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1

Property:Building/TotalFloorArea | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/TotalFloorArea Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total floor area (BRA), m2 Pages using the property "Building/TotalFloorArea" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,855 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,310 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 +

2

Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Other retail Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaOtherRetail" Showing 1 page using this...

3

Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Daytime health services Pages using the property "BuildingFloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime" Showing 4...

4

Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Restaurants Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaRestaurants" Showing 13 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0007 + 1,990 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 215 + Sweden Building 05K0038 + 345 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 330 + Sweden Building 05K0060 + 256 + Sweden Building 05K0065 + 520 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 98 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 155 + Sweden Building 05K0098 + 170 + Sweden Building 05K0105 + 2,450 + Sweden Building 05K0114 + 400 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants&oldid=285973#SMWResults"

5

Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaMiscellaneous FloorAreaMiscellaneous Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Miscellaneous Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous" Showing 25 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 360 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 110 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 3,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 445 + Sweden Building 05K0021 + 250 + Sweden Building 05K0025 + 254 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,629 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 175 + Sweden Building 05K0040 + 869 + Sweden Building 05K0044 + 1,234 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,039 + Sweden Building 05K0051 + 1,489.92 + Sweden Building 05K0052 + 200 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 140 + Sweden Building 05K0063 + 654 + Sweden Building 05K0068 + 746 + Sweden Building 05K0071 + 293 +

6

Property:Building/FloorAreaShops | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Shops Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaShops" Showing 19 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 800 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 1,587 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 154 + Sweden Building 05K0017 + 3,150 + Sweden Building 05K0018 + 245 + Sweden Building 05K0019 + 5,600 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 292 + Sweden Building 05K0046 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0062 + 940 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 530 + Sweden Building 05K0086 + 920 + Sweden Building 05K0088 + 1,170 + Sweden Building 05K0089 + 976 + Sweden Building 05K0092 + 360 +

7

Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Heated garages (> 10 °C) Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages" Showing 15 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0002 + 900 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 400 + Sweden Building 05K0020 + 300 + Sweden Building 05K0022 + 3,300 + Sweden Building 05K0031 + 2,331 + Sweden Building 05K0033 + 465 + Sweden Building 05K0035 + 1,276 + Sweden Building 05K0037 + 130 + Sweden Building 05K0039 + 580 + Sweden Building 05K0047 + 1,076 + Sweden Building 05K0048 + 340 + Sweden Building 05K0061 + 90 + Sweden Building 05K0067 + 856 + Sweden Building 05K0093 + 2,880 +

8

Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaOffices FloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaOffices" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 5,000 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,360 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,150 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 13,048 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 21,765 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,500 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 33,955 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 14,080 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 20,978 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 15,632 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,101 +

9

Property:Building/FloorAreaTotal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaTotal FloorAreaTotal Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Total Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaTotal" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) S Sweden Building 05K0001 + 19,657 + Sweden Building 05K0002 + 7,160 + Sweden Building 05K0003 + 4,454 + Sweden Building 05K0004 + 25,650 + Sweden Building 05K0005 + 2,260 + Sweden Building 05K0006 + 14,348 + Sweden Building 05K0007 + 24,155 + Sweden Building 05K0008 + 7,800 + Sweden Building 05K0009 + 34,755 + Sweden Building 05K0010 + 437 + Sweden Building 05K0011 + 15,300 + Sweden Building 05K0012 + 22,565 + Sweden Building 05K0013 + 19,551 + Sweden Building 05K0014 + 1,338.3 + Sweden Building 05K0015 + 1,550 + Sweden Building 05K0016 + 2,546 +

10

Production system improvement : floor area reduction and cycle time analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A medical device company challenged a research team to reduce the manufacturing floor space required for an occlusion system product by one third. The team first cataloged equipment location and size, detailed the processes ...

Peterson, Jennifer J. (Jennifer Jeanne)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C Pages using the property "Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises" Showing 6 pages using this property. S Sweden Building 05K0021 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0050 + 760 + Sweden Building 05K0058 + 1,200 + Sweden Building 05K0080 + 2,000 + Sweden Building 05K0081 + 700 + Sweden Building 05K0102 + 234 + Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Property:Building/FloorAreaUnheatedRentedPremises&oldid=285964#SMWResults" What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load)

12

Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for 24-hour health services Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleProperty:Building...

13

Construction of a global disaggregated dataset of building energy use and floor area in 2010  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presents the construction of a dataset of energy use in 2010 by buildings in 10 regions spanning the entire world, broken down by sector (residential and commercial), end use (space heating, space cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, and miscellaneous (mostly plug) loads) and energy source (fossil fuels, district heat, biofuels, solar and geothermal heat, and electricity). Combined with estimates of the residential and commercial floor area and of population in each region, this 4-dimensional disaggregation gives an estimate of building energy intensities (kWh/m2/yr) or per capita energy use for each end use/energy source combination in each sector and region. This dataset provides a starting point that can be used in scenarios of future building energy demand but also serves to highlight discrepancies, uncertainties, and areas where improved data collection is needed.

L.D. Danny Harvey; Katarina Korytarova; Oswaldo Lucon; Volha Roshchanka

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

AHA! Adaptive Hypermedia for All Paul De Bra*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at educational applications. Previous developments on the AHA system (De Bra & Calvi, 1998) and the AHAM model

De Bra, Paul

15

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency Agency/Company /Organization: Pew Center on Global Climate Change Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Topics: Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learned/best practices Website: www.pewclimate.org/docUploads/PEW_EnergyEfficiency_FullReport.pdf References: From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy Efficiency[1] FROM SHOP FLOOR TO TOP FLOOR: BEST BUSINESS PRACTICES IN ENERGY EFFICIENCY. Pew Center on Global Climate Change. William R. Prindle. April 2010. In the last decade, rising and volatile energy prices coupled with

16

AHA! meets AHAM Paul De Bra, Ad Aerts, David Smits, and Natalia Stash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AHA! meets AHAM Paul De Bra, Ad Aerts, David Smits, and Natalia Stash Department of Computer the features of most existing hypertext systems in a single, formal reference model. Likewise, the AHAM model] with the condition-action rules that were introduced in AHAM [8]. This results in a more versatile adaptation engine

De Bra, Paul

17

First Floor1 Second Floor2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource Center Financial Counseling & Infusion Center Scheduling Lactation Room Meditation Garden Infusion Center Clinical Lab Waiting Playground Registration Infusion Center Waiting Second Floor Research Tower . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Conference Room 2250 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Second Financial Counseling & Infusion

Gleeson, Joseph G.

18

AHAM: A Dexterbased Reference Model for Adaptive Paul De Bra \\Lambda , GeertJan Houben y and Hongjing Wu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AHAM: A Dexter­based Reference Model for Adaptive Hypermedia Paul De Bra \\Lambda , Geert­Jan Houben, called AHAM, which encompasses most features supported by adaptive systems that exist today in order to be able to explain AHAM rather than formally specify it. AHAM augments Dex­ ter with features

De Bra, Paul

19

AHAM: A Dexterbased Reference Model for Adaptive Paul De Bra \\Lambda , GeertJan Houben y and Hongjing Wu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AHAM: A Dexter­based Reference Model for Adaptive Hypermedia Paul De Bra \\Lambda , Geert­Jan Houben applications. In this paper we describe a reference model for adaptive hy­ permedia applications, called AHAM to be able to explain AHAM rather than formally specify it. AHAM aug­ ments Dexter with features for doing

Houben, Geert-Jan

20

FishNet: Finding and Maintaining Information on the Net Paul De Bra 1 and Pim Lemmens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FishNet: Finding and Maintaining Information on the Net Paul De Bra 1 and Pim Lemmens Department whether links are still valid and whether documents they point to have been modified or moved. ffl Fish of a given set of (addresses of) documents. FishNet keeps track of the evolution of a domain of interest

De Bra, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Design of a flooring removal system for asbestos backed flooring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DESIGN OF A FLOORING REMOVAL SYSTEM FOR ASBESTOS BACKED FLOORING A Thesis bi PATHANJALI SAI PUDURU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AJsM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering DESIGN OF A FLOORING REIyIOVAL SYSTEUil F' OR ASBESTOS BACKED FLOORING A Thesis PATHAX. JALI SAI Pl DI. RF Approved as to style ansi r ontent bp David G. . ansson (C'barr of C'omrnittee) Alan...

Puduru, Pathanjali Sai

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Thermal capacity of composite floor slabs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Thermal building simulation tools take account of the thermal capacity of the walls and floors by a one-dimensional characterization. The objective was to obtain thermal equivalent parameters for ribbed or composite slab elements that can be input into one-dimensional models. Method Transient finite element calculations (FEM) were used to establish the heat transfer to and from composite floors using four deck profiles and for daily heating cycles in compartments with defined heat gains and operating conditions. Results The performance of composite slabs was compared to a concrete flat slab for a typical office in the UK and Germany. It was shown that a deep ribbed slab generates a maximum heat flux of 30.5W/m2 for a 5C temperature variation about the mean, and that the daily heat absorbed by a typical composite slab was 220Wh/m2 floor area. Conclusions Using the thermal capacity of the ribbed floor slabs, the comfort conditions defined in terms of the number of hours over 25C are acceptable for many classes of offices. Practical implications Thermally equivalent properties of ribbed slabs can be used in conventional software to predict the thermal performance.

B. Doering; C. Kendrick; R.M. Lawson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

XGSP-Floor: Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 XGSP-Floor: Floor Control for Synchronous and Ubiquitous Collaboration Kangseok Kim1, 2 , Wenjun of software/hardware technologies and wireless networking, there is coming a need for ubiquitous collaboration computing paradigms and collaborative applications, a workspace for working together is being expanded from

24

Vibrations of raised access floors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raised access floors play a critical role in modern cleanroom design. They have unique mechanical properties that make them respond to dynamic loading in a manner quite different from conventional floors. For example an unbraced floor is much more flexible horizontally than in the vertical direction. Horizontal vibration amplitudes with walker excitation may exceed 100??m/s in an unbraced floor exceeding the sensitivity of 1000 inspection microscopes by as much as an order of magnitude. Issues such as these become important when moderately vibration?sensitive instruments such as optical microscopes are supported on access floors typically the case in cleanrooms. This paper presents results of experimental studies involving a 3?m3?m segment of floor and a large floor installed in a cleanroom both of which were subjected to dynamic loads using a shaker. Both drive?point and propagation properties were examined. In addition data are presented for variations in bracing and bolting using the 3?m3?m segment.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Efficiency This document is the presentation delivered on the Pew Center on Global Climate Change's report From Shop Floor to Top Floor: Best Business Practices in Energy...

26

AREA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

AREA AREA FAQ # Question Response 316 vs DCAA FAQ 1 An inquiry from CH about an SBIR recipient asking if a DCAA audit is sufficient to comply with the regulation or if they need to add this to their audit they have performed yearly by a public accounting firm. 316 audits are essentially A-133 audits for for-profit entities. They DO NOT replace DCAA or other audits requested by DOE to look at indirect rates or incurred costs or closeouts. DCAA would never agree to perform A-133 or our 316 audits. They don't do A-133 audits for DOD awardees. The purpose of the audits are different, look at different things and in the few instances of overlap, from different perspectives. 316

27

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot's motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot's motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

SIMON: A mobile robot for floor contamination surveys  

SciTech Connect

The Robotics Development group at the Savannah River Site is developing an autonomous robot to perform radiological surveys of potentially contaminated floors. The robot scans floors at a speed of one-inch/second and stops, sounds an alarm, and flashes lights when contamination in a certain area is detected. The contamination of interest here is primarily alpha and beta-gamma. The contamination levels are low to moderate. The robot, a Cybermotion K2A, is radio controlled, uses dead reckoning to determine vehicle position, and docks with a charging station to replenish its batteries and calibrate its position. It has an ultrasonic collision avoidance system as well as two safety bumpers that will stop the robot`s motion when they are depressed. Paths for the robot are preprogrammed and the robot`s motion can be monitored on a remote screen which shows a graphical map of the environment. The radiation instrument being used is an Eberline RM22A monitor. This monitor is microcomputer based with a serial I/O interface for remote operation. Up to 30 detectors may be configured with the RM22A. For our purposes, two downward-facing gas proportional detectors are used to scan floors, and one upward-facing detector is used for radiation background compensation. SIMON is interfaced with the RM22A in such a way that it scans the floor surface at one-inch/second, and if contamination is detected, the vehicle stops, alarms, and activates a voice synthesizer. Future development includes using the contamination data collected to provide a graphical contour map of a contaminated area. 3 refs.

Dudar, E.; Teese, G.; Wagner, D.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

SCOPING SUMMARY FOR THE P-AREA OPERABLE UNIT  

SciTech Connect

This scoping summary supports development of the combined Remedial Investigation (RI)/Baseline Risk Assessment (BRA)/Feasibility Study (FS) for the P-Area Operable Unit (PAOU), or Combined document, which will be submitted on or before 09/28/2007. The objective of this Feasibility Study scoping summary meeting is to agree on the likely response actions to be evaluated and developed as alternatives in the combined document and agree on the uncertainties identified and whether they have been adequately managed.

