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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Improvement in impact insulation ratings of common floor/ceiling assemblies in multi?family dwellings with standard floor coverings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improvement in the field?rated impact insulation class [FIIC] was measured for several common floor/ceiling assemblies in existing multi?family buildings utilizing several standard grades of carpet pad and various vinyl products. Testing included determination of FIIC ratings with existing floor coverings and with other more effective floor coverings including ordinary cushioned vinyl thickly cushion?backed vinyl and vinyl products with fiber board and particle board underlayment. Test results indicate that a significant improvement in the FIIC ratings of existing vinyl covered floor/ceiling assemblies can be achieved by the superposition of an appropriate cushioned vinyl on top of the existing standard vinyl. The test results also indicate that a significant increase in FIIC ratings of existing carpeted floor/ceiling assemblies can be achieved by appropriate selection of new pad and carpet. Test data from measurements performed in accordance with ISO recommendation R140 are presented in the paper for several representative configurations.

Stanley M. Rosen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Thermal simulation and system optimization of a chilled ceiling coupled with a floor containing a phase change material (PCM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The integration of phase change materials (PCMs) for cooling applications in buildings reduces the amplitude of indoor air temperature fluctuations due to solar and internal gains, enabling passive solar, HVAC system downsizing or off-peak cooling designs. This work studies the use of radiant systems for discharging heat stored in a PCM; this approach differs from the typical practice of accomplishing this task by either night cooling ventilation or embedding an active heat exchanger into the PCM of the wall. In this study, a PCM is incorporated into the floor, and a hydronic radiant ceiling system is used as the energy discharge system. The advantages and disadvantages of this configuration in terms of cooling energy demands and thermal comforts of occupants are analyzed using the simulation software TRNSYS®. Five design parameters are optimized using the software GENOPT®. The simulation reveals that when accompanied by an air-to-air heat recovery system, this configuration can significantly reduce the cooling energy demand (more than 50% compared to the cooling energy demand of the same building without PCM) and can thus significantly reduce the energy consumption. However, the degrees of occupant comfort will inevitably vary (i.e., the predicted percent dissatisfied (PPD) increases by 2–5%).

J.F. Belmonte; P. Eguía; A.E. Molina; J.A. Almendros-Ibáñez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Passive Ozone Control Through Use of Reactive Indoor Wall and Ceiling Materials Paper # 715 Donna A and unpainted drywall as passive ozone control surfaces in a room-sized laboratory chamber. Mean deposition-50%, resulted in increased reactivity for activated carbon. In our model for a typical house, about 35

Siegel, Jeffrey

4

An experimental study of the transient response of a radiant panel ceiling and enclosure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The transient responses of a radiant heating system and enclosure was investigated for a range of hot-water supply temperatures and flow rates. The radiant heating system consisted of copper tubes embedded in a standard plaster ceiling at 6-in (152-mm) intervals. Transient experiments were performed by heating the radiant ceiling and enclosure from a cooled-down condition by using a step change in the hot-water supply temperature. Temperature transients in the water supply and return lines on the ceiling and wall surfaces and in the room air were then monitored for a period of several hours. Results were as follows: the ceiling temperature was uniform; the thermal response of the ceiling and enclosure was slow because of the large thermal mass in the ceiling; the air temperature did not lag the wall and floor temperature; and the room walls were heated by a combination of radiation heat transfer from the ceiling and convection heat transfer from the air. In addition, the transient response of the radiant system was found to be a function of water supply temperature but not of water flow rate.

Zhang, Z.; Pate, M.B.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Ceiling Fan | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TODO: Add description List of Ceiling Fan Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleCeilingFan&oldid267151" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

6

Record of Communication Concerning Ceiling Fan and Ceiling Fan...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

of communications made to DOE staff on the subject of possible changes to standards and test procedures for ceiling fans and ceiling fan light kits. Memo on August 20 ALA DOE...

7

DEVELOPMENT OF A QUANTITATIVE MEASURE OF THE FUNCTIONALITY OF FRAME WALLS ENHANCED WITH PHASE CHANGE MATERIALS USING A DYNAMIC WALL SIMULATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into the conditioned space. PCMs have been typically incorporated into the building structure in the form of impregnated masonry (brick or concrete block) or gypsum board in walls, ceilings, and floors [5]. PCMs have been macro-encapsulated in containers... suitable for energy storage applications. Zhang, et al. [10] tested the performance of macroencapsulated PCMs by developing a frame wall that incorporated paraffin PCM encapsulated in pipes. Two small-scale test houses were constructed to compare...

Evers, Angela C.

2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Spacing of Ceiling Fans for Human Comfort in Warm Temperature Conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Airspeed tests of a commercially popular 52 in. ceiling fan operating at a low speed of 155 fpm provided sufficient airspeed for comfort to 82F in an average floor area of 97.2 ft^2 beneath the fan. When operating at maximum speed, the average floor...

Spain, S.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Solar passive ceiling system. Final report. [Passive solar heating system with venetian blind reflectors and latent heat storage in ceiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The construction of a 1200 square foot building, with full basement, built to be used as a branch library in a rural area is described. The primary heating source is a passive solar system consisting of a south facing window system. The system consists of: a set of windows located in the south facing wall only, composed of double glazed units; a set of reflectors mounted in each window which reflects sunlight up to the ceiling (the reflectors are similar to venetian blinds); a storage area in the ceiling which absorbs the heat from the reflected sunlight and stores it in foil salt pouches laid in the ceiling; and an automated curtain which automatically covers and uncovers the south facing window system. The system is totally passive and uses no blowers, pumps or other active types of heat distribution equipment. The building contains a basement which is normally not heated, and the north facing wall is bermed four feet high around the north side.

Schneider, A.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Development of a High Efficiency Ceiling Fan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of ceiling fans to improve comfort during the cooling season is well documented (Rohles et al.. 1983; Fairey et al.. 1986). There are at least two cases: In the first where air conditioning is unavailable, adding ceiling fans may...

Parker, D. S.; Callahan, M. P.; Sonne, J. K.; Su, G. H.; Hibbs, B. D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental Approaches to Probe the Properties of Supercooled Liquids near the Glass Breaking Through the Glass Ceiling: Recent Experimental...

12

Breaking through the Glass Ceiling: The Correlation Between the...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

through the Glass Ceiling: The Correlation Between the Self-Diffusivity in and Krypton Permeation through Deeply Breaking through the Glass Ceiling: The Correlation Between the...

13

Sandia National Laboratories: 39,000 Pounds of Ceiling Tiles...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

acoustic lay-in ceiling tiles from going to the landfill and returned them to the manufacturer for recycle. Pollution Prevention (P2) and Sandia's Facilities team worked...

14

Transmission of sound through suspended ceilings from HVAC terminal units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An ASHRAE project to investigate factors determining the sound pressure levels in rooms below ceilings concealing air?terminal units has been completed. Four terminal units installed close to the six ceiling types used were the major noise sources. They were supplemented by two simulators powered by loudspeakers. Sound power was measured for each device in the 156 cubic meter test room in its reverberant condition. The levels in the room were measured for each combination of source and ceiling tile. Sound pressure level was measured as a function of distance from two sources in the room below. The main intent of the project was to validate ARI Standard 885 which provides a calculation method for such situations. Differences among ceiling types were less than expected; leakage around the edges of each panel is a dominant transmission path. Ceiling attenuations at low frequencies were found to depend on the area of the lower face of the units. Sound levels in the room were essentially uniform when the source was above the ceiling. The decay of sound with distance from the sources below the ceiling was found to depend on the inverse of the room reverberation time.

Alf Warnock

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

First Floor1 Second Floor2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resource Center Financial Counseling & Infusion Center Scheduling Lactation Room Meditation Garden Infusion Center Clinical Lab Waiting Playground Registration Infusion Center Waiting Second Floor Research Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Conference Room 2250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Financial Counseling & Infusion

Gleeson, Joseph G.

16

Building America Case Study: Raised Ceiling Interior Duct System, New Smyrna, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of BA-PIRC's longtime Habitat for Humanity partners, S.E. Volusia CO (SEVHFH), was interested in building a home to the new Challenge Home standards. SEVHFH routinely builds ENERGY STAR V3.1 homes. The only modification to their design needed to comply with the Challenge Home criteria was the interior duct requirement. Unwilling to incur the added costs of a foam roof deck or wall heights above 8 feet to accommodate a fur-down chase SEVHFH opted to build a fur-up or raised ceiling chase.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

List of Ceiling Fan Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fan Incentives Fan Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 99 Ceiling Fan Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 99) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active AEP Ohio (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Residential Building Insulation Ceiling Fan Central Air conditioners Custom/Others pending approval Duct/Air sealing Heat pumps Lighting Motors Programmable Thermostats Windows Yes AEP Ohio (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Ohio) Utility Rebate Program Ohio Residential Building Insulation Ceiling Fan Central Air conditioners Custom/Others pending approval Dehumidifiers Duct/Air sealing Heat pumps Lighting Motors Programmable Thermostats

18

Commercial Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes |  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes Air Barrier Requirements for Insulated Ceilings - Code Notes The 2009 International Energy Conservation Code requires openings in the building envelope to be sealed to prevent air leakage into and out of the space, including an air barrier at insulation installations. Publication Date: Wednesday, June 22, 2011 cn_commercial_air_barrier_requirements_for_insulated_ceilings.pdf Document Details Prepared by: Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy Building Energy Codes Program Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 2009 IECC Document type: Code Notes Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy USA.gov Last Updated: Thursday, September 20, 2012 - 17:25

19

2014-10-27 Issuance: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fan Light Kits...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

27 Issuance: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fan Light Kits; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking 2014-10-27 Issuance: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fan Light Kits; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking...

20

Mechanical decontamination techniques for floor drain systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The unprecedented nature of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) following the 1979 accident has necessitated the development of new techniques to deal with radiation and contamination in the plant. One of these problems was decontamination of floor drain systems, which had become highly contaminated with various forms of dirt and sludge containing high levels of fission products and fuel from the damaged reactor core. The bulk of this contamination is loosely adherent to the drain pipe walls; however, significant amounts of contamination have become incorporated into pipe wall oxide and corrosion layers and embedded in microscopic pits and fissures in the pipe wall material. The need to remove this contamination was recognized early in the TMI-2 cleanup effort. A program consisting of development and laboratory testing of floor drain decontamination techniques was undertaken early in the cleanup with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Based on this initial research, two techniques were judged to show promise for use at TMI-2: a rotating brush hone system and a high-pressure water mole nozzle system. Actual use of these devices to clean floor drains at TMI-2 has yielded mixed decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness that has been obtained is highly dependent on the nature of the contamination in the drain pipe and the combination of decontamination techniques used.

Palau, G.L.; Saigusa, Moriyuki

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

THE GLASS CEILING: STRUCTURAL, CULTURAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL CAREER BARRIERS FOR FRENCH AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE GLASS CEILING: STRUCTURAL, CULTURAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL CAREER BARRIERS FOR FRENCH AND TURKISH is particularly focused on the glass ceiling issues and the main career obstacles for female executives based to the concept of the `glass ceiling'. A comparative descriptive analysis was conducted to show differences

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

22

Thermal capacity of composite floor slabs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Thermal building simulation tools take account of the thermal capacity of the walls and floors by a one-dimensional characterization. The objective was to obtain thermal equivalent parameters for ribbed or composite slab elements that can be input into one-dimensional models. Method Transient finite element calculations (FEM) were used to establish the heat transfer to and from composite floors using four deck profiles and for daily heating cycles in compartments with defined heat gains and operating conditions. Results The performance of composite slabs was compared to a concrete flat slab for a typical office in the UK and Germany. It was shown that a deep ribbed slab generates a maximum heat flux of 30.5 W/m2 for a 5 °C temperature variation about the mean, and that the daily heat absorbed by a typical composite slab was 220 Wh/m2 floor area. Conclusions Using the thermal capacity of the ribbed floor slabs, the comfort conditions defined in terms of the number of hours over 25 °C are acceptable for many classes of offices. Practical implications Thermally equivalent properties of ribbed slabs can be used in conventional software to predict the thermal performance.

B. Doering; C. Kendrick; R.M. Lawson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Covering Walls With Fabrics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the glue a dull surface to adhere to. Fill any gouges or nail holes with patching plaster and sand smooth after they have dried thoroughly. Minor ripples can be covered with spackling compound, a plaster-like substance that is spread thinly... during dry weather and in a well-ventilated room. Cut each panel 3 inches longer than the ceiling height. Match and cut sufficient fabric widths to cover completely one wall at a time. Start with Corner I nstall the first fabric panel so...

Anonymous,

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Classroom Vocabulary Classroom Vocabulary [msamiati wa darasani  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

] sakafu / sakafu [floor / floors] dari / dari [ceiling / ceilings] paa / paa [roof / roofs] simu / simu

25

Design of a flooring removal system for asbestos backed flooring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DESIGN OF A FLOORING REMOVAL SYSTEM FOR ASBESTOS BACKED FLOORING A Thesis bi PATHANJALI SAI PUDURU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AJsM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN OF A FLOORING REIyIOVAL SYSTEUil F' OR ASBESTOS BACKED FLOORING A Thesis PATHAX. JALI SAI Pl DI. RF Approved as to style ansi r ontent bp David G. . ansson (C'barr of C'omrnittee) Alan...

Puduru, Pathanjali Sai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

CX-011401: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the walls, floor and ceiling; installing energy efficient lighting and occupancy sensors; repairing plumbing leaks; and replacing all windows and doors. CX-011401.pdf More...

27

XGSP-Floor: Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 XGSP-Floor: Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration Kangseok Kim1, 2 , Wenjun of software/hardware technologies and wireless networking, there is coming a need for ubiquitous collaboration computing paradigms and collaborative applications, a workspace for working together is being expanded from

28

How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting about 4°F with no reduction in comfort. Ceiling fans don't just cool in the summer; you can also reverse the direction in the winter to provide an updraft and force warm air down into the room. How has a ceiling fan affected the way you heat and cool your home? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

29

How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? How Has a Ceiling Fan Affected the Way You Heat and Cool Your Home? September 23, 2010 - 7:30am Addthis On Monday, Chris told you about his new ceiling fan and how it's changed the way he cools his home. In warm weather, ceiling fans cool people (not rooms) by producing a wind-chill effect-which is why you should turn off fans when you leave the room. A ceiling fan allows you to raise the thermostat setting about 4°F with no reduction in comfort. Ceiling fans don't just cool in the summer; you can also reverse the direction in the winter to provide an updraft and force warm air down into the room. How has a ceiling fan affected the way you heat and cool your home? Each Thursday, you have the chance to share your thoughts on a question

30

Price Ceilings as Focal Points for Tacit Collusion: Evidence from Credit Cards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Price Ceilings as Focal Points for Tacit Collusion: Evidence from Credit Cards By CHRISTOPHER R. KNITTEL AND VICTOR STANGO* We test whether a nonbinding price ceiling may serve as a focal point for tacit by the end of the decade. The results highlight a perverse effect of price regulation. (JEL L0, L12, L5

Rothman, Daniel

31

Ceiling-mounted Projector with 5200 ANSI lumens Large motorized screen  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Room 111 Ceiling-mounted Projector with 5200 ANSI lumens Large motorized screen Wireless-mounted Projector with 3500 ANSI lumens Pull-down screen Wireless microphones available Laptop running Windows 7 Mac users must bring VGA or HDMI adapter Auditorium Ceiling-mounted Projector with 7000 ANSI lumens Large

Hutcheon, James M.

32

Building Envelope Air Leakage Failure in Small Commercial Buildings Related to the Use of Suspended Tile Ceilings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings, they usually have a suspended tile ceiling between the conditioned space and ceiling or attic space. Testing indicates that the building envelope in small commercial buildings is substantially less airtight than residential buildings and the cause...

Withers, C. R.; Cummings, J. B.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Beautify Your Windows and Glass Walls.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-utside? How do your dqkrie outside of your house? 2 IlnKY color affect , Coloor, De~kn and Tex When choosing draperies to har- monize with a room, consider the room, proportions, exposure, view, walls, floors, furnishings, accessories...

Tompkins, Charlotte

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Vibrations of raised access floors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raised access floors play a critical role in modern cleanroom design. They have unique mechanical properties that make them respond to dynamic loading in a manner quite different from conventional floors. For example an unbraced floor is much more flexible horizontally than in the vertical direction. Horizontal vibration amplitudes with walker excitation may exceed 100??m/s in an unbraced floor exceeding the sensitivity of 1000× inspection microscopes by as much as an order of magnitude. Issues such as these become important when moderately vibration?sensitive instruments such as optical microscopes are supported on access floors typically the case in cleanrooms. This paper presents results of experimental studies involving a 3?m×3?m segment of floor and a large floor installed in a cleanroom both of which were subjected to dynamic loads using a shaker. Both drive?point and propagation properties were examined. In addition data are presented for variations in bracing and bolting using the 3?m×3?m segment.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Hot Air Stratification of Ceiling Air Supply in a Large Space Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Maximize Comfort: Temperature, Humidity and IAQ Vol.I-5-3 Hot Air Stratification of Ceiling Air Supply in a Large Space Building Hanqing Wang Zhiyong Wang Changrong Liu Ph.D. Professor Doctoral... of flow and temperature fields in atrium with ceiling height of 130 m [J]. ASHRAE Trans, 1995, 101(2): 1144-1157. [9] Wang han-qing, et al. Numerical simulation research on delaminating phenomena of ordinary air-conditional room [J]. Journal...

Wang, H.; Wang, Z.; Liu, C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency This document is the presentation delivered on the Pew Center on Global Climate Change's report From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...

37

Stay Cool for Less Money with a Ceiling Fan | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Stay Cool for Less Money with a Ceiling Fan Stay Cool for Less Money with a Ceiling Fan Stay Cool for Less Money with a Ceiling Fan May 12, 2009 - 5:00am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL After a few late snowstorms here in Colorado, I am more than ready to turn off the heat and enjoy some warm spring weather. We haven't had any heat waves here yet, but many of you have already been trying to stay cool; our friends in Washington, D.C. were sweltering (by comparison) in 90+°F weather just a couple short weeks ago! Whether you're still anticipating snow or have broken out the sandals and tank tops, you may be starting to think about keeping your summer cooling costs down. One easy way to keep cool while saving money is using a ceiling fan. Did you know that a ceiling fan could allow you to raise the thermostat

38

Thermal Behavior of Floor Tubes in a Kraft Recovery Boiler  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temperatures of floor tubes in a slope-floored black liquor recovery boiler were measured using an array of thermocouples located on the tube crowns. It was found that sudden, short duration temperature increases occurred with a frequency that increased with distance from the spout wall. To determine if the temperature pulses were associated with material falling from the convective section of the boiler, the pattern of sootblower operation was recorded and compared with the pattern of temperature pulses. During the period from September, 1998, through February, 1999, it was found that more than 2/3 of the temperature pulses occurred during the time when one of the fast eight sootblowers, which are directed at the back of the screen tubes and the leading edge of the first superheater bank, was operating.

Barker, R.E.; Choudhury, K.A.; Gorog, J.P.; Hall, L.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Sarma, G.B.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/PEW_EnergyEfficiency_FullReport.pdf References: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency[1] FROM SHOP FLOOR TO TOP FLOOR: BEST BUSINESS PRACTICES IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY. Pew Center on Global Climate Change. William R. Prindle. April 2010. In the last decade, rising and volatile energy prices coupled with

40

Building America Case Study: Duct in Conditioned Space in a Dropped Ceiling or Fur-down, Gainesville, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Forced air distribution systems (duct systems) typically are installed out of sight for aesthetic reasons, most often in unconditioned areas such as an attic or crawlspace. Any leakage of air to or from the duct system (duct leakage) in unconditioned space not only loses energy, but impacts home and equipment durability and indoor air quality. An obvious solution to this problem is to bring the duct system into the interior of the house, either by sealing the area where the ducts are installed (sealed attic or crawlspace) or by building an interior cavity or chase above the ceiling plane (raised ceiling or fur-up chase) or below the ceiling plane (dropped ceiling or fur-down) for the duct system. This case study examines one Building America builder partner's implementation of an inexpensive, quick and effective method of building a fur-down or dropped ceiling chase.

Not Available

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

DATA FUSION ENABLES BETTER RECOGNITION OF CEILING AND VISIBILITY HAZARDS IN AVIATION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low cloud ceilings and poor visibility claim the lives of more general aviation (GA) pilots and passengers than any other cause of weather-related GA accidents. Experience shows that instrument-rated pilots as well as those rated only for visual ...

Paul Herzegh; Gerry Wiener; Richard Bateman; James Cowie; Jennifer Black

42

CFD Simulation and Analysis of the Combined Evaporative Cooling and Radiant Ceiling Air-conditioning System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the ceiling cooling system deals with the other part of sensible loads in the air-conditioned zone, so that the condensation on radiant panels and the insufficiency of cooling capacity can be avoided. The cooling water at 18? used in the cooling coils...

Xiang, H.; Yinming, L.; Junmei, W.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

An investigation of a residential solar system coupled to a radiant panel ceiling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental study of a solar-radiant heating system was performed at Iowa State University's Energy Research House (ERH). The ERH was constructed with copper tubes embedded in the plaster ceilings, thus providing a unique radiant heating system. In addition, 24 water-glycol, flat-plate solar collectors were mounted on the south side of the residence. The present study uses the solar collectors to heat a storage tank via a submerged copper tube oil. Hot water from the storage tank is then circulated through a heat exchanger, which heats the water flowing through the radiant ceiling. This paper contains a description of the solar-radiant system and an interpretation of the data that were measured during a series of transient experiments. In addition, the performance of the flat-plate solar collectors and the water storage tank were evaluated. The characteristics of a solar-to-radiant heat exchanger were also investigated. The thermal behavior of the radiant ceiling and the room enclosures were observed, and the heat transfer from the ceiling by radiation and convection was estimated. The overall heating system was also evaluated using the thermal performances of the individual components. The results of this study verify that it is feasible to use a solar system coupled to a low-temperature radiant-panel heating system for space heating. A sample performance evaluation is also presented.

Zhang, Z.; Pate, M.; Nelson, R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Natural ceiling features based self-localisation for indoor mobile robots  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When a mobile robot navigates in an indoor environment using visual dead reckoning method, its positioning accuracy suffers from accumulated errors. Therefore, it is necessary to use landmarks to make correction. This paper investigates the natural landmark-based localisation for an indoor mobile robot. The landmarks used here include smoke detection sensors, speakers and lights on the ceiling that are widely available in many offices and corridors. To improve the real-time performance, the proposed method utilises global and local strategies to search lines on the ceiling, as well as the line fitting algorithm based on Hough transform and random sample consensus. The pose of mobile robot is estimated with visual dead reckoning method, and then corrected via PnP-based positioning method with natural landmarks. Experimental results verify the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

Liwei Han; De Xu; Yi Zhang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Raised Ceiling Interior Duct System, New Smyrna, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This project describes a Habitat for Humanity builder’s efforts to construct a home to new DOE Zero Energy Ready Home standards, and use a fur-up or raised ceiling chase.

46

2014-09-19 Issuance: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fans;NOPR  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fans, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on September 19, 2014.

47

Numerical modelling and experimental studies of thermal behaviour of building integrated thermal energy storage unit in a form of a ceiling panel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The paper presents a new concept of building integrated thermal energy storage unit and novel mathematical and numerical models of its operation. This building element is made of gypsum based composite with microencapsulated PCM. The proposed heat storage unit has a form of a ceiling panel with internal channels and is, by assumption, incorporated in a ventilation system. Its task is to reduce daily variations of ambient air temperature through the absorption (and subsequent release) of heat in PCM, without additional consumption of energy. Methods The operation of the ceiling panel was investigated experimentally on a special set-up equipped with temperature sensors, air flow meter and air temperature control system. Mathematical and numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow in the panel account for air flow in the panel as well as real thermal properties of the PCM composite, i.e.: thermal conductivity variation with temperature and hysteresis of enthalpy vs. temperature curves for heating and cooling. Proposed novel numerical simulator consists of two strongly coupled sub models: the first one – 1D – which deals with air flowing through the U-shaped channel and the second one – 3D – which deals with heat transfer in the body of the panel. Results Spatial and temporal air temperature variations, measured on the experimental set-up, were used to validate numerical model as well as to get knowledge of thermal performance of the panel operating in different conditions. Conclusion Preliminary results of experimental tests confirmed the ability of the proposed heat storage unit to effectively control the air temperature inside the building. However, detailed measurement of the temperature of PCM composite have shown some disadvantages of the panel used in the study, e.g. thickness of the walls and distribution of PCM should be optimized. This can be achieved with the aid of the numerical simulator developed in this research. Practical implications The proposed ceiling panel, optimised from the point of view of thermal performance in a given environmental conditions, can be used as a part of ventilation systems in residential and office buildings.

Maciej Jaworski; Piotr ?apka; Piotr Furma?ski

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

2014-10-27 Issuance: Test Procedure for Ceiling Fan Light Kits; Notice of Proposed Rulemaking  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of proposed rulemaking regarding test procedures for ceiling fan light kits, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on October 27, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

49

Floor Buffer Guidelines Floor buffers can expose employees to noise, hazardous materials, and hazards related to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as possible. 3. Custodial staff should receive training on the safe operation of the machines, pads, and floor floors. 5. Select the least abrasive pad for stripping operations. 6. Do not over-strip, and stop and use of hearing protection. Propane Re-filling Only trained and qualified personnel may refill propane

de Lijser, Peter

50

Wide-area egomotion from omnidirectional video and coarse 3D structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis describes a method for real-time vision-based localization in human-made environments. Given a coarse model of the structure (walls, floors, ceilings, doors and windows) and a video sequence, the system computes ...

Koch, Olivier (Olivier A.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Floor tube corrosion in recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lower sulfur emissions at a pulp mill result in higher sulfidity levels and in the enrichment of potassium in the mill`s liquor system. The sulfidity values at Scandinavian kraft mills previously fluctuated between 28 and 35%; today they exceed 45%. Viscosity measurements show that the viscosity decreases drastically when the sulfidity increases from 30 mole% to 40 mole%, its potassium and chlorine levels are high enough, and the char bed is low, the smelt flows easily and may penetrate the char bed, approaching the floor tubes. In extreme cases, the hot smelt destroys the layer of solidified smelt on the floor tube`s surface and reacts very rapidly with the floor tube.

Klarin, A. [A. Ahistrom Corp., Helsinki (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail" Showing 1 page using this...

53

Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Daytime health services Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime" Showing 4...

54

Meadowlark House  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Large windows and open floor Large windows and open floor plan in main living area provide natural daylight * LED light bulbs reduce energy consumption * East-west orientation optimizes natural lighting and passive heating * Energy recovery ventilator reduces energy requirements for interior heating and cooling * Air-tight building envelope prevents air leakage and moisture infiltration * Superinsulation in walls, ceilings, and floor slab with R-value for walls (R-40), foundation floor slab (R-50),

55

Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Floor Support Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 Scheduling X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Cathy Knotts Lisa Dunn 120 120 3191 2087 User Check-In/Badging Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 User Financial Accounts Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 Beam Lines/ VUV Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Mechanical Chuck Troxel, Jr. 120 2700 Beam Lines/ X-ray-VUV Electronics Alex Garachtchenko 120 3440 Beam Lines/ Macromolecular Crystallography Mike Soltis 277 3050 SMB XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer Erik Nelson 274 274 4944 3938 MEIS XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer

56

User ESH Support (UES)/Floor Coordinators  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators Bruce Glagola, Group Leader Building 431, Room Z005 Phone: 630-252-9797 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: glagola@aps.anl.gov Nena Moonier Building 431, Room Z008 Phone: 630-252-8504 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: nmoonier@aps.anl.gov Karen Kucer Building 401, Room C3257C Phone: 630-252-9091 Fax: 630-252-5948 E-mail: kucer@aps.anl.gov Floor Coordinators Bruno Fieramosca Building 432, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0201 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site page: 4-0201 E-mail: bgf@aps.anl.gov Shane Flood Building 436, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0600 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0600 E-mail: saf@aps.anl.gov Patti Pedergnana Building 434, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0401 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0401 E-mail: neitzke@aps.anl.gov Wendy VanWingeren Building 435, Room C001

57

2014-09-16 Issuance: Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans: Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans: Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document.

58

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Floors | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Floors Floors The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on mass floors; steel joist or wood frame floors; slab-on-grade floors. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_floors.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

59

COMET TA Floor Plan 100225.vc6  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rack Argus Chamber Interaction Chamber Work Station 8 3 0 2 - V B L as phere CL 420mm f rom N i nner wall. Lens h older E f ac e27mm f rom W i nner w all. Parabola CL 534m m from...

60

Behavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gravity based sys- tems suspension mechanisms or linear spring based systems coil springs or rubber unitsBehavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems Shenlei Cui, M.ASCE1 ; Michel of bidirectional spring units used as isolators in a kind of isolated floor system, three types of characterization

Bruneau, Michel

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

The glass ceiling in SMEs and its impact on firm managerialisation: a comparison between family and non-family SMEs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article aims at comparing family and non-family SMEs with regard to the role of women in ownership, governance and management roles and its relation with the firm managerialisation. We conducted a quantitative deductive design and tested the hypotheses through a questionnaire survey of 313 SMEs in Italy. Findings reveal that family SMEs are a more favourable context for breaking through the glass ceiling. Results also show that in non-family SMEs managerial mechanisms are more relevant when women are involved in governance and managerial roles. On the contrary, in family SMEs, our findings do not outline an active role of women in favouring firm managerialisation.

Lucrezia Songini; Luca Gnan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Issuance 2014-11-21:Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans: Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document, Notice of Comment Period Extension  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Energy Efficiency Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans: Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document, Notice of Comment Period Extension

63

Wall to Wall Optimal Transport  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The calculus of variations is employed to find steady divergence-free velocity fields that maximize transport of a tracer between two parallel walls held at fixed concentration for one of two constraints on flow strength: a fixed value of the kinetic energy or a fixed value of the enstrophy. The optimizing flows consist of an array of (convection) cells of a particular aspect ratio Gamma. We solve the nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations analytically for weak flows and numerically (and via matched asymptotic analysis in the fixed energy case) for strong flows. We report the results in terms of the Nusselt number Nu, a dimensionless measure of the tracer transport, as a function of the Peclet number Pe, a dimensionless measure of the energy or enstrophy of the flow. For both constraints the maximum transport Nu_{MAX}(Pe) is realized in cells of decreasing aspect ratio Gamma_{opt}(Pe) as Pe increases. For the fixed energy problem, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-1/2}, while for the fixed enstrophy scenario, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Pe^{10/17} and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Pe^{-0.36}. We also interpret our results in the context of certain buoyancy-driven Rayleigh-Benard convection problems that satisfy one of the two intensity constraints, enabling us to investigate how the transport scalings compare with upper bounds on Nu expressed as a function of the Rayleigh number \\Ra. For steady convection in porous media, corresponding to the fixed energy problem, we find Nu_{MAX} \\sim \\Ra and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Ra^{-1/2}$, while for steady convection in a pure fluid layer between free-slip isothermal walls, corresponding to fixed enstrophy transport, Nu_{MAX} \\sim Ra^{5/12} and Gamma_{opt} \\sim Ra^{-1/4}.

