major anatomic and physiologic indicators of disease progression and genetic or drug modification of responses are measurements of blood vessel caliber and flow. Moreover, cardiopulmonary blood flow is a critical indicator of gas exchange. Current methods of measuring cardiopulmonary blood flow suffer from some or all of the following limitations--they produce relative values, are limited to global measurements, do not provide vasculature visualization, are not able to measure acute changes, are invasive, or require euthanasia. Methods: In this study, high-spatial and high-temporal resolution x-ray digital subtraction angiography (DSA) was used to obtain vasculature visualization, quantitative blood flow in absolute metrics (ml/min instead of arbitrary units or velocity), and relative blood volume dynamics from discrete regions of interest on a pixel-by-pixel basis (100x100 {mu}m{sup 2}). Results: A series of calibrations linked the DSA flow measurements to standard physiological measurement using thermodilution and Fick's method for cardiac output (CO), which in eight anesthetized Fischer-344 rats was found to be 37.0{+-}5.1 ml/min. Phantom experiments were conducted to calibrate the radiographic density to vessel thickness, allowing a link of DSA cardiac output measurements to cardiopulmonary blood flow measurements in discrete regions of interest. The scaling factor linking relative DSA cardiac output measurements to the Fick's absolute measurements was found to be 18.90xCO{sub DSA}=CO{sub Fick}. Conclusions: This calibrated DSA approach allows repeated simultaneous visualization of vasculature and measurement of blood flow dynamics on a regional level in the living rat.

  3. Spatially localized measurement of thermal conductivity using a hybrid photothermal technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David H Hurley; Marat Khafizov; Zilong Hua; Rory Kennedy; Heng Ban

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photothermal technique capable of measuring thermal conductivity with micrometer lateral resolution is presented. This technique involves measuring separately the thermal diffusivity, D, and thermal effusivity, e, to extract the thermal conductivity, k=(e2/D)1/2. To generalize this approach, sensitivity analysis was conducted for materials having a range of thermal conductivities. Experimental validation was sought using two substrate materials, SiO2 and CaF2, both coated with thin titanium films. The measured conductivities compare favorably with literature values.

  4. Undersampling to accelerate time-resolved MRI velocity measurement of carotid blood flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Yuehui

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved velocity information of carotid blood flow can be used to estimate haemodynamic conditions associated with carotid artery disease leading to stroke. MRI provides high-resolution measurement of such information ...

  5. Determination of volume fractions in two-phase flows from sound speed measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaudhuri, Anirban [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sinha, Dipen N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Osterhoudt, Curtis F. [University of Alaska

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate measurement of the composition of oil-water emulsions within the process environment is a challenging problem in the oil industry. Ultrasonic techniques are promising because they are non-invasive and can penetrate optically opaque mixtures. This paper presents a method of determining the volume fractions of two immiscible fluids in a homogenized two-phase flow by measuring the speed of sound through the composite fluid along with the instantaneous temperature. Two separate algorithms are developed by representing the composite density as (i) a linear combination of the two densities, and (ii) a non-linear fractional formulation. Both methods lead to a quadratic equation with temperature dependent coefficients, the root of which yields the volume fraction. The densities and sound speeds are calibrated at various temperatures for each fluid component, and the fitted polynomial is used in the final algorithm. We present results when the new algorithm is applied to mixtures of crude oil and process water from two different oil fields, and a comparison of our results with a Coriolis meter; the difference between mean values is less than 1%. Analytical and numerical studies of sensitivity of the calculated volume fraction to temperature changes and calibration errors are also presented.

  6. Full-field velocity measurements of single and two phase flows using digital pulsed laser velocimetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canaan, Robert Ernst

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    particles. The use of a cylindrical constant heat flux emitting conductor enabled full-field velocity measurement of unsteady natural convective flows over a wide range of single phase flow regimes. The method was additionally extended to the measurement... and will utilize a constant heat flux emitting electrical conductor in order to represent a simple model of a nuclear reactor fuel element vertically positioned within a rectangular coolant channel. Natural convective cooling is of particularly recent concern...

  7. Large scale test rig for flow visualization and leakage measurement of labyrinth seals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broussard, Daniel Harold

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of requirements for degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering LARGE SCALE TEST RIG FOR FLOW VISUALIZATION AND LEAKAGE MEASUREMENT OF LABYRINTH SEALS A Thesis by DANIEL HAROLD BROUSSARD Approved as to style and content by: David L. Rhode...

  8. Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber Measurements of IN Concentration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution And Bylaws |ContactFlow Diffusion Chamber (CFDC)

  9. ADVANCING THE FUNDAMENTAL UNDERSTANDING AND SCALE-UP OF TRISO FUEL COATERS VIA ADVANCED MEASUREMENT AND COMPUTATIONAL TECHNIQUES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biswas, Pratim; Al-Dahhan, Muthanna

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tri-isotropic (TRISO) fuel particle coating is critical for the future use of nuclear energy produced byadvanced gas reactors (AGRs). The fuel kernels are coated using chemical vapor deposition in a spouted fluidized bed. The challenges encountered in operating TRISO fuel coaters are due to the fact that in modern AGRs, such as High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGRs), the acceptable level of defective/failed coated particles is essentially zero. This specification requires processes that produce coated spherical particles with even coatings having extremely low defect fractions. Unfortunately, the scale-up and design of the current processes and coaters have been based on empirical approaches and are operated as?black boxes. Hence, a voluminous amount of experimental development and trial and error work has been conducted. It has been clearly demonstrated that the quality of the coating applied to the fuel kernels is impacted by the hydrodynamics, solids flow field, and flow regime characteristics of the spouted bed coaters, which themselves are influenced by design parameters and operating variables. Further complicating the outlook for future fuel-coating technology and nuclear energy production is the fact that a variety of new concepts will involve fuel kernels of different sizes and with compositions of different densities. Therefore, without a fundamental understanding the underlying phenomena of the spouted bed TRISO coater, a significant amount of effort is required for production of each type of particle with a significant risk of not meeting the specifications. This difficulty will significantly and negatively impact the applications of AGRs for power generation and cause further challenges to them as an alternative source of commercial energy production. Accordingly, the proposed work seeks to overcome such hurdles and advance the scale-up, design, and performance of TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters. The overall objectives of the proposed work are to advance the fundamental understanding of the hydrodynamics by systematically investigating the effect of design and operating variables, to evaluate the reported dimensionless groups as scaling factors, and to establish a reliable scale-up methodology for the TRISO fuel particle spouted bed coaters based on hydrodynamic similarity via advanced measurement and computational techniques. An additional objective is to develop an on-line non-invasive measurement technique based on gamma ray densitometry (i.e. Nuclear Gauge Densitometry) that can be installed and used for coater process monitoring to ensure proper performance and operation and to facilitate the developed scale-up methodology. To achieve the objectives set for the project, the work will use optical probes and gamma ray computed tomography (CT) (for the measurements of solids/voidage holdup cross-sectional distribution and radial profiles along the bed height, spouted diameter, and fountain height) and radioactive particle tracking (RPT) (for the measurements of the 3D solids flow field, velocity, turbulent parameters, circulation time, solids lagrangian trajectories, and many other of spouted bed related hydrodynamic parameters). In addition, gas dynamic measurement techniques and pressure transducers will be utilized to complement the obtained information. The measurements obtained by these techniques will be used as benchmark data to evaluate and validate the computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models (two fluid model or discrete particle model) and their closures. The validated CFD models and closures will be used to facilitate the developed methodology for scale-up, design and hydrodynamic similarity. Successful execution of this work and the proposed tasks will advance the fundamental understanding of the coater flow field and quantify it for proper and safe design, scale-up, and performance. Such achievements will overcome the barriers to AGR applications and will help assure that the US maintains nuclear energy as a feasible option to meet the nationÃ?Â?Ã?Â?Ã

  10. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a Geothermal Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Joint inversion of geophysical data for ground water flow imaging; Reduced the cost in geothermal exploration and monitoring; & Combined passive and active geophysical methods.

  11. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  12. Device and method for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  13. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FSWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described.

  14. A primary high-pressure air flow measurement standard in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiunn-Haur Shaw; Fong-Ruey Yang; Yao-Fu Chen [Industrial Technology Research Inst., Hsinchu (Taiwan, Province of China)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-pressure air-flow national measurement standard is constructed in Taiwan with a capacity of 8400 Nm{sup 3}/h and a projected measurement uncertainty of {plus_minus}0.2% in the pressure range of 1 {approximately} 84 bars. it is a blow-down type facility, and its main purpose is to serve as the primary standard of a larger-flowrate natural gas flow measurement facility to be built in the future by Chinese Petroleum Company (CPC). The system has a gyroscopic weighing platform suitable for high precision gravimetric measurements and several sonic nozzles with different throat diameters situated in a chamber to be the reference flow meters. A set of two turbine meters, 50mm and 100mm, are sued as the transfer standard. The facility has two test sections separated by the nozzle chamber and four different calibration modes could be arranged. To make calibration, the storage tank, the temperature control loop, and two sets of pressure regulating valve establish a pressurized air flow with stable temperature and pressure in the test section. The control of the air-flow diversion, connect-disconnect mechanism, sonic nozzle array is made through a hydraulic power unit operating at 200 bars. Real time measurements of temperature, pressure, flow signal, and time are collected through a Honeywell 9000-series PLC and a FIX DMAC data acquisition/control software. This paper describes the key components of the test facility and presents the preliminary results of performance assessment.

  15. Recent Advances in Computational Techniques for Simulation of Flow in Porous Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coutinho, Alvaro L. G. A.

    are also addressed. Introduction Modeling porous media flow processes is required in many science and engineering applications. Oil recovery, environmental hydrology and groundwater flow are a few drivers in the development of porous media simulation tools. Nowadays high resolution models are constructed as a result

  16. Higher harmonic anisotropic flow measurements of charged particles at 2.76 TeV with the ALICE detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You Zhou; for the ALICE Collaboration

    2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the measurements of elliptic flow $v_{2}$, as well as higher harmonics triangular flow $v_{3}$ and quadrangular flow $v_{4}$, in $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}} =$ 2.76 TeV Pb--Pb collisions, measured with the ALICE detector. We show that the measured elliptic and triangular flow can be understood from the initial spatial anisotropy and its event--by--event fluctuations. The resulting fluctuations of $v_{2}$ and $v_{3}$ are also discussed.

  17. Omnium-G parabolic dish optical efficiency: a comparison of two independent measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bohn, M.; Gaul, H.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements made at SERI of the optical efficiency of the Omnium-G parabolic dish concentrator are described. Two independent techniques were used: the cold-water calorimeter method and the heat of fusion method. Results from both techniques agree quite well and indicate that the optical efficiency for a 10-cm receiver aperture is 25%. Optical efficiency measured in early 1979 was 37%, and in mid 1979 it had degraded to 21%. An optical alignment procedure is described that resulted in the increase in optical efficiency from 21% to the current value of 25%.

  18. Blood flow measurement and slow flow detection in retinal vessels with Joint Spectral and Time domain method in ultrahigh speed OCT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gorczynska, I.

    We present an application of the Joint Spectral and Time domain OCT (STdOCT) method for detection of wide range of flows in the retinal vessels. We utilized spectral/Fourier domain OCT (SOCT) technique for development of ...

  19. Flow control techniques for real-time media applications in best-effort networks using fluid models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konstantinou, Apostolos

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    at the application layer. An end-to-end ?uid model is used, including the source bu?er, the network and the destination bu?er. Traditional con- trol techniques, along with more advanced adaptive predictive control methods, are considered in order to provide... OF THE END-TO-END FLOW TRANSPORT SYSTEM : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 25 A. Source Bu?er Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 B. Network Dynamic Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 1. Time-Varying Time Delay Model...

  20. UW -Center for Intelligent Materials and Systems 1 1-D Heat Flow Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taya, Minoru

    : Calibrate Seebeck Coefficient for TFTC(Thin Film Thermocouples) x y Heater (70°C) Water (19°C) #12;UW ANSYS Simulation Used Data Water Temp. 2 Measured Temp. (Channel 14, 15) Heater size Assumption. Factor 2.258 #12;UW - Center for Intelligent Materials and Systems 3 2-D Heat Flow Measurement x y Heater

  1. Randomized flow model and centrality measure for electrical power transmission network analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    the vulnerability of electric power infrastructure systems [2, 3]. The focus of these types of studies is typically1 Randomized flow model and centrality measure for electrical power transmission network analysis. Centrality measures can then be coherently defined. An example of application to an electrical power

  2. Analysis of the Sommer technique for measurement of the mobility for charges in two dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrotra, R.; Dahm, A.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technique for measuring the low-frequency ac mobility of free surface charges first employed by Sommer is analyzed for arbitrary values of driving frequency, charge mobility, and effective mass. Analytical expressions for the cell admittance are given for both rectangular and circular geometries in the absence of edge corrections.

  3. Energy analysis of substorms based on remote sensing techniques, solar wind measurements, and geomagnetic indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ã?stgaard, Nikolai

    Energy analysis of substorms based on remote sensing techniques, solar wind measurements wind Citation: Ã?stgaard, N., G. Germany, J. Stadsnes, and R. R. Vondrak, Energy analysis of substorms satellite have been used to examine the energy deposition in the Northern Hemisphere by precipitating

  4. Measurements of ship-induced flow and its effect on bank erosion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hongbin

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Discussion C. Existing Models Review D. Modification of Model and Computation E. Boundary Layer Consideration . F. Comparisons with Field Measurements 12 12 15 19 25 30 TABLE OF CONTENTS (Continued) CHAPTER Page IV SHIP WAVES A. Description B... only considers flow parallel to the channel. The mea; surements indicate that passing barges may generate substantial flow perpendicular to the bank depending on the near-shore topography. Also, the model assumes a 25 uniform distribution...

  5. Flow Measurement with Tangential Paddlewheel Flow Meters: Analysis of Experimental Results and in-situ Diagnostics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watt, J. B.; Haberl, J. S.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    acquisition system. In this paper new results from calibration efforts in the LoanSTAR program are presented, including the premature drop-out of magnetic-type tangential paddlewheel sensors, as well as several in-situ diagnostic measures for ascertaining...

  6. Standardization of Laser Methods and Techniques for Vibration Measurements and Calibrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martens, Hans-Juergen von [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (retired), Abbestrasse 2-12, 12587 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The realization and dissemination of the SI units of motion quantities (vibration and shock) have been based on laser interferometer methods specified in international documentary standards. New and refined laser methods and techniques developed by national metrology institutes and by leading manufacturers in the past two decades have been swiftly specified as standard methods for inclusion into in the series ISO 16063 of international documentary standards. A survey of ISO Standards for the calibration of vibration and shock transducers demonstrates the extended ranges and improved accuracy (measurement uncertainty) of laser methods and techniques for vibration and shock measurements and calibrations. The first standard for the calibration of laser vibrometers by laser interferometry or by a reference accelerometer calibrated by laser interferometry (ISO 16063-41) is on the stage of a Draft International Standard (DIS) and may be issued by the end of 2010. The standard methods with refined techniques proved to achieve wider measurement ranges and smaller measurement uncertainties than that specified in the ISO Standards. The applicability of different standardized interferometer methods to vibrations at high frequencies was recently demonstrated up to 347 kHz (acceleration amplitudes up to 350 km/s{sup 2}). The relative deviations between the amplitude measurement results of the different interferometer methods that were applied simultaneously, differed by less than 1% in all cases.

  7. Measurements of the subcriticality using advanced technique of shooting source during operation of NPP reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, G. V., E-mail: lgv2004@mail.ru; Petrov, V. V. [National Research Center Kurchatov Institute (Russian Federation); Bobylyov, V. T.; Butov, R. I.; Zhukov, A. M.; Sladkov, A. A. [Dukhov VNIIA (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the rules of nuclear safety, the measurements of the subcriticality of reactors should be carried out in the process of performing nuclear hazardous operations. An advanced technique of shooting source of neutrons is proposed to meet this requirement. As such a source, a pulsed neutron source (PNS) is used. In order to realize this technique, it is recommended to enable a PNS with a frequency of 1–20 Hz. The PNS is stopped after achieving a steady-state (on average) number of neutrons in the reactor volume. The change in the number of neutrons in the reactor volume is measured in time with an interval of discreteness of ?0.1 s. The results of these measurements with the application of a system of point-kinetics equations are used in order to calculate the sought subcriticality. The basic idea of the proposed technique used to measure the subcriticality is elaborated in a series of experiments on the Kvant assembly. The conditions which should be implemented in order to obtain a positive result of measurements are formulated. A block diagram of the basic version of the experimental setup is presented, whose main element is a pulsed neutron generator.

  8. An order flow model and a liquidity measure of financial markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Adlar Jeewook

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thesis seeks a better understanding of liquidity generation process of financial markets and attempts to find a quantitative measure of market liquidity. Various statistical modeling techniques are introduced to model ...

  9. Experimental Measurement of the Flow Field of Heavy Trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fred Browand; Charles Radovich

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Flat flaps that enclose the trailer base on the sides and top are known to reduce truck drag and reduce fuel consumption. Such flapped-truck geometries have been studied in laboratory wind tunnels and in field tests. A recent review of wind tunnel data for a variety of truck geometries and flow Reynolds numbers show roughly similar values of peak drag reduction, but differ in the determination of the optimum flap angle. Optimum angles lie in the range 12 degrees-20 degrees, and may be sensitive to Reynolds number and truck geometry. The present field test is undertaken to provide additional estimates of the magnitude of the savings to be expected on a typical truck for five flap angles 10, 13, 16, 19, and 22 degrees. The flaps are constructed from a fiberglass-epoxy-matrix material and are one-quarter of the base width in length (about 61 cm, or 2 feet). They are attached along the rear door hinge lines on either side of the trailer, so that no gap appears at the joint between the flap and the side of the trailer The flap angle is adjusted by means of two aluminum supports. The present test is performed on the NASA Crows Landing Flight Facility at the northern end of the San Joaquin valley in California. The main runway is approximately 2400 meters in length, and is aligned approximately in a north-south direction The test procedure is to make a series of runs starting at either end of the runway. All runs are initiated under computer control to accelerate the truck to a target speed of 60 mph (96 6 km/hr), to proceed at the target speed for a fixed distance, and to decelerate at the far end of the runway. During a run, the broadcast fuel rate, the engine rpm, forward speed, elapsed time--as well as several other parameters (10 in all)--are digitized at a rate of 100 digitizations per second. Various flapped-conditions are interspersed with the ''no flaps'' control, and are sequenced in a different order on different days. Approximately 310 runs are accumulated over the 5-day test period, May 17-21, 2004. The runway slopes rather uniformly upward from north-to-south. Over the distance of 2424 meters between our two ''start'' markers at either end of the runway, the net change in elevation is a little over ten meters. Test results clearly show the greater fuel consumption required to lift the truck against gravity in the southbound direction For this reason, it is important that the tests be averaged over a round trip circuit--that is, a run in both directions over the identical portion of the roadway. Northbound-southbound averages require an overlap segment of the runway (near the middle of the runway) where the truck--starting from either end--has achieved its target speed. For the target truck speed of 60 mph, this overlap region is approximately 700 meters in length. Typically a run and the return run are accomplished within a time interval of 6 minutes. Analysis of the data show fuel consumption savings at all flap angle settings tested, when compared to the ''no flaps'' condition. The most beneficial flap angle appears to be 13 degrees, for which the fuel consumption is 0.3778 {+-} 0.0025 liters/km compared to the ''no flaps'' control of 0.3941 {+-} 0.0034 liters/km. The error bounds expressed above mark the 99% confidence interval in the mean values given. That is, additional estimates of the mean fuel consumption would be expected to lie within the bounds given, approximately 99% of the time. The fuel consumption saving is--to reasonable accuracy--about 1.63 liters/100 kilometers. These savings represent the increment associated only with the change in drag due to the presence or absence of flaps. The result will hold for any truck of similar size and shape and engine performance regardless of the loading of the truck or the rolling resistance. The economy achieved by use of base flaps can be compared to the economy resulting from driving two trucks in a tandem configuration. In December 2003, such fuel consumption tests were performed at the same Crows Landing testsite. In the tests, two identical trucks are ope

  10. An optical investigation of air particle flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCluskey, Denise R

    This thesis is a fundamental study of air-particle flow fields where the experimental parameters are characteristics of coal-fired electricity generating stations. The optical flow field measurement technique Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV...

  11. An Efficient Random Jitter Measurement Technique Using Fast Comparator Dongwoo Hong, Cameron Dryden, Gordon Saksena, Michael Panis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    An Efficient Random Jitter Measurement Technique Using Fast Comparator Sampling Dongwoo Hong.panis@teradyne.com Abstract This paper describes a random jitter measurement technique using simple algorithms and comparator regions. Random jitter is measured accurately even in the presence of deterministic and low

  12. Measurements of continuous mix evolution in a high energy density shear flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loomis, E., E-mail: loomis@lanl.gov; Doss, F.; Flippo, K.; Fincke, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the novel integration of streaked radiography into a counter-flowing High Energy Density (HED) shear environment that continually measures a growing mix layer of Al separating two low-density CH foams. Measurements of the mix width allow us to validate compressible turbulence models and with streaked imaging, make this possible with a minimal number of experiments on large laser facilities. In this paper, we describe how the HED counter-flowing shear layer is created and diagnosed with streaked radiography. We then compare the streaked data to previous two-dimensional, single frame radiography and radiation hydrodynamic simulations of the experiment with inline compressible turbulent mix models.

  13. A system for the real time, direct measurement of natural gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sowell, T. [PMI, Badger Meter, Inc., Tulsa, OK (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    PMI/Badger Meter, Inc. with partial sponsorship from the Gas Research Institute, has designed and developed direct measurement total energy flow metering instrumentation. As industry demands for improved accuracy and speed of measurement have increased so has the complexity of the overall hardware and software systems. Considering traditional system approaches, few companies have the in house capability of maintaining a complete system. This paper addresses efforts to implement a direct, total gas energy flow metering system which is simple to use and cost effective.

  14. Deconvolution of Stark broadened spectra for multi-point density measurements in a flow Z-pinch

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Vogman, G. V. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Shumlak, U. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stark broadened emission spectra, once separated from other broadening effects, provide a convenient non-perturbing means of making plasma density measurements. A deconvolution technique has been developed to measure plasma densities in the ZaP flow Z-pinch experiment. The ZaP experiment uses sheared flow to mitigate MHD instabilities. The pinches exhibit Stark broadened emission spectra, which are captured at 20 locations using a multi-chord spectroscopic system. Spectra that are time- and chord-integrated are well approximated by a Voigt function. The proposed method simultaneously resolves plasma electron density and ion temperature by deconvolving the spectral Voigt profile into constituent functions: a Gaussian function associated with instrument effects and Doppler broadening by temperature; and a Lorentzian function associated with Stark broadening by electron density. The method uses analytic Fourier transforms of the constituent functions to fit the Voigt profile in the Fourier domain. The method is discussed and compared to a basic least-squares fit. The Fourier transform fitting routine requires fewer fitting parameters and shows promise in being less susceptible to instrumental noise and to contamination from neighboring spectral lines. The method is evaluated and tested using simulated lines and is applied to experimental data for the 229.69 nm C III line from multiple chords to determine plasma density and temperature across the diameter of the pinch. These measurements are used to gain a better understanding of Z-pinch equilibria.

  15. A new measurement of the bulk flow of X-ray luminous clusters of galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kashlinsky; F. Atrio-Barandela; H. Ebeling; A. Edge; D. Kocevski

    2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new measurements of the large-scale bulk flows of galaxy clusters based on 5-year WMAP data and a significantly expanded X-ray cluster catalogue. Our method probes the flow via measurements of the kinematic Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) effect produced by the hot gas in moving clusters. It computes the dipole in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) data at cluster pixels, which preserves the SZ component while integrating down other contributions. Our improved catalog of over 1,000 clusters enables us to further investigate possible systematic effects and, thanks to a higher median cluster redshift, allows us to measure the bulk flow to larger scales. We present a corrected error treatment and demonstrate that the more X-ray luminous clusters, while fewer in number, have much larger optical depth, resulting in a higher dipole and thus a more accurate flow measurement. This results in the observed correlation of the dipole derived at the aperture of zero monopole with the monopole measured over the cluster central regions. This correlation is expected if the dipole is produced by the SZ effect and cannot be caused by unidentified systematics (or primary cosmic microwave background anisotropies). We measure that the flow is consistent with approximately constant velocity out to at least 800 Mpc. The significance of the measured signal peaks around 500 Mpc, most likely because the contribution from more distant clusters becomes progressively more diluted by the WMAP beam. We can, however, at present not rule out that these more distant clusters simply contribute less to the overall motion.

  16. A Correction Scheme for Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using the Comparative Cut-bar Technique Based on a 3D Numerical Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas W. Marshall; Changhu Xing; Charles Folsom; Colby Jensen; Heng Ban

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As an important factor affecting the accuracy of the thermal conductivity measurement, systematic (bias) error in the guarded comparative axial heat flow (cut-bar) method was mostly neglected by previous researches. This bias is due primarily to the thermal conductivity mismatch between sample and meter bars (reference), which is common for a sample of unknown thermal conductivity. A correction scheme, based on a finite element simulation of the measurement system, was proposed to reduce the magnitude of the overall measurement uncertainty. This scheme was experimentally validated by applying corrections on four types of sample measurements in which the specimen thermal conductivity is much smaller, slightly smaller, equal and much larger than that of the meter bar. As an alternative to the optimum guarding technique proposed before, the correction scheme can be used to minimize uncertainty contribution from the measurement system with non-optimal guarding conditions. It is especially necessary for large thermal conductivity mismatches between sample and meter bars.

  17. X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makoto Tabata; Yoshikiyo Hatakeyama; Ichiro Adachi; Takeshi Morita; Keiko Nishikawa

    2012-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain high performance in a large-area detector, a key characteristic of radiator is the density (i.e. refractive index) uniformity of an individual aerogel monolith. At a refractive index of n = 1.05, our requirement for the refractive index uniformity in the transverse plane direction of an aerogel tile is |\\delta (n - 1)/(n - 1)| aerogels from a trial production and that of Panasonic products (SP-50) as a reference, and to confirm they have sufficient density uniformity within \\pm 1% along the transverse plane direction. The measurement results show that the proposed technique can quantitatively estimate the density uniformity of aerogels.

  18. X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabata, Makoto; Adachi, Ichiro; Morita, Takeshi; Nishikawa, Keiko; 10.1016/j.nima.2012.09.001

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes a new X-ray radiographic technique for measuring density uniformity of silica aerogels used as radiator in proximity-focusing ring-imaging Cherenkov detectors. To obtain high performance in a large-area detector, a key characteristic of radiator is the density (i.e. refractive index) uniformity of an individual aerogel monolith. At a refractive index of n = 1.05, our requirement for the refractive index uniformity in the transverse plane direction of an aerogel tile is |\\delta (n - 1)/(n - 1)| aerogels from a trial production and that of Panasonic products (SP-50) as a reference, and to confirm they have sufficient density uniformity within \\pm 1% along the transverse plane direction. The measurement results show that the proposed technique can quantitatively estimate the density uniformity of aerogels.

  19. Aerodynamic pressure and flow-visualization measurement from a rotating wind turbine blade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butterfield, C.P.

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aerodynamic, load, flow-visualization, and inflow measurements have been made on a 10-m, three-bladed, downwind, horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT). A video camera mounted on the rotor was used to record nighttime and daytime video images of tufts attached to the low-pressure side of a constant-chord, zero-twist blade. Load measurements were made using strain gages mounted at every 10% of the blade's span. Pressure measurements were made at 80% of the blade's span. Pressure taps were located at 32 chordwise positions, revealing pressure distributions comparable with wind tunnel data. Inflow was measured using a vertical-plane array of eight propvane and five triaxial (U-V-W) prop-type anemometers located 10 m upwind in the predominant wind direction. One objective of this comprehensive research program was to study the effects of blade rotation on aerodynamic behavior below, near, and beyond stall. To this end, flow patterns are presented here that reveal the dynamic and steady behavior of flow conditions on the blade. Pressure distributions are compared to flow patterns and two-dimensional wind tunnel data. Separation boundary locations are shown that change as a function of spanwise location, pitch angle, and wind speed. 6 refs., 23 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Crosscheck of different techniques for two dimensional power spectral density measurements of x-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Irick, Steve C.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi, Farhad; Warwick, Tony

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency of different instruments and methods for measuring two-dimensional (2D) power spectral density (PSD) distributions are investigated. The instruments are an interferometric microscope, an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the X-ray Reflectivity and Scattering experimental facility, all available at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measurements were performed with a gold-coated mirror with a highly polished stainless steel substrate. It was shown that these three techniques provide essentially consistent results. For the stainless steel mirror, an envelope over all measured PSD distributions can be described with an inverse power-law PSD function. It is also shown that the measurements can be corrected for the specific spatial frequency dependent systematic errors of the instruments. The AFM and the X-ray scattering measurements were used to determine the modulation transfer function of the interferometric microscope. The corresponding correction procedure is discussed in detail. Lower frequency investigation of the 2D PSD distribution was also performed with a long trace profiler and a ZYGO GPI interferometer. These measurements are in some contradiction, suggesting that the reliability of the measurements has to be confirmed with additional investigation. Based on the crosscheck of the performance of all used methods, we discuss the ways for improving the 2D PSD characterization of X-ray optics.

  1. Techniques for the measurement of disruption halo currents in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerhardt, S. P.; Fredrickson, E.; Guttadora, L.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; Menard, J.; Takahashi, H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes techniques for measuring halo currents, and their associated toroidal peaking, in the National Spherical Torus Experiments. The measurements are based on three techniques: (i) measurement of the toroidal field created by the poloidal halo current, either with segmented Rogowski coils or discrete toroidal field sensors, (ii) the direct measurement of halo currents into specially instrument tiles, and (iii) small Rogowski coils placed on the mechanical supports of in-vessel components. For the segmented Rogowski coils and discrete toroidal field detectors, it is shown that the toroidal peaking factor inferred from the data is significantly less than the peakingmore »factor of the underlying halo current distribution, and a simple model is developed to relate the two. For the array of discrete toroidal field detectors and small Rogowski sensors, the compensation steps that are used to isolate the halo current signal are described. The electrical and mechanical design of compact under-tile resistive shunts and mini-Rogowski coils is described. Example data from the various systems is shown.« less

  2. Method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content using microwave absorption techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fryer, Michael O. (Roberts, ID); Hills, Andrea J. (Iowa City, IA); Morrison, John L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A self calibrating method and apparatus for measuring butterfat and protein content based on measuring the microwave absorption of a sample of milk at several microwave frequencies. A microwave energy source injects microwave energy into the resonant cavity for absorption and reflection by the sample undergoing evaluation. A sample tube is centrally located in the resonant cavity passing therethrough and exposing the sample to the microwave energy. A portion of the energy is absorbed by the sample while another portion of the microwave energy is reflected back to an evaluation device such as a network analyzer. The frequency at which the reflected radiation is at a minimum within the cavity is combined with the scatter coefficient S.sub.11 as well as a phase change to calculate the butterfat content in the sample. The protein located within the sample may also be calculated in a likewise manner using the frequency, S.sub.11 and phase variables. A differential technique using a second resonant cavity containing a reference standard as a sample will normalize the measurements from the unknown sample and thus be self-calibrating. A shuttered mechanism will switch the microwave excitation between the unknown and the reference cavities. An integrated apparatus for measuring the butterfat content in milk using microwave absorption techniques is also presented.

  3. Techniques for the measurement of disruption halo currents in the National Spherical Torus Experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gerhardt, S. P. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Fredrickson, E. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Guttadora, L. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Kugel, H. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Menard, J. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Takahashi, H. [Princeton Fusion Research LLC, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes techniques for measuring halo currents, and their associated toroidal peaking, in the National Spherical Torus Experiments [M. Ono, et. al, Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. The measurements are based on three techniques: (i) measurement of the toroidal field created by the poloidal halo current, either with segmented Rogowski coils or discrete toroidal field sensors, (ii) the direct measurement of halo currents into specially instrument tiles, and (iii) small Rogowski coils placed on the mechanical supports of in-vessel components. For the segmented Rogowski coils and discrete toroidal field detectors, it is shown that the toroidal peaking factor inferred from the data is significantly less than the peaking factor of the underlying halo current distribution, and a simple model is developed to relate the two. For the array of discrete toroidal field detectors and small Rogowski sensors, the compensation steps that are used to isolate the halo current signal are described. The electrical and mechanical design of compact under-tile resistive shunts and mini-Rogowski coils is described. Example data from the various systems is shown.

  4. UMTRA ground water sampling techniques: Comparison of the traditional and low flow methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the potential changes in water quality data that may occur with the conversion from MBV (multiple bore volume) to LF (low flow) sampling and provides two examples of how such a change might impact Project decisions. The existing scientific literature on LF sampling is reviewed and the new LF data from three UMTRA Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project sites are evaluated seeking answers to the questions posed above. Several possible approaches, that the UMTRA Project may take to address issues unanswered by the literature are presented and compared, and a recommendation is offered for the future direction of the LF conversion effort.

  5. Aerosol characterization study using multi-spectrum remote sensing measurement techniques.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glen, Crystal Chanea; Sanchez, Andres L.; Lucero, Gabriel Anthony; Schmitt, Randal L.; Johnson, Mark S.; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Servantes, Brandon Lee

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A unique aerosol flow chamber coupled with a bistatic LIDAR system was implemented to measure the optical scattering cross sections and depolarization ratio of common atmospheric particulates. Each of seven particle types (ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, sodium chloride, potassium chloride, black carbon and Arizona road dust) was aged by three anthropogenically relevant mechanisms: 1. Sulfuric acid deposition, 2. Toluene ozonolysis reactions, and 3. m-Xylene ozonolysis reactions. The results of pure particle scattering properties were compared with their aged equivalents. Results show that as most particles age under industrial plume conditions, their scattering cross sections are similar to pure black carbon, which has significant impacts to our understanding of aerosol impacts on climate. In addition, evidence emerges that suggest chloride-containing aerosols are chemically altered during the organic aging process. Here we present the direct measured scattering cross section and depolarization ratios for pure and aged atmospheric particulates.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IN-PILE TECHNIQUE FOR THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY MEASUREMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandon Fox; Heng Ban; Joy L. Rempe; Joshua E. Daw; Keith G. Condie; Darrell L. Knudson

    2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermophysical properties of advanced fuels and materials during irradiation must be known prior to their use in existing, advanced, or next generation reactors. Fuel thermal conductivity is one of the most important properties for predicting fuel performance and reactor safety. This paper discusses a joint Utah State University (USU)/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) project to investigate an in-pile fuel thermal conductivity measurement technique using a surrogate fuel rod. The method used a surrogate fuel rod with Joule heating to simulate volumetric heat generation as a proof-of-concept test in-pile application. Carbon structural foam, CFOAM®, a product of Touchtone Research Laboratory was chosen as the surrogate material because of the variable electrical and thermal properties upon fabrication. To stay within the surrogate fuel rod requirements, electrical and thermal properties were tailored by Touchtone Research Laboratory to match required values. This paper describes are the techniques used for quantifying thermal conductivity. A description of the test setup and preliminary results are presented. Two thermocouples are inserted into a 1-inch diameter, 6-inch long rod of CFOAM® at known locations. Knowing the applied volumetric heat to the rod by electrical resistance heating, the thermal conductivity can be calculated. Sensitivities of this measurement can also found by analysis and testing of different configurations of the sample setup. Verification of thermal conductivity is found by measuring the thermal properties of the CFOAM® using different methods. Thermal properties including thermal conductivity, specific heat capacity, and expansion coefficient of two types of CFOAM®, CFOAM20 and CFOAM25, were characterized using standard measurement techniques, such as laser flash, differential scanning calorimetry, and pushrod dilatometry.