Kupar, J; Sadika Baladi, S; Mark Amidon, M

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

30

Floor Buffer Guidelines Floor buffers can expose employees to noise, hazardous materials, and hazards related to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as possible. 3. Custodial staff should receive training on the safe operation of the machines, pads, and floor floors. 5. Select the least abrasive pad for stripping operations. 6. Do not over-strip, and stop and use of hearing protection. Propane Re-filling Only trained and qualified personnel may refill propane

de Lijser, Peter

31

MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Common Use Areas All floored areas in the building for circulation and standard facilities provided and the like. These are extracts of NWPC standard method of measurement of building areas with an addition fromSection S ANNEXURE 4 MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS MEASUREMENT OF BUILDING AREAS 1. GROSS BUILDING

Wang, Yan

32

Production system improvement : floor area reduction and inventory optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis shows improvements of a medical device production system. The demand at the Medical Device Manufacturing Company (MDMC) is low for the occlusion system product and there is a need to introduce other production ...

Yang, Tianying, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Floor tube corrosion in recovery boilers  

SciTech Connect

Lower sulfur emissions at a pulp mill result in higher sulfidity levels and in the enrichment of potassium in the mill`s liquor system. The sulfidity values at Scandinavian kraft mills previously fluctuated between 28 and 35%; today they exceed 45%. Viscosity measurements show that the viscosity decreases drastically when the sulfidity increases from 30 mole% to 40 mole%, its potassium and chlorine levels are high enough, and the char bed is low, the smelt flows easily and may penetrate the char bed, approaching the floor tubes. In extreme cases, the hot smelt destroys the layer of solidified smelt on the floor tube`s surface and reacts very rapidly with the floor tube.

Klarin, A. [A. Ahistrom Corp., Helsinki (Finland)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Floor Support | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Floor Support Floor Support Service Responsible Person BLDG Extension (650) 926-XXXX Beam Status Duty Operator 120 926-2326 (BEAM) Duty Operator Cell Duty Operator 120 926-4040 Scheduling X-ray/VUV Macromolecular Crystallography Cathy Knotts Lisa Dunn 120 120 3191 2087 User Check-In/Badging Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 User Financial Accounts Jackie Kerlegan 120 2079 Beam Lines/ VUV Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Bart Johnson 120 3858 Beam Lines/ X-ray Mechanical Chuck Troxel, Jr. 120 2700 Beam Lines/ X-ray-VUV Electronics Alex Garachtchenko 120 3440 Beam Lines/ Macromolecular Crystallography Mike Soltis 277 3050 SMB XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer Erik Nelson 274 274 4944 3938 MEIS XAS Beam Lines & Equipment Matthew Latimer

35

User ESH Support (UES)/Floor Coordinators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators User ESH Support (UES) / Floor Coordinators Bruce Glagola, Group Leader Building 431, Room Z005 Phone: 630-252-9797 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: glagola@aps.anl.gov Nena Moonier Building 431, Room Z008 Phone: 630-252-8504 Fax: 630-252-1664 E-mail: nmoonier@aps.anl.gov Karen Kucer Building 401, Room C3257C Phone: 630-252-9091 Fax: 630-252-5948 E-mail: kucer@aps.anl.gov Floor Coordinators Bruno Fieramosca Building 432, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0201 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site page: 4-0201 E-mail: bgf@aps.anl.gov Shane Flood Building 436, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0600 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0600 E-mail: saf@aps.anl.gov Patti Pedergnana Building 434, Room C001 Phone: 630-252-0401 Fax: 630-252-1664 On-site pager: 4-0401 E-mail: neitzke@aps.anl.gov Wendy VanWingeren Building 435, Room C001

36

Mechanical decontamination techniques for floor drain systems  

SciTech Connect

The unprecedented nature of cleanup activities at Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) following the 1979 accident has necessitated the development of new techniques to deal with radiation and contamination in the plant. One of these problems was decontamination of floor drain systems, which had become highly contaminated with various forms of dirt and sludge containing high levels of fission products and fuel from the damaged reactor core. The bulk of this contamination is loosely adherent to the drain pipe walls; however, significant amounts of contamination have become incorporated into pipe wall oxide and corrosion layers and embedded in microscopic pits and fissures in the pipe wall material. The need to remove this contamination was recognized early in the TMI-2 cleanup effort. A program consisting of development and laboratory testing of floor drain decontamination techniques was undertaken early in the cleanup with support from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Based on this initial research, two techniques were judged to show promise for use at TMI-2: a rotating brush hone system and a high-pressure water mole nozzle system. Actual use of these devices to clean floor drains at TMI-2 has yielded mixed decontamination results. The decontamination effectiveness that has been obtained is highly dependent on the nature of the contamination in the drain pipe and the combination of decontamination techniques used.

Palau, G.L.; Saigusa, Moriyuki

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

AEDG Implementation Recommendations: Floors | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Floors Floors The Advanced Energy Design Guide (AEDG) for Small Office Buildings, 30% series, seeks to achieve 30% savings over ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999. This guide focuses on improvements to small office buildings, less than 20,000ft2. The recommendations in this article are adapted from the implementation section of the guide and focus on mass floors; steel joist or wood frame floors; slab-on-grade floors. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 air_floors.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Commercial Code Referenced: ASHRAE Standard 90.1-1999 Document type: AEDG Implementation Recommendations Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Contractor Engineer State: All States Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

38

Statistical Analysis of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide1, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed, and the results of this analysis are reported. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2013-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

39

Statistical Analysis Of Tank 5 Floor Sample Results  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, and the radionuclide, elemental, and chemical concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogenous across composite samples.

Shine, E. P.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

STATISTICAL ANALYSIS OF TANK 5 FLOOR SAMPLE RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Sampling has been completed for the characterization of the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 in the F-Area Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site (SRS), near Aiken, SC. The sampling was performed by Savannah River Remediation (SRR) LLC using a stratified random sampling plan with volume-proportional compositing. The plan consisted of partitioning the residual material on the floor of Tank 5 into three non-overlapping strata: two strata enclosed accumulations, and a third stratum consisted of a thin layer of material outside the regions of the two accumulations. Each of three composite samples was constructed from five primary sample locations of residual material on the floor of Tank 5. Three of the primary samples were obtained from the stratum containing the thin layer of material, and one primary sample was obtained from each of the two strata containing an accumulation. This report documents the statistical analyses of the analytical results for the composite samples. The objective of the analysis is to determine the mean concentrations and upper 95% confidence (UCL95) bounds for the mean concentrations for a set of analytes in the tank residuals. The statistical procedures employed in the analyses were consistent with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) technical guidance by Singh and others [2010]. Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) measured the sample bulk density, nonvolatile beta, gross alpha, radionuclide, inorganic, and anion concentrations three times for each of the composite samples. The analyte concentration data were partitioned into three separate groups for further analysis: analytes with every measurement above their minimum detectable concentrations (MDCs), analytes with no measurements above their MDCs, and analytes with a mixture of some measurement results above and below their MDCs. The means, standard deviations, and UCL95s were computed for the analytes in the two groups that had at least some measurements above their MDCs. The identification of distributions and the selection of UCL95 procedures generally followed the protocol in Singh, Armbya, and Singh [2010]. When all of an analyte's measurements lie below their MDCs, only a summary of the MDCs can be provided. The measurement results reported by SRNL are listed in Appendix A, and the results of this analysis are reported in Appendix B. The data were generally found to follow a normal distribution, and to be homogeneous across composite samples.

Shine, E.

2012-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Behavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gravity based sys- tems suspension mechanisms or linear spring based systems coil springs or rubber unitsBehavior of Bidirectional Spring Unit in Isolated Floor Systems Shenlei Cui, M.ASCE1 ; Michel of bidirectional spring units used as isolators in a kind of isolated floor system, three types of characterization

Bruneau, Michel

42

Improvement in impact insulation ratings of common floor/ceiling assemblies in multi?family dwellings with standard floor coverings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improvement in the field?rated impact insulation class [FIIC] was measured for several common floor/ceiling assemblies in existing multi?family buildings utilizing several standard grades of carpet pad and various vinyl products. Testing included determination of FIIC ratings with existing floor coverings and with other more effective floor coverings including ordinary cushioned vinyl thickly cushion?backed vinyl and vinyl products with fiber board and particle board underlayment. Test results indicate that a significant improvement in the FIIC ratings of existing vinyl covered floor/ceiling assemblies can be achieved by the superposition of an appropriate cushioned vinyl on top of the existing standard vinyl. The test results also indicate that a significant increase in FIIC ratings of existing carpeted floor/ceiling assemblies can be achieved by appropriate selection of new pad and carpet. Test data from measurements performed in accordance with ISO recommendation R140 are presented in the paper for several representative configurations.

Stanley M. Rosen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Dubbla miljml, dubbelt s bra?.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? D bde arbetet fr att snka koldioxidutslppen och fr att ka andelen frnybar energiproduktion pverkar energimarknaden, finns anledning att misstnka att vissa konflikter kan (more)

Spector, Erik

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout NSLS-II Source Properties and Floor Layout April 12, 2010 Contents Basic Storage Ring Parameters Basic and Advanced Source Parameters Brightness Flux Photon Source Size and Divergence Power Infrared Sources Distribution of Sources Available for User Beamlines Floor Layout This document provides a summary of the current NSLS-II source and floor layout parameters. For a more complete description of the NSLS-II accelerator properties planned for NSLS-II, see the NSLS-II Preliminary Design Report Basic NSLS-II Storage Ring Parameters at NSLS-II website. We note that this document summarizes the present status of the design, but that the design continues to be refined and that these parameters may change as part of this process. NSLS-II is designed to deliver photons with high average spectral brightness in the 2 keV to 10 keV

45

Full-scale shear tests of embedded floor modules  

SciTech Connect

A floor module used to support a centrifuge machine is a steel framework embedded in a 2-ft (610-mm) thick concrete slab. This steel framework is made up of four cylindrical hollow sockets tied together with four S-beams to form a square pattern. In the event of a centrifuge machine wreck, large forces are transmitted from the machine to the corner sockets (through connecting steel lugs) and to the concrete slab. The floor modules are loaded with a combination of torsion and shear forces in the plane of the floor slab. Precisely how these wreck loads are transmitted to, and reacted by, the floor modules and the surrounding concrete was the scope of a series of full-scale tests performed at the DOE Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plant (GCEP) located near Piketon, Ohio. This report describes the tests and the results of the data reduction to date.

Fricke, K.E.; Jones, W.D.; Burdette, E.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Energy Saving in Office Building by Floor Integration System: Reducing Total Energy of HVAC and Lighting system using daylight Speaker(s): Yoshifumi Murakami Date: May 20, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Naoya Motegi Information Technology that is featured by standard communication protocol like Lon Works, BACnet is very useful for managing building systems. Now we can collect much data quickly and easily and to analyze them in detail with this technology. Under the circumstances in that saving energy and reducing CO2 are required strongly, important thing is finding the effective information for building operation and control from collected data and the analysis of them. In our project, the floor integration controller that integrates the each building systems was proposed. It

47

Viscosity Control of the Composition of Ocean Floor Volcanics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

4 February 1971 research-article Viscosity Control of the Composition of Ocean Floor...environment. Instead it is postulated that the viscosity exercises a control by limiting the range...magmas (to those with a sufficiently low viscosity) which is capable of penetrating the...

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

716 Langdon St 2nd Floor Red Gym  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

716 Langdon St 2nd Floor Red Gym Madison WI 53706 (608) 262-4503 http://msc.wisc.edu 1 FOLLOW OUR of witnesses may always go before you and walk beside you. We bestow a red and white kente stole upon all of our graduates. Red, for passion and sacrifice. White, for initiation and new beginnings. Each stole

Sheridan, Jennifer

49

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Visopt ShopFloor System: Integrating Planning into Production Scheduling Roman Barták Charles, the first machine pre-processes the item (3 time units) that is finished in the second machine (additional 3 in parallel and a worker is required (left) or via a serial production when the item is pre- processed

Bartak, Roman

50

Prototype development of an apparatus to locate and map sea floor petroleum seepages. First quarterly technical progress report, August 1, 1995--October 31, 1995  

SciTech Connect

This document is the first quarterly technical progress report for the project entitled {open_quotes}Prototype Development of an Apparatus to Locate and Map Sea Floor Petroleum Seepages{close_quotes}. This report describes progress in three areas: electronic design, mechanical design, and experiment/research.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Lunar floor-fractured craters: Classification, distribution, origin and implications for magmatism and shallow crustal structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floor-Fractured Craters (FFCs) are a class of lunar craters characterized by anomalously shallow floors cut by radial, concentric, and/or polygonal fractures; additional interior features are moats, ridges, and patches of ...

Jozwiak, Lauren M.

52

Thermal Behavior of Floor Tubes in a Kraft Recovery Boiler  

SciTech Connect

The temperatures of floor tubes in a slope-floored black liquor recovery boiler were measured using an array of thermocouples located on the tube crowns. It was found that sudden, short duration temperature increases occurred with a frequency that increased with distance from the spout wall. To determine if the temperature pulses were associated with material falling from the convective section of the boiler, the pattern of sootblower operation was recorded and compared with the pattern of temperature pulses. During the period from September, 1998, through February, 1999, it was found that more than 2/3 of the temperature pulses occurred during the time when one of the fast eight sootblowers, which are directed at the back of the screen tubes and the leading edge of the first superheater bank, was operating.