Pedram Hassanzadeh; Gregory P. Chini; Charles R. Doering

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

64

Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaRestaurants" Showing 13 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1,990 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 215 + Sweden Building 05K0038 + 345 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 330 + Sweden Building 05K0060 + 256 + Sweden Building 05K0065 + 520 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 98 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 155 + Sweden Building 05K0098 + 170 + Sweden Building 05K0105 + 2,450 + Sweden Building 05K0114 + 400 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants&oldid=285973#SMWResults"

65

Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaMiscellaneous FloorAreaMiscellaneous Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Miscellaneous Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 445 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 250 + Sweden Building 05K0025 + 254 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,629 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 175 + Sweden Building 05K0040 + 869 + Sweden Building 05K0044 + 1,234 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,039 + Sweden Building 05K0051 + 1,489.92 + Sweden Building 05K0052 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 140 + Sweden Building 05K0063 + 654 + Sweden Building 05K0068 + 746 + Sweden Building 05K0071 + 293 +

66

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

67

Production system improvement : floor area reduction and cycle time analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A medical device company challenged a research team to reduce the manufacturing floor space required for an occlusion system product by one third. The team first cataloged equipment location and size, detailed the processes ...

Peterson, Jennifer J. (Jennifer Jeanne)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Wall surveyor project report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report is made on the demonstration of a first-generation Wall Surveyor that is capable of surveying the interior and thickness of a stone, brick, or cement wall. LLNL`s Micropower Impulse Radar is used, based on emitting and detecting very low amplitude and short microwave impulses (MIR rangefinder). Six test walls were used. While the demonstrator MIR Wall Surveyor is not fieldable yet, it has successfully scanned the test walls and produced real-time images identifying the walls. It is planned to optimize and package the evaluation wall surveyor into a hand held unit.

Mullenhoff, D.J.; Johnston, B.C.; Azevedo, S.G.

1996-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

70

Building America Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Duct in Conditioned Space in a Dropped Ceiling or Fur-down, Gainesville, Florida (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This case study examines a Building America builder partner’s implementation of an inexpensive, quick and effective method of building a fur-down or dropped ceiling chase, which brings the duct system into the interior of the house to reduce air leakage and improve durability and indoor air quality

71

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

72

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Naoya Motegi Information Technology that is featured by standard communication protocol like Lon Works, BACnet is very useful for managing building systems. Now we can collect much data quickly and easily and to analyze them in detail with this technology. Under the circumstances in that saving energy and reducing CO2 are required strongly, important thing is finding the effective information for building operation and control from collected data and the analysis of them. In our project, the floor integration controller that integrates the each building systems was proposed. It

73

Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Shops Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaShops" Showing 19 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 800 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 1,587 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 154 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3,150 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 245 + Sweden Building 05K0019 + 5,600 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 292 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 940 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0086 + 920 + Sweden Building 05K0088 + 1,170 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 976 + Sweden Building 05K0092 + 360 +

74

Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 °C) Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages" Showing 15 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 400 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 3,300 + Sweden Building 05K0031 + 2,331 + Sweden Building 05K0033 + 465 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,276 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 130 + Sweden Building 05K0039 + 580 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,076 + Sweden Building 05K0048 + 340 + Sweden Building 05K0061 + 90 + Sweden Building 05K0067 + 856 + Sweden Building 05K0093 + 2,880 +

75

General engineering specifications for 6000 tpd SRC-I Demonstration Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This volume contains specifications for architectural features of buildings for the SRC-1 Demonstration Plant: skylights, ventilators, sealants, doors, mirrors, furring and lathing, gypsum plaster, lightweight plaster, wallboard, ceramic tile, acoustic ceiling systems, resilient flooring, carpeting, brick flooring, architectural painting, vinyl wall covering, chalkboards, tackboards, toilets, access flooring, lockers, partitions, washroom accessories, unit kitchens, dock levels, seals, shelters, custom casework, auditorium seats, drapery tacks, prefabricated buildings, stairs, elevators, shelves, etc. (LTN).

Not Available

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program Hercules Municipal Utility - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Sunscreens: 50% of cost, Maximum rebate of $100 Insulation (ceiling): Up to $150 per home Insulation (walls): Up to $200 per home Insulation (floor): Up to $75 per home Program Info State California Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $1 per sq. ft. Insulation (ceiling): $150 per home Insulation (walls): $200 per home Insulation (floor): $75 per home Sunscreens: $1 per sq. ft. Refrigerators: $100 Clothes Washers: $75

77

Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

Maniscalco, James A. (Danville, CA); Meier, Wayne R. (Livermore, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaOffices FloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaOffices" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 5,000 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,360 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,150 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 21,765 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,500 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 33,955 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 14,080 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 20,978 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 15,632 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,101 +

79

Viscosity Control of the Composition of Ocean Floor Volcanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

4 February 1971 research-article Viscosity Control of the Composition of Ocean Floor...environment. Instead it is postulated that the viscosity exercises a control by limiting the range...magmas (to those with a sufficiently low viscosity) which is capable of penetrating the...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

716 Langdon St 2nd Floor Red Gym  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

716 Langdon St 2nd Floor Red Gym Madison WI 53706 (608) 262-4503 http://msc.wisc.edu 1 FOLLOW OUR of witnesses may always go before you and walk beside you. We bestow a red and white kente stole upon all of our graduates. Red, for passion and sacrifice. White, for initiation and new beginnings. Each stole

Sheridan, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling Roman Barták Charles, the first machine pre-processes the item (3 time units) that is finished in the second machine (additional 3 in parallel and a worker is required (left) or via a serial production when the item is pre- processed

Bartak, Roman

82

Liquid Wall Chambers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

Meier, W R

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

83

Lunar floor-fractured craters: Classification, distribution, origin and implications for magmatism and shallow crustal structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Floor-Fractured Craters (FFCs) are a class of lunar craters characterized by anomalously shallow floors cut by radial, concentric, and/or polygonal fractures; additional interior features are moats, ridges, and patches of ...

Jozwiak, Lauren M.

84

Achieving minimum impact insulation class 50 rating using resilient clip technology in lightweight construction.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Resilient clip technology is an alternative to resilient channel for supporting gypsum wallboard in fire rated wall and floor?ceiling assemblies. Lightweight wood frame construction presents challenges in meeting building code requirements for impact insulation class (IIC) and sound transmission class (STC) ratings in floor?ceiling assemblies. Through laboratory testing we were able to compare different floor?ceiling assemblies commonly used in multi?family construction. Two different structures were tested an 18 in. open web truss 24 in. o.c. and a 12 in. engineered joist (TJI) 24 in. o.c. Various finish floor coverings were used including ceramic tile vinyl and engineered wood. Structures achieved minimum IIC and STC 50 with and without 3/4 in. Gypsum concrete. Resilient rubber underlayment of varying thickness can further improve the IIC and STC ratings of the assembly as can adding a second layer of gypsum wallboard.

Wilson Byrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Tokamak reactor first wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to an improved first wall construction for a tokamak fusion reactor vessel, or other vessels subjected to similar pressure and thermal stresses.

Creedon, R.L.; Levine, H.E.; Wong, C.; Battaglia, J.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

86

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot's motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot's motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot`s motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot`s motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

88

Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

materials indicated there are variations in the changes of appearance and wear in these materials. Solid sheet vinyls and rubber tiles showed significantly less wear than asphalt tiles, vinyl- asbestos tiles, linoleums and cork. Asphalt tiles showed... in home installations. Six common floor covering materials-solid .sheet vinyls, rubber tiles, vinyl-asbestos tiles, J linoleums, corks and asphalt tiles-were used to construct 63 test specimens 2 x 2 feet in size. 1 T'ariations in specimens were...

Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

90

Refinishing contamination floors in Spent Nuclear Fuels storage basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The floors of the K Basins at the Hanford Site are refinished to make decontamination easier if spills occur as the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is being unloaded from the basins for shipment to dry storage. Without removing the contaminated existing coating, the basin floors are to be coated with an epoxy coating material selected on the basis of the results of field tests of several paint products. The floor refinishing activities must be reviewed by a management review board to ensure that work can be performed in a controlled manner. Major documents prepared for management board review include a report on maintaining radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, a waste management plan, and reports on hazard classification and unreviewed safety questions. To protect personnel working in the radiation zone, Operational Health Physics prescribed the required minimum protective methods and devices in the radiological work permit. Also, industrial hygiene safety must be analyzed to establish respirator requirements for persons working in the basins. The procedure and requirements for the refinishing work are detailed in a work package approved by all safety engineers. After the refinishing work is completed, waste materials generated from the refinishing work must be disposed of according to the waste management plan.

Huang, F.F.; Moore, F.W.

1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Great Wall Starbucks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

along the Great Wall. When you think about it, it's not a bad marketing strategy: the Wall is high, the stairs relentless; what better than an espresso to energize you for the steep climb up? On second thought, make that a double. #ceas #china #tsutsui...

Hacker, Randi; Gatewood, Tyler; Tsutsui, William

2006-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

E-Print Network 3.0 - attics Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sizing Summary: are exposed directly to the attic. For the downstairs ceiling mounted boots, this result implies... that the ceiling of the lower floor has good airflow...

93

2014-09-16 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fans; Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of Preliminary Technical Support Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of public meeting and availability of preliminary technical support document regarding energy conservation standards for ceiling fans, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary on September 16, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

94

2014-10-27 Issuance: Energy Conservation Standards for Ceiling Fan Light Kits; Notice of Public Meeting and Availability of the Preliminary Technical Support Document  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This document is a pre-publication Federal Register notice of public meeting and availability of the preliminary technical support document regarding energy conservation standards for ceiling fan light kits, as issued by the Deputy Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency on October 27, 2014. Though it is not intended or expected, should any discrepancy occur between the document posted here and the document published in the Federal Register, the Federal Register publication controls. This document is being made available through the Internet solely as a means to facilitate the public's access to this document.

95

Fans for Cooling | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling Fans for Cooling May 30, 2012 - 7:46pm Addthis Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger Ceiling fans circulate air in a room to help keep occupants cool. | Photo courtesy of ©iStockphoto/jimkruger What does this mean for me? You may be able to keep your home cool with energy-efficient and well-placed fans. Fans are less expensive to operate than air conditioners. Circulating fans include ceiling fans, table fans, floor fans, and fans mounted to poles or walls. These fans create a wind chill effect that will make you more comfortable in your home, even if it's also cooled by natural ventilation or air conditioning. Ceiling Fans Ceiling fans are considered the most effective of these types of fans,

96

Unitised Curtain Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Unitised curtain walling was developed to overcome the problems associated with the installation of stick systems (see Chapter 7) and to reduce the on-site installation time. It consists of large panels, usual...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models Building America Technical Update Meeting Eric Wilson April 30, 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Definitions Current definitions for HSP/BEopt: Single Family Attached = Townhouses, row houses, duplexes Multifamily Buildings = 5+ units; shared floors/ceilings 2 Single Family Attached - Rowhouses 3 Multifamily - Stacked Units * Enable Superinsulated Slab and Roof options in Option Manager 4 Multifamily Modeling Needs * Adiabatic shared walls, floors, and ceilings * Unit multipliers  Whole-Building Model * Corridors * Common Areas * Operating Conditions (Benchmark)

98

Researchers at Montana State University and Idaho National Lab have developed a process to effectively and efficiently clean natural and man-made porous material of radioactive contamination. The system eliminates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to effectively and efficiently clean natural and man-made porous material of radioactive contamination. The system eliminates the practice of full demolition and removal of contaminated objects and can address contaminated substrate. Thus, building walls (interior or exterior), floors and ceilings can be remediated

Maxwell, Bruce D.

99

Category Measure Minimum Efficiency / Certification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and cooling (floor, wall, and ceiling) Radiant systems must be powered by a heat pump (electric or gas-fired, or ground-source), efficient gas boiler, or solar system (not by electric resistance) $4000-$20000 none sealing $300-$1200 Not clear if Xcel insulation/air sealing rebate applies here Energy or heat recovery

Kammen, Daniel M.

100

Topic 14. Retrofit and optimal operation of the building energy systems Performances of Low Temperature Radiant Heating Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

panel system are given by its energy (the consumption of gas for heating, electricity for pumps Temperature Radiant Heating Systems Milorad Boji1*, Dragan Cvetkovi1 , Jasmina Skerli1 , Danijela Nikoli1, wall heating, floor heating, ceiling heating, EnergyPlus SUMMARY Low temperature heating panel systems

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ventilating Existing Homes in the US Air Infiltration Review. 2010;31(2)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.energy.gov/buildings/building_america/)). In these new homes it was relatively simple to include air retarders in walls, floors or ceilings and to seal this in existing homes, however, presents a significantly tougher challenge. Air sealing has historically (e.g., in US DOE weatherization programs: http://apps1.eere.energy.gov/weatherization/wxtech_air_sealing

102

THERMAL EVALUATION OF CONTAMINATED LIQUID ONTO CELL FLOORS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP), postulated events in the new Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) can result in spilling liquids that contain Cs-137 and organics onto cell floors. The parameters of concern are the maximum temperature of the fluid following a spill and the time required for the maximum fluid temperature to be reached. Control volume models of the various process cells have been developed using standard conduction and natural convection relationships. The calculations are performed using the Mathcad modeling software. The results are being used in Consolidated Hazards Analysis Planning (CHAP) to determine the controls that may be needed to mitigate the potential impact of liquids containing Cs-137 and flammable organics that spill onto cell floors. Model development techniques and the ease of making model changes within the Mathcad environment are discussed. The results indicate that certain fluid spills result in overheating of the fluid, but the times to reach steady-state are several hundred hours. The long times allow time for spill clean up without the use of expensive mitigation controls.

(NOEMAIL), J

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

103

Analysis of composite tube cracking in recovery boiler floors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking of co-extruded (generally identified as composite) floor tubes in kraft black liquor recovery boilers was first observed in Scandinavia, but this problem has now been found in many North American boilers. In most cases, cracking in the outer 304L stainless steel has not progressed into the carbon steel, but the potential for such crack propagation is a cause of concern. A multidimensional study has been initiated to characterize the cracking seen in composite floor tubes, to measure the residual stresses resulting from composite tube fabrication, and to predict the stresses in tubes under operating conditions. The characterization studies include review of available reports and documents on composite tube cracking, metallographic examination of a substantial number of cracked tubes, and evaluation of the dislocation structure in cracked tubes. Neutron and X-ray diffraction are being used to determine the residual stresses in composite tubes from two major manufacturers, and finite element analysis is being used to predict the stresses in the tubes during normal operation and under conditions where thermal fluctuations occur.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 22, 2007 ... block diagram shows the location and dimensions of the building and .... where the material handling transportation between floors is executed ...

Marc Goetschalckx and Takashi Irohara

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

105

Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 28, 2007 ... Abstract: The block layout problem for a multi-floor facility is an important sub ... Category 2: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences ...

Marc Goetschalckx

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

106

Experimental Evaluation of Innovative Wall Daylighting Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to deliver most of the light from the projecting mirror to the two inner spaces. One way of doing this without causing glare to the occupants is to project the light on the area of ceiling over the two spaces and allow the ceiling to serve aa a secondary... those two spaces (see Figure 10). To achieve this optical behavior, the appropriate cross- sectional shape for the projecting mirror would be an ellipse with one of its foci at the line souree (i.e., at the center of the glazing) and one of its foci...

Place, J. W.; Howard, T. C.; Paulos, S.; Chung, K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

110

BNL | Joseph S. Wall  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Joseph S. Wall Joseph S. Wall Emeritus Research Interests Mass mapping of unstained biological molecules with the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM), particularly assemblies of complexes from subunits of known size and shape. Examples include: Alzheimer's filaments, viral capsids, annelid hemoglobins, hemocyanins, proteases, chaperonins, microtubule proteins, prions and various nucleic acid-protein complexes. Another research area is instrument development involving design and construction of an instrument for low-temperture, energy loss spectroscopy, and elemental mapping at low dose. This is being used to map phosphorus in nucleic acid-protein complexes, phosphorylated proteins and phospholipid structures. He also is director of the Scanning Transmission Electron Microscope STEM

111

ARM - Facility News Article  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 31, 2010 [Facility News] July 31, 2010 [Facility News] Containers for Aerosol Observing Systems Pass Acceptance Testing Bookmark and Share Left to right: Pat Maloy, Stephen Springston, and Mike Ritsche inspect the AMF2 AOS container. They checked for proper locations of unistrut on the ceiling, walls and floor for connecting racks and other equipment, as well as functioning of HVAC units and infrared heaters (above Mike's head). Red lights are required for nighttime ship operations, and the hatch in ceiling will accommodate the aerosol stack. Left to right: Pat Maloy, Stephen Springston, and Mike Ritsche inspect the AMF2 AOS container. They checked for proper locations of unistrut on the ceiling, walls and floor for connecting racks and other equipment, as well as functioning of HVAC units and infrared heaters (above Mike's head). Red

112

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF BI-DIRECTIONAL SPRING UNIT IN ISOLATED FLOOR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) or linear spring based systems (coil springs or rubber units used for restoration force), with viscousEXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF BI-DIRECTIONAL SPRING UNIT IN ISOLATED FLOOR SYSTEMS Shenlei Cui1 , Michel the mechanical behavior of bi-directional spring units used as isolators in a kind of such isolated floor systems

Bruneau, Michel

113

This bright top floor accommodation comprises: -hall with shelved storage cupboard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This bright top floor accommodation comprises: - hall with shelved storage cupboard - fully oak flooring in the living/dining room and varnished floorboards in the hall and double bedroom regarded restaurants and a Waitrose supermarket. Recreational facilities can be found at Warrender Swimming

Edinburgh, University of

114

Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Floor Radiant Heating System with Enclosed Phase Change Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the energy storage floor is designed,which places heat pipes in the enclosed phase change material (PCM) layer, without concrete in it. The PCM thermal storage time is studied in relation to the floor surface temperature under different low-temperature hot...

Qiu, L.; Wu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises" Showing 6 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0021 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0050 + 760 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 1,200 + Sweden Building 05K0080 + 2,000 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0102 + 234 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises&oldid=285964#SMWResults" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

116

Single-Walle 4. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

applications, carbon nanotube research is ac- tively being pursued in diverse areas including energy storage105 Single-Walle 4. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Sebastien Nanot, Nicholas A. Thompson, Ji Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are hol- low, long cylinders with extremely large aspect ratios

Kono, Junichiro

117

Stick-System Curtain Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Curtain walls can be divided in two main types according to the system of fabrication and installation: stick systems and unitised panels. The traditional curtain-wall construction is the stick system, where m...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Radiant Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via the radiation of heat, which is also called infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating. Despite the name, radiant floor heating systems also depend heavily on convection, the natural circulation of heat within a room, caused by heat rising from the floor. Radiant floor

119

Radiant Heating Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics Radiant Heating Basics August 19, 2013 - 10:33am Addthis Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via the radiation of heat, which is also called infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating. Despite the name, radiant floor heating systems also depend heavily on convection, the natural circulation of heat within a room, caused by heat rising from the floor. Radiant floor

120

Domain walls in SU(5)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider the grand unified SU(5) model with a small or vanishing cubic term in the adjoint scalar field in the potential. This gives the model an approximate or exact Z2 symmetry whose breaking leads to domain walls. The simplest domain wall has the structure of a kink across which the Higgs field changes sign (??-?) and inside which the full SU(5) is restored. The kink is shown to be perturbatively unstable for all parameters. We then construct a domain wall solution that is lighter than the kink and show it to be perturbatively stable for a range of parameters. The symmetry in the core of this domain wall is smaller than that outside. The interactions of the domain wall with magnetic monopoles are discussed and it is shown that magnetic monopoles with certain internal space orientations relative to the wall pass through the domain wall. Magnetic monopoles in other relative internal space orientations are likely to be swept away on collision with the domain walls, suggesting a scenario where the domain walls might act like optical polarization filters, allowing certain monopole “polarizations” to pass through but not others. As SU(5) domain walls will also be formed at small values of the cubic coupling, this leads to a very complicated picture of the evolution of defects after the grand unified phase transition.

Levon Pogosian and Tanmay Vachaspati

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-11-4 Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation Yanli Ren1, Deying Li2, Yufeng Zhang1 1...

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermal performance of phase change material energy storage floor for active solar water-heating system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional active solar water-heating floor system contains a big water tank to store energy in the day time for heating at night, which takes much building space and is very heavy. In order to reduce the w...

Ruolang Zeng; Xin Wang; Wei Xiao…

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Production system improvement at a medical devices company : floor layout reduction and manpower analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Due to the low demand and the need to introduce other production lines in the floor, the medical devices company wants to optimize the utilization of space and manpower for the occlusion system product. This thesis shows ...

AlEisa, Abdulaziz A. (Abdulaziz Asaad)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Development of an NC equipment level controller in a hierarchical shop floor control system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The methodology of developing an NC equipment controller in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) System, which is based on a philosophy of hierarchical shop floor control, is presented in this research. The underlying architecture consists...

Chang, William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

125

Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solar energy, low-vale electricity as heat sources in a floor radiant system are analyzed. This paper presents a new heat pump system and discusses its operational modes in winter....

Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for 24-hour health services Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Building...

127

Domain Walls in Gapped Graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic properties of a particular class of domain walls in gapped graphene are investigated. We show that they can support midgap states which are localized in the vicinity of the domain wall and propagate along its length. With a finite density of domain walls, these states can alter the electronic properties of gapped graphene significantly. If the midgap band is partially filled, the domain wall can behave like a one-dimensional metal embedded in a semiconductor and could potentially be used as a single-channel quantum wire.

G. W. Semenoff; V. Semenoff; Fei Zhou

2008-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

128

Oven wall panel construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An oven roof or wall is formed from modular panels, each of which comprises an inner fabric and an outer fabric. Each such fabric is formed with an angle iron framework and somewhat resilient tie-bars or welded at their ends to flanges of the angle irons to maintain the inner and outer frameworks in spaced disposition while minimizing heat transfer by conduction and permitting some degree of relative movement on expansion and contraction of the module components. Suitable thermal insulation is provided within the module. Panels or skins are secured to the fabric frameworks and each such skin is secured to a framework and projects laterally so as slidingly to overlie the adjacent frame member of an adjacent panel in turn to permit relative movement during expansion and contraction.

Ellison, Kenneth (20 Avondale Cres., Markham, CA); Whike, Alan S. (R.R. #1, Caledon East, both of Ontario, CA)

1980-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Allocative Cost of Price Ceilings: Lessons to be Learned from the U.S. Residential Market for Natural Gas,” Unpublished paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following a Supreme Court decision in 1954, natural gas markets in the U.S. were subject to 35 years of intensive federal regulation. Several studies have measured the deadweight loss from the price ceilings that were imposed during this period. This paper concentrates on an additional component of welfare loss that is rarely discussed. In particular, when there is excess demand for a good such as natural gas for which secondary markets do not exist, an additional welfare loss occurs when the good is not allocated to the buyers who value it the most. We quantify the overall size of this allocative cost, its evolution during the post-war period, and its geographical distribution across states, and we highlight implications of our analysis for the regulation of other markets. Using a household-level, discrete-continuous model of natural gas demand we estimate that the allocative cost averaged $8.1 billion annually in the U.S. residential market for natural gas during 1950-2000, effectively doubling previous estimates of the total welfare losses from natural gas regulation. We find that these allocative costs were borne disproportionately by households in the Northeast, Midwest, and South Atlantic states.

Lucas W. Davis; Lutz Kilian; Jel D; Comments William; James Adams; James R. Hines

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Dynamics of strings between walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Configurations of vortex-strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 BPS states. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex-strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string endpoints in the wall effective action. In the first method we obtain the effective Lagrangian explicitly and find the 90 degree scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1){sup N} gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well separated strings. This talk is based on the work [1].

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Mathematics, Tokyo Woman's Christian University, Tokyo 167-8585 (Japan)

2008-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

131

Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

Jonathan H. Davis

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

132

Resuspension of wall deposits in spray dryers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wall deposition occurs in spray dryers when dried or partially dried particles contact and adhere to the walls during operation, thus reducing the yield of product collected. Wall deposits also present a product ...

M. J. Hanus; T. A. G. Langrish

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In bachelor’s thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case… (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Report on Analysis of Forest Floor Bulk Density and Depth at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The forest floor data from the Savannah River Site consists of two layers, the litter layer and the duff layer. The purpose for the study was to determine bulk density conversion factors to convert litter and duff depth values in inches to forest floor fuel values in tons per acre. The primary objective was to collect litter and duff samples to adequately characterize forest floor depth and bulk density for combinations of 4 common forest types (loblolly/slash pine, longleaf pine, pine and hardwood mix, upland hardwood), 3 age classes (5-20, 20-40, 40+ years old) and 3 categories of burning history (0-3, 3-10, 10+ years since last burn).

Bernard R. Parresol

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Radiant Heating | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiant Heating Radiant Heating Radiant Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:52pm Addthis In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer -- the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating.

136

Radiant Heating | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Radiant Heating Radiant Heating Radiant Heating June 24, 2012 - 5:52pm Addthis In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. In-wall radiant heating in a house under construction near Denver. | Photo courtesy of Warren Gretz, NREL. Radiant heating systems supply heat directly to the floor or to panels in the wall or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer -- the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via infrared radiation. Radiant heating is the effect you feel when you can feel the warmth of a hot stovetop element from across the room. When radiant heating is located in the floor, it is often called radiant floor heating or simply floor heating.

137

Theory and practice of continuous improvement in shop-floor teams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most publications about Continuous Improvement (CI) stress the importance, and describe practical applications, of CI. Practicable, i.e. useful and usable, theories that help organisations to make appropriate decisions when adopting, implementing, operating and continuously improving a CI system are relatively few. Concentrating on one particular form of CI, i.e., shop-floor improvement teams, the aim of the present article is to contribute to the development of such a practicable theory about CI. Based on insights given by contingency theory and empirical observations, the article explores and explains the functioning of shop-floor improvement teams and their contribution to the CI.

Ellen de Lange-Ros; Harry Boer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

A Portable Real Time Data Acquisition System for the Comparison of Floor Vibration Data with AISC Design Guide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A portable real time vibration measurement data acquisition system was assembled with the intentionA Portable Real Time Data Acquisition System for the Comparison of Floor Vibration Data with AISC. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND In response to the increasing incidence of vibration problems in modern floor systems

Hines, Eric

139

CALIFORNIA ENERGY Ceiling Insulation Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;#12;ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS The products and outcomes presented in this report are part of the Integrated Design of Commercial Integrated Energy Systems: Productivity and Building Science Program (Program) as part of the PIER Program Fair Oaks, California Managed By: New Buildings Institute Cathy Higgins, Program Director White Salmon

140

RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING BELOW A VOLCANIC CRATER FLOOR WITH COSMIC-RAY MUONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

horizontally-arriving cosmic ray muon with energy of 1 TeV can penetrate 2.6 km of water. Thus, cosmic-ray muon that uncertainty on the shape and amplitude of the energy spectrum of the muon source is within a few percentRADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING BELOW A VOLCANIC CRATER FLOOR WITH COSMIC-RAY MUONS HIROYUKI K.M. TANAKA

Aoki, Yosuke

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A. Siegel*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A@mail.utexas.edu Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Indoor surfaces, Particle experiments Introduction Particle resuspension from for supermicron particles. Resuspension is usually reported either as a critical velocity, the velocity at which

Siegel, Jeffrey

142

Compression of felt?type thermal insulation layer for underfloor heating system and floor impact sound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Korea almost every house uses underfloor heating which has advantages of thermal comfort and energy efficiency. However when it is constructed for high?rise apartment houses it yields a problem in floor impact sound insulation. It accounts for the fact that a foam?type thermal insulator sandwiched between structural slab and heating floor functions as a spring and easily transmits impacts on the floor to the slab. In that case the system's transmissibility is determined by dynamic stiffness of the thermal insulation layer and the lower the dynamic stiffness is the more the floor impact is isolated. For that reason apartments construction companies are attempting to lower the dynamic stiffness of the thermal insulation layer for impact sound reduction. As part of the attempt felt?type materials with relatively low dynamic stiffness such as glass wool or polyester felt are considered as a substitution for the foam?type thermal insulator. However there is a possibility that compression of the felt?type materials would increase the dynamic stiffness and the impact sound insulation effect at early stage might be weakened in the long term. This paper investigates the correlation between gradual compression of the felt?type thermal insulation layer and the impact sound variation.

Tongjun Cho; Hyun?Min Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Support Vector Networks for Prediction of Floor Pressures in Shallow Cavity Flows  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to collect a set of data, which is in the form of pressure readings from particular points in the test measurement at the cavity floor. The SVM based model is built for a very limited amount of training data indicate that the SVM based model is capable of matching the experimental data satisfactorily over

Efe, Mehmet Ã?nder

144

Marketing & Communications Office 21 N. Park Street, 7th floor, 262-2723  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marketing & Communications Office 21 N. Park Street, 7th floor, 262-2723 Fax: 265-4555 JOB REQUEST for Publications/Design form. rev. 4/09 Address/ phone Due Date Article (2 page, 500+ words) Marketing Copy (ad to (if different than client): Web copy Other Market Research Marketing Plan Development Photography

Sheridan, Jennifer

145

Analysis of sludge from K East basin floor and weasel pit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sludge samples from the floor of the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool have been retrieved and analyzed. Both chemical and physical properties have been determined. The results are to be used to determine the disposition of the bulk of the sludge and possibly assess the impact of residual sludge on dry storage of the associated intact metallic uranium fuel elements.

Makenas, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

146

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Office of the General Counsel New South, Fourth Floor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Office of the General Counsel New South, Fourth Floor (609) 258-2500 To as interpreted by the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR). In the event you believe with the authority to interpret and enforce Title IX. In this capacity, OCR is given substantial deference by courts

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

147

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

Wood, Stephen L.