  7. Interim Columbia and Snake rivers flow improvement measures for salmon: Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public comments are sought on this final SEIS, which supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis (OA)/Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The Corps of Engineers, in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation proposes five alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. These are: (1) Without Project (no action) Alternative, (2) the 1992 Operation, (3) the 1992 Operation with Libby/Hungry Horse Sensitivity, (4) a Modified 1992 Operation with Improvements to Salmon Flows from Dworshak, and (5) a Modified 1992 Operation with Upper Snake Sensitivity. Alternative 4, Modified 1992 Operations, has been identified as the preferred alternative.

  8. NMR imaging techniques and applications in the flow behavior of fluids in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Halimi, Hassan I

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    proton magnetic resonance technique can be used to determine the oil saturation in the pores of a rock. The NMR system can produce images of the molecules under investigation because the signals recorded are obtained directly from fluids contained... in liquids as well. This should enable us to obtain additional information about the fluids in the rock '4. Spin-spin relaxation has a characteristic time T~. T~ is the time constant for the decay of the precessing R-Zo component of the magnetization...

  9. An Ion Doppler Spectrometer Instrument for Ion Temperature and Flow Measurements on SSPX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, J D; McLean, H S; Wood, R D; Romero-Talamas, C A; Moller, J M; Morse, E C

    2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-resolution ion Doppler spectrometer has been installed on the Sustained Spheromak Plasma Experiment to measure ion temperatures and plasma flow. The system is composed of a 1 meter focal length Czerny-Turner spectrometer with diffraction grating line density of 2400 lines/mm, which allows for first order spectra between 300 and 600 nm. A 16-channel photomultiplier tube detection assembly combined with output coupling optics provides a spectral resolution of 0.0126 nm per channel. We calculate in some detail the mapping of curved slit images onto the linear detector array elements. This is important in determining wavelength resolution and setting the optimum vertical extent of the slit. Also, because of the small wavelength window of the IDS, a miniature fiber optic survey spectrometer sensitive to a wavelength range 200 to 1100 nm and having resolution 0.2 nm, is used to obtain a time-integrated spectrum for each shot to verify specific impurity line radiation. Several measurements validate the systems operation. Doppler broadening of C III 464.72 nm line in the plasma shows time-resolved ion temperatures up to 250 eV for hydrogen discharges, which is consistent with neutral particle energy analyzer measurements. Flow measurements show a sub-Alfvenic plasma flow ranging from 5 to 45 km/s for helium discharges.

  10. A measurement technique to determine the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Gallagher, Ian; Masi, Kathryn J.; Lee, Choonik; Prisciandaro, Joann I.; Hamstra, Daniel A.; Ritter, Timothy; Lam, Kwok L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-5010 (United States)

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To present and characterize a measurement technique to quantify the calibration accuracy of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter.Methods: This technique was developed as a quality assurance method for electromagnetic tracking systems used in a multi-institutional clinical hypofractionated prostate study. In this technique, the electromagnetic tracking system is calibrated to isocenter with the manufacturers recommended technique, using laser-based alignment. A test patient is created with a transponder at isocenter whose position is measured electromagnetically. Four portal images of the transponder are taken with collimator rotations of 45° 135°, 225°, and 315°, at each of four gantry angles (0°, 90°, 180°, 270°) using a 3 × 6 cm{sup 2} radiation field. In each image, the center of the copper-wrapped iron core of the transponder is determined. All measurements are made relative to this transponder position to remove gantry and imager sag effects. For each of the 16 images, the 50% collimation edges are identified and used to find a ray representing the rotational axis of each collimation edge. The 16 collimator rotation rays from four gantry angles pass through and bound the radiation isocenter volume. The center of the bounded region, relative to the transponder, is calculated and then transformed to tracking system coordinates using the transponder position, allowing the tracking system's calibration offset from radiation isocenter to be found. All image analysis and calculations are automated with inhouse software for user-independent accuracy. Three different tracking systems at two different sites were evaluated for this study.Results: The magnitude of the calibration offset was always less than the manufacturer's stated accuracy of 0.2 cm using their standard clinical calibration procedure, and ranged from 0.014 to 0.175 cm. On three systems in clinical use, the magnitude of the offset was found to be 0.053 ± 0.036, 0.121 ± 0.023, and 0.093 ± 0.013 cm.Conclusions: The method presented here provides an independent technique to verify the calibration of an electromagnetic tracking system to radiation isocenter. The calibration accuracy of the system was better than the 0.2 cm accuracy stated by the manufacturer. However, it should not be assumed to be zero, especially for stereotactic radiation therapy treatments where planning target volume margins are very small.

  11. A technique to measure the effectiveness of "OSHA" in American manufacturing industry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pietrini, Luis Alejandro

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lmore (Chai rman of Committee) Dr. Alberto Garcia-Diaz (Member) Mr. Harr eggs (Member) Newto . Ellis (Head of Department) AUGUST 1983 ABSTRACT A Technique to Measure the Effectiveness of "OSHA" in American Manufacturing Industry. (August 1983... of the planning and execution of th1s research. I would also like to thank Dr. Alberto Garc1a and Mr. Harry Suggs for the assistance received in the performance of this study. I am also in debt to Dr. Ralph Vernon, whose encouragement and instructive...

  12. Scattering effects at near-wall flow measurements using Doppler global velocimetry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Andreas; Haufe, Daniel; Buettner, Lars; Czarske, Juergen

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler global velocimetry (DGV) is considered to be a useful optical measurement tool for acquiring flow velocity fields. Often near-wall measurements are required, which is still challenging due to errors resulting from background scattering and multiple-particle scattering. Since the magnitudes of both errors are unknown so far, they are investigated by scattering simulations and experiments. Multiple-particle scattering mainly causes a stochastic error, which can be reduced by averaging. Contrary to this, background scattering results in a relative systematic error, which is directly proportional to the ratio of the background scattered light power to the total scattered light power. After applying a correction method and optimizing the measurement arrangement, a subsonic flat plate boundary layer was successfully measured achieving a minimum wall distance of 100 {mu}m with a maximum relative error of 6%. The investigations reveal the current capabilities and perspectives of DGV for near-wall measurements.

  13. Direct measurement of isothermal flow stress of metals at elevated temperatures and high strain rates with application to Ta and Ta-W alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nemat-Nasser, S.; Isaacs, J.B. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is developed for measuring the flow stress of metals over a broad range of strains, strain rates, and temperatures, in uniaxial compression. It utilizes a recent, enhanced version of the classical (Kolsky) compression split Hopkinson bar, in which a sample is subjected to a single stress pulse of a predefined profile, and then recovered without being subjected to any other additional loading. For the present application, the UCSD`s split Hopkinson bar is further enhanced by the addition of a new mechanism by means of which the incident and transmission bars of the split Hopkinson construction are moved into a constant-temperature furnace containing the sample, and gently brought into contact with the sample, as the elastic stress pulse reaches and loads the sample. Using several samples of the same material and testing them at the same strain rate and temperature, but different incremental strains, an accurate estimate of the material`s isothermal flow stress can be obtained. Additionally, the modified Hopkinson technique allows the direct measurement of the change in the (high strain-rate) flow stress with a change of the strain rate, while the strain and temperature are kept constant, i.e., the strain rate can be increased or decreased during the high strain-rate test. The technique is applied to obtain both quasi-isothermal and adiabatic flow stresses of tantalum (Ta) and a tantalum-tungsten (Ta-W) alloy at elevated temperatures. These experimental results show the flow stress of these materials to be controlled by a simple long-range plastic-strain-dependent barrier, and a short-range thermally activated Peierls mechanism. For tantalum, a model which fits the experimental data over strains from a few to over 100%, strain rates from quasi-static to 40,000/s, and temperatures from {minus}200 to 1,000 C, is presented and discussed.

  14. LDV measurements of the velocity field within a ribbed internal duct flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckle, E.; Pantelic, D.; Hu, K.; Jones, S.; Travkin, V.; Catton, I.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) has been used to measure the velocity field in an internal duct flow of air with regular rib roughness. The experiments were conducted to study the effect regular wall obstacles have on the flow velocity field. The instantaneous u and v velocities were measured in both a smooth and rough rectangular duct. For the smooth channel the wind tunnel Reynolds number capability was first investigated and was shown to be linear with blower shaft frequency, having a range of 13,000--42,000. Next, the turbulent velocity profiles were measured in the smooth channel for 6 different blower speeds (Reynolds numbers), and the results greatly resembled those found in previous literature. Twenty sets of rectangular, 6.35 mm x 6.35 mm ribs were then mounted to the top and bottom of the channel with a spacing of 75 mm (P/H = 11.8). A grid of nodes were selected and the turbulent velocities were measured for a given Reynolds number, and are presented and discussed. Valuable insight was gained which will aid in future studies intended to measure the Reynolds stress and other closure terms.

  15. Measurement of volume resistivity/conductivity of metallic alloy in inhibited seawater by optical interferometry techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Habib, K. [Materials Science Laboratory, Department of Advanced Systems KISR, P.O. Box 24885, SAFAT 13109 (Kuwait)

    2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical interferometry techniques were used for the first time to measure the volume resistivity/conductivity of carbon steel samples in seawater with different concentrations of a corrosion inhibitor. In this investigation, the real-time holographic interferometry was carried out to measure the thickness of anodic dissolved layer or the total thickness, U{sub total}, of formed oxide layer of carbon steel samples during the alternating current (ac) impedance of the samples in blank seawater and in 5-20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater, respectively. In addition, a mathematical model was derived in order to correlate between the ac impedance (resistance) and the surface (orthogonal) displacement of the surface of the samples in solutions. In other words, a proportionality constant [resistivity ({rho}) or conductivity ({sigma})= 1/{rho}] between the determined ac impedance [by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique] and the orthogonal displacement (by the optical interferometry techniques) was obtained. The value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample in the blank seawater was found similar to the value of the resistivity of the carbon steel sample air, around 1 x 10{sup -5}{Omega} cm. On the contrary, the measured values of the resistivity of the carbon steel samples were 1.85 x 10{sup 7}, 3.35 x 10{sup 7}, and 1.7 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm in 5, 10, and 20 ppm TROS C-70 inhibited seawater solutions, respectively. Furthermore, the determined value range of {rho} of the formed oxide layers, from 1.7 x 10{sup 7} to 3.35 x 10{sup 7}{Omega} cm, is found in a reasonable agreement with the one found in literature for the Fe oxide-hydroxides, i.e., goethite ({alpha}-FeOOH) and for the lepidocrocite ({gamma}-FeOOH), 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm. The {rho} value of the Fe oxide-hydroxides, 1 x 10{sup 9}{Omega} cm, was found slightly higher than the {rho} value range of the formed oxide layer of the present study. This is because the former value was determined by a dc method rather than by an electromagnetic method, i.e., holographic interferometry with applications of EIS, i.e., ac method. As a result, erroneous measurements were recorded due to the introduction of heat to Fe oxide-hydroxides.

  16. Lift, drag and flow-field measurements around a small ornithopter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balakumar, B J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chavez - Alarcon, Ramiro [NMSU; Shu, Fangjun [NMSU

    2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The aerodynamics of a flight-worthy, radio controlled ornithopter is investigated using a combination of Particle-Image Velocimetry (PIV), load cell measurements, and high-speed photography of smoke visualizations. The lift and thrust forces of the ornithopter are measured at various flow speeds, flapping frequencies and angles of attack to characterize the flight performance. These direct force measurements are then compared with forces estimated using control volume analysis on PIV data. High-speed photography of smoke streaks is used to visualize the evolution of leading edge vortices, and to qualitatively infer the effect of wing deformation on the net downwash. Vortical structures in the wake are compared to previous studies on root flapping, and direct measurements of flapping efficiency are used to argue that the current ornithopter operates sub-optimally in converting the input energy into propulsive work.

  17. Impingement cooling and heat transfer measurement using transient liquid crystal technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yizhe

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A heat transfer study on jet impingement cooling is presented. The study focuses on the effect of impingement jet flow rate, jet angle, and flow exit direction on various target surface heat transfer distributions. A two-channel test section...

  18. Techniques and tools for measuring energy efficiency of scientific software applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Abdurachmanov; Peter Elmer; Giulio Eulisse; Robert Knight; Tapio Niemi; Jukka K. Nurminen; Filip Nyback; Goncalo Pestana; Zhonghong Ou; Kashif Khan

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale of scientific High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Throughput Computing (HTC) has increased significantly in recent years, and is becoming sensitive to total energy use and cost. Energy-efficiency has thus become an important concern in scientific fields such as High Energy Physics (HEP). There has been a growing interest in utilizing alternate architectures, such as low power ARM processors, to replace traditional Intel x86 architectures. Nevertheless, even though such solutions have been successfully used in mobile applications with low I/O and memory demands, it is unclear if they are suitable and more energy-efficient in the scientific computing environment. Furthermore, there is a lack of tools and experience to derive and compare power consumption between the architectures for various workloads, and eventually to support software optimizations for energy efficiency. To that end, we have performed several physical and software-based measurements of workloads from HEP applications running on ARM and Intel architectures, and compare their power consumption and performance. We leverage several profiling tools (both in hardware and software) to extract different characteristics of the power use. We report the results of these measurements and the experience gained in developing a set of measurement techniques and profiling tools to accurately assess the power consumption for scientific workloads.

  19. Precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei based on Doppler-shift techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iwasaki, Hironori [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan 48824 (United States) and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent progress in precision lifetime measurements of exotic nuclei at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL), Michigan State University is presented. The Recoil Distance Doppler-shift (RDDS) technique has been applied to nuclear reactions involving intermediate-energy rare isotope (RI) beams, to determine absolute transition strengths between nuclear states model independently from level lifetimes of interest. As such an example, recent lifetime measurements of the first 2{sup +} states in the neutron-rich {sup 62,64,66}Fe isotopes at and around N=40 are introduced. The experiment was performed at the Coupled Cyclotron Facility at NSCL using a unique combination of several experimental instruments; the Segmented Germanium Array (SeGA), the plunger device, and the S800 spectrograph. The reduced E2 transition probabilities B(E2) are determined directly from the measured lifetimes. The observed trend of B(E2) clearly demonstrates that an enhanced collectivity persists in {sup 66}Fe despite the harmonic-oscillator magic number N=40. The present results are also discussed in comparison with the large-scale shell model calculations, pointing to a possible extension of the deformation region beyond N=40.

  20. CT reconstruction techniques for improved accuracy of lung CT airway measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodriguez, A. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Ranallo, F. N. [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 and Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Judy, P. F. [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Gierada, D. S. [Department of Radiology, Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri 63110 (United States); Fain, S. B., E-mail: sfain@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin 53792 (United States); Department of Biomedical Engineering,University of Wisconsin School of Engineering, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: To determine the impact of constrained reconstruction techniques on quantitative CT (qCT) of the lung parenchyma and airways for low x-ray radiation dose. Methods: Measurement of small airways with qCT remains a challenge, especially for low x-ray dose protocols. Images of the COPDGene quality assurance phantom (CTP698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) were obtained using a GE discovery CT750 HD scanner for helical scans at x-ray radiation dose-equivalents ranging from 1 to 4.12 mSv (12–100 mA s current–time product). Other parameters were 40 mm collimation, 0.984 pitch, 0.5 s rotation, and 0.625 mm thickness. The phantom was sandwiched between 7.5 cm thick water attenuating phantoms for a total length of 20 cm to better simulate the scatter conditions of patient scans. Image data sets were reconstructed using STANDARD (STD), DETAIL, BONE, and EDGE algorithms for filtered back projection (FBP), 100% adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction (ASIR), and Veo reconstructions. Reduced (half) display field of view (DFOV) was used to increase sampling across airway phantom structures. Inner diameter (ID), wall area percent (WA%), and wall thickness (WT) measurements of eight airway mimicking tubes in the phantom, including a 2.5 mm ID (42.6 WA%, 0.4 mm WT), 3 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 0.6 mm WT), and 6 mm ID (49.0 WA%, 1.2 mm WT) were performed with Airway Inspector (Surgical Planning Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA) using the phase congruency edge detection method. The average of individual measures at five central slices of the phantom was taken to reduce measurement error. Results: WA% measures were greatly overestimated while IDs were underestimated for the smaller airways, especially for reconstructions at full DFOV (36 cm) using the STD kernel, due to poor sampling and spatial resolution (0.7 mm pixel size). Despite low radiation dose, the ID of the 6 mm ID airway was consistently measured accurately for all methods other than STD FBP. Veo reconstructions showed slight improvement over STD FBP reconstructions (4%–9% increase in accuracy). The most improved ID and WA% measures were for the smaller airways, especially for low dose scans reconstructed at half DFOV (18 cm) with the EDGE algorithm in combination with 100% ASIR to mitigate noise. Using the BONE + ASIR at half BONE technique, measures improved by a factor of 2 over STD FBP even at a quarter of the x-ray dose. Conclusions: The flexibility of ASIR in combination with higher frequency algorithms, such as BONE, provided the greatest accuracy for conventional and low x-ray dose relative to FBP. Veo provided more modest improvement in qCT measures, likely due to its compatibility only with the smoother STD kernel.

  1. EIS-0163-S: Supplemental EIS/1993 Interim Columbia and Snake Rivers Flow Improvement Measures for Salmon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District has prepared this statement to assess alternatives to improve flows of water in the lower Columbia-Snake rivers in 1993 and future years to assist the migration of juvenile and adult anadromous fish past eight hydropower dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency in developing this supplement due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement in March of 1993. This statement supplements the 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis Environmental Impact Statement, which evaluated ways to alter water management operations in 1992 on the lower Columbia and Snake rivers to enhance the survival of wild Snake River salmon.

  2. Fluorescence measurements for evaluating the application of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reichardt, Thomas A.; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Jones, Howland D. T.; Sickafoose, Shane M.; Schmitt, Randal L.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced fluorescence measurements of cuvette-contained laser dye mixtures are made for evaluation of multivariate analysis techniques to optically thick environments. Nine mixtures of Coumarin 500 and Rhodamine 610 are analyzed, as well as the pure dyes. For each sample, the cuvette is positioned on a two-axis translation stage to allow the interrogation at different spatial locations, allowing the examination of both primary (absorption of the laser light) and secondary (absorption of the fluorescence) inner filter effects. In addition to these expected inner filter effects, we find evidence that a portion of the absorbed fluorescence is re-emitted. A total of 688 spectra are acquired for the evaluation of multivariate analysis approaches to account for nonlinear effects.

  3. Oxide thickness measurement technique for duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 cladding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, R.G.; O'Leary, P.M. (Siemens Nuclear Power Corp., Richland, WA (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Siemens Nuclear Power Corporation (SNP) is investigating the use of duplex-layer Zircaloy-4 tubing to improve the waterside corrosion resistance of cladding for high-burnup pressurized water reactor (PWR) fuel designs. Standard SNP PWR cladding is typically 0.762-mm (0.030-in.)-thick Zircaloy-4. The SNP duplex cladding is nominally 0.660-mm (0.026-in.)-thick Zircalloy-4 with an [approximately]0.102-mm (0.004-in.) outer layer of another, more corrosion-resistant, zirconium-based alloy. It is common industry practice to monitor the in-reactor corrosion behavior of Zircaloy cladding by using an eddy-current lift-off' technique to measure the oxide thickness on the outer surface of the fuel cladding. The test program evaluated three different cladding samples, all with the same outer diameter and wall thickness: Zircaloy-4 and duplex clad types D2 and D4.

  4. CT measurements of two-phase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, R.G.; Brigham, W.E.; Castanier, L.M.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulation of flow in naturally fractured reservoirs commonly divides the reservoir into two continua - the matrix system and the fracture system. Flow equations are written presuming that the primary flow between grid blocks occurs through the fracture system and that the primary fluid storage is in the matrix system. The dual porosity formulation of the equations assumes that there is no flow between matrix blocks while the dual permeability formulation allows fluid movement between matrix blocks. Since most of the fluid storage is contained in the matrix, recovery is dominated by the transfer of fluid from the matrix to the high conductivity fractures. The physical mechanisms influencing this transfer have been evaluated primarily through numerical studies. Relatively few experimental studies have investigated the transfer mechanisms. Early studies focused on the prediction of reservoir recoveries from the results of scaled experiments on single reservoir blocks. Recent experiments have investigated some of the mechanisms that are dominant in gravity drainage situations and in small block imbibition displacements. The mechanisms active in multiphase flow in fractured media need to be further illuminated, since some of the experimental results appear to be contradictory. This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner.

  5. O Isotopic Composition of CaCO3 Measured by Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry: Statistical Evaluation and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    d13 C and d18 O Isotopic Composition of CaCO3 Measured by Continuous Flow Isotope Ratio Mass method streamlines the classical phosphoric acid ­ calcium carbonate (H3 PO4 ­ CaCO3 ) reaction method XL continuous flow isotope ratio mass spectrometer. Conditions for which the H3 PO4 ­ CaCO3 reaction

  6. Fatigue testing of high-density polyethylene and polycarbonate with crack length measurement using image processing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riemslag, A.C. (Delft Univ. of Technology (Netherlands). Lab. of Materials Science)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new automated method of measuring fatigue cracks in polymers is discussed. The new method is based on a video signal of the crack which is analyzed with image processing techniques. With this technique the crack length is measured every 20 s during a fatigue test. The accuracy of one single measurement is about 0.05 mm, but this can be increased by averaging a large number of measurements. The applied automated data collection and subsequent data processing is discussed in relation to the recommendations given in ASTM E 647, Test method for Measurement of Fatigue Crack Growth Rates. The use of the new technique is illustrated on the basis of fatigue tests performed on transparent polycarbonate (PC) and nontransparent polyethylene (PE). The fatigue behavior of PE and PC is briefly discussed.

  7. Measurement of {sup 235}U content and flow of UF{sub 6} using delayed neutrons or gamma rays following induced fission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stromswold, D.C.; Peurrung, A.J.; Reeder, P.L.; Perkins, R.W.

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Feasibility experiments conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory demonstrate that either delayed neutrons or energetic gamma rays from short-lived fission products can be used to monitor the blending of UF{sub 6} gas streams. A {sup 252}Cf neutron source was used to induce {sup 235}U fission in a sample, and delayed neutrons and gamma rays were measured after the sample moved {open_quotes}down-stream.{close_quotes} The experiments used a UO{sub 2} powder that was transported down the pipe to simulate the flowing UF{sub 6} gas. Computer modeling and analytic calculation extended the test results to a flowing UF{sub 6} gas system. Neutron or gamma-ray measurements made at two downstream positions can be used to indicate both the {sup 235}U content and UF{sub 6} flow rate. Both the neutron and gamma-ray techniques have the benefits of simplicity and long-term reliability, combined with adequate sensitivity for low-intrusion monitoring of the blending process. Alternatively, measuring the neutron emission rate from (a, n) reactions in the UF{sub 6} provides an approximate measure of the {sup 235}U content without using a neutron source to induce fission.

  8. Regional measurements of /sup 14/Cmisonidazole distribution and blood flow in subcutaneous RT-9 experimental tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blasberg, R.; Horowitz, M.; Strong, J.; Molnar, P.; Patlak, C.; Owens, E.; Fenstermacher, J.

    1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional (/sup 14/C)misonidazole-derived radioactivity (MISO*) was measured by quantitative autoradiography in s.c. RT-9 experimental tumors 0.5, 2, and 4 h after an i.v. bolus (25 mg) and constant infusion (10 mg/h) in rats. Misonidazole (MISO) concentration in plasma, tumor, and other tissues was also measured by high-pressure liquid chromatography. The distribution of MISO* in the tumors always resulted in a characteristic pattern with high peripheral and low central values. The high-activity regions in the tumor rim achieved tissue: plasma MISO* activity ratios of 0.97 and 2.2 by 0.5 and 4 h, respectively; for central tumor regions, this ratio was 0.20 and 0.32 for the same periods, respectively. The limited distribution of MISO* to central tumor regions could be correlated to low values of blood flow (measured with (/sup 131/I)iodoantipyrine) and to diffusion from peripheral tumor regions. Low blood flow in the central regions of these tumors will significantly limit the distribution of MISO and other drugs to viable-appearing cells in these areas and could account in part for the failures of chemotherapy in certain solid tumors. Pharmacokinetic modeling indicates that 1 to 9 h may be necessary for MISO concentrations in some tumor regions to reach 50% of that in plasma.

  9. Local heat transfer and pressure drop measurements in a wavy channel with and without flow disturbers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dini, S.; Kmelius, D. [Western New England College, Springfield, MA (United States); Saniei, N. [Southern Illinois Univ., Edwardsville, IL (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments have been performed to measure local heat transfer coefficients and pressure drop in a wavy channel for Reynolds numbers of 2,900 and 7,000. Additionally, the effect of flow disturbers mounted on the first two peaks on one surface was investigated. The transient method and liquid crystals were used for the local heat transfer measurements. Initial experimental results indicate that addition of ribs into the passage stimulates flow instabilities which enhance the heat transfer performance with moderate effect on pressure drop. Measurements were conducted on a 6 in x 3/8 in x 12 in wavy channel with a wave length of one inch. The highest local heat transfer was detected on the second, followed by the third and fourth peaks at Re = 7000; wheras for Re = 2900 the highest heat transfer was along the next peak detected immediately after the disturbers. The experimental results observed in this study suggest that ribbed passages would yield higher heat transfer with moderate change in pressure drop compared with non-ribbed channels.

  10. F/sub 2/ boundary layer measurement in a chemical laser slit nozzle flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spenser, D.J.; Durran, D.A.; Bixler, H.A.; Varwig, R.L.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive F2 absorption diagnostic suitable for slit nozzle scanning was developed and applied to the measurement of an F2 boundary layer in an HF chemical laser flow. The F2 boundary layer profile was determined to be of exponential decay form with peak at the nozzle wall and of width approx. 1/3 the viscous boundary layer. The F2 concentration profile was displaced inwardly and slightly compressed by the H2 slit injection at the nozzle exit plane. The F2 profile apparently remains fairly intact in passing through the lasing zone.

  11. Viability of Pushrod Dilatometry Techniques for High Temperature In-Pile Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. E. Daw; J. L. Rempe; D. L. Knudson; K. G. Condie; J. C. Crepeau

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To evaluate the performance of new fuel, cladding, and structural materials for use in advanced and existing nuclear reactors, robust instrumentation is needed. Changes in material deformation are typically evaluated out-of-pile, where properties of materials are measured after samples were irradiated for a specified length of time. To address this problem, a series of tests were performed to examine the viability of using pushrod dilatometer techniques for in-pile instrumentation to measure deformation. The tests were performed in three phases. First, familiarity was gained in the use and accuracy of this system by testing samples with well defined thermal elongation characteristics. Second, high temperature data for steels, specifically SA533 Grade B, Class 1 (SA533B1) Low Alloy Steel and Stainless Steel 304 (SS304), found in Light Water Reactor (LWR) vessels, were aquired. Finally, data were obtained from a short pushrod in a horizontal geometry to data obtained from a longer pushrod in a vertical geometry, the configuration likely to be used for in-situ measurements. Results of testing show that previously accepted data for the structural steels tested, SA533B1 and SS304, are inaccurate at high temperatures (above 500 oC) due to extrpolation of high temperature data. This is especially true for SA533B1, as previous data do not account for the phase transformation of the material between 730 oC and 830 oC. Also, comparison of results for horizontal and vertical configurations show a maximum percent difference of 2.02% for high temperature data.

  12. Development of a Digital Fringe Projection Technique to Characterize the Transient Behavior of Wind-Driven Droplet/Rivulet Flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    endeavor, including lava flows in geology, tertiary oil recovery, lubricant oil films in tribology, surface and environmental problems ranging from microchip manufacturing, structured packing to lava flows in geology

  13. Determination of the permeability of carbon aerogels by gas flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and pyrolysis at 1050{degree}C in nitrogen. Because of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell structure and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications, such as in supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, we calculated the permeability of carbon aerogels from equations based upon Darcy`s law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have apparent permeabilities on the order of 10{sup {minus}12}to 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} for densities ranging from 0.44 to 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}. Like their mechanical properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density and average pore size. Such findings help us to estimate the average pore sizes of carbon aerogels once their densities are known. This paper reveals the relationships among permeability, pore size and density in carbon aerogels.

  14. Determination of the permeability of carbon aerogels by gas flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong, F.M.; Hulsey, S.S.; Alviso, C.T.; Pekala, R.W.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon aerogels are synthesized via the polycondensation of resorcinol and formaldehyde, followed by supercritical drying and pyrolysis at 1050{degree}C in nitrogen. Because of their interconnected porosity, ultrafine cell structure and high surface area, carbon aerogels have many potential applications, such as in supercapacitors, battery electrodes, catalyst supports, and gas filters. The performance of carbon aerogels in the latter two applications depends on the permeability or gas flow conductance in these materials. By measuring the pressure differential across a thin specimen and the nitrogen gas flow rate in the viscous regime, we calculated the permeability of carbon aerogels from equations based upon Darcy's law. Our measurements show that carbon aerogels have apparent permeabilities on the order of 10{sup {minus}12}to 10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} for densities ranging from 0.44 to 0.05 g/cm{sup 3}. Like their mechanical properties, the permeability of carbon aerogels follows a power law relationship with density and average pore size. Such findings help us to estimate the average pore sizes of carbon aerogels once their densities are known. This paper reveals the relationships among permeability, pore size and density in carbon aerogels.

  15. Interpretation of Array Production Logging Measurements in Horizontal Wells for Flow Profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Lulu

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and possible back flow of denser phases result in misinterpretation of the inflow distribution. To assess the downhole flow conditions more accurately, logging tools have been developed to overcome the flow regime related issues. Multiple-sensor array tools...

  16. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt gradual bend

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.

    1998-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having an abrupt bend. The system includes pressure transducers, one disposed in the conduit at the inside of the bend and one or more disposed in the conduit at the outside of the bend but spaced a distance therefrom. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  17. Higher harmonic anisotropic flow measurements of charged particles in Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALICE Collaboration

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the first measurement of the triangular v3, quadrangular v4, and pentagonal v5 charged particle flow in Pb-Pb collisions at 2.76 TeV measured with the ALICE detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. We show that the triangular flow can be described in terms of the initial spatial anisotropy and its fluctuations, which provides strong constraints on its origin. In the most central events, where the elliptic flow v2 and v3 have similar magnitude, a double peaked structure in the two-particle azimuthal correlations is observed, which is often interpreted as a Mach cone response to fast partons. We show that this structure can be naturally explained from the measured anisotropic flow Fourier coefficients.

  18. Dwarf Galaxies in the Coma Cluster. I. Detection, Measurement and Classification Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff Secker; William E. Harris

    1997-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Deep B- and R-band CCD images of the central ~700 arcmin^2 of the Coma cluster core have been used to measure the dwarf-galaxy population in Coma. In this paper, we describe a newly developed code for automated detection, photometry and classification of faint objects of arbitrary shape and size on digital images. Intensity-weighted moments are used to compute the positions, radial structures, ellipticities, and integrated magnitudes of detected objects. We demonstrate that Kron-type 2r_1 aperture aperture magnitudes and surface brightnesses are well suited to faint-galaxy photometry of the type described here. Discrimination between starlike and extended (galaxy) objects is performed interactively through parameter-space culling in several possible parameters, including the radial moments, surface brightness, and integrated color versus magnitude. Our code is tested and characterized with artificial CCD images of star and galaxy fields; it is demonstrated to be accurate, robust and versatile. Using these analysis techniques, we detect a large population of dE galaxies in the Coma cluster core. These dEs stand out as a tight sequence in the R, (B-R) color-magnitude diagram.

  19. Study of Kinematics of Extreme Waves Impacting Offshore and Coastal Structures by Non Intrusive Measurement Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Youn Kyung

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme wave flows associated with a large scale wave breaking during interactions with marine structures or complex coastal geography of is one of the major concerns in a design of coastal and ocean structures. In order to properly understand...

  20. Impingement cooling and heat transfer measurement using transient liquid crystal technique 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yizhe

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    is used in this study to obtain the detailed heat transfer coefficient. Results show that a higher Reynolds number increases heat transfer over the entire impingement target surface. The flow exit orientation with crossflow affects the heat transfer...

  1. Low differential pressure and multiphase flow measurements by means of differential pressure devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justo, Hernandez Ruiz,

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    performance in the gas mass flow rate estimation was exhibited by the slotted and standard plates for the air-water flow, while poor results were obtained for the air-oil and air-water oil flows. The performance of all the flow meter tested in the analysis...

  2. A Comprehensive Statistically-Based Method to Interpret Real-Time Flowing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinan Dawkrajai; Keita Yoshioka; Analis A. Romero; Ding Zhu; A.D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is motivated by the increasing use of distributed temperature sensors for real-time monitoring of complex wells (horizontal, multilateral and multi-branching wells) to infer the profiles of oil, gas, and water entry. Measured information can be used to interpret flow profiles along the wellbore including junction and build section. In this second project year, we have completed a forward model to predict temperature and pressure profiles in complex wells. As a comprehensive temperature model, we have developed an analytical reservoir flow model which takes into account Joule-Thomson effects in the near well vicinity and multiphase non-isothermal producing wellbore model, and couples those models accounting mass and heat transfer between them. For further inferences such as water coning or gas evaporation, we will need a numerical non-isothermal reservoir simulator, and unlike existing (thermal recovery, geothermal) simulators, it should capture subtle temperature change occurring in a normal production. We will show the results from the analytical coupled model (analytical reservoir solution coupled with numerical multi-segment well model) to infer the anomalous temperature or pressure profiles under various conditions, and the preliminary results from the numerical coupled reservoir model which solves full matrix including wellbore grids. We applied Ramey's model to the build section and used an enthalpy balance to infer the temperature profile at the junction. The multilateral wellbore temperature model was applied to a wide range of cases varying fluid thermal properties, absolute values of temperature and pressure, geothermal gradients, flow rates from each lateral, and the trajectories of each build section.

  3. Compressive Sensing Based Machine Learning Strategy For Characterizing The Flow Around A Cylinder With Limited Pressure Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bright, Ido; Lin, Guang; Kutz, Nathan

    2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Compressive sensing is used to determine the flow characteristics around a cylinder (Reynolds number and pressure/flow field) from a sparse number of pressure measurements on the cylinder. Using a supervised machine learning strategy, library elements encoding the dimensionally reduced dynamics are computed for various Reynolds numbers. Convex L1 optimization is then used with a limited number of pressure measurements on the cylinder to reconstruct, or decode, the full pressure field and the resulting flow field around the cylinder. Aside from the highly turbulent regime (large Reynolds number) where only the Reynolds number can be identified, accurate reconstruction of the pressure field and Reynolds number is achieved. The proposed data-driven strategy thus achieves encoding of the fluid dynamics using the L2 norm, and robust decoding (flow field reconstruction) using the sparsity promoting L1 norm.

  4. F/sup 2/ boundary layer measurement in a chemical laser slit nozzle flow. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, D.J.; Durran, D.A.; Bixler, H.A.; Varwig, R.L.

    1983-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive F/sup 2/ absorption diagnostic suitable for slit nozzle scanning was developed and applied to the measurement of an F/sup 2/ boundary layer in an HF chemical laser flow. The F/sup 2/ boundary layer profile was determined to be of exponential decay form with peak at the nozzle wall and of width approx. 1/3 the viscous boundary layer. The F/sup 2/ concentration profile was displaced inwardly and slightly compressed by the H2 slit injection at the nozzle exit plane, which penetration profile followed the relation delta = 0.1(sq. root of x). The F/sup 2/ profile apparently remains fairly intact in passing through the lasing zone.