Barker, R.E.; Choudhury, K.A.; Gorog, J.P.; Hall, L.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Sarma, G.B.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

53

Accelerated Wear Tests on Common Floor-covering Materials.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

materials indicated there are variations in the changes of appearance and wear in these materials. Solid sheet vinyls and rubber tiles showed significantly less wear than asphalt tiles, vinyl- asbestos tiles, linoleums and cork. Asphalt tiles showed... in home installations. Six common floor covering materials-solid .sheet vinyls, rubber tiles, vinyl-asbestos tiles, J linoleums, corks and asphalt tiles-were used to construct 63 test specimens 2 x 2 feet in size. 1 T'ariations in specimens were...

Stewart, B. R.; Kunze, O. R.; Hobgood, Price.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Refinishing contamination floors in Spent Nuclear Fuels storage basins  

SciTech Connect

The floors of the K Basins at the Hanford Site are refinished to make decontamination easier if spills occur as the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) is being unloaded from the basins for shipment to dry storage. Without removing the contaminated existing coating, the basin floors are to be coated with an epoxy coating material selected on the basis of the results of field tests of several paint products. The floor refinishing activities must be reviewed by a management review board to ensure that work can be performed in a controlled manner. Major documents prepared for management board review include a report on maintaining radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable, a waste management plan, and reports on hazard classification and unreviewed safety questions. To protect personnel working in the radiation zone, Operational Health Physics prescribed the required minimum protective methods and devices in the radiological work permit. Also, industrial hygiene safety must be analyzed to establish respirator requirements for persons working in the basins. The procedure and requirements for the refinishing work are detailed in a work package approved by all safety engineers. After the refinishing work is completed, waste materials generated from the refinishing work must be disposed of according to the waste management plan.

Huang, F.F.; Moore, F.W.

1997-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

55

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements six months into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Analysis and repair attempts of the VLA used in the deep water deployment during October 2003 have been completed; Definition of an interface protocol for the VLA DATS to the SFO has been established; Design modifications to allow integration of the VLA to the SFO have been made; Experience gained in the deployments of the first VLA is being applied to the design of the next VLAs; One of the two planned new VLAs being modified to serve as an Oceanographic Line Array (OLA). (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: The decision to replace the Sea Floor Probe technology with the borehole emplacement of a geophysical array was reversed due to the 1300m water depth at the JIP selected borehole site. The SFP concept has been revisited as a deployment technique for the subsea floor array; The SFP has been redesigned to include gravity driven emplacement of an array up to 10m into the shallow subsurface of the sea floor. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes; Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor; A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: The initial Inductive Conductivity Cell has been constructed from components acquired during the previous reporting period; Laboratory tests involving measuring bubble volume as a component of conductivity have been performed; The laboratory tests were performed in a closed system, under controlled conditions; the relationship between voltage and bubble volume appears to be linear. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Designs and construction schematics for all electronic mounting pieces and an electronics system baseplate were finalized after extensive modeling to facilitate the successful fabrication and implementation of electronic components into the deep-sea, glass instrument housing; Construction schematics and fabrication of an electronics system baseplate have been completed with successful integration of all currently fabricated electronic mounting pieces; Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' has commenced; A second generation chemometric data evaluation software package for evaluating complex spectra including corrections for baseline drifts and spectral anomalies resulting from matrix substances has been developed and will be incorporated into an optimized ''deepSniff'' program upon c

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health, was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical, geological, and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. These delays caused scheduling and deployments difficulties but many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). The CMRET has conducted one very significant research cruise during this reporting period: a March cruise to perform sea trials of the Station Service Device (SSD), the custom Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) built to perform several of the unique functions required for the observatory to become fully operational. March's efforts included test deployments of the SSD and Florida Southern University's mass spectrometer designed to measure hydrocarbon gases in the water column and The University of Georgia's microbial collector. The University of Georgia's rotational sea-floor camera was retrieved as was Specialty Devices storm monitor array. The former was deployed in September and the latter in June, 2006. Both were retrieved by acoustic release from a dispensable weight. Cruise participants also went prepared to recover any and all instruments left on the sea-floor during the September Johnson SeaLink submersible cruise. One of the pore-fluid samplers, a small ''peeper'' was retrieved successfully and in fine condition. Other instrumentation was left on the sea-floor until modifications of the SSD are complete and a return cruise is accomplished.

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas M. McGee; Carol Blanton Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

57

Basin-floor fans in the North Sea: Sequence stratigraphic models vs. sedimentary facies  

SciTech Connect

Examination of nearly 12,000 feet (3658m) of conventional core from Paleogene and Cretaceous deep-water sandstone reservoirs cored in 50 wells in 10 different areas or fields in the North Sea and adjacent regions reveals that these reservoirs are predominantly composed of mass-transport deposits, mainly sandy slumps and sandy debris flows. Sedimentary features indicating slump and debris-flow origin include sand units with sharp upper contacts; slump folds; discordant, steeply dipping layers (up to 60{degrees}); glide planes; shear zones; brecciated clasts; clastic injections; floating mudstone clasts; planar clast fabric; inverse grading of clasts; and moderate-to-high matrix content (5-30%). This model predicts that basin-floor fans are predominantly composed of sand-rich turbidites with laterally extensive, sheetlike geometries. However, calibration of sedimentary facies in our long (400-700 feet) cores with seismic and wire-line-log signatures through several of these basin-floor fans (including the Gryphon-Forth, Frigg, and Faeroe areas) shows that these features are actually composed almost exclusively of mass-transport deposits consisting mainly of slumps and debris flows. Distinguishing deposits of mass-transport processes, such as debris flows, from those of turbidity currents has important implications for predicting reservoir geometry. Debris flows, which have plastic flow rheology, can form discontinuous, disconnected sand bodies that are harder to delineate and less economical to develop than deposits of fluidal turbidity currents, which potentially produce more laterally continuous, interconnected sand bodies. Process sedimentological interpretation of conventional core is commonly critical for determining the true origin and distribution of reservoir sands.

Shanmugam, G.; Bloch, R.B. [Mobil Research and Development Corp., Dallas, TX (United States); Mitchell, S.M. [Mobil Exploration and Producing US, Inc., Dallas, TX (United States); Beamish, G.W.J.; Shields, K.E. [Mobil North Sea Ltd., London (United Kingdom); Hodgkinson, R.J.; Straume, T.; Syvertsen, S.E. [Mobil Exploration Norway, Inc., Stavanger (Norway); Damuth, J.E. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The Consortium is administered by the Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET, at the University of Mississippi. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2007, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the marine environment, including sea water and sea-floor sediments, on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. In 2005, biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health was added to the mission of the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has now achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort was made to locate and retain the services of a suitable vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) following the storms and the loss of the contracted vessel, the M/V Ocean Quest and its two submersibles, but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

J. Robert Woolsey; Tom McGee; Carol Lutken; Elizabeth Stidham

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has already succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. As funding for this project, scheduled to commence December 1, 2002, had only been in place for less than half of the reporting period, project progress has been less than for other reporting periods. Nevertheless, significant progress has been made and several cruises are planned for the summer/fall of 2003 to test equipment, techniques and compatibility of systems. En route to reaching the primary goal of the Consortium, the establishment of a monitoring station on the sea floor, the following achievements have been made: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, Incorporation of capability to map the bottom location of the VLA, Improvements in timing issues for data recording. (2) Sea Floor Probe: The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed; The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments. (3) Electromagnetic bubble detector and counter: Initial tests performed with standard conductivity sensors detected nonconductive objects as small as .6mm, a very encouraging result, Components for the prototype are being assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed. (4) Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate; these measurements will be used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station; A scattering system and bubble-producing device, being assembled at USM, will be tested in the next two months, and the results compared to a physical scattering model. (5) Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: Progress has been made toward minimizing system maintenance through increased capacity and operational longevity, Miniaturization of many components of the sensor systems has been completed, A software package has been designed especially for the MIR sensor data evaluation, Custom electronics have been developed that reduce power consumption and, therefore, increase the length of time the system can remain operational. (6) Seismo-acoustic characterization of sea floor properties and processes at the hydrate monitoring station. (7) Adaptation of the acoustic-logging device, developed as part of the European Union-funded research project, Sub-Gate, for monitoring temporal variations in seabe

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

THERMAL EVALUATION OF CONTAMINATED LIQUID ONTO CELL FLOORS  

SciTech Connect

For the Salt Disposition Integration Project (SDIP), postulated events in the new Salt Waste Processing Facility (SWPF) can result in spilling liquids that contain Cs-137 and organics onto cell floors. The parameters of concern are the maximum temperature of the fluid following a spill and the time required for the maximum fluid temperature to be reached. Control volume models of the various process cells have been developed using standard conduction and natural convection relationships. The calculations are performed using the Mathcad modeling software. The results are being used in Consolidated Hazards Analysis Planning (CHAP) to determine the controls that may be needed to mitigate the potential impact of liquids containing Cs-137 and flammable organics that spill onto cell floors. Model development techniques and the ease of making model changes within the Mathcad environment are discussed. The results indicate that certain fluid spills result in overheating of the fluid, but the times to reach steady-state are several hundred hours. The long times allow time for spill clean up without the use of expensive mitigation controls.

(NOEMAIL), J

2009-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of composite tube cracking in recovery boiler floors  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of co-extruded (generally identified as composite) floor tubes in kraft black liquor recovery boilers was first observed in Scandinavia, but this problem has now been found in many North American boilers. In most cases, cracking in the outer 304L stainless steel has not progressed into the carbon steel, but the potential for such crack propagation is a cause of concern. A multidimensional study has been initiated to characterize the cracking seen in composite floor tubes, to measure the residual stresses resulting from composite tube fabrication, and to predict the stresses in tubes under operating conditions. The characterization studies include review of available reports and documents on composite tube cracking, metallographic examination of a substantial number of cracked tubes, and evaluation of the dislocation structure in cracked tubes. Neutron and X-ray diffraction are being used to determine the residual stresses in composite tubes from two major manufacturers, and finite element analysis is being used to predict the stresses in the tubes during normal operation and under conditions where thermal fluctuations occur.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hubbard, C.R.; Swindeman, R.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Singbeil, D.L.; Prescott, R. [Pulp and Paper Research Inst. of Canada, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 22, 2007 ... block diagram shows the location and dimensions of the building and .... where the material handling transportation between floors is executed...

Marc Goetschalckx and Takashi Irohara

2007-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

63

Efficient Formulations for the Multi-Floor Facility Layout Problem with ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Feb 28, 2007 ... Abstract: The block layout problem for a multi-floor facility is an important sub ... Category 2: Applications -- OR and Management Sciences...

Marc Goetschalckx

2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF BI-DIRECTIONAL SPRING UNIT IN ISOLATED FLOOR SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) or linear spring based systems (coil springs or rubber units used for restoration force), with viscousEXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF BI-DIRECTIONAL SPRING UNIT IN ISOLATED FLOOR SYSTEMS Shenlei Cui1 , Michel the mechanical behavior of bi-directional spring units used as isolators in a kind of such isolated floor systems

Bruneau, Michel

65

This bright top floor accommodation comprises: -hall with shelved storage cupboard  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This bright top floor accommodation comprises: - hall with shelved storage cupboard - fully oak flooring in the living/dining room and varnished floorboards in the hall and double bedroom regarded restaurants and a Waitrose supermarket. Recreational facilities can be found at Warrender Swimming

Edinburgh, University of

66

Numerical Simulation of Thermal Performance of Floor Radiant Heating System with Enclosed Phase Change Material  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the energy storage floor is designed,which places heat pipes in the enclosed phase change material (PCM) layer, without concrete in it. The PCM thermal storage time is studied in relation to the floor surface temperature under different low-temperature hot...

Qiu, L.; Wu, X.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Remedial investigation concept plan for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of the Army (DA) are conducting cleanup activities at two properties--the DOE chemical plant area and the DA ordnance works area (the latter includes the training area)--located in the Weldon Spring area in St. Charles County, Missouri. These areas are on the National Priorities List (NPL), and cleanup activities at both areas are conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), as amended. DOE and DA are conducting a joint remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) as part of the remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) for the groundwater operable units for the two areas. This joint effort will optimize further data collection and interpretation efforts and facilitate overall remedial decision making since the aquifer of concern is common to both areas. A Work Plan issued jointly in 1995 by DOE and the DA discusses the results of investigations completed at the time of preparation of the report. The investigations were necessary to provide an understanding of the groundwater system beneath the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area. The Work Plan also identifies additional data requirements for verification of the evaluation presented.