148

Dynamics of strings between walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Configurations of vortex strings stretched between or ending on domain walls were previously found to be 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in N=2 supersymmetric gauge theories in 3+1 dimensions. Among zero modes of string positions, the center of mass of strings in each region between two adjacent domain walls is shown to be non-normalizable whereas the rests are normalizable. We study dynamics of vortex strings stretched between separated domain walls by using two methods, the moduli space (geodesic) approximation of full 1/4 BPS states and the charged particle approximation for string end points in the wall effective action. In the first method we explicitly obtain the effective Lagrangian in the strong coupling limit, which is written in terms of hypergeometric functions, and find the 90 deg. scattering for head-on collision. In the second method the domain wall effective action is assumed to be U(1){sup N} gauge theory, and we find a good agreement between two methods for well-separated strings.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Mathematics, Tokyo Woman's Christian University, Tokyo 167-8585 (Japan)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

Tacoma Power - Residential Weatherization Rebate Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Weatherization Rebate Program Weatherization Rebate Program Tacoma Power - Residential Weatherization Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Windows: $1,000 Ceiling/Floor/Wall Insulation: $3,000 Duct Sealing: $450 Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Windows: $2 - $4 per square foot Insulation: $0.50 per square foot Duct Sealing: up to $450 Provider Tacoma Power Tacoma Power helps residential customers increase the energy efficiency of homes through the utility's residential weatherization program. Weatherization upgrades to windows are eligible for an incentive payment of up to $1,000. Customers who pursue ceiling, floor, and wall insulation

150

Domain walls riding the wave.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent years have witnessed a rapid proliferation of electronic gadgets around the world. These devices are used for both communication and entertainment, and it is a fact that they account for a growing portion of household energy consumption and overall world consumption of electricity. Increasing the energy efficiency of these devices could have a far greater and immediate impact than a gradual switch to renewable energy sources. The advances in the area of spintronics are therefore very important, as gadgets are mostly comprised of memory and logic elements. Recent developments in controlled manipulation of magnetic domains in ferromagnet nanostructures have opened opportunities for novel device architectures. This new class of memories and logic gates could soon power millions of consumer electronic devices. The attractiveness of using domain-wall motion in electronics is due to its inherent reliability (no mechanical moving parts), scalability (3D scalable architectures such as in racetrack memory), and nonvolatility (retains information in the absence of power). The remaining obstacles in widespread use of 'racetrack-type' elements are the speed and the energy dissipation during the manipulation of domain walls. In their recent contribution to Physical Review Letters, Oleg Tretiakov, Yang Liu, and Artem Abanov from Texas A&M University in College Station, provide a theoretical description of domain-wall motion in nanoscale ferromagnets due to the spin-polarized currents. They find exact conditions for time-dependent resonant domain-wall movement, which could speed up the motion of domain walls while minimizing Ohmic losses. Movement of domain walls in ferromagnetic nanowires can be achieved by application of external magnetic fields or by passing a spin-polarized current through the nanowire itself. On the other hand, the readout of the domain state is done by measuring the resistance of the wire. Therefore, passing current through the ferromagnetic wire is the preferred method, as it combines manipulation and readout of the domain-wall state. The electrons that take part in the process of readout and manipulation of the domain-wall structure in the nanowire do so through the so-called spin transfer torque: When spin-polarized electrons in the ferromagnet nanowire pass through the domain wall they experience a nonuniform magnetization, and they try to align their spins with the local magnetic moments. The force that the electrons experience has a reaction force counterpart that 'pushes' the local magnetic moments, resulting in movement of the domain wall in the direction of the electron flow through the spin-transfer torque. The forces between the electrons and the local magnetic moments in the ferromagnet also create additional electrical resistance for the electrons passing through the domain wall. By measuring resistance across a segment of the nanowire, one determines if a domain wall is present; i.e., one can read the stored information. The interaction of the spin-polarized electrons with the domain wall in the ferromagnetic nanowire is not very efficient. Even for materials achieving high polarization of the free electrons, it is very difficult to move the magnetic domain wall. Several factors contribute to this problem, with imperfections of the ferromagnetic nanowire that cause domain-wall pinning being the dominant one. Permalloy nanowires, one of the best candidates for domain-wall-based memory and logic devices, require current densities of the order of 10{sup 8} A/cm{sup 2} in order to move a domain wall from a pinning well. Considering that this current has to pass through a relatively long wire, it is not very difficult to imagine that most of the energy will go to Joule heating. The efficiency of the process - the ratio of the energy converted to domain-wall motion to the total energy consumed - is comparable to that of an incandescent light bulb converting electricity to light. A step towards more efficient domain-wall-based memory devices is the advance of using alternating currents or curren

Karapetrov, G.; Novosad, V.; Materials Science Division

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Domain Walls, Triples and Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a construction of domain walls in string theory. The domain walls can bridge both Minkowski and AdS string vacua. A key ingredient in the construction are novel classical Yang-Mills configurations, including instantons, which interpolate between toroidal Yang-Mills vacua. Our construction provides a concrete framework for the study of inflating metrics in string theory. In some cases, the accelerating space-time comes with a holographic description. The general form of the holographic dual is a field theory with parameters that vary over space-time.

Travis Maxfield; Savdeep Sethi

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

152

Liquid Walls Innovative Concepts for First Walls and Blankets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rrr �= V r J r PV r B r 1P 2P g r + - V r #12;Liquid Wall Options Thickness · Thin (~ 2cm with existing technology · Size of plasma devices and power plants can be substantially reduced High Poloidal

Abdou, Mohamed

153

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control room for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects labelled 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 in the drawing are no less than four inches from walls labelled 10.2. A ceiling contains cooling fins that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates. A concrete slab is poured over the plates. Studs are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete. 6 figures.

Lamuro, R.C.; Orr, R.

1993-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

154

Nuclear reactor control room construction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A control room 10 for a nuclear plant is disclosed. In the control room, objects 12, 20, 22, 26, 30 are no less than four inches from walls 10.2. A ceiling 32 contains cooling fins 35 that extend downwards toward the floor from metal plates 34. A concrete slab 33 is poured over the plates. Studs 36 are welded to the plates and are encased in the concrete.

Lamuro, Robert C. (Pittsburgh, PA); Orr, Richard (Pittsburgh, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Condition Assessment Survey (CAS) Program. Deficiency standards and inspections methods manual: Volume 6, 0.06 Interior construction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

General information is presented for asset determinant factor/CAS repair codes/CAS cost factors; guide sheet tool & material listing; testing methods; inspection frequency; standard system design life tables; system work breakdown structure; and general system/material data. Deficiency standards and inspection methods are presented for conventional and specialty partitions, toilet partitions & accessories, interior doors, paint finishes/coatings/ wall covering systems; floor finishing systems; and ceiling systems.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University, Dept. Civ. & Env. Eng.;  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University in the design of steel and concrete floor systems to control vibrations suggests that a floor system's vibration-term collaborative research program between Tufts University and LeMessurier Consultants to investigate the vibration

Hines, Eric

157

Dynamics of Domain Wall Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Networks or webs of domain walls are admitted in Abelian or non-Abelian gauge theory coupled to fundamental Higgs fields with complex masses. We examine the dynamics of the domain wall loops by using the moduli approximation and find a phase rotation induces a repulsive force which can be understood as a Noether charge of Q-solitons. Non-Abelian gauge theory allows different types of loops which can be deformed to each other by changing a modulus. This admits the moduli geometry like a sandglass made by gluing the tips of the two cigar-(cone-)like metrics of a single triangle loop. We conclude that the sizes of all loops tend to grow for a late time in general models with complex Higgs masses, while the sizes are stabilized at some values once triplet masses are introduced for the Higgs fields. We also show that the stationary motion on the moduli space of the domain wall webs represents 1/4 BPS Q-webs of walls.

Minoru Eto; Toshiaki Fujimori; Takayuki Nagashima; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

2007-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

158

Dynamics of domain wall networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Networks or webs of domain walls are admitted in Abelian or non-Abelian gauge theory coupled to fundamental Higgs fields with complex masses. We examine the dynamics of the domain wall loops by using the moduli approximation and find a phase rotation induces a repulsive force which can be understood as a Noether charge of Q-solitons. Non-Abelian gauge theory allows different types of loops which can be deformed to each other by changing a modulus. This admits the moduli geometry like a sandglass made by gluing the tips of the two cigar-(cone-)like metrics of a single triangle loop. We conclude that the sizes of all loops tend to grow for a late time in general models with complex Higgs masses, while the sizes are stabilized at some values once triplet masses are introduced for the Higgs fields. We also show that the stationary motion on the moduli space of the domain wall webs represents 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield Q-webs of walls.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

159

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Infiltrating the Ocean Floor  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Grant S. Bromhal, Duane H. Smith, US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered to be a potentially important method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions (US DOE, 1999). Oceans are currently the largest atmospheric carbon dioxide sink; and certainly, enough storage capacity exists in the oceans to hold all of the CO 2 that we can emit for many years. Additionally, technologies exist that allow us to pump liquid CO 2 into the oceans at depths between one and two kilometers for extended periods of time and five times that deep for shorter durations. The biggest unknown in the ocean sequestration process, however, is the fate and

160

Contribution of floor treatment characteristics to background noise levels in health care facilities, Part 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustical tests were conducted on five types of commercial-grade flooring to assess their potential contribution to noise generated within health care facilities outside of patient rooms. The floor types include sheet vinyl (with and without a 5 mm rubber backing) virgin rubber (with and without a 5 mm rubber backing) and a rubber-backed commercial grade carpet for comparison. The types of acoustical tests conducted were ISO-3741 compliant sound power level testing (using two source types: a tapping machine to simulate footfalls and a rolling hospital cart) and sound absorption testing as per ASTM-C423. Among the non-carpet samples the material type that produced the least sound power was determined to be the rubber-backed sheet vinyl. While both 5 mm-backed samples showed a significant difference compared to their un-backed counterparts with both source types the rubber-backed sheet vinyl performed slightly better than the rubber-backed virgin rubber in the higher frequency bands in both tests. The performance and suitability of these flooring materials in a health care facility compared to commercial carpeting will be discussed. [Work supported by Paul S. Veneklasen Research Foundation.

Adam L. Paul; David A. Arena; Eoin A. King

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Development of generic floor response spectra for equipment qualification for seismic loads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A generic floor response spectra has been developed for use in the qualification of electrical and mechanical equipment in operating nuclear power plants. Actual PWR and BWR - Mark I structural models were used as representative of a class of structures. For each model, the stiffness properties were varied, with the same mass, so as to extend the fundamental base structure natural frequency from 2 cps to 36 cps. This resulted in fundamental mode coupled natural frequencies as low as 0.86 cps and as high as 30 cps. The characteristics of 1000 floor response spectra were studied to determine the generic spectra. A procedure for its application to any operating plant has been established. The procedure uses as much or as little information that currently exists at the plant relating to the question of equipment qualification. A generic floor response spectra is proposed for the top level of a generic structure. Reduction factors are applied to the peak acceleration for equipment at lower levels.

Curreri, J.R.; Costantino, C.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Status Report on Studies of Recovery Boiler Composite Floor Tube Cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking of the stainless steel layer of co-extruded 304L stainless steel/SA210 Gd A 1 carbon steel black liquor recovery boiler floor tubes has been identified as one of the most serious material problems in the pulp and paper industry. A DOE-funded study was initiated in 1995 with the goal of determining the cause of and possible solutions to this cracking problem. These studies have characterized tube cracking as well as the chemical and thermal environment and stress state of floor tubes. Investigations of possible cracking mechanisms indicate that stress corrosion cracking rather than thermal fatigue is a more likely cause of crack initiation. The cracking mechanism appears to require the presence of hydrated sodium sulfide and is most likely active during shut-downs and/or start-ups. Based on these results and operating experience, certain alloys appear to be more resistant than others to cracking in the floor environment, and certain operating practices appear to significantly lessen the likelihood of cracking. This report is the latest in a series of progress reports presented on this project.

Eng, P.; Frederick, L.A.; Hoffmann, C.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Mahmood, J.; Maziasz, P.J.; Prescott, R.; Sarma, G.B.; Singbeil, D.L.; Singh, P.M.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wang, X.-L.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

163

Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wall Research Advances the Science and Energy Goals of Fusion in a Perfect Fit · If we can make liquidRemarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering UCLA Note For recent presentations and papers on liquid wall research by the APEX team see website: http

Abdou, Mohamed

164

Prediction of Floor Water Inrush: The Application of GIS-Based AHP Vulnerable Index Method to Donghuantuo Coal Mine, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Floor water inrush represents a geohazard that can pose significant threat to safe operations for instance in coal mines in China and elsewhere. Its occurrence ... process (AHP) and geographic information system ...

Qiang Wu; Yuanzhang Liu; Donghai Liu; Wanfang Zhou

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Appliances & Electronics Sealing Your Home Ventilation Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Cooling Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing: up to $150 Floor Insulation: $50 - $100 Bandjoist Insulation: $50 - $100 Above Grade Wall/Knee Wall Insulation: $250 Crawl Space/Wall/Band Joist Insulation: $100 Ceiling Insulation: $125 - $250 Window Replacement: $30/window; $60/picture window or sliding glass door Programmable Thermostat: $10-$20

166

Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-Abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the world volume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as domain wall Skyrmions.

Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Tong, David [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2005-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

Plancher solaire direct mixte \\`a double r\\'eseau en habitat bioclimatique - Conception et bilan thermique r\\'eel. Double direct solar floor heating in boclimatic habitation - Design and real energetical balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study presents a new direct solar floor heating technique with double heating network wich allows simultaneous use of solar and supply energy. Its main purpose is to store and to diffuse the whole available solar energy while regulating supply energy by physical means without using computer controlled technology. This solar system has been tested in real user conditions inside a bioclimatic house to study the interaction of non-inertial and passive walls on the solar productivity. Daily, monthly and annual energy balances were drawn up over three years and completed by real-time measurements of several physical on-site parameters. As a result the expected properties of this technique were improved. The use of per-hour solar productivity, saved primary energy and corrected solar covering ratio is recommended to analyze the performances of this plant and to allow more refined comparisons with other solar systems

De Larochelambert, Thierry

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

Burdick, A.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Experiments measuring particle deposition from fully developed turbulent flow in ventilation ducts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Particle deposition in ventilation ducts influences particle exposures of building occupants and may lead to a variety of indoor air quality concerns. Experiments have been performed in a laboratory to study the effects of particle size and air speed on deposition rates of particles from turbulent air flows in galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. The duct systems were constructed of materials typically found in commercial heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle sizes of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition rates of particles with nominal sizes of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m were measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces (floor, wall and ceiling) at two straight duct sections where the turbulent flow profile was fully developed. In steel ducts, deposition rates were higher to the duct floor than to the wall, which were, in turn, greater than to the ceiling. In insulated ducts, deposition was nearly the same to the duct floor, wall and ceiling for a given particle size and air speed. Deposition to duct walls and ceilings was greatly enhanced in insulated ducts compared to steel ducts. Deposition velocities to each of the three duct surface orientations in both systems were found to increase with increasing particle size or air velocity over the ranges studied. Deposition rates measured in the current experiments were in general agreement with the limited observations of similar systems by previous researchers.

Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Energy Efficiency Optimization of Joining Processes on Shop Floor and Process Chain Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Research has shown that the energy demand for manufacturing processes is frequently dominated by secondary consumers, especially since these are often neither controlled nor accounted for by corresponding primary processes. Secondary consumers are often continuously operating on high load, independent of the supported core processes’ operational state – e.g. downtimes. This perception has lead to a methodical approach, calculating an energetic performance indicator that can be actively influenced by both, manufacturing and technology planning as well as production planning. The case presented focuses a joining application wherein the detailed analysis on the shop floor lead to approaches on process chain level.

Christian Mose; Nils Weinert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Forest floor bulk density and depth at Savannah River - Draft Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing the amount of biomass across a landscape is becoming increasingly important to fire managers as new fuel and fire management decision support systems come on line. Fire managers rarely have the time or funding available to sample fuels operationally and often depend upon mean values for critical variables whose variation is often associated with simple stand characteristics such as age, forest type, time since last burn, stocking, or site, and other easily measured variables. This report outlines a study to collect and analyze litter and duff bulk density samples for developing a simple predictive tool to estimate forest floor fuel loading based on simple stand characteristics.

Maier, Brian; Ottmar, Roger; Wright, Clint

2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

Quantum Fusion of Domain Walls with Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study how fluxes on the domain wall world volume modify quantum fusion of two distant parallel domain walls into a composite wall. The elementary wall fluxes can be separated into parallel and antiparallel components. The parallel component affects neither the binding energy nor the process of quantum merger. The antiparallel fluxes, instead, increase the binding energy and, against naive expectations, suppress quantum fusion. In the small flux limit we explicitly find the bounce solution and the fusion rate as a function of the flux. We argue that at large (antiparallel) fluxes there exists a critical value of the flux (versus the difference in the wall tensions), which switches off quantum fusion altogether. This phenomenon of flux-related wall stabilization is rather peculiar: it is unrelated to any conserved quantity. Our consideration of the flux-related all stabilization is based on substantiated arguments that fall short of complete proof.

S. Bolognesi; M. Shifman; M. B. Voloshin

2009-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

173

Panelized wall system with foam core insulation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A wall system includes a plurality of wall members, the wall members having a first metal panel, a second metal panel, and an insulating core between the first panel and the second panel. At least one of the first panel and the second panel include ridge portions. The insulating core can be a foam, such as a polyurethane foam. The foam can include at least one opacifier to improve the k-factor of the foam.

Kosny, Jan (Oak Ridge, TN); Gaskin, Sally (Houston, TX)

2009-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Depolarization mechanisms arising from the recycling of the polarized fuel at the limiter and the first-wall of a fusion reactor are greater than those mechanisms in the plasma. Rapid depolarization of the plasma is prevented by providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec.sup.-1.

Greenside, Henry S. (Cranbury, NJ); Budny, Robert V. (Princeton, NJ); Post, Jr., Douglass E. (Buttonwood, CT)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Holocene valley-floor deposition and incision in a small drainage basin in western Colorado, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The valley floor of a 33.9 km2 watershed in western Colorado experienced gradual sedimentation from before ? 6765 to ? 500 cal yr BP followed by deep incision, renewed aggradation, and secondary incision. In contrast, at least four terraces and widespread cut-and-fill architecture in the valley floor downstream indicate multiple episodes of incision and deposition occurred during the same time interval. The upper valley fill history is atypical compared to other drainages in the Colorado Plateau. One possible reason for these differences is that a bedrock canyon between the upper and lower valley prevented headward erosion from reaching the upper valley fill. Another possibility is that widespread, sand-rich, clay-poor lithologies in the upper drainage limited surface runoff and generally favored alluviation, whereas more clay-rich lithologies in the lower drainage resulted in increased surface runoff and more frequent incision. Twenty-two dates from valley fill charcoal indicate an approximate forest fire recurrence interval of several hundred years, similar to that from other studies in juniper–piñon woodlands. Results show that closely spaced vertical sampling of alluvium in headwater valleys where linkages between hillslope processes and fluvial activity are relatively direct can provide insight about the role of fires in alluvial chronologies of semi-arid watersheds.

Lawrence S. Jones; Margaret Rosenburg; Maria del Mar Figueroa; Kathleen McKee; Ben Haravitch; Jenna Hunter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Effects of lithospheric rigidity on ocean floor bathymetry and heat flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The observed quasi-rigid behaviour of surface plates in the course of their relative motion is a consequence of the high viscosity which obtains in the cold near surface region. By assigning a particular constant velocity as the upper boundary condition in a numerical model of mantle convection, we have investigated the effect of lithospheric rigidity on the variation of oceanic bathymetry and heat flow as a function of ocean floor age. Predicted variations of both bathymetry and heat flow at the surface of mantle wide convection cells which are partially heated from within, exhibit the same qualitative behaviour as data compiled for the major ocean basins. The bathymetry varies with distance x from the spreading centre initially as x/sup 1/2/ but subsequently flattens with respect to an x/sup 1/2/ reference curve whereas the heat flow closely follows an x-/sup 1/2/ decay over most of the convection cell. Consequently the viability of the mechanism for sea floor flattening proposed by Jarvis and Peltier (1980) is increased when a constant surface velocity, characteristic of rigid plates, is incorporated in the model. This model successfully predicts both that the bathymetry should flatten and that the heat flow should not.

Jarvis, G.T.; Peltier, W.R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Overview of the DOE studies of recovery boiler floor tube cracking  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking of the stainless steel layer of coextruded 304L/SA210 recovery boiler floor tubes has been observed in an increasing number of black liquor recovery boilers. Because failure of such tubes is a serious safety concern as well as an economic issue, this project was initiated with the objective of identifying alternate materials or process changes that would prevent tube cracking. Tensile stresses are essential for the most likely failure mechanisms, i.e., fatigue or stress corrosion cracking, therefore stresses were measured at room temperature and modeling was used to predict stresses under operating conditions. Laboratory studies have identified conditions under which composite tubes crack due to thermal fatigue and stress corrosion. Floor tube temperature measurements have defined the magnitude and frequency of temperature fluctuations experienced by such tubes, and smelt corrosion studies have measured the degradation rate when molten smelt comes in contact with tubes. Based on these observations, certain materials appear more likely to resist cracking and certain process changes should help avoid conditions that cause composite tube cracking.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Skyrmions from Instantons inside Domain Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Some years ago, Atiyah and Manton described a method to construct approximate Skyrmion solutions from Yang-Mills instantons. Here we present a dynamical realization of this construction using domain walls in a five-dimensional gauge theory. The non-abelian gauge symmetry is broken in each vacuum but restored in the core of the domain wall, allowing instantons to nestle inside the wall. We show that the worldvolume dynamics of the wall is given by the Skyrme model, including the four-derivative term, and the instantons appear as Skyrmions.

Minoru Eto; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; David Tong

2005-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

179

Modeling Drilled Shafts in MSE Block Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS xii ABSTRACT xiii 1 INTRODUCTION 1 2 LITERATURE REVIEW 3 2.1 Physical Testing 3 2.1.1 MSE Wall Design (FHWA) 3 2.1.2 Design of Laterally Loaded Shafts 6 2.1.3 Design of Drilled Shafts Supporting Sound Walls 7 2.1.4 Topics Related to MSE... Wall Interaction with Bridges 8 2.1.5 Lateral Loading of Facing and Retained Soil 9 2.1.6 Physical Test Results 11 2.1.6.1 Construction and Instrumentation of Test Wall 12 2.1.6.2 Physical Testing and Results 17 2.2 Numerical Approaches 22 2...

Pierson, Matthew Charles

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Multiple moving wall dry coal extrusion pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pump for transporting particulate material includes a passageway defined on each side between an inlet and an outlet by a moving wall.

Fitzsimmons, Mark Andrew

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

First wall for polarized fusion reactors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A first-wall or first-wall coating for use in a fusion reactor having polarized fuel may be formed of a low-Z non-metallic material having slow spin relaxation, i.e., a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/. Materials having these properties include hydrogenated and deuterated amorphous semiconductors. A method for preventing the rapid depolarization of a polarized plasma in a fusion device may comprise the step of providing a first-wall or first-wall coating formed of a low-Z, non-metallic material having a depolarization rate greater than 1 sec/sup -1/.

Greenside, H.S.; Budny, R.V.; Post, D.E. Jr.

1985-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

182

Beetle Kill Wall at NREL  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

When it comes to designing an interior decorative feature for one of the most energy efficient office buildings in the world, very few would consider bringing in a beetle to do the job. But thats what happened at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Research Support Facility (RSF) located on the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) campus.In June, the RSF will become home to more than 800 workers from DOE and NREL and building visitors will be greeted with a soaring, two-story high wall entirely covered with wood harvested from the bark beetle infestation that has killed millions of pine trees in the Western U.S. But, the use of beetle kill wood is just one example of the resources being leveraged to make the RSF a model for sustainability and one more step toward NRELs goal to be a net zero energy campus.

None

2013-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Virtual gap dielectric wall accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A virtual, moving accelerating gap is formed along an insulating tube in a dielectric wall accelerator (DWA) by locally controlling the conductivity of the tube. Localized voltage concentration is thus achieved by sequential activation of a variable resistive tube or stalk down the axis of an inductive voltage adder, producing a "virtual" traveling wave along the tube. The tube conductivity can be controlled at a desired location, which can be moved at a desired rate, by light illumination, or by photoconductive switches, or by other means. As a result, an impressed voltage along the tube appears predominantly over a local region, the virtual gap. By making the length of the tube large in comparison to the virtual gap length, the effective gain of the accelerator can be made very large.

Caporaso, George James; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Nelson, Scott; Sullivan, Jim; Hawkins, Steven A

2013-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

184

Where to Insulate in a Home | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home November 26, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis Examples of where to insulate. 1. In unfinished attic spaces, insulate between and over the floor joists to seal off living spaces below. (1A) attic access door 2. In finished attic rooms with or without dormer, insulate (2A) between the studs of "knee" walls, (2B) between the studs and rafters of exterior walls and roof, (2C) and ceilings with cold spaces above. (2D) Extend insulation into joist space to reduce air flows. 3. All exterior walls, including (3A) walls between living spaces and unheated garages, shed roofs, or storage areas; (3B) foundation walls above ground level; (3C) foundation walls in heated basements, full wall either interior or exterior.

185

Where to Insulate in a Home | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home Where to Insulate in a Home November 26, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis Examples of where to insulate. 1. In unfinished attic spaces, insulate between and over the floor joists to seal off living spaces below. (1A) attic access door 2. In finished attic rooms with or without dormer, insulate (2A) between the studs of "knee" walls, (2B) between the studs and rafters of exterior walls and roof, (2C) and ceilings with cold spaces above. (2D) Extend insulation into joist space to reduce air flows. 3. All exterior walls, including (3A) walls between living spaces and unheated garages, shed roofs, or storage areas; (3B) foundation walls above ground level; (3C) foundation walls in heated basements, full wall either interior or exterior.

186

Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Remarks on Liquid Wall Research Mohamed Abdou Professor Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering UCLA physicists and engineering scientists · Enhances synergism between IFE and MFE · Provides excellent disciplines. #12;Several "Ideas" Have Been Proposed for Liquid Walls Fluids 1) High-conductivity, low Pr

California at Los Angeles, University of

187

Wall System Innovations: Familiar Materials, Better Performance  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

1 1 Wall System Innovation Vladimir Kochkin Joseph Wiehagen April 2013 Wall Innovation Metrics  High R (thermal and air barrier)  High Performance  Durable, structural  Build-able  Low transition risk to builders  50% Building America Goal  ≈ R25+ (CZ 4 and higher) 2 Background  Technologies for high-R walls have been proposed and used for over 25 years  But real market penetration is very low  Often the last EE measure implemented by builders (e.g. E*) 3 Background  High-R wall solutions have not achieved a broad level of standardization and commonality  A large set of methods and materials entered the market  Multiple and conflicting details  Wall characteristics are more critical = RISK 4 New Home Starts -

188

STATE OF INDIANA OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR State House, Second Floor  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

INDIANA INDIANA OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR State House, Second Floor Indianapolis, Indiana 46204 Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr. Governor March 12,2009 The Honorable Steven Chu Secretary U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S. W Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: State Energy Program Assurances Dear Secretary Chu: As a condition of receiving our State's share of the $3.1 billion funding for the State Energy Program (SEP) under the American Recovery and Renewal Act of 2009 (H.R. I)(ARRA), I am providing the following assurances. I have requested our public utility commission (the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission) to consider additional actions to promote energy efficiency, consistent with the federal statutory language contained in H.R. 1 and their obligations to

189

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

190

Construction of a global disaggregated dataset of building energy use and floor area in 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the construction of a dataset of energy use in 2010 by buildings in 10 regions spanning the entire world, broken down by sector (residential and commercial), end use (space heating, space cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, and miscellaneous (mostly plug) loads) and energy source (fossil fuels, district heat, biofuels, solar and geothermal heat, and electricity). Combined with estimates of the residential and commercial floor area and of population in each region, this 4-dimensional disaggregation gives an estimate of building energy intensities (kW h/m2/yr) or per capita energy use for each end use/energy source combination in each sector and region. This dataset provides a starting point that can be used in scenarios of future building energy demand but also serves to highlight discrepancies, uncertainties, and areas where improved data collection is needed.

L.D. Danny Harvey; Katarina Korytarova; Oswaldo Lucon; Volha Roshchanka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Basin-floor fans in the North Sea: Sequence stratigraphic models vs. sedimentary facies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Examination of nearly 12,000 feet (3658m) of conventional core from Paleogene and Cretaceous deep-water sandstone reservoirs cored in 50 wells in 10 different areas or fields in the North Sea and adjacent regions reveals that these reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows. Sedimentary features indicating slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts; slump folds; discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60{degrees}); glide planes; shear zones; brecciated clasts; clastic injections; floating mudstone clasts; planar clast fabric; inverse grading of clasts; and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-30%). This model predicts that basin-floor fans are predominantly composed of sand-rich turbidites with laterally extensive, sheetlike geometries. However, calibration of sedimentary facies in our long (400-700 feet) cores with seismic and wire-line-log signatures through several of these basin-floor fans (including the Gryphon-Forth, Frigg, and Faeroe areas) shows that these features are actually composed almost exclusively of mass-transport deposits consisting mainly of slumps and debris flows. Distinguishing deposits of mass-transport processes, such as debris flows, from those of turbidity currents has important implications for predicting reservoir geometry. Debris flows, which have plastic flow rheology, can form discontinuous, disconnected sand bodies that are harder to delineate and less economical to develop than deposits of fluidal turbidity currents, which potentially produce more laterally continuous, interconnected sand bodies. Process sedimentological interpretation of conventional core is commonly critical for determining the true origin and distribution of reservoir sands.

Shanmugam, G.; Bloch, R.B. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Mitchell, S.M. [Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Beamish, G.W.J.; Shields, K.E. [Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hodgkinson, R.J.; Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E. [Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., Stavanger (Norway); Damuth, J.E. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Thermodynamic modeling and optimization of a screw compressor chiller and cooling tower system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of areas: office and lab. The load in the office area is attributed to lighting, computers, people and solar heat gain through the exterior walls and windows. The lab area is located on the south side of the building in a single story building... addition with approximately 10-ft. high ceilings. The load in the lab area is attributed to two autoclaves, hydraulic pumping equipment, lighting, computers, people and solar heat gain through the exterior walls and roof. The second floor of the building...

Graves, Rhett David

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

METHOD OF EVALUATING THE EFFICIENCY OF ANTICOCCIDIAL DRUGS IN FLOOR-PEN TRIALS WITH MULTIPLE IN-FEED INFECTION VERSUS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contrôler la contamination des animaux que par la méthode des « seeder birds » et l'anticoccidien a une of environmental contamina- tion. Cover (1970) considers that floor-pen expe- riments are essential because) ; these authors use either a direct contamina- tion by suspended « seeder birds », or an indi- rect contamination

Boyer, Edmond

194

PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite and smectite surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite carbon (DOC) concentrations (0­140 g C m 3 ) for reaction with goethite ( -FeOOH), birnessite ( -MnO2 different NOM adsorption, fractionation and transformation patterns. Goethite exhibited a steep initial

Chorover, Jon

195

Alliance of Chicago Community Health Services, L3C 215 W. Ohio, 4th floor Chicago, IL 60654  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Alliance of Chicago Community Health Services, L3C 215 W. Ohio, 4th floor Chicago, IL 60654 Phone at the Alliance of Chicago Community Health Services (Alliance). He/She is responsible for programming design life cycle for the Alliance EHR, which includes the following primary tasks: o Programming

Liblit, Ben

196

Hindawi Publishing Corporation 410 Park Avenue,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Corporation 410 Park Avenue,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA http. Bona USA J. R. Cannon USA S.-N. Chow USA B. S. Dandapat India E. DiBenedetto USA R. Finn USA R. L. Fosdick USA J. Frehse Germany A. Friedman USA R. Grimshaw UK J. Malek Czech Republic J. T. Oden USA R

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

197

FREE CONVECTIVE LAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL H. Akbarf andLAMINAR FLOW WITHIN THE TROMBE WALL CHANNEL H. Akbari andchannel surfaces of the Trombe wall has been investigated.