  5. On the combination of delayed neutron and delayed gamma techniques for fission rate measurement in nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perret, G.; Jordan, K. A. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen, 5232 (Switzerland)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel techniques to measure newly induced fissions in spent fuel after re-irradiation at low power have been developed and tested at the Proteus zero-power research reactor. The two techniques are based on the detection of high energy gamma-rays emitted by short-lived fission products and delayed neutrons. The two techniques relate the measured signals to the total fission rate, the isotopic composition of the fuel, and nuclear data. They can be combined to derive better estimates on each of these parameters. This has potential for improvement in many areas. Spent fuel characterisation and safeguard applications can benefit from these techniques for non-destructive assay of plutonium content. Another application of choice is the reduction of uncertainties on nuclear data. As a first application of the combination of the delayed neutron and gamma measurement techniques, this paper shows how to reduce the uncertainties on the relative abundances of the longest delayed neutron group for thermal fissions in {sup 235}U, {sup 239}Pu and fast fissions in {sup 238}U. The proposed experiments are easily achievable in zero-power research reactors using fresh UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel and do not require fast extraction systems. The relative uncertainties (1{sigma}) on the relative abundances are expected to be reduced from 13% to 4%, 16% to 5%, and 38% to 12% for {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U and {sup 239}Pu, respectively. (authors)

  6. New technique for measuring Newton's constant G J. H. Gundlach, E. G. Adelberger, B. R. Heckel, and H. E. Swanson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , , of a torsion pen- dulum in the field of a nearby attractor can be expressed in a multipole formalism 9,10 : l April 1996 We discuss a new technique for measuring Newton's constant G using a rotating torsion balance the torque on a torsion pendulum or relied on the constancy of the restoring torque of a torsion fiber

  7. A noncontacting technique for measuring surface tension of liquids C. Cinbis and B. T. Khuri-Yakub

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

    A noncontacting technique for measuring surface tension of liquids C. Cinbis and B. T. Khuri is the surface tension which acts to minimize the surface area of the liquid. Therefore, capillary wavesin of capillary wavesin order to mea- sure in siiu the surface tension of liquids. Current tech- niques of surface

  8. Retinal blood flow measurement with ultrahigh-speed swept-source / Fourier domain optical coherence tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Bernhard

    Doppler OCT is a functional extension of OCT that provides information on flow in biological tissues. We present a novel approach for total retinal blood flow assessment using ultrahigh speed Doppler OCT. A swept source / ...

  9. Measuring of electrical changes induced by in situ combustion through flow-through electrodes in a laboratory sample of core material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., James R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are provided for obtaining accurate dynamic measurements for passage of phase fronts through a core sample in a test fixture. Flow-through grid structures are provided for electrodes to permit data to be obtained before, during and after passage of a front therethrough. Such electrodes are incorporated in a test apparatus for obtaining electrical characteristics of the core sample. With the inventive structure a method is provided for measurement of instabilities in a phase front progressing through the medium. Availability of accurate dynamic data representing parameters descriptive of material characteristics before, during and after passage of a front provides a more efficient method for enhanced recovery of oil using a fire flood technique.

  10. Measuring of electrical changes induced by in situ combustion through flow-through electrodes in a laboratory sample of core material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, D.O.; Montoya, P.C.; Wayland, J.R. Jr.

    1986-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Method and apparatus are provided for obtaining accurate dynamic measurements for passage of phase fronts through a core sample in a test fixture. Flow-through grid structures are provided for electrodes to permit data to be obtained before, during and after passage of a front there through. Such electrodes are incorporated in a test apparatus for obtaining electrical characteristics of the core sample. With the inventive structure a method is provided for measurement of instabilities in a phase front progressing through the medium. Availability of accurate dynamic data representing parameters descriptive of material characteristics before, during and after passage of a front provides a more efficient method for enhanced recovery of oil using a fire flood technique. 12 figs.

  11. Stress-dependent surface reactions and implications for a stress measurement technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suo, Zhigang

    . If a phase transition generates a large amount of heat, such as during freezing, heat conduction flow of the matrix may limit the interface velocity. In addi- tion to the long-range transport, atoms the situations where the long-range transport and deformation are absent or rapid, so that the interface reaction

  12. Measurement of fluid-flow-velocity profile in turbid media by the use of optical Doppler tomography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Milner, T.E.; Chen, Zhongping; Nelson, J.S. [Beckman Laser Institute and Medical Clinic, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92715 (United States)]|[Department of Physics, Georgia Southern University, Statesboro, Georgia 30460 (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical Doppler tomography is demonstrated to be a simple, accurate, and noncontact method for measuring the fluid velocity of laminar flow in small-diameter ({approximately}0.5-mm) ducts. Studies are described that utilize circular (square) plastic (glass) ducts infused with a moving suspension of polymer micro-spheres in air and buried in an optically turbid medium. The measurement of Doppler-shifted frequencies of backscattered light from moving microspheres is used to construct a high-resolution spatial profile of fluid-flow velocity in the ducts. {copyright} 1997 Optical Society of America

  13. Novel Techniques for Single-Pulse Spectrum and Pulsewidth Measurements for an IR-FEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemans, W.P.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ofthe LBL/Stanford diagnostics. FEL Thespectral andtemporalMeasurements for an IR-FEL W.P. Leemans, J.A. Edighoffer, K-Measurements for an IR-FEL* W. P. Leemans, J. A. Edighoffer,

  14. FIELD MEASUREMENT OF HIGH TEMPERATURE BULK REACTION RATES I: THEORY AND TECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baxter, Ethan F.

    and mineral chemistry. The local equilibrium assumption, used in geochronology, geothermobarometry describe in detail the theory and methodology of a technique for extracting bulk reaction rates directly for the exchange process. Forward modeling of the reactive transport process using numerical methods

  15. {beta}{sub eff} measurements in reflected reactors using a Rossi-{alpha} technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doulin, V.A. [Inst. of Physics and Power Engineering, Obninsk (Russian Federation); Spriggs, G.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1998-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report the authors calculate the effective delayed neutron fraction equation for reflected reactors using the Rossi-{alpha} technique. They determine that the equation for the delayed neutron fraction is just as valid for reflected systems as it is for unreflected systems.

  16. Input Power Measurement Techniques for Single-Phase Digitally Controlled PFC Rectifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    resulting in accurate input power measurements are outlined. 1. INTRODUCTION Time-of-use marketing are required for both "time-of-use" billing and system power management purposes. When a digitally controlled. Experimental results comparing and contrasting the perfor- mance of the power measurement architectures

  17. The application of a scintillation flask technique for the measurement of radon emanation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles, Martha

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    after the specifications recommended by the Health and Safety Laboratory (HASL), which initially bor- rowed the design from the Ar entinian Comision Nacional de ~E' . EA A t' ' Co ' ' t d ty plastic block and fitted the cell with a single stop... are fitted on the flask to allow flow- through sample collection when desired. Sensitivities of the small and large radon flasks are reported to be 0. 7 cpm/pci/1 to 2 cpm/pci/1 after the daughters have grown to equilibrium 11 with radon (Ge76). The HASL...

  18. Measurement of fracture aperture fields using transmitted light: An evaluation of measurement errors and their influence on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Detwiler, Russell

    Scott E. Pringle and Robert J. Glass Flow Visualization and Processes Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico Abstract. Understanding of single-phase and multiphase flow and transport light transmission techniques yield quantitative measurements of aperture, solute concentration

  19. Residual stress measurement on ductile cast iron using critically refracted longitudinal (Lcr) wave technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chundu, Srinivasulu Naidu

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Temperature is an important factor that has significant effect on the velocity of L wave in ductile cast iron. Fully annealed and as-cast test bars were investigated to study the effect of temperature in the absence and presence of residual stresses.... Effect of Anisotropy in the Present Investigation l. Introduction . . 2. Examining the Test Bars for Anisotropy VIII. DETECTION OF STRESSES IN SHOT PEENED AND SHOT BLASTED DUCTILE IRON SAMPLES APPLYING LcR WAVE TECHNIQUE. . . . . . . . . . . . . A...

  20. Laboratory evaluation of the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Amy Lynn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis evaluates the constant rate of strain and constant head techniques for measurement of the hydraulic conductivity of fine grained soils. A laboratory program compares hydraulic conductivity measurements made ...

  1. Development of a lidar polarimeter technique of measuring suspended solids in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presley, David W

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of depolarization would indicate the relative concentration of scattering particles. The laboratory measurements supported the hypothesis and established the potential of measuri ng suspended solids, turbi dity and transmi ssi vi ty using a lidar polarimeter...

  2. Experimental Observation and Measurements of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer using PIV, Shadowgraphy, RICM Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di, Yuan 1988-

    2012-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This present study seeks to contribute detailed visualization data on a pool boiling experiments using HFE-7000. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the time resolved whole field liquid velocity. Bubble dynamic parameters...

  3. Ultra-fast Imaging of Two-Phase Flow in Structured Monolith Reactors; Techniques and Data Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heras, Jonathan Jaime

    This thesis will address the use of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques to probe the “monolith reactor”, which consists of a structured catalyst over which reactions may occur. This reactor has emerged...

  4. JOURNAL OF ELECTRON MICROSCOPY TECHNIQUE 16:160-166 11990) A Stopped-Flow/Rapid-Freezing Machine With Millisecond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in chemical kinetics (Johnson, 1986)with a propane jet freezing unit previously used to prepare static samples a Berger-type mixer and into a thin-walled copper flow cell (Fig. 1). After a predetermined delay, Rockford, IL) con- nected to a 1.5-mm Mark I Berger-type mixer (Re- search Instruments and Manufacturi

  5. Development of reactivity feedback effect measurement techniques under sub-critical condition in fast reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kitano, A.; Nishi, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1 1, Shiraki, Tsuruga-shi, Fukui-ken, 919-1279 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 2-4, Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken, 319-1195 (Japan); Okajima, S.; Kanemoto, S. [Univ. of Aizu, Tsuruga, Ikki-machi, Aizu-Wakamatsu-shi, Fukushima-ken, 965-8580 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first-of-a-kind reactor has been licensed by a safety examination of the plant design based on the measured data in precedent mock-up experiments. The validity of the safety design can be confirmed without a mock-up experiment, if the reactor feed-back characteristics can be measured before operation, with the constructed reactor itself. The 'Synthesis Method', a systematic and sophisticated method of sub-criticality measurement, is proposed in this work to ensure the safety margin before operation. The 'Synthesis Method' is based on the modified source multiplication method (MSM) combined with the noise analysis method to measure the reference sub-criticality level for MSM. A numerical simulation for the control-rod reactivity worth and the isothermal feed-back reactivity was conducted for typical fast reactors of 100 MWe-size, 300 MWe-size, 750 MWe-size, and 1500 MWe-size to investigate the applicability of Synthesis Method. The number of neutron detectors and their positions necessary for the measurement were investigated for both methods of MSM and the noise analysis by a series of parametric survey calculations. As a result, it was suggested that a neutron detector located above the core center and three or more neutron detectors located above the radial blanket region enable the measurement of sub-criticality within 10% uncertainty from -$0.5 to -$2 and within 15% uncertainty for the deeper sub-criticality. (authors)

  6. Fluorocarbon-23 measure of cat cerebral blood flow by nuclear magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, J.R.; Branch, C.A.; Fagan, S.C.; Helpern, J.A.; Simkins, R.T.; Butt, S.M.; Welch, K.M. (Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, MI (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We employed fluorocarbon-23 (trifluoromethane) as a nuclear magnetic resonance gaseous indicator of cerebral blood flow in seven cats. Pulsed inhalation of this indicator and switching between two coils allowed the acquisition of both an arterial input and a cerebral response function, making possible multicompartmental curve fits to cerebral uptake and clearance data. The brain:blood partition coefficient for trifluoromethane was 0.9 for both gray and white matter. Fast-compartment blood flows were normal and showed appropriate CO{sub 2} reactivity. Slow-compartment blood flows did not demonstrate CO{sub 2} reactivity, probably because cranial as well as white-matter blood flows were lumped together in the slow compartment. Although cerebral blood flow was stable during administration of 60% trifluoromethane, the compound did prove to be a mild cardiac sensitizer to epinephrine in five cats.

  7. Cross-check of different techniques for two-dimensional powerspectral density measurements of X-ray optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Irick, Steve C.; Gullikson, Eric M.; Howells, Malcolm R.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Salmassi, Farhad; Warwick, Tony

    2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The consistency of different instruments and methods for measuring two-dimensional (2D) power spectral density (PSD) distributions are investigated. The instruments are an interferometric microscope, an atomic force microscope (AFM) and the X-ray Reflectivity and Scattering experimental facility, all available at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The measurements were performed with a gold-coated mirror with a highly polished stainless steel substrate. It was shown that these three techniques provide essentially consistent results. For the stainless steel mirror, an envelope over all measured PSD distributions can be described with an inverse power-law PSD function. It is also shown that the measurements can be corrected for the specific spatial frequency dependent systematic errors of the instruments. The AFM and the X-ray scattering measurements were used to determine the modulation transfer function of the interferometric microscope. The corresponding correction procedure is discussed in detail. Lower frequency investigation of the 2D PSD distribution was also performed with a long trace profiler and a ZYGO GPI interferometer. These measurements are in some contradiction, suggesting that the reliability of the measurements has to be confirmed with additional investigation. Based on the crosscheck of the performance of all used methods, we discuss the ways for improving the 2D PSD characterization of X-ray optics.

  8. Measurement of isotope separation factors in the palladium-hydrogen system using a thermistor technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortiz, T.M.

    1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The range of available data on separation factors in the palladium-hydrogen/deuterium system has been extended. A matched pair of glass-coated bead thermistors was used to measure gas phase compositions. The compositions of the input gas--assumed also to be the solid phase composition--were measured independently be mass spectrometry as being within 0.5 mole% of the values used to calibrate the thermistors. This assumption is based on the fact that > 99% of the input gas is absorbed into the solid. Separation factors were measured for 175 K {le} T {le} 389 K and for 0.195 {le} x{sub H} {le} 0.785.

  9. QUALIFICATION OF A TRULY DISTRIBUTED FIBER OPTIC TECHNIQUE FOR STRAIN AND TEMPERATURE MEASUREMENTS IN CONCRETE STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) and insensitive to electromagnetic fields. Thanks to the low attenuation of the transmitted light signal monitoring is a key factor in life cycle management of infrastructures. Truly distributed fiber optic sensors experiments seem very promising since measurements performed with distributed sensing systems are found

  10. Development Of An Experiment For Measuring Flow Phenomena Occurring In A Lower Plenum For VHTR CFD Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. McEligot; K.G. Condie; G. E. Mc Creery; H. M. Mc Ilroy

    2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the present report is to document the design of our first experiment to measure generic flow phenomena expected to occur in the lower plenum of a typical prismatic VHTR (Very High Temperature Reactor) concept. In the process, fabrication sketches are provided for the use of CFD (computational fluid dynamics) analysts wishing to employ the data for assessment of their proposed codes. The general approach of the project is to develop new benchmark experiments for assessment in parallel with CFD and coupled CFD/systems code calculations for the same geometry. One aspect of the complex flow in a prismatic VHTR is being addressed: flow and thermal mixing in the lower plenum ("hot streaking" issue). Current prismatic VHTR concepts were examined to identify their proposed flow conditions and geometries over the range from normal operation to decay heat removal in a pressurized cooldown. Approximate analyses were applied to determine key non-dimensional parameters and their magnitudes over this operating range. The flow in the lower plenum can locally be considered to be a situation of multiple jets into a confined crossflow -- with obstructions. Flow is expected to be turbulent with momentum-dominated turbulent jets entering; buoyancy influences are estimated to be negligible in normal full power operation. Experiments are needed for the combined features of the lower plenum flows. Missing from the typical jet experiments available are interactions with nearby circular posts and with vertical posts in the vicinity of vertical walls - with near stagnant surroundings at one extreme and significant crossflow at the other.

  11. Measurement of flow in a microfluidic channel in response to application of voltage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soukup, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores two methods of calculating the flow of Electrorheological fluid in a microfluidic channel in response to a gradient in an electric field: MATLAB simulation and microscopy experiments. Electrorheological ...

  12. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); Biblarz, Oscar (Swampscott, MA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process.

  13. An Energy Signature Scheme for Steam Trap Assessment and Flow Rate Estimation Using Pipe-Induced Acoustic Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Allgood, Glenn O [ORNL; Kuruganti, Phani Teja [ORNL; Lake, Joe E [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Congress has passed legislation dictating that all government agencies establish a plan and process for improving energy efficiencies at their sites. In response to this legislation, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has recently conducted a pilot study to explore the deployment of a wireless sensor system for a real-time measurement-based energy efficiency optimization framework within the steam distribution system within the ORNL campus. We make assessments on the real-time status of the distribution system by observing the state measurements of acoustic sensors mounted on the steam pipes/traps/valves. In this paper, we describe a spectral-based energy signature scheme that interprets acoustic vibration sensor data to estimate steam flow rates and assess steam traps health status. Experimental results show that the energy signature scheme has the potential to identify different steam trap health status and it has sufficient sensitivity to estimate steam flow rate. Moreover, results indicate a nearly quadratic relationship over the test region between the overall energy signature factor and flow rate in the pipe. The analysis based on estimated steam flow and steam trap status helps generate alerts that enable operators and maintenance personnel to take remedial action. The goal is to achieve significant energy-saving in steam lines by monitoring and acting on leaking steam pipes/traps/valves.

  14. Past changes in the vertical distribution of ozone – Part 1: Measurement techniques, uncertainties and availability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hassler, B.; Petropavlovskikh, I.; Staehelin, J.; August, T.; Bhartia, P. K.; Clerbaux, C.; Degenstein, D.; Maziere, M. De; Dinelli, B. M.; Dudhia, A.; Dufour, G.; Frith, S. M.; Froidevaux, L.; Godin-Beekmann, S.; Granville, J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Hoppel, K.; Hubert, D.; Kasai, Y.; Kurylo, M. J.; Kyrola, E.; Lambert, J.-C.; Levelt, P. F.; McElroy, C. T.; McPeters, R. D.; Munro, R.; Nakajima, H.; Parrish, A.; Raspollini, P.; Remsberg, E. E.; Rosenlof, K. H.; Rozanov, A.; Sano, T.; Sasano, Y.; Shiotani, M.; Smit, H. G. J.; Stiller, G.; Tamminen, J.; Tarasick, D. W.; Urban, J.; van der A, R. J.; Veefkind, J. P.; Vigouroux, C.; von Clarmann, T.; von Savigny, C.; Walker, K. A.; Weber, M.; Wild, J.; Zawodny, J. M.

    2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    , Germany 28Research Institute for Sustainable Humanosphere, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan 29Association of International Research Initiatives for Environmental Studies, Tokyo, Japan 30Research Centre Jülich, Institute for Energy and Climate Research... Sciences, Göteborg, Sweden Published by Copernicus Publications on behalf of the European Geosciences Union. 1396 B. Hassler et al.: Ozone profile measurements 34Institut für Physik, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany 35...

  15. Development and application of the scintillation flask technique for the measurement of indoor radon-222 concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasquez, Gerard Michael

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    half-life. Exposure to alpha emitting radon progeny is the major source of natural radiation doses to the lung (NCRP84b). Almost all of this is received indoors, where radon levels are elevated due to a trapping effect 1n the enclosed areas. Since... measure indoor radon and radon progeny levels, a suitable detection method must be developed. Charles (Ch84) designed and constructed an air grab sampling system using "scintillation flasks". There were, however, some minor problems with the system...

  16. Method for single-cell mass and electrophoretic mobility measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dextras, Philip

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of single cells using flow cytometry techniques has created a wealth of knowledge about cellular phenomena that could not be obtained by population average measurements. As these techniques are integrated with ...

  17. Simultaneous measurements of soot volume fraction and particle size/microstructure in flames using a thermophoretic sampling technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koeylue, U.O.; McEnally, C.S.; Rosner, D.E.; Pfefferle, L.D. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new particle volume fraction measurement technique was developed using electron microscope analysis of thermophoretically sampled particles/aggregates based on a theoretical treatment of particle deposition to a cold surface immersed in a flame. This experimental method, referred to as the thermophoretic sampling particle diagnostic (TSPD), can yield all particle parameters of principal interest (particle volume fraction, particle and aggregate sizes, and fractal properties) without requiring knowledge of particle bulk density and refractive index. To assess its reliability, the TSPD technique was implemented at various heights on the centerline of a soot-containing coflowing ethylene/air nonpremixed laminar flame. Inferred soot volume fractions agreed with previous laser extinction and thermocouple particle densitometry measurements within experimental uncertainties at sampling positions where only aggregates of mature particles were present. However, TSPD-soot volume fractions were about a factor of 3 higher than light extinction results in the lower part of the flame. This significant difference was evidently a result of the presence of translucent precursor soot particles, which do not absorb as much visible light as mature particles, but can be quantified with the electron microscope. Clearly, this ability of TSPD to separately measure the concentration and morphology of each type of soot is a significant advantage over other available diagnostics, making it extremely valuable for studying particle formation in flames.

  18. Elucidating the event-by-event flow fluctuations in heavy-ion collisions via the event shape selection technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peng Huo; Jiangyong Jia; Soumya Mohapatra

    2014-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The presence of large event-by-event flow fluctuations in heavy ion collisions at RHIC and the LHC provides an opportunity to study a broad class of flow observables. This paper explores the correlations among harmonic flow coefficients $v_n$ and their phases $\\Phi_n$, and the rapidity fluctuation of $v_n$. The study is carried out usin Pb+Pb events generated by the AMPT model with fixed impact parameter. The overall ellipticity/triangularity of events is varied by selecting on the eccentricities $\\epsilon_n$ or the magnitudes of the flow vector $q_n$ for n=2 and 3, respectively. The responses of the $v_n$, the event-plane correlations, and the rapidity fluctuations, to the change in $\\epsilon_n$ and $q_n$ are then systematized. Strong positive correlations are observed among all even harmonics $v_2, v_4$, and $v_6$ (all increase with $q_2$), between $v_2$ and $v_5$ (both increase with $q_2$) and between $v_3$ and $v_5$ (both increase with $q_3$), consistent with the effects of nonlinear collective response. In contrast, an anti-correlation is observed between $v_2$ and $v_3$ similar to that seen between $\\epsilon_2$ and $\\epsilon_3$. These correlation patterns are found to be independent of whether selecting on $q_n$ or $\\epsilon_n$, validating the ability of $q_n$ in selecting the initial geometry. A forward/backward asymmetry of $v_n(\\eta)$ is observed for events selected on $q_n$ but not on $\\epsilon_n$, reflecting dynamical fluctuations exposed by the $q_n$ selection. Many event-plane correlators show good agreement between $q_n$ and $\\epsilon_n$ selections, suggesting that their variations with $q_n$ are controlled by the change of $\\epsilon_n$ in the initial geometry. Hence these correlators may serve as promising observables for disentangling the fluctuations generated in various stages of the evolution of the matter created in heavy ion collisions.

  19. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  20. Resistivity measurements of iodine single crystals by an A.C. technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Intararithi, Thanom

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . measure- ment and could be responsible for the disagreement. Another object is to de- termine any frequency dependence of the resistivity of iodine single crystals which might give information concerning the reasons for the increase in acti- vation... the assembly used in the resublimation. TO DIFFUSION FUMP S, ;U I. IQUID NITRO&EN C 33 A O'LASS WOOJ- F EACrE NT-&'RADE IODINE The reagent-grade iodine is initially in tube A. A trap T filled with liquid nitrogen prevents the contamination of the pump...

  1. A user's guide to SWIFT: A Monte Carlo technique for inference of differential energy spectra from multisphere spectrometer measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanna, R.S.; O'Brien, K.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SWIFT is a FORTRAN-77 program written for the VAX-11/750 computer. Its purpose is to unfold neutron spectra from multisphere spectrometer measurements using the Monte Carlo technique. This guide describes the code in sufficient detail to enable a user, with a background in FORTRAN programming, to alter the code for use with other spectrometers and/or to install it on computers other than the VAX-11/750. The code and the required input and resulting output are described. As an aid to its implementation, input and output for a sample problem are also presented. 19 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  2. Reference-less measurement of the transmission matrix of a highly scattering material using a DMD and phase retrieval techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dremeau, Angelique; Martina, David; Katz, Ori; Schulke, Christophe; Krzakala, Florent; Gigan, Sylvain; Daudet, Laurent

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates experimental means of measuring the transmission matrix (TM) of a highly scattering medium, with the simplest optical setup. Spatial light modulation is performed by a digital micromirror device (DMD), allowing high rates and high pixel counts but only binary amplitude modulation. We used intensity measurement only, thus avoiding the need for a reference beam. Therefore, the phase of the TM has to be estimated through signal processing techniques of phase retrieval. Here, we compare four different phase retrieval principles on noisy experimental data. We validate our estimations of the TM on three criteria : quality of prediction, distribution of singular values, and quality of focusing. Results indicate that Bayesian phase retrieval algorithms with variational approaches provide a good tradeoff between the computational complexity and the precision of the estimates.

  3. Techniques and tools for measuring energy efficiency of scientific software applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdurachmanov, David; Eulisse, Giulio; Knight, Robert; Niemi, Tapio; Nurminen, Jukka K; Nyback, Filip; Pestana, Goncalo; Ou, Zhonghong; Khan, Kashif

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scale of scientific High Performance Computing (HPC) and High Throughput Computing (HTC) has increased significantly in recent years, and is becoming sensitive to total energy use and cost. Energy-efficiency has thus become an important concern in scientific fields such as High Energy Physics (HEP). There has been a growing interest in utilizing alternate architectures, such as low power ARM processors, to replace traditional Intel x86 architectures. Nevertheless, even though such solutions have been successfully used in mobile applications with low I/O and memory demands, it is unclear if they are suitable and more energy-efficient in the scientific computing environment. Furthermore, there is a lack of tools and experience to derive and compare power consumption between the architectures for various workloads, and eventually to support software optimizations for energy efficiency. To that end, we have performed several physical and software-based measurements of workloads from HEP applications running o...

  4. Benchmark validation comparisons of measured and calculated delayed neutron detector responses for a pulsed photonuclear assessment technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. W. Sterbentz; J. L. Jones; W. Y. Yoon; D. R. Norman; K. J. Haskell

    2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An MCNPX-based calculational methodology has been developed to numerically simulate the complex electron–photon–neutron transport problem for the active interrogation system known as the pulsed photonuclear assessment (PPA) technique. The PPA technique uses a pulsed electron accelerator to generate bremsstrahlung photons in order to fission nuclear materials. Delayed neutron radiation is then detected with helium-3 neutron detectors as evidence of the nuclear material presence. Two experimental tests were designed, setup and run to generate experimental data for benchmarking purposes. The first test irradiated depleted uranium in air, and the second test, depleted uranium in a simulated cargo container (plywood pallet), using 10 MeV electron pulses. Time-integrated, post-flash, delayed neutron counts were measured and compared to calculated count predictions in order to benchmark the calculational methodology and computer models. Comparisons between the experimental measurements and numerical predictions of the delayed neutron detector responses resulted in reasonable experiment/calculated ratios of 1.42 and 1.06 for the two tests. High-enriched uranium (HEU) predictions were also made with the benchmarked models.

  5. Optical fiber sensor technique for strain measurement during materials deposition, chemical reaction, and relaxation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Ginley, D.S.

    1988-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser light from a common source is split and conveyed through two similar optical fibers and emitted at their respective ends to form an interference pattern, one of the optical fibers having a portion thereof subjected to a strain. Changes in the strain cause changes in the optical path length of the strain fiber, and generate corresponding changes in the interference pattern. The interference pattern is received and transduced into signals representative of fringe shifts corresponding to changes in the strain experienced by the strained one of the optical fibers. These signals are then processed to evaluate strain as a function of time, typical examples of the application of the apparatus including electrodeposition of a metallic film on a conductive surface provided on the outside of the optical fiber being strained, so that strains generated in the optical fiber during the course of the electrodeposition are measurable as a function of time. In one aspect of the invention, signals relating to the fringe shift are stored for subsequent processing and analysis, whereas in another aspect of the invention the signals are processed for real-time display of the strain changes under study. 9 figs.

  6. SEM technique for imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jesse, Stephen (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Geohegan, David B. (Knoxville, TN) [Knoxville, TN; Guillorn, Michael (Brooktondale, NY) [Brooktondale, NY

    2009-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods and apparatus are described for SEM imaging and measuring electronic transport in nanocomposites based on electric field induced contrast. A method includes mounting a sample onto a sample holder, the sample including a sample material; wire bonding leads from the sample holder onto the sample; placing the sample holder in a vacuum chamber of a scanning electron microscope; connecting leads from the sample holder to a power source located outside the vacuum chamber; controlling secondary electron emission from the sample by applying a predetermined voltage to the sample through the leads; and generating an image of the secondary electron emission from the sample. An apparatus includes a sample holder for a scanning electron microscope having an electrical interconnect and leads on top of the sample holder electrically connected to the electrical interconnect; a power source and a controller connected to the electrical interconnect for applying voltage to the sample holder to control the secondary electron emission from a sample mounted on the sample holder; and a computer coupled to a secondary electron detector to generate images of the secondary electron emission from the sample.

  7. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Measurements and Modeling of the Flow Field in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzman, Jerry M.

    in an Ultra-Low Emissions Combustor Gopalakrishnan, P.* , Undapalli, S.* , Bobba, M.* , Sankaran, V.§ , Menon Atlanta, GA 30332 The flowfield of a novel combustor design that can operate stably even at high flowrates and very lean conditions is studied. This Stagnation Point Reverse Flow (SPRF) combustor consists

  8. Interpretation of Array Production Logging Measurements in Horizontal Wells for Flow Profile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Lulu

    2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and arrangement of the sensors with each layer containing at least one sensor. Holdup and velocity outputs from sensors in each wellbore area segment are combined to calculate the volumetric flow rates of each phase in each segment. These results yield a profile...

  9. AIAA 2002-3196 SURFACE FLOW MEASUREMENTS OF MICRO-SUPERSONIC IMPINGING JETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are of interest because of their potential applications, such as in electronics cooling and surface cleaning and 8 and impinging plate distances of 2 to 8 diameters. A specialized micro-Schlieren system is used not be amenable to other methods. Future improvements in the application of oil-film interferometry to this flow

  10. Measurement of microbial nitrogen flow in the duodenum in sheep WZ Yang, C Poncet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    composition and distribution of LAB and adherent biomasses expressed as &dquo;solid adherent bacteria- scribed by Yang et al (1989). Cr-EDTA and 15N, continuously infused for 5 d and 3 d respectively before sampling, were used as flow and micro- bial markers. LAB biomasse in the rumen efflu- ent was estimated as

  11. Experimental Measurement of Multiphase Flow and CFD Erosion Modeling in Electrical Submersible Pumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pirouzpanah, Sahand

    2015-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

    on the performance of a 3-stage MVP along with detail study on the performance of two stages of the pump are performed. Overall pump performance for different operating conditions such as different inlet pressure, inlet gas volume fraction, water flow rate...

  12. Method and apparatus to measure vapor pressure in a flow system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grossman, M.W.; Biblarz, O.

    1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a method for determining, by a condensation method, the vapor pressure of a material with a known vapor pressure versus temperature characteristic, in a flow system particularly in a mercury isotope enrichment process. 2 figures.

  13. Calibration of Predicted Hourly Zone-Level Supply Air Flows with Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihai, A.; Zmeureanu, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Saturday instead, but only after February 28th. h) Initially, the predictions presented a one hour lag compared to the measurements; after investigations, it was discovered that the measurements do not take into consideration the daylight savings...

  14. Experimental measurements in a radio frequency discharge heated supersonic flow: Evaluation of a potential electric propulsion thruster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wantuck, P.J.; Hull, D.E.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An operational radio frequency discharge-driven supersonic flow system, which utilizes an inductively and capacitively coupled plasma (ICCP) tube to produce high enthalpy source gas, is described. The ICCP coupled to a properly designed nozzle represents a potential electric propulsion device. The high gas temperatures achieved in the plasma discharge (> 5000 K) and the electrodeless nature of the tube's operation offers potentially high thruster performance coupled and long operational lifetime. A preliminary characterization of the current system was established using emission and probe-based measurements. A nominal peak specific impulse of 155 s was estimated for operation with argon. The calculated thrust based upon the peak velocity and mass flow through the device is 1.1 N. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  15. An optimal guarding scheme for thermal conductivity measurement using a guarded cut-bar technique, part 1 experimental study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Changhu Xing [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Colby Jensen [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Charles Folsom [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Heng Ban [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Douglas W. Marshall [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the guarded cut-bar technique, a guard surrounding the measured sample and reference (meter) bars is temperature controlled to carefully regulate heat losses from the sample and reference bars. Guarding is typically carried out by matching the temperature profiles between the guard and the test stack of sample and meter bars. Problems arise in matching the profiles, especially when the thermal conductivitiesof the meter bars and of the sample differ, as is usually the case. In a previous numerical study, the applied guarding condition (guard temperature profile) was found to be an important factor in measurement accuracy. Different from the linear-matched or isothermal schemes recommended in literature, the optimal guarding condition is dependent on the system geometry and thermal conductivity ratio of sample to meter bar. To validate the numerical results, an experimental study was performed to investigate the resulting error under different guarding conditions using stainless steel 304 as both the sample and meter bars. The optimal guarding condition was further verified on a certified reference material, pyroceram 9606, and 99.95% pure iron whose thermal conductivities are much smaller and much larger, respectively, than that of the stainless steel meter bars. Additionally, measurements are performed using three different inert gases to show the effect of the insulation effective thermal conductivity on measurement error, revealing low conductivity, argon gas, gives the lowest error sensitivity when deviating from the optimal condition. The result of this study provides a general guideline for the specific measurement method and for methods requiring optimal guarding or insulation.

  16. Unsteady momentum fluxes in two-phase flow and the vibration of nuclear reactor components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yih, Tien Sieh

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steady and unsteady components of the momentum flux in a twophase flow have been measured at the exit of a vertical pipe. Measured momentum flux data has been machine processed by standard random vibration techniques ...

  17. Phase-space representation of digital holographic and light field imaging with application to two-phase flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Lei, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, two computational imaging techniques used for underwater research, in particular, two-phase flows measurements, are presented. The techniques under study, digital holographic imaging and light field imaging, ...

  18. Interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howarth, S.M.; Peterson, E.W.; Lagus, P.L.; Lie, K.; Finley, S.J.; Nowak, E.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes preliminary interpretation of in-situ pressure and flow measurements of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The WIPP facility is located 660 m underground in the Salado, a bedded salt deposit. Shut-in pressure tests were conducted prior to, and subsequent to, the mining of a circular drift in order to evaluate excavation effects on pore pressure, permeability, and host rock heterogeneity. Borehole deformation was measured during these tests and used to correct for changes in the test region volume due to salt creep effects. Preliminary pre-excavation results indicate that the flow properties of this layered host rock are heterogeneous. Resulting pore pressures range from 1 to 14 MPa and permeabilities range from below measurable to about 1 nanodarcy. Normalized borehole diameter change rates were between {minus}4 and 63 microstrains/day. Shut-in pressures and borehole diameters in all test boreholes were affected by the excavation of Room Q coincident with the advances of the boring machine. Preliminary results from post-excavation test results show decreased pore pressures compared to pre-excavation values.