NONE

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to innovate research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. A year into the life of this cooperative agreement, we note the following achievements: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (A) Software and hardware upgrades to the data logger for the prototype vertical line array, including enhanced programmable gains, increased sampling rates, improved surface communications, (B) Cabling upgrade to allow installation of positioning sensors, (C) Adaptation of SDI's Angulate program to use acoustic slant ranges and DGPS data to compute and map the bottom location of the vertical array, (D) Progress in T''0'' delay and timing issues for improved control in data recording, (E) Successful deployment and recovery of the VLA twice during an October, 2003 cruise, once in 830m water, once in 1305m water, (F) Data collection and recovery from the DATS data logger, (G) Sufficient energy supply and normal functioning of the pressure compensated battery even following recharge after the first deployment, (H) Survival of the acoustic modem following both deployments though it was found to have developed a slow leak through the transducer following the second deployment due, presumably, to deployment in excess of 300m beyond its rating. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (A) The Sea Floor Probe and its delivery system, the Multipurpose sled have been completed, (B) The probe has been modified to penetrate the <1m blanket of hemipelagic ooze at the water/sea floor interface to provide the necessary coupling of the accelerometer with the denser underlying sediments, (C) The MPS has been adapted to serve as an energy source for both p- and s-wave studies at the station as well as to deploy the horizontal line arrays and the SFP. (3) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (A) Components for the prototype have been assembled, including a dedicated microcomputer to control power, readout and logging of the data, all at an acceptable speed, (B) The prototype has been constructed and preliminary data collected, (C) The construction of the field system is underway. (4) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (A) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been made from a submersible dive and the bubbles analyzed with respect to their size, number, and rise rate. These measurements have been used to determine the parameters to build the system capable of measuring gas escaping at the site of the monitoring station, (B) Laboratory tests performed using the project prototype have produced a conductivity data set that is being used to refine parameters of the field model. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (A) Preliminary designs of mounting pieces for electrical components of ''sphereIR'' have been completed using AutoCAD software, (B) The preliminary design of an electronics baseplate has been completed and aided in the optimization of

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Feasibility study for remedial action for the groundwater operable units at the chemical plant area and the ordnance works area, Weldon Spring, Missouri  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Department of Army (DA) are conducting an evaluation to identify the appropriate response action to address groundwater contamination at the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant (WSCP) and the Weldon Spring Ordnance Works (WSOW), respectively. The two areas are located in St. Charles County, about 48 km (30 rni) west of St. Louis. The groundwater operable unit (GWOU) at the WSCP is one of four operable units being evaluated by DOE as part of the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP). The groundwater operable unit at the WSOW is being evaluated by the DA as Operable Unit 2 (OU2); soil and pipeline contamination are being managed under Operable Unit 1 (OU1). Remedial activities at the WSCP and the WSOW are being conducted in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). Consistent with DOE policy, National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) values have been incorporated into the CERCLA process. A remedial investigation/feasibility study (RI/FS) work plan summarizing initial site conditions and providing site hydrogeological and exposure models was published in August of 1995 (DOE 1995). The remedial investigation (RI) and baseline risk assessment (BRA) have also recently been completed. The RI (DOE and DA 1998b) discusses in detail the nature, extent, fate, and transport of groundwater and spring water contamination. The BRA (DOE and DA 1998a) is a combined baseline assessment of potential human health and ecological impacts and provides the estimated potential health risks and ecological impacts associated with groundwater and springwater contamination if no remedial action were taken. This feasibility study (FS) has been prepared to evaluate potential options for addressing groundwater contamination at the WSCP and the WSOW. A brief description of the history and environmental setting of the sites is presented in Section 1.1, key information relative to the nature and extent of contamination is presented in Section 1.2, and the results of the BRA are summarized in Section 1.3. The objective of this FS is discussed in Section 1.4, and preliminary remediation goals are identified in Section 1.5. The organization of the remaining chapters of this FS is outlined in Section 1.6.

NONE

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China HVAC Technologies for Energy Efficiency, Vol. IV-11-4 Experimental Study of the Floor Radiant Cooling System Combined with Displacement Ventilation Yanli Ren1, Deying Li2, Yufeng Zhang1 1...

Ren, Y.; Li, D.; Zhang, Y.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Thermal performance of phase change material energy storage floor for active solar water-heating system  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conventional active solar water-heating floor system contains a big water tank to store energy in the day time for heating at night, which takes much building space and is very heavy. In order to reduce the w...

Ruolang Zeng; Xin Wang; Wei Xiao

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Production system improvement at a medical devices company : floor layout reduction and manpower analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the low demand and the need to introduce other production lines in the floor, the medical devices company wants to optimize the utilization of space and manpower for the occlusion system product. This thesis shows ...

AlEisa, Abdulaziz A. (Abdulaziz Asaad)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Development of an NC equipment level controller in a hierarchical shop floor control system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The methodology of developing an NC equipment controller in a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) System, which is based on a philosophy of hierarchical shop floor control, is presented in this research. The underlying architecture consists...

Chang, William

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

74

Combined Operation of Solar Energy Source Heat Pump, Low-vale Electricity and Floor Radiant System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar energy, low-vale electricity as heat sources in a floor radiant system are analyzed. This paper presents a new heat pump system and discusses its operational modes in winter....

Liu, G.; Guo, Z.; Hu, S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research. The primary objective of the group has been to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (MS/SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission, although unavoidably delayed by hurricanes and other disturbances, necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station has always included the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. This possibility has recently achieved reality via the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology's (NIUST) solicitation for proposals for research to be conducted at the MS/SFO. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in the arena of gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. The observatory has achieved a microbial dimension in addition to the geophysical and geochemical components it had already included. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in Mississippi Canyon 118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, have had to be postponed and the use of the vessel M/V Ocean Quest and its two manned submersibles sacrificed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. Every effort is being made to locate and retain the services of a replacement vessel and submersibles or Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) but these efforts have been fruitless due to the demand for these resources in the tremendous recovery effort being made in the Gulf area. Station/observatory completion, anticipated for 2007, will likely be delayed by at least one year. The seafloor monitoring station/observatory is funded approximately equally by three federal Agencies: Minerals Management Services (MMS) of the Department of the Interior (DOI), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) of the Department of Energy (DOE), and the National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology (NIUST), an agency of the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Subcontractors with FY03 funding fulfilled their technical reporting requirements in the previous report (41628R10). Only unresolved matching funds issues remain and will be addressed in the report of the University of Mississippi's Office of Research and Sponsored Programs.

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis; Bob A. Hardage; Jeffrey Chanton; Rudy Rogers

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT  

SciTech Connect

A Consortium, designed to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research, has been established at the University of Mississippi's Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology, CMRET. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico by the year 2005, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor. This mission necessitates assembling a station that will monitor physical and chemical parameters of the sea water and sea floor sediments on a more-or-less continuous basis over an extended period of time. Development of the station allows for the possibility of expanding its capabilities to include biological monitoring, as a means of assessing environmental health. Establishment of the Consortium has succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among researchers in this relatively new research arena. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative research methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Noteworthy achievements one year into the extended life of this cooperative agreement include: (1) Progress on the vertical line array (VLA) of sensors: (1a) Repair attempts of the VLA cable damaged in the October >1000m water depth deployment failed; a new design has been tested successfully. (1b) The acoustic modem damaged in the October deployment was repaired successfully. (1c) Additional acoustic modems with greater depth rating and the appropriate surface communications units have been purchased. (1d) The VLA computer system is being modified for real time communications to the surface vessel using radio telemetry and fiber optic cable. (1e) Positioning sensors--including compass and tilt sensors--were completed and tested. (1f) One of the VLAs has been redesigned to collect near sea floor geochemical data. (2) Progress on the Sea Floor Probe: (2a) With the Consortium's decision to divorce its activities from those of the Joint Industries Program (JIP), due to the JIP's selection of a site in 1300m of water, the Sea Floor Probe (SFP) system was revived as a means to emplace arrays in the shallow subsurface until arrangements can be made for boreholes at >1000m water depth. (2b) The SFP penetrometer has been designed and construction begun. (2c) The SFP geophysical and pore-fluid probes have been designed. (3) Progress on the Acoustic Systems for Monitoring Gas Hydrates: (3a) Video recordings of bubbles emitted from a seep in Mississippi Canyon have been analyzed for effects of currents and temperature changes. (3b) Several acoustic monitoring system concepts have been evaluated for their appropriateness to MC118, i.e., on the deep sea floor. (3c) A mock-up system was built but was rejected as too impractical for deployment on the sea floor. (4) Progress on the Electromagnetic Bubble Detector and Counter: (4a) Laboratory tests were performed using bubbles of different sizes in waters of different salinities to test the sensitivity of the. Differences were detected satisfactorily. (4b) The system was field tested, first at the dock and then at the shallow water test site at Cape Lookout Bight where methane bubbles from the sea floor, naturally, in 10m water depth. The system successfully detected peaks in bubbling as spike decreases in conductivity. (5) Progress on the Mid-Infrared Sensor for Continuous Methane Monitoring: (5a) Modeling and design of an optics platform complementary to the constructed electronics platform for successful incorporation into ''sphereIR'' continues. AutoCAD design and manual construction of mounting pieces for major optical components have been completed. (5b) Initial design concepts for IR-ATR sensor probe geometries have been established and evaluated. Initial evaluations of a horizontal ATR (HATR) sensing probe with fiber optic guiding light have been performed and validate the design concept as a potentially viable deep sea sensing pr

Paul Higley; J. Robert Woolsey; Ralph Goodman; Vernon Asper; Boris Mizaikoff; Angela Davis

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Human Resources Office Dalia Bldg. 2nd Floor,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for rainfed and irrigated environments in the dry areas of West Asia-North Africa (WANA) and the Nile valley for the improvement of bread and durum wheat within Central and West Asia and North Africa (CWANA) as part

78

Human Resources Office Dalia Bldg. 2nd Floor,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Dry Areas (ICARDA) is an international autonomous, non-profit, research organization temporarily based and structures Up to date knowledge of advanced tools and techniques for measuring wind and water erosion

79

Variable area light reflecting assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Device is described for tracking daylight and projecting it into a building. The device tracks the sun and automatically adjusts both the orientation and area of the reflecting surface. The device may be mounted in either a wall or roof of a building. Additionally, multiple devices may be employed in a light shaft in a building, providing daylight to several different floors. The preferred embodiment employs a thin reflective film as the reflecting device. One edge of the reflective film is fixed, and the opposite end is attached to a spring-loaded take-up roller. As the sun moves across the sky, the take-up roller automatically adjusts the angle and surface area of the film. Additionally, louvers may be mounted at the light entrance to the device to reflect incoming daylight in an angle perpendicular to the device to provide maximum reflective capability when daylight enters the device at non-perpendicular angles. 9 figs.

Howard, T.C.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

80

Dark Matter vs. Neutrinos: The effect of astrophysical uncertainties and timing information on the neutrino floor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Future multi-tonne Direct Detection experiments will be sensitive to solar neutrino induced nuclear recoils which form an irreducible background to light Dark Matter searches. Indeed for masses around 6 GeV the spectra of neutrinos and Dark Matter are so similar that experiments will run into a neutrino floor, for which sensitivity increases only marginally with exposure past a certain cross section. In this work we show that this floor can be overcome using the different annual modulation expected from solar neutrinos and Dark Matter. Specifically for cross sections below the neutrino floor the DM signal is observable through a phase shift and a smaller amplitude for the time-dependent event rate. This allows the exclusion power to be improved by up to an order of magnitude for large exposures. In addition we demonstrate that the neutrino floor exists over a wider mass range than has been previously shown, since the large uncertainties in the Dark Matter velocity distribution make the signal spectrum harder to distinguish from the neutrino background. However for most velocity distributions the neutrino floor can still be surpassed using timing information, though certain velocity streams may prove problematic.

Jonathan H. Davis

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Heat pumps and under floor heating as a heating system for Finnish low-rise residential buildings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In bachelors thesis the study of under floor heating system with ground source heat pump for the heat transfers fluid heating is considered. The case (more)

Chuduk, Svetlana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Report on Analysis of Forest Floor Bulk Density and Depth at the Savannah River Site.  

SciTech Connect

The forest floor data from the Savannah River Site consists of two layers, the litter layer and the duff layer. The purpose for the study was to determine bulk density conversion factors to convert litter and duff depth values in inches to forest floor fuel values in tons per acre. The primary objective was to collect litter and duff samples to adequately characterize forest floor depth and bulk density for combinations of 4 common forest types (loblolly/slash pine, longleaf pine, pine and hardwood mix, upland hardwood), 3 age classes (5-20, 20-40, 40+ years old) and 3 categories of burning history (0-3, 3-10, 10+ years since last burn).

Bernard R. Parresol

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Theory and practice of continuous improvement in shop-floor teams  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most publications about Continuous Improvement (CI) stress the importance, and describe practical applications, of CI. Practicable, i.e. useful and usable, theories that help organisations to make appropriate decisions when adopting, implementing, operating and continuously improving a CI system are relatively few. Concentrating on one particular form of CI, i.e., shop-floor improvement teams, the aim of the present article is to contribute to the development of such a practicable theory about CI. Based on insights given by contingency theory and empirical observations, the article explores and explains the functioning of shop-floor improvement teams and their contribution to the CI.