Akbari, H.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Effective Action of Domain Wall Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U(Nc) gauge theory with Nf fundamental scalars admits BPS junctions of domain walls. When the networks/webs of these walls contain loops, their size moduli give localized massless modes. We construct Kahler potential of their effective action. In the large size limit Kahler metric is well approximated by kinetic energy of walls and junctions, which is understood in terms of tropical geometry. Kahler potential can be expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions which are useful to understand small size behavior. Even when the loop shrinks, the metric is regular with positive curvature. Moduli space of a single triangle loop has a geometry between a cone and a cigar.

Minoru Eto; Toshiaki Fujimori; Takayuki Nagashima; Muneto Nitta; Keisuke Ohashi; Norisuke Sakai

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards the development of a useful mechanism for hydrogen storage, we have studied the hydrogenation of single-walled carbon nanotubes with atomic hydrogen using core-level photoelectron spectroscopy and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. We find that atomic hydrogen creates C-H bonds with the carbon atoms in the nanotube walls and such C-H bonds can be com-pletely broken by heating to 600 oC. We demonstrate approximately 65+/-15 at % hydrogenation of carbon atoms in the single-walled carbon nanotubes which is equivalent to 5.1+/-1.2 weight % hydrogen capacity. We also show that the hydrogenation is a reversible process.

Anton Nikitin; Hirohito Ogasawara; David Mann; Reinhard Denecke; Zhiyong Zhang; Hongjie Dai; KJ Cho; Anders Nilsson

2005-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

Symmetry of single-wall nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A review of the symmetry groups of the various single-wall nano- and microtubes considered in the literature (BN, GaN, MS2, C, BC3, BC2N) is presented.

Damnjanovic, M.

2001-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Nonextensive statistical dynamics applied to wall turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We apply a formalism of nonextensive statistical mechanics to experimental wall turbulence data, for the first time to our knowledge. Wind tunnel data for velocity differences a streamwise distance $r$ apart are compared to the prediction from theory as developed by Beck. The simplest theory, in which all free parameters are removed, is found to reproduce statistics for the wall-normal velocity component remarkably well, even for $r$ well beyond the corresponding integral scale, while the corresponding description of the streamwise velocity fluctuations is reasonable at separations below the integral scale. A least-squares 2-parameter fit is performed, and the dependence of the optimum parameter values on wall separation and $r$ is analysed. Both parameters are found to be approximately independent of wall-separation in the logarithmic sub-layer.

Simen Å Ellingsen; Per-Åge Krogstad

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

CLIMBING WALL POLICIES Open Bouldering Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Climb at your own risk. Supervised Climbing Rules: 1. All climbers must check in at the climbing wall a munter knot and/or a figure eight belay device are not acceptable ways to belay. 11. Shirts and close

204

Axions from cosmic string and wall decay  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If inflation occurred with a reheat temperature > T{sub PQ}, axions from the decay of global axion strings and domain walls would make an important contribution to the cosmological energy density, comparable to that from vacuum misalignment. Several groups have numerically studied the evolution of axion strings and walls in the past, however substantial uncertainties remain in their contribution to the present density {Omega}{sub a,string+wall} {approx} 1-100 (f{sub a}/10{sup 12} GeV){sup 7/6}, where f{sub a} is the axion decay constant. I will describe the numerical methods used in our simulations and show results for several string and wall configurations.

Hagmann, C A

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

205

Domain walls with non-Abelian clouds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Domain walls in U(N) gauge theories, coupled to Higgs scalar fields with degenerate masses, are shown to possess normalizable non-Abelian Nambu-Goldstone (NG) modes, which we call non-Abelian clouds. We construct the moduli space metric and its Kaehler potential of the effective field theory on the domain walls by focusing on two models: a U(1) gauge theory with several charged Higgs fields, and a U(N) gauge theory with 2N Higgs fields in the fundamental representation. We find that non-Abelian clouds spread between two domain walls and that their rotation induces a long-range repulsive force, in contrast to a U(1) mode in models with fully nondegenerate masses which gives a short-range force. We also construct a bound state of dyonic domain walls by introducing the imaginary part of the Higgs masses. In the latter model we find that when all walls coincide, SU(N){sub L}xSU(N){sub R}xU(1) symmetry is broken down to SU(N){sub V}, and U(N){sub A} NG modes and the same number of quasi-NG modes are localized on the wall. When n walls separate, off-diagonal elements of U(n) NG modes have wave functions spreading between two separated walls (non-Abelian clouds), whereas some quasi-NG modes turn to NG bosons as a result of further symmetry breaking U(n){sub V}{yields}U(1){sub V}{sup n}. In the case of 4+1-dimensional bulk, we can dualize the effective theory to the supersymmetric Freedman-Townsend model of non-Abelian 2-form fields.

Eto, Minoru [INFN, Sezione di Pisa, Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Pisa Largo Pontecorvo, 3, Ed. C, 56127 Pisa (Italy); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan); Ohashi, Keisuke [Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics, University of Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

Electric and Magnetic Walls on Dielectric Interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sufficient conditions of the existence of electric or magnetic walls on dielectric interfaces are given for a multizone uniform dielectric waveguiding system. If one of two adjacent dielectric zones supports a TEM field distribution while the other supports a TM (TE) field distribution, then the common dielectric interface behaves as an electric (magnetic) wall, that is, the electric (magnetic) field line is perpendicular to the interface while the magnetic (electric) field line is parallel to the interface.

Changbiao Wang

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

207

INTOR impurity control and first wall system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The highlights of the recent INTOR effort on examining the key issues of the impurity control/first wall system are summarized. The emphasis of the work was an integrated study of the edge-region physics, plasma-wall interaction, materials, engineering and magnetic considerations associated with the poloidal divertor and pump limiter. The development of limiter and divertor collector plate designs with an acceptable lifetime was a major part of the work.

Abdou, M.A.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Modelling of Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) is envisioned in ITER to clean the wall from impurities, to control the wall isotopic ratio and the hydrogen recycling in the presence of the toroidal magnetic field. Various experiments and modelling are advancing to consolidate this technique. In this contribution the modeling of ICWC is presented, which can be divided in two parts: plasma description and plasma wall interaction. Firstly a 0D plasma model, based on a set of energy and particle balance equations for Maxwellian Hydrogen and Helium species, is presented. The model takes into account elementary collision processes, coupled RF power, particle confinement, wall recycling, and active gas injection and pumping. The RF plasma production process is based mainly on electron collisional ionization. The dependency of the plasma parameters, the Hydrogen and Helium partial pressures and neutral or ionic fluxes on pressure and RF power are quantitatively in good agreement with those obtained experimentally on TORE SUPRA. Secondly an extension of the 0D model including the description of the wall interaction is presented and compared to TORE SUPRA multi-pulse ICWC discharges.

Douai, D.; Wauters, T.; Wuenderlich, D.; Bremond, S.; Lombard, G.; Mollard, P.; Pegourie, B. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 St Paul lez Durance (France); Lyssoivan, A. [LPP-ERM/KMS, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Marchuk, O. [IEK-4, FZ Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Van Oost, G. [Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium)

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

209

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Analysis of error floor of LDPC codes under LP decoding over the BSC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider linear programming (LP) decoding of a fixed low-density parity-check (LDPC) code over the binary symmetric channel (BSC). The LP decoder fails when it outputs a pseudo-codeword which is not a codeword. We propose an efficient algorithm termed the instanton search algorithm (ISA) which, given a random input, generates a set of flips called the BSC-instanton and prove that: (a) the LP decoder fails for any set of flips with support vector including an instanton; (b) for any input, the algorithm outputs an instanton in the number of steps upper-bounded by twice the number of flips in the input. We obtain the number of unique instantons of different sizes by running the ISA sufficient number of times. We then use the instanton statistics to predict the performance of the LP decoding over the BSC in the error floor region. We also propose an efficient semi-analytical method to predict the performance of LP decoding over a large range of transition probabilities of the BSC.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chilappagari, Shashi [UNIV OF AZ; Vasic, Bane [UNIV OF AZ; Stepanov, Mikhail [UNIV OF AZ

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Effect of ozonation on fungal resistance of bamboo and oak flooring materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignocellulosic materials are gaining increased interest as renewable sources of building materials. However, chemical and microbiological degradation can occur when lignocellulosic materials are exposed to environmental stressors such as ozone and elevated humidity. In this study, the effects of ozone treatment and solvent extraction on fungal growth rates of bamboo and oak flooring materials were investigated. One set of samples was extracted with a mixture of cyclohexane and ethanol solvents for 72 h to remove extractable compounds. Another set of materials was exposed continuously to ozone (2000 ?L m?3 or 2000 ppbv) for one to five weeks. Solvent-extracted and ozone-treated samples were incubated in closed chambers at 85% or 55% RH and 30 °C. Incubated samples were removed at regular time intervals for fungal growth evaluation. Ozone treatment caused chemical changes in bamboo and oak, which appeared to reduce bamboo's resistance to fungal attack. Longer ozone exposure led to higher susceptibility to fungal growth. Untreated and ozone-treated oak showed no evidence of fungal growth, suggesting that this material may contain fungi-inhibitory compounds that are not removed by these treatments. Also, a delay in fungal growth on cyclohexane/ethanol-extracted bamboo was observed, probably due to the extraction process removing substances that enhanced fungal growth.

Chi Hoang; Tinh Nguyen; Deborah Stanley; Andrew Persily; Richard L. Corsi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

Valkovic, V. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, Zagreb (Croatia); Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Inst. Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia); Matika, D. [Inst. for Researches and Development of Defense Systems, Zagreb (Croatia); Kollar, R. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, Zagreb (Croatia); Nad, K.; Orlic, Z. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Inst. Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2NT00041628 2NT00041628 Final Report Covering research during the period 1 June, 2002 through 30 September, 2008 Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project Submitted by: University of Mississippi Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology 310 Lester Hall, University, MS 38677 Principal Authors: J. Robert Woolsey, Thomas M. McGee, Carol B. Lutken Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy ii SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT DOE Award Number DE-FC26-02NT41628 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

214

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42877 Semiannual Progress Report HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO Submitted by: CENTER FOR MARINE RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 111 BREVARD HALL, UNIVERSITY, MS 38677 Principal Author: Carol Lutken, PI Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy ii HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO SEMIANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT 1 JANUARY, 2011 THROUGH 30 JUNE, 2011

215

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

217

Identification of Novel Cell Wall Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our DOE Biosciences-funded work focused on the fungal cell wall and morphogenesis. We are especially interested in how new cell wall material is targeted to appropriate areas for polar (asymmetric) growth. Polar growth is the only way that filamentous fungi explore the environment to find suitable substrates to degrade. Work funded by this grant has resulted in a total of twenty peer-reviewed publications. In work funded by this grant, we identified nine Aspergillus nidulans temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants that fail to send out a germ tube and show a swollen cell phenotype at restrictive temperature, the swo mutants. In other organisms, a swollen cell phenotype is often associated with misdirected growth or weakened cell walls. Our work shows that several of the A. nidulans swo mutants have defects in the establishment and maintenance of polarity. Cloning of several swo genes by complementation also showed that secondary modification of proteins seems is important in polarity. We also investigated cell wall biosynthesis and branching based on leads in literature from other organisms and found that branching and nuclear division are tied and that the cell wall reorganizes during development. In our most recent work we have focused on gene expression during the shift from isotropic to polar growth. Surprisingly we found that genes previously thought to be involved only in spore formation are important in early vegetative growth as well.

Michelle Momany

2009-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

218

WallBots: Interactive Wall-Crawling Robots In the Hands of Public Artists and Political Activists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WallBots: Interactive Wall-Crawling Robots In the Hands of Public Artists and Political Activists present WallBots- autonomous, wall-crawling robots as a research probe for public expression across a wide, street art INTRODUCTION "People look at an oil painting and admire the use of brushstrokes to convey

Paulos, Eric

219

Hindawi Publishing Corporation 410 Park Avenue,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA http://www.hindawi.com/journals/denm/ Differential is not possible, you can contact denm.support@hindawi.com. Associate Editors N. Bellomo Italy J. L. Bona USA J. R. Cannon USA S.-N. Chow USA B. S. Dandapat India E. DiBenedetto USA R. Finn USA R. L. Fosdick USA J. Frehse

Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.

220

living walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14 14 Varnish cache server Home Groups Community Central Green Button Applications Developer Utility Rate FRED: FRee Energy Database More Public Groups Private Groups Features Groups Blog posts Content Stream Documents Discussions Polls Q & A Events Notices My stuff Energy blogs 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142229614 Varnish cache server living walls Home Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 Living Walls ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Effective action of domain wall networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U(N{sub C}) gauge theory with N{sub F} fundamental scalars admits BPS junctions of domain walls. When the networks/webs of these walls contain loops, their size moduli give localized massless modes. We construct Kaehler potential of their effective action. In the large size limit Kaehler metric is well approximated by kinetic energy of walls and junctions, which is understood in terms of tropical geometry. Kaehler potential can be expressed in terms of hypergeometric functions that are useful to understand small size behavior. Even when the loop shrinks, the metric is regular with positive curvature. Moduli space of a single triangle loop has a geometry between a cone and a cigar.

Eto, Minoru [Institute of Physics, University of Tokyo, Komaba 3-8-1, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Fujimori, Toshiaki; Nagashima, Takayuki; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Nitta, Muneto [Department of Physics, Keio University, Hiyoshi, Yokohama, Kanagawa 223-8521 (Japan)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

222

Wall thickness measuring method and apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for measuring the wall thickness of a nonmagnetic article having a housing supporting a magnet and a contiguous supporting surface. The tubular article and the housing are releasably secured to the supporting surface and a support member of an optical comparator, respectively. To determine the wall thickness of the article at a selected point, a magnetically responsive ball is positioned within the tubular article over said point and retained therein by means of a magnetic field produced by the magnet. Thereafter, an optical comparator is employed to project a magnified image of the ball on a screen and the wall thickness at the selected point is calculated by using a ball surface measurement taken with the comparator in conjunction with a previously determined base line measurement.

Salzer, L.J.; Bergren, D.A.

1987-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

223

Thermodynamics of free Domain Wall fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Studying various thermodynamic quantities for the free domain wall fermions for both finite and infinite fifth dimensional extent N_5, we find that the lattice corrections are minimum for $N_T\\geq10$ for both energy density and susceptibility, for its irrelevant parameter M in the range 1.45-1.50. The correction terms are, however, quite large for small lattice sizes of $N_T\\leq8$. We propose modifications of the domain wall operator, as well as the overlap operator, to reduce the finite cut-off effects to within 10% of the continuum results of the thermodynamic quantities for the currently used N_T=6-8 lattices. Incorporating chemical potential, we show that \\mu^2 divergences are absent for a large class of such domain wall fermion actions although the chiral symmetry is broken for $\\mu\

R. V. Gavai; Sayantan Sharma

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

224

Living Walls | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Living Walls Living Walls Home > Groups > Buildings Dc's picture Submitted by Dc(15) Member 15 November, 2013 - 13:26 ancient building system architect biomimicry building technology cooling cu daylight design problem energy use engineer fred andreas geothermal green building heat transfer heating living walls metabolic adjustment net zero pre-electricity Renewable Energy Solar university of colorado utility grid Wind Much of the discussion surrounding green buildings centers around reducing energy use. The term net zero is the platinum standard for green buildings, meaning the building in question does not take any more energy from the utility grid than it produces using renewable energy resources, such as solar, wind, or geothermal installations (and sometimes these renewable energy resources actually feed energy back to the utility grid). Architects

225

Cell Wall Recipe: A Lesson on Biofuels  

K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

Students will investigate how changes in the DNA sequence that codes for cell wall formation can have a favorable outcome in producing plants that have higher levels of cellulose than the parent plant. The cellulose yield is most important in the production of ethanol: the greater the amount of cellulose within the cell wall, the greater the amount of ethanol that can be produced. To engage students, the first part of this lesson has students participating in a discovery activity where they will extract DNA from wheat germ.

226

Walking on daylight : the application of translucent floor systems as a means of achieving natural daylighting in mid and low rise architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis is concerned with the introduction of quality daylight to buildings by means of translucency in the horizontal planes or floors within the building. Since people began to build, the concept of translucency in ...

Widder, James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Ice cores drilled from lake and ocean floors, continents, and ice sheets provide geoscientists with the most extensive and accurate picture of the earth!s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zer Ice cores drilled from lake and ocean floors, continents, and ice sheets provide geoscientists produces 30 GB of raw imagery. With the ability to display core sections in high resolution, Corelyzer

Johnson, Andrew

228

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Hot wire production of single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus (210) for producing a multi-wall carbon nanotube (213) may comprise a process chamber (216), a furnace (217) operatively associated with the process chamber (216), and at least one filament (218) positioned within the process chamber (216). At least one power supply (220) operatively associated with the at least one filament (218) heats the at least one filament (218) to a process temperature. A gaseous carbon precursor material (214) operatively associated with the process chamber (216) provides carbon for forming the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213). A metal catalyst material (224) operatively associated with the process (216) catalyzes the formation of the multi-wall carbon nanotube (213).

Dillon, Anne C. (Boulder, CO); Mahan, Archie H. (Golden, CO); Alleman, Jeffrey L. (Lakewood, CO)

2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

230

THE CHINESE WALL LATTICE Ravi Sandhu  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

security policy for confidentiality · Mixture of free choice (discretionary) and mandatory of interest class #12;4 CHINESE WALL EXAMPLE BANKS OIL COMPANIESBANKS OIL COMPANIES A B X Y #12;5 READ ACCESS BREWER-NASH SIMPLE SECURITY S can read O only if · O is in the same company dataset as· O is in the same

Sandhu, Ravi

231

Symmetry groups of single-wall nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An approach to the determination of the symmetry groups of structural analogs of single-wall carbon nanotubes using ideas in color symmetry theory is described. The line group structures of the symmetry groups of BN, BC3, BCN and BC2N nanotubes are identified. An extension of the method to address nanotubes with non-hexagonal symmetry is also presented.

De Las Pe?as, M.L.A.N.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

232

Annual Report Diana H. Wall, Director  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Student Sustainability Center more than doubled its student engagement, and our pre-college Summer2013-2014 Annual Report #12;Diana H. Wall, Director CSU is at the forefront of sustainability if such systems are to endure, and developing the expertise that is needed to shape a sustainable future

233

Wall Precursor Effects in Gaseous Detonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... and 5 mm long, were used in an investigation of electrical phenomena in stoichiometric oxyhydrogen detonations produced in a 4 m long stainless steel tube of hexagonal cross-section. The ... , which was insulated from the tube wall, recorded the time of arrival of the detonation plasma at the plane of observation. Only when both the probes and insulating surfaces ...

M. C. CAVENOR

1970-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

234

Subcooled Boiling Near a Heated Wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency, and velocity are obtained in subcooled R-134a flowing over a heated flat plate near an unheated wall and compared to analytical predictions. The measurements were obtained for a fixed system pressure and mass flow rate (P = 2.4 MPa and w = 106 kg/hr) at various inlet liquid temperatures. During the experiments, electrical power was applied at a constant rate to one side of the test section. The local void fraction data, acquired with a hot-film anemometer probe, showed the existence of a significant peak near the heated wall and a smaller secondary peak near the unheated wall for the larger inlet subcoolings. Local vapor velocity data, taken with the hot-film probe and a laser Doppler velocimeter, showed broad maxima near the centerline between the heated and unheated plates. Significant temperature gradients near the heated wall were observed for large inlet subcooling. Bubble size data, inferred from measurements of void fraction, bubble frequency and vapor velocity, when combined with the measured bubble chord length distributions illustrate the transition from pure three dimensional spherical to two-dimensional planar bubble flow, the latter being initiated when the bubbles fill the gap between the plates. These various two-phase flow measurements were used for development of a multidimensional, four-field calculational method; comparisons of the data to the calculations show reasonable agreement.

T.A. Trabold; C.C. Maneri; P.F. Vassallo; D.M. Considine

2000-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

235

Design of wetted wall bioaerosol concentration cyclones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

...................................................................................... 24 Aerosol-to-aerosol collection efficiency.................................................... 24 Wetting pattern on the impacting wall ? effect of an atomizer.................. 24..................................................................................... 67 Figure 3.4. Cold temperature experiemental setup ........................................................... 68 Figure 3.5. Preliminary heating system for the 1250 L/min cyclone and thermo-couple locations...

Seo, Youngjin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

TBU-0061- In the Matter of Misti Wall  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Misti Wall (the complainant or Wall), appeals the dismissal of her complaint of retaliation filed under 10 C.F.R. Part 708, the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program. As...

238

Double Diffusion in Enclosure Bounded by Massive and Volatilizing Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-10), are considered. Other governing parameters are maintained constant (Rayleigh number, Prandtl number, Lewis number and width ratio of massive wall to enclosure). The conjugate heat transfer of the thick wall and indoor airflow and the enhanced heat transfer...

Liu, D.; Tang, G.; Zhao, F.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Helium Pumping Wall for a Liquid Lithium Tokamak Richard Majeski...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Helium Pumping Wall for a Liquid Lithium Tokamak Richard Majeski This invention is designed to be a subsystem of a device, a tokamak with walls or plasma facing components of...

240

After Exodus : re-occupation of the metropolitan wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The title "Exodus alludes to a restricted exclave encircled by a forbidding wall -- effect, a prison on the scale of a metropolis, and one in which people sought refuge voluntarily. Over the past forty years, similar walls ...

Allison, Jordan Lloyd Norman

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reading the Cosmic Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall Reading the Cosmic Writing on the Wall NERSC Key to Planck's Revision of Universal Recipe March 21, 2013 Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, + 1 510 486 7421 map800-600.jpg This map shows the oldest light in our universe, as detected with the greatest precision yet by the Planck mission. The ancient light, called the cosmic microwave background, was imprinted on the sky when the universe was 370,000 years old. (Image credit: ESA and the Planck Collaboration) Thanks to a supersensitive space telescope and some sophisticated supercomputing, scientists from the international Planck collaboration have made the closest reading yet of the most ancient story in our universe: the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Today, the team released preliminary results based on the Planck

243

Gravitational infall in the hard wall model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An infalling shell in the hard wall model provides a simple holographic model for energy injection in a confining gauge theory. Depending on its parameters, a scalar shell either collapses into a large black brane, or scatters between the hard wall and the anti-de Sitter boundary. In the scattering regime, we find numerical solutions that keep oscillating for as long as we have followed their evolution, and we provide an analytic argument that shows that a black brane can never be formed. This provides examples of states in infinite-volume field theory that never thermalize. We find that the field theory expectation value of a scalar operator keeps oscillating, with an amplitude that undergoes modulation.

B. Craps; E. J. Lindgren; A. Taliotis; J. Vanhoof; H. Zhang

2014-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Enhanced dielectric-wall linear accelerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A dielectric-wall linear accelerator is enhanced by a high-voltage, fast e-time switch that includes a pair of electrodes between which are laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators. A high voltage is placed between the electrodes sufficient to stress the voltage breakdown of the insulator on command. A light trigger, such as a laser, is focused along at least one line along the edge surface of the laminated alternating layers of isolated conductors and insulators extending between the electrodes. The laser is energized to initiate a surface breakdown by a fluence of photons, thus causing the electrical switch to close very promptly. Such insulators and lasers are incorporated in a dielectric wall linear accelerator with Blumlein modules, and phasing is controlled by adjusting the length of fiber optic cables that carry the laser light to the insulator surface. 6 figs.

Sampayan, S.E.; Caporaso, G.J.; Kirbie, H.C.

1998-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

245

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Wall, Pennsylvania: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.3936801°, -79.7861577° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.3936801,"lon":-79.7861577,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

246

Manipulation and Imaging of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manipulation and Imaging of Individual Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with an Atomic Force Microscope** By Henk W. C. Postma, Allard Sellmeijer, and Cees Dekker* Carbon nanotubes[1] have attracted-walled nanotubes,[3±5] the prototype single-walled tubes are much more difficult to study since their diameter

247

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBXM 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal on Lithium Wall Experiment (LWX) on PBX­M 1 Leonid E. Zakharov, Princeton University; OUTLINE 1. Mini­conference on Lithium walls and low recycling regime. 2. PBX­M Capabilities. 3. Motivation "Lithium covered walls and low recycling regimes in toka­ maks". APS meeting, October 23­27, 2000, Quebec

Zakharov, Leonid E.

248

Particle Sizing using Passive Ultrasonic Measurement of Vessel Wall Vibrations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Particle Sizing using Passive Ultrasonic Measurement of Vessel Wall Vibrations Gillian Carson for particle sizing using an ultrasonic transducer to measure vessel wall vibrations and 1 #12;considers in a stirred vessel, its subse- quent impact with the vessel wall, and the resulting flexural vibrations

Mottram, Nigel

249

Environment/Health/Safety/Security (EHSS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 JHA Templates Construction JHA 2013 Instructions Mobilization & Overall Scope of Work Abatement (Lead, Asbestos & Mold) Aerial and Scissor Lifts ASHRAE Testing 110 Acoustical Ceilings (T-bar) All Terrain & Powered Industrial Trucks (PIT) Arborist - Vegetation Management Blank JHA Cabinetry Installation Carpentry, Forming, Framing or Wood Working Chemical Use Concrete Work - Truck & Pumping Confined Space Containment ... Dust Particulate Isolation Core Drilling Concrete (wet method) Crane Lifts Demolition Electrical Work (LOTO) Excavating, Trenching & Pot Holing Fall Protection Flooring Installation Carpet - Sheet Vinyl - VCT - Ceramic Tile Hot Tap Insulation (Wall or Pipe with PVC fittings) Ladders Mechanical Ducting Operating Hand, Power Tools & Equipment

250

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs (Idaho) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives should not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost. Program Info State Idaho Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Refrigerator/Freezer Recycling: $30 Water Heater: $30 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

251

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Avista Utilities (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Heating & Cooling Construction Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives will not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Source Heat Pump: $100 Variable Speed Motor: $100 Water Heater: $30 Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance: $750 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft.

252

NREL Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs (Fact Sheet), Building America: Technical Highlight, Building Technologies Program (BTP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Develops Develops Diagnostic Test Cases To Improve Building Energy Simulation Programs The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Residential and Commercial Buildings research groups developed a set of diagnostic test cases for building energy simulations. Eight test cases were developed to test surface conduction heat transfer algorithms of building envelopes in building energy simulation programs. These algorithms are used to predict energy flow through external opaque surfaces such as walls, ceilings, and floors. The test cases consist of analyti- cal and vetted numerical heat transfer solutions that have been available for decades, which increases confidence in test results. NREL researchers adapted these solutions for comparisons with building energy simulation results.

253

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) Cheyenne Light, Fuel and Power (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program (Wyoming) < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Sealing Your Home Ventilation Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Insulation (Wall/Ceiling/Floor): $750 Insulation (Duct): $170 Infiltration Control: $200 Duct Sealing: $285 Program Info State Wyoming Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Home Energy Audit: Required for Infiltration Control, Insulation, Duct Sealing, and Window Rebates

254

Avista Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs Avista Utilities (Gas) - Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Programs < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Construction Design & Remodeling Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Maximum Rebate Incentives should not exceed 50% of the actual measure cost Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Natural Gas Furnace/Boiler: $400 Water Heater: $30 Floor and Wall Insulation: $0.50/sq. ft. Attic and Ceiling Insulation: $0.25/sq. ft. ENERGY STAR rated homes: $650 - $900 Replacement of Electric Straight Resistance Space Heat: $750 Provider

255

DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program DTE Energy (Electric) - Residential Energy Efficiency Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Cooling Appliances & Electronics Construction Design & Remodeling Ventilation Commercial Lighting Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Maximum Rebate Contact DTE Program Info State Michigan Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Air Sealing: up to $150 Floor Insulation: $50 - $100 Bandjoist Insulation: $50 - $100 Wall Insulation: Up to $250 Ceiling Insulation: Up to $250 Window Replacement: $30 (window); $60 (picture window/sliding glass door)

256

Recommendations for 15% Above-Code Energy Efficiency Measures for Single-Family Residences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

frame construction #0;? Ceiling R-value: R-30 #0;? Wall R-value: R-13 #0;? Un-insulated, slab-on-grade Fenestration #0;? 18% window-to-floor area ratio #0;? U-value: 0.47 Btu/hr ºF ft 2 #0;? SHGC: 0.40 Two system types: Electric cooling Natural gas..., 15% each on east and west orientations #0;? 4 ft. roof overhang was also included on all four sides Envelope & Fenestration Measures 9. Improved Window Performance #0;? Uvalue 0 .47 to 0.42 Btu/h-sq. ft.-°F #0;? SHGC 0.40 to 0.33 6. Increased...

Culp, C.; Haberl, J. S.; Mukhopadhyay, J.; Liu, J. B.; Yazdani, B.; Malhotra, M.

257

Brick Walls and AdS/CFT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the relationship between the bulk-boundary correspondence in Rehren's algebraic holography (and in other 'fixed-background' approaches to holography) and in mainstream 'Maldacena AdS/CFT'. Especially, we contrast the understanding of black-hole entropy from the viewpoint of QFT in curved spacetime -- in the framework of 't Hooft's 'brick wall' model -- with the understanding based on Maldacena AdS/CFT. We show that the brick-wall modification of a Klein Gordon field in the Hartle-Hawking-Israel state on 1+2-Schwarzschild AdS (BTZ) has a well-defined boundary limit with the same temperature and entropy as the brick-wall-modified bulk theory. One of our main purposes is to point out a close connection, for general AdS/CFT situations, between the puzzle raised by Arnsdorf and Smolin regarding the relationship between Rehren's algebraic holography and mainstream AdS/CFT and the puzzle embodied in the 'correspondence principle' proposed by Mukohyama and Israel in their work on the brick-wall approach to black hole entropy. Working on the assumption that similar results will hold for bulk QFT other than the Klein Gordon field and for Schwarzschild AdS in other dimensions, and recalling the first author's proposed resolution to the Mukohyama-Israel puzzle based on his 'matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis', we argue that, in Maldacena AdS/CFT, the algebra of the boundary CFT is isomorphic only to a proper subalgebra of the bulk algebra, albeit (at non-zero temperature) the (GNS) Hilbert spaces of bulk and boundary theories are still the 'same' -- the total bulk state being pure, while the boundary state is mixed (thermal). We also argue from the finiteness of its boundary (and hence, on our assumptions, also bulk) entropy at finite temperature, that the Rehren dual of the Maldacena boundary CFT cannot itself be a QFT and must, instead, presumably be something like a string theory.