  19. Apparatus for measuring the local void fraction in a flowing liquid containing a gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, Patrick F. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The local void fraction in liquid containing a gas is measured by placing an impedance-variation probe in the liquid, applying a controlled voltage or current to the probe, and measuring the probe current or voltage. A circuit for applying the one electrical parameter and measuring the other includes a feedback amplifier that minimizes the effect of probe capacitance and a digitizer to provide a clean signal. Time integration of the signal provides a measure of the void fraction, and an oscilloscope display also shows bubble size and distribution.

  20. Assessment of microwave power flow for reflectometry measurements in tokamak plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gourdain, P-A; Peebles, W. A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    measurements in tokamak plasmas P. -A. Gourdain a , W. A.are widely employed in tokamak fusion plasmas, and are alsoresearch devices, such as tokamaks, microwave reflectometry

  1. Demonstration of a novel technique to measure two-photon exchange effects in elastic e±p scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moteabbed, Maryam [Florida Institute of Technology; Niroula, Megh [Old Dominion University; Raue, Brian [Florida International University; Weinstein, Lawrence [Old Dominion University

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrepancy between proton electromagnetic form factors extracted using unpolarized and polarized scattering data is believed to be a consequence of two-photon exchange (TPE) effects. However, the calculations of TPE corrections have significant model dependence, and there is limited direct experimental evidence for such corrections. The TPE contributions depend on the sign of the lepton charge in e±p scattering, but the luminosities of secondary positron beams limited past measurement at large scattering angles, where the TPE effects are believe to be most significant. We present the results of a new experimental technique for making direct e±p comparisons, which has the potential to make precise measurements over a broad range in Q2 and scattering angles. We use the Jefferson Laboratory electron beam and the Hall B photon tagger to generate a clean but untagged photon beam. The photon beam impinges on a converter foil to generate a mixed beam of electrons, positrons, and photons. A chicane is used to separate and recombine the electron and positron beams while the photon beam is stopped by a photon blocker. This provides a combined electron and positron beam, with energies from 0.5 to 3.2 GeV, which impinges on a liquid hydrogen target. The large acceptance CLAS detector is used to identify and reconstruct elastic scattering events, determining both the initial lepton energy and the sign of the scattered lepton. The data were collected in two days with a primary electron beam energy of only 3.3 GeV, limiting the data from this run to smaller values of Q2 and scattering angle. Nonetheless, this measurement yields a data sample for e±p with statistics comparable to those of the best previous measurements. We have shown that we can cleanly identify elastic scattering events and correct for the difference in acceptance for electron and positron scattering. Because we ran with only one polarity for the chicane, we are unable to study the difference between the incoming electron and positron beams. This systematic effect leads to the largest uncertainty in the final ratio of positron to electron scattering: R=1.027±0.005±0.05 for 2 >=0.206 GeV2 and 0.830 ? ? ? 0.943. We have demonstrated that the tertiary e± beam generated using this technique provides the opportunity for dramatically improved comparisons of e±p scattering, covering a significant range in both Q2 and scattering angle. Combining data with different chicane polarities will allow for detailed studies of the difference between the incoming e+ and e- beams.

  2. Demonstration of a novel technique to measure two-photon exchange effects in elastic e±p scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Niroula, Megh; Raue, Brian; Weinstein, Lawrence

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrepancy between proton electromagnetic form factors extracted using unpolarized and polarized scattering data is believed to be a consequence of two-photon exchange (TPE) effects. However, the calculations of TPE corrections have significant model dependence, and there is limited direct experimental evidence for such corrections. The TPE contributions depend on the sign of the lepton charge in e±p scattering, but the luminosities of secondary positron beams limited past measurement at large scattering angles, where the TPE effects are believe to be most significant. We present the results of a new experimental technique for making direct e±p comparisons, which has themore »potential to make precise measurements over a broad range in Q2 and scattering angles. We use the Jefferson Laboratory electron beam and the Hall B photon tagger to generate a clean but untagged photon beam. The photon beam impinges on a converter foil to generate a mixed beam of electrons, positrons, and photons. A chicane is used to separate and recombine the electron and positron beams while the photon beam is stopped by a photon blocker. This provides a combined electron and positron beam, with energies from 0.5 to 3.2 GeV, which impinges on a liquid hydrogen target. The large acceptance CLAS detector is used to identify and reconstruct elastic scattering events, determining both the initial lepton energy and the sign of the scattered lepton. The data were collected in two days with a primary electron beam energy of only 3.3 GeV, limiting the data from this run to smaller values of Q2 and scattering angle. Nonetheless, this measurement yields a data sample for e±p with statistics comparable to those of the best previous measurements. We have shown that we can cleanly identify elastic scattering events and correct for the difference in acceptance for electron and positron scattering. Because we ran with only one polarity for the chicane, we are unable to study the difference between the incoming electron and positron beams. This systematic effect leads to the largest uncertainty in the final ratio of positron to electron scattering: R=1.027±0.005±0.05 for 2 >=0.206 GeV2 and 0.830 ? ? ? 0.943. We have demonstrated that the tertiary e± beam generated using this technique provides the opportunity for dramatically improved comparisons of e±p scattering, covering a significant range in both Q2 and scattering angle. Combining data with different chicane polarities will allow for detailed studies of the difference between the incoming e+ and e- beams.« less

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF PIV TECHNIQUE UNDER MAGNETIC FIELDS AND MEASUREMENT OF TURBULENT PIPE FLOW OF FLIBE SIMULANT FLUID

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    sufficiently large heat transfer using high Prandtl number fluid coolant, high turbulence is required, and the heat transfer characteristics of low Prandtl number fluids are con heat transfer (low film temperature drop) to cool first wall structures. In order to obtain

  4. Can Emergency Physicians Perform Common Carotid Doppler Flow Measurements to Assess Volume Responsiveness?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolz, Lori A.; Mosier, Jarrod M.; Gross, Austin M.; Douglas, Matthew J.; Blavais, Michael; Adhikari, Srikar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    within 0.5cm of the carotid bulb and measured intima to0.5cm of the common carotid bulb in the long axis with a 12-within 0.5 cm of the carotid bulb and measured intima to

  5. EIS-0163: 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers – Walla Walla District prepared this statement to analyze four general alternatives to modify the flow of water in the lower Columbia-Snake River in order to help anadromous fish migrate past eight multipurpose Federal dams. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Bonneville Power Administration served as a cooperating agency due to its key role in direct operation of the integrated and coordinated Columbia-Snake River System, and adopted this statement on February 10, 1992.

  6. Miniaturized flow injection analysis system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Folta, James A. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical analysis technique known as flow injection analysis, wherein small quantities of chemical reagents and sample are intermixed and reacted within a capillary flow system and the reaction products are detected optically, electrochemically, or by other means. A highly miniaturized version of a flow injection analysis system has been fabricated utilizing microfabrication techniques common to the microelectronics industry. The microflow system uses flow capillaries formed by etching microchannels in a silicon or glass wafer followed by bonding to another wafer, commercially available microvalves bonded directly to the microflow channels, and an optical absorption detector cell formed near the capillary outlet, with light being both delivered and collected with fiber optics. The microflow system is designed mainly for analysis of liquids and currently measures 38.times.25.times.3 mm, but can be designed for gas analysis and be substantially smaller in construction.

  7. A statistical method for estimating wood thermal diffusivity and probe geometry using in situ heat response curves from sap flow measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Xingyuan; Miller, Gretchen R.; Rubin, Yoram; Baldocchi, Dennis

    2012-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The heat pulse method is widely used to measure water flux through plants; it works by inferring the velocity of water through a porous medium from the speed at which a heat pulse is propagated through the system. No systematic, non-destructive calibration procedure exists to determine the site-specific parameters necessary for calculating sap velocity, e.g., wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing. Such parameter calibration is crucial to obtain the correct transpiration flux density from the sap flow measurements at the plant scale; and consequently, to up-scale tree-level water fluxes to canopy and landscape scales. The purpose of this study is to present a statistical framework for estimating the wood thermal diffusivity and probe spacing simutaneously from in-situ heat response curves collected by the implanted probes of a heat ratio apparatus. Conditioned on the time traces of wood temperature following a heat pulse, the parameters are inferred using a Bayesian inversion technique, based on the Markov chain Monte Carlo sampling method. The primary advantage of the proposed methodology is that it does not require known probe spacing or any further intrusive sampling of sapwood. The Bayesian framework also enables direct quantification of uncertainty in estimated sap flow velocity. Experiments using synthetic data show that repeated tests using the same apparatus are essential to obtain reliable and accurate solutions. When applied to field conditions, these tests are conducted during different seasons and automated using the existing data logging system. The seasonality of wood thermal diffusivity is obtained as a by-product of the parameter estimation process, and it is shown to be affected by both moisture content and temperature. Empirical factors are often introduced to account for the influence of non-ideal probe geometry on the estimation of heat pulse velocity, and they are estimated in this study as well. The proposed methodology can be applied for the calibration of existing heat ratio sap flow systems at other sites. It is especially useful when an alternative transpiration calibration device, such as a lysimeter, is not available.

  8. Measurements of ship-induced flow and its effect on bank erosion 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Hongbin

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Purpose B. Background C. Objective FIELD MEASUREMENT AND ANALYSIS A. Site Selection and Characteristics B. Instrumentation and Procedures C. Data Processing 6 9 10 DRAWDOWN AND RETURN VELOCITIES 12 A. Description B. Field Measurement Results... 20 40 60 Figure 5. Sketch of Site 2 Sundown Bay Site 2 l2m concrete revelment wave gauges scale in melers channelcross sect one 20 0 20 40 60 Bludwodh Island Figure 6. Channel Cross Section for Site 2 B. Instrumentation and Procedures...

  9. Demonstration of a novel technique to measure two-photon exchange effects in elastic $e^\\pm p$ scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Moteabbed; M. Niroula; B. A. Raue; L. B. Weinstein; D. Adikaram; J. Arrington; W. K. Brooks; J. Lachniet; Dipak Rimal; M. Ungaro; K. P. Adhikari; M. Aghasyan; M. J. Amaryan; S. Anefalos Pereira; H. Avakian; J. Ball; N. A. Baltzell; M. Battaglieri; V. Batourine; I. Bedlinskiy; R. P. Bennett; A. S. Biselli; J. Bono; S. Boiarinov; W. J. Briscoe; V. D. Burkert; D. S. Carman; A. Celentano; S. Chandavar; P. L. Cole; P. Collins; M. Contalbrigo; O. Cortes; V. Crede; A. D'Angelo; N. Dashyan; R. De Vita; E. De Sanctis; A. Deur; C. Djalali; D. Doughty; R. Dupre; H. Egiyan; L. El Fassi; P. Eugenio; G. Fedotov; S. Fegan; R. Fersch; J. A. Fleming; N. Gevorgyan; G. P. Gilfoyle; K. L. Giovanetti; F. X. Girod; J. T. Goetz; W. Gohn; E. Golovatch; R. W. Gothe; K. A. Griffioen; M. Guidal; N. Guler; L. Guo; K. Hafidi; H. Hakobyan; C. Hanretty; N. Harrison; D. Heddle; K. Hicks; D. Ho; M. Holtrop; C. E. Hyde; Y. Ilieva; D. G. Ireland; B. S. Ishkhanov; E. L. Isupov; H. S. Jo; K. Joo; D. Keller; M. Khandaker; A. Kim; F. J. Klein; S. Koirala; A. Kubarovsky; V. Kubarovsky; S. E. Kuhn; S. V. Kuleshov; S. Lewis; H. Y. Lu; M. MacCormick; I . J . D. MacGregor; D. Martinez; M. Mayer; B. McKinnon; T. Mineeva; M. Mirazita; V. Mokeev; R. A. Montgomery; K. Moriya; H. Moutarde; E. Munevar; C. Munoz Camacho; P. Nadel-Turonski; R. Nasseripour; S. Niccolai; G. Niculescu; I. Niculescu; M. Osipenko; A. I. Ostrovidov; L. L. Pappalardo; R. Paremuzyan; K. Park; S. Park; E. Phelps; J. J. Phillips; S. Pisano; O. Pogorelko; S. Pozdniakov; J. W. Price; S. Procureur; D. Protopopescu; A. J. R. Puckett; M. Ripani; G. Rosner; P. Rossi; F. Sabatié; M. S. Saini; C. Salgado; D. Schott; R. A. Schumacher; E. Seder; H. Seraydaryan; Y. G. Sharabian; E. S. Smith; G. D. Smith; D. I. Sober; D. Sokhan; S. Stepanyan; S. Strauch; W. Tang; C. E. Taylor; Ye Tian; S. Tkachenko; H. Voskanyan; E. Voutier; N. K. Walford; M. H. Wood; N. Zachariou; L. Zana; J. Zhang; Z. W. Zhao; I. Zonta

    2013-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrepancy between proton electromagnetic form factors extracted using unpolarized and polarized scattering data is believed to be a consequence of two-photon exchange (TPE) effects. However, the calculations of TPE corrections have significant model dependence, and there is limited direct experimental evidence for such corrections. We present the results of a new experimental technique for making direct $e^\\pm p$ comparisons, which has the potential to make precise measurements over a broad range in $Q^2$ and scattering angles. We use the Jefferson Lab electron beam and the Hall B photon tagger to generate a clean but untagged photon beam. The photon beam impinges on a converter foil to generate a mixed beam of electrons, positrons, and photons. A chicane is used to separate and recombine the electron and positron beams while the photon beam is stopped by a photon blocker. This provides a combined electron and positron beam, with energies from 0.5 to 3.2 GeV, which impinges on a liquid hydrogen target. The large acceptance CLAS detector is used to identify and reconstruct elastic scattering events, determining both the initial lepton energy and the sign of the scattered lepton. The data were collected in two days with a primary electron beam energy of only 3.3 GeV, limiting the data from this run to smaller values of $Q^2$ and scattering angle. Nonetheless, this measurement yields a data sample for $e^\\pm p$ with statistics comparable to those of the best previous measurements. We have shown that we can cleanly identify elastic scattering events and correct for the difference in acceptance for electron and positron scattering. The final ratio of positron to electron scattering: $R=1.027\\pm0.005\\pm0.05$ for $=0.206$ GeV$^2$ and $0.830\\leq \\epsilon\\leq 0.943$.

  10. Device and method for measuring multi-phase fluid flow and density of fluid in a conduit having a gradual bend

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, M.G.; Boucher, T.J.

    1998-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A system is described for measuring fluid flow in a conduit having a gradual bend or arc, and a straight section. The system includes pressure transducers, one or more disposed in the conduit on the outside of the arc, and one disposed in the conduit in a straight section thereof. The pressure transducers measure the pressure of fluid in the conduit at the locations of the pressure transducers and this information is used by a computational device to calculate fluid flow rate in the conduit. For multi-phase fluid, the density of the fluid is measured by another pair of pressure transducers, one of which is located in the conduit elevationally above the other. The computation device then uses the density measurement along with the fluid pressure measurements, to calculate fluid flow. 1 fig.

  11. Development, construction, and use of pneumometric tubes for measurement of steam flow in the steam lines of PVG-1000 at NPP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorbunov, Yu. S.; Ageev, A. G.; Vasil'eva, R. V.; Korol'kov, B. M. [FGUP 'Elektrogorsk Scientific-Research Center for NPP Safety' (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for the direct measurement of steam flow in steam lines after a steam generator, which utilizes a special design of pneumometric tubes and a computing unit that accounts for variation in steam pressure, has been developed to improve the quality of water-level regulation in the steam generators of VVER-1000 power-generating units in the stationary and transitional modes. The advantage of the pneumometric tubes consists in their structural simplicity, high erosion resistance, and absence of irrevocable losses during measurement of steam flow. A similar measurement system is used at foreign NPP. The measurement system in question has been placed in experimental service at the No. 3 unit of the Balakovo NPP, and has demonstrated its worthiness. This measurement system can also be used to determine steam flow in the steam lines of NPP units with VVER-1000 and VVER-440 reactors, and PBMK-1000 power-generating units.

  12. Technique for measuring D{sub 2} pellet mass loss through a curved guide tube using two microwave cavity detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Combs, S. K.; Caughman, J. B. O.; Wilgen, J. B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8071 (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Two microwave cavity mass detectors have been used to measure the mass loss of deuterium (D{sub 2}) pellets transported through a curved guide tube. The test tube was a mock-up of the pellet injection guide tube for the proposed ITER experiment, which will be used to transport pellets, including deuterium-tritium (D-T), from the pellet acceleration device to the inner wall (or magnetic high-field side) of the large tokamak for pellet injection and core fueling of plasmas. An accurate estimate of the mass loss is particularly important for D-T injection, because the inventory of the radioactive isotope (T) for ITER is limited and accountability and recycling will be crucial issues. In the laboratory, frozen cylindrical D{sub 2} pellets of nominal 5.3-mm diameter were shot through the stainless steel test tube ({approx_equal}10 m in length and 10-mm inside diameter), with each end equipped with a microwave cavity. As the pellet passes through each tuned microwave cavity, the peak output signal from the electronics is directly proportional to the pellet mass. An absolute calibration of the cavities, which can be problematic, is not needed for the nondestructive technique described here. Instead, a cross calibration of the two cavities with pellets of varying masses provides the relationship to determine mass loss more precisely than any other technique previously reported. In addition, the individual output signals from the cavities can be used to identify intact pellets (a single signal peak) or broken pellets (multiple signal peaks). For the pellet speed range tested in this study (100-500 m/s), the mass loss for intact pellets was directly dependent on the pellet speed, with {approx_equal}10% mass loss at 300 m/s. The microwave cavities and the associated electronics, as well as some basic theory, are described; calibration and experimental data are presented and discussed.

  13. The measurement of heat transfer rates in contaminated, high enthalpy flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muniz, Edelmiro

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    '"i, ally it, was decided that a spectral absor'pticn techinicue would. bc the simplest nd best way to cietcr- I1ine hcw LIuch a Lurilirrcm c ointa, ciri, ', ti, 0 . ' wBS produced couipled with a Bto'res-i'. CLI od g:, ", e to measure thc pressuri...

  14. Full-Scale Boiler Measurements Demonstrating Striated Flows during Biomass Co-Firing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    based measurements methods #12;Objective Minor impact of biomass cofiring with coal on boiler operation and performance at biomass shares below 20% on an energy basis. Dilution of biomass ash stream reduce potential;06-02-2008 Coal burner side: 1.5 m inside boiler thermal load 433 MW boiler thermal load 440-471 MW #12

  15. Incorporation of PCI flow measurement/control at AK Steel Corporation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dibert, W.A.; Keaton, D. [AK Steel Corp., Ashland, KY (United States)

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement and control system has been developed and implemented to improve the distribution of coal among the tuyere lines on AK Steel Corporation`s Amanda blast furnace at Ashland, Kentucky. This paper discusses the development and design of the system, and briefly reviews operating results achieved.

  16. Demonstration of a novel technique to measure two-photon exchange effects in elastic e±p scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moteabbed, Maryam [Florida Institute of Technology; Niroula, Megh [Old Dominion University; Raue, Brian [Florida International University; Weinstein, Lawrence [Old Dominion University

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The discrepancy between proton electromagnetic form factors extracted using unpolarized and polarized scattering data is believed to be a consequence of two-photon exchange (TPE) effects. However, the calculations of TPE corrections have significant model dependence, and there is limited direct experimental evidence for such corrections. The TPE contributions depend on the sign of the lepton charge in e±p scattering, but the luminosities of secondary positron beams limited past measurement at large scattering angles, where the TPE effects are believe to be most significant. We present the results of a new experimental technique for making direct e±p comparisons, which has the potential to make precise measurements over a broad range in Q2 and scattering angles. We use the Jefferson Laboratory electron beam and the Hall B photon tagger to generate a clean but untagged photon beam. The photon beam impinges on a converter foil to generate a mixed beam of electrons, positrons, and photons. A chicane is used to separate and recombine the electron and positron beams while the photon beam is stopped by a photon blocker. This provides a combined electron and positron beam, with energies from 0.5 to 3.2 GeV, which impinges on a liquid hydrogen target. The large acceptance CLAS detector is used to identify and reconstruct elastic scattering events, determining both the initial lepton energy and the sign of the scattered lepton. The data were collected in two days with a primary electron beam energy of only 3.3 GeV, limiting the data from this run to smaller values of Q2 and scattering angle. Nonetheless, this measurement yields a data sample for e±p with statistics comparable to those of the best previous measurements. We have shown that we can cleanly identify elastic scattering events and correct for the difference in acceptance for electron and positron scattering. Because we ran with only one polarity for the chicane, we are unable to study the difference between the incoming electron and positron beams. This systematic effect leads to the largest uncertainty in the final ratio of positron to electron scattering: R=1.027±0.005±0.05 for < Q2 >=0.206 GeV2 and 0.830 ? ? ? 0.943. We have demonstrated that the tertiary e± beam generated using this technique provides the opportunity for dramatically improved comparisons of e±p scattering, covering a significant range in both Q2 and scattering angle. Combining data with different chicane polarities will allow for detailed studies of the difference between the incoming e+ and e- beams.

  17. Measurement of the flow properties within a copper tube containing a deflagrating explosive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Morris, John S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jackson, Scott I [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the propagation of deflagration waves in the high explosive (HE) PBX 9501 (95 wt % HMX, 5 wt% binder). Our test configuration, which we call the def1agration cylinder test (DFCT), is fashioned after the detonation cylinder test (DTCT) that is used to calibrate the JWL detonation product equation of state (EOS). In the DFCT, the HE is heated to a uniform slightly subcritical temperature, and is ignited at one end by a hot wire. For some configurations and initial conditions, we observe a quasi-steady wave that flares the tube into a funnel shape, stretching it to the point of rupture. This behavior is qualitatively like the DTCT, such that, by invoking certain additional approximations that we discuss, its behavior can be analyzed by the same methods. We employ an analysis proposed by G.I. Taylor to infer the pressure-volume curve for the burning, expanding flow. By comparing this result to the EOS of HMX product gas alone. we infer that only {approx}20 wt% of the HMX has burned at tube rupture. This result confirms pre-existing observations about the role of convective burning in HMX cookoff explosions.

  18. 1992 Columbia River Salmon Flow Measures Options Analysis/EIS : Appendices.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Options Analysis/Environmental Impact Statement (OA/EIS) identifies, presents effects of, and evaluates the potential options for changing instream flow levels in efforts to increase salmon populations in the lower Columbia and Snake rivers. The potential actions would be implemented during 1992 to benefit juvenile and adult salmon during migration through eight run-of-river reservoirs. The Corps of Engineers (Corps) prepared this document in cooperation with the Bonneville Power Administration and the Bureau of Reclamation. The US Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) is a participating agency. The text and appendices of the document describe the characteristics of 10 Federal projects and one private water development project in the Columbia River drainage basin. Present and potential operation of these projects and their effects on the salmon that spawn and rear in the Columbia and Snake River System are presented. The life history, status, and response of Pacific salmon to current environmental conditions are described. The document concludes with an evaluation of the potential effects that could result from implementing proposed actions. The conclusions are based on evaluation of existing data, utilization of numerical models, and application of logical inference. This volume contains the appendices.

  19. FACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, Robert B.

    to the repair of hydraulic turbine runners and large pump impellers. Reclamation operates and maintains a wideFACILITIES INSTRUCTIONS, STANDARDS, & TECHNIQUES VOLUME 2-5 TURBINE REPAIR Internet Version variety of reaction and impulse turbines as well as axial flow, mixed flow, radial flow pumps and pump

  20. Measuring temperature - dependent propagating disturbances in coronal fan loops using multiple SDO/AIA channels and surfing transform technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Uritsky, Vadim M; Viall, Nicholeen M; Ofman, Leon

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of co-aligned high resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling quantitative description of subvisual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1 %. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional "surfing" signals extracted from position-time plots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency - velocity space which exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the c...

  1. Macro-to-microchannel transition in two-phase flow: Part 1 - Two-phase flow patterns and film thickness measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, C.L.; Thome, J.R. [Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, EPFL-STI-IGM-LTCM, Station 9, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The classification of macroscale, mesoscale and microscale channels with respect to two-phase processes is still an open question. The main objective of this study focuses on investigating the macro-to-microscale transition during flow boiling in small scale channels of three different sizes with three different refrigerants over a range of saturation conditions to investigate the effects of channel confinement on two-phase flow patterns and liquid film stratification in a single circular horizontal channel (Part 2 covers the flow boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux). This paper presents the experimental two-phase flow pattern transition data together with a top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison for refrigerants R134a, R236fa and R245fa during flow boiling in small channels of 1.03, 2.20 and 3.04 mm diameter. Based on this work, an improved flow pattern map has been proposed by determining the flow patterns transitions existing under different conditions including the transition to macroscale slug/plug flow at a confinement number of Co {approx} 0.3-0.4. From the top/bottom liquid film thickness comparison results, it was observed that the gravity forces are fully suppressed and overcome by the surface tension and shear forces when the confinement number approaches 1, Co {approx} 1. Thus, as a new approximate rule, the lower threshold of macroscale flow is Co = 0.3-0.4 while the upper threshold of symmetric microscale flow is Co {approx} 1 with a transition (or mesoscale) region in-between. (author)

  2. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence measurements of ion velocity and temperature of drift turbulence driven sheared plasma flow in a linear helicon plasma device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chakraborty Thakur, S.; Fedorczak, N.; Manz, P.; Tynan, G. R.; Xu, M. [Center for Momentum Transport and Flow Organization, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States); McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, West Virginia 26506 (United States); Lee, T. [Center for Energy Research, University of California at San Diego, San Diego, California 92093 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using laser induced fluorescence (LIF), radial profiles of azimuthal ion fluid velocity and ion temperature are measured in the controlled shear de-correlation experiment (CSDX) linear helicon plasma device. Ion velocities and temperatures are derived from the measured Doppler broadened velocity distribution functions of argon ions. The LIF system employs a portable, high power (>300 mW), narrowband ({approx}1 MHz) tunable diode laser-based system operating at 668.614 nm. Previous studies in CSDX have shown the existence of a radially sheared azimuthal flow as measured with time delay estimation methods and Mach probes. Here, we report the first LIF measurements of sheared plasma fluid flow in CSDX. Above a critical magnetic field, the ion fluid flow profile evolves from radially uniform to peaked on axis with a distinct reversed flow region at the boundary, indicating the development of a sheared azimuthal flow. Simultaneously, the ion temperature also evolves from a radially uniform profile to a profile with a gradient. Measurements in turbulent and coherent drift wave mode dominated plasmas are compared.

  4. A measurement of the effective delayed neutron fraction of the Westinghouse Idaho Nuclear Company Slab Tank Assembly using Rossi-[alpha] techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spriggs, G.D. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effective delayed neutron fraction of a solution reactor fueled with highly enriched uranyl nitrate was measured using two Rossi-[alpha] techniques: the slope method and the Nelson number method. The average value of the effective delayed neutron fraction was measured to be 0.0147 [plus minus] 13%, which is significantly higher than the calculated value of 0.009. The discrepancy between the measured and the calculated value is not understood at this time, but it is suspected that the majority of the bias is associated with the measurement of the intrinsic neutron source strength.

  5. CT Measurements of Two-Phase Flow in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brigham, William E.; Castanier Louis M.; Hughes, Richard G.

    1999-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the design, construction, and preliminary results of an experiment that studies imbibition displacement in two fracture blocks. Multiphase (oil/water) displacements will be conducted at the same rate on three core configurations. The configurations are a compact core, a two-block system with a 1 mm spacer between the blocks, and a two-block system with no spacer. The blocks are sealed in epoxy so that saturation measurements can be made throughout the displacement experiments using a Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. Preliminary results are presented from a water/air experiment. These results suggest that it is incorrect to assume negligible capillary continuity between matrix blocks as is often done.

  6. New measurement technique for the product of the electron mobility and mean free drift time for pixelated semiconductor detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Zhong

    for 35 2 Â 2 Â 1.5 cm3 CdZnTe detectors recently received from Redlen Technologies, Inc. Comparable results for 1 cm3 CdZnTe detectors grown by Redlen Technologies, Inc. have been found using a technique experimental effort. This new technique has allowed for the comparison between mete and energy resolution

  7. Nuclear modification and elliptic flow measurements for $?$ mesons at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$ = 200 GeV d+Au and Au+Au collisions by PHENIX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dipali Pal

    2005-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first results of the nuclear modification factors and elliptic flow of the phi mesons measured by the PHENIX experiment at RHIC in high luminosity Au+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV. The nuclear modification factors R_AA and R_CP of the phi follow the same trend of suppression as pi0's in Au+Au collisions. In d+Au collisions at sqrt(sNN) = 200 GeV, the phi mesons are not suppressed. The elliptic flow of the phi mesons, measured in the minimum bias Au+Au events, is statistically consistent with other identified particles.

  8. Wavelet analysis study of microbubble drag reduction in a boundary channel flow 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen, Ling

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and pressure measurement techniques were performed to investigate the drag reduction due to microbubble injection in the boundary layer of a fully developed turbulent channel flow. ...

  9. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Chimiche, via Marzolo 1, Universita degli Studi di Padova, 35131 Padova (Italy); Meneghini, C. [Dipartimento di Scienze, via della Vasca Navale 84, Universita di Roma TRE, 00146 Roma (Italy)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  10. Microsphere estimates of blood flow: Methodological considerations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    von Ritter, C.; Hinder, R.A.; Womack, W.; Bauerfeind, P.; Fimmel, C.J.; Kvietys, P.R.; Granger, D.N.; Blum, A.L. (Univ. of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg (South Africa) Louisianna State Univ. Medical Center, Shreveport (USA) Universitaire Vaudois (Switzerland))

    1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microsphere technique is a standard method for measuring blood flow in experimental animals. Sporadic reports have appeared outlining the limitations of this method. In this study the authors have systematically assessed the effect of blood withdrawals for reference sampling, microsphere numbers, and anesthesia on blood flow estimates using radioactive microspheres in dogs. Experiments were performed on 18 conscious and 12 anesthetized dogs. Four blood flow estimates were performed over 120 min using 1 {times} 10{sup 6} microspheres each time. The effects of excessive numbers of microspheres pentobarbital sodium anesthesia, and replacement of volume loss for reference samples with dextran 70 were assessed. In both conscious and anesthetized dogs a progressive decrease in gastric mucosal blood flow and cardiac output was observed over 120 min. This was also observed in the pancreas in conscious dogs. The major factor responsible for these changes was the volume loss due to the reference sample withdrawals. Replacement of the withdrawn blood with dextran 70 led to stable blood flows to all organs. The injection of excessive numbers of microspheres did not modify hemodynamics to a greater extent than did the injection of 4 million microspheres. Anesthesia exerted no influence on blood flow other than raising coronary flow. The authors conclude that although blood flow to the gastric mucosa and the pancreas is sensitive to the minor hemodynamic changes associated with the microsphere technique, replacement of volume loss for reference samples ensures stable blood flow to all organs over a 120-min period.

  11. 5. A. Cappy, Noise modeling and measurement techniques, IEEE Z .Trans Microwave Theory Tech 36 1988 , 1 10.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masoudi, Husain M.

    power loss. 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Microwave Opt Technol Lett 26: 385 390, 2000. Key words waveguides, and sometimes it is accompanied by substantial power loss. An alternative technique with little power loss. We use the three-dimensional explicit Z .finite-difference beam-propagation method EFD

  12. Comparison of Air Fluorescence and Ionization Measurements of E.M. Shower Depth Profiles: Test of a UHECR Detector Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belz, J.; Cao, Z.; Huentemeyer, P.; Jui, C.C.H.; Martens, K.; Matthews, J.; Maestas, M.; Smith, J.; Sokolsky, P.; Springer, R.W.; Thomas, J.; Thomas, S.; /Utah U.; Chen,P.; Field, Clive; Hast, C.; Iverson, R.; Ng, J.S.T.; Odian, A.; Reil, K.; Vincke, H.; Walz, D.; /SLAC /Montana U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U.; ,

    2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements are reported on the fluorescence of air as a function of depth in electromagnetic showers initiated by bunches of 28.5 GeV electrons. The light yield is compared with the expected and observed depth profiles of ionization in the showers. It validates the use of atmospheric fluorescence profiles in measuring ultra high energy cosmic rays.

  13. Measurements of wall heat (mass) transfer for flow through blockages with round and square holes in a wide rectangular channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Joel

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) transfer on the channel wall by 4.7 to 6.3 times, and increased the pressure drop along the test channel by up to almost 490 times that for fully developed turbulent flow through a smooth channel at the same mass flow rates. The blockages with round holes...

  14. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 3d 2D5/2 state in the 40Ca+ ion using the shelving technique on a few-ion string

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staanum, P; Martinussen, R G; Voigt, D; Drewsen, M; Staanum, Peter; Jensen, Inger S.; Martinussen, Randi G.; Voigt, Dirk; Drewsen, Michael

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the lifetime of the metastable 3d 2D5/2 state in the 40Ca+ ion, using the so-called shelving technique on a string of five Doppler laser-cooled ions in a linear Paul trap. A detailed account of the data analysis is given, and systematic effects due to unwanted excitation processes and collisions with background gas atoms are discussed and estimated. From a total of 6805 shelving events, we obtain a lifetime tau=1149+/-14(stat.)+/-4(sys.)ms, a result which is in agreement with the most recent measurements.

  15. Direct Measurement of Initial Enrichment and Burn-up of Spent Fuel Assembly with a Differential Die-Away Technique Based Instrument

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henzl, Vladimir [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A key objective of the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) is to utilize non-destructive assay (NDA) techniques to determine the elemental plutonium (Pu) content in a commercial-grade nuclear spent fuel assembly (SFA). In the third year of the NGSI Spent Fuel NDA project, the research focus is on the integration of a few NDA techniques. One of the reoccurring challenges to the accurate determination of Pu content has been the explicit dependence of the measured signal on the presence of neutron absorbers which build up in the assembly in accordance with its operating and irradiation history. The history of any SFA is often summarized by the parameters of burn-up (BU), initial enrichment (IE) and cooling time (CT). While such parameters can typically be provided by the operator, the ability to directly measure and verify them would significantly enhance the autonomy of the IAEA inspectorate. Within this paper, we demonstrate that an instrument based on a Differential Die-Away technique is in principle capable of direct measurement of IE and, should the CT be known, also the BU.

  16. Determining flow, recharge, and vadose zonedrainage in anunconfined aquifer from groundwater strontium isotope measurements, PascoBasin, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mjsingleton@lbl.gov

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Strontium isotope compositions (87Sr/86Sr) measured in groundwater samples from 273 wells in the Pasco Basin unconfined aquifer below the Hanford Site show large and systematic variations that provide constraints on groundwater recharge, weathering rates of the aquifer host rocks, communication between unconfined and deeper confined aquifers, and vadose zone-groundwater interaction. The impact of millions of cubic meters of wastewater discharged to the vadose zone (103-105 times higher than ambient drainage) shows up strikingly on maps of groundwater 87Sr/86Sr. Extensive access through the many groundwater monitoring wells at the site allows for an unprecedented opportunity to evaluate the strontium geochemistry of a major aquifer, hosted primarily in unconsolidated sediments, and relate it to both long term properties and recent disturbances. Groundwater 87Sr/86Sr increases systematically from 0.707 to 0.712 from west to east across the Hanford Site, in the general direction of groundwater flow, as a result of addition of Sr from the weathering of aquifer sediments and from diffuse drainage through the vadose zone. The lower 87Sr/86Sr groundwater reflects recharge waters that have acquired Sr from Columbia River Basalts. Based on a steady-state model of Sr reactive transport and drainage, there is an average natural drainage flux of 0-1.4 mm/yr near the western margin of the Hanford Site, and ambient drainage may be up to 30 mm/yr in the center of the site assuming an average bulk rock weathering rate of 10-7.5 g/g/yr.