Ellen de Lange-Ros; Harry Boer

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities of Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project  

SciTech Connect

The Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) was established in 1999 to assemble leaders in gas hydrates research that shared the need for a way to conduct investigations of gas hydrates and their stability zone in the Gulf of Mexico in situ on a more-or-less continuous basis. The primary objective of the group is to design and emplace a remote monitoring station or sea floor observatory (SFO) on the sea floor in the northern Gulf of Mexico, in an area where gas hydrates are known to be present at, or just below, the sea floor and to discover the configuration and composition of the subsurface pathways or 'plumbing' through which fluids migrate into and out of the hydrate stability zone (HSZ) to the sediment-water interface. Monitoring changes in this zone and linking them to coincident and perhaps consequent events at the seafloor and within the water column is the eventual goal of the Consortium. This mission includes investigations of the physical, chemical and biological components of the gas hydrate stability zone - the sea-floor/sediment-water interface, the near-sea-floor water column, and the shallow subsurface sediments. The eventual goal is to monitor changes in the hydrate stability zone over time. Establishment of the Consortium succeeded in fulfilling the critical need to coordinate activities, avoid redundancies and communicate effectively among those involved in gas hydrates research. Complementary expertise, both scientific and technical, has been assembled to promote innovative methods and construct necessary instrumentation. Following extensive investigation into candidate sites, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118) was chosen by consensus of the Consortium at their fall, 2004, meeting as the site most likely to satisfy all criteria established by the group. Much of the preliminary work preceding the establishment of the site - sensor development and testing, geophysical surveys, and laboratory studies - has been reported in agency documents including the Final Technical Report to DOE covering Cooperative Agreement DEFC26-00NT40920 and Semiannual Progress Reports for this award, DE-FC26-02NT41628. Initial components of the observatory, a probe that collects pore-fluid samples and another that records sea floor temperatures, were deployed in MC118 in May of 2005. Follow-up deployments, planned for fall 2005, had to be postponed due to the catastrophic effects of Hurricane Katrina (and later, Rita) on the Gulf Coast. SFO completion, now anticipated for 2009-10, has, therefore, been delayed. Although delays caused scheduling and deployment difficulties, many sensors and instruments were completed during this period. Software has been written that will accommodate the data that the station retrieves, when it begins to be delivered. In addition, new seismic data processing software has been written to treat the peculiar data to be received by the vertical line array (VLA) and additional software has been developed that will address the horizontal line array (HLA) data. These packages have been tested on data from the test deployments of the VLA and on data from other, similar, areas of the Gulf (in the case of the HLA software). During the life of this Cooperative Agreement (CA), the CMRET conducted many cruises. Early in the program these were executed primarily to survey potential sites and test sensors and equipment being developed for the SFO. When MC118 was established as the observatory site, subsequent cruises focused on this location. Beginning in 2005 and continuing to the present, 13 research cruises to MC118 have been conducted by the Consortium. During September, 2006, the Consortium was able to secure 8 days aboard the R/V Seward Johnson with submersible Johnson SeaLink, a critical chapter in the life of the Observatory project as important documentation, tests, recoveries and deployments were accomplished during this trip (log appended). Consortium members have participated materially in a number of additional cruises including several of the NIUST autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV), Ea

J. Robert Woolsey; Thomas McGee; Carol Lutken

2008-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

85

A Portable Real Time Data Acquisition System for the Comparison of Floor Vibration Data with AISC Design Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A portable real time vibration measurement data acquisition system was assembled with the intentionA Portable Real Time Data Acquisition System for the Comparison of Floor Vibration Data with AISC. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND In response to the increasing incidence of vibration problems in modern floor systems

Hines, Eric

86

RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING BELOW A VOLCANIC CRATER FLOOR WITH COSMIC-RAY MUONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

horizontally-arriving cosmic ray muon with energy of 1 TeV can penetrate 2.6 km of water. Thus, cosmic-ray muon that uncertainty on the shape and amplitude of the energy spectrum of the muon source is within a few percentRADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING BELOW A VOLCANIC CRATER FLOOR WITH COSMIC-RAY MUONS HIROYUKI K.M. TANAKA

Aoki, Yosuke

87

Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A. Siegel*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particle resuspension from indoor flooring materials James H. Lohaus, Atila Novoselac and Jeffrey A@mail.utexas.edu Keywords: Fluid dynamics, Indoor surfaces, Particle experiments Introduction Particle resuspension from for supermicron particles. Resuspension is usually reported either as a critical velocity, the velocity at which

Siegel, Jeffrey

88

Compression of felt?type thermal insulation layer for underfloor heating system and floor impact sound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Korea almost every house uses underfloor heating which has advantages of thermal comfort and energy efficiency. However when it is constructed for high?rise apartment houses it yields a problem in floor impact sound insulation. It accounts for the fact that a foam?type thermal insulator sandwiched between structural slab and heating floor functions as a spring and easily transmits impacts on the floor to the slab. In that case the system's transmissibility is determined by dynamic stiffness of the thermal insulation layer and the lower the dynamic stiffness is the more the floor impact is isolated. For that reason apartments construction companies are attempting to lower the dynamic stiffness of the thermal insulation layer for impact sound reduction. As part of the attempt felt?type materials with relatively low dynamic stiffness such as glass wool or polyester felt are considered as a substitution for the foam?type thermal insulator. However there is a possibility that compression of the felt?type materials would increase the dynamic stiffness and the impact sound insulation effect at early stage might be weakened in the long term. This paper investigates the correlation between gradual compression of the felt?type thermal insulation layer and the impact sound variation.

Tongjun Cho; Hyun?Min Kim

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Support Vector Networks for Prediction of Floor Pressures in Shallow Cavity Flows  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to collect a set of data, which is in the form of pressure readings from particular points in the test measurement at the cavity floor. The SVM based model is built for a very limited amount of training data indicate that the SVM based model is capable of matching the experimental data satisfactorily over

Efe, Mehmet ?nder

90

Marketing & Communications Office 21 N. Park Street, 7th floor, 262-2723  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marketing & Communications Office 21 N. Park Street, 7th floor, 262-2723 Fax: 265-4555 JOB REQUEST for Publications/Design form. rev. 4/09 Address/ phone Due Date Article (2 page, 500+ words) Marketing Copy (ad to (if different than client): Web copy Other Market Research Marketing Plan Development Photography

Sheridan, Jennifer

91

Analysis of sludge from K East basin floor and weasel pit  

SciTech Connect

Sludge samples from the floor of the Hanford K East Basin fuel storage pool have been retrieved and analyzed. Both chemical and physical properties have been determined. The results are to be used to determine the disposition of the bulk of the sludge and possibly assess the impact of residual sludge on dry storage of the associated intact metallic uranium fuel elements.

Makenas, B.J., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

92

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Office of the General Counsel New South, Fourth Floor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY Office of the General Counsel New South, Fourth Floor (609) 258-2500 To as interpreted by the U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR). In the event you believe with the authority to interpret and enforce Title IX. In this capacity, OCR is given substantial deference by courts

Singh, Jaswinder Pal

93

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wing Wave: Feasible, Alternative, Renewable, Electrical Energy Producing Ocean Floor System Mark, alternative energy system to convert the circular motion of ocean waves as they propagate through the sea and feasible alternative, renewable, electrical energy producing subsea system. Index Terms--ocean energy, wave

Wood, Stephen L.

94

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Areas Areas Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

95

Results of a sea-floor electromagnetic survey over a sedimented hydrothermal area on the Juan de Fuca Ridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......northern Juan de Fuca Ridge is complex where it intersects the Sovanco Fracture Zone (see location map, Fig. 1).West Valley is the current spreading axis, but Middle Valley was the centre of spreading until recent times (

D. C. Nobes; L. K. Law; R. N. Edwards

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Research Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research Areas Print Research Areas Print Scientists from a wide variety of fields come to the ALS to perform experiements. Listed below are some of the most common research areas covered by ALS beamlines. Below each heading are a few examples of the specific types of topics included in that category. Click on a heading to learn more about that research area at the ALS. Energy Science Photovoltaics, photosynthesis, biofuels, energy storage, combustion, catalysis, carbon capture/sequestration. Bioscience General biology, structural biology. Materials/Condensed Matter Correlated materials, nanomaterials, magnetism, polymers, semiconductors, water, advanced materials. Physics Atomic, molecular, and optical (AMO) physics; accelerator physics. Chemistry Surfaces/interfaces, catalysts, chemical dynamics (gas-phase chemistry), crystallography, physical chemistry.

97

coherence area  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1....In an electromagnetic wave, such as a lightwave or a radio wave, the area of a surface (a) every point on which the surface is perpendicular to the direction of propagation, (b) over which the e...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University, Dept. Civ. & Env. Eng.;  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Floor System Vibration Control E.M. Hines, Ph.D., P.E., Res. Asst. Professor, Tufts University in the design of steel and concrete floor systems to control vibrations suggests that a floor system's vibration-term collaborative research program between Tufts University and LeMessurier Consultants to investigate the vibration

Hines, Eric

99

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Infiltrating the Ocean Floor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Infiltrating the Ocean Floor Grant S. Bromhal, Duane H. Smith, US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315 Ocean sequestration of carbon dioxide is considered to be a potentially important method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions (US DOE, 1999). Oceans are currently the largest atmospheric carbon dioxide sink; and certainly, enough storage capacity exists in the oceans to hold all of the CO 2 that we can emit for many years. Additionally, technologies exist that allow us to pump liquid CO 2 into the oceans at depths between one and two kilometers for extended periods of time and five times that deep for shorter durations. The biggest unknown in the ocean sequestration process, however, is the fate and

100

Contribution of floor treatment characteristics to background noise levels in health care facilities, Part 1  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Acoustical tests were conducted on five types of commercial-grade flooring to assess their potential contribution to noise generated within health care facilities outside of patient rooms. The floor types include sheet vinyl (with and without a 5 mm rubber backing) virgin rubber (with and without a 5 mm rubber backing) and a rubber-backed commercial grade carpet for comparison. The types of acoustical tests conducted were ISO-3741 compliant sound power level testing (using two source types: a tapping machine to simulate footfalls and a rolling hospital cart) and sound absorption testing as per ASTM-C423. Among the non-carpet samples the material type that produced the least sound power was determined to be the rubber-backed sheet vinyl. While both 5 mm-backed samples showed a significant difference compared to their un-backed counterparts with both source types the rubber-backed sheet vinyl performed slightly better than the rubber-backed virgin rubber in the higher frequency bands in both tests. The performance and suitability of these flooring materials in a health care facility compared to commercial carpeting will be discussed. [Work supported by Paul S. Veneklasen Research Foundation.

Adam L. Paul; David A. Arena; Eoin A. King

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Development of generic floor response spectra for equipment qualification for seismic loads  

SciTech Connect

A generic floor response spectra has been developed for use in the qualification of electrical and mechanical equipment in operating nuclear power plants. Actual PWR and BWR - Mark I structural models were used as representative of a class of structures. For each model, the stiffness properties were varied, with the same mass, so as to extend the fundamental base structure natural frequency from 2 cps to 36 cps. This resulted in fundamental mode coupled natural frequencies as low as 0.86 cps and as high as 30 cps. The characteristics of 1000 floor response spectra were studied to determine the generic spectra. A procedure for its application to any operating plant has been established. The procedure uses as much or as little information that currently exists at the plant relating to the question of equipment qualification. A generic floor response spectra is proposed for the top level of a generic structure. Reduction factors are applied to the peak acceleration for equipment at lower levels.

Curreri, J.R.; Costantino, C.J.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Status Report on Studies of Recovery Boiler Composite Floor Tube Cracking  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of the stainless steel layer of co-extruded 304L stainless steel/SA210 Gd A 1 carbon steel black liquor recovery boiler floor tubes has been identified as one of the most serious material problems in the pulp and paper industry. A DOE-funded study was initiated in 1995 with the goal of determining the cause of and possible solutions to this cracking problem. These studies have characterized tube cracking as well as the chemical and thermal environment and stress state of floor tubes. Investigations of possible cracking mechanisms indicate that stress corrosion cracking rather than thermal fatigue is a more likely cause of crack initiation. The cracking mechanism appears to require the presence of hydrated sodium sulfide and is most likely active during shut-downs and/or start-ups. Based on these results and operating experience, certain alloys appear to be more resistant than others to cracking in the floor environment, and certain operating practices appear to significantly lessen the likelihood of cracking. This report is the latest in a series of progress reports presented on this project.

Eng, P.; Frederick, L.A.; Hoffmann, C.M.; Keiser, J.R.; Mahmood, J.; Maziasz, P.J.; Prescott, R.; Sarma, G.B.; Singbeil, D.L.; Singh, P.M.; Swindeman, R.W.; Wang, X.-L.

1999-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

103

Prediction of Floor Water Inrush: The Application of GIS-Based AHP Vulnerable Index Method to Donghuantuo Coal Mine, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Floor water inrush represents a geohazard that can pose significant threat to safe operations for instance in coal mines in China and elsewhere. Its occurrence ... process (AHP) and geographic information system ...