Bernard S. Kay; L. Ortiz

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

258

Conserved currents for Mobius Domain Wall Fermions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive the exactly conserved vector, and almost conserved axial currents for rational approximations to the overlap operator with a general Mobius kernel. The approach maintains manifest Hermiticity, and allows matrix elements of the currents to be constructed at no extra cost after solution of the usual 5d system of equations, similar to the original approach of Furman and Shamir for domain wall Fermions.

P. A. Boyle

2014-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

259

1993 NEC 1) (Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MWNT (Vapor-grown carbon fiber, VGCF)33) 10001300 34) SWNT CCVD Smalley 15) CO SWNT SWNT 1993 NEC 1) (Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes, SWNTs) 1(a) 1nm µm µm SWNTs 2) (MWNTs) 1(c 29,30,35-41) SWNT , MgO Fe/Co, Ni/Co, Mo/Co nm SWNT VGCF Fe(CO)5 SWNT Ethanol tank Hot

Maruyama, Shigeo

260

Phenomenology of Wall Bounded Newtonian Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct a simple analytic model for wall-bounded turbulence, containing only four adjustable parameters. Two of these parameters characterize the viscous dissipation of the components of the Reynolds stress-tensor and other two parameters characterize their nonlinear relaxation. The model offers an analytic description of the profiles of the mean velocity and the correlation functions of velocity fluctuations in the entire boundary region, from the viscous sub-layer, through the buffer layer and further into the log-layer. As a first approximation, we employ the traditional return-to-isotropy hypothesis, which yields a very simple distribution of the turbulent kinetic energy between the velocity components in the log-layer: the streamwise component contains a half of the total energy whereas the wall-normal and the cross-stream components contain a quarter each. In addition, the model predicts a very simple relation between the von-K\\'arm\\'an slope $\\kappa $ and the turbulent velocity in the log-law region $v^+$ (in wall units): $v^+=6 \\kappa$. These predictions are in excellent agreement with DNS data and with recent laboratory experiments.

Victor S. L'vov; Anna Pomyalov; Itamar Procaccia; Sergej S. Zilitinkevich

2005-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Influence of ventilation arrangements on particle removal in industrial cleanrooms with various tool coverage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to investigate the influence of comparative ventilation arrangements (wall-return, locally balanced ceiling-return, and four-way ceiling-return) on the airflow distribution and particle fates w...

Yun-Chun Tung; Shih-Cheng Hu; Tengfang Xu; Ren-Huei Wang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A Study of the Filling of Wall Cavities With Retrofit Wall Insulation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Power Marketing Agency, the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), conducted a retrofit wall insulation study to determine the effects of various obstructions within a wall cavity, where voids are likely to occur, and preferred filling methods and material types. The insulation test structure was composed of four 8-foot /times/ 12-foot walls, and was built using standard construction practices. The inside walls were clear plastic glazing, instead of gypsum board, to enable viewing of the filling process. A total of eight tests were performed: four cellulose, two rockwool, and two fiberglass. One- and two-hole filling methods were observed. All insulations were found to perform in the same basic manner with all experiencing the same problem areas. Common installer problems were empty spaces at the tops of cavities and missed cavities, especially above headers. Wiring and lath and plaster consistently caused reduced insulation densities in cavities. The problems with wiring, lath and plaster, and other features in the wall cavities were avoided with the use of a filler tube. The filler tube also provided a more consistent fill along the length of the entire cavity. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Flores, Joseph A.; Grill, Alan R.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Effect of elasticity of wall on diffusion in nano channel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Confining walls of nano channel are taken to be elastic to study their effect on the diffusion coefficient of fluid flowing through the channel. The wall is elastic to the extent that it responses to molecular pressure exerted by fluid. The model to study diffusion is based on microscopic considerations. Results obtained for fluid confining to 20 atomic diameter width contrasted with results obtained by considering rigid and smooth wall. The effect of roughness of wall on diffusion can be compensated by the elastic property of wall.

Tankeshwar, K., E-mail: tankesh@pu.ac.in [Computer Centre, Panjab University Chandigarh,- 160014 (India); Srivastava, Sunita [Department of Physics, Panjab University, Chandigarh 160014 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

265

Method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of non-destructively inspecting a curved wall portion of a large and thick walled vessel for a defect by computed tomography is provided. A collimated source of radiation is placed adjacent one side of the wall portion and an array of detectors for the radiation is placed on the other side adjacent the source. The radiation from the source passing through the wall portion is then detected with the detectors over a limited angle, dependent upon the curvature of the wall of the vessel, to obtain a dataset. The source and array are then coordinately moved relative to the wall portion in steps and a further dataset is obtained at each step. The plurality of datasets obtained over the limited angle is then processed to produce a tomogram of the wall portion to determine the presence of a defect therein. In a preferred embodiment, the curved wall portion has a center of curvature so that the source and the array are positioned at each step along a respective arc curved about the center. If desired, the detector array and source can be reoriented relative to a new wall portion and an inspection of the new wall portion can be easily obtained. Further, the source and detector array can be indexed in a direction perpendicular to a plane including the limited angle in a plurality of steps so that by repeating the detecting and moving steps at each index step, a three dimensional image can be created of the wall portion.

Fong, James T. (Bethel Park, PA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project Highly Energy Efficient Wall Systems Research Project The Department of Energy is currently conducting research into highly energy efficient wall systems. Walls with high R-values are better insulators, and their development can help buildings come closer to having zero net energy consumption. Project Description This project seeks to develop a commercially viable wall system up to R-40 through integration of vacuum technology with the exterior insulated façade system (EIFS). Dow Corning will develop a wall system configuration of expanded polystyrene vacuum isolation panels that can be specified for R-values of 20, 30, and 40. This project also aims to develop a unitized protection system of vacuum isolation panels and to validate current code

267

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

268

Domain Walls and Vortices in Chiral Symmetry Breaking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study domain walls and vortices in chiral symmetry breaking in a QCD-like theory with N flavors in the chiral limit. If the axial anomaly is absent, there exist stable Abelian axial vortices winding around the spontaneously broken U(1)_A symmetry and non-Abelian axial vortices winding around both the U(1)_A and non-Abelian SU(N) chiral symmetries. In the presence of the axial anomaly term, metastable domain walls are present and Abelian axial vortices must be attached by N domain walls, forming domain wall junctions. We show that a domain wall junction decays into N non-Abelian vortices attached by domain walls, implying its metastability. We also show that domain walls decay through the quantum tunneling by creating a hole bounded by a closed non-Abelian vortex.

Minoru Eto; Yuji Hirono; Muneto Nitta

2013-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

269

Moisture Management of High-R Walls (Fact Sheet), Building America...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

wall with ccSPF cavity insulation Double stud wall with cellulose insulation and polyethylene vapor retarder Double stud wall with cellulose and 2 in. of ccSPF Double stud wall...

270

Detonation limits in rough walled tubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The present paper reports the results of a study of detonation limits in rough tubes. Detonation velocity is measured by photodiodes and ionization probes spaced at 10 cm intervals along the length of the tube. Short lengths of smoked foils inserted into the core of the rough tube is used to register the structure of the detonation wave. Pressure transducers are also used to obtain the pressure profile. The results indicate that in rough tubes, the detonation velocity is generally much lower than the corresponding values for smooth tubes. The velocity decreases slowly at first and then more rapidly as the limit is approached. The velocity variation is generally continuous and at the limits, the failure velocity is of the order of about 0.4 V CJ for all cases. The detonation limits in rough tubes are found to be wider than for a smooth tube. This indicates that the turbulence generated by the wall roughness facilitates the propagation of the detonation and extends the limits. Smoked foil records show that in the core of the rough tube the detonation front has a cellular structure corresponding to the usual cellular structure due to instability of the detonation. Thus the intrinsic unstable cellular structure is quite robust and retains its global characteristics in spite of the large perturbations generated by the rough wall. The detonation in the core of the rough tube goes from multi-headed to single headed as the limit is approached. Past the single headed spin, the low velocity detonation has no cellular structure but consists of interacting weak transverse waves from the rough wall. The averaged pressure of the low velocity detonation front corresponds to about the constant volume explosion pressure, in accord with the velocity of the low velocity detonation.

Amanda Starr; John H.S. Lee; Hoi Dick Ng

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Melting Instantons, Domain Walls, and Large N  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monte Carlo studies of $CP^{N-1}$ sigma models have shown that the structure of topological charge in these models undergoes a sharp transition at $N=N_c\\approx 4$. For $NN_c$ it is dominated by extended, thin, 1-dimensionally coherent membranes of topological charge, which can be interpreted as domain walls between discrete quasi-stable vacua. These vacua differ by a unit of background electric flux. The transition can be identified as the delocalization of topological charge, or "instanton melting," a phenomenon first suggested by Witten to resolve the conflict between instantons and large $N$ behavior. Implications for $QCD$ are discussed.

H. B. Thacker

2008-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

Gas turbine bucket wall thickness control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A core for use in casting a turbine bucket including serpentine cooling passages is divided into two pieces including a leading edge core section and a trailing edge core section. Wall thicknesses at the leading edge and the trailing edge of the turbine bucket can be controlled independent of each other by separately positioning the leading edge core section and the trailing edge core section in the casting die. The controlled leading and trailing edge thicknesses can thus be optimized for efficient cooling, resulting in more efficient turbine operation.

Stathopoulos, Dimitrios (Glenmont, NY); Xu, Liming (Greenville, SC); Lewis, Doyle C. (Greer, SC)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Flame-wall interaction simulation in a turbulent channel flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The interaction between turbulent premixed flames and channel walls is studied. Combustion is represented by a simple irreversible reaction with a large activation temperature. A low heat release assumption is used, but feedback to the flowfield can be allowed through viscosity changes. The effect of wall distance on local and global flame structure is investigated. Quenching distances and maximum wall heat fluxed computed in laminar cases are compared to DNS results. It is found that quenching distances decrease and maximum heat fluxes increase relative to laminar flame values, scaling with the turbulent strain rate. It is shown that these effects are due to large coherent structures which push flame elements towards the wall. The effect of wall strain in flame-wall interaction is studied in a stagnation line flow; this is used to explain the DNS results. The effects of the flame on the flow through viscosity changes is studied. It is also shown that remarkable flame events are produced by flame interaction with a horseshoe vortex: burned gases are pushed towards the wall at high speed and induce quenching and high wall heat flux while fresh gases are expelled from the wall region and form finger-like structures. Effects of the wall on flame surface density are investigated.

Bruneaux, G.; Akselvoll, K.; Poinsot, T.; Ferziger, J.H.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Chem. Phys. Lett. in press Cold wall CVD generation of single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-furnace [3] and arc-discharge [4] methods, several techniques employing the CVD approach [5-13] have been Catalytic CVD generation of high-purity single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) without use of an electric without resort to an electric furnace or a hot filament is proposed. All one needs is a vacuum chamber

Maruyama, Shigeo

275

Sampling and analysis plan for sludge located on the floor and in the pits of the 105-K basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) provides direction for the sampling of the sludge found on the floor and in the remote pits of the 105-K Basins to provide: (1) basic data for the sludges that have not been characterized to-date and (2) representative Sludge material for process tests to be made by the SNF Project/K Basins sludge treatment process subproject. The sampling equipment developed will remove representative samples of the radioactive sludge from underwater at the K Basins, depositing them in shielded containers for transport to the Hanford Site laboratories. Included in the present document is the basic background logic for selection of the samples to meet the requirements established in the Data Quality Objectives (DQO), HNF-2033, for this sampling activity. The present document also includes the laboratory analyses, methods, procedures, and reporting that will be required to meet the DQO.

BAKER, R.B.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

276

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

277

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

278

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

279

Webs of domain walls in supersymmetric gauge theories  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Webs of domain walls are constructed as 1/4 Bogomol'nyi-Prasad-Sommerfield (BPS) states in d=4, N=2 supersymmetric U(N{sub C}) gauge theories with N{sub F} hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation. Webs of walls can contain any numbers of external legs and loops like (p,q) string/5-brane webs. We find the moduli space M of a 1/4 BPS equation for wall webs to be the complex Grassmann manifold. When moduli spaces of 1/2 BPS states (parallel walls) and the vacua are removed from M, the noncompact moduli space of genuine 1/4 BPS wall webs is obtained. All the solutions are obtained explicitly and exactly in the strong gauge coupling limit. In the case of Abelian gauge theory, we work out the correspondence between configurations of wall web and the moduli space CP{sup N{}sub F}{sup -1}.

Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)

2005-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

280

Hollow porous-wall glass microspheres for hydrogen storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A porous wall hollow glass microsphere is provided having a diameter range of between 1 to 200 microns, a density of between 1.0 to 2.0 gm/cc, a porous-wall structure having wall openings defining an average pore size of between 10 to 1000 angstroms, and which contains therein a hydrogen storage material. The porous-wall structure facilitates the introduction of a hydrogen storage material into the interior of the porous wall hollow glass microsphere. In this manner, the resulting hollow glass microsphere can provide a membrane for the selective transport of hydrogen through the porous walls of the microsphere, the small pore size preventing gaseous or liquid contaminants from entering the interior of the hollow glass microsphere.

Heung, Leung K. (Aiken, SC); Schumacher, Ray F. (Aiken, SC); Wicks, George G. (Aiken, SC)

2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

En-Vac Robotic Wall Scabbler. Innovative Technology Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL)demonstrated an En-Vac Robotic Wall Scabbler from Japan to remove contaminated paint and concrete up to five times faster than workers using a hand-held scabbling/grinding tool. The Robotic Wall Scabbler uses abrasive steel grit to blast metal and concrete surfaces and it moves along the wall and adheres to the surface using vacuum suction. The Robotic Wall Scabbling unit includes the robot, grit recycling unit, debris filtration system, vacuum system, and remote control station. It scabbles concrete at depths up to 1/8-inch per pass. The demonstration was conducted on the walls of the Decontamination Shop of Test Area North which is contaminated with polychlorobiphenyls, lead, and radionuclides. Besides production rate, other benefits of the robotic wall scabbler include reduced radiation dose to workers and no airborne contamination.

None

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

283

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Stochastic Domain-Wall Depinning in Magnetic Nanowires Print Reliably controlling the motion of magnetic domain walls along magnetic nanowires is a key requirement for current technological development of novel classes of logic and storage devices, but understanding the nature of non-deterministic domain-wall motion remains a scientific challenge. A statistical analysis of high-resolution magnetic soft x-ray microscopy images by a Berkeley Lab-University of Hamburg group has now revealed that the stochastic behavior of the domain-wall depinning field in notch-patterned Ni80Fe20 (permalloy) nanowires depends strongly on the wire width and the notch depth. This result both provides valuable insight into the motion of magnetic-domain walls and opens a path to further technological developments in spintronics applications.

284

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

D-brane Configurations for Domain Walls and Their Webs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supersymmetric U(NC) gauge theory with NF massive hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation admits various BPS solitons like domain walls and their webs. In the first part we show as a review of the previous paper that domain walls are realized as kinky fractional D3-branes interpolating between separated D7-branes. In the second part we discuss brane configurations for domain wall webs. This is a contribution to the conference based on the talk given by MN.

Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ohta, Kazutoshi [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scale synthesis of carbon nanotubes." Nature, Vol.358, 220-Ropes of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes." Science, Vol.273(5274),of single- wall carbon nanotubes. Process, product, and

Gao, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Stud Walls With Continuous Exterior Insulation for Factory Built...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

density, fairly simple window and door framing details can be used. Easily installed plastic sill flashing is an added benefit. STUD WALLS WITH FOAM- CONTROL NAILBRACE AFM's...

288

Concept for Reducing Hall Thruster Chamber Wall Erosion with...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Concept for Reducing Hall Thruster Chamber Wall Erosion with Lithium Vapor Shielding. Hall thrusters have been established as a compact and reliable means for satellite...

289

Security Walls, LLC, January 14-18, 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Assistance Washington, DC 20585 Security Walls, LLC DOE-VPP Onsite Review January 2013 Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) recognizes that true excellence can be...

290

Imaging cell wall architecture in single Zinnia elegans tracheary elements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indicated a loss of lignin and a modest loss of otherTEs accumulate lignin in their secondary walls and undergohemicelluloses, and also lignin, a complex aromatic polymer

Lacayo, Catherine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding of Single-Walled Carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Epoxy Composites Ning (SWNT)-polymer composites have been fabricated to evaluate the electromagnetic interference (EMI

Gao, Hongjun

292

Fracture of welded aluminum thin-walled structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A comprehensive methodology was developed in the thesis for damage prediction of welded aluminum thin-walled structures, which includes material modeling, calibration, numerical simulation and experimental verification. ...

Zheng, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Seismic design, testing and analysis of reinforced concrete wall buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Priestley M.J.N. (1992). “Seismic Design of Reinforced2007). “Displacement Based Seismic Design of Structures”.318-99 Provisions for Seismic Design of Structural Walls.

Panagiotou, Marios

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Wall and laser spot motion in cylindrical hohlraums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wall and laser spot motion measurements in empty, propane-filled and plastic (CH)-lined gold coated cylindrical hohlraums were performed on the Omega laser facility [T. R. Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Wall motion was measured using axial two-dimensional (2D) x-ray imaging and laser spot motion was perpendicularly observed through a thinned wall using streaked hard x-ray imaging. Experimental results and 2D hydrodynamic simulations show that while empty targets exhibit on-axis plasma collision, CH-lined and propane-filled targets inhibit wall expansion, corroborated with perpendicular streaked imaging showing a slower motion of laser spots.

Huser, G.; Courtois, C.; Monteil, M.-C. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France)

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

295

Self-assembling functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-walled carbon nanotubes Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) arescale synthesis of carbon nanotubes." Nature, Vol.358, 220-Ropes of Metallic Carbon Nanotubes." Science, Vol.273(5274),

Gao, Yan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 7, JULY 2006 1289 Profile-Guided Microarchitectural Floor Planning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 7, JULY 2006 1289 Profile-Guided Microarchitectural Floor Planning for Deep Submicron Processor Design Mongkol integration (VLSI) process tech- nology migrates to nanoscale with a feature size of less than 100 nm, global

Lim, Sung Kyu

297

This form must be filled out in its entirety and returned to your academic advisor on the fourth floor of the IT building. Revised 2/2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

academic advisor on the fourth floor of the IT building. Revised 2/2014 FORM to enroll form with their academic advisor by April 1 for the fall semester and permission to enroll form must be completed and routed to your academic advisor

Zhou, Yaoqi

298

Prototype development of an apparatus to locate and map sea floor petroleum seepages. First quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1995--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project entitled {open_quotes}Prototype Development of an Apparatus to Locate and Map Sea Floor Petroleum Seepages{close_quotes}. This report describes progress in three areas: electronic design, mechanical design, and experiment/research.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2011 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2011 Cardboard is stored on the first floor. On Friday, one individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible to transport the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking

Rock, Chris

300

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department, the individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible for transporting the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking lot and in close

Rock, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2012 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2012 Cardboard is stored on the first floor. On Friday, the individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible to transport the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking

Rock, Chris

302

SunFloor 3D: A Tool for Networks on Chip Topology Synthesis for 3D Systems on Ciprian Seiculescu , Srinivasan Murali  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SunFloor 3D: A Tool for Networks on Chip Topology Synthesis for 3D Systems on Chips Ciprian an efficient Network on Chip (NoC) intercon- nect for a 3D SoC that not only meets the application performance constraints, but also the constraints imposed by the 3D technology, is a significant challenge. In this work

De Micheli, Giovanni

303

Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' 'k.f' :, , j '"; ,,' DEC 5 1984 Mr. Andy Wall0 The Aerospace Corporation suite 4000 955 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W. Washington, D.C. 20024 Dear Mr. Wallo: The Divisfon of Remedial Action Projects staff has reviewed the authority review documents for Gardinler, Inc., Tampa, Florida; Conserv (formerly Virginia-Carolina Chemical Co.), Nichols, Florida; and Blockson Chemical co., Joliet, Illinois. Based on the content therein and in consultation with Mr. Steve Miller, Office of General Counsel (C&11), Departamt of Energy, It has been determined that the Department has no authority, through the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, to conduct remedial action at the aforementioned sites, Therefore, please prepare the document packages necessary to notify the appropriate state authorities and the

304

Hadronization at the AdS wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe hadronization events, using the AdS/CFT Correspondence, which display many of the qualitative features expected in QCD. In particular we study the motion of strings with separating end points in a back-reacted hard wall geometry. The solutions show the development of a linear QCD-like string. The end points oscillate in the absence of string breaking. We introduce string breaking by hand and evolve the new state forward in time to observe the separation of two string segments. A kink associated with this breaking evolves to the end points of the string inducing rho meson production. We explicitly compute the rho meson production at the end point.

Nick Evans; James French; Kristan Jensen; Ed Threlfall

2009-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

305

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Wind Farm Facility Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Developer Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Energy Purchaser Wall Lake Municipal Utilities Location Wall Lake IA Coordinates 42.281965°, -95.094098° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.281965,"lon":-95.094098,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

306

Resistive ferromagnetic wall modes in theory and experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Effects of the ferromagnetic resistive wall on the plasma stability are analyzed. The analysis is based on the equations describing the perturbation dynamics outside the plasma, assuming a linear plasma response. A single-mode cylindrical model is used with two features that differ from the standard case: the wall magnetic permeability is incorporated and the thin-wall approximation is waived. The derivations are performed so that the results can be applied to both tokamaks and line-tied pinches. This is done to allow conclusions for tokamaks from comparison of the developed theory with the experimental data on the resistive and ferromagnetic wall modes in the Wisconsin rotating wall machine with and without a ferritic wall [W. F. Bergerson, D. A. Hannum, C. C. Hegna, R. D. Kendrick, J. S. Sarff, and C. B. Forest, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 235005 (2008)]. The model shows that the ferromagnetic wall effect is always destabilizing. However, it must be small under standard conditions in tokamaks. The effect can be much stronger in the pinch with lower magnetic field and larger wall permeability. The dispersion relation obtained here makes possible an explanation of the experimental results available so far, including those from the Wisconsin machine reported recently as strongly contradictory to expectations based on earlier models. Also, an easy practical solution for compensating the destabilizing ferromagnetic effect in tokamaks is proposed.

Pustovitov, V. D. [Nuclear Fusion Institute, Russian Research Centre Kurchatov Institute, Kurchatov Square 1, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laser-produced plasma-wall interaction O. RENNER,1 R. LISKA,2 AND F.B. ROSMEJ3,4 1 Institute, France (RECEIVED 30 August 2009; ACCEPTED 21 September 2009) Abstract Jets of laser­generated plasma surfaces (walls). The pilot experiments carried out on the iodine laser system (5­200 J, 0.44 mm, 0

Liska, Richard

308

Electron-wall interaction in Hall thrustersa... Y. Raitsesb  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electron-wall interaction in Hall thrustersa... Y. Raitsesb and D. Staack Princeton Plasma Physics; accepted 22 February 2005; published online 2 May 2005 Electron-wall interaction effects in Hall thrusters this threshold, the electron energy gain is constant in the acceleration region and therefore, secondary electron

309

A review on Phase Change Materials Integrated in Building Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A review on Phase Change Materials Integrated in Building Walls Fr´ed´eric Kuznika, , Damien Davida review of the integration of phase change materials in building walls. Many considerations are discussed in this paper including physical considerations about building envelop and phase change material, phase change

310

CP-Violating Bubble Wall and Electroweak Baryogenesis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...August 1997 research-article Articles CP-Violating Bubble Wall and Electroweak...baryogenesis depends on the profile of the CP-violating bubble wall created at the first...point out that a sufficiently small explicit CP violation gives nonperturbative effects......

Koichi Funakubo; Akira Kakuto; Shoichiro Otsuki; Fumihiko Toyoda

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Global structure of moduli space for BPS walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the global structure of the moduli space of BPS walls in the Higgs branch of supersymmetric theories with eight supercharges. We examine the structure in the neighborhood of a special Lagrangian submanifold M, and find that the dimension of the moduli space can be larger than that naively suggested by the index theorem, contrary to previous examples of BPS solitons. We investigate BPS wall solutions in an explicit example of M using Abelian gauge theory. Its Higgs branch turns out to contain several special Lagrangian submanifolds including M. We show that the total moduli space of BPS walls is the union of these submanifolds. We also find interesting dynamics between BPS walls as a by-product of the analysis. Namely, mutual repulsion and attraction between BPS walls sometimes forbid a movement of a wall and lock it in a certain position; we also find that a pair of walls can transmute to another pair of walls with different tension after they pass through.

Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ohta, Kazutoshi [Theoretical Physics Laboratory, The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tachikawa, Yuji [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 112-0033 (Japan)

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

Absorption spectroscopy of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Absorption spectroscopy of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes Stéphane Berciaud,a Laurent-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) lead to heterogeneous samples containing mixtures of metallic and semiconducting species with a variety of lengths and defects. Optical detection at the single nanotube level should thus

Boyer, Edmond

313

Simulations of nanosensors based on single walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simulations of nanosensors based on single walled carbon nanotubes Polina Pine1, Yuval E. Yaish2. The potential of single-walled carbon nanotubes as mass sensors is examined. The change in mass leads to proportional changes in the nanotube vibrational frequencies, which are monitored during atomistic simulations

Adler, Joan

314

Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scanning tunneling spectroscopy of suspended single-wall carbon nanotubes B. J. LeRoy,a) S. G-wall carbon nanotubes that are freely suspended over a trench. The nanotubes were grown by chemical vapor on the freestanding portions of the nanotubes. Spatially resolved spectroscopy on the suspended portion of both

Dekker, Cees

315

Characterization of single wall carbon nanotubes by nonane preadsorption  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy for nitrogen adsorbed in nanotubes at zero coverage within the range of 12­18 kJ/mol. This bindingCharacterization of single wall carbon nanotubes by nonane preadsorption Oleg Byl a , Jie Liu b The preferential blocking of the interior adsorption sites of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by n

Liu, Jie

316

Electrical Transport in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. (a) Schematic view a nanotube field-effect transistor (b) The Dirac energy dispersion coneElectrical Transport in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Michael J. Biercuk1,3 , Shahal Ilani2 metal and semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes. The fundamental scattering mechanisms governing

McEuen, Paul L.

317

Raman Measurements on Electrochemically Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Raman Measurements on Electrochemically Doped Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes P. M. Rafailov, M and studied the Raman response of electro- chemically doped single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) using different salt solutions. The fre- quency shift of the radial breathing mode (RBM) and the high-energy mode

Nabben, Reinhard

318

Wall Sculpture by Ellsworth Kelly Installed on Dartmouth Campus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wall Sculpture by Ellsworth Kelly Installed on Dartmouth Campus Dartmouth Panels will be dedicated District, a wall sculpture by renowned abstract artist Ellsworth Kelly has been installed on the eastern façade of the Hopkins Center for the Arts, facing the Visual Arts Center. Kelly was in attendance

Shepherd, Simon

319

Ultrastructure and Composition of the Nannochloropsis gaditana Cell Wall  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...removing the walls from the green pellet at the bottom of the tube until no green pellet was observed...the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (46). Characterization...Environ. Prog. Sustain. Energy 32 :989-1001. doi...wall proteomics of the green alga Haematococcus pluvialis...

Matthew J. Scholz; Taylor L. Weiss; Robert E. Jinkerson; Jia Jing; Robyn Roth; Ursula Goodenough; Matthew C. Posewitz; Henri G. Gerken

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

320

NON-RECTANGULAR RC WALLS: A REVIEW ON EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

section. It was rare that tests were done using load paths that did not follow the principal axes subjected to unidirectional or bidirectional loading along one or both of the principal axes of the wall-sections such as for example L-shaped or U-shaped walls which were tested under quasi-static or dynamic loads. The tests

Thévenaz, Jacques

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Optical absorption intensity of semiconductor single-wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical absorption intensity of semiconductor single-wall carbon nanotubes Y. Oyama1 , R. Saito1. The optical absorption intensity is inversely proportional to the diameter in the unit of per carbon atom of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) synthesized by alcohol CCVD (ACCVD) method and HiPco method [1

Maruyama, Shigeo

322

ORIGINAL PAPER Hydrothermal process synthesized electrocatalytic multi-walled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Hydrothermal process synthesized electrocatalytic multi-walled carbon nanotubes as MWCNTs-Au, have been successfully prepared by a facile hydrothermal pro- cess of gold(III) chloride (Au. Keywords Hydrothermal Á Composites Á Au microparticles Á Multi-walled carbon nanotubes Á Ethanol oxidation

Guo, John Zhanhu

323

Associative model for solving the wall-following problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A navigation system for a robot is presented in this work. The Wall-Following problem has become a classic problem of Robotics due to robots have to be able to move through a particular stage. This problem is proposed as a classifying task and it is ... Keywords: associative models, classification, morphological models, wall-following

Rodolfo Navarro; Elena Acevedo; Antonio Acevedo; Fabiola Martínez

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Optical microcavity with semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optical microcavity with semiconducting single- wall carbon nanotubes Etienne Gaufrès,1 Nicolas-Perot microcavities based on semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes with a quality factor of 160. We properties References and links 1. P. Avouris, M. Freitag and V. Perebeinos, "Carbon nanotube photonics

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

325

Transverse Effect due to Short-range Resistive Wall Wakefield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For accelerator designs with ultra short electron beams, beam dynamics study has to invoke the short-range wakefields. In this paper, we first obtain the short-range dipole mode resistive wall wakefield. Analytical approach is then developed to study the single bunch transverse beam dynamics due to this short-range resistive wall wake. The results are applied to the LCLS undulator.

Juhao Wu; Alex Chao; Jean Delayen

2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Borehole-Wall Imaging with Acoustic and Optical Televiewers for Fractured-Bedrock Aquifer Investigations Abstract Imaging with acoustic and optical televiewers results in continuous and oriented 360 degree views of the borehole wall from which the character and orientation of lithologic and structural features can be defined for fractured-bedrock aquifer investigations. Fractures are more clearly defined under a wider range of conditions on acoustic images than on optical images including dark-colored rocks, cloudy borehole water, and coated borehole walls. However, optical images allow for the direct viewing

327

Methods for degrading or converting plant cell wall polysaccharides  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to methods for converting plant cell wall polysaccharides into one or more products, comprising: treating the plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into the one or more products. The present invention also relates to methods for producing an organic substance, comprising: (a) saccharifying plant cell wall polysaccharides with an effective amount of a spent whole fermentation broth of a recombinant microorganism, wherein the recombinant microorganism expresses one or more heterologous genes encoding enzymes which degrade or convert the plant cell wall polysaccharides into saccharified material; (b) fermenting the saccharified material of step (a) with one or more fermenting microoganisms; and (c) recovering the organic substance from the fermentation.