  17. Measurement of the B-bar 0 to D^* l ^- nu-bar Branching Fraction with a Partial Reconstruction Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sonnek, Peter; /Mississippi U.

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented is a precise measurement of the {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} branching fraction using 81.47 fb{sup -1} of data collected with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} storage ring at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The measurement was performed by partially reconstructing the D*{sup +} meson from {bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}} decays using only the soft pion of the D*{sup +} {yields} D{sup 0}{pi}{sup +} decay to reconstruct its four vector. The branching fraction was measured to be {Beta}({bar B}{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup +}{ell}{sup -}{bar {nu}}{sub {ell}}) = (4.91 {+-} 0.01{sub stat} {+-} 0.15{sub syst})%.

  18. Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation Detection of Tritium Decay Electrons as a New Technique for Measuring the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, Benjamin

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The shape of the beta decay energy distribution is sensitive to the mass of the electron neutrino. Attempts to measure the endpoint shape of tritium decay have so far seen no distortion from the zero-mass form, thus placing an upper limit of m_nu_beta < 2.3 eV. Here we show that a new type of electron energy spectroscopy could improve future measurements of this spectrum and therefore of the neutrino mass. We propose to detect the coherent cyclotron radiation emitted by an energetic electron in a magnetic field. For mildly relativistic electrons, like those in tritium decay, the relativistic shift of the cyclotron frequency allows us to extract the electron energy from the emitted radiation. We present calculations for the energy resolution, noise limits, high-rate measurement capability, and systematic errors expected in such an experiment.

  19. Relativistic Cyclotron Radiation Detection of Tritium Decay Electrons as a New Technique for Measuring the Neutrino Mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Monreal; Joseph A. Formaggio

    2009-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The shape of the beta decay energy distribution is sensitive to the mass of the electron neutrino. Attempts to measure the endpoint shape of tritium decay have so far seen no distortion from the zero-mass form, thus placing an upper limit of m_nu_beta < 2.3 eV. Here we show that a new type of electron energy spectroscopy could improve future measurements of this spectrum and therefore of the neutrino mass. We propose to detect the coherent cyclotron radiation emitted by an energetic electron in a magnetic field. For mildly relativistic electrons, like those in tritium decay, the relativistic shift of the cyclotron frequency allows us to extract the electron energy from the emitted radiation. We present calculations for the energy resolution, noise limits, high-rate measurement capability, and systematic errors expected in such an experiment.

  20. Combined x-ray scattering, radiography, and velocity interferometry/streaked optical pyrometry measurements of warm dense carbon using a novel technique of shock-and-release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Falk, K.; Collins, L. A.; Kagan, G.; Kress, J. D.; Montgomery, D. S.; Srinivasan, B. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Gamboa, E. J. [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States) [University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, 2575 Sand Hill Road, MS 72, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States); Tzeferacos, P. [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)] [Flash Center for Computational Science, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Benage, J. F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States) [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This work focused on a new application of the shock-and-release technique for equation of state (EOS) measurements. Warm dense matter states at near normal solid density and at temperatures close to 10?eV in diamond and graphite samples were created using a deep release from a laser-driven shock at the OMEGA laser facility. Independent temperature, density, and pressure measurements that do not depend on any theoretical models or simulations were obtained using imaging x-ray Thomson scattering, radiography, velocity interferometry, and streaked optical pyrometry. The experimental results were reproduced by the 2-D FLASH radiation hydrodynamics simulations finding a good agreement. The final EOS measurement was then compared with widely used SESAME EOS models as well as quantum molecular dynamics simulation results for carbon, which were very consistent with the experimental data.

  1. Fast 3D Modeling of Borehole Induction Measurements in Dipping and Anisotropic Formations using a Novel Approximation Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    complex linear system of equations whose solution yields the spatial distribution of the internal electricFast 3D Modeling of Borehole Induction Measurements in Dipping and Anisotropic Formations using two sequential steps. First, the spatial distribution of the electric field within scatterers

  2. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MICROWAVE THEORY AND TECHNIQUES, VOL. 57, NO. 2, FEBRUARY 2009 505 Microwave Frequency Measurement Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Jianping

    -sweeping op- eration of the electronic spectrum analyzer. For applications such as in a warfare system based on an electronic spectrum analyzer can provide a measurement range from a few gigahertz to a few tens of gigahertz [1]­[3], which can be extended to over a few hundred gigahertz if an electronic mixer

  3. Ultra-thin Titanium Oxide Films on Accession #s 00936, 00937,00938 Mo(112), Measured by XPS Technique: XPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodman, Wayne

    Ultra-thin Titanium Oxide Films on Accession #s 00936, 00937,00938 Mo(112), Measured by XPS preparation methods were employed to grow a well-ordered ultra-thin titanium oxide film on Mo(J (2), The tirst: photoemission; titanium oxide; tllin film PACS: 81.15.Gh. 79,60.Dp SPECIMEN DESCRIPTION (Accession #00936) Host

  4. Relativistic cyclotron radiation detection of tritium decay electrons as a new technique for measuring the neutrino mass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monreal, Benjamin

    The shape of the beta-decay energy distribution is sensitive to the mass of the electron neutrino. Attempts to measure the endpoint shape of tritium decay have so far seen no distortion from the zero-mass form, thus placing ...

  5. FM stars: A Fourier view of pulsating binary stars, a new technique for measuring radial velocities photometrically

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shibahashi, Hiromoto

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some pulsating stars are good clocks. When they are found in binary stars, the frequencies of their luminosity variations are modulated by the Doppler effect caused by orbital motion. For each pulsation frequency this manifests itself as a multiplet separated by the orbital frequency in the Fourier transform of the light curve of the star. We derive the theoretical relations to exploit data from the Fourier transform to derive all the parameters of a binary system traditionally extracted from spectroscopic radial velocities, including the mass function which is easily derived from the amplitude ratio of the first orbital sidelobes to the central frequency for each pulsation frequency. This is a new technique that yields radial velocities from the Doppler shift of a pulsation frequency, thus eliminates the need to obtain spectra. For binary stars with pulsating components, an orbital solution can be obtained from the light curve alone. We give a complete derivation of this and demonstrate it both with artifici...

  6. Measurements of time-dependent CP asymmetries in B?D*??± decays using a partial reconstruction technique

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bahinipati, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Kinoshita, K.; Arinstein, K.; Aulchenko, V.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Balagura, V.; Barberio, E.; Belous, K.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bischofberger, M.; Bondar, A.; Bozek, A.; Bra?ko, M.; Chen, A.; Chen, P.; Cheon, B. G.; Chiang, C.-C.; Cho, I.-S.; Cho, K.; Choi, Y.; Dalseno, J.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Eidelman, S.; Gabyshev, N.; Golob, B.; Ha, H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Hyun, H. J.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwabuchi, M.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, M. J.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, N.; Kodyš, P.; Križan, P.; Kumita, T.; Kwon, Y.-J.; Kyeong, S.-H.; Lange, J. S.; Lee, M. J.; Lee, S.-H.; Li, J.; Liu, C.; Louvot, R.; Matyja, A.; McOnie, S.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mohanty, G. B.; Nakao, M.; Natkaniec, Z.; Neubauer, S.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Ohshima, T.; Pakhlov, P.; Park, C. W.; Petri?, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Poluektov, A.; Röhrken, M.; Sahoo, H.; Sakai, Y.; Schneider, O.; Schwanda, C.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sevior, M. E.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shiu, J.-G.; Smerkol, P.; Sohn, Y.-S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stani?, S.; Stari?, M.; Sumisawa, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tanaka, S.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Wang, C. H.; Won, E.; Yabsley, B. D.; Yamashita, Y.; Zhang, C. C.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhou, P.; Zivko, T.; Zupanc, A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report results on time-dependent CP asymmetries in B?D*??± decays based on a data sample containing 657×10? BB¯ pairs collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e?e? collider at the ?(4S) resonance. We use a partial reconstruction technique, wherein signal B?D*??± events are identified using information only from the fast pion from the B decay and the slow pion from the subsequent decay of the D*?, where the former (latter) corresponds to D*?(D*?) final states. We obtain CP violation parameters S?=+0.061±0.018 (stat)±0.012 (syst) and S?=+0.031±0.019 (stat)±0.015 (syst).

  7. Determining resistivity of a formation adjacent to a borehole having casing by generating constant current flow in portion of casing and using at least two voltage measurement electrodes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vail, III, William Banning (Bothell, WA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods of operation of different types of multiple electrode apparatus vertically disposed in a cased well to measure information related to the resistivity of adjacent geological formations from within the cased well are described. The multiple electrode apparatus has a minimum of two spaced apart voltage measurement electrodes that electrically engage a first portion of the interior of the cased well and that provide at least first voltage information. Current control means are used to control the magnitude of any selected current that flows along a second portion of the interior of the casing to be equal to a predetermined selected constant. The first portion of the interior of the cased well is spaced apart from the second portion of the interior of the cased well. The first voltage information and the predetermined selected constant value of any selected current flowing along the casing are used in part to determine a magnitude related to the formation resistivity adjacent to the first portion of the interior of the cased well. Methods and apparatus having a plurality of voltage measurement electrodes are disclosed that provide voltage related information in the presence of constant currents flowing along the casing which is used to provide formation resistivity.

  8. Automation of radiochemical analysis by applying flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, David

    of detection systems, including scintillation counting, a-spectrometers, proportional counters, mass spectrometry and spectrophotometry. ª 2010 Published by Elsevier Ltd. Keywords: Flow-analysis technique; Flow

  9. Generalizing the flash technique in the front-face configuration to measure the thermal diffusivity of semitransparent solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pech-May, Nelson Wilbur [Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain); Department of Applied Physics, CINVESTAV Unidad Mérida, carretera Antigua a Progreso km6, A.P. 73 Cordemex, Mérida Yucatán 97310, México (Mexico); Mendioroz, Arantza; Salazar, Agustín, E-mail: agustin.salazar@ehu.es [Departamento de Física Aplicada I, Escuela Técnica Superior de Ingeniería, Universidad del País Vasco UPV/EHU, Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we have extended the front-face flash method to retrieve simultaneously the thermal diffusivity and the optical absorption coefficient of semitransparent plates. A complete theoretical model that allows calculating the front surface temperature rise of the sample has been developed. It takes into consideration additional effects, such as multiple reflections of the heating light beam inside the sample, heat losses by convection and radiation, transparency of the sample to infrared wavelengths, and heating pulse duration. Measurements performed on calibrated solids, covering a wide range of absorption coefficients (from transparent to opaque) and thermal diffusivities, validate the proposed method.

  10. A novel target-type low pressure drop bidirectional optoelectronic air flow sensor for infant artificial ventilation: Measurement principle and static calibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saccomandi, Paola; Schena, Emiliano; Silvestri, Sergio [Faculty of Biomedical Engineering, University Campus Bio-Medico, Via Alvaro del Portillo, 21, 00128 Rome (Italy)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An optoelectronic target-type volumetric air flow-rate transducer for bidirectional measurements is presented. The sensor is composed of a T-shaped target and two nominally identical LED-photodiode couples which are operated in differential mode. The sensitive surfaces of the photodiodes are differentially shadowed by the deflection of the target, which in turn depends on the gas flow-rate. The principle of operation is described in mathematical terms and the design parameters have been optimized in order to obtain the highest sensitivity along with minimal pressure drop and reduced dimensions. The sensor is placed in a 20 mm diameter hose and was tested with air flow-rate in the typical temperature range of mechanical ventilation between 20 and 40 deg. C. The theoretical model was validated through experiments carried out in the volumetric flow range from -7.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The nonlinear behavior allows sensitivities equal to 0.6 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -2.0 to +2.0 l min{sup -1}, equal to 2.0 V l{sup -1} min for flow rates ranging from -3.0 to -2.0 l min{sup -1} and from +2.0 to +3.0 l min{sup -1}, up to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min at higher flow rates ranging from -7.0 to -3.0 l min{sup -1} and from +3.0 to +7.0 l min{sup -1}. The linear range extends from 3.0 to 7.0 l min{sup -1} with constant sensitivity equal to 5.7 V l{sup -1} min. The sensor is able to detect a flow-rate equal to 1.0 l min{sup -1} with a sensitivity of about 400 mV l{sup -1} min. The differential nature of the output minimizes the influence of the LEDs' power supply variations and allows to obtain a repeatability in the order of 3% of full scale output. The small pressure drop produced by the sensor placed in-line the fluid stream, of about 2.4 Pa at 7 l min{sup -1}, corresponds to a negligible fluid dynamic resistance lower than 0.34 Pa l{sup -1} min.

  11. A comprehensive laboratory study on the immersion freezing behavior of illite NX particles: a comparison of 17 ice nucleation measurement techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Augustin-Bauditz, Stefanie; Bingemer, Heinz; Budke, Carsten; Curtius, J.; Danielczok, Anja; Diehl, K.; Dreischmeier, Katharina; Ebert, Martin; Frank, F.; Hoffmann, Nadine; Kandler, Kondrad; Kiselev, Alexei; Koop, Thomas; Leisner, Thomas; Mohler, Ottmar; Nillius, Bjorn; Peckhaus, Andreas; Rose, Diana; Weinbruch, Stephan; Wex, Heike; Boose, Yvonne; DeMott, Paul J.; Hader, John D.; Hill, Thomas; Kanji, Zamin; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Levin, Ezra; McCluskey, Christina; Murakami, Masataka; Murray, Benjamin J.; Niedermeier, Dennis; Petters, Markus D.; O'Sullivan, Daniel; Saito, Atsushi; Schill, Gregory; Tajiri, Takuya; Tolbert, Margaret A.; Welti, Andre; Whale, Thomas; Wright, Timothy; Yamashita, Katsuya

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Immersion freezing is the most relevant heterogeneous ice nucleation mechanism 3 through which ice crystals are formed in mixed-phase clouds. In recent years, an increasing 4 number of laboratory experiments utilizing a variety of instruments have examined immersion 5 freezing activity of atmospherically relevant ice nucleating particles (INPs). However, an 6 inter-comparison of these laboratory results is a difficult task because investigators have used 7 different ice nucleation (IN) measurement methods to produce these results. A remaining 8 challenge is to explore the sensitivity and accuracy of these techniques and to understand how 9 the IN results are potentially influenced or biased by experimental parameters associated with 10 these techniques. 11 Within the framework of INUIT (Ice Nucleation research UnIT), we distributed an 12 illite rich sample (illite NX) as a representative surrogate for atmospheric mineral dust 13 particles to investigators to perform immersion freezing experiments using different IN 14 measurement methods and to obtain IN data as a function of particle concentration, 15 temperature (T), cooling rate and nucleation time. Seventeen measurement methods were 16 involved in the data inter-comparison. Experiments with seven instruments started with the 17 test sample pre-suspended in water before cooling, while ten other instruments employed 18 water vapor condensation onto dry-dispersed particles followed by immersion freezing. The 19 resulting comprehensive immersion freezing dataset was evaluated using the ice nucleation 20 active surface-site density (ns) to develop a representative ns(T) spectrum that spans a wide 21 temperature range (-37 °C < T < -11 °C) and covers nine orders of magnitude in ns. 22 Our inter-comparison results revealed a discrepancy between suspension and dry-23 dispersed particle measurements for this mineral dust. While the agreement was good below ~-24 26 °C, the ice nucleation activity, expressed in ns, was smaller for the wet suspended samples 25 and higher for the dry-dispersed aerosol samples between about -26 and -18 °C. Only 26 instruments making measurement techniques with wet suspended samples were able to 27 measure ice nucleation above -18 °C. A possible explanation for the deviation between -26 28 and -18 °C is discussed. In general, the seventeen immersion freezing measurement 29 techniques deviate, within the range of about 7 °C in terms of temperature, by three orders of 30 magnitude with respect to ns. In addition, we show evidence that the immersion freezing 31 efficiency (i.e., ns) of illite NX particles is relatively independent on droplet size, particle 32 mass in suspension, particle size and cooling rate during freezing. A strong temperature-33 2 dependence and weak time- and size-dependence of immersion freezing efficiency of illite-34 rich clay mineral particles enabled the ns parameterization solely as a function of temperature. 35 We also characterized the ns(T) spectra, and identified a section with a steep slope between -36 20 °C and -27 °C, where a large fraction of active sites of our test dust may trigger immersion 37 freezing. This slope was followed by a region with a gentler slope at temperatures below -27 38 °C. A multiple exponential distribution fit is expressed as ns(T) = exp(23.82 × exp(-exp(0.16 × 39 (T + 17.49))) + 1.39) based on the specific surface area and ns(T) = exp(25.75 × exp(-exp(0.13 40 × (T + 17.17))) + 3.34) based on the geometric area (ns and T in m-2 and °C, respectively). 41 These new fits, constrained by using an identical reference samples, will help to compare IN 42 measurement methods that are not included in the present study and, thereby, IN data from 43 future IN instruments.

  12. PIV flow measurements for heat transfer characterization in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90 ribbed walls

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kihm, IconKenneth David

    -pass square channel with a smooth wall and a 90° rib-roughened wall. Detailed averaged velocity distributions enhancements for both smooth and ribbed wall two-pass square channels. The rib-induced flow turbulence distribution in two-pass square channels with smooth and 90° ribbed walls. Han and Zhang [3] studied the effect

  13. Two-Dimensional Measurement of n+-p Asymmetrical Junctions in Multicrystalline Silicon Solar Cells Using AFM-Based Electrical Techniques with Nanometer Resolution: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. S.; Moutinho, H. R.; Li, J. V.; Al-Jassim, M. M.; Heath, J. T.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lateral inhomogeneities of modern solar cells demand direct electrical imaging with nanometer resolution. We show that atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based electrical techniques provide unique junction characterizations, giving a two-dimensional determination of junction locations. Two AFM-based techniques, scanning capacitance microscopy/spectroscopy (SCM/SCS) and scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy (SKPFM), were significantly improved and applied to the junction characterizations of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) cells. The SCS spectra were taken pixel by pixel by precisely controlling the tip positions in the junction area. The spectra reveal distinctive features that depend closely on the position relative to the electrical junction, which allows us to indentify the electrical junction location. In addition, SKPFM directly probes the built-in potential over the junction area modified by the surface band bending, which allows us to deduce the metallurgical junction location by identifying a peak of the electric field. Our results demonstrate resolutions of 10-40 nm, depending on the techniques (SCS or SKPFM). These direct electrical measurements with nanometer resolution and intrinsic two-dimensional capability are well suited for investigating the junction distribution of solar cells with lateral inhomogeneities.

  14. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed to nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)

  15. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under full pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  16. Portable wastewater flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunter, Robert M. (320 S. Wilson Ave., Bozeman, MT 59715)

    1999-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A portable wastewater flow meter particularly adapted for temporary use at a single location in measuring the rate of liquid flow in a circular entrance conduit of a sewer manhole both under free flow and submerged, open channel conditions and under fill pipe, surcharged conditions, comprising an apparatus having a cylindrical external surface and an inner surface that constricts the flow through the apparatus in such a manner that a relationship exists between (1) the difference between the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the entrance of the apparatus and the static pressure head of liquid flowing through the constriction, and (2) the rate of liquid flow through the apparatus.

  17. ONE THOUSAND AND ONE CLUSTERS: MEASURING THE BULK FLOW WITH THE PLANCK ESZ AND X-RAY-SELECTED GALAXY CLUSTER CATALOGS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mody, Krishnan [Mathematics Department, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Hajian, Amir, E-mail: kmody@princeton.edu, E-mail: ahajian@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our measurement of the 'bulk flow' using the kinetic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich (kSZ) effect in the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) seven-year data. As the tracer of peculiar velocities, we use Planck Early Sunyaev-Zel'dovich Detected Cluster Catalog and a compilation of X-ray-detected galaxy cluster catalogs based on ROSAT All-Sky Survey. We build a full-sky kSZ template and fit it to the WMAP data in W band. Using a Wiener filter we maximize the signal-to-noise ratio of the kSZ cluster signal in the data. We find no significant detection of the bulk flow, and our results are consistent with the {Lambda}CDM prediction.

  18. Measurements of wall heat (mass) transfer for flow through blockages with round and square holes in a wide rectangular channel 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervantes, Joel

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . . . n1 DEDICATION. ACKNOWLEGDEMENTS . . . V1 TABLE OF CONTENTS . vn LIST OF FIGURES. NOMENCLATURE . . INTRODUCTION. LITERATURE SURVEY. EXPERIMENTAL APPARATUS . Xt EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE DATA REDUCTION. PRESENTATION & DISCUSSION OF RESULTS..., kg/(m s) Nun~ local Nusselt number //u pa average Nusselt number Nus reference Nusselt number for fully developed turbulent flow in smooth channel POIIII Pv, w atmospheric pressure, N/m 2 vapor pressure on naphthalene surface, N/m 2 P...

  19. Measurements of elliptic and triangular flow in high-multiplicity $^{3}$He$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$~GeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Adare; S. Afanasiev; C. Aidala; N. N. Ajitanand; Y. Akiba; R. Akimoto; H. Al-Bataineh; J. Alexander; M. Alfred; H. Al-Ta'ani; K. R. Andrews; A. Angerami; K. Aoki; N. Apadula; L. Aphecetche; E. Appelt; Y. Aramaki; R. Armendariz; S. H. Aronson; J. Asai; H. Asano; E. C. Aschenauer; E. T. Atomssa; R. Averbeck; T. C. Awes; B. Azmoun; V. Babintsev; M. Bai; G. Baksay; L. Baksay; A. Baldisseri; N. S. Bandara; B. Bannier; K. N. Barish; P. D. Barnes; B. Bassalleck; A. T. Basye; S. Bathe; S. Batsouli; V. Baublis; C. Baumann; A. Bazilevsky; M. Beaumier; S. Beckman; S. Belikov; R. Belmont; J. Ben-Benjamin; R. Bennett; A. Berdnikov; Y. Berdnikov; J. H. Bhom; A. A. Bickley; D. S. Blau; J. G. Boissevain; J. S. Bok; H. Borel; K. Boyle; M. L. Brooks; D. Broxmeyer; J. Bryslawskyj; H. Buesching; V. Bumazhnov; G. Bunce; S. Butsyk; C. M. Camacho; S. Campbell; A. Caringi; P. Castera; B. S. Chang; W. C. Chang; J. -L. Charvet; C. -H. Chen; S. Chernichenko; C. Y. Chi; J. Chiba; M. Chiu; I. J. Choi; J. B. Choi; R. K. Choudhury; P. Christiansen; T. Chujo; P. Chung; A. Churyn; O. Chvala; V. Cianciolo; Z. Citron; C. R. Cleven; B. A. Cole; M. P. Comets; Z. Conesa del Valle; M. Connors; P. Constantin; M. Csanád; T. Csörg?; T. Dahms; S. Dairaku; I. Danchev; D. Danley; K. Das; A. Datta; M. S. Daugherity; G. David; M. K. Dayananda; M. B. Deaton; K. DeBlasio; K. Dehmelt; H. Delagrange; A. Denisov; D. d'Enterria; A. Deshpande; E. J. Desmond; K. V. Dharmawardane; O. Dietzsch; A. Dion; P. B. Diss; J. H. Do; M. Donadelli; L. D'Orazio; O. Drapier; A. Drees; K. A. Drees; A. K. Dubey; J. M. Durham; A. Durum; D. Dutta; V. Dzhordzhadze; S. Edwards; Y. V. Efremenko; J. Egdemir; F. Ellinghaus; W. S. Emam; T. Engelmore; A. Enokizono; H. En'yo; S. Esumi; K. O. Eyser; B. Fadem; N. Feege; D. E. Fields; M. Finger; M. Finger; \\, Jr.; F. Fleuret; S. L. Fokin; Z. Fraenkel; J. E. Frantz; A. Franz; A. D. Frawley; K. Fujiwara; Y. Fukao; T. Fusayasu; S. Gadrat; C. Gal; P. Gallus; P. Garg; I. Garishvili; H. Ge; F. Giordano; A. Glenn; H. Gong; X. Gong; M. Gonin; J. Gosset; Y. Goto; R. Granier de Cassagnac; N. Grau; S. V. Greene; G. Grim; M. Grosse Perdekamp; Y. Gu; T. Gunji; L. Guo; H. -Å. Gustafsson; T. Hachiya; A. Hadj Henni; C. Haegemann; J. S. Haggerty; K. I. Hahn; H. Hamagaki; J. Hamblen; H. F. Hamilton; R. Han; S. Y. Han; J. Hanks; H. Harada; C. Harper; E. P. Hartouni; K. Haruna; S. Hasegawa; T. O. S. Haseler; K. Hashimoto; E. Haslum; R. Hayano; X. He; M. Heffner; T. K. Hemmick; T. Hester; H. Hiejima; J. C. Hill; R. Hobbs; M. Hohlmann; R. S. Hollis; W. Holzmann; K. Homma; B. Hong; T. Horaguchi; Y. Hori; D. Hornback; T. Hoshino; N. Hotvedt; J. Huang; S. Huang; T. Ichihara; R. Ichimiya; H. Iinuma; Y. Ikeda; K. Imai; J. Imrek; M. Inaba; Y. Inoue; A. Iordanova; D. Isenhower; L. Isenhower; M. Ishihara; T. Isobe; M. Issah; A. Isupov; D. Ivanishchev; Y. Iwanaga; B. V. Jacak; M. Jezghani; J. Jia; X. Jiang; J. Jin; O. Jinnouchi; D. John; B. M. Johnson; T. Jones; K. S. Joo; D. Jouan; D. S. Jumper; F. Kajihara; S. Kametani; N. Kamihara; J. Kamin; S. Kanda; M. Kaneta; S. Kaneti; B. H. Kang; J. H. Kang; J. S. Kang; H. Kanou; J. Kapustinsky; K. Karatsu; M. Kasai; D. Kawall; M. Kawashima; A. V. Kazantsev; T. Kempel; J. A. Key; V. Khachatryan; A. Khanzadeev; K. M. Kijima; J. Kikuchi; A. Kim; B. I. Kim; C. Kim; D. H. Kim; D. J. Kim; E. Kim; E. -J. Kim; G. W. Kim; M. Kim; S. H. Kim; Y. -J. Kim; Y. K. Kim; B. Kimelman; E. Kinney; K. Kiriluk; Á. Kiss; E. Kistenev; R. Kitamura; A. Kiyomichi; J. Klatsky; J. Klay; C. Klein-Boesing; D. Kleinjan; P. Kline; T. Koblesky; L. Kochenda; V. Kochetkov; B. Komkov; M. Konno; J. Koster; D. Kotchetkov; D. Kotov; A. Kozlov; A. Král; A. Kravitz; J. Kubart; G. J. Kunde; N. Kurihara; K. Kurita; M. Kurosawa; M. J. Kweon; Y. Kwon; G. S. Kyle; R. Lacey; Y. S. Lai; J. G. Lajoie; D. Layton; A. Lebedev; D. M. Lee; J. Lee; K. B. Lee; K. S. Lee; M. K. Lee; S Lee; S. H. Lee; S. R. Lee; T. Lee; M. J. Leitch; M. A. L. Leite; B. Lenzi; X. Li; P. Lichtenwalner; P. Liebing; S. H. Lim; L. A. Linden Levy; T. Liška; A. Litvinenko; H. Liu; M. X. Liu; B. Love; D. Lynch; C. F. Maguire; Y. I. Makdisi; M. Makek; A. Malakhov; M. D. Malik; A. Manion; V. I. Manko; E. Mannel; Y. Mao; L. Mašek; H. Masui; F. Matathias; M. McCumber; P. L. McGaughey; D. McGlinchey; C. McKinney; N. Means; A. Meles; M. Mendoza; B. Meredith; Y. Miake; T. Mibe; A. C. Mignerey; P. Mikeš; K. Miki; T. E. Miller; A. Milov; S. Mioduszewski; D. K. Mishra; M. Mishra; J. T. Mitchell; M. Mitrovski; Y. Miyachi; S. Miyasaka; S. Mizuno; A. K. Mohanty; P. Montuenga; H. J. Moon; T. Moon; Y. Morino; A. Morreale; D. P. Morrison; S. Motschwiller; T. V. Moukhanova; D. Mukhopadhyay; T. Murakami; J. Murata; A. Mwai; S. Nagamiya; K. Nagashima; Y. Nagata; J. L. Nagle; M. Naglis; M. I. Nagy; I. Nakagawa; H. Nakagomi; Y. Nakamiya; K. R. Nakamura; T. Nakamura; K. Nakano; S. Nam; C. Nattrass

    2015-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first measurement of elliptic ($v_2$) and triangular ($v_3$) flow in high-multiplicity $^{3}$He$+$Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{NN}}}=200$~GeV. Two-particle correlations, where the particles have a large separation in pseudorapidity, are compared in $^{3}$He$+$Au and in $p$$+$$p$ collisions and indicate that collective effects dominate the second and third Fourier components for the correlations observed in the $^{3}$He$+$Au system. The collective behavior is quantified in terms of elliptic $v_2$ and triangular $v_3$ anisotropy coefficients measured with respect to their corresponding event planes. The $v_2$ values are comparable to those previously measured in $d$$+$Au collisions at the same nucleon-nucleon center-of-mass energy. Comparison with various theoretical predictions are made, including to models where the hot spots created by the impact of the three $^{3}$He nucleons on the Au nucleus expand hydrodynamically to generate the triangular flow. The agreement of these models with data may indicate the formation of low-viscosity quark-gluon plasma even in these small collision systems.

  20. A computational study of ultrasonic film thickness measurements in annular two-phase flows under microgravity conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pautz, Shawn Daniel

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    wave equation: 11 V p(x, t) ? z z' = S(x, t), o p(x, t) c'(x) cl' (2. 1) where p(x, t) is the sound pressure, c(x) is the sound speed of propagation, and S(x, t) is a time-dependent source. Equation (2. 1) is derived from conservation laws... of level liquid film with epoxy layer, 2D approximation . . . . . 55 4. 13 Return signal of level liquid film with epoxy layer, 2D approximation . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 5. 1 Maximum return amplitude vs. interfacial slope for smooth annular flow...

  1. A Differential Pressure Instrument with Wireless Telemetry for In-Situ Measurement of Fluid Flow across Sediment-Water Boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardner, Alan T.

    An instrument has been built to carry out continuous in-situ measurement of small differences in water pressure, conductivity and temperature, in natural surface water and groundwater systems. A low-cost data telemetry ...

  2. Relation between photospheric flow fields and the magnetic field distribution on the solar surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simon, G.W.; Title, A.M.; Topka, K.P.; Tarbell, T.D.; Shine, R.A.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the technique of local correlation tracking on a 28 minute time sequence of white-light images of solar granulation, the horizontal flow field on the solar surface is measured. The time series was obtained by the Solar Optical Universal Polarimeter (SOUP) on Spacelab 2 (Space Shuttle flight 51-F) and is free from atmospheric blurring and distortion. The SOUP flow fields have been compared with carefully aligned magnetograms taken over a nine hour period at the Big Bear Solar Observatory before, during, and after the SOUP images. The flow field and the magnetic field agree in considerable detail: vectors which define the flow of the white-light intensity pattern (granulation) point toward magnetic field regions, magnetic fields surround flow cells, and magnetic features move along the flow arrows. The projected locations of free particles (corks) in the measured flow field congregate at the same locations where the magnetic field is observed. 31 references.

  3. System and method for measuring particles in a sample stream of a flow cytometer using a low power laser source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graves, Steven W; Habbersett, Robert C

    2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for analyzing a particle in a sample stream of a flow cytometer or the like. The system has a light source, such as a laser pointer module, for generating a low powered light beam and a fluidics apparatus which is configured to transport particles in the sample stream at substantially low velocity through the light beam for interrogation. Detectors, such as photomultiplier tubes, are configured to detect optical signals generated in response to the light beam impinging the particles. Signal conditioning circuitry is connected to each of the detectors to condition each detector output into electronic signals for processing and is designed to have a limited frequency response to filter high frequency noise from the detector output signals.

  4. System and method for measuring particles in a sample stream of a flow cytometer or the like

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graves, Steven W. (San Juan Pueblo, NM); Habberset, Robert C. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for analyzing a particle in a sample stream of a flow cytometer or the like. The system has a light source, such as a laser pointer module, for generating a low powered light beam and a fluidics apparatus which is configured to transport particles in the sample stream at substantially low velocity through the light beam for interrogation. Detectors, such as photomultiplier tubes, are configured to detect optical signals generated in response to the light beam impinging the particles. Signal conditioning circuitry is connected to each of the detectors to condition each detector output into electronic signals for processing and is designed to have a limited frequency response to filter high frequency noise from the detector output signals.

  5. System and method for measuring particles in a sample stream of a flow cytometer using low-power laser source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Graves, Steven W.; Habbersett, Robert C.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system and method for analyzing a particle in a sample stream of a flow cytometer or the like. The system has a light source, such as a laser pointer module, for generating a low powered light beam and a fluidics apparatus which is configured to transport particles in the sample stream at substantially low velocity through the light beam for interrogation. Detectors, such as photomultiplier tubes, are configured to detect optical signals generated in response to the light beam impinging the particles. Signal conditioning circuitry is connected to each of the detectors to condition each detector output into electronic signals for processing and is designed to have a limited frequency response to filter high frequency noise from the detector output signals.

  6. Topological Performance Measures as Surrogates for Physical Flow Models for Risk and Vulnerability Analysis for Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaRocca, Sarah; Hassel, Henrik; Guikema, Seth

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Critical infrastructure systems must be both robust and resilient in order to ensure the functioning of society. To improve the performance of such systems, we often use risk and vulnerability analysis to find and address system weaknesses. A critical component of such analyses is the ability to accurately determine the negative consequences of various types of failures in the system. Numerous mathematical and simulation models exist which can be used to this end. However, there are relatively few studies comparing the implications of using different modeling approaches in the context of comprehensive risk analysis of critical infrastructures. Thus in this paper, we suggest a classification of these models, which span from simple topologically-oriented models to advanced physical flow-based models. Here, we focus on electric power systems and present a study aimed at understanding the tradeoffs between simplicity and fidelity in models used in the context of risk analysis. Specifically, the purpose of this pa...

  7. TESTING THE ACCRETION FLOW WITH PLASMA WAVE HEATING MECHANISM FOR SAGITTARIUS A* BY THE 1.3 mm VLBI MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230026 (China); Takahashi, Rohta [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Shen Zhiqiang, E-mail: mlhuang@ustc.edu.c [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200030 (China)

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The vicinity of the supermassive black hole associated with the compact radio source Sagittarius (Sgr) A* is believed to dominate the observed emission at wavelengths near and shorter than approx1 millimeter. We show that a general relativistic accretion flow, heated via the plasma wave heating mechanism, is consistent with the polarization and recent millimeter-VLBI observations of Sgr A* for an inclination angle of approx45{sup 0}, position angle of approx140{sup 0}, and spin approx<0.9. Structure in visibilities produced by the black hole shadow can potentially be observed by 1.3 mm-VLBI on the existing Hawaii-CARMA and Hawaii-SMT baselines. We also consider eight additional potential millimeter-VLBI stations, including sites in Chile and New Zealand, finding that with these the basic geometry of the emission region can be reliably estimated.