Qiang Wu; Yuanzhang Liu; Donghai Liu; Wanfang Zhou

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Radiological Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Revision to Clearance Policy Associated with Recycle of Scrap Metals Originating from Radiological Areas On July 13, 2000, the Secretary of Energy imposed an agency-wide suspension on the unrestricted release of scrap metal originating from radiological areas at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities for the purpose of recycling. The suspension was imposed in response to concerns from the general public and industry groups about the potential effects of radioactivity in or on material released in accordance with requirements established in DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment. The suspension was to remain in force until DOE developed and implemented improvements in, and better informed the public about, its release process. In addition, in 2001 the DOE announced its intention to prepare a

105

About the AreaCalc Software | Building Energy Codes Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About the AreaCalc Software About the AreaCalc Software AreaCalc is a tool to simplify the process of calculating the building areas needed to demonstrate energy code compliance. A spreadsheet-like interface is used to calculate window, door, skylight, roof, wall, and floor areas. These areas can then be transferred directly into REScheck(tm) where the code compliance results for those assemblies can be displayed. Publication Date: Wednesday, May 13, 2009 ab_about_the_areacalc_sofware.pdf Document Details Affiliation: DOE BECP Focus: Compliance Building Type: Residential Code Referenced: International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) Document type: Technical Articles Target Audience: Architect/Designer Builder Code Official Contractor Engineer Contacts Web Site Policies U.S. Department of Energy

106

Energy Efficiency Optimization of Joining Processes on Shop Floor and Process Chain Level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Research has shown that the energy demand for manufacturing processes is frequently dominated by secondary consumers, especially since these are often neither controlled nor accounted for by corresponding primary processes. Secondary consumers are often continuously operating on high load, independent of the supported core processes operational state e.g. downtimes. This perception has lead to a methodical approach, calculating an energetic performance indicator that can be actively influenced by both, manufacturing and technology planning as well as production planning. The case presented focuses a joining application wherein the detailed analysis on the shop floor lead to approaches on process chain level.

Christian Mose; Nils Weinert

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Forest floor bulk density and depth at Savannah River - Draft Final Report.  

SciTech Connect

Knowing the amount of biomass across a landscape is becoming increasingly important to fire managers as new fuel and fire management decision support systems come on line. Fire managers rarely have the time or funding available to sample fuels operationally and often depend upon mean values for critical variables whose variation is often associated with simple stand characteristics such as age, forest type, time since last burn, stocking, or site, and other easily measured variables. This report outlines a study to collect and analyze litter and duff bulk density samples for developing a simple predictive tool to estimate forest floor fuel loading based on simple stand characteristics.

Maier, Brian; Ottmar, Roger; Wright, Clint

2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

108

Holocene valley-floor deposition and incision in a small drainage basin in western Colorado, USA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The valley floor of a 33.9km2 watershed in western Colorado experienced gradual sedimentation from before ?6765 to ?500cal yr BP followed by deep incision, renewed aggradation, and secondary incision. In contrast, at least four terraces and widespread cut-and-fill architecture in the valley floor downstream indicate multiple episodes of incision and deposition occurred during the same time interval. The upper valley fill history is atypical compared to other drainages in the Colorado Plateau. One possible reason for these differences is that a bedrock canyon between the upper and lower valley prevented headward erosion from reaching the upper valley fill. Another possibility is that widespread, sand-rich, clay-poor lithologies in the upper drainage limited surface runoff and generally favored alluviation, whereas more clay-rich lithologies in the lower drainage resulted in increased surface runoff and more frequent incision. Twenty-two dates from valley fill charcoal indicate an approximate forest fire recurrence interval of several hundred years, similar to that from other studies in juniperpion woodlands. Results show that closely spaced vertical sampling of alluvium in headwater valleys where linkages between hillslope processes and fluvial activity are relatively direct can provide insight about the role of fires in alluvial chronologies of semi-arid watersheds.

Lawrence S. Jones; Margaret Rosenburg; Maria del Mar Figueroa; Kathleen McKee; Ben Haravitch; Jenna Hunter

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Effects of lithospheric rigidity on ocean floor bathymetry and heat flow  

SciTech Connect

The observed quasi-rigid behaviour of surface plates in the course of their relative motion is a consequence of the high viscosity which obtains in the cold near surface region. By assigning a particular constant velocity as the upper boundary condition in a numerical model of mantle convection, we have investigated the effect of lithospheric rigidity on the variation of oceanic bathymetry and heat flow as a function of ocean floor age. Predicted variations of both bathymetry and heat flow at the surface of mantle wide convection cells which are partially heated from within, exhibit the same qualitative behaviour as data compiled for the major ocean basins. The bathymetry varies with distance x from the spreading centre initially as x/sup 1/2/ but subsequently flattens with respect to an x/sup 1/2/ reference curve whereas the heat flow closely follows an x-/sup 1/2/ decay over most of the convection cell. Consequently the viability of the mechanism for sea floor flattening proposed by Jarvis and Peltier (1980) is increased when a constant surface velocity, characteristic of rigid plates, is incorporated in the model. This model successfully predicts both that the bathymetry should flatten and that the heat flow should not.

Jarvis, G.T.; Peltier, W.R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Overview of the DOE studies of recovery boiler floor tube cracking  

SciTech Connect

Cracking of the stainless steel layer of coextruded 304L/SA210 recovery boiler floor tubes has been observed in an increasing number of black liquor recovery boilers. Because failure of such tubes is a serious safety concern as well as an economic issue, this project was initiated with the objective of identifying alternate materials or process changes that would prevent tube cracking. Tensile stresses are essential for the most likely failure mechanisms, i.e., fatigue or stress corrosion cracking, therefore stresses were measured at room temperature and modeling was used to predict stresses under operating conditions. Laboratory studies have identified conditions under which composite tubes crack due to thermal fatigue and stress corrosion. Floor tube temperature measurements have defined the magnitude and frequency of temperature fluctuations experienced by such tubes, and smelt corrosion studies have measured the degradation rate when molten smelt comes in contact with tubes. Based on these observations, certain materials appear more likely to resist cracking and certain process changes should help avoid conditions that cause composite tube cracking.

Keiser, J.R.; Taljat, B.; Wang, X.L. [and others

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Southeast Idaho Area Links  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Attractions and Events Area Geography Area History Area Links Driving Directions Idaho Falls Attractions and Events INL History INL Today Research Park Sagebrush Steppe...

112

STATE OF INDIANA OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR State House, Second Floor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDIANA INDIANA OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR State House, Second Floor Indianapolis, Indiana 46204 Mitchell E. Daniels, Jr. Governor March 12,2009 The Honorable Steven Chu Secretary U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Avenue, S. W Washington, D.C. 20585 Re: State Energy Program Assurances Dear Secretary Chu: As a condition of receiving our State's share of the $3.1 billion funding for the State Energy Program (SEP) under the American Recovery and Renewal Act of 2009 (H.R. I)(ARRA), I am providing the following assurances. I have requested our public utility commission (the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission) to consider additional actions to promote energy efficiency, consistent with the federal statutory language contained in H.R. 1 and their obligations to

113

Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Report Period: Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: Instructions: (e.g., Street Address, Bldg, Floor, Suite) Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. Zip Code: - If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 - - Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey - - U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov Contact Name: Version No.: 2013.01 Date of this Report: Mo Day State: Year Phone No.: DOMESTIC CRUDE OIL FIRST PURCHASE REPORT Company Name: A completed form must be filed by the 30th calendar day following the end of the report

114

METHOD OF EVALUATING THE EFFICIENCY OF ANTICOCCIDIAL DRUGS IN FLOOR-PEN TRIALS WITH MULTIPLE IN-FEED INFECTION VERSUS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contrôler la contamination des animaux que par la méthode des « seeder birds » et l'anticoccidien a une of environmental contamina- tion. Cover (1970) considers that floor-pen expe- riments are essential because) ; these authors use either a direct contamina- tion by suspended « seeder birds », or an indi- rect contamination

Boyer, Edmond

115

PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite and smectite surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PII S0016-7037(00)00511-1 Reaction of forest floor organic matter at goethite, birnessite carbon (DOC) concentrations (0­140 g C m 3 ) for reaction with goethite ( -FeOOH), birnessite ( -MnO2 different NOM adsorption, fractionation and transformation patterns. Goethite exhibited a steep initial

Chorover, Jon

116

Alliance of Chicago Community Health Services, L3C 215 W. Ohio, 4th floor Chicago, IL 60654  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alliance of Chicago Community Health Services, L3C 215 W. Ohio, 4th floor Chicago, IL 60654 Phone at the Alliance of Chicago Community Health Services (Alliance). He/She is responsible for programming design life cycle for the Alliance EHR, which includes the following primary tasks: o Programming

Liblit, Ben

117

Hindawi Publishing Corporation 410 Park Avenue,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Corporation 410 Park Avenue,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA http. Bona USA J. R. Cannon USA S.-N. Chow USA B. S. Dandapat India E. DiBenedetto USA R. Finn USA R. L. Fosdick USA J. Frehse Germany A. Friedman USA R. Grimshaw UK J. Malek Czech Republic J. T. Oden USA R

Shen, Xuemin "Sherman"

118

Site Monitoring Area Maps  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to the Site Monitoring Area (SMA) The Site Monitoring Area sampler Control measures (best management practices) installed at the Site Monitoring Area Structures such as...

119

Analysis of error floor of LDPC codes under LP decoding over the BSC  

SciTech Connect

We consider linear programming (LP) decoding of a fixed low-density parity-check (LDPC) code over the binary symmetric channel (BSC). The LP decoder fails when it outputs a pseudo-codeword which is not a codeword. We propose an efficient algorithm termed the instanton search algorithm (ISA) which, given a random input, generates a set of flips called the BSC-instanton and prove that: (a) the LP decoder fails for any set of flips with support vector including an instanton; (b) for any input, the algorithm outputs an instanton in the number of steps upper-bounded by twice the number of flips in the input. We obtain the number of unique instantons of different sizes by running the ISA sufficient number of times. We then use the instanton statistics to predict the performance of the LP decoding over the BSC in the error floor region. We also propose an efficient semi-analytical method to predict the performance of LP decoding over a large range of transition probabilities of the BSC.

Chertkov, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Chilappagari, Shashi [UNIV OF AZ; Vasic, Bane [UNIV OF AZ; Stepanov, Mikhail [UNIV OF AZ

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effect of ozonation on fungal resistance of bamboo and oak flooring materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Lignocellulosic materials are gaining increased interest as renewable sources of building materials. However, chemical and microbiological degradation can occur when lignocellulosic materials are exposed to environmental stressors such as ozone and elevated humidity. In this study, the effects of ozone treatment and solvent extraction on fungal growth rates of bamboo and oak flooring materials were investigated. One set of samples was extracted with a mixture of cyclohexane and ethanol solvents for 72h to remove extractable compounds. Another set of materials was exposed continuously to ozone (2000?Lm?3 or 2000ppbv) for one to five weeks. Solvent-extracted and ozone-treated samples were incubated in closed chambers at 85% or 55% RH and 30C. Incubated samples were removed at regular time intervals for fungal growth evaluation. Ozone treatment caused chemical changes in bamboo and oak, which appeared to reduce bamboo's resistance to fungal attack. Longer ozone exposure led to higher susceptibility to fungal growth. Untreated and ozone-treated oak showed no evidence of fungal growth, suggesting that this material may contain fungi-inhibitory compounds that are not removed by these treatments. Also, a delay in fungal growth on cyclohexane/ethanol-extracted bamboo was observed, probably due to the extraction process removing substances that enhanced fungal growth.

Chi Hoang; Tinh Nguyen; Deborah Stanley; Andrew Persily; Richard L. Corsi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Inspection of the objects on the sea floor by using 14 MeV tagged neutrons  

SciTech Connect

Variety of objects found on the sea floor needs to be inspected for the presence of materials which represent the threat to the environment and to the safety of humans. We have demonstrated that the sealed tube 14 MeV neutron generator with the detection of associated alpha particles can be used underwater when mounted inside ROV equipped with the hydraulic legs and variety of sensors for the inspection of such objects for the presence of threat materials. Such a system is performing the measurement by using the NaI gamma detector and an API-120 neutron generator which could be rotated in order to maximize the inspected target volume. The neutron beam intensity during the 10-30 min. measurements is usually 1 x 10{sup 7} n/s in 4{pi}. In this report the experimental results for some of commonly found objects containing TNT explosive or its simulant are presented. The measured gamma spectra are dominant by C, O and Fe peaks enabling the determination of the presence of explosives inside the ammunition shell. Parameters influencing the C/O ratio are discussed in some details. (authors)

Valkovic, V. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, Zagreb (Croatia); Sudac, D.; Obhodas, J. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Inst. Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia); Matika, D. [Inst. for Researches and Development of Defense Systems, Zagreb (Croatia); Kollar, R. [A.C.T.d.o.o., Prilesje 4, Zagreb (Croatia); Nad, K.; Orlic, Z. [Dept. of Experimental Physics, Inst. Ruder Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Sweden Building 05K0026 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

26 26 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1850 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1338.0 OID, m2 1482.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1850 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1338.0 Total 1338.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

123

Sweden Building 05K0106 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 8700.0 OID, m2 8970.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8090.0 - Shops 610.0 Total 8700.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 560.0 District heating 1021.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

124

Sweden Building 05K0005 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private company Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2260.0 OID, m2 2395.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2150.0 - Miscellaneous 110.0 Total 2260.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 122.6 District heating 605.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0

125

Sweden Building 05K0117 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

98 98 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1925.0 OID, m2 1984.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1898 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1865.0 - Residential 60.0 Total 1925.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 160.0 District heating 221.0

126

Sweden Building 05K0069 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Start Page Start Page General Information Year of construction 1983 Category Office Boundaries 0.0 Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1264.0 OID, m2 1492.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1983 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1983 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.225 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1264.0 Total 1264.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 150.4 District heating 77.0