Berka, Randy (Davis, CA); Cherry, Joel (Davis, CA)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Rail assembly for use in a radioactive environment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved rail assembly and method of construction thereof is disclosed herein that is particularly adapted for use with a crane trolley in a hot cell environment which is exposed to airborne and liquidborne radioactive contaminants. The rail assembly is generally comprised of a support wall having an elongated, rail-housing recess having a floor, side wall and ceiling. The floor of the recess is defined at least in part by the load-bearing surface of a rail, and is substantially flat, level and crevice-free to facilitate the drainage of liquids out of the recess. The ceiling of the recess overhangs and thereby captures trolley wheels within the recess to prevent them from becoming dislodged from the recess during a seismic disturbance. Finally, the interior of the recess includes a power track having a slot for receiving a sliding electrical connector from the crane trolley. The power track is mounted in an upper corner of the recess with its connector-receiving groove oriented downwardly to facilitate the drainage of liquidborne contaminants and to discourage the collection of airborne contaminants within the track.

Watts, Ralph E. (Harrison, OH)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Theoretical comparison between field emission from single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes A. Mayer,1,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical comparison between field emission from single-wall and multi-wall carbon nanotubes A s : 73.63.Fg, 79.70. q, 85.35.Kt, 03.65.Nk I. INTRODUCTION Carbon nanotubes show interesting field-emission of field emission from carbon nanotubes,13­16 we now consider the depen- dence of the emission from single

Mayer, Alexandre

330

Domain wall QCD with physical quark masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results for several light hadronic quantities ($f_\\pi$, $f_K$, $B_K$, $m_{ud}$, $m_s$, $t_0^{1/2}$, $w_0$) obtained from simulations of 2+1 flavor domain wall lattice QCD with large physical volumes and nearly-physical pion masses at two lattice spacings. We perform a short, O(3)%, extrapolation in pion mass to the physical values by combining our new data in a simultaneous chiral/continuum `global fit' with a number of other ensembles with heavier pion masses. We use the physical values of $m_\\pi$, $m_K$ and $m_\\Omega$ to determine the two quark masses and the scale - all other quantities are outputs from our simulations. We obtain results with sub-percent statistical errors and negligible chiral and finite-volume systematics for these light hadronic quantities, including: $f_\\pi$ = 130.2(9) MeV; $f_K$ = 155.5(8) MeV; the average up/down quark mass and strange quark mass in the $\\overline {\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 2.997(49) and 81.64(1.17) MeV respectively; and the neutral kaon mixing parameter, $B_K$, in the RGI scheme, 0.750(15) and the $\\overline{\\rm MS}$ scheme at 3 GeV, 0.530(11).

RBC; UKQCD collaborations; :; T. Blum; P. A. Boyle; N. H. Christ; J. Frison; N. Garron; R. J. Hudspith; T. Izubuchi; T. Janowski; C. Jung; A. Juettner; C. Kelly; R. D. Kenway; C. Lehner; M. Marinkovic; R. D. Mawhinney; G. McGlynn; D. J. Murphy; S. Ohta; A. Portelli; C. T. Sachrajda; A. Soni

2014-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

331

Pneumatic wall-locking geophone system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seismic signal receiving system is provided for use in boreholes to receive seismic waves in carrying out geophysical investigations. The system includes three pairs of opposed plates, each of the pairs of plates including oppositely facing outer surfaces for engagement with opposite sides of a borehole. A seismic receiver is mounted on the inner surface of each of the plates for receiving seismic signals. A double-acting, fluid-operated actuator selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates away from each other to provide expansion thereof so as to enable the plates to engage the walls of a borehole and selectively causes relative movement of the plates of the pairs of plates toward each other to provide retraction thereof so as to enable the system to be removed from a borehole. The pairs of plates each comprise a relatively long plate and a relatively short plate. An expandable linkage interconnects the long plates at the distal ends thereof. The plates are mechanically biassed into the retracted state so that the plates return to this state in the event of a system failure.

Kuhlman, Harland L. (Minneapolis, MN); Cumerlato, Calvin L. (Minneapolis, MN); Tweeton, Daryl R. (Apple Valley, MN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We use a combination of analytic tools and an extensive set of the largest and most accurate three-dimensional field theory numerical simulations to study the dynamics of domain wall networks with junctions. We build upon our previous work and consider a class of models which, in the limit of large number N of coupled scalar fields, approaches the so-called ''ideal'' model (in terms of its potential to lead to network frustration). We consider values of N between N=2 and N=20, and a range of cosmological epochs, and we also compare this class of models with other toy models used in the past. In all cases we find compelling evidence for a gradual approach to scaling, strongly supporting our no-frustration conjecture. We also discuss the various possible types of junctions (including cases where there is a hierarchy of them) and their roles in the dynamics of the network. Finally, we provide a cosmological Zel'dovich-type bound on the energy scale of this kind of defect network: it must be lower than 10 keV.

Avelino, P. P.; Oliveira, J. C. R. E. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Martins, C. J. A. P. [Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas s/n, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom); Menezes, J. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Centro de Astrofisica da Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas s/n, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Menezes, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba, Caixa Postal 5008, 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Case history: Vertical barrier wall system for Superfund Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Design considerations and construction aspects are presented for the installation of a vertical barrier wall system for the Boeing Company at a Superfund Site near Seattle, WA. The construction was performed during 1996. The vertical barrier wall system included: (1) a soil-bentonite (SB) slurry wall, approximately 670 meters (2200 feet) in length, ranging from 12 to 21 meters (40 to 70 feet) in depth; (2) expansion of a cover system over the area enclosed by the SB wall; and (3) surface drainage improvements. Design and construction of the system addressed requirements of a Consent Decree for the site issued in 1993. The paper discusses the development of the design to meet remedial performance goals of preventing migration of contaminants in the soil/groundwater system and aiding aquifer restoration. Secondly, the paper details installation of the SB wall, highlighting the more significant construction issues, which included excavation of the wall through glacially deposited cobbles/boulders/till as well as addressing the severe elevation changes along the wall alignment. Thirdly, the paper presents Quality Assurance (QA) monitoring and testing performed during the construction phase.

Koelling, M.A.; Kovac, C.P.; Norris, J.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

A Survey of Databases for Analysis of Plant Cell Wall-Related Enzymes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plant Cell Wall-Related Enzymes Peijian Cao & Ki-Hong Jung &plant cell wall-related enzymes. The goal of this review isfor Plant Cell Wall-Related Enzymes (plantcellwalls.ucdavis.

Cao, Peijian; Jung, Ki-Hong; Ronald, Pamela C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Conductance-Controlled Point Functionalization of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Brett R. Goldsmith, 1 Johnof Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Brett R. Goldsmith et al.single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to fabricate single-

Collins, Philip G

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control Advanced Metal Fiber Wall-Flow DPF For Diesel Emission Control A new metal fiber wall-flow DPF with up to 99% efficiency and...

337

A High Resolution Ultrawideband Wall Penetrating Erman Engin, Berkehan iftiolu, Meri zcan and brahim Tekin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for underground mine detection [1], [2], through the wall imaging [3], cancerous tissue detection applications [4 respiratory activity of a human behind a 23 cm thick brick wall. Keywords: UWB Radar, Wall penetrating Radar

Yanikoglu, Berrin

338

SUBCRITICAL BUBBLES NEAR THE PHASE SPACE DOMAIN WALL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the subcritical bubble formation near the phase space domain wall. We take into account that the phase of the scalar field can vary using complex U(1) symmetric field and a phenomenological potential with cubic term responsible to symmetry breaking. We show that the presence of the domain wall induces subcritical bubbles so that their formation rate near the wall is considerably larger than far of it. The allowed deviations of the phases of new bubbles are so large that they prevent the system from induced nucleation.

J. Sirkka; I. Vilja

1995-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

339

Conceptual design of the INTOR first-wall system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design concept and performance characteristics of the first-wall design for the phase-1 INTOR (International Tokamak Reactor) study is described. The reference design consists of a water-cooled stainless steel panel. The major uncertainty regarding the performance of the bare stainless steel wall relates to the response of a thin-melt layer predicted to form on limited regions during a plasma disruption. A more-complex backup design, which incorporates radiatively cooled graphite tiles on the inboard wall, is briefly described.

Smith, D.L.; Majumdar, S.; Mattas, R.F.; Turner, L.; Jung, J.; Abdou, M.A.; Bowers, D.; Trachsel, C.; Merrill, B.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Crystalline mesoporous zirconia catalysts having stable tetragonal pore wall structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods are disclosed for the preparation of new sulfated mesoporous zirconia materials/catalysts with crystalline pore walls of predominantly tetragonal crystal structure, characterized by nitrogen physical sorption measurement, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and catalytic tests using n-butane isomerization to iso-butane and alkylation of 1-naphthol with 4-tert-butylstyrene as probe reactions. Sulfate deposition is preferred for the transformation of a mesoporous precursor with amorphous pore walls into a material with crystalline pore walls maintaining the mesoporous characteristics. 17 figs.

Sachtler, W.M.H.; Huang, Y.Y.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Comparison of the effects of floor and cage housing on the performance of five strains and crosses of egg production stocks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strains, found average hen housed product, on of 176 eggs for birds housed on the floor compared with 154 eggs foz compaxable b'rds in layaway batteries. The xesponse differences among stxains were incons'stent. Rowevex, Millex (19/6) reported moxe... of suz'vivors while the caged pullets showed signif icantly lower mox tality and heavier eggs, Consistent significant differences could not be demonstrated for the traits studied, namely the production index and sexual maturity. Francis {19...

Bailey, Bernice Boyce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

E-Print Network 3.0 - anterior vaginal wall Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

vaginal wall Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: anterior vaginal wall Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Anterior repair using Bologna...

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - aligned single-walled carbon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Thermal conductivity measurement of vertically-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by 3 omega... the high-purity vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes 2,...

344

E-Print Network 3.0 - aligned double-walled carbon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: , and H. M. Cheng. Polarized raman analysis of aligned double- walled carbon nanotubes. Physical Review B... Nonlinear Oscillations of a Double-Walled Carbon Nanotube...

345

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody-functionalized single-walled carbon...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5 > >> 1 Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nucleation Process of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Summary: Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Nucleation Process of Single-Walled Carbon...

346

E-Print Network 3.0 - aligned single wall Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: Thermal conductivity measurement of vertically-aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes by 3 omega... the high-purity vertically aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes 2,...

347

Magnetic soft x-ray microscopy of the domain wall depinning process in permalloy magnetic nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R P 2002 Magnetic domain-wall logic Science 296 1688 [2]magnetic domain»wall nanowire shift register Science 320

Im, Mi-Young

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

NREL: News Feature - NREL Breaks Down Walls for Biofuels  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL Breaks Down Walls for Biofuels NREL Breaks Down Walls for Biofuels November 30, 2009 Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and ethanol producers are racing to come up with ways to make ethanol from cellulosic biomass that are cheaper and easier to produce than current methods. But they are hitting a wall. Cell walls in plants are making the production of cellulosic ethanol a challenge. So researchers are creating their own computer program to help model and break down the tiny fibers of cellulose - or fibrils - found in plant cells. Although ethanol is becoming more available to consumers, NREL is working closely with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to meet a quickly approaching goal to produce competitively priced ethanol for $1.50 per gallon by 2012. Why the rush? DOE believes this is the price at which

349

Experimental Investigation of Natural Convection in Trombe Wall Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, experiments with a passive solar building with Trombe wall in the north cold climate are carried out and discussed, and the natural convection heat transfer process has been investigated. The relativity of the factors affecting indoor...

Chen, B.; Zhao, J.; Chen, C.; Zhuang, Z.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Accident Simulation Tests on a Wet-Wall LNG Design  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The “wet wall” design concept for containing cryogenic Hquids has been successfully employed in the Apollo space program [1...] and may be described as a double-hulled tank with a liquid-tight insulation system. ...

P. O. Metz; R. W. Lautensleger; D. A. Sarno

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

High-R Walls - Building America Top Innovation | Department of...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

R values and the need for vented cladding to reduce condensation potential with some insulation types. Research on common high-R wall assemblies has shown that the measured R-value...

352

Superconductivity in Bundles of Double-Wall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present electrical and thermal specific heat measurements that show superconductivity in double-wall carbon nanotube (DWCNT) bundles. Clear evidence, comprising a resistance drop as a function of temperature, magnetoresistance ...

Shi, Wu

353

Building America Case Study: Evaluating Through-Wall Air Transfer...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the performance of market-available through-wall air transfer fans with respect to Air Conditioning Contractors of America (ACCA) Manual RS and ASHRAE Standard 55-2010...

354

Xylan deposition on secondary wall of Fagus crenata fiber  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Delignified and/or xylanase-treated secondary walls of Fagus crenata fibers were examined by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Microfibrils with a smooth surface were visible in the innermost surface

T. Awano; K. Takabe; M. Fujita

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Domain wall induced magnetoresistance in a superconductor/ferromagnet nanowire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a nanowire consisting of a ferromagnet/insulator/superconductor multilayer structure, the superconductivity is shown to depend strongly on the configuration of the magnetic domain walls in the neighboring ferromagnetic ...

Miao, G. X.

356

Characterization of double walled carbon nanotubes-polyvinylidene fluoride nanocomposites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the main objectives of this thesis is to disperse double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNT) in a polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) matrix, and to characterize the resulting composite using electrical, thermal, and mechanical characterization...

Almasri, Atheer Mohammad

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

357

Dynamic analysis of concrete coupled wall structures : a parametric study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Concrete coupled wall structure is a system that can efficiently dissipate energy under the effect of lateral loads. It has been widely used in medium height buildings for several decades. While researchers have conducted ...

Huang, Elaine Annabelle, 1981-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Conserval aka SolarWall | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name: Conserval (aka SolarWall) Place: Toronto, Ontario, Canada Zip: M3J2N5 Sector: Solar Product: Makes solar passive heating and cooling...

359

Field measurements of earth pressure on a cantilever retaining wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The measurements were made before and after backfilling for a duration of 385 days. The effects of a clay surcharge were studied. The total thrust of the measured lateral earth pressures was com- pared to total thrust determined from a Culmann graphical... to bearing pressures calculated by conventional methods. The measured bearing pressures compared reasonably well with the calculated pressures. Wall movement data indicated that the wall tilted or rotated toward the backfill during sand backfilling...

Schulze, Larry Wayne

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

360

Excess free energy of supercooled liquids at disordered walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a novel thermodynamic integration scheme, we compute the excess free energy, $\\gamma$, of a glass-forming, binary Lennard-Jones liquid in contact with a frozen amorphous wall, formed by particles frozen into a similar structure as the liquid. We find that $\\gamma$ is non-zero, becoming negative at low temperature. This indicates that the thermodynamics of the system is perturbed by the effect of the amorphous wall.

Benjamin, Ronald

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Field measurement of lateral earth pressures on retaining walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The measured pressures are compared with the computed Coulomb and Rankine pressures for the active case. The measured pressures on the cantilever wall are in close agreement with the theoretical pressures on the upper half of the wall, but the measured... Pressure Variance with Time and Temperature. INTRODUCTION Present Status of the Question -- The latera1 earth pressure theories developed by Coulomb in 1776 and Rankine in 1S57 are known as the classical earth pressure theories (5)*. The basic equation...

Riggins, Michael

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

362

Potential digestibilities and digestion kinetics of forage cell wall components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LITERATURE REVIEW. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES. Chemical Analysis Colorimetric Determinations Statistical Evaluation. 10 13 15 IV RESULTS AND DISCUSSION 16 V Characteristics of Forage Kinetics of Cell Wall Digestion SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS... and both of these variables appear to be the result of several dynamic processes. The amount of structural carbohydrates, the main constituents of the fibrous cell wall, ruminants can digest appears to be limited by the potential digestibility...

Tauskey, William Henry

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

LiveWall Operational Evaluation: Seattle Law Enforcement Pilot  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LiveWall concept envisioned as an outgrowth of the Precision Information Environment (PIE) project allows communications between separate groups using interactive video, audio, and a shared desktop environment; this allows everyone to participate and collaborate in real time, regardless of location. The LiveWall concept provides a virtual window to other locations, where all parties can interact and collaboratively work with each other. This functionality is intended to improve multi-site coordination amongst emergency operations centers (EOC), field operations sites and across organizations and jurisdictions to accommodate communications during routine and emergency events. For the initial LiveWall operational evaluation PNNL partnered with the Seattle Police Department (SPD). This partnership allowed for the creation of an excellent LiveWall test bed specific to law enforcement. This partnership made it possible to test the LiveWall concept with scenarios involving the many facets of the law enforcement work done by SPD. PNNL and SPD agreed that integrating the systems into operations for a real event would be the best test of the technology and give SPD staff greater visibility into the functionality and benefits offered by the LiveWall concept.

Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Stein, Steven L.

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C September 20, 2010 - 3:00pm Addthis As part of some recent money- and energy-savings improvements I've been making to my home, a couple of weeks ago I installed a ceiling fan in my main living room. Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory As part of some recent money- and energy-savings improvements I've been making to my home, a couple of weeks ago I installed a ceiling fan in my main living room. Part of my research led me to understand how ceiling fans are considered the most effective fans compared among table fans, floor fans, and fans mounted to poles or walls because they effectively circulate the air in a room to create a draft throughout the room.

365

Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C Turning on the Fan and Turning off the A/C September 20, 2010 - 3:00pm Addthis As part of some recent money- and energy-savings improvements I've been making to my home, a couple of weeks ago I installed a ceiling fan in my main living room. Chris Stewart Senior Communicator at DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory As part of some recent money- and energy-savings improvements I've been making to my home, a couple of weeks ago I installed a ceiling fan in my main living room. Part of my research led me to understand how ceiling fans are considered the most effective fans compared among table fans, floor fans, and fans mounted to poles or walls because they effectively circulate the air in a room to create a draft throughout the room.

366

Fifth Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 5106 5107 5108 5109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 5110 5111 5112 5113 5206 5208 5207 5209 Bathroom Bathroom 5210 Student Advisor 5211 5301 5303 5305 5307 5302 5304 5309 5411 5018 Restroom 5016 Lounge 5017 Kitchen 5015 Data Closet Elevator 54085406 54095407 Student Advisor

Gering, Jon C.

367

Third Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 3106 3107 3108 3109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 3110 3111 3112 3113 3206 3208 3207 3209 Bathroom Bathroom 3210 Student Advisor 3211 3301 3303 3305 3307 3302 3304 3309 3411 3018 Restroom 3016 Lounge 3017 Kitchen 3015 Mechanical Elevator 34083406 34093407 Student Advisor

Gering, Jon C.

368

Fourth Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 4106 4107 4108 4109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 4110 4111 4112 4113 4208 4207 4209 Bathroom Bathroom 4210 Student Advisor 4211 4301 4303 4305 4307 4302 4304 4309Bathroom Restroom 4016 Lounge 4017 Kitchen Elevator 44084406 44094407 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 44044402

Gering, Jon C.

369

Threats, design limits and design windows for laser IFE dry wall chambers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Threats, design limits and design windows for laser IFE dry wall chambers A. Rene´ Raffray-drive targets and a dry wall chamber. The dry wall must accommodate the ion and photon threat spectra from. The neutron energy is deposited deeper in the first wall and blanket and does not represent a major threat

Raffray, A. René

370

Improved Confinement in JET High {beta} Plasmas with an ITER-Like Wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The replacement of the JET carbon wall (C-wall) by a Be/W ITER-like wall (ILW) has affected the plasma energy confinement. To investigate this, experiments have been performed with both the C-wall and ILW to vary the heating power over a wide range for plasmas with different shapes.

Challis, C D; Beurskens, M; Buratti, P; Delabie, E; Drewelow, P; Frassinetti, L; Giroud, C; Hawkes, N; Hobirk, J; Joffrin, E; Keeling, D; King, D B; Maggi, C F; Mailloux, J; Marchetto, C; McDonald, D; Nunes, I; Pucella, G; Saarelma, S; Simpson, J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

IN-SITU MEASUREMENT OF WALL THERMAL PERFORMANCE: DATA INTERPRETATION AND APPARATUS DESIGN RECOMMENDATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Unit (ETTU): Field Measurement of Wall Performance, Presented at Third International Symposium on Energy

Modera, M.P.; Sherman, M.H.; de Vinuesa, S.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The University of Texas at Austin July 11, 2012 Data Communications Wi-Fi Access Points 27 21 33-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

building spaces shall have coverage for currently supported Wi-Fi standards (as of 6/2012 this includes 802 above a hard deck ceiling or below a hard floor or in proximity to metal building components, HVAC ducts

Dawson, Clint N.

373

Ducts Sealing Using Injected Spray Sealant, Raleigh, North Carolina...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

sealed by hand with mastic. Air handlers were sealed with foil tape or mastic. Duct boots were sealed to floors and ceilings with foil tape or mastic. Lessons Learned *...

374

Step-by-Step Instructions  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hawaii Hawaii based upon the simple prescriptive option of the 2012 IECC. It does not provide a guarantee for meeting the IECC. This guide is not designed to reflect the actual energy code, with amendments, if any, adopted in Hawaii and does not, therefore, provide a guarantee for meeting the state energy code. For details on the energy code adopted by Hawaii, including how it may differ from the IECC, please contact your local building code official. Additional copies of this guide are available on www.reca-codes.com. CLIMATE ZONE 1 Hawaii Honolulu Kauai Maui Windows Insulation Foundation Fenestration U-Factor Skylight U-Factor Glazed Fenestration SHGC Ceiling R-Value Wood Frame Wall R-Value Mass Wall R-Value Floor

375

Heavy wall casing in C110 grade for sour service  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent developments of high pressure and sour wells in the North Sea area have increased the need for high strength H{sub 2}S resistant carbon steels. Steel chemistry and heat treatment solutions have been available to provide products suitable for use in these environments within the constraints of classic well design since the early 90`s but operators are now demanding higher strength and heavier wall products for HPHT wells. Well completion design teams are now specifying from OCTG suppliers C110 grade products in increasingly heavy wall and the challenge facing suppliers is to guarantee product integrity not only of these heavy wall casing but also the associated coupling stocks. This paper was aimed at evaluating the performances of thick walled C110 tubulars (up to 2in) for sour environments. Metallurgical characteristics (microstructure, structure, microhardness), mechanical properties (hardness, tensile, toughness), Sulfide Stress Cracking resistance (smooth tensile, DCB) have been investigated throughout the wall thickness. The C110 proprietary grade proved to be an excellent material for use as Oil Country Tubular Goods (OCTG) in typical North Sea environments with improved assessment of H2S corrosion resistance properties according to both NACE and EFC (European Federation of Corrosion) philosophies.

Linne, C.P.; Blanchard, F.; Puissochet, F. [Vallourec Research Center, Aulnoye Aymeries (France). Corrosion and Metallurgical Dept.; Orlans-Joliet, B.J.; Hamilton, R.S.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

376

"Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls", A. Astaneh-Asl, SEAONC Seminar, November 2001, San Francisco. of 181 Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls", A. Astaneh-Asl, SEAONC Seminar, November 2001, San Francisco. of 181 Seismic Behavior and Design of Steel Shear Walls By Abolhassan Astaneh-Asl, Ph.ce.berkeley.edu/~astaneh Introduction Steel plate shear wall systems have been used in recent years in highly seismic areas to resist

Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

377

D-brane construction for non-Abelian walls  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supersymmetric U(N{sub C}) gauge theory with N{sub F} massive hypermultiplets in the fundamental representation is given by the brane configuration made of N{sub C} fractional Dp-branes stuck at the Z{sub 2} orbifold singularity on N{sub F} separated D(p+4)-branes. We show that non-Abelian walls in this theory are realized as kinky fractional Dp-branes interpolating between D(p+4)-branes. Wall solutions and their duality between N{sub C} and N{sub F}-N{sub C} imply extensions of the s-rule and the Hanany-Witten effect in brane dynamics. We also find that the reconnection of fractional D-branes occurs in this system. Diverse phenomena in non-Abelian walls found in field theory can be understood very easily by this brane configuration.

Eto, Minoru; Isozumi, Youichi; Nitta, Muneto; Ohashi, Keisuke; Ohta, Kazutoshi; Sakai, Norisuke [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Theoretical Physics Laboratory, the Institute of Physical and Chemical Research (RIKEN), 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2005-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Spin alignment of dark matter haloes in filaments and walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MMF technique is used to segment the cosmic web as seen in a cosmological N-body simulation into wall-like and filament-like structures. We find that the spins and shapes of dark matter haloes are significantly correlated with each other and with the orientation of their host structures. The shape orientation is such that the halo minor axes tend to lie perpendicular to the host structure, be it a wall or filament. The orientation of the halo spin vector is mass dependent. Low mass haloes in walls and filaments have a tendency to have their spins oriented within the parent structure, while higher mass haloes in filaments have spins that tend to lie perpendicular to the parent structure.

Miguel A. Aragón-Calvo; Rien van de Weygaert; Bernard J. T. Jones; J. M. Thijs van der Hulst

2006-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

379

Wall Adhesion and Constitutive Modelling of Strong Colloidal Gels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wall adhesion effects during batch sedimentation of strongly flocculated colloidal gels are commonly assumed to be negligible. In this study in-situ measurements of colloidal gel rheology and solids volume fraction distribution suggest the contrary, where significant wall adhesion effects are observed in a 110mm diameter settling column. We develop and validate a mathematical model for the equilibrium stress state in the presence of wall adhesion under both viscoplastic and viscoelastic constitutive models. These formulations highlight fundamental issues regarding the constitutive modeling of colloidal gels, specifically the relative utility and validity of viscoplastic and viscoelastic rheological models under arbitrary tensorial loadings. The developed model is validated against experimental data, which points toward a novel method to estimate the shear and compressive yield strength of strongly flocculated colloidal gels from a series of equilibrium solids volume fraction profiles over various column widths.

Daniel R. Lester; Richard Buscall; Anthony D. Stickland; Peter J. Scales

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Studies of Resistive Wall Heating at JLAB FEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

When the JLAB FEL is under CW operation, it had been observed that temperature rises over the wiggler vacuum chamber, presumably as the result of the power deposition on the resistive wall of the wiggler chamber. Previous analyses have been done on the resistive wall impedance for various cases, such as DC, AC, and anomalous skin effects*. Here we report an investigation on the beam kinetic energy losses for each of these cases. This study includes the non-ultrarelativistic effect on resistive wall loss, for both round pipe and parallel plates. We will present the comparison of our results with the measured data obtained during CW operation of the JLAB FEL. Other possible factors contributing to the measured heating will also be discussed.

Li, Rui; Benson, Stephen V.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Earth melter with rubble walls and method of use  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is an improvement to the earth melter described and claimed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,443,618. The improvement is the use of rubble for retaining walls. More specifically, the retaining walls rest on ground level and extend above ground level piling rubble around a melt zone. A portion of the melter may be below grade wherein sidewalls are formed by the relatively undisturbed native soil or rock, and the rubble may be used as a backfill liner for the below grade sidewalls.

Chapman, Chris C. (Richland, WA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Effect of Trapped Energetic Particles on the Resistive Wall Mode  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A stability analysis for the resistive wall mode is studied in the presence of trapped energetic particles (EPs). When the EPs' beta exceeds a critical value, a fishbonelike bursting mode (FLM) with an external kink eigenstructure can exist. This offers the first analytic interpretation of the experimental observations [Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 045001 (2009)]. The mode-particle resonances for the FLM and the q=1 fishbone occur in different regimes of the precession frequency of EPs. In certain ranges of the plasma rotation speed and the EPs' beta, a mode conversion can occur between the resistive wall mode and FLM.

Hao, G. Z.; Wang, A. K.; Qiu, X. M. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Post Office Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Liu, Y. Q. [Euratom/CCFE Fusion Association, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Effective hydrogen storage in single-wall carbon nanotubes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The hydrogen-storage behavior of single-wall carbon nanotubes was studied using molecular dynamics simulations and ab initio electronic calculations. Hydrogen atoms with kinetic energy of 16–25 eV were observed to penetrate into and be trapped inside the tube. Consecutively injected H atoms form hydrogen molecules, and gradually condense to become liquid hydrogen in the tube. The density of injected hydrogen in the tube and the pressure on the wall of the nanotube induced by the stored hydrogen molecules were evaluated at room temperature.

Yuchen Ma; Yueyuan Xia; Mingwen Zhao; Ruijin Wang; Liangmo Mei

2001-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

384

MHK Technologies/Water Wall Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turbine Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Water Wall Turbine.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Water Wall Turbine Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description WWTurbine has developed and introduced a new commercially viable system for the extraction of Potential and Kinetic Energy from large fast moving water currents for conversion into Electric Energy Mooring Configuration Monopile Optimum Marine/Riverline Conditions min current velocity of 2 m s Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 0 5 3 0 MW Device Testing

385

BPS domain wall junctions in infinitely large extra dimensions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider models of scalar fields coupled to gravity which are higher-dimensional generalizations of four dimensional supergravity. We use these models to describe domain wall junctions in an anti–de Sitter background. We derive Bogomol’nyi equations for the scalar fields from which the walls are constructed and for the metric. From these equations a BPS-like formula for the junction energy can be derived. We demonstrate that such junctions localize gravity in the presence of more than one uncompactified extra dimension.

Sean M. Carroll; Simeon Hellerman; Mark Trodden

2000-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

386

Method of controlling the side wall thickness of a turbine nozzle segment for improved cooling  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane extending therebetween. Each band has a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band has an inturned flange defining with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The outer surface of the side wall is provided with a step prior to welding the cover to the side wall. A thermal barrier coating is applied in the step and, after the cover is welded to the side wall, the side wall is finally machined to a controlled thickness removing all, some or none of the coating.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

General formulation of the resistive wall mode coupling equations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A theoretical framework to describe the magnetic coupling of the toroidal plasma with the resistive wall and other sources of the field asymmetry is formulated. This is done for general toroidal geometry without restrictions on the plasma, while the wall is considered as a thin shell. Mathematically, the approach here exploits the Chance concept [M. S. Chance, Phys. Plasmas 4, 2161 (1997)], but with an essential difference: each source of the magnetic perturbation b (plasma, wall, external currents) is treated separately with account of their differences in space and nature. This allows much simpler formulation of the problem than was known before. The final equation couples the normal component of {partial_derivative}b/{partial_derivative}t at the wall to the perturbation at the plasma surface. Step by step reduction of this first-principle equation is performed with demonstration of its main features, starting from the known problem of singularities. This also includes the reduction to axially symmetric geometry, large-aspect-ratio, and the cylindrical limits. In the latter case, the known 'cylindrical' equation is reproduced, but now from the full 'toroidal' equations.

Pustovitov, V. D. [Nuclear Fusion Institute, Russian Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute', Kurchatov Sq., 1, Moscow, 123182 (Russian Federation)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

388

Transpiring wall supercritical water oxidation reactor salt deposition studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has teamed with Foster Wheeler Development Corp. and GenCorp, Aerojet to develop and evaluate a new supercritical water oxidation reactor design using a transpiring wall liner. In the design, pure water is injected through small pores in the liner wall to form a protective boundary layer that inhibits salt deposition and corrosion, effects that interfere with system performance. The concept was tested at Sandia on a laboratory-scale transpiring wall reactor that is a 1/4 scale model of a prototype plant being designed for the Army to destroy colored smoke and dye at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Arkansas. During the tests, a single-phase pressurized solution of sodium sulfate (Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) was heated to supercritical conditions, causing the salt to precipitate out as a fine solid. On-line diagnostics and post-test observation allowed us to characterize reactor performance at different flow and temperature conditions. Tests with and without the protective boundary layer demonstrated that wall transpiration provides significant protection against salt deposition. Confirmation tests were run with one of the dyes that will be processed in the Pine Bluff facility. The experimental techniques, results, and conclusions are discussed.