  8. An ECT/ERT dual-modality sensor for oil-water two-phase flow measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Pitao [School of Electronic Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, 300072 and School of Electronic Engineering, University of Jinan (China); Wang, Huaxiang; Sun, Benyuan; Cui, Ziqiang [School of Electronic Engineering and Automation, Tianjin University, 300072 (China); Huang, Wenrui [HuaDian Heavy Industries Co. Ltd, Beijing, 100077 (China)

    2014-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a new sensor for ECT/ERT dual-modality system which can simultaneously obtain the permittivity and conductivity of the materials in the pipeline. Quasi-static electromagnetic fields are produced by the inner electrodes array sensor of electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) system. The results of simulation show that the data of permittivity and conductivity can be simultaneously obtained from the same measurement electrode and the fusion of two kinds of data may improve the quality of the reconstructed images. For uniform oil-water mixtures, the performance of designed dual-modality sensor for measuring the various oil fractions has been tested on representative data and the results of experiments show that the designed sensor broadens the measurement range compared to single modality.

  9. Application of a ratiometric laser induced fluorescence (LIF) thermometry for micro-scale temperature measurement for natural convection flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Heon Ju

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    cuvette, which was controlled by two thermo-bathes. 488nm Ar-ion laser used for incident light and two filter sets used for separating each fluorescence emission. Thermally stratified filed of 10mm channel with micro-scale resolution measured within 1...

  10. MEASUREMENTS OF VELOCITY PROFILES AND SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT CONCENTRATIONS IN A COLORADO RIVER EDDY DURING HIGH FLOW

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    averaged; suspended sediment is modeled through use of the advection-dispersion equation which yieldsMEASUREMENTS OF VELOCITY PROFILES AND SUSPENDED-SEDIMENT CONCENTRATIONS IN A COLORADO RIVER EDDY profiles and suspended-sediment concentration were made in a recirculating eddy along the Colorado River

  11. Measurement of the distributions of event-by-event flow harmonics in lead-lead collisions at ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Frank E.

    The distributions of event-by-event harmonic flow coefficients v [subscript n] for n = 2- 4 are measured in ?s[subscript NN] = 2.76 TeV Pb + Pb collisions using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. The measurements are performed ...

  12. Isolation of Flow and Nonflow Correlations by Two- and Four-Particle Cumulant Measurements of Azimuthal Harmonics in $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV Au+Au Collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. M. Abdelwahab; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; A. Banerjee; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderóndela Barca Sánchez; J. M. Campbell; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; G. Contin; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; O. Eyser; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; L. Greiner; D. Grosnick; D. S. Gunarathne; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; X. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; L. K. Kosarzewski; L. Kotchenda; A. F. Kraishan; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; M. Lomnitz; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; G. Nigmatkulov; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; D. L. Olvitt Jr.; B. S. Page; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; N. Poljak; K. Poniatowska; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; J. Putschke; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; O. Rusnakova; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; M. Simko; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; M. A. Szelezniak; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; M. Vandenbroucke; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; J. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; N. Yu; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; J. L. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

    2014-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to measurements of Au+Au collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{_{\\rm NN}}} =$ 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance $\\Delta\\eta$-dependent and $\\Delta\\eta$-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a component of the correlation that is $\\Delta\\eta$-independent, which is likely dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of $\\eta$ within the measured range of pseudorapidity $|\\eta| 0.7$.

  13. Bubbly Flow Experiment in Channel Using an Optical Probe and Tracking Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Abdul

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    was inserted through a porous media at three superficial gas velocities: 4.6 mm/s, 2.5 mm/s, and 1.4 mm/s. Two techniques were applied in the experiment to measure the bubbly flow: an optical probe and an in-house developed tracking algorithm. Measurements...

  14. Rényi entropy flows from quantum heat engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammad H. Ansari; Yuli V. Nazarov

    2015-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate Renyi entropy flows from generic quantum heat engines (QHE) to a weakly-coupled probe environment kept in thermal equilibrium. We show that the flows are determined not only by heat flow but also by a quantum coherent flow that can be separately measured in experiment apart from the heat flow measurement. The same pertains to Shanon entropy flow. This appeals for a revision of the concept of entropy flows in quantum nonequlibrium thermodynamics.

  15. Illumination Sufficiency Survey Techniques: In-situ Measurements of Lighting System Performance and a User Preference Survey for Illuminance in an Off-Grid, African Setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alstone, Peter; Jacobson, Arne; Mills, Evan

    2010-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Efforts to promote rechargeable electric lighting as a replacement for fuel-based light sources in developing countries are typically predicated on the notion that lighting service levels can be maintained or improved while reducing the costs and environmental impacts of existing practices. However, the extremely low incomes of those who depend on fuel-based lighting create a need to balance the hypothetically possible or desirable levels of light with those that are sufficient and affordable. In a pilot study of four night vendors in Kenya, we document a field technique we developed to simultaneously measure the effectiveness of lighting service provided by a lighting system and conduct a survey of lighting service demand by end-users. We took gridded illuminance measurements across each vendor's working and selling area, with users indicating the sufficiency of light at each point. User light sources included a mix of kerosene-fueled hurricane lanterns, pressure lamps, and LED lanterns.We observed illuminance levels ranging from just above zero to 150 lux. The LED systems markedly improved the lighting service levels over those provided by kerosene-fueled hurricane lanterns. Users reported that the minimum acceptable threshold was about 2 lux. The results also indicated that the LED lamps in use by the subjects did not always provide sufficient illumination over the desired retail areas. Our sample size is much too small, however, to reach any conclusions about requirements in the broader population. Given the small number of subjects and very specific type of user, our results should be regarded as indicative rather than conclusive. We recommend replicating the method at larger scales and across a variety of user types and contexts. Policymakers should revisit the subject of recommended illuminance levels regularly as LED technology advances and the price/service balance point evolves.

  16. Characterization of non-Darcy multiphase flow in petroleum bearing formations. Annual status report, May 14, 1991--May 13, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, R.D.; Civan, F.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this research are: Develop a proper theoretical model for characterizing non-Darcy multi-phase flow in petroleum bearing formations. Develop an experimental technique for measuring non-Darcy flow coefficients under multiphase flow at insitu reservoir conditions. Develop dimensional consistent correlations to express the non-Darcy flow coefficient as a function of rock and fluid properties for consolidated and unconsolidated porous media. The research accomplished during the period May 1991--May 1992 focused upon theoretical and experimental studies of multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous media.

  17. Measuring temperature-dependent propagating disturbances in coronal fan loops using multiple SDO/AIA channels and the surfing transform technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uritsky, Vadim M.; Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M.; Viall, Nicholeen M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A set of co-aligned high-resolution images from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory is used to investigate propagating disturbances (PDs) in warm fan loops at the periphery of a non-flaring active region NOAA AR 11082. To measure PD speeds at multiple coronal temperatures, a new data analysis methodology is proposed enabling a quantitative description of subvisual coronal motions with low signal-to-noise ratios of the order of 0.1%. The technique operates with a set of one-dimensional 'surfing' signals extracted from position-time plots of several AIA channels through a modified version of Radon transform. The signals are used to evaluate a two-dimensional power spectral density distribution in the frequency-velocity space that exhibits a resonance in the presence of quasi-periodic PDs. By applying this analysis to the same fan loop structures observed in several AIA channels, we found that the traveling velocity of PDs increases with the temperature of the coronal plasma following the square-root dependence predicted for slow mode magneto-acoustic waves which seem to be the dominating wave mode in the loop structures studied. This result extends recent observations by Kiddie et al. to a more general class of fan loop system not associated with sunspots and demonstrating consistent slow mode activity in up to four AIA channels.

  18. Advanced tomographic flow diagnostics for opaque multiphase fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torczynski, J.R.; O`Hern, T.J.; Adkins, D.R.; Jackson, N.B.; Shollenberger, K.A.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the work performed for the ``Advanced Tomographic Flow Diagnostics for Opaque Multiphase Fluids`` LDRD (Laboratory-Directed Research and Development) project and is presented as the fulfillment of the LDRD reporting requirement. Dispersed multiphase flows, particularly gas-liquid flows, are industrially important to the chemical and applied-energy industries, where bubble-column reactors are employed for chemical synthesis and waste treatment. Due to the large range of length scales (10{sup {minus}6}-10{sup 1}m) inherent in real systems, direct numerical simulation is not possible at present, so computational simulations are forced to use models of subgrid-scale processes, the accuracy of which strongly impacts simulation fidelity. The development and validation of such subgrid-scale models requires data sets at representative conditions. The ideal measurement techniques would provide spatially and temporally resolved full-field measurements of the distributions of all phases, their velocity fields, and additional associated quantities such as pressure and temperature. No technique or set of techniques is known that satisfies this requirement. In this study, efforts are focused on characterizing the spatial distribution of the phases in two-phase gas-liquid flow and in three-phase gas-liquid-solid flow. Due to its industrial importance, the bubble-column geometry is selected for diagnostics development and assessment. Two bubble-column testbeds are utilized: one at laboratory scale and one close to industrial scale. Several techniques for measuring the phase distributions at conditions of industrial interest are examined: level-rise measurements, differential-pressure measurements, bulk electrical impedance measurements, electrical bubble probes, x-ray tomography, gamma-densitometry tomography, and electrical impedance tomography.

  19. Measurement Measurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Catch Composition - Pelagic codes M Male F Female I Indeterminate U Unknown (not inspected) #12;Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Type Measurement Photos Comment Length 1 Version 1.2 6/2011 HookNo. Species name

  20. Isolation of flow and nonflow correlations by two- and four-particle cumulant measurements of azimuthal harmonics in ?sNN = 200 GeV Au+Au collisions.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abdelwahab, N. M.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A data-driven method was applied to Au+Au collisions at ?sNN = 200 GeV made with the STAR detector at RHIC to isolate pseudorapidity distance ??-dependent and ??-independent correlations by using two- and four-particle azimuthal cumulant measurements. We identified a ??-independent component of the correlation, which is dominated by anisotropic flow and flow fluctuations. It was also found to be independent of ? within the measured range of pseudorapidity |?| T less than 2 GeV/c. The ??-dependent part, attributed tomore »nonflow correlations, is found to be 5% ± 2%(sys.) relative to the flow of the measured second harmonic cumulant at |??| > 0.7. (author)« less

  1. Flow of suspensions in pipelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nasr-El-Din, H.A. [Laboratory R& D Center, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Slurry pipelines are used in many industrial applications. Several parameters are often needed by the operator, including critical deposit velocity, solids concentration, and particle velocity profiles. This chapter first reviews important formulas used to predict critical deposit velocity both in Newtonian and non-Newtonian (power-law) carrier fluids. Various methods to measure local velocity and solids concentration profiles in slurry pipelines are discussed. Local solids concentration can be measured by sample withdrawal technique. However, the sample should be withdrawn at isokinetic conditions. Sampling downstream of tees and elbows can result in significant errors in measuring solids concentration. Gamma-ray absorption methods can be used; however, two scans are needed to obtain local solids concentration. Bulk velocity of conductive slurries can be obtained using magnetic flow meters mounted on a vertical section of the pipe. Local particle velocity can be obtained using conductivity probes. NMR methods can be used to measure concentration and particle velocity profiles but are limited to small-diameter pipes. Vertical solids concentration of coarse slurries flowing in a horizontal pipeline exhibits a positive gradient near the bottom of the pipe. Traditional models to predict these profiles are given, and new mathematical models and computer software to determine these profiles are introduced. 104 refs., 31 figs., 1 tab.

  2. A new localized corrosion monitoring technique for the evaluation of oilfield inhibitors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, S.L.; Griffin, A.M.; Garcia, J.G. Jr. [Nalco/Exxon Energy Chemicals, L.P., Sugar Land, TX (United States); Yang, B. [Nalco Chemical Co., Naperville, IL (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow induced localized corrosion (FILC) is one of the major problems in the oilfield. Presently very few effective techniques are available for monitoring localized corrosion in oilfields. A new electrochemical technique was developed to provide a simple and effective way to monitor localized corrosion. The technique requires a potentiostat and a ZRA (zero resistance ammeter) as the measurement instrument. A special setup was designed to create a small anode and a large cathode. The technique was tested in a recirculating flow loop simulating FILC conditions. This technique was used to demonstrate the effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor in mitigating localized corrosion. It can be further applied, both in the laboratory and in the field, to other areas where FILC is severe. 35 refs., 12 figs.

  3. Scientific perspectives on MRV: approaches, techniques, and requirements of quantifying GHG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scientific perspectives on MRV: approaches, techniques, and requirements of quantifying GHG-up inventories - measure changes in stocks or flows of carbon, extrapolate to all ecosystems. ~Bottom-up TBMs to Bedrich Benes, Jason Lambert, Yuyu Zhou #12;INFLUX Background CO2, CH4 WindWind Urban CO2, CH4 Thanks

  4. Inertially-induced secondary flow in microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amini, Hamed; Di Carlo, Dino

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a novel technique to passively create strong secondary flows at moderate to high flow rates in microchannels, accurately control them and finally, due to their deterministic nature, program them into microfluidic platforms. Based on the flow conditions and due to the presence of the pillars in the channel, the flow streamlines will lose their fore-aft symmetry. As a result of this broken symmetry the fluid is pushed away from the pillar at the center of the channel (i.e. central z-plane). As the flow needs to maintain conservation of mass, the fluid will laterally travel in the opposite direction near the top and bottom walls. Therefore, a NET secondary flow will be created in the channel cross-section which is depicted in this video. The main platform is a simple straight channel with posts (i.e. cylindrical pillars - although other pillar cross-sections should also function) placed along the channel. Channel measures were 200 \\mum\\times50 \\mum, with pillars of 100 \\mum in diameter. Positioning the...

  5. Measurement of two-dimensional concentration fields of a glycol-based tracer aerosol using laser light sheet illumination and microcomputer video image acquisition and processing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Revi, Frank

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a tracer aerosol with a bulk density close to that of air is a convenient way to study the dispersal of pollutants in ambient room air flow. Conventional point measurement techniques do not permit the rapid and ...

  6. Fermionic renormalization group flows Technique and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    ­dimensional (t, t )­Hubbard model in the regime relevant for high­ temperature superconductivity. The purpose

  7. COMPARISON OF SOLAR SURFACE FLOWS INFERRED FROM TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY AND COHERENT STRUCTURE TRACKING USING HMI/SDO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svanda, Michal [Astronomical Institute, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic (v. v. i.), Fricova 298, CZ-25165 Ondrejov (Czech Republic); Roudier, Thierry; Rieutord, Michel [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, Universite de Toulouse, 14 avenue Edouard Belin, F-31400, Toulouse (France); Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent, E-mail: michal@astronomie.cz [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Sonnensystemforschung, Max-Planck-Strasse 2, D-37191 Katlenburg-Lindau (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We compare measurements of horizontal flows on the surface of the Sun using helioseismic time-distance inversions and coherent structure tracking of solar granules. Tracking provides two-dimensional horizontal flows on the solar surface, whereas the time-distance inversions estimate the full three-dimensional velocity flows in the shallow near-surface layers. Both techniques use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations as input. We find good correlations between the various measurements resulting from the two techniques. Further, we find a good agreement between these measurements and the time-averaged Doppler line-of-sight velocity, and also perform sanity checks on the vertical flow that resulted from the three-dimensional time-distance inversion.

  8. TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L. Mitchell1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TOPOGRAPHY OF TITAN'S ARCTIC LAKE DISTRICT: IMPLICATIONS FOR SUBSURFACE LIQUID ALKANE FLOW. K. L Monopulse Amplitude Comparison method [3]. This technique estimates surface heights by comparing of good radar return where topography varies within the measurement width, and insufficient in areas

  9. Glacier flow monitoring by digital camera and space-borne SAR images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 Glacier flow monitoring by digital camera and space-borne SAR images Flavien Vernier1, Renaud glaciers and to measure their surface velocity by different techniques. However, the image size) images the motion of Alpine glaciers. The optical images are acquired by a digital camera installed near

  10. Wavelet analysis study of microbubble drag reduction in a boundary channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhen, Ling

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    with single phase channel flow characteristics. A drag reduction of 38.4% was achieved with void fraction of 4.9%. The measurements were analyzed by studying the turbulence characteristics utilizing wavelet techniques. The wavelet cross-correlation and auto...

  11. Lifetime measurement of the metastable 3d {sup 2}D{sub 5sol2} state in the {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion using the shelving technique on a few-ion string

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staanum, Peter; Jensen, Inger S.; Martinussen, Randi G.; Voigt, Dirk; Drewsen, Michael [QUANTOP-Danish National Research Foundation Center for Quantum Optics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark)

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a measurement of the lifetime of the metastable 3d {sup 2}D{sub 52} state in the {sup 40}Ca{sup +} ion, using the so-called shelving technique on a string of five Doppler laser-cooled ions in a linear Paul trap. A detailed account of the data analysis is given, and systematic effects due to unwanted excitation processes and collisions with background gas atoms are discussed and estimated. From a total of 6805 shelving events, we obtain a lifetime {tau}=1149{+-}14(stat.){+-}4(sys.)ms, a result which is in agreement with the most recent measurements.

  12. Liquid metal Flow Meter - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andersen, C.; Hoogendoom, S.; Hudson, B.; Prince, J.; Teichert, K.; Wood, J.; Chase, K.

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Measuring the flow of liquid metal presents serious challenges. Current commercially-available flow meters use ultrasonic, electromagnetic, and other technologies to measure flow, but are inadequate for liquid metal flow measurement because of the high temperatures required by most liquid metals. As a result of the reactivity and high temperatures of most liquid metals, corrosion and leakage become very serious safety concerns. The purpose of this project is to develop a flow meter for Lockheed Martin that measures the flow rate of molten metal in a conduit.

  13. Rheo-optical determination of flow birefringence and flow dichroism with the pulsed laser method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheo-optical determination of flow birefringence and flow dichroism with the pulsed laser method online 29 August 2006 Rheo-optical measurements of the flow birefringence, flow dichroism systems under flow. However, the standard setup of an optical train, using phase modulation for the rheo-optical

  14. A comparison of techniques for on-line monitoring of unit heat rate of coal fired units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarunac, N.; Levy, E. (Lehigh Univ., Bethlehem, PA (USA). Energy Research Center); Williams, S.; Cramer, D. (Potomac Electric Power Co. (US)); Leyse, R. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (USA))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The input/output method is one of the most commonly used approaches for measuring unit performance, but it is rarely used on-line because of difficulties in accurate on-line measurement of coal heating value and flow rate. Two other techniques for monitoring unit heat rate are much more suitable for on-line application. One of these, the boiler turbine cycle efficiency. The output/loss method utilizes information on turbine cycle performance along with measurements of stack gas flow rate, unburned carbon and other commonly available information such as O{sub 2} levels, gas and air temperatures and gross and auxiliary power. This paper provides a summary of the three techniques, describes their characteristics, gives instrumentation requirements and compares accuracies. Guidelines on the applications for which each technique should be considered are also given.

  15. SUBMITTED TO THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FLOW CONTROL, REVISED VERSION 1 Fluid Flow Control: a Vision-Based Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SUBMITTED TO THE INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF FLOW CONTROL, REVISED VERSION 1 Fluid Flow Control, by visualizing a fluid flow, dense flow velocity maps can be computed via optical flow techniques by diminishing the fuel consumption of their aircrafts through drag reduction [1]. In contrast, in other

  16. Large Matched-Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Systems for International Collaboration In Fluid Mechanics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald M. McEligot; Stefan Becker; Hugh M. McIlroy, Jr.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent international collaboration, INL and Uni. Erlangen have developed large MIR flow systems which can be ideal for joint graduate student education and research. The benefit of the MIR technique is that it permits optical measurements to determine flow characteristics in complex passages and around objects to be obtained without locating a disturbing transducer in the flow field and without distortion of the optical paths. The MIR technique is not new itself; others employed it earlier. The innovation of these MIR systems is their large size relative to previous experiments, yielding improved spatial and temporal resolution. This report will discuss the benefits of the technique, characteristics of the systems and some examples of their applications to complex situations. Typically their experiments have provided new fundamental understanding plus benchmark data for assessment and possible validation of computational thermal fluid dynamic codes.

  17. J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys., Vol. 11, 1978. Printed in Great Britain A new technique for the measurement of acoustic emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wadley, Haydn

    for the measurement of acoustic emission transients and their relationship to crack propagation CB Scruby?, J C to the detection of acoustic emission in which a capacitance transducer has been used to record the transient reported in recent years in which acoustic emission has been observed during the deformation and fracture

  18. Optical 3-D Measurement Techniques, 9-12 July 2007, Zurich Kohoutek, T. Monitoring of an Industrial Robot by Processing of 3D Range

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of an Industrial Robot by Processing of 3D Range Imaging Data Measured by the SwissRanger®SR-3000 Diploma Thesis TU (Switzerland) Industrial robots are commonly used in manufacturing industry, especially in automobile industry environments. The weight and high speeds of industrial robots, and resulting high tuning moments cause harmful

  19. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  20. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and amore »correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.« less

  1. Measurement of the top-quark mass in the lepton+jets channel using a matrix element technique with the CDF II detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aaltonen, T [Helsinki Inst. of Phys.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B [Oviedo U., Cantabria Inst. of Phys.; Amerio, S [INFN, Padua; Amidei, D [Michigan U.; Anastassov, A [Northwestern U.; Annovi, A [Frascati

    2011-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the top-quark mass is presented using Tevatron data from proton-antiproton collisions at center-of-mass energy ?s = 1.96 TeV collected with the CDF II detector. Events are selected from a sample of candidates for production of tt? pairs that decay into the lepton+jets channel. The top-quark mass is measured with an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal and background matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterized jet-to-parton transfer functions. The likelihood function is maximized with respect to the top-quark mass, the signal fraction in the sample, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) calibration of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction ({Delta}{sub JES}) amounts to an additional in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using the data sample of 578 lepton+jets candidate events, corresponding to 3.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, the top-quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat + ?JES) ± 1.3 (syst) GeV/c2.

  2. Measurements of 222Rn, 220Rn, and CO Emissions in Natural CO2 Fields in Wyoming: MVA Techniques for Determining Gas Transport and Caprock Integrity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John; Sims, Kenneth

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated field-laboratory program evaluated the use of radon and CO2 flux measurements to constrain source and timescale of CO2 fluxes in environments proximate to CO2 storage reservoirs. By understanding the type and depth of the gas source, the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir can be assessed and monitored. The concept is based on correlations of radon and CO2 fluxes observed in volcanic systems. This fundamental research is designed to advance the science of Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) and to address the Carbon Storage Program goal of developing and validating technologies to ensure 99 percent storage performance. Graduate and undergraduate students conducted the research under the guidance of the Principal Investigators; in doing so they were provided with training opportunities in skills required for implementing and deploying CCS technologies. Although a final method or “tool” was not developed, significant progress was made. The field program identified issues with measuring radon in environments rich in CO2. Laboratory experiments determined a correction factor to apply to radon measurements made in CO2-bearing environments. The field program also identified issues with radon and CO2-flux measurements in soil gases at a natural CO2 analog. A systematic survey of radon and CO2 flux in soil gases at the LaBarge CO2 Field in Southwest Wyoming indicates that measurements of 222Rn (radon), 220Rn (thoron), and CO2 flux may not be a robust method for monitoring the integrity of a CO2 storage reservoir. The field program was also not able to correlate radon and CO2 flux in the CO2-charged springs of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system. However, this part of the program helped to motivate the aforementioned laboratory experiments that determined correction factors for measuring radon in CO2-rich environments. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; she is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Measurement of radon in springs has improved significantly since the field program first began; however, in situ measurement of 222Rn and particularly 220Rn in springs is problematic. Future refinements include simultaneous salinity measurements and systematic corrections, or adjustments to the partition coefficient as needed for more accurate radon concentration determination. A graduate student earned a Master of Science degree for this part of the field program; he is currently employed with a geologic consulting company. Both graduate students are poised to begin work in a CCS technology area. Laboratory experiments evaluated important process-level fundamentals that effect measurements of radon and CO2. Laboratory tests established that fine-grained source minerals yield higher radon emissivity compared to coarser-sized source minerals; subtleties in the dataset suggest that grain size alone is not fully representative of all the processes controlling the ability of radon to escape its mineral host. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn increases linearly with temperature due to reaction of rocks with water, consistent with faster diffusion and enhanced mineral dissolution at higher temperatures. The presence of CO2 changes the relative importance of the factors that control release of radon. Emissivity for both 222Rn and 220Rn in CO2-bearing experiments is greater at all temperatures compared to the experiments without CO2, but emissivity does not increase as a simple function of temperature. Governing processes may include a balance between enhanced dissolution versus carbonate mineral formation in CO2-rich waters.

  3. Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition in High Temperature Hydrogenated Water Using the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) Technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; M.A. Ando; N.F. Panayotou; C.D. Thompson

    2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior studies of Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 have shown the existence of a maximum in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high temperature water (e.g., at 360 C), when testing is conducted over a range of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations. It has also been shown that this maximum in SCC susceptibility tends to occur in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition, suggesting that oxide phase stability may affect primary water SCC (PWSCC) resistance. Previous studies have estimated the Ni/NiO transition using thermodynamic calculations based on free energies of formation for NiO and H{sub 2}O. The present study reports experimental measurements of the Ni/NiO transition performed using a contact electric resistance (CER) instrument. The CER is capable of measuring the surface resistance of a metal to determine whether it is oxide-covered or oxide-free at a given condition. The transition aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentration corresponding to the Ni/NiO equilibrium was measured at 288, 316, 338 and 360 C using high purity Ni specimens. The results showed an appreciable deviation (i.e., 7 to 58 scc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O) between the measured Ni/NiO transition and the theoretical Ni/NiO transition previously calculated using free energy data from the Journal of Solution Chemistry. The CER-measured position of the Ni/NiO transition is in good agreement with the maxima in PWSCC susceptibility at 338 and 360 C. The measured Ni/NiO transition provides a reasonable basis for estimating the aqueous H{sub 2} level at which the maximum in SCC susceptibility is likely to be observed at temperatures lower than 338 to 360 C, at which SCC tests are time-consuming to perform. Limited SCC data are presented which are consistent with the observation that SCC susceptibility is maximized near the Ni/NiO transition at 288 C.

  4. Spatially resolved measurements of ion density and electron temperature in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasma by complete floating double probe technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang Xiangzhan; Liu Yongxin; Yang Shuo; Lu Wenqi; Bi Zhenhua; Li Xiaosong; Wang Younian [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially resolved measurements of the ion density and electron temperature in a dual-frequency capacitively coupled Ar discharge plasma are performed with a newly developed complete floating double probe. Axial and radial distributions of the ion density and electron temperature under various high-frequency (HF) power and gas pressure were studied in detail. Both the ion density and the electron temperature increased with increasing HF power. With increasing gas pressure from 1.3 to 9.3 Pa, the radial profile of ion density below the driven electrode experienced a change from ''bimodal'' to ''unimodal'' shape, with better uniformity being achieved at the optimal pressure of about 5 Pa. In addition, changing the axial profile of ion density was also observed with the peak shift toward the powered electrode at higher pressures. The measured results showed satisfying consistency with that of improved two dimensional fluid simulations.

  5. Measurement of the Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Composition from 10^{17} to 10^{18.3} eV Using a Hybrid Fluorescence Technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Abu-Zayyad; K. Belov; D. J. Bird; J. Boyer; Z. Cao; M. Catanese; G. F. Chen; R. W. Clay; C. E. Covault; H. Y. Dai; B. R. Dawson; J. W. Elbert; B. E. Fick; L. F. Fortson; J. W. Fowler; K. G. Gibbs; M. A. K. Glasmacher; K. D. Green; Y. Ho; A. Huang; C. C. Jui; M. J. Kidd; D. B. Kieda; B. C. Knapp; S. Ko; C. G. Larsen; W. Lee; E. C. Loh; E. J. Mannel; J. Matthews; J. N. Matthews; B. J. Newport; D. F. Nitz; R. A. Ong; K. M. Simpson; J. D. Smith; D. Sinclair; P. Sokolsky; P. Sommers; C. Song; J. K. K. Tang; S. B. Thomas; J. .van der Velde; L. R. Wiencke; C. R. Wilkinson; S. Yoshida; X. Z. Zhang

    2000-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the spectrum and average mass composition of cosmic rays with primary energies between 10^{17} eV and 10^{18} eV using a hybrid detector consisting of the High Resolution Fly's Eye (HiRes) prototype and the MIA muon array. Measurements have been made of the change in the depth of shower maximum as a function of energy. A complete Monte Carlo simulation of the detector response and comparisons with shower simulations leads to the conclusion that the cosmic ray intensity is changing f rom a heavier to a lighter composition in this energy range. The spectrum is consistent with earlier Fly's Eye measurements and supports the previously found steepening near 4 \\times 10^{17} eV .

  6. Electrochemical Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Gang; Lin, Yuehe

    2008-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitive and selective detection techniques are of crucial importance for capillary electrophoresis (CE), microfluidic chips, and other microfluidic systems. Electrochemical detectors have attracted considerable interest for microfluidic systems with features that include high sensitivity, inherent miniaturization of both the detection and control instrumentation, low cost and power demands, and high compatibility with microfabrication technology. The commonly used electrochemical detectors can be classified into three general modes: conductimetry, potentiometry, and amperometry.

  7. Determining heat fluxes from temperature measurements made in massive walls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.; Hedstrom, J.C.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique is described for determining heat fluxes at the surfaces of masonry walls or floors using temperature data measured at two points within the wall, usually near the surfaces. The process consists of solving the heat diffusion equation in one dimension using finite difference techniques given two measured temperatures as input. The method is fast and accurate and also allows for an in-situ measurement of wall thermal diffusivity if a third temperature is measured. The method is documented in sufficient detail so that it can be readily used by the reader. Examples are given for heat flow through walls. Annual results for two cases are presented. The method has also been used to determine heat flow into floors.

  8. Acoustic techniques for localizing holdup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vnuk, D.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material that does not come out of a process as product or waste is called holdup. When this is fissile material, its location and quantity must be determined to improve safeguards and security as well as safety at the facility. The most common method for detecting and measuring holdup is with radiation based techniques. When using them, one must consider equipment geometry, geometry of holdup, and effects of background radiation when converting the radiation measurement into a fissile material quantity. We are developing complementary techniques that use tiny acoustic transducers, which are unaffected by background radiation, to improve holdup measurements by aiding in determining the above conversion factors for holdup measurements. Thus far, we have applied three techniques, Acoustic Interferometry, Pulse Echo, and bending Wave Propagation, of which the latter appears most effective. This paper will describe each of these techniques and show how they may ultimately reduce costs and personnel radiation exposure while increasing confidence I and accuracy of holdup measurements.

  9. Virtual Measurement in Pipes, Part 2: Liquid Holdup and Flow Pattern Correlations J. Ternyik, IV, SPE, H.I. Bilgesu, SPE, S. Mohaghegh, SPE, West Virginia U.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    the design of the system. Other important areas of application can be cited as gas lift operations for the engineer to use in the design process for a variety of conditions. Artificial neural networks (ANN) were multiphase flow systems using readily available data. The VMP methodology was tested for validity

  10. WATER RESOURCES RESEARCH, VOL. 23, NO.9, PAGES 1751-1756, SEPTEMBER 1987 Use of Current Meters for Continuous Measurement of Flows in Large Rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    accuracy during ice-free periods, but may contain large errors during winter months with extensive ice cover. The St. Clair River is particularly prone to large ice jams because of practically unlimited ice flow supply provided by Lake Huron and an extensive river delta that retards the passage of these ice

  11. Taylor-Couette flow of unmagnetized plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, C.; Cooper, C. M.; Flanagan, K.; Khalzov, I. V.; Nornberg, M. D.; Forest, C. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States) [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Center for Magnetic Self Organization, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Clark, M.; Seidlitz, B.; Wallace, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Differentially rotating flows of unmagnetized, highly conducting plasmas have been created in the Plasma Couette Experiment. Previously, hot-cathodes have been used to control plasma rotation by a stirring technique [C. Collins et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 115001 (2012)] on the outer cylindrical boundary—these plasmas were nearly rigid rotors, modified only by the presence of a neutral particle drag. Experiments have now been extended to include stirring from an inner boundary, allowing for generalized circular Couette flow and opening a path for both hydrodynamic and magnetohydrodynamic experiments, as well as fundamental studies of plasma viscosity. Plasma is confined in a cylindrical, axisymmetric, multicusp magnetic field, with T{sub e}?flows (up to 12?km/s, M?=?V?c{sub s}???0.7) are driven by edge J?×?B torques in helium, neon, argon, and xenon plasmas, and the experiment has already achieved Rm???65 and Pm?0.2?12. We present measurements of a self-consistent, rotation-induced, species-dependent radial electric field, which acts together with pressure gradient to provide the centripetal acceleration for the ions. The maximum flow speeds scale with the Alfvén critical ionization velocity, which occurs in partially ionized plasma. A hydrodynamic stability analysis in the context of the experimental geometry and achievable parameters is also explored.

  12. Supersonic combustion of a transverse injected H sub 2 jet in a radio frequency heated flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wantuck, P.J.; Tennant, R.A.; Watanabe, H.H.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The combustion of a single hydrogen jet, normally injected into a radio frequency (RF) heated, oxidant-containing, supersonic flow, has been established to characterize the chemical and fluid dynamic phenomena associated with the reaction process and ultimately validate the predictive capability of computational computer dynamic (CFD) codes. The experimental system employed for this study is unique in that it uses an electrodeless, inductively coupled plasma tube to generate the high temperature oxidant-containing gas for subsequent nozzle expansion. Advantages of an RF heated flow system include reduced free-stream chemical contamination, continuous operation, and relative ease of integration into a typical flow laboratory environment. A description of the system utilized for this study is presented including preliminary results of the reactive flow characterization. In addition, the use of the laser-based diagnostic techniques, such as planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF), for measuring flow properties is also discussed. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 1. Technique and NO sub 2 observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wahner, A.; Callies, J.; Dorn, H.P.; Platt, U.; Schiller, C. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic measurements of column abundances of NO{sub 2} were carried out from the NASA DC-8 airplane during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition in January and February 1989. Stratospheric airmasses inside and close to the polar vortex were found to be highly depleted of NO{sub 2} with lowest vertical column abundances of NO{sub 2} below 2 {times} 10{sup 14} cm{sup {minus}2} compared to abundances of 3-5 {times} 10{sup 15} cm{sup {minus}2} south of 50{degree}N in winter (WMO, 1985).

  14. Evaluation and enhancement of Texas ramp metering strategies, compliance, and alternative enforcement techniques: Go with the flow Houston. Public outreach plan (revised); Interim research report, September 1995--October 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lancaster, S.; Fette, B.; Busler, L.; Miller, K.; Messer, C.

    1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the public outreach plan on the implementation of ramp meters along the Katy Freeway in Houston, Generally, ramp metering is neither beloved nor understood by the public. To gain public awareness, acceptance, compliance and continued support, ramp metering operations should be reinforced by a strong, ongoing public information and outreach campaign that communicates the need for and benefits of the program. Because the term `ramp metering` exhibits restrictions on the public, the phrase `Flow Signals` was developed to better describe the benefits of ramp metering; enhanced flow of traffic, fewer bottlenecks, and fewer trip delays. The logo, `Go with the Flow Houston,` and a graphic identity were developed to help communicate the theme throughout the various media where both the primary and secondary messages are intended to reach 15 different audiences. These media will include: a PSA, both static and changeable message signs, a brochure, Internet web site information, letters to specific audience and media relations efforts.

  15. Flow chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morozov, Victor (Manassas, VA)

    2011-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  16. Geological flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. N. Bratkov

    2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper geology and planetology are considered using new conceptual basis of high-speed flow dynamics. Recent photo technics allow to see all details of a flow, 'cause the flow is static during very short time interval. On the other hand, maps and images of many planets are accessible. Identity of geological flows and high-speed gas dynamics is demonstrated. There is another time scale, and no more. All results, as far as the concept, are new and belong to the author. No formulae, pictures only.