127

Sweden Building 05K0002 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1999 Category Office Boundaries Part of a building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 7160.0 OID, m2 7700.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1999 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5000.0 - Shops 900.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 900.0 - Miscellaneous 360.0 Total 7160.0

128

Sweden Building 05K0041 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

71 71 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 7733.81 OID, m2 7973.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1971 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 7733.81 Total 7733.81 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 414.0 District heating 858.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

129

Sweden Building 05K0075 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1747.0 OID, m2 1794.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1996 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Jönköping County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.84166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 4.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1381.0 - Miscellaneous 366.0 Total 1747.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 362.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

130

Sweden Building 05K0082 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 1721.75 OID, m2 1775.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1979 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.65833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1721.75 Total 1721.75 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 415.0 District heating 230.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

131

Sweden Building 05K0076 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 888.0 OID, m2 892.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1993 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 888.0 Total 888.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 104.0 District heating 56.9 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

132

Sweden Building 05K0001 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Several buildings Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 19657.0 OID, m2 20246.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2003 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1921 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 19657.0 Total 19657.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1399.0 District heating 2067.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0

133

Sweden Building 05K0122 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

891 891 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2906.0 OID, m2 3129.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1891 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1793.0 - Residential 1113.0 Total 2906.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 112.6 District heating 305.1

134

Sweden Building 05K0034 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

758 758 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2760.0 OID, m2 2906.0 Interior height, m 3.4 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1758 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2760.0 Total 2760.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 322.351 District heating 276.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

135

Sweden Building 05K0120 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 19400.0 OID, m2 19990.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1987 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 19000.0 - Miscellaneous 400.0 Total 19400.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 2078.0 District heating 788.0

136

Sweden Building 05K0036 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2066.1 OID, m2 2130.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2066.0 Total 2066.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 486.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

137

Sweden Building 05K0119 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private company Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1946.0 OID, m2 1960.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.98333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1608.0 - Warehouses 73.0 - Daytime health services 235.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 30.0 Total 1946.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 180.0 District heating 273.0

138

Sweden Building 05K0089 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

38 38 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4567.0 OID, m2 4708.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1938 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 155.0 - Offices 3436.0 - Shops 976.0 Total 4567.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 337.35 District heating 314.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

139

Sweden Building 05K0090 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

920 920 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 6078.0 OID, m2 6266.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2683.02 - Miscellaneous 3395.0 Total 6078.02 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 4699.0 District heating 238.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

140

Sweden Building 05K0091 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

58 58 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9301.0 OID, m2 9580.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1958 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8000.0 - Warehouses 1300.0 Total 9300.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 936.0 District heating 611.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Sweden Building 05K0063 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55 55 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2900.0 OID, m2 3049.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1978 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1955 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2246.0 - Miscellaneous 654.0 Total 2900.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 477.44 District heating 254.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

142

Sweden Building 05K0040 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2960.0 OID, m2 3112.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1936 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1890 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1851.0 - Daytime health services 240.0 - Miscellaneous 869.0 Total 2960.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 239.7 District heating 367.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

143

Sweden Building 05K0015 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

878 878 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1550.0 OID, m2 1608.0 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1878 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1550.0 Total 1550.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 112.0 District heating 145.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

144

Sweden Building 05K0019 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

93 93 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 24000.0 OID, m2 24735.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1993 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18400.0 - Shops 5600.0 Total 24000.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 898.6 District heating 1326.0

145

Sweden Building 05K0025 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 3120.0 OID, m2 3213.6 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1974 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1974 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/07/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/06/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2866.0 - Miscellaneous 254.0 Total 3120.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 266.0 District heating 295.0

146

Sweden Building 05K0018 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 18679.0 OID, m2 19081.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1986 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18434.0 - Shops 245.0 Total 18679.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 709.8 District heating 959.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

147

Sweden Building 05K0064 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

74 74 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 5565.0 OID, m2 5675.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1974 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1974 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.20833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5565.0 Total 5565.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 280.0 District heating 371.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

148

Sweden Building 05K0095 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

20 20 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 660.0 OID, m2 680.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2002 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.175 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 660.0 Total 660.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 53.0 District heating 172.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

149

Sweden Building 05K0062 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 7130.0 OID, m2 7230.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1976 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1976 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6150.0 - Shops 940.0 - Miscellaneous 140.0 Total 7230.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 802.666 District heating 500.1

150

Sweden Building 05K0067 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 11474.0 OID, m2 11666.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1984 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Södermanland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.15833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 10618.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 856.0 Total 11474.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1195.8

151

Sweden Building 05K0070 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1052.0 OID, m2 1369.0 Interior height, m 0.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1052.0 Total 1052.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 58.93 District heating 103.9 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

152

Sweden Building 05K0071 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

89 89 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1689.0 OID, m2 2160.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1396.0 - Miscellaneous 293.0 Total 1689.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 122.909 District heating 58.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

153

Sweden Building 05K0068 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

12 12 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3177.0 OID, m2 3923.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1912 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3177.0 - Miscellaneous 746.0 Total 3923.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 413.381 District heating 95.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

154

Sweden Building 05K0029 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 8970.0 OID, m2 9244.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8970.0 Total 8970.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 700.0 District heating 380.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

155

Sweden Building 05K0027 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

027 027 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1956 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4440.0 OID, m2 4664.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1956 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4440.0 Total 4440.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 519.065

156

Sweden Building 05K0049 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1242.0 OID, m2 1280.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1985 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1242.0 Total 1242.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 127.8 District heating 80.17 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

157

Sweden Building 05K0073 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 1469.0 OID, m2 1918.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1469.0 Total 1469.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 221.0 District heating 280.02 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

158

Sweden Building 05K0074 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 1579.0 OID, m2 1918.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1996 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1579.0 Total 1579.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 206.7 District heating 258.48 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

159

Sweden Building 05K0021 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5100.0 OID, m2 5130.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1929 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1929 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4150.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 700.0 - Miscellaneous 250.0 Total 5100.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

160

Sweden Building 05K0020 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2761.0 OID, m2 2810.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1981 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1981 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2059.0 - Warehouses 200.0 - Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres 202.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 300.0 Total 2761.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sweden Building 05K0116 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page General Information Year of construction 1978 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3590.0 OID, m2 3700.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1978 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1978 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3590.0 Total 3590.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 202.0

162

Sweden Building 05K0115 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

115 115 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1991 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 13820.0 OID, m2 14250.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13820.0 Total 13820.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

163

Sweden Building 05K0022 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 16900.0 OID, m2 17000.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13700.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 3300.0 Total 17000.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1078.109 District heating 789.0

164

Sweden Building 05K0003 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sweden Building 05K0003 Sweden Building 05K0003 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1960 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4855.0 OID, m2 4920.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4360.0 - Warehouses 94.0 Total 4454.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2]

165

Sweden Building 05K0059 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Start Page Start Page General Information Year of construction 1991 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3100.0 OID, m2 3200.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.71 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2005/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2670.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 530.0 Total 3200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

166

Sweden Building 05K0057 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1103.0 OID, m2 1136.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2005 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1800 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1103.0 Total 1103.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.0 District heating 78.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

167

Sweden Building 05K0105 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries Part of a building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 11815.0 OID, m2 11400.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1971 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 2450.0 - Offices 9125.0 - Shops 240.0 Total 11815.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 672.0 District heating 809.0

168

Sweden Building 05K0109 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

62 62 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 6160.0 OID, m2 6350.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1962 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1962 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4120.0 - Miscellaneous 2040.0 Total 6160.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1042.0 District heating 543.0

169

Sweden Building 05K0110 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County council County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 2206.0 OID, m2 2310.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1999 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1890 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2206.0 Total 2206.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 153.2 District heating 323.2 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0 Pellets 0.0

170

Sweden Building 05K0054 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

29 29 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5940.0 OID, m2 6118.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2001 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1929 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5940.0 Total 5940.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 806.0 District heating 771.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

171

Sweden Building 05K0028 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

K0028 K0028 Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1960 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5500.0 OID, m2 5665.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1960 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5500.0 Total 5500.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

172

Sweden Building 05K0123 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

72 72 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5219.0 OID, m2 5375.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1972 County Jämtland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.58333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 2.0 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4052.0 - Miscellaneous 1167.0 Total 5219.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 741.0 District heating 671.0

173

Sweden Building 05K0039 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5820.0 OID, m2 6200.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1984 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1984 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5240.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 580.0 Total 5820.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 550.0 District heating 207.9

174

Sweden Building 05K0017 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1987 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 21200.0 OID, m2 21860.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1987 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 18050.0 - Shops 3150.0 Total 21200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

175

Sweden Building 05K0033 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3041.0 OID, m2 3140.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1977 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1977 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2576.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 465.0 Total 3041.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 372.0 District heating 324.0

176

Sweden Building 05K0035 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 10184.0 OID, m2 10406.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1997 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1997 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6937.0 - Shops 292.0 - Swimming baths, indoor and outdoor sports centres 50.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 1276.0 - Miscellaneous 1629.0 Total 10184.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2]

177

Sweden Building 05K0121 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

889 889 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 2100.0 OID, m2 2150.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1889 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.13333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2100.0 Total 2100.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 186.0 District heating 217.4 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

178

Sweden Building 05K0006 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 13048.0 OID, m2 13957.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1995 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13048.0 - Other retail 1300.0 Total 14348.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 843.1 District heating 1727.0

179

Sweden Building 05K0056 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 13566.0 OID, m2 13756.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1971 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 13566.0 Total 13566.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1423.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 1466.0

180

Sweden Building 05K0055 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Social housing company etc. Social housing company etc. Total floor area (BRA), m2 11335.0 OID, m2 12278.0 Interior height, m 0.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1954 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 11335.0 Total 11335.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1454.0 District heating 842.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Sweden Building 05K0098 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5192.0 OID, m2 5347.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1990 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1957 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.58333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Hotels 330.0 - Restaurants 170.0 - Offices 4392.0 - Daytime health services 300.0 Total 5192.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

182

Sweden Building 05K0047 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private company Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 7103.0 OID, m2 7400.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 0 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2002 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.13846153846 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4988.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 1076.0 - Miscellaneous 1039.0 Total 7103.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 883.4 District heating 264.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

183

Sweden Building 05K0046 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4800.0 OID, m2 4656.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1953 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1910 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 200.0 - Offices 4070.0 - Shops 530.0 Total 4800.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 392.83 District heating 467.882

184

Sweden Building 05K0118 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 9200.0 OID, m2 9500.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1968 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1968 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.98333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 9200.0 Total 9200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1130.96 District heating 1384.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

185

Sweden Building 05K0045 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

650 650 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2195.0 OID, m2 2270.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1650 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.825 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/08/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/07/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2195.0 Total 2195.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 93.4 District heating 234.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

186

Sweden Building 05K0024 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

30 30 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1500.0 OID, m2 1580.0 Interior height, m 4.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1975 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1930 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1500.0 Total 1500.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 110.9 District heating 142.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

187

Sweden Building 05K0023 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Local community owner Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 9541.0 OID, m2 9541.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.025 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 9500.0 Total 9500.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 568.5 District heating 1166.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0 Pellets 0.0

188

Sweden Building 05K0096 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 861.0 OID, m2 886.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2004 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 3.275 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 861.0 Total 861.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 34.0 District heating 80.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

189

Sweden Building 05K0108 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 2111.0 OID, m2 2145.0 Interior height, m 2.9 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1983 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1952 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2111.0 Total 2111.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 92.5 District heating 246.6 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

190

Sweden Building 05K0107 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3 3 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 6852.0 OID, m2 6990.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 6852.0 Total 6852.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 965.1 District heating 487.4 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

191

Sweden Building 05K0100 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1900 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 1414.0 OID, m2 1429.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1999 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1414.0 Total 1414.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

192

Sweden Building 05K0102 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 5044.0 OID, m2 5200.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1950 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5044.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 234.0 Total 5278.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 242.0

193

Sweden Building 05K0032 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1220.0 OID, m2 1220.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1985 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.69916666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1220.0 Total 1220.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 108.5 District heating 58.7 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

194

Sweden Building 05K0101 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

One building One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 3410.0 OID, m2 3510.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2003 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2003 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3410.0 Total 3410.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 424.0 District heating 374.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0

195

Sweden Building 05K0104 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

40 40 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3418.0 OID, m2 3491.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1940 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1940 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.34166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3418.0 Total 3418.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 127.5 District heating 385.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

196

Sweden Building 05K0030 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private person Total floor area (BRA), m2 2544.5 OID, m2 2555.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2434.5 Total 2434.5 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 208.444 District heating 226.19 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

197

Sweden Building 05K0010 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

777 777 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 437.0 OID, m2 460.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2004 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1777 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 437.0 Total 437.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 66.52 District heating 61.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

198

Sweden Building 05K0012 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2000 2000 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 22565.0 OID, m2 23220.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2000 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2000 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 20978.0 - Shops 1587.0 Total 22565.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 809.65 District heating 1185.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

199

Sweden Building 05K0011 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

95 95 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 15310.0 OID, m2 15780.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1995 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1995 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 14080.0 - Theatres, concert halls and cinemas 1220.0 Total 15300.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 391.0