Haroldsen, B.L.; Mills, B.E.; Ariizumi, D.Y.; Brown, B.G. [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Unified first wall-blanket structure for plasma device applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A plasma device for use in controlling nuclear reactions within the plasma including a first wall and blanket formed in a one-piece structure composed of a solid solution containing copper and lithium and melting above about 500.degree. C.

Gruen, Dieter M. (Downers Grove, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An instrument is described for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A packet production line model is also described. 3 figures.

Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

1993-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

391

CP-Violating Profile of the Electroweak Bubble Wall  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......November 1995 research-article Articles CP-Violating Profile of the Electroweak Bubble...electroweak baryogenesis, the profile of the CP violating bubble wall, created at the first-order...solutions. Two of them smoothly connect the CP-violating broken phase and the symmetric......

Koichi Funakubo; Akira Kakuto; Shoichiro Otsuki; Kazunori Takenaga; Fumihiko Toyoda

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STEEL PLATE SHEAR WALL BUILDINGS: DESIGN REQUIREMENTS AND RESEARCH Michel Bruneau, P.E. 1 Dr. Bruneau is conducting research on the seismic evaluation and retrofit of existing steel bridges, steel of this research, and has co- authored the book "Ductile Design of Steel Structures" published in 1997 by Mc

Bruneau, Michel

393

Gravitational collapse and thermalization in the hard wall model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study a simple example of holographic thermalization in a confining field theory: the homogeneous injection of energy in the hard wall model. Working in an amplitude expansion, we find black brane formation for sufficiently fast energy injection and a scattering wave solution for sufficiently slow injection. We comment on our expectations for more sophisticated holographic QCD models.

Ben Craps; Elias Kiritsis; Christopher Rosen; Anastasios Taliotis; Joris Vanhoof; Hongbao Zhang

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Electrochemical and Raman measurements on single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electrochemical and Raman measurements on single-walled carbon nanotubes M. Stoll a,*, P performed on a carbon nanotube mat as a working electrode using different salt solutions. The gravimetric capacitance of the nanotube material was estimated and its effective surface area was de- termined in a purely

Nabben, Reinhard

395

THE ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ELECTRONIC PROPERTIES OF MULTI-WALLED CARBON NANOTUBES A Thesis Submitted to the Faculty I #12;rst started. I also thank Michael Buss for his insight and for making my #12;rst nanotube family for the many yawns and blank stares at the mention of the word nanotube. At least they listened

396

Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unambiguously divided between the colliding objects leading to definition of the gravitationally dressed momenta. These take into account for gravity in the same way as the potential energy does in the non-relativistic theory, but our treatment is fully relativistic. Another unusual feature of our problem is the non-vanishing flux of the total energy-momentum tensor through the lateral surface of the world tube. In this case the zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor does not imply conservation of the total momentum defined as the integral over the space-like section of the tube. But one can still define the conservation low infinitesimally, passing to time derivatives of the momenta. Using this definition we establish the momentum balance in terms of the dressed particle and wall momenta.

D. V. Gal'tsov; E. Yu. Melkumova; P. A. Spiirin

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Flame/Wall interactions : laminar study of unburnt HC formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an important part to the sources of hydrocarbon (HC) emission in a combustion chamber. The aim of this work in gasoline engine. A skeletal mechanism (29 species and 48 reactions) mimicking iso-octane combustion is used, wall heat flux, quench distances as well as HC families are investigated by varying parameters like

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

398

Experimental cosiderations regarding brick masonry structural walls consolidating  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims at giving a succinct presentation of some aspects regarding the advantages of the brick masonry walls, which makes their consolidation necessary and realistic in case of damage. Secondly, various solutions are presented for strengthening, ... Keywords: consolidation, ferrocement, micro-concrete, structure measurement

Gavrila Muntean; Radu Muntean; Traian Onet

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Turbulent Boundary Layer Yin-Chiu Kan , Clara and hypersonic turbulent boundary layer datasets from direct numerical simulation (DNS). Contour plots and Marusic5 and Mathis, Hutchins and Marusic16 ). In contrast to supersonic and hypersonic flow regimes

Martín, Pino

400

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Turbulence Structure and Wall Signature in Hypersonic Boundary Layer Yin-Chiu Kan , Beekman Izaak and low- speed features, found in subsonic experiments, are present in our supersonic and hypersonic and hypersonic regimes due to the lack of detailed flow field data, and the studies have been mostly restricted

Martín, Pino

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geckobot and Waalbot: Small-Scale Wall Climbing Ozgur Unver  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surfaces smooth metal or painted structures. This paper proposes two semi-autonomous small-scale robotGeckobot and Waalbot: Small-Scale Wall Climbing Robots Ozgur Unver oUnver@andrew.cmu.edu Michael P robots able to navigate on smooth vertical surfaces which use adhesive materials for attachment. Geckobot

Sitti, Metin

402

Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head.

Kollie, Thomas G. (Oak Ridge, TN); Thacker, Louis H. (Knoxville, TN); Fine, H. Alan (Lexington, KY)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An instrument is disclosed for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets, the packets having a wall that it can be deformed by the application of an external dynamic vacuum to an area thereof. The instrument has a detector head for placement against the deformable wall of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector. A change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the dynamic vacuum applied through the head be to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum within the packet. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum plate is placed beneath the packet to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface of the packet. A vacuum can be applied to a recess in this vacuum plate, the value of which can be used to calibrate the vacuum transducer in the detector head. 4 figs.

Kollie, T.G.; Thacker, L.H.; Fine, H.A.

1995-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

404

Instrument for measurement of vacuum in sealed thin wall packets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An instrument for the measurement of vacuum within sealed packets 12, the packets 12 having a wall 14 sufficiently thin that it can be deformed by the application of an external vacuum to small area thereof. The instrument has a detector head 18 for placement against the deformable wall 14 of the packet to apply the vacuum in a controlled manner to accomplish a limited deformation or lift of the wall 14, with this deformation or lift monitored by the application of light as via a bifurcated light pipe 20. Retro-reflected light through the light pipe is monitored with a photo detector 26. An abrupt change (e.g., a decrease) of retro-reflected light signals the wall movement such that the value of the vacuum applied through the head 18 to achieve this initiation of movement is equal to the vacuum Within the packet 12. In a preferred embodiment a vacuum reference plate 44 is placed beneath the packet 12 to ensure that no deformation occurs on the reverse surface 16 of the packet. A packet production line model is also described.

Kollie, Thomas G. (117 Oklahoma Ave., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Thacker, Louis H. (3727 Frostwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37921); Fine, H. Alan (949 Wishbone Cir., Lexington, KY 40502)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Radial elasticity of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the radial mechanical properties of multi-walled boron nitride nanotubes (MW-BNNTs) using atomic force microscopy. The employed MW-BNNTs were synthesized using pressurized vapor/condenser (PVC) methods and were dispersed in aqueous solution using ultrasonication methods with the aid of ionic surfactants. Our nanomechanical measurements reveal the elastic deformational behaviors of individual BNNTs with two to four tube walls in their transverse directions. Their effective radial elastic moduli were obtained through interpreting their measured radial deformation profiles using Hertzian contact mechanics models. Our results capture the dependences of the effective radial moduli of MW-BNNTs on both the tube outer diameter and the number of tube layers. The effective radial moduli of double-walled BNNTs are found to be several-fold higher than those of single-walled BNNTs within the same diameter range. Our work contributes directly to a complete understanding of the fundamental structural and mechanical properties of BNNTs and the pursuits of their novel structural and electronics applications.

Michael W. Smith, Cheol Park, Meng Zheng, Changhong Ke ,In-Tae Bae, Kevin Jordan

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Interactive Weather Simulation and Visualization on a Display Wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.hoai.ha,john.markus.bjorndalen,otto.anshus}@uit.no, {tormsh,daniels}@cs.uit.no Abstract. Numerical Weather Prediction models (NWP) used for op- erational Weather Model, WRF, Tiled Display Walls, Live Data Sets, On-Demand Computation. 1 Introduction Numerical Weather Prediction models for use in weather forecasting centers are often computed for a fixed static

Ha, Phuong H.

407

Violating privacy through walls by passive monitoring of radio windows  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We investigate the ability of an attacker to passively use an otherwise secure wireless network to detect moving people through walls. We call this attack on privacy of people a "monitoring radio windows" (MRW) attack. We design and implement the MRW ... Keywords: line crossing, radio window, signal strength, wifi

Arijit Banerjee; Dustin Maas; Maurizio Bocca; Neal Patwari; Sneha Kasera

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Dynamics of biased domain walls and the devaluation mechanism  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the evolution of biased domain walls in the early universe. We explicitly discuss the roles played by the surface tension and volume pressure in the evolution of the walls, and quantify their effects by looking at the collapse of spherical wall solutions. We then apply our results to a particular mechanism, known as the devaluation scenario, in which the dynamics of biased domain walls was suggested as a possible solution to the cosmological constant problem. Our results indicate that devaluation will, in general, lead to values of the cosmological constant that differ by several orders of magnitude from the observationally inferred value, {rho}{sub vac}{sup 1/4}{approx}10{sup -3} eV. We also argue that the reasons behind this are not specific to a particular realization, and are expected to persist in any scenario of this kind, except if a low-energy cutoff on the spectra of vacuum energy densities, of the order of the critical density at the present time, is postulated. This implies that any such scenario will require a fine-tuning similar to the usual one.

Avelino, P. P.; Sousa, L. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Martins, C. J. A. P. [Centro de Astrofisica, Universidade do Porto, Rua das Estrelas s/n, 4150-762 Porto (Portugal); DAMTP, University of Cambridge, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi [Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-8560 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Modeling of Spherical Torus Plasmas for Liquid Lithium Wall Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Liquid metal walls have the potential to solve first-wall problems for fusion reactors, such as heat load and erosion of dry walls, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. In the near term, such walls can serve as the basis for schemes to stabilize magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes. Furthermore, the low recycling characteristics of lithium walls can be used for particle control. Liquid lithium experiments have already begun in the Current Drive eXperiment-Upgrade (CDX-U). Plasmas limited with a toroidally localized limiter have been investigated, and experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter are in progress. A liquid surface module (LSM) has been proposed for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). In this larger ST, plasma currents are in excess of 1 MA and a typical discharge radius is about 68 cm. The primary motivation for the LSM is particle control, and options for mounting it on the horizontal midplane or in the divertor region are under consideration. A key consideration is the magnitude of the eddy currents at the location of a liquid lithium surface. During plasma start up and disruptions, the force due to such currents and the magnetic field can force a conducting liquid off of the surface behind it. The Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) has been used to estimate the magnitude of this effect. This program is a two dimensional, time dependent, free boundary simulation code that solves the MHD equations for an axisymmetric toroidal plasma. From calculations that match actual ST equilibria, the eddy current densities can be determined at the locations of the liquid lithium. Initial results have shown that the effects could be significant, and ways of explicitly treating toroidally local structures are under investigation.

R. Kaita; S. Jardin; B. Jones; C. Kessel; R. Majeski; J. Spaleta; R. Woolley; L. Zakharo; B. Nelson; M. Ulrickson

2002-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

411

Building America Top Innovations Hall of Fame Profile … High-R Walls  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

require walls that cost-effectively require walls that cost-effectively control both thermal and moisture flow. Building America research results have provided proven high-R wall options for builders across the country. Building America's research teams have conducted modeling analysis as well as field studies of several different wall assemblies to identify effective "whole- wall" R-values that take into account thermal bridging of framing members. Researchers have also investigated critical moisture potential and durability issues since high-R walls have much less drying potential. Between 2008 and 2012, CARB conducted several evaluations of wall types (see for example Aldrich et al. 2010). In one study, CARB performed THERM and WUFI analysis on three typical cold climate wall assemblies modeled at ASHRAE

412

Numerical Simulation of Wind Tunnel Wall Effects on the Transonic Flow around an Airfoil Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For wind tunnel measurements in closed-wall test sections, possible interference effects of the wind tunnel walls play an important role. Three-dimensional TAU simulations were performed for the transonic flow ar...

K. Richter; H. Rosemann

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Apparatus for impingement cooling a side wall adjacent an undercut region of a turbine nozzle segment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and vanes therebetween. Each band includes a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. Slots are formed through the inturned flange along the nozzle side wall. A plate having through-apertures extending between opposite edges thereof is disposed in each slot, the slots and plates being angled such that the cooling medium exiting the apertures in the second cavity lie close to the side wall for focusing and targeting cooling medium onto the side wall.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Diverse mechanisms of pectic polysaccharide degradation distinguished in fruit cell walls in vivo   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cell wall loosening and degradation are important processes in major stages of plant development including fruit ripening. Three main mechanisms have been proposed to contribute towards cell wall polysaccharide degradation ...

Othman, Babul Airianah

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Synthesis and Electronic Transport in Known Chirality Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synthesis and Electronic Transport in Known Chirality Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Bhupesh Chandra;ABSTRACT Synthesis and Electronic Transport in Known Chirality Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes Bhupesh Chandra Carbon nanotubes are intriguing new materials with extraordinary electrical properties originating from

Hone, James

416

Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes and Titanium Dioxide Nanobelts with Cell-Specific Transcriptomic Three Human Cell Types Respond to Multi-Walled Carbon...

417

Ultrafast Mid-Infrared Intra-Excitonic Response of Individualized Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Z. Ma et al. , in: Carbon Nanotubes, edited by A. Jorio, G.Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Jigang Wang, 1, 2 Matt W.7,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes. Strong photoinduced

Wang, Jigang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Reduction of Metal Oxides by Microwave Heating of Multi-walled...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reduction of Metal Oxides by Microwave Heating of Multi-walled Carbon Nanotubes Microwave heating of a metal oxide in the presence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes may result in...

419

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Phenomenological theory of a single domain wall in uniaxial trigonal ferroelectrics: Lithium niobate and lithium tantalate David A. Scrymgeour and Venkatraman Gopalan Department of Materials Science, lithium niobate and lithium tantalate. The contributions to the domain- wall energy from polarization

Gopalan, Venkatraman

420

Growth Conditions of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growth Conditions of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Arc Discharge ... Preparation conditions for large-scale synthesis of double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWCNTs) by using electric arc discharge were examined. ...

Yahachi Saito; Takanori Nakahira; Sashiro Uemura

2003-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An analysis model for wind resistance performance of automated exterior wall painting robots in apartment buildings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The painting of exterior walls on apartment buildings involves ... to fatalities. Although the market for domestic painting is expanding, painters tend to avoid the risk of painting exterior walls. Accordingly, m...

Ji-Won Cho; Jeong-Ho Lee; Young-Suk Kim…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Uniform Directional Alignment of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Viscous Polymer Flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, we probed the effects of shear flow on the alignment of dispersed single-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer solutions. Two different systems were compared:? Single-walled carbon nanotubes dispersed using an anionic surfactant and single-...

Erin Camponeschi; Bill Florkowski; Richard Vance; Glenn Garrett; Hamid Garmestani; Rina Tannenbaum

2006-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

423

Chitosan, the Deacetylated Form of Chitin, Is Necessary for Cell Wall Integrity in Cryptococcus neoformans  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...significantly reduced chitosan and are sensitive to cell wall inhibitors and elevated temperatures...sensitivity suggests that chitosan may be an essential...and mother cells. Chitosan-deficient strains...select cell wall inhibitors. The majority of...

Lorina G. Baker; Charles A. Specht; Maureen J. Donlin; Jennifer K. Lodge

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

424

Phase-Change Frame Walls (PCFWs) for Peak Demand Reduction, Load Shifting, Energy Conservation and Comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) for lowering peak heat transfer rates across walls of residential and small commercial buildings. A PCFW is a typical wall in which phase change materials (PCMs) have been incorporated via macroencapsulation to enhance the energy storage capabilities...

Medina, M.; Stewart, R.

425

Solution of Air Conditioning Cooling Load Temperature for New Energy-Saving Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the development of wall reforms, the production scale and engineering applications of energy savings are increasing daily. It is inevitable to aggressively extend production of new energy-saving walls. Based on the thermal instantaneous...

Wang, X.; Hong, J.; Deying, L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling the Impact of Agricultural Terrace Walls on Spatial Patterns of Erosion and Landscape Evolution Jennifer Glaubius Department of Geography University of Kansas Research Objectives 2 1. Implement terrace walls within a landscape evolution... model 2. Test the impact of human intervention with the terrace walls a. Interval between checking the wall for maintenance b. Time since abandonment of terraced land Model 3 Landscape evolution model from Chen et al. (2014); implemented in Python...

Glaubius, Jennifer

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

427

New retaining wall design criteria based on lateral earth pressure measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. , 72 1X LIST OF FIGURES Figures Page Condition of Active Rankine State, Cantilever Wall . . 3 Cross Section of Cantilever Wall Location of Earth Pressure Cells, Cantilever Wall Movement Measurement Scheme, Cantilever Wall. 12 Measured Lateral... INTRODUCTION Earth Pressure Theories -- The principles of limiting equilibrium mechanics are used to desiqn earth retaining structures. In this approach the pressures that would exist at a failure condition are predicted from Coulomb or Rankine (13...

Wright, William Vincent

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

428

Anticavitation protection of pressure outlets through regulation of velocities in wall layer of the flow  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1. The tests showed that an installation forming a continuous low-velocity flow along a wall comprising a solid ...

P. R. Khlopenkov; G. A. Chepaikin

1976-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Radiation Damage and Tritium Breeding Study in a Fusion Reactor Using a Liquid Wall of Various Thorium Molten Salts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new magnetic fusion reactor design, called APEX uses a liquid wall between fusion plasma and solid first wall to reach ... replacement of the first wall structure during the reactor’s operation due to the radia...

Mustafa Übeyli

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Walled Lake, Michigan: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Walled Lake, Michigan: Energy Resources Walled Lake, Michigan: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.537811°, -83.4810481° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.537811,"lon":-83.4810481,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

431

Wall conditioning and power balance for spheromak plasmas in SSPX  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report here results from power balance measurements for ohmically heated plasmas in the sustained spheromak physics experiment. The plasma is formed inside a close-fitting tungsten-coated copper shell; wall conditioning by baking, glow discharge cleaning (GDC), Ti gettering, and helium shot conditioning produces clean plasmas (Zeff<2.5) and reduces impurity radiation to a small fraction of the input energy, except when the molybdenum divertor plate has been overheated. We find that most of the input energy is lost by conduction to the walls (the divertor plate and the inner electrode in the coaxial source region). Recently, carborane was added during GDC to boronize the plasma-facing surfaces, but little benefit was obtained.

D.N. Hill; R.D. Wood; R. Bulmer; H.S. McLean; D. Ryutov; B.W. Stallard; S. Woodruff

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Trombe Walls in Low-Energy Buildings: Practical Experiences; Preprint  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Trombe Walls in Low-Energy Trombe Walls in Low-Energy Buildings: Practical Experiences Preprint July 2004 * NREL/CP-550-36277 P. Torcellini and S. Pless To be presented at the World Renewable Energy Congress VIII and Expo Denver, Colorado August 29-September 3, 2004 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Operated for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy by Midwest Research Institute * Battelle Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published

433

Sustainable wall construction and exterior insulation retrofit technology process and structure  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A low-cost process for exterior wall insulation retrofit, or new wall construction by stacking layers of fabric tube filled with insulating material against a wall and covering them with mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value.

Vohra, Arun (Bethesda, MD)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Heat Transfer in Buildings: Application to Solar Air Collector and Trombe Wall Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11 Heat Transfer in Buildings: Application to Solar Air Collector and Trombe Wall Design H. Boyer focuses on the modeling of Trombe solar walls. In each case, detailed modeling of heat transfer allows with same thermal behaviour). For heat conduction in walls, it results from electrical analogy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

435

Detection of cell wall structural polysaccharides by cellulase-gold and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Bendtska 2, Czech Republic Abstract: The rigid cell wall of Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae wall of the symbiotic Chlorella Pbi strain the chitin-Iike substance was proved (KAPAUN & REISSER1995 Chlorella and Scenedesmus(TAKEDA1993, 1996). Monosaccharidal composition of the rigid cell wall provides

436

Oxidative enzymatic response of white-rot fungi to single-walled carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxidative enzymatic response of white-rot fungi to single-walled carbon nanotubes Timothy D. Berry-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are becoming increasingly prevalent in manufacturing, there is little knowledge. Introduction Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), formed from single- atom thick sheets of carbon wound

Blanchette, Robert A.

437

Carbon nanotubes Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Sharp  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon nanotubes Growth of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes from Sharp Metal Tips Julio A. Rodri Banhart* The nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes is observed in situ in a transmission a region of high surface curvature, spontaneous nucleation and growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes

Nordlund, Kai

438

Propagating and reflecting of spin wave in permalloy nanostrip with 360° domain wall  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By micromagnetic simulation, we investigated the interaction between propagating spin wave (or magnonic) and a 360° domain wall in a nanostrip. It is found that propagating spin wave can drive a 360° domain wall motion, and the velocity and direction are closely related to the transmission coefficient of the spin wave of the domain wall. When the spin wave passes through the domain wall completely, the 360° domain wall moves toward the spin wave source. When the spin wave is reflected by the domain wall, the 360° domain wall moves along the spin wave propagation direction. Moreover, when the frequency of the spin wave is coincident with that of the 360° domain wall normal mode, the 360° domain wall velocity will be resonantly enhanced no matter which direction the 360 DW moves along. On the other hand, when the spin wave is reflected from the moving 360° domain wall, we observed the Doppler effect clearly. After passing through a 360° domain wall, the phase of the spin wave is changed, and the phase shift is related to the frequency. Nevertheless, phase shift could be manipulated by the number of 360° domain walls that spin wave passing through.

Zhang, Senfu; Mu, Congpu; Zhu, Qiyuan; Zheng, Qi; Liu, Xianyin; Wang, Jianbo; Liu, Qingfang, E-mail: liuqf@lzu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Magnetism and Magnetic Materials of Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

439

Supporting Information to: Single-Molecule Electrocatalysis by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S1 Supporting Information to: Single-Molecule Electrocatalysis by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes. Experimental Methods I.1. Purification of SWNTs. The single-walled carbon nanotubes were purchased from Carbon Nanotechnologies Incorporated (Purified HiPCO single-walled carbon nanotubes). These SWNTs have an average diameter

Chen, Peng

440

ccsd-00008772,version1-15Sep2005 Nucleation and growth of single wall carbon nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ccsd-00008772,version1-15Sep2005 Nucleation and growth of single wall carbon nanotubes F. Beuneu and growth of single wall carbon nanotubes from a carbon-saturated catalytic particle surrounded by a single. INTRODUCTION Since their discovery nearly fifteen years ago, sin- gle wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) have

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Protective interior wall and attaching means for a fusion reactor vacuum vessel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The wall basically consists of an array of small rectangular plates attached to the existing walls with threaded fasteners. The protective wall effectively conceals and protects all mounting hardware beneath the plate array, while providing a substantial surface area that will absorb plasma energy.

Phelps, R.D.; Upham, G.A.; Anderson, P.M.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The characterization of cell wall mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana, combined with biochemical approaches toward the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

source of terrestrial biomass and renewable energy. Cell wall material is also of great practical migrations do not contribute to the development of the plant body, the planes of cell divisions photosynthetically fixed carbon is incorporated into cell wall polymers, making plant cell walls the most abundant

Reiter, Wolf-Dieter

443

Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes of Controlled Diameter and Bundle Size and Their Field Emission Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes of Controlled Diameter and Bundle Size and Their Field Emission: June 8, 2005 Field emission studies were conducted on as-produced CoMoCAT single-walled carbon nanotube electron emitter. By adjusting the catalytic synthesis conditions, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT

Resasco, Daniel

444

Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter-Morphologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Field Emission Properties of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with a Variety of Emitter@chemsys.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp Field emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), which have been prepared through: single-walled carbon nanotube, field emission, alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition, ethanol

Maruyama, Shigeo

445

Symmetry Properties of Single-Walled BC2N Nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The symmetry properties of the single-walled BC2N nanotubes were investigated. All the BC2N nanotubes possess nonsymmorphic line groups. In contrast with the carbon and boron nitride nanotubes, armchair and zigzag BC2N nanotubes belong to different line groups, depending on the index n (even or odd) and the vector chosen. The number of Raman- active phonon modes is almost twice that of the infrared-active phonon modes for all kinds of BC2N nanotubes.

Pan, Hui [ORNL; Feng, Yuan Ping [National University of Singapore; Lin, Jainyi [Institute of Chemical and Engineering, Singapore

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Vortex energy and 360 Neel walls in thinfilm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.Ignat@math.u-psud.fr) Courant Institute, New York University, New York, NY 10012, USA (e-mail: knuepfer@cims.nyu.edu) 1 #12Vortex energy and 360 ­N´eel walls in thin­film micromagnetics Radu Ignat , Hans Kn¨upfer October-section. The model is based on the following energy functional: E2d (m) = Z B2 |m|2 dx + | ln | 2 Z R2 ||-1

447

Domain wall network evolution in (N+1)-dimensional FRW universes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We develop a velocity-dependent one-scale model for the evolution of domain wall networks in flat expanding or collapsing homogeneous and isotropic universes with an arbitrary number of spatial dimensions, finding the corresponding scaling laws in frictionless and friction dominated regimes. We also determine the allowed range of values of the curvature parameter and the expansion exponent for which a linear scaling solution is possible in the frictionless regime.

Avelino, P. P. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Paraiba 58051-970 Joao Pessoa, Paraiba (Brazil); Sousa, L. [Centro de Fisica do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Departamento de Fisica da Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

448

Influence of mefluidide on sorghum cell wall components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

percentage points per day) (Ademosum et al. , 1968). This quality decline is attributed to an increase in poorly digestible cell wall components, i. e. ; lignin, cellulose, etc. , while the highly digestible cell contents and cell proteins decline..., cellulose, hemicellulose, lignin, and cellulase digestibility. All morphological studies indicated a reducton in plant height when mefluidide was applied to an early-to-mid vegetative stage in sorghum. Secondary basal tillering was initiated earlier...

Stair, David William

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Binding of Nucleobases with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We have calculated the binding energy of various nucleobases (guanine (G), adenine (A), thymine (T) and cytosine (C)) with (5,5) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using ab-initio Hartre-Fock method (HF) together with force field calculations. The gas phase binding energies follow the sequence G $>$ A $>$ T $>$ C. We show that main contribution to binding energy comes from van-der Wall (vdW) interaction between nanotube and nucleobases. We compare these results with the interaction of nucleobases with graphene. We show that the binding energy of bases with SWNTs is much lower than the graphene but the sequence remains same. When we include the effect of solvation energy (Poisson-Boltzman (PB) solver at HF level), the binding energy follow the sequence G $>$ T $>$ A $>$ C $>$, which explains the experiment\\cite{zheng} that oligonucleotides made of thymine bases are more effective in dispersing the SWNT in aqueous solution as compared to poly (A) and poly (C). We also demonstrate experimentally that there is differential binding affinity of nucleobases with the single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by directly measuring the binding strength using isothermal titration (micro) calorimetry. The binding sequence of the nucleobases varies as thymine (T) $>$ adenine (A) $>$ cytosine (C), in agreement with our calculation.

Anindya Das; A. K. Sood; Prabal K. Maiti; Mili Das; R. Varadarajan; C. N. R. Rao

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Energy-momentum balance in particle - domain wall perforating collision  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the energy-momentum balance in the perforating collision of a point particle with an infinitely thin planar domain wall within the linearized gravity in arbitrary dimensions. Since the metric of the wall increases with distance, the wall and the particle are never free, and their energy-momentum balance involves not only the instantaneous kinetic momenta, but also the non-local contribution of gravitational stresses. However, careful analysis shows that the stresses can be unambiguously divided between the colliding objects leading to definition of the gravitationally dressed momenta. These take into account for gravity in the same way as the potential energy does in the non-relativistic theory, but our treatment is fully relativistic. Another unusual feature of our problem is the non-vanishing flux of the total energy-momentum tensor through the lateral surface of the world tube. In this case the zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor does not imply conservation of the total momentum de...

Gal'tsov, D V; Spiirin, P A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Three-component borehole wall-locking seismic detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seismic detector for boreholes is described that has an accelerometer sensor block for sensing vibrations in geologic formations of the earth. The density of the seismic detector is approximately matched to the density of the formations in which the detector is utilized. A simple compass is used to orient the seismic detector. A large surface area shoe having a radius approximately equal to the radius of the borehole in which the seismic detector is located may be pushed against the side of the borehole by actuating cylinders contained in the seismic detector. Hydraulic drive of the cylinders is provided external to the detector. By using the large surface area wall-locking shoe, force holding the seismic detector in place is distributed over a larger area of the borehole wall thereby eliminating concentrated stresses. Borehole wall-locking forces up to ten times the weight of the seismic detector can be applied thereby ensuring maximum detection frequency response up to 2,000 hertz using accelerometer sensors in a triaxial array within the seismic detector.

Owen, Thomas E. (Helotes, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Plasma–wall interaction in laser inertial fusion reactors: novel proposals for radiation tests of first wall materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dry-wall laser inertial fusion (LIF) chambers will have to withstand strong bursts of fast charged particles which will deposit tens of kJ m?2 and implant more than 1018 particles m?2 in a few microseconds at a repetition rate of some Hz. Large chamber dimensions and resistant plasma-facing materials must be combined to guarantee the chamber performance as long as possible under the expected threats: heating, fatigue, cracking, formation of defects, retention of light species, swelling and erosion. Current and novel radiation resistant materials for the first wall need to be validated under realistic conditions. However, at present there is a lack of facilities which can reproduce such ion environments.This contribution proposes the use of ultra-intense lasers and high-intense pulsed ion beams (HIPIB) to recreate the plasma conditions in LIF reactors. By target normal sheath acceleration, ultra-intense lasers can generate very short and energetic ion pulses with a spectral distribution similar to that of the inertial fusion ion bursts, suitable to validate fusion materials and to investigate the barely known propagation of those bursts through background plasmas/gases present in the reactor chamber. HIPIB technologies, initially developed for inertial fusion driver systems, provide huge intensity pulses which meet the irradiation conditions expected in the first wall of LIF chambers and thus can be used for the validation of materials too.