  17. Feasibility study for measurement of insulation compaction in the cryogenic rocket fuel storage tanks at Kennedy Space Center by fast/thermal neutron techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, R. A. [Materials Science and Engineering Dept., U. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Schweitzer, J. S. [Physics Dept., U. of Connecticut, Storrs (United States); Parsons, A. M. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt (United States); Arens, E. E. [John F. Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquid hydrogen and oxygen cryogenic storage tanks at John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC) use expanded perlite as thermal insulation. Some of the perlite may have compacted over time, compromising the thermal performance and also the structural integrity of the tanks. Neutrons can readily penetrate through the 1.75 cm outer steel shell and through the entire 120 cm thick perlite zone. Neutrons interactions with materials produce characteristic gamma rays which are then detected. In compacted perlite the count rates in the individual peaks in the gamma ray spectrum will increase. Portable neutron generators can produce neutron simultaneous fluxes in two energy ranges: fast (14 MeV) and thermal (25 meV). Fast neutrons produce gamma rays by inelastic scattering which is sensitive to Si, Al, Fe and O. Thermal neutrons produce gamma rays by radiative capture in prompt gamma neutron activation (PGNA), which is sensitive to Si, Al, Na, K and H among others. The results of computer simulations using the software MCNP and measurements on a test article suggest that the most promising approach would be to operate the system in time-of-flight mode by pulsing the neutron generator and observing the subsequent die away curve in the PGNA signal.

  18. Superhydrophobic Materials Technology-PVC Bonding Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, Scott R. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Efird, Marty [VeloxFlow, LLC

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the technology maturation project was to develop an enhanced application technique for applying diatomaceous earth with pinned polysiloxane oil to PVC pipes and materials. The oil infiltration technique is applied as a spray of diluted oil in a solvent onto the superhydrophobic diatomaceous earth substrate. This makes the surface take on the following characteristics: • wet?cleanable • anti?biofouling • waterproof • anti?corrosion. The project involved obtaining input and supplies from VeloxFlow and the development of successful techniques that would quickly result in a commercial license agreement with VeloxFlow and other companies that use PVC materials in a variety of other fields of use.

  19. advanced distributed measurements: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the in situ water distribution within the gas 69 MEASUREMENT OF FLOW FIELD AND WALL TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN Physics Websites Summary: MEASUREMENT OF FLOW FIELD AND WALL...

  20. Uncertainty quantification using multiscale methods for porous media flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dostert, Paul Francis

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    numerical models. When solving the flow and transport through heterogeneous porous media some type of upscaling or coarsening is needed due to scale disparity. We describe multiscale techniques used for solving the spatial component of the stochastic flow...

  1. Development of AeroView: an interactive flow diagnostics laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galls, Samuel Fernando

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research includes the development of a set of experimental flow-diagnostics techniques for low speed aerodynamics applications and an interactive software for flow field data acquisition and presentation called AeroView. The data collection...

  2. Antarctica: measuring glacier velocity from satellite images

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lucchitta, B.K.; Ferguson, H.M.

    1986-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Landsat images of Antarctica show distinctive flow and crevasse features in the floating part of ice streams and outlet glaciers immediately below their grounding zones. Some of the features, which move with the glacier or ice stream, remain visible over many years and thus allow time-lapse measurements of ice velocities. Measurements taken from Landsat images of features on Byrd Glacier agree well with detailed ground and aerial observations. The satellite-image technique thus offers a rapid and cost-effective method of obtaining average velocities, to a first order of accuracy, of many ice streams and outlet glaciers near their termini.

  3. Downhole steam quality measurement

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, David O. (Albuquerque, NM); Montoya, Paul C. (Albuquerque, NM); Muir, James F. (Albuquerque, NM); Wayland, Jr., J. Robert (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An empirical method for the remote sensing of steam quality that can be easily adapted to downhole steam quality measurements by measuring the electrical properties of two-phase flow across electrode grids at low frequencies.

  4. Cooling Flows or Heating Flows?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Binney

    2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It is now clear that AGN heat cooling flows, largely by driving winds. The winds may contain a relativistic component that generates powerful synchrotron radiation, but it is not clear that all winds do so. The spatial and temporal stability of the AGN/cooling flow interaction are discussed. Collimation of the winds probably provides spatial stability. Temporal stability may be possible only for black holes with masses above a critical value. Both the failure of cooling flows to have adiabatic cores and the existence of X-ray cavities confirm the importance of collimated outflows. I quantify the scale of the convective flow that the AGN Hydra would need to drive if it balanced radiative inward flow by outward flow parallel to the jets. At least in Virgo any such flow must be confined to r<~20 kpc. Hydrodynamical simulations suggest that AGN outbursts cannot last longer than ~25 Myr. Data for four clusters with well studied X-ray cavities suggests that heating associated with cavity formation approximately balances radiative cooling. The role of cosmic infall and the mechanism of filament formation are briefly touched on.

  5. A comparison of geostatistically based inverse techniques for use in performance assessment analysis at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site: Results from Test Case No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimmerman, D.A. [GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, D.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The groundwater flow pathway in the Culebra Dolomite aquifer at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) has been identified as a potentially important pathway for radionuclide migration to the accessible environment. Consequently, uncertainties in the models used to describe flow and transport in the Culebra need to be addressed. A ``Geostatistics Test Problem`` is being developed to evaluate a number of inverse techniques that may be used for flow calculations in the WIPP performance assessment (PA). The Test Problem is actually a series of test cases, each being developed as a highly complex synthetic data set; the intent is for the ensemble of these data sets to span the range of possible conceptual models of groundwater flow at the WIPP site. The Test Problem analysis approach is to use a comparison of the probabilistic groundwater travel time (GWTT) estimates produced by each technique as the basis for the evaluation. Participants are given observations of head and transmissivity (possibly including measurement error) or other information such as drawdowns from pumping wells, and are asked to develop stochastic models of groundwater flow for the synthetic system. Cumulative distribution functions (CDFs) of groundwater flow (computed via particle tracking) are constructed using the head and transmissivity data generated through the application of each technique; one semi-analytical method generates the CDFs of groundwater flow directly. This paper describes the results from Test Case No. 1.

  6. Semiconductor laser diode facet reflectivity measurement techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael John

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , support and patience during my studies at Texas A&M. TABLE OF CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION Page 1 II. THEORY A. Laser Model B. Laser Model with Feedback III. THEORETICAL CALCULATIONS A. Power Ratio Method B. Fabry-Perot Method 5 6 10 10 11 IV... APPENDIX F VITA 14 14 14 19 21 22 22 24 27 27 28 29 31 35 38 38 40 42 43 49 51 57 78 99 120 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. 1 2. 1 Setup by Wang Laser Model without Feedback Page 2. 2 Laser Model with Feedback 3. 1 3. 2 4. 1...

  7. FIELD MEASUREMENT TECHNIQUES: STATUS AND NEEDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, N.G.W.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Furthermore, of all rock properties, thermomechanicalthat the information ·on·rock properties available in thethe inherent variability in properties within a rock mass.

  8. Quantitative imaging of turbulent and reacting flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul, P.H. [Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA (United States)

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative digital imaging, using planar laser light scattering techniques is being developed for the analysis of turbulent and reacting flows. Quantitative image data, implying both a direct relation to flowfield variables as well as sufficient signal and spatial dynamic range, can be readily processed to yield two-dimensional distributions of flowfield scalars and in turn two-dimensional images of gradients and turbulence scales. Much of the development of imaging techniques to date has concentrated on understanding the requisite molecular spectroscopy and collision dynamics to be able to determine how flowfield variable information is encoded into the measured signal. From this standpoint the image is seen as a collection of single point measurements. The present effort aims at realizing necessary improvements in signal and spatial dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution in the imaging system as well as developing excitation/detection strategies which provide for a quantitative measure of particular flowfield scalars. The standard camera used for the study is an intensified CCD array operated in a conventional video format. The design of the system was based on detailed modeling of signal and image transfer properties of fast UV imaging lenses, image intensifiers and CCD detector arrays. While this system is suitable for direct scalar imaging, derived quantities (e.g. temperature or velocity images) require an exceptionally wide dynamic range imaging detector. To apply these diagnostics to reacting flows also requires a very fast shuttered camera. The authors have developed and successfully tested a new type of gated low-light level detector. This system relies on fast switching of proximity focused image-diode which is direct fiber-optic coupled to a cooled CCD array. Tests on this new detector show significant improvements in detection limit, dynamic range and spatial resolution as compared to microchannel plate intensified arrays.

  9. Flow Test At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank Engineering...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activity Details Location Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Flow Test Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis...

  10. A Mixed Finite Element Framework for Modeling Coupled Fluid Flow ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birendra Jha

    2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    and in enhanced oil recovery techniques such as steam assisted gravity ..... When fluid flows through a porous medium there are three forces acting, per unit.

  11. Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the...

  12. Droplet sizes, dynamics and deposition in vertical annular flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopes, J C.B.; Dukler, A E

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of droplets in vertical upwards annular flow is investigated, focusing on the droplet size distributions, dynamics, and deposition phenomena. An experimental program was performed based on a new laser optical technique developed in these laboratories and implemented here for annular flow. This permitted the simultaneous measurement of droplet size, axial and radial velocity. The dependence of droplet size distributions on flow conditions is analyzed. The Upper-Log Normal function proves to be a good model for the size distribution. The mechanism controlling the maximum stable drop size was found to result from the interaction of the pressure fluctuations of the turbulent flow of the gas core with the droplet. The average axial droplet velocity showed a weak dependence on gas rates. This can be explained once the droplet size distribution and droplet size-velocity relationship are analyzed simultaneously. The surprising result from the droplet conditional analysis is that larger droplet travel faster than smaller ones. This dependence cannot be explained if the drag curves used do not take into account the high levels of turbulence present in the gas core in annular flow. If these are considered, then interesting new situations of multiplicity and stability of droplet terminal velocities are encountered. Also, the observed size-velocity relationship can be explained. A droplet deposition is formulated based on the particle inertia control. This permitted the calculation of rates of drop deposition directly from the droplet size and velocities data.

  13. Convective heat flow probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunn, J.C.; Hardee, H.C.; Striker, R.P.

    1984-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A convective heat flow probe device is provided which measures heat flow and fluid flow magnitude in the formation surrounding a borehole. The probe comprises an elongate housing adapted to be lowered down into the borehole; a plurality of heaters extending along the probe for heating the formation surrounding the borehole; a plurality of temperature sensors arranged around the periphery of the probe for measuring the temperature of the surrounding formation after heating thereof by the heater elements. The temperature sensors and heater elements are mounted in a plurality of separate heater pads which are supported by the housing and which are adapted to be radially expanded into firm engagement with the walls of the borehole. The heat supplied by the heater elements and the temperatures measured by the temperature sensors are monitored and used in providing the desired measurements. The outer peripheral surfaces of the heater pads are configured as segments of a cylinder and form a full cylinder when taken together. A plurality of temperature sensors are located on each pad so as to extend along the length and across the width thereof, with a heating element being located in each pad beneath the temperature sensors. An expansion mechanism driven by a clamping motor provides expansion and retraction of the heater pads and expandable packet-type seals are provided along the probe above and below the heater pads.

  14. Measurement of colour flow with the jet pull angle in $t\\bar{t}$ events using the ATLAS detector at $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aad, Georges; ATLAS Collaboration; Abdallah, Jalal; Abdinov, Ovsat; Aben, Rosemarie; Abolins, Maris; AbouZeid, Ossama; Abramowicz, Halina; Abreu, Henso; Abreu, Ricardo; Abulaiti, Yiming; Acharya, Bobby Samir; Adamczyk, Leszek; Adams, David; Adelman, Jahred; Adomeit, Stefanie; Adye, Tim; Affolder, Tony; Agatonovic-Jovin, Tatjana; Agricola, Johannes; Aguilar-Saavedra, Juan Antonio; Ahlen, Steven; Ahmadov, Faig; Aielli, Giulio; Akerstedt, Henrik; Åkesson, Torsten Paul Ake; Akimov, Andrei; Alberghi, Gian Luigi; Albert, Justin; Albrand, Solveig; Alconada Verzini, Maria Josefina; Aleksa, Martin; Aleksandrov, Igor; Alexa, Calin; Alexander, Gideon; Alexopoulos, Theodoros; Alhroob, Muhammad; Alimonti, Gianluca; Alio, Lion; Alison, John; Alkire, Steven Patrick; Allbrooke, Benedict; Allport, Phillip; Aloisio, Alberto; Alonso, Alejandro; Alonso, Francisco; Alpigiani, Cristiano; Altheimer, Andrew David; Alvarez Gonzalez, Barbara; ?lvarez Piqueras, Damián; Alviggi, Mariagrazia; Amadio, Brian Thomas; Amako, Katsuya; Amaral Coutinho, Yara; Amelung, Christoph; Amidei, Dante; Amor Dos Santos, Susana Patricia; Amorim, Antonio; Amoroso, Simone; Amram, Nir; Amundsen, Glenn; Anastopoulos, Christos; Ancu, Lucian Stefan; Andari, Nansi; Andeen, Timothy; Anders, Christoph Falk; Anders, Gabriel; Anders, John Kenneth; Anderson, Kelby; Andreazza, Attilio; Andrei, George Victor; Angelidakis, Stylianos; Angelozzi, Ivan; Anger, Philipp; Angerami, Aaron; Anghinolfi, Francis; Anisenkov, Alexey; Anjos, Nuno; Annovi, Alberto; Antonelli, Mario; Antonov, Alexey; Antos, Jaroslav; Anulli, Fabio; Aoki, Masato; Aperio Bella, Ludovica; Arabidze, Giorgi; Arai, Yasuo; Araque, Juan Pedro; Arce, Ayana; Arduh, Francisco Anuar; Arguin, Jean-Francois; Argyropoulos, Spyridon; Arik, Metin; Armbruster, Aaron James; Arnaez, Olivier; Arnal, Vanessa; Arnold, Hannah; Arratia, Miguel; Arslan, Ozan; Artamonov, Andrei; Artoni, Giacomo; Asai, Shoji; Asbah, Nedaa; Ashkenazi, Adi; Åsman, Barbro; Asquith, Lily; Assamagan, Ketevi; Astalos, Robert; Atkinson, Markus; Atlay, Naim Bora; Auerbach, Benjamin; Augsten, Kamil; Aurousseau, Mathieu; Avolio, Giuseppe; Axen, Bradley; Ayoub, Mohamad Kassem; Azuelos, Georges; Baak, Max; Baas, Alessandra; Baca, Matthew John; Bacci, Cesare; Bachacou, Henri; Bachas, Konstantinos; Backes, Moritz; Backhaus, Malte; Bagiacchi, Paolo; Bagnaia, Paolo; Bai, Yu; Bain, Travis; Baines, John; Baker, Oliver Keith; Baldin, Evgenii; Balek, Petr; Balestri, Thomas; Balli, Fabrice; Banas, Elzbieta; Banerjee, Swagato; Bannoura, Arwa A E; Bansil, Hardeep Singh; Barak, Liron; Barberio, Elisabetta Luigia; Barberis, Dario; Barbero, Marlon; Barillari, Teresa; Barisonzi, Marcello; Barklow, Timothy; Barlow, Nick; Barnes, Sarah Louise; Barnett, Bruce; Barnett, Michael; Barnovska, Zuzana; Baroncelli, Antonio; Barone, Gaetano; Barr, Alan; Barreiro, Fernando; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, João; Bartoldus, Rainer; Barton, Adam Edward; Bartos, Pavol; Basalaev, Artem; Bassalat, Ahmed; Basye, Austin; Bates, Richard; Batista, Santiago Juan; Batley, Richard; Battaglia, Marco; Bauce, Matteo; Bauer, Florian; Bawa, Harinder Singh; Beacham, James Baker; Beattie, Michael David; Beau, Tristan; Beauchemin, Pierre-Hugues; Beccherle, Roberto; Bechtle, Philip; Beck, Hans Peter; Becker, Anne Kathrin; Becker, Maurice; Becker, Sebastian; Beckingham, Matthew; Becot, Cyril; Beddall, Andrew; Beddall, Ayda; Bednyakov, Vadim; Bee, Christopher; Beemster, Lars; Beermann, Thomas; Begel, Michael; Behr, Janna Katharina; Belanger-Champagne, Camille; Bell, William; Bella, Gideon; Bellagamba, Lorenzo; Bellerive, Alain; Bellomo, Massimiliano; Belotskiy, Konstantin; Beltramello, Olga; Benary, Odette; Benchekroun, Driss; Bender, Michael; Bendtz, Katarina; Benekos, Nektarios; Benhammou, Yan; Benhar Noccioli, Eleonora; Benitez Garcia, Jorge-Armando; Benjamin, Douglas; Bensinger, James; Bentvelsen, Stan; Beresford, Lydia; Beretta, Matteo; Berge, David; Bergeaas Kuutmann, Elin; Berger, Nicolas; Berghaus, Frank; Beringer, Jürg; Bernard, Clare; Bernard, Nathan Rogers; Bernius, Catrin; Bernlochner, Florian Urs; Berry, Tracey; Berta, Peter; Bertella, Claudia; Bertoli, Gabriele; Bertolucci, Federico; Bertsche, Carolyn; Bertsche, David; Besana, Maria Ilaria; Besjes, Geert-Jan; Bessidskaia Bylund, Olga; Bessner, Martin Florian; Besson, Nathalie; Betancourt, Christopher; Bethke, Siegfried; Bevan, Adrian John; Bhimji, Wahid; Bianchi, Riccardo-Maria; Bianchini, Louis; Bianco, Michele; Biebel, Otmar; Biedermann, Dustin; Bieniek, Stephen Paul; Biglietti, Michela; Bilbao De Mendizabal, Javier

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The distribution and orientation of energy inside jets is predicted to be an experimental handle on colour connections between the hard--scatter quarks and gluons initiating the jets.  This Letter presents a measurement of the distribution of one such variable, the jet pull angle. The pull angle is measured for jets produced in $t\\bar{t}$ events with one $W$ boson decaying leptonically and the other decaying to jets using 20.3 fb$^{-1}$ of data recorded with the ATLAS detector at a centre--of--mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8$ TeV at the LHC. The jet pull angle distribution is corrected for detector resolution and acceptance effects and is compared to various models.

  15. Experimental and Analytic Study on the Core Bypass Flow in a Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Schultz

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Core bypass flow has been one of key issues in the very high temperature reactor (VHTR) design for securing core thermal margins and achieving target temperatures at the core exit. The bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core occurs through the control element holes and the radial and axial gaps between the graphite blocks for manufacturing and refueling tolerances. These gaps vary with the core life cycles because of the irradiation swelling/shrinkage characteristic of the graphite blocks such as fuel and reflector blocks, which are main components of a core's structure. Thus, the core bypass flow occurs in a complicated multidimensional way. The accurate prediction of this bypass flow and counter-measures to minimize it are thus of major importance in assuring core thermal margins and securing higher core efficiency. Even with this importance, there has not been much effort in quantifying and accurately modeling the effect of the core bypass flow. The main objectives of this project were to generate experimental data for validating the software to be used to calculate the bypass flow in a prismatic VHTR core, validate thermofluid analysis tools and their model improvements, and identify and assess measures for reducing the bypass flow. To achieve these objectives, tasks were defined to (1) design and construct experiments to generate validation data for software analysis tools, (2) determine the experimental conditions and define the measurement requirements and techniques, (3) generate and analyze the experimental data, (4) validate and improve the thermofluid analysis tools, and (5) identify measures to control the bypass flow and assess its performance in the experiment.

  16. Message Flow Modeling Oscar Nierstrasz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nierstrasz, Oscar

    Message Flow Modeling Oscar Nierstrasz and Dennis Tsichritzis Computer Systems Research Group University of Toronto ABSTRACT A message management system provides users with a facility for automatically handling messages. This paper describes a technique for characterizing the behaviour of such a system

  17. A biofilm microreactor system for simultaneous electrochemical and nuclear magnetic resonance techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renslow, Ryan S.; Babauta, Jerome T.; Majors, Paul D.; Mehta, Hardeep S.; Ewing, R. James; Ewing, Thomas; Mueller, Karl T.; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to fully understand electrochemically active biofilms and the limitations to their scale-up in industrial biofilm reactors, a complete picture of the microenvironments inside the biofilm is needed. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques are ideally suited for the study of biofilms and for probing their microenvironments because these techniques allow for non-invasive interrogation and in situ monitoring with high resolution. By combining NMR with simultaneous electrochemical techniques, it is possible to sustain and study live electrochemically active biofilms. Here, we introduce a novel biofilm microreactor system that allows for simultaneous electrochemical and NMR techniques (EC-NMR) at the microscale. Microreactors were designed with custom radiofrequency resonator coils, which allowed for NMR measurements of biofilms growing on polarized gold electrodes. For an example application of this system, we grew Geobacter sulfurreducens biofilms. NMR was used to investigate growth media flow velocities, which were compared to simulated laminar flow, and electron donor concentrations inside the biofilms. We use Monte Carlo error analysis to estimate standard deviations of the electron donor concentration measurements within the biofilm. The EC-NMR biofilm microreactor system can ultimately be used to correlate extracellular electron transfer rates with metabolic reactions and explore extracellular electron transfer mechanisms.

  18. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.; Spangler, B.S. Jr.

    1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device are described comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips. 7 figures.

  19. Fluid flow monitoring device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McKay, Mark D. (1426 Socastee Dr., North Augusta, SC 29841); Sweeney, Chad E. (3600 Westhampton Dr., Martinez, GA 30907-3036); Spangler, Jr., B. Samuel (2715 Margate Dr., Augusta, GA 30909)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

  20. Permeability enhancement using explosive techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, T.F.; Schmidt, S.C.; Carter, W.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In situ recovery methods for many of our hydrocarbon and mineral resources depend on the ability to create or enhance permeability in the resource bed to allow uniform and predictable flow. To meet this need, a new branch of geomechanics devoted to computer prediction of explosive rock breakage and permeability enhancement has developed. The computer is used to solve the nonlinear equations of compressible flow, with the explosive behavior and constitutive properties of the medium providing the initial/boundary conditions and material response. Once the resulting computational tool has been verified and calibrated with appropriate large-scale field tests, it can be used to develop and optimize commercially useful explosive techniques for in situ resource recovery.

  1. Near wake models for the hydrodynamics forces on a cylinder in periodic flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sibetheros, I.A.; Medeiros, E.F. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Miksad, R.W. [Univ. of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). School of Engineering and Applied Science

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The relationship between hydrodynamic forces and the reversing near wake flow field around a cylinder in oscillatory farfield flow was experimentally investigated. A computer controlled pressurized water tunnel was employed to generate a planar harmonic flow past a stationary cylinder of Keulegan-Carpenter numbers (KC) in the inertia-drag flow regime and at subcritical Reynolds numbers (Re). Streamwise (u-) and cross-stream (v-) velocities near the cylinder and u-velocities at the far flow field were measured using a three-component LDV system. Inline and lift forces on the cylinder were measured using a very sensitive six-component load cell. A modal phase averaging technique was applied to the velocity data to estimate averaged velocity cycles that distinguish between positive and negative flow modes. A positive (negative) flow mode signifies dominant vortex shedding and motion occurring from the top (bottom) of the cylinder, respectively. The force measurements were likewise phase averaged into positive and negative mode force cycles. u- and v-velocity profiles for KC = 10, 15, and 20, based on modal phase averages of velocity measurements, were used to estimate averaged wake u- and v-velocities. These wake velocities were used in the place of the undisturbed farfield u-velocity as inputs to Morison`s equation for the inline force, and to the quasi-steady model for the lift force. It was found that, for KC = 15 a significant improvement in the prediction of lift force was achieved using the wake-based lift force model, whereas a smaller improvement in the inline force prediction was obtained from the wake-based Morison`s equation.

  2. Numerical and experimental investigation of vortical flow-flame interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Najm, H.N.; Schefer, R.W.; Milne, R.B.; Mueller, C.J. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Devine, K.D.; Kempka, S.N. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A massively parallel coupled Eulerian-Lagrangian low Mach number reacting flow code is developed and used to study the structure and dynamics of a forced planar buoyant jet flame in two dimensions. The numerical construction uses a finite difference scheme with adaptive mesh refinement for solving the scalar conservation equations, and the vortex method for the momentum equations, with the necessary coupling terms. The numerical model construction is presented, along with computational issues regarding the parallel implementation. An experimental acoustically forced planar jet burner apparatus is also developed and used to study the velocity and scalar fields in this flow, and to provide useful data for validation of the computed jet. Burner design and laser diagnostic details are discussed, along with the measured laboratory jet flame dynamics. The computed reacting jet flow is also presented, with focus on both large-scale outer buoyant structures and the lifted flame stabilization dynamics. A triple flame structure is observed at the flame base in the computed flow, as is theoretically expected, but was not observable with present diagnostic techniques in the laboratory flame. Computed and experimental results are compared, along with implications for model improvements.

  3. Active load control techniques for wind turbines.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    van Dam, C.P. (University of California, Davis, CA); Berg, Dale E.; Johnson, Scott J. (University of California, Davis, CA)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides an overview on the current state of wind turbine control and introduces a number of active techniques that could be potentially used for control of wind turbine blades. The focus is on research regarding active flow control (AFC) as it applies to wind turbine performance and loads. The techniques and concepts described here are often described as 'smart structures' or 'smart rotor control'. This field is rapidly growing and there are numerous concepts currently being investigated around the world; some concepts already are focused on the wind energy industry and others are intended for use in other fields, but have the potential for wind turbine control. An AFC system can be broken into three categories: controls and sensors, actuators and devices, and the flow phenomena. This report focuses on the research involved with the actuators and devices and the generated flow phenomena caused by each device.

  4. Smokeless Control of Flare Steam Flow Rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agar, J.; Balls, B. W.

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 FLARE GAS FLOW RATE MEASUREMENT "Accurate measurement of the very low flow rates which are normally present is very difficult" 0, p 15-8). "It is generally considered too...-04-91 Proceedings from the First Industrial Energy Technology Conference Houston, TX, April 22-25, 1979 to calibration conditions. Turndown is 40:1 and pressure loss is negligible. APPLICATION FLOW RATE The mass flow meter described has been applied to a wide...

  5. The Big Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Sikivie

    2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The late infall of cold dark matter onto an isolated galaxy, such as our own, produces streams and caustics in its halo. The outer caustics are topological spheres whereas the inner caustics are rings. The self-similar model of galactic halo formation predicts that the caustic ring radii $a_n$ follow the approximate law $a_n \\sim 1/n$. In a study of 32 extended and well-measured external galactic rotation curves evidence was found for this law. In the case of the Milky Way, the locations of eight sharp rises in the rotation curve fit the prediction of the self-similar model at the 3% level. Moreover, a triangular feature in the IRAS map of the galactic plane is consistent with the imprint of a ring caustic upon the baryonic matter. These observations imply that the dark matter in our neighborhood is dominated by a single flow. Estimates of that flow's density and velocity vector are given.

  6. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang; Hu, Hui [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, Wen-Li [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); School of Civil Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150090 (China); Bond, Leonard J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, 151 ASC II, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost $300, heavy wet snow removal can cost $3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to $10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions.

  7. Drag Reduction by Laser-Plasma Energy Addition in Hypersonic Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, A. C. [Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais, 12630-000 Cachoeira Paulista (Brazil); Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Minucci, M. A. S.; Toro, P. G. P.; Chanes, J. B. Jr [Instituto de Estudos Avancados, 12228-001 Sao Jose dos Campos (Brazil); Myrabo, L. N. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180-3590 (United States)

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental study was conducted to investigate the drag reduction by laser-plasma energy addition in a low density Mach 7 hypersonic flow. The experiments were conducted in a shock tunnel and the optical beam of a high power pulsed CO{sub 2} TEA laser operating with 7 J of energy and 30 MW peak power was focused to generate the plasma upstream of a hemispherical model installed in the tunnel test section. The non-intrusive schlieren optical technique was used to visualize the effects of the energy addition to hypersonic flow, from the plasma generation until the mitigation of the shock wave profile over the model surface. Aside the optical technique, a piezoelectric pressure transducer was used to measure the impact pressure at stagnation point of the hemispherical model and the pressure reduction could be observed.

  8. Use of low power EM radar sensors for speech articulator measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Burnett, G.C.

    1997-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Very low power electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors are being used to measure speech articulator motions such as the vocal fold oscillations, jaw, tongue, and the soft palate. Data on vocal fold motions, that correlate well with established laboratory techniques, as well as data on the jaw, tongue, and soft palate are shown. The vocal fold measurements together with a volume air flow model are being used to perform pitch synchronous estimates of the voiced transfer functions using ARMA (autoregressive moving average) techniques. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Techniques for determining physical zones of influence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamann, Hendrik F; Lopez-Marrero, Vanessa

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for analyzing flow of a quantity in a given domain are provided. In one aspect, a method for modeling regions in a domain affected by a flow of a quantity is provided which includes the following steps. A physical representation of the domain is provided. A grid that contains a plurality of grid-points in the domain is created. Sources are identified in the domain. Given a vector field that defines a direction of flow of the quantity within the domain, a boundary value problem is defined for each of one or more of the sources identified in the domain. Each of the boundary value problems is solved numerically to obtain a solution for the boundary value problems at each of the grid-points. The boundary problem solutions are post-processed to model the regions affected by the flow of the quantity on the physical representation of the domain.

  10. Ferrofluid surface and volume flows in uniform rotating magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elborai, Shihab M. (Shihab Mahmoud), 1977-

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferrofluid surface and volume effects in uniform dc and rotating magnetic fields are studied. Theory and corroborating measurements are presented for meniscus shapes and resulting surface driven flows, spin-up flows, and ...

  11. Bubble Size Control to Improve Oxygen-Based Bleaching: Characterization of Flow Regimes in Pulp-Water-Gas Three-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.M. Ghiaasiaan and Seppo Karrila

    2006-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow characteristics of fibrous paper pulp-water-air slurries were investigated in a vertical circular column 1.8 m long, with 5.08 cm diameter. Flow structures, gas holdup (void fraction), and the geometric and population characteristics of gas bubbles were experimentally investigated, using visual observation, Gamma-ray densitometry, and flash X-ray photography. Five distinct flow regimes could be visually identified: dispersed bubbly, layered bubbly, plug, churn-turbulent, and slug. Flow regime maps were constructed, and the regime transition lines were found to be sensitive to consistency. The feasibility of using artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the identification of the flow regimes, using the statistical characteristics of pressure fluctuations measured by a single pressure sensor, was demonstrated. Local pressure fluctuations at a station were recorded with a minimally-intrusive transducer. Three-layer, feed-forward ANNs were designed that could identify the four major flow patterns (bubbly, plug, churn, and slug) well. The feasibility of a transportable artificial neural network (ANN) - based technique for the classification of flow regimes was also examined. Local pressures were recorded at three different locations using three independent but similar transducers. An ANN was designed, trained and successfully tested for the classification of the flow regimes using one of the normalized pressure signals (from Sensor 1). The ANN trained and tested for Sensor 1 predicted the flow regimes reasonably well when applied directly to the other two sensors, indicating a good deal of transportability. An ANN-based method was also developed, whereby the power spectrum density characteristics of other sensors were adjusted before they were used as input to the ANN that was based on Sensor 1 alone. The method improved the predictions. The gas-liquid interfacial surface area concentration was also measured in the study. The gas absorption technique was applied, using CO2 as the transferred species and sodium hydroxide as the alkaline agent in water. Statistical analysis was performed to identify the parametric dependencies. The experimental data were empirically correlated.

  12. A Simple Flow Measuring Device for Farms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    can be constructed using metal or plywood and a short piece of PVC or metal pipe. When the flume PVC or metal pipe contracting both sides. The cross section of the device is thereby constricted using lengthwise half sections of PVC or metal pipe as shown in fig. 1 (top view). The side view of the flume

  13. NMRI methods for characterizing fluid flow in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xiaoli

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the measurement and the prediction of flow permeability in rocks. We have investigated the application of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging to velocity measurement. A stimulated echo pulse field gradient approach was proposed to measure the localized velocity...

  14. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, B.B.; Ballard, S.

    1994-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration is disclosed. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow. 4 figs.

  15. Monitoring probe for groundwater flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Looney, Brian B. (Aiken, SC); Ballard, Sanford (Albuquerque, NM)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring probe for detecting groundwater migration. The monitor features a cylinder made of a permeable membrane carrying an array of electrical conductivity sensors on its outer surface. The cylinder is filled with a fluid that has a conductivity different than the groundwater. The probe is placed in the ground at an area of interest to be monitored. The fluid, typically saltwater, diffuses through the permeable membrane into the groundwater. The flow of groundwater passing around the permeable membrane walls of the cylinder carries the conductive fluid in the same general direction and distorts the conductivity field measured by the sensors. The degree of distortion from top to bottom and around the probe is precisely related to the vertical and horizontal flow rates, respectively. The electrical conductivities measured by the sensors about the outer surface of the probe are analyzed to determine the rate and direction of the groundwater flow.

  16. Low volume flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meixler, Lewis D. (East Windsor, NJ)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The low flow monitor provides a means for determining if a fluid flow meets a minimum threshold level of flow. The low flow monitor operates with a minimum of intrusion by the flow detection device into the flow. The electrical portion of the monitor is externally located with respect to the fluid stream which allows for repairs to the monitor without disrupting the flow. The electronics provide for the adjustment of the threshold level to meet the required conditions. The apparatus can be modified to provide an upper limit to the flow monitor by providing for a parallel electronic circuit which provides for a bracketing of the desired flow rate.

  17. Optical on line techniques for nuclear applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doizi, D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC/SECR/LSRM (France); Pailloux, A.; Maury, C.; Sirven, J. B.; Dauvois, V.; Roujou, J. L.; Rosset, C. D. [CEA, Nuclear Energy Div. DEN, DANS/DPC (France); Hartmann, J. M. [CNRS., UMR 7583, LISA, Creteil (France)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical on line techniques enable non intrusive physical measurements in harsh environments (high temperature, high pressure, radioactivity, ...). Optical absorption spectrometries such as UV-Visible, FTIR, CRDS have been successfully used to study gas phase speciation in different nuclear applications. LIBS which relies on laser matter interactions is a on line optical technique for solids and liquids elementary analysis. (authors)

  18. 2D X-ray scanner and its uses in laboratory reservoir characterization measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maloney, D.; Doggett, K.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray techniques are used in petroleum laboratories for a variety of reservoir characterization measurements. This paper describes the configuration of a 2D X-ray scanner and many of the ways in which it simplifies and improves accuracy`s of laboratory measurements. Linear X-ray scanners are most often used to provide descriptions of fluid saturations within core plugs during flow tests. We configured our linear scanner for both horizontal and vertical movement. Samples can be scanned horizontally, vertically, or according to horizontal and vertical grids. X-ray measurements are fast, allowing measurements of two- and three-phase fluid saturations during both steady- and unsteady-state flow processes. Rock samples can be scanned while they are subjected to stress, pore pressure, and temperature conditions simulating those of a petroleum reservoir. Many types of measurements are possible by selecting appropriate X-ray power settings, dopes, filters, and collimator configurations. The scanner has been used for a variety of applications besides fluid saturation measurements. It is useful for measuring porosity distributions in rocks, concentrations of X-ray dopes within flow streams during tracer tests, gap widths in fracture flow cells, fluid interface levels in PVT cells and fluid separators, and other features and phenomena.

  19. Visualization of Flows and Transfer Capability in Electric Networks Thomas J. Overbye James D. Weber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of power system flow values, contouring of transmission line flow values, data aggregation techniques power flows, the scheduled power flows, and the capacity of the transmission system. This paper presents. Introduction The electric power business throughout the world is restructuring its institutional arrangements

  20. Time-resolved fuel injector flow characterisation based on 3D laser Doppler vibrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crua, Cyril

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to enable investigations of the fuel flow inside unmodified injectors, we have developed a new experimental approach to measure time-resolved vibration spectra of diesel nozzles using a three dimensional laser vibrometer. The technique we propose is based on the triangulation of the vibrometer and fuel pressure transducer signals, and enables the quantitative characterisation of quasi-cyclic internal flows without requiring modifications to the injector, the working fluid, or limiting the fuel injection pressure. The vibrometer, which uses the Doppler effect to measure the velocity of a vibrating object, was used to scan injector nozzle tips during the injection event. The data were processed using a discrete Fourier transform to provide time-resolved spectra for valve-closed-orifice, minisac and microsac nozzle geometries, and injection pressures ranging from 60 to 160MPa, hence offering unprecedented insight into cyclic cavitation and internal mechanical dynamic processes. A peak was consistently f...

  1. Assessor Training Assessment Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NVLAP Assessor Training Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills and Conducting an Assessment listener ·Knowledgeable Assessor Training 2009: Assessment Techniques: Communication Skills & Conducting, truthful, sincere, discrete · Diplomatic · Decisive · Selfreliant Assessor Training 2009: Assessment

  2. Fig. 1 Subtraction technique principle Fig. 2 Relationship between flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    were scanned at 3T (Siemens Tim Trio) with the VFL (Siemens SPACE, Sampling Perfection with Application

  3. Approximation Techniques for Incompressible Flows with Heterogeneous Properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salgado Gonzalez, Abner Jonatan

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    .21) and Mh := qh 2 C 0( ) : qhjT 2 Pk; 8T 2 Th : (3.22) For a proof the reader can consult standard references, for instance [16, 34, 27]. Finally, we de ne the discrete solution space Xh := Xh Mh; normed by k kX: Clearly, Xh X: For the sequel... (1.1) when the function is truncated above and below. We introduce a straightforward nite element scheme, such as Pk 1 for each component of the velocity and Pk for the pres- sure, similar to the scheme studied by J.E. Roberts and J.-M. Thomas...

  4. Use of Geophysical Techniques to Characterize Fluid Flow in a...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    modeling with TOUGH and eTOUGH * Stochastic and deterministic joint inversion - Use seismic to provide the architecture of the system plus wells, - Use EMresistivity,...

  5. Bacteria in shear flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcos, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacteria are ubiquitous and play a critical role in many contexts. Their environment is nearly always dynamic due to the prevalence of fluid flow: creeping flow in soil, highly sheared flow in bodily conduits, and turbulent ...

  6. Dispersed flow film boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoder, Graydon L.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed flow consists of small liquid droplets entrained in a flowing vapor. This flow regime can occur in cryogenic equipment, in steam generators, and during nuclear reactor loss of coolant accidents. A theoretical ...

  7. Acoustic techniques in nuclear safeguards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olinger, C.T.; Sinha, D.N.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acoustic techniques can be employed to address many questions relevant to current nuclear technology needs. These include establishing and monitoring intrinsic tags and seals, locating holdup in areas where conventional radiation-based measurements have limited capability, process monitoring, monitoring containers for corrosion or changes in pressure, and facility design verification. These acoustics applications are in their infancy with respect to safeguards and nuclear material management, but proof-of-principle has been demonstrated in many of the areas listed.

  8. A preliminary assessment of the effects of groundwater flow on closed-loop ground source heat pump systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiasson, A.D.; Rees, S.J.; Spitler, J.D.

    2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A preliminary study has been made of the effects of groundwater flow on the heat transfer characteristics of vertical closed-loop heat exchangers and the ability of current design and in-situ thermal conductivity measurement techniques to deal with these effects. It is shown that an initial assessment of the significance of groundwater flow can be made by examining the Peclet number of the flow. A finite-element numerical groundwater flow and heat transfer model has been used to simulate the effects of groundwater flow on a single closed-loop heat exchanger in various geologic materials. These simulations show that advection of heat by groundwater flow significantly enhances heat transfer in geologic materials with high hydraulic conductivity, such as sands, gravels, and rocks exhibiting fractures and solution channels. Simulation data were also used to derive effective thermal conductivities with an in-situ thermal conductivity estimation procedure. These data were used to design borehole fields of different depths for a small commercial building. The performance of these borehole field designs was investigated by simulating each borehole field using the pre-calculated building loads over a ten-year period. Results of these simulations, in terms of the minimum and peak loop temperatures, were used to examine the ability of current design methods to produce workable and efficient designs under a range of groundwater flow conditions.

  9. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, C.R.; Hardee, H.C.; Reynolds, G.D.; Steinfort, T.D.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings. 6 figs.

  10. Triaxial thermopile array geo-heat-flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, Charles R. (Tracy, CA); Hardee, Harry C. (Albuquerque, NM); Reynolds, Gerald D. (Tijeras, NM); Steinfort, Terry D. (Tijeras, NM)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A triaxial thermopile array geothermal heat flow sensor is designed to measure heat flow in three dimensions in a reconstituted or unperturbed subsurface regime. Heat flow can be measured in conductive or permeable convective media. The sensor may be encased in protective pvc tubing and includes a plurality of thermistors and an array of heat flow transducers arranged in a vertical string. The transducers produce voltage proportional to heat flux along the subsurface regime and permit direct measurement of heat flow in the subsurface regime. The presence of the thermistor array permits a comparison to be made between the heat flow estimates obtained from the transducers and heat flow calculated using temperature differences and Fourier's Law. The device is extremely sensitive with an accuracy of less than 0.1 Heat Flow Units (HFU) and may be used for long term readings.

  11. Development of slotted orifice flow conditioner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihfe, Larry Michael

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the two flow conditioners. A baseline Co was also plotted for comparative purposes. 24 RESULTS LDA Veloci Profile and Turbulence Intensi Anal sis The velocity profile and turbulence intensity measurements obtained using the LDA are shown in figures...

  12. Heat Transfer and Cooling Techniques at Low Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baudouy, B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first part of this chapter gives an introduction to heat transfer and cooling techniques at low temperature. We review the fundamental laws of heat transfer (conduction, convection and radiation) and give useful data specific to cryogenic conditions (thermal contact resistance, total emissivity of materials and heat transfer correlation in forced or boiling flow for example) used in the design of cooling systems. In the second part, we review the main cooling techniques at low temperature, with or without cryogen, from the simplest ones (bath cooling) to the ones involving the use of cryocoolers without forgetting the cooling flow techniques.

  13. Multiphase flow calculation software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2003-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase flow calculation software and computer-readable media carrying computer executable instructions for calculating liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of high void fraction multiphase flows. The multiphase flow calculation software employs various given, or experimentally determined, parameters in conjunction with a plurality of pressure differentials of a multiphase flow, preferably supplied by a differential pressure flowmeter or the like, to determine liquid and gas phase mass flow rates of the high void fraction multiphase flows. Embodiments of the multiphase flow calculation software are suitable for use in a variety of applications, including real-time management and control of an object system.

  14. Biophysical modeling of hemodynamic-based neuroimaging techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gagnon, Louis, 1984-

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two different hemodynamic-based neuroimaging techniques were studied in this work. Near-Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) is a promising technique to measure cerebral hemodynamics in a clinical setting due to its potential for ...

  15. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S.; Morita, S.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICSmore »can provide pro#12;file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi#12;ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.« less

  16. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pablant, N. A.; Bell, R. E.; Bitter, M.; Delgado-Aparicio, L.; Hill, K. W.; Lazerson, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States); Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at the Large Helical Device. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS can provide profile measurements of the local emissivity, temperature, and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modified Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example, geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.

  17. Tomographic inversion techniques incorporating physical constraints for line integrated spectroscopy in stellarators and tokamaksa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Pablant, N. A. [PPPL; Bell, R. E. [PPPL; Bitter, M. [PPPL; Delgado-Aparicio, L. [PPPL; Hill, K. W. [PPPL; Lazerson, S. [PPPL; Morita, S. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292, Gifu, Japan

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurate tomographic inversion is important for diagnostic systems on stellarators and tokamaks which rely on measurements of line integrated emission spectra. A tomographic inversion technique based on spline optimization with enforcement of constraints is described that can produce unique and physically relevant inversions even in situations with noisy or incomplete input data. This inversion technique is routinely used in the analysis of data from the x-ray imaging crystal spectrometer (XICS) installed at LHD. The XICS diagnostic records a 1D image of line integrated emission spectra from impurities in the plasma. Through the use of Doppler spectroscopy and tomographic inversion, XICS can provide pro#12;file measurements of the local emissivity, temperature and plasma flow. Tomographic inversion requires the assumption that these measured quantities are flux surface functions, and that a known plasma equilibrium reconstruction is available. In the case of low signal levels or partial spatial coverage of the plasma cross-section, standard inversion techniques utilizing matrix inversion and linear-regularization often cannot produce unique and physically relevant solutions. The addition of physical constraints, such as parameter ranges, derivative directions, and boundary conditions, allow for unique solutions to be reliably found. The constrained inversion technique described here utilizes a modifi#12;ed Levenberg-Marquardt optimization scheme, which introduces a condition avoidance mechanism by selective reduction of search directions. The constrained inversion technique also allows for the addition of more complicated parameter dependencies, for example geometrical dependence of the emissivity due to asymmetries in the plasma density arising from fast rotation. The accuracy of this constrained inversion technique is discussed, with an emphasis on its applicability to systems with limited plasma coverage.

  18. MATCHED-INDEX-OF-REFRACTION FLOW FACILITY FOR FUNDAMENTAL AND APPLIED RESEARCH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Donald M. McEligot; Richard Skifton; Hugh McIlroy

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant challenges face reactor designers with regard to thermal hydraulic design and associated modeling for advanced reactor concepts. Computational thermal hydraulic codes solve only a piece of the core. There is a need for a whole core dynamics system code with local resolution to investigate and understand flow behavior with all the relevant physics and thermo-mechanics. The matched index of refraction (MIR) flow facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has a unique capability to contribute to the development of validated computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes through the use of state-of-the-art optical measurement techniques, such as Laser Doppler Velocimetry (LDV) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). PIV is a non-intrusive velocity measurement technique that tracks flow by imaging the movement of small tracer particles within a fluid. At the heart of a PIV calculation is the cross correlation algorithm, which is used to estimate the displacement of particles in some small part of the image over the time span between two images. Generally, the displacement is indicated by the location of the largest peak. To quantify these measurements accurately, sophisticated processing algorithms correlate the locations of particles within the image to estimate the velocity (Ref. 1). Prior to use with reactor deign, the CFD codes have to be experimentally validated, which requires rigorous experimental measurements to produce high quality, multi-dimensional flow field data with error quantification methodologies. Computational thermal hydraulic codes solve only a piece of the core. There is a need for a whole core dynamics system code with local resolution to investigate and understand flow behavior with all the relevant physics and thermo-mechanics. Computational techniques with supporting test data may be needed to address the heat transfer from the fuel to the coolant during the transition from turbulent to laminar flow, including the possibility of an early laminarization of the flow (Refs. 2 and 3) (laminarization is caused when the coolant velocity is theoretically in the turbulent regime, but the heat transfer properties are indicative of the coolant velocity being in the laminar regime). Such studies are complicated enough that computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models may not converge to the same conclusion. Thus, experimentally scaled thermal hydraulic data with uncertainties should be developed to support modeling and simulation for verification and validation activities. The fluid/solid index of refraction matching technique allows optical access in and around geometries that would otherwise be impossible while the large test section of the INL system provides better spatial and temporal resolution than comparable facilities. Benchmark data for assessing computational fluid dynamics can be acquired for external flows, internal flows, and coupled internal/external flows for better understanding of physical phenomena of interest. The core objective of this study is to describe MIR and its capabilities, and mention current development areas for uncertainty quantification, mainly the uncertainty surface method and cross-correlation method. Using these methods, it is anticipated to establish a suitable approach to quantify PIV uncertainty for experiments performed in the MIR.

  19. Development and Implementation of 3-D, High Speed Capacitance Tomography for Imaging Large-Scale, Cold-Flow Circulating Fluidized Bed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qussai Marashdeh

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A detailed understanding of multiphase flow behavior inside a Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) requires a 3-D technique capable of visualizing the flow field in real-time. Electrical Capacitance Volume Tomography (ECVT) is a newly developed technique that can provide such measurements. The attractiveness of the technique is in its low profile sensors, fast imaging speed and scalability to different section sizes, low operating cost, and safety. Moreover, the flexibility of ECVT sensors enable them to be designed around virtually any geometry, rendering them suitable to be used for measurement of solid flows in exit regions of the CFB. Tech4Imaging LLC has worked under contract with the U.S. Department of Energyâ??s National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE NETL) to develop an ECVT system for cold flow visualization and install it on a 12 inch ID circulating fluidized bed. The objective of this project was to help advance multi-phase flow science through implementation of an ECVT system on a cold flow model at DOE NETL. This project has responded to multi-phase community and industry needs of developing a tool that can be used to develop flow models, validate computational fluid dynamics simulations, provide detailed real-time feedback of process variables, and provide a comprehensive understating of multi-phase flow behavior. In this project, a complete ECVT system was successfully developed after considering different potential electronics and sensor designs. The system was tested at various flow conditions and with different materials, yielding real-time images of flow interaction in a gas-solid flow system. The system was installed on a 12 inch ID CFB of the US Department of Energy, Morgantown Labs. Technical and economic assessment of Scale-up and Commercialization of ECVT was also conducted. Experiments conducted with larger sensors in conditions similar to industrial settings are very promising. ECVT has also the potential to be developed for imaging multi-phase flow systems in high temperature and high pressure conditions, typical in many industrial applications.

  20. Seismic attenuation due to wave-induced flow - Purdue University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2004-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 14, 2004 ... have also presented a squirt flow model applicable to liquid- ...... (2002), Comparison of sound speed and attenuation measured in a sandy.

  1. abnormal blood flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blood flow speed and cardiac pulsation using a combined PAM-electrocardiogra- phy (ECG) system, we demonstrated the first in vivo photoa- coustic measurement of the PWV in...

  2. aortic blood flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blood flow speed and cardiac pulsation using a combined PAM-electrocardiogra- phy (ECG) system, we demonstrated the first in vivo photoa- coustic measurement of the PWV in...

  3. atrial blood flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blood flow speed and cardiac pulsation using a combined PAM-electrocardiogra- phy (ECG) system, we demonstrated the first in vivo photoa- coustic measurement of the PWV in...

  4. altered blood flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blood flow speed and cardiac pulsation using a combined PAM-electrocardiogra- phy (ECG) system, we demonstrated the first in vivo photoa- coustic measurement of the PWV in...

  5. artery blood flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blood flow speed and cardiac pulsation using a combined PAM-electrocardiogra- phy (ECG) system, we demonstrated the first in vivo photoa- coustic measurement of the PWV in...

  6. arterial blood flow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    blood flow speed and cardiac pulsation using a combined PAM-electrocardiogra- phy (ECG) system, we demonstrated the first in vivo photoa- coustic measurement of the PWV in...

  7. Drag Reduction Study by Wavelet Analysis of Differential Pressure Signals in Turbulent Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ling Zhen; Yassin, A. Hassan; Dominguez-Ontiveros, Elvis [Nuclear Engineering Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

    2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drag reduction was studied when micro-bubbles with low void fractions were injected in the boundary layer of a turbulent channel flow. The particle tracking velocimetry (PIV) flow measurement technique was used to measure two-dimensional full velocity fields. Since pressure field distribution is associated with turbulence behavior and dissipation, it is important to study the changes of the pressure field. However, the differential pressure signals are difficult to analyze due to irregularity. The characteristics of these signals have been studied by traditional statistical methods. In this study, the multi-resolution technique of wavelet transform based on localized wavelet functions is utilized to nonlinear pressure signals. By using continuous wavelet transform method, the pressure signals in the turbulent flow can be decomposed into its approximations and details at different resolutions. The magnitudes of the coefficients represent the energy distribution at different scales and this also can facilitate the visual observation of the energy transition process. The wavelet decomposition coefficients at different scales plot would provide a tool to further our understanding of drag reduction mechanism via micro-bubbles injection. (authors)

  8. Field Test of a DHW Distribution System: Temperature and Flow Analyses (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barley, C. D.; Hendron, B.; Magnusson, L.

    2010-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation discusses a field test of a DHW distribution system in an occupied townhome. It includes measured fixture flows and temperatures, a tested recirculation system, evaluated disaggregation of flow by measured temperatures, Aquacraft Trace Wizard analysis, and comparison.

  9. Control of blood glucose levels through glucose measurement and insulin injection can reduce the occurrence of complications in type 1 diabetes. Methods such as the `finger-stick' technique have proven expensive, cumbersome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    Background Control of blood glucose levels through glucose measurement and insulin injection can pioneered the first portable and programmable device for measuring blood glucose levels which can also detect other blood circulating molecules such as lactate. Technology The technology makes use

  10. Techniques for remotely sensing watershed runoff potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Jerry Don

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Techniques for Remotely Sensing Watershed Runoff Potential. (August 1978) Jerry Don Walker, B. S. , Texas ASM University Directed by: Dr. Bruce J. Blanchard The Soil Conservation Service runoff equation is widely used for predicting the watershed runoff... cases, no outflow occurs through the spillway of an overdes1gned structure. Since evaporation losses are high 1n these areas, the salinity of the water stored in the structure gradually increases with time. With insufficient flow through...

  11. Global helioseismic evidence for a deeply penetrating Solar meridional flow consisting of multiple flow cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schad, A; Roth, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a novel global helioseismic analysis method to infer the meridional flow in the deep Solar interior. The method is based on the perturbation of eigenfunctions of Solar p modes due to meridional flow. We apply this method to time series obtained from Dopplergrams measured by the Michelson Doppler Imager aboard the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) covering the observation period 2004-2010. Our results show evidence that the meridional flow reaches down to the base of the convection zone. The flow profile has a complex spatial structure consisting of multiple flow cells distributed in depth and latitude. Toward the Solar surface, our results are in good agreement with flow measurements from local helioseismology.

  12. Flow Mapping in a Gas-Solid Riser via Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthanna Al-Dahhan; Milorad P. Dudukovic; Satish Bhusarapu; Timothy J. O'hern; Steven Trujillo; Michael R. Prairie

    2005-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Statement of the Problem: Developing and disseminating a general and experimentally validated model for turbulent multiphase fluid dynamics suitable for engineering design purposes in industrial scale applications of riser reactors and pneumatic conveying, require collecting reliable data on solids trajectories, velocities ? averaged and instantaneous, solids holdup distribution and solids fluxes in the riser as a function of operating conditions. Such data are currently not available on the same system. Multiphase Fluid Dynamics Research Consortium (MFDRC) was established to address these issues on a chosen example of circulating fluidized bed (CFB) reactor, which is widely used in petroleum and chemical industry including coal combustion. This project addresses the problem of lacking reliable data to advance CFB technology. Project Objectives: The objective of this project is to advance the understanding of the solids flow pattern and mixing in a well-developed flow region of a gas-solid riser, operated at different gas flow rates and solids loading using the state-of-the-art non-intrusive measurements. This work creates an insight and reliable database for local solids fluid-dynamic quantities in a pilot-plant scale CFB, which can then be used to validate/develop phenomenological models for the riser. This study also attempts to provide benchmark data for validation of Computational Fluid Dynamic (CFD) codes and their current closures. Technical Approach: Non-Invasive Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT) technique provides complete Eulerian solids flow field (time average velocity map and various turbulence parameters such as the Reynolds stresses, turbulent kinetic energy, and eddy diffusivities). It also gives directly the Lagrangian information of solids flow and yields the true solids residence time distribution (RTD). Another radiation based technique, Computed Tomography (CT) yields detailed time averaged local holdup profiles at various planes. Together, these two techniques can provide the needed local solids flow dynamic information for the same setup under identical operating conditions, and the data obtained can be used as a benchmark for development, and refinement of the appropriate riser models. For the above reasons these two techniques were implemented in this study on a fully developed section of the riser. To derive the global mixing information in the riser, accurate solids RTD is needed and was obtained by monitoring the entry and exit of a single radioactive tracer. Other global parameters such as Cycle Time Distribution (CTD), overall solids holdup in the riser, solids recycle percentage at the bottom section of the riser were evaluated from different solids travel time distributions. Besides, to measure accurately and in-situ the overall solids mass flux, a novel method was applied.

  13. High Performance Computing linear algorithms for two-phase flow in porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    High Performance Computing linear algorithms for two-phase flow in porous media Robert Eymard High Performance Computing techniques. This implies to handle the difficult problem of solving

  14. Freshwater Flow Charts - 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiper, G V

    2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the following: (1) Explanation of Charts Showing Freshwater Flow in 1995; (2) Estimated U.S. Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (3) Estimated California Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); (4) Estimated New Mexico Freshwater Flow in 1995 (chart); and (5) Web locations and credits.

  15. Development and Quantification of UV-Visible and Laser Spectroscopic Techniques for Materials Accountability and Process Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Czerwinski; Phil Weck; Frederic Poineau

    2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultraviolet-Visible Spectroscopy (UV-Visible) and Time Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) optical techniques can permit on-line, real-time analysis of the actinide elements in a solvent extraction process. UV-Visible and TRLFS techniques have been used for measuring the speciation and concentration of the actinides under laboratory conditions. These methods are easily adaptable to multiple sampling geometries, such as dip probes, fiber-optic sample cells, and flow-through cell geometries. To fully exploit these techniques for GNEP applications, the fundamental speciation of the target actinides and the resulting influence on 3 spectroscopic properties must be determined. Through this effort detection limits, process conditions, and speciation of key actinide components can be establish and utilized in a range of areas of interest to GNEP, especially in areas related to materials accountability and process control.

  16. Microfluidic Flow-Flash: Method for Investigating Protein Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenis, Paul J. A.

    Microfluidic Flow-Flash: Method for Investigating Protein Dynamics Michael W. Toepke, Scott H Institute, Troy, New York 12180 We report a new method, microfluidic flow-flash, for measuring protein reaction kinetics. The method couples a microscope imaging detection system with a microfluidic flow cell

  17. Technique for continuous high-resolution analysis of trace substances in firn and ice cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roethlisberger, R.; Bigler, M.; Hutterli, M.; Sommer, S.; Stauffer, B.; Junghans, H.G.; Wagenbach, D.

    2000-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The very successful application of a CFA (Continuous flow analysis) system in the GRIP project (Greenland Ice Core Project) for high-resolution ammonium, calcium, hydrogen peroxide, and formaldehyde measurements along a deep ice core led to further development of this analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis technique. The authors included methods for continuous analysis of sodium, nitrate, sulfate, and electrolytical conductivity, while the existing methods have been improved. The melting device has been optimized to allow the simultaneous analysis of eight components. Furthermore, a new melter was developed for analyzing firn cores. The system has been used in the frame of the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA) for in-situ analysis of several firn cores from Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica, and for the new ice core drilled at Dome C, Antarctica.

  18. Ring diagram analysis of near-surface flows in the Sun

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarbani Basu; H. M. Antia; S. C. Tripathy

    1998-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Ring diagram analysis of solar oscillation power spectra obtained from MDI data is carried out to study the velocity fields in the outer part of the solar convection zone. The three dimensional power spectra are fitted to a model which has a Lorentzian profile in frequency and which includes the advection of the wave front by horizontal flows, to obtain the two components of the sub-surface flows as a function of the horizontal wave number and radial order of the oscillation modes. This information is then inverted using OLA and RLS methods to infer the variation in horizontal flow velocity with depth. The average rotation velocity at different latitudes obtained by this technique agrees reasonably with helioseismic estimates made using frequency splitting data. The shear layer just below the solar surface appears to consist of two parts with the outer part up to a depth of 4 Mm, where the velocity gradient does not show any reversal up to a latitude of 60 degrees. In the deeper part the velocity gradient shows reversal in sign around a latitude of 55 degrees. The zonal flow velocities inferred in the outermost layers appears to be similar to those obtained by other measurements. A meridional flow from equator polewards is found. It has a maximum amplitude of about 30 m/s near the surface and the amplitude is nearly constant in the outer shear layer.

  19. FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3 1st Edition FTN4 OPTIMIZATION TECHNIQUES November 1979O. INTRODUCTION 1. COt1PILER OPTIMIZATIONS 2. SOURCE CODEcode. Most of these optimizations decrease central processor

  20. Measurement-Measurement-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Jaehoon "Paul"

    Internet Measurement- System A Measurement- System B Control System GPS Satellite GPS Satellite GPS Receiver GPS Receiver 2) measurement 3) data1) command Methodology for One-way IP Performance Measurement This paper proposes a methodology for measurement of one-way IP performance metrics such as one-way delay

  1. Sediment Transport in Shallow Subcritical Flow Disturbed by Simulated Rainfall 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machemehl, J. L.

    1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sediment samples were siphoned from the flow with a stainless steel-pipette sediment sampler. Sediment concentrations were found with a filtering technique. Sediment samples were taken with and without rainfall to evaluate the relative effect...

  2. Numerical Study of Flow and Heat Transfer in Rotating Microchannels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Pratanu

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer in rotating microchannels is important for centrifugal microfluidics, which has emerged as an advanced technique in biomedical applications and chemical separations. The centrifugal force...

  3. Numerical simulation of flow separation control by oscillatory fluid injection 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resendiz Rosas, Celerino

    2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, numerical simulations of flow separation control are performed. The sep-aration control technique studied is called 'synthetic jet actuation'. The developed code employs a cell centered finite volume scheme which handles viscous...

  4. array processing techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    telescope arrays MIT - DSpace Summary: Measurement and analysis of redshifted 21cm hydrogen emissions is a developing technique for studying the early universe. The primary time...

  5. artery diagnostic techniques: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    machining phics. (EDM) process were observed using fiber optics positioned the dielectric oil. New measurement techniques were developed to observe the spark in the extremely noisy...

  6. alternative diagnostic technique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    machining phics. (EDM) process were observed using fiber optics positioned the dielectric oil. New measurement techniques were developed to observe the spark in the extremely noisy...

  7. antenna diagnostics technique: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    machining phics. (EDM) process were observed using fiber optics positioned the dielectric oil. New measurement techniques were developed to observe the spark in the extremely noisy...

  8. Graph partitioning advance clustering technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madhulatha, T Soni

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clustering is a common technique for statistical data analysis, Clustering is the process of grouping the data into classes or clusters so that objects within a cluster have high similarity in comparison to one another, but are very dissimilar to objects in other clusters. Dissimilarities are assessed based on the attribute values describing the objects. Often, distance measures are used. Clustering is an unsupervised learning technique, where interesting patterns and structures can be found directly from very large data sets with little or none of the background knowledge. This paper also considers the partitioning of m-dimensional lattice graphs using Fiedler's approach, which requires the determination of the eigenvector belonging to the second smallest Eigenvalue of the Laplacian with K-means partitioning algorithm.

  9. The use of particle tracking to obtain planar velocity measurements in an unsteady laminar diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, G.S.; Cantwell, B.J.; Lecuona, A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the flame-flow interaction in an unsteady laminar co-flowing jet diffusion flame is underway. The flame is made periodic by acoustic excitation of the fuel stream. The objective of the research is to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the flowfield and combustion process by superimposing measurements of the vector velocity field on planar measurements of reactive and passive scalars. In this connection a technique is being developed to obtain instantaneous two-dimensional velocity measurements from multiply-exposed photographic images of scattered light from speed particles in the flow. The technique involves simple photographic images taken at a right angle to a thin laser sheet on the diametric center of the jet. The illumination source is pulsed Cu vapor laser. The important issues considered have included the particle type and size as they relate to the particle's ability to follow the flow and to withstand combustion temperatures. Also of concern is the effect of thermophoretic forces on the measurement accuracy. Both Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and TiO/sub 2/ have been used successfully and detailed information about the size and geometry of TiO/sub 2/ particles has been obtained through scanning electron microscope photographs. The TiO/sub 2/ particles have been produced from the reaction of TiCl/sub 4/ and water. The technique has been successfully demonstrated by measuring a cold laminar jet exit velocity profile. Also, good particle images have been obtained in a pulsed diffusion flame.

  10. Contamination Control Techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    EBY, J.L.

    2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Welcome to a workshop on contamination Control techniques. This work shop is designed for about two hours. Attendee participation is encouraged during the workshop. We will address different topics within contamination control techniques; present processes, products and equipment used here at Hanford and then open the floor to you, the attendees for your input on the topics.

  11. Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawfis, Roger

    Rendering Implicit Flow Volumes Daqing Xue, Caixia Zhang, Roger Crawfis* Department of Computer and then rendered using an unstructured volume rendering technique. Unless a detailed refinement of the flow volume-dimensional texture mapping and an interval volume segmentation coupled with a tetrahedron projection-based renderer

  12. HIGH-RESOLUTION HELIOSEISMIC IMAGING OF SUBSURFACE STRUCTURES AND FLOWS OF A SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OBSERVED BY HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao Junwei; Kosovichev, Alexander G. [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States); Sekii, Takashi [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze a solar active region observed by the Hinode Ca II H line using the time-distance helioseismology technique, and infer wave-speed perturbation structures and flow fields beneath the active region with a high spatial resolution. The general subsurface wave-speed structure is similar to the previous results obtained from Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager observations. The general subsurface flow structure is also similar, and the downward flows beneath the sunspot and the mass circulations around the sunspot are clearly resolved. Below the sunspot, some organized divergent flow cells are observed, and these structures may indicate the existence of mesoscale convective motions. Near the light bridge inside the sunspot, hotter plasma is found beneath, and flows divergent from this area are observed. The Hinode data also allow us to investigate potential uncertainties caused by the use of phase-speed filter for short travel distances. Comparing the measurements with and without the phase-speed filtering, we find out that inside the sunspot, mean acoustic travel times are in basic agreement, but the values are underestimated by a factor of 20%-40% inside the sunspot umbra for measurements with the filtering. The initial acoustic tomography results from Hinode show a great potential of using high-resolution observations for probing the internal structure and dynamics of sunspots.

  13. Plasma flows in scrape-off layer of Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sangwan, Deepak; Jha, Ratneshwar; Brotankova, Jana; Gopalkrishna, M. V. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar 382 428, Gujarat (India)

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The magnetized Mach probe is used to make measurement of plasma flows in the scrape-off layer of the Aditya tokamak [R. Jha et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 51, 095010 (2009)]. This probe is further used to measure dependencies of Mach number on local plasma densities and radial distances of the probe in the scrape-off layer. The measured Mach number has contributions from E Multiplication-Sign B drift, Pfrisch-Schlueter, and transport driven flows. We have determined that the toroidal flow is towards the ion side of the limiter and the poloidal flow direction is towards the contact of the last closed flux surface with the limiter.

  14. A few nascent methods for measuring mechanical properties of the biological cell.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thayer, Gayle Echo; de Boer, Maarten Pieter; Corvalan, Carlos (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Corwin, Alex David; Campanella, Osvaldo H. (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Nivens, David (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Werely, Steven (Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN); Sumali, Anton Hartono; Koch, Steven John

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes a survey of several new methods for obtaining mechanical and rheological properties of single biological cells, in particular: (1) The use of laser Doppler vibrometry (LDV) to measure the natural vibrations of certain cells. (2) The development of a novel micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) for obtaining high-resolution force-displacement curves. (3) The use of the atomic force microscope (AFM) for cell imaging. (4) The adaptation of a novel squeezing-flow technique to micro-scale measurement. The LDV technique was used to investigate the recent finding reported by others that the membranes of certain biological cells vibrate naturally, and that the vibration can be detected clearly with recent instrumentation. The LDV has been reported to detect motions of certain biological cells indirectly through the motion of a probe. In this project, trials on Saccharomyces cerevisiae tested and rejected the hypothesis that the LDV could measure vibrations of the cell membranes directly. The MEMS investigated in the second technique is a polysilicon surface-micromachined force sensor that is able to measure forces to a few pN in both air and water. The simple device consists of compliant springs with force constants as low as 0.3 milliN/m and Moire patterns for nanometer-scale optical displacement measurement. Fields from an electromagnet created forces on magnetic micro beads glued to the force sensors. These forces were measured and agreed well with finite element prediction. It was demonstrated that the force sensor was fully functional when immersed in aqueous buffer. These results show the force sensors can be useful for calibrating magnetic forces on magnetic beads and also for direct measurement of biophysical forces on-chip. The use of atomic force microscopy (AFM) for profiling the geometry of red blood cells was the third technique investigated here. An important finding was that the method commonly used for attaching the cells to a substrate actually modified the mechanical properties of the cell membrane. Thus, the use of the method for measuring the mechanical properties of the cell may not be completely appropriate without significant modifications. The latest of the studies discussed in this report is intended to overcome the drawback of the AFM as a means of measuring mechanical and rheological properties. The squeezing-flow AFM technique utilizes two parallel plates, one stationary and the other attached to an AFM probe. Instead of using static force-displacement curves, the technique takes advantage of frequency response functions from force to velocity. The technique appears to be quite promising for obtaining dynamic properties. More research is required to develop this technique.

  15. Top quark mass measurement in the tt[over -bar] all hadronic channel using a matrix element technique in pp[over -bar] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xie, Si

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the all hadronic channel (tt??bb?q[subscript 1]q?[subscript 2]q[subscript 3]q?[subscript 4] using 943??pb[superscript -1] of pp? collisions at ?s=1.96??TeV collected at the ...

  16. Aqueous carrier waveguide in a flow cytometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Engh, G. van den; Northrup, M.A.

    1995-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The liquid of a flow cytometer itself acts as an optical waveguide, thus transmitting the light to an optical filter/detector combination. This alternative apparatus and method for detecting scattered light in a flow cytometer is provided by a device which views and detects the light trapped within the optical waveguide formed by the flow stream. A fiber optic or other light collecting device is positioned within the flow stream. This provides enormous advantages over the standard light collection technique which uses a microscope objective. The signal-to-noise ratio is greatly increased over that for right-angle-scattered light collected by a microscope objective, and the alignment requirements are simplified. 6 figs.

  17. Flow Phenomena at AGS Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. P. Wessels

    1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this talk some of the latest data on directed sideward, elliptic, radial, and longitudinal flow at AGS energies will be reviewed. A method to identify the reaction plane event by event and the measurement of its resolution will be discussed. The distributions of global observables (transverse energy E_T and charged particle multiplicity N_c), as well as those of identified particles will be shown. Finally, the data will be put in context with measurements at other beam energies. These systematics will then be discussed in terms of possible signatures of the QCD phase transition.

  18. Ultrasonic flow metering system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Mauseth, Jason A. (Pocatello, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for determining the density, flow velocity, and mass flow of a fluid comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the fluid. A system for determining flow velocity uses two of the inventive circuits with directional transmitters and receivers, one of which is set at an angle to the direction of flow that is different from the others.

  19. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dacus, Michael W. (Gilbert, AR); Cole, Jack H. (Fayetteville, AR)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.

  20. Pressure balanced drag turbine mass flow meter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dacus, M.W.; Cole, J.H.

    1980-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The density of the fluid flowing through a tubular member may be measured by a device comprising a rotor assembly suspended within the tubular member, a fluid bearing medium for the rotor assembly shaft, independent fluid flow lines to each bearing chamber, and a scheme for detection of any difference between the upstream and downstream bearing fluid pressures. The rotor assembly reacts to fluid flow both by rotation and axial displacement; therefore concurrent measurements may be made of the velocity of blade rotation and also bearing pressure changes, where the pressure changes may be equated to the fluid momentum flux imparted to the rotor blades. From these parameters the flow velocity and density of the fluid may be deduced.