J Alvarez Ruiz; A Rivera; K Mima; D Garoz; R Gonzalez-Arrabal; N Gordillo; J Fuchs; K Tanaka; I Fernández; F Briones; J Perlado

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Issues related to venting of attics and cathedral ceilings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current model building codes require attic ventilation in all US climates. Originally, these requirements were strictly based on concerns for condensation in attics during winter in cold climates, and they were based on limited technical information. Nevertheless, attic ventilation has become the uncontested strategy to minimize condensation and ice dams during winter and extreme attic temperatures during summer. However, other strategies exist that address each of these problems as well as or better than attic ventilation. This paper examines issues such as summer attic temperatures, ice dams, and shingle durability and discusses the relative merits of attic ventilation compared to alternative design approaches in various climates. The authors support current recommendations for attic ventilation in cold and mixed climates but recommend that attic ventilation be treated as a design option in warm, humid climates. The authors review the new information on attic and roof ventilation in the 1997 ASHRAE Handbook--Fundamentals and discuss the reasons for the changes.

TenWolde, A.; Rose, W.B.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Bid Ceil (1996) 87, 143-147 0 Elsevier. Paris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009, Biology Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-8080, USA; b sections. Both are available commercially (Polysci- ences, Inc, Warrington, PA). At present, there seems located within the polytene nuclei of Chironomus tentans salivary glands. EM tomography and image

Olins, Ada L.

455

Potential Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2011). ENERGY STAR Unit Shipment and Market Penetration2012c. ENERGY STAR Unit Shipment and Market Penetration7 and Figure 8 show ENERGY STAR market data for qualifying

Sathaye, Nakul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Potential Global Benefits of Improved Ceiling Fan Energy Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Products/BUENAS.aspx electricity are cost effective. 5 CCEkWh whereas the cost of electricity is typically greaterthe global energy Cost of electricity(CCE) for consumers is

Sathaye, Nakul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

A scale model study of displacement ventilation with chilled ceilings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Displacement ventilation is a form of air-conditioning which provides good air quality and some energy savings. The air quality is better than for a conventional mixed ventilation system. The maximum amount of cooling that ...

Holden, Katherine J. A. (Katherine Joan Adrienne)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

The WKB approximation for a linear potential and ceiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of non-bounce trajectories with equal initial data, y, and flnal time, t. The only variable is the flnal position, x. xd1 represents the flnal position of a type (1) trajectory. xd2 is the flnal position for type (2). And xt is for a turning.... The flnal position, x, is varying. The critical trajectory is dashed, and bc denotes the time of bounce for this trajectory, xc denotes the flnal position. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 10 5 Plot of direct trajectories for flnal data (x;t). The dotted line...

Zapata, Todd Austin

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

459

The WKB approximation for a linear potential and ceiling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

types of non-bounce trajectories with equal initial data, y, and flnal time, t. The only variable is the flnal position, x. xd1 represents the flnal position of a type (1) trajectory. xd2 is the flnal position for type (2). And xt is for a turning.... The flnal position, x, is varying. The critical trajectory is dashed, and bc denotes the time of bounce for this trajectory, xc denotes the flnal position. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 10 5 Plot of direct trajectories for flnal data (x;t). The dotted line...

Zapata, Todd Austin

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

460

DOE Publishes Request for Information for Ceiling Fans | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Fans Energy Conservation Standards DOE Publishes Final Rule for the Request for Exclusion of 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conservation Standards...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Building America Case Study: Raised Ceiling Interior Duct System...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): all PERFORMANCE DATA (of the measure alone, not whole house) Cost of energy-efficiency measure (including labor): 1890 or 1.51ft 2 Projected...

462

How are basement walls input in REScheck? | Building Energy Codes Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

basement walls input in REScheck? basement walls input in REScheck? After selecting a basement wall type, a basement wall illustration will appear with input boxes for the basement wall height, depth below grade, and depth of insulation. The illustration helps identify the dimensions being requested. You may enter basement wall dimensions directly into this illustration and select the OK button to have them transferred to the corresponding row in the table on the Envelope screen. If you prefer to enter the dimensions directly into the table on the Envelope screen, you can select Cancel to remove the illustration without entering dimensions. To view the basement wall illustration and inputs at a later time, click the right-mouse button anywhere on the basement row and select Edit Basement Inputs from the popup menu.

463

Apparatus and methods for impingement cooling of a side wall of a turbine nozzle segment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas turbine nozzle segment has outer and inner bands and a vane therebetween. Each band includes a nozzle wall, a side wall, a cover and an impingement plate between the cover and the nozzle wall defining two cavities on opposite sides of the impingement plate. Cooling steam is supplied to one cavity for flow through apertures of the impingement plate to cool the nozzle wall. The side wall of the band and inturned flange define with the nozzle wall an undercut region. The impingement plate has a turned flange welded to the inturned flange. A backing plate overlies the turned flange and aligned apertures are formed through the backing plate and turned flange to direct and focus cooling flow onto the side wall of the nozzle segment.

Burdgick, Steven Sebastian (Schenectady, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Building America Technlogy Solutions for New and Existing Homes: Interior Foundation Insulation Upgrade – Madison Residence (Fact Sheet)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This basement insulation project included a dimple map conveying inbound moisture to a draintile, airtight spray polyurethane foam wall and floor insulation, and radiant floor heat installation.

465

The logic behind thick, liquid-walled, fusion concepts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It may be possible to surround the region where fusion reactions are taking place with a neutronically thick liquid blanket which has penetrations that allow only a few tenths of a percent of the neutrons to leak out. Even these neutrons can be attenuated by adding an accurately placed liquid or solid near the target to shadow-shield the beam ports from line-of-sight neutrons. The logic of such designs are discussed and their evolution is described with examples applied to both magnetic and inertial fusion (HYLIFE-II). These designs with liquid protection are self healing when exposed to pulsed loading and have a number of advantages-over the usual designs with solid first walls. For example, the liquid-protected solid components will last the life of the plant, and therefore the capacity factor is estimated to be approximately 10% higher than for the non-liquid-walled blankets, because no blanket replacement shutdowns are required. The component replacement, operations, and maintenance costs might be half the usual value because no blanket change-out costs or accompanying facilities are required. These combined savings might lower the cost of electricity by 20%. Nuclear-grade construction should not be needed, largely because the liquid attenuates neutrons and results in less activation of materials. Upon decommissioning, the reactor materials should qualify for disposal by shallow burial even when constructed of ordinary 304 stainless steel. The need for a high-intensity 14-MeV neutron test facility to develop first-wall materials is avoided or greatly reduced, saving billions of development dollars. Flowing molten Li, the molten salt Flibe (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}), and molten Li{sub l7}Pb{sub 83} have been considered. An advantage of molten salt is that it will not burn and has a low tritium solubility and therefore low tritium inventory.

Moir, R.W.

1994-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

466

Tin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from slurries. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of this effort was to develop a process for economically fabricating thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres from conventional ceramic powders using dispersions. This process resulted in successful production of monosized spheres in the mm size range which were point contact bonded into foams. Thin-wall hollow ceramic spheres of small (one to five millimeter) diameter have novel applications as high-temperature insulation and light structural materials when bonded into monolithic foams. During Phase 1 of this program the objective as to develop a process for fabricating thin-wall hollow spheres from powder slurries using the coaxial nozzle fabrication method. Based on the success during Phase 1, Phase 2 was revised to emphasize the assessment of the potential structural and insulation applications for the spheres and modeling of the sphere formation process was initiated. As more understanding developed, it was clear that to achieve successful structural application, the spheres had to be bonded into monolithic foams and the effort was further expanded to include both bonding into structures and finite element mechanical modeling which became the basis of Phase 3. Successful bonding techniques and mechanical modeling resulted but thermal conductivities were higher than desired for insulating activities. In addition, considerable interest had been express by industry for the technology. Thus the final Phase 4 concentrated on methods to reduce thermal conductivity by a variety of techniques and technology transfer through individualized visits. This program resulted in three Ph.D. theses and 10 M.S. theses and they are listed in the appropriate technical sections.

Chapman, A.T.; Cochran, J.K.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

Short note on the stability of a dilatonic wall  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A nontopological soliton solution of dilaton-Maxwell theory describes a domain wall-like solution which confines magnetic flux in its core [G.W. Gibbons and C.G. Wells, Class. Quant. Grav. 11, 2499 (1994)]. Since the solution is not stabilized by a nontrivial topology of the vacuum manifold, it is interesting to see if the static solution is stable against small fluctuations. We consider the stability of the solution in response to small fluctuations in the scalar and magnetic fields. It is determined that the ansatz solution does indeed exhibit stability.

J. R. Morris

2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

468

Domain-growth kinetics of systems with soft walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has recently been suggested by Mouritsen on the basis of computer simulations that systems with soft domain walls exhibit slower domain growth than the R?t1/2 growth law predicted by Lifshitz and Allen and Cahn. We underscore the reasons to believe this interpretation of the data to be incorrect and draw attention to an experiment by Pindak, Young, Meyer, and Clark, whose results are in complete agreement with the predictions of Allen and Cahn. The reason for the unexpected growth dynamics observed in Mouritsen’s simulations is suggested.

Wim van Saarloos and Martin Grant

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Single-wall carbon nanotubes as coherent plasmon generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The possibility of low-energy surface plasmon amplification by optically excited excitons in small-diameter single-wall carbon nanotubes is theoretically demonstrated. The nonradiative exciton-plasmon energy transfer causes the buildup of macroscopic population numbers of coherent localized surface plasmons associated with high-intensity coherent local fields formed at nanoscale throughout the nanotube surface. These strong local fields can be used in a variety of new optoelectronic applications of carbon nanotubes, including near-field nonlinear-optical probing and sensing, optical switching, enhanced electromagnetic absorption, and materials nanoscale modification.

I. V. Bondarev

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

470

Field-ion microscopy observation of single-walled carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Field-ion microscopy (FIM), a tool for surface analysis with atomic resolution, has been employed to observe the end structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). FIM images revealed the existence of open SWCNT ends. Amorphous carbon atoms were also observed to occur around SWCNTs and traditional field evaporation failed to remove them. Heat treatment was found to be efficacious in altering the end structures of SWCNT bundles. Carbon and oxygen atoms released from heated tungsten filament are believed to be responsible for the decoration imposed on the SWCNT ends.

Zhang Zhao-Xiang; Zhang Geng-Min; Du Min; Jin Xin-Xi; Hou Shi-Min; Sun Jian-Ping; Gu Zhen-Nan; Zhao Xing-Yu; Liu Wei-Min; Wu Jin-Lei; Xue Zeng-Quan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

LiWall Fusion - The New Concept of Magnetic Fusion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilization of the outstanding abilities of a liquid lithium layer in pumping hydrogen isotopes leads to a new approach to magnetic fusion, called the LiWall Fusion. It relies on innovative plasma regimes with low edge density and high temperature. The approach combines fueling the plasma by neutral injection beams with the best possible elimination of outside neutral gas sources, which cools down the plasma edge. Prevention of cooling the plasma edge suppresses the dominant, temperature gradient related turbulence in the core. Such an approach is much more suitable for controlled fusion than the present practice, relying on high heating power for compensating essentially unlimited turbulent energy losses.

L.E. Zakharov

2011-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

472

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

31 - 28840 of 31,917 results. 31 - 28840 of 31,917 results. Download DOE Organization Chart- July 23, 2013 The DOE Organization Chart is a diagram of the U.S. Department of Energy's structure along with the relationships and relative ranks of its parts and positions/jobs. http://energy.gov/downloads/doe-organization-chart-july-23-2013 Article Evaporative Cooling Basics Evaporative cooling uses evaporated water to naturally and energy-efficiently cool. http://energy.gov/eere/energybasics/articles/evaporative-cooling-basics Article Radiant Heating Basics Radiant heating systems involve supplying heat directly to the floor or to panels in the walls or ceiling of a house. The systems depend largely on radiant heat transfer: the delivery of heat directly from the hot surface to the people and objects in the room via the radiation of heat, which is

473

Tips: Air Ducts | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Air Ducts Air Ducts Tips: Air Ducts June 24, 2013 - 7:23pm Addthis Air Ducts: Out of Sight, Out of Mind. The unsealed ducts in your attic and crawlspaces lose air, and uninsulated ducts lose heat -- wasting energy and money. Air Ducts: Out of Sight, Out of Mind. The unsealed ducts in your attic and crawlspaces lose air, and uninsulated ducts lose heat -- wasting energy and money. Your air ducts are one of the most important systems in your home, and if the ducts are poorly sealed or insulated they are likely contributing to higher energy bills. Your home's duct system is a branching network of tubes in the walls, floors, and ceilings; it carries the air from your home's furnace and central air conditioner to each room. Ducts are made of sheet metal, fiberglass, or other materials.

474

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

01 - 25710 of 28,904 results. 01 - 25710 of 28,904 results. Article Affordability Contest Adds New Dimension to Solar Decathlon 2011 The big buzz word in Washington, D.C., these days is budget. In the solar village at West Potomac Park, cost savings are top of mind for the decathletes as well. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/affordability-contest-adds-new-dimension-solar-decathlon-2011 Article Solar Decathlon Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. http://energy.gov/energysaver/articles/solar-decathlon-technology-spotlight-structural-insulated-panels Article 2011 Fuel Economy Guide Now Available This annual Fuel Economy Guide provides consumers with information about

475

Microsoft Word - CX-Santiam_Substation_Renovation_WEB.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

KEPR-4 KEPR-4 SUBJECT: Environmental Clearance Memorandum Noah Carlson Project Manager - NWM-4 Proposed Action: Removal of asbestos and renovation of Santiam Substation PP&A Project No.: PP&A-1566 Budget Information: Work Order # 244751 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B1.16 Removal of asbestos from buildings Location: Santiam substation in Linn County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: This project entails the removal of all paint from all interior wall surfaces down to bare concrete as well as the removal of the suspended ceiling (painted with the same asbestos containing paint) and lighting systems. The asbestos containing floor tile will be removed as will the asbestos

476

CX-001181: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

181: Categorical Exclusion Determination 181: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001181: Categorical Exclusion Determination Santiam Substation Renovation CX(s) Applied: B1.16 Date: 03/12/2010 Location(s): Linn County, Oregon Office(s): Bonneville Power Administration This project entails the removal of all paint from all interior wall surfaces down to bare concrete as well as the removal of the suspended ceiling (painted with the same asbestos containing paint) and lighting systems. The asbestos containing floor tile will be removed as will the asbestos containing mastic used to adhere them. All asbestos pipe insulation will be removed from the facility as well. DOCUMENT(S) AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD CX-001181.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-001413: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009643: Categorical Exclusion Determination

477

Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for Existing Homes |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Existing Homes Existing Homes Cascade Natural Gas - Conservation Incentives for Existing Homes < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Ventilation Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Appliances & Electronics Water Heating Program Info State District of Columbia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Floor Insulation: $0.45 per sq. ft. Wall Insulation: $0.40 per sq. ft. Ceiling or Attic Insulation: $0.25 per sq. ft. High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnace: $150 Duct Sealing: $150 High Efficiency Natural Gas Furnace and Duct Sealing: $400 High Efficiency Natural Gas Hearth: $70 Conventional Natural Gas Water Heater: $40 Combination Domestic Water/Hydronic Space Heating System (using Tankless

478

THE WORLD'S Biggest Fan Collection  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

WORLD'S Biggest Fan Collection WORLD'S Biggest Fan Collection If you only know the Big Ass Fan Company as the preeminent designer and manufacturer of high volume, low speed fans for factories and cows, it's time you get to know us better. While we continue to lead the way in industrial and agricultural air movement, we've also refined these designs to bring the same innovation and benefits of our famous fans to circulate an ocean of air in sound-sensitive commercial spaces and homes. And when our customers said they wanted something for smaller spaces, we listened - and we think you'll like the results. We've got you covered - ceiling to floor, wall to door! Features  New patented airfoil system uses 10 Powerfoil airfoils, winglets and patent-pending AirFence(tm) technology to increase

479

DOE Solar Decathlon: News Blog » Blog Archive » Technology Spotlight:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Technology Spotlight: Structural Insulated Panels Monday, September 19, 2011 Alexis Powers Editor's Note: This post is one of a series of technology spotlights that introduces common technologies used in U.S. Department of Energy Solar Decathlon team houses. Structural insulated panels (SIPs) are prefabricated structural elements used to build walls, ceilings, floors, and roofs. Made of foam insulation sandwiched between two layers of structural board, SIPs provide a more airtight dwelling than a standard stud-frame house. This creates a quieter and more energy-efficient interior space. Various types of insulation can be used in SIPs in homes. The most common insulating material is polystyrene or polyisocyanurate foam. Foam insulation is added between two sheets of oriented strand board (an

480

Buildings Energy Data Book: 2.5 Residential Construction and Housing Market  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

7 7 Materials Used in the Construction of a 2,272 Square-Foot Single-Family Home 13,837 board-feet of lumber 12 interior doors 13,118 square feet of sheathing 6 closet doors 19 tons of concrete 2 garage doors 3,206 square feet of exterior siding material 1 fireplace 3,103 square feet of roofing material 3 toilets, 2 bathtubs, 1 shower stall 3,061 square feet of insulation 3 bathroom sinks 6,050 square feet of interior wall material 15 kitchen cabinets, 5 other cabinets 2,335 square feet of interior ceiling material 1 kitchen sink 226 linear feet of ducting 1 range, 1 refrigerator, 1 dishwasher, 1 garbage disposal, 1 range hood 19 windows 1 washer, 1 dryer 4 exterior doors (3 hinged, 1 sliding) 1 heating and cooling system 2,269 square feet of flooring material Source(s):

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floors walls ceilings" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

NCSU solar energy and conservation house. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A passive solar energy house has been built adjacent to the NCSU McKimmon Continuing Education Center. The house contains a two-story embedded sunspace, two Trombe walls, active solar hot water heating, thermal storage in a rock filled ceiling/floor, and numerous research treatments, and energy conservation features. (See attached photo brochure; Appendix 1). The house is completely decorated and furnished in an attractive manner and the exterior architecture is traditional and has broad consumer appeal. It is also thoroughly instrumented to monitor performance. The house is open to the public on weekends and numerous people come to visit on their own initiative and others take advantage of the close proximity to McKimmon while there attending conferences. The house will influence and motivate large numbers of people to consider solar and energy conservation facets in their homes and will provide data to substantiate performance to prospective home buyers and meaningful data on design and construction for builders.

Not Available

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Cool CAVEs | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CAVEs CAVEs Cool CAVEs January 5, 2011 - 6:18pm Addthis Charles Rousseaux Charles Rousseaux Senior Writer, Office of Science What are the key facts? The Idaho National Laboratory's "CAVE" -- 3-D Computer-Assisted Virtual Environment -- allows scientists to literally walk into their data and look at it from multiple perspectives. Projectors, mounted behind the walls and on the ceiling, are manipulated by researchers using 3-D goggles and a handheld controller -- and allow them to study everything from terrain to applied nuclear research, to active sites of proteins. To escape the holiday chaos, many folks found refuge in caves - dark places with sticky floors, lumpy seating and Jeff Bridges playing scenes against a computer-enhanced younger version of himself . . . at least if

483

BiFeO3 Domain Wall Energies and Structures: A Combined Experimental and Density Functional Theory+U Study  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We determined the atomic structures and energies of 109°, 180°, and 71° domain walls in BiFeO3, combining density functional theory+U calculations and aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy images. We find a substantial Bi sublattice shift and a rather uniform Fe sublattice across the walls. The calculated wall energies (?) follow the sequence ?109 180 71 for the 109°, 180°, and 71° walls. We attribute the high 71° wall energy to an opposite tilting rotation of the oxygen octahedra and the low 109° wall energy to the opposite twisting rotation of the oxygen octahedra across the domain walls.

Wang, Yi; Nelson, Chris; Melville, Alexander; Winchester, Benjamin; Shang, Shunli; Liu, Zi-Kui; Schlom, Darrell G.; Pan, Xiaoqing; Chen, Long-Qing

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Bentonite-water slurry rheology and cutoff wall trench stability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The rheological behavior of bentonite-water slurry is responsible for its ability to stabilize trenches that are made for construction of subsurface barriers to ground water flow. This paper reviews the rheology of bentonite-water slurries and presents property values for a range of bentonite concentrations. Test results indicate that, if the D{sub 15} size of the native ground is less than 0.4 mm, it is likely that a bentonite filter cake will form on the face of an excavation supported by bentonite-water slurry. For soils that are too coarse for a filter cake to form, it was found that the penetration distance of slurry into the soil increases as the D{sub 5} size and void ratio of the soil increase. An expression for the factor of safety against local sloughing failure of the trench wall is presented. Local sloughing failures that occurred during construction of the cutoff wall at Island Copper Mine, Vancouver Island, BC, are discussed, and calculated factors of safety are in good agreement with the observed performance.

Filz, G.M. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Boyer, R.D. [Langan Engineering and Environmental Services, Elmwood Park, NJ (United States); Davidson, R.R. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

485

Process for safe underground storage of materials and apparatus for storage of such materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is disclosed for the formation of a safe storage area to hold materials, where the storage area is in the form of an underground storage cavern in a preferably rock formation maintained at a different temperature from the natural temperature of the environs surrounding the walls, floor, and the ceiling of said storage cavern. The inside of the storage cavern is with or without insulation and an inner first circulation system surrounds the cavern. The circulation system has a plurality of channels regularly distributed around the cavern and near its surface parallel to the axis of the storage space. The system of tunnels formed of the channels together encloses and surrounds the cavern. Further away from the cavern and on the outside of and in working relation to the first inner circulation system is a second outer circulation system, consisting of a plurality of regularly distributed channels formed either from the said inner tunnel system or between a second outer system of surrounding tunnels parallel to the axis of the storage space and together with said last mentioned channels enclosing the cavern and the inner circulation system. A circulating drying heat exchange medium for exchanging heat between the circulating medium and the surroundings around the first inner circulation system is introduced into the first inner circulation system and a circulating heat exchange drying medium for exchanging heat between the circulating medium and the surroundings around the second outer circulation system is also employed by maintaining heat exchange with the surroundings of first inner circulation system keeping its walls, floor, and ceiling of the cavern at a predetermined temperature above a temperature of the stored materials when storing hot materials below the temperature of the hot materials to form a temperature barrier envelope about said cavern.

Grennard, A.H.

1980-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

486

Indoor air quality: The legal landscape II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s office environment is as different from its predecessor as an automobile is from a horse and buggy. A 1950s office typically contained tile floors, painted walls, plaster ceilings, carbon paper, and plentiful fresh air circulating through windows that were usually open when weather permitted. In the 1990s, the decor has shifted to carpeted floors, synthetic wall coverings, ceiling tile and multiple copiers. Sophisticated building materials and motorized office products can emit unwelcome constituents into the indoor air, yet ventilation is limited by windows that do not open. One result of these changes has been an unprecedented and ever-increasing concern about indoor air quality (IAQ). Some studies rank indoor air pollution as today`s number one environmental health risk. Increased media attention to the topic has increased public awareness, which has increased litigation and regulatory activity in the area. This paper explores the legal landscape of IAQ in the US, ranging from legislative to regulatory activity on both the federal and state levels, and from civil litigation to actions brought before administrative boards. Along the way, the paper defines and discusses such IAQ problems as building-related illness (BRI) and sick building syndrome (SBS), examining the magnitude of the problems and their possible causes. Finally, the paper provides suggestions to those potentially liable for alleged injuries from indoor air pollution, including architects, builders, contractors, building product manufacturers, building owners and managers, building sellers, employers, and engineering and environmental consultants. This paper is an update of a paper presented at the Air and Waste Management Association`s Annual Meeting in 1992.

Neet, J.O. Jr.; Smith, T.A. [Shook, Hardy and Bacon, Kansas City, MO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

487

A framework for studying the effect of compliant surfaces on wall turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper extends the resolvent formulation proposed by McKeon & Sharma (2010) to consider turbulence-compliant wall interactions. Under this formulation, the turbulent velocity field is expressed as a linear superposition of propagating modes, identified via a gain-based decomposition of the Navier-Stokes equations. Compliant surfaces, modeled as a complex wall-admittance linking pressure and velocity, affect the gain and structure of these modes. With minimal computation, this framework accurately predicts the emergence of the quasi-2D propagating waves observed in recent direct numerical simulations. Further, the analysis also enables the rational design of compliant surfaces, with properties optimized to suppress flow structures energetic in wall turbulence. It is shown that walls with unphysical negative damping are required to interact favorably with modes resembling the energetic near-wall cycle, which could explain why previous studies have met with limited success. Positive-damping walls are eff...

Luhar, M; McKeon, B J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Performance of a selective-surface trombe wall in a small commercial building  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design and construction of a 100% passive solar building utilizing a clerestory and a trombe wall are described. The use of three selectively absorptive and emissive coverings on the trombe wall outer surface are investigated. One of the coverings and its laminating adhesive are tested for degradation after a year of exposure under normal operating conditions. Ambient temperature, room air temperature, trombe wall interior and exterior surface temperatures, and solar radiation are measured.

Judkoff, R.; Sokol, F.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Fabrication of thin-wall hollow nickel spheres and low density syntactic foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process has been developed to fabricate thin-wall hollow spheres from conventional oxide powders at room temperature. The polymer- bonded powder shells are fired in air to sinter the walls, leaving the shells either impervious or porous. Alternatively, the oxide shells can be preferentially reduced to produce thin-wall hollow metal spheres which can be bonded together to produce an ultra light weight closed-cell foam. Processing and properties of this class of low density structures will be discussed.

Clancy, R.B.; Sanders, T.H. Jr.; Cochran, J.K.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

Material Characterization and Design Recommendations for Mechanically Stabilized Earth Retaining Walls  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. ................................... 120  Figure 94. Ka FLAC Comparison with Ka_Rankine for Different ? (Retain) for 10 ft Wall Height with No Dilation Angle. .................................................... 121  xiv Figure 95. Ka_FLAC Comparison with Ka_Rankine for Different... ? (Retain) for 10 ft Wall Height with Dilation Angle. .......................................................... 122  Figure 96. Ka_FLAC Comparison with Ka_Rankine for Different ? (Retain) for 20 ft Wall Height with No Dilation Angle...

Dantal, Vishal

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

491

Distribution of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid in Floor Dust throughout Homes Following Homeowner and Commercial Lawn Applications:? Quantitative Effects of Children, Pets, and Shoes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First, in the main living areas of homes A and B there was ap proximately a 3-fold reduction in 2,4-D levels relative to the homeowner application study, contrasted with a 3-fold increase in 2,4-D levels in homes E and F. In the case of home B, there was a 2-fold increase in the 2,4-D level on the lawn, and in home F there was a 5-fold decrease in the level on the front lawn. ... Since the homeowners in homes B, E, and F removed or thoroughly rinsed shoes after self-application and before reentry, the differences between homeowner and commercial application tend to indicate that activity patterns of the family overshadow effects such as the applicator's reentry into the home or the level on the turf. ... These scenarios, in comparison with fully occupied homes, suggest that the postapplication 2,4-D floor dust levels of homes X and Y were caused primarily by intrusion mechanisms other than track-in and are presumed to involve resuspension of 2,4-D from turf followed by fine particle intrusion of the closed house (home Y) and an incremental addition of fine particle penetration as doors and windows were opened (home X). ...

Marcia G. Nishioka; Hazel M. Burkholder; Marielle C. Brinkman; Robert G. Lewis

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

492

E-Print Network 3.0 - accelerator wall materials Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

interactions Neutron damage to first wall and optics Channel formation 12;The types of research ... Source: UK Fusion Center at Culham (UKAEA) Collection: Plasma...

493

Partition wall subsystem modeling and effect on the coupled building system response  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Design and Modeling baseline. 5.3 Building Design and Modeling Three reinforcedthe bare building (no wall), the modeling efforts neglected

Wood, Richard Lee

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Detecting Cellulase Penetration Into Corn Stover Cell Walls by Immuno-Electron Microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In general, pretreatments are designed to enhance the accessibility of cellulose to enzymes, allowing for more efficient conversion. In this study, we have detected the penetration of major cellulases present in a commercial enzyme preparation (Spezyme CP) into corn stem cell walls following mild-, moderate- and high-severity dilute sulfuric acid pretreatments. The Trichoderma reesei enzymes, Cel7A (CBH I) and Cel7B (EG I), as well as the cell wall matrix components xylan and lignin were visualized within digested corn stover cell walls by immuno transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using enzyme- and polymer-specific antibodies. Low severity dilute-acid pretreatment (20 min at 100 C) enabled <1% of the thickness of secondary cell walls to be penetrated by enzyme, moderate severity pretreatment at (20 min at 120 C) allowed the enzymes to penetrate {approx}20% of the cell wall, and the high severity (20 min pretreatment at 150 C) allowed 100% penetration of even the thickest cell walls. These data allow direct visualization of the dramatic effect dilute-acid pretreatment has on altering the condensed ultrastructure of biomass cell walls. Loosening of plant cell wall structure due to pretreatment and the subsequently improved access by cellulases has been hypothesized by the biomass conversion community for over two decades, and for the first time, this study provides direct visual evidence to verify this hypothesis. Further, the high-resolution enzyme penetration studies presented here provide insight into the mechanisms of cell wall deconstruction by cellulolytic enzymes.

Donohoe, B. S.; Selig, M. J.; Viamajala, S.; Vinzant, T. B.; Adney, W. S.; Himmel, M. E.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

495

Nonlinear response of plain concrete shear walls with elastic-damaging behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the theoretical and computational efforts on the modeling of small scale shear walls. Small scale shear walls are used extensively in the study of shear wall behavior because the construction and testing of full size walls are rather expensive. A finite element code is developed which incorporates nonlinear constitutive relations of damage mechanics. The program is used to obtain nonlinear load-deformation curves and to address the initial loss of stiffness due to shrinkage cracking. The program can also be used to monitor the continuous degradation of the fundamental frequency due to progressive damage.

Yazdani, S.; Schreyer, H.L.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Existence and uniqueness of domain wall solitons in a Maxwell–Chern–Simons model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present some sharp existence and uniqueness theorems for the domain wall solutions of the basic governing equations of a self-dual Maxwell–Chern–Simons model.

Zhang, Ruifeng [Institute of Contemporary Mathematics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China) [Institute of Contemporary Mathematics, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China); College of Mathematics and Information Science, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China); Li, Fangfang [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China)] [College of Mathematics and Information Science, Henan University, Kaifeng 475001 (China)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

497

E-Print Network 3.0 - armchair single-walled carbon Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

carbon Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Fluorescence spectroscopy of single-walled carbon nanotubes synthesized from alcohol Summary: I&EC 221 Fluorescence spectroscopy of...

498

Go No-Go Decision: Pure, Undoped, Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Vehicular Hydrogen Storage  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This document provides information about the go/no-go decision on pure, undoped single walled carbon nanotubes for vehicular hydrogen storage.

499

E-Print Network 3.0 - anterior wall myocardial Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hearts with IschemiaReperfusion Summary: rats showed re- gional defects localized in the LCA-supplied area, including the anterior wall, apex... ) views. Regional per- fusion...

500

Building America Expert Meeting: Code Challenges with Multifamily Area Separation Walls  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America Expert Meeting was conducted by the IBACOS team on Sept. 29, 2014, and focused on air sealing of area separation wall assemblies in multifamily buildings.