200

Sweden Building 05K0099 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 760.0 OID, m2 772.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1999 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 760.0 Total 760.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 48.233 District heating 78.6 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Sweden Building 05K0061 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1290.0 OID, m2 1320.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1943 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1943 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.69916666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1246.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 90.0 Total 1336.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 117.639 District heating 145.8

202

Sweden Building 05K0097 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Local community owner Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 2480.0 OID, m2 2550.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2002 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 2002 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.175 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.7 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2480.0 Total 2480.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 415.0 District heating 211.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0 Pellets 0.0

203

Sweden Building 05K0007 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 24155.0 OID, m2 25162.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 1990.0 - Offices 21765.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 400.0 Total 24155.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1487.0

204

Sweden Building 05K0004 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

14 14 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 25650.0 OID, m2 26420.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) The date "2000-2004" was not understood.The date "2000-2004" was not understood. Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1914 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 25650.0 Total 25650.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

205

Sweden Building 05K0079 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 4263.0 OID, m2 4296.0 Interior height, m 2.7 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4263.0 Total 4263.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 582.104 District heating 401.2 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0 Pellets 0.0

206

Sweden Building 05K0016 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

700 700 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2546.0 OID, m2 2786.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1700 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2101.0 - Miscellaneous 445.0 Total 2546.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 83.191 District heating 268.0

207

Sweden Building 05K0051 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 5286.5 OID, m2 5450.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1920 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1920 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3298.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 496.64 - Miscellaneous 1489.92 Total 5284.56 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

208

Sweden Building 05K0052 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Other Total floor area (BRA), m2 1190.0 OID, m2 1225.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1960 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 990.0 - Miscellaneous 200.0 Total 1190.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 193.0 District heating 287.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

209

Sweden Building 05K0058 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Other Total floor area (BRA), m2 11170.0 OID, m2 11182.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1969 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 330.0 - Offices 10750.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 1200.0 Total 12280.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 2013.781

210

Sweden Building 05K0077 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46 46 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 3606.0 OID, m2 3617.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1946 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3606.0 Total 3606.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 243.5 District heating 360.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

211

Sweden Building 05K0078 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

46 46 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 2425.0 OID, m2 2500.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1993 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1946 County Blekinge County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.35 Mean annual temperature at the site 7.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2425.0 Total 2425.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 181.098 District heating 365.862 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

212

Sweden Building 05K0080 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Jump to: navigation, search Start Page General Information Year of construction 1988 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9619.0 OID, m2 9907.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.65833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5727.0 - Daytime health services 117.0 - Schools, including child day-care centres 687.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 2000.0

213

Sweden Building 05K0081 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4928.0 OID, m2 5075.84 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1962 County Skåne County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 8.89166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 8.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 98.0 - Offices 3350.0 - Shops 530.0 - Warehouses 250.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 700.0 Total 4928.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

214

Sweden Building 05K0042 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

25 25 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4600.0 OID, m2 5118.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1925 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 1.75 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4600.0 Total 4600.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 652.083692308 District heating 370.723 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

215

Sweden Building 05K0111 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1419.0 OID, m2 1443.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1950 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1419.0 Total 1419.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.3 District heating 184.33 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

216

Sweden Building 05K0114 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

69 69 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5588.0 OID, m2 5705.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1969 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1969 County Västernorrland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 4.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 3.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 400.0 - Offices 3415.0 - Shops 1773.0 Total 5588.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 322.6 District heating 1107.0

217

Sweden Building 05K0112 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category County council Total floor area (BRA), m2 5422.0 OID, m2 5590.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1987 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1952 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5422.0 Total 5422.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 338.0 District heating 706.5 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

218

Sweden Building 05K0050 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

91 91 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 4044.0 OID, m2 4078.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3528.0 - Warehouses 516.0 - Unheated but rented-out premises (garages) < 10 °C 760.0 Total 4804.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

219

Sweden Building 05K0044 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

78 78 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 6026.0 OID, m2 7096.0 Interior height, m 5.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1970 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1878 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.825 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/08/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/07/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3948.0 - Theatres, concert halls and cinemas 844.0 - Miscellaneous 1234.0 Total 6026.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 452.0

220

Sweden Building 05K0043 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

00 00 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1860.0 OID, m2 1883.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1972 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1900 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1860.0 Total 1860.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 193.86 District heating 215.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Sweden Building 05K0094 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1 1 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 11550.0 OID, m2 11896.0 Interior height, m 3.2 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1991 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1991 County Dalarna County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.7 Mean annual temperature at the site 4.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 11550.0 Total 11550.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1900.0 District heating 876.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

222

Sweden Building 05K0093 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 37800.0 OID, m2 38900.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1992 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1992 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 32447.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 2880.0 Total 35327.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 3263.0 District heating 1099.0

223

Sweden Building 05K0038 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries Several buildings Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 6040.0 OID, m2 6225.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1980 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 0.0 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 345.0 - Offices 5690.0 Total 6035.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 621.0 District heating 596.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

224

Sweden Building 05K0086 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2 2 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 5607.0 OID, m2 5780.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1976 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1912 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 4687.0 - Shops 920.0 Total 5607.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 453.5 District heating 332.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

225

Sweden Building 05K0084 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

80 80 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 1065.0 OID, m2 1115.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1929 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1880 County Västra Götaland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.30833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.3 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1065.0 Total 1065.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 77.61 District heating 130.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

226

Sweden Building 05K0087 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9591.0 OID, m2 9888.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 2002 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1977 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 5771.0 - Miscellaneous 3820.0 Total 9591.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1003.0 District heating 623.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

227

Sweden Building 05K0088 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

7 7 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9795.0 OID, m2 10089.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1967 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1967 County Örebro County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.675 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 8625.0 - Shops 1170.0 Total 9795.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 750.3 District heating 646.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

228

Sweden Building 05K0072 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

6 6 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3659.0 OID, m2 4200.0 Interior height, m 2.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1986 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1986 County Östergötland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.8 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 3659.0 - Miscellaneous 541.0 Total 4200.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 533.1 District heating 430.189 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

229

Sweden Building 05K0065 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

88 88 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 14520.0 OID, m2 15972.0 Interior height, m 2.8 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1988 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1988 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 520.0 - Offices 14000.0 Total 14520.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1752.84 District heating 1505.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

230

Sweden Building 05K0066 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

55 55 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Local community owner Total floor area (BRA), m2 1822.0 OID, m2 1853.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1977 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1955 County Södermanland County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 6.15833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.4 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1822.0 Total 1822.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 65.0 District heating 325.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

231

Sweden Building 05K0031 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4 4 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 12629.0 OID, m2 12900.0 Interior height, m 2.6 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1985 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1964 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.7 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/09/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/08/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 10298.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 2331.0 Total 12629.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1072.0 District heating 953.0

232

Sweden Building 05K0103 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private company Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 9050.0 OID, m2 9325.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1973 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1973 County Gävleborg County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 5.75833333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 5.2 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 7330.0 - Shops 225.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 1720.0 Total 9275.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 719.0 District heating 902.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0

233

Sweden Building 05K0014 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

650 650 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 1338.3 OID, m2 1487.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1996 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1650 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.08333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/11/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/10/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 1338.3 Total 1338.3 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 227.66 District heating 154.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0

234

Sweden Building 05K0037 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

89 89 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 3152.5 OID, m2 3250.0 Interior height, m 3.5 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1989 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1989 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.14166666667 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 2713.0 - Warehouses 135.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 130.0 - Miscellaneous 175.0 Total 3153.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year]

235

Sweden Building 05K0013 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

850 850 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 19551.0 OID, m2 20156.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1992 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1850 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 215.0 - Offices 15632.0 - Shops 154.0 - Miscellaneous 3550.0 Total 19551.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1199.0

236

Sweden Building 05K0009 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0 0 Category Office Boundaries One building Ownership Category Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 34755.0 OID, m2 35830.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1980 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1980 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 33955.0 - Shops 800.0 Total 34755.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 1963.0 District heating 2176.0

237

Sweden Building 05K0008 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Government building Government building Total floor area (BRA), m2 7800.0 OID, m2 8040.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1997 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1997 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.73333333333 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/10/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2005/09/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Restaurants 300.0 - Offices 7500.0 Total 7800.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 315.0 District heating 844.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0

238

Distribution of 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid in Floor Dust throughout Homes Following Homeowner and Commercial Lawn Applications:? Quantitative Effects of Children, Pets, and Shoes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

First, in the main living areas of homes A and B there was ap proximately a 3-fold reduction in 2,4-D levels relative to the homeowner application study, contrasted with a 3-fold increase in 2,4-D levels in homes E and F. In the case of home B, there was a 2-fold increase in the 2,4-D level on the lawn, and in home F there was a 5-fold decrease in the level on the front lawn. ... Since the homeowners in homes B, E, and F removed or thoroughly rinsed shoes after self-application and before reentry, the differences between homeowner and commercial application tend to indicate that activity patterns of the family overshadow effects such as the applicator's reentry into the home or the level on the turf. ... These scenarios, in comparison with fully occupied homes, suggest that the postapplication 2,4-D floor dust levels of homes X and Y were caused primarily by intrusion mechanisms other than track-in and are presumed to involve resuspension of 2,4-D from turf followed by fine particle intrusion of the closed house (home Y) and an incremental addition of fine particle penetration as doors and windows were opened (home X). ...

Marcia G. Nishioka; Hazel M. Burkholder; Marielle C. Brinkman; Robert G. Lewis

1999-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

239

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2NT00041628 2NT00041628 Final Report Covering research during the period 1 June, 2002 through 30 September, 2008 Support of Gulf of Mexico Hydrate Research Consortium: Activities to Support Establishment of a Sea Floor Monitoring Station Project Submitted by: University of Mississippi Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology 310 Lester Hall, University, MS 38677 Principal Authors: J. Robert Woolsey, Thomas M. McGee, Carol B. Lutken Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January, 2009 Office of Fossil Energy ii SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION PROJECT DOE Award Number DE-FC26-02NT41628 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

240

SUPPORT OF GULF OF MEXICO HYDRATE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM: ACTIVITIES TO SUPPORT ESTABLISHMENT OF A SEA FLOOR MONITORING STATION P  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Technology Oil & Natural Gas Technology DOE Award No.: DE-FC26-06NT42877 Semiannual Progress Report HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO Submitted by: CENTER FOR MARINE RESOURCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY 111 BREVARD HALL, UNIVERSITY, MS 38677 Principal Author: Carol Lutken, PI Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory August, 2011 Office of Fossil Energy ii HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO SEMIANNUAL PROGRESS REPORT 1 JANUARY, 2011 THROUGH 30 JUNE, 2011

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Hindawi Publishing Corporation 410 Park Avenue,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,15th Floor,#287 pmb,New York,NY 10022,USA http://www.hindawi.com/journals/denm/ Differential is not possible, you can contact denm.support@hindawi.com. Associate Editors N. Bellomo Italy J. L. Bona USA J. R. Cannon USA S.-N. Chow USA B. S. Dandapat India E. DiBenedetto USA R. Finn USA R. L. Fosdick USA J. Frehse

Plataniotis, Konstantinos N.

242

Walking on daylight : the application of translucent floor systems as a means of achieving natural daylighting in mid and low rise architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is concerned with the introduction of quality daylight to buildings by means of translucency in the horizontal planes or floors within the building. Since people began to build, the concept of translucency in ...

Widder, James

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Ice cores drilled from lake and ocean floors, continents, and ice sheets provide geoscientists with the most extensive and accurate picture of the earth!s  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

zer Ice cores drilled from lake and ocean floors, continents, and ice sheets provide geoscientists produces 30 GB of raw imagery. With the ability to display core sections in high resolution, Corelyzer

Johnson, Andrew

244

Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

10) 10) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Numerical Modeling At Coso Geothermal Area (2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Numerical Modeling Activity Date 2010 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine conditions when fractures nucleate Notes A numerical model was developed using Poly3D to simulate the distribution and magnitude of stress concentration in the vicinity of the borehole floor, and determine the conditions under which petal-centerline fractures nucleate. As a whole, the simulations have demonstrated that a borehole under the stress boundary conditions present at the Coso 58A-10 borehole is able to amplify the stress concentration to produce tension below the

245

Ozone-initiated Terpene Reaction Products in Five European Offices: Replacement of a Floor Cleaning Agent  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The chamber was operated at conditions relevant to US residences in polluted areas during warm-weather seasons: an air exchange rate of 1.0 h-1 and an inlet O3 concn. of approx. ... A review on the formaldehyde indoor air pollution, including sources, sampling and anal. of formaldehyde, indoor pollution and guidelines of formaldehyde, and exposure risk assessment. ...

A.W. Nrgaard; V. Kofoed-Srensen; C. Mandin; G. Ventura; R. Mabilia; E. Perreca; A. Cattaneo; A. Spinazz; V.G. Mihucz; T. Szigeti; Y. de Kluizenaar; H.J.M. Cornelissen; M. Trantallidi; P. Carrer; I. Sakellaris; J. Bartzis; P. Wolkoff

2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

246

An evaluation of floor surfaces on the basis of skin temperature during constrained standing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

weight for an indrvidual was assumed to be 170 lb (77. 3 kg). Pressure = 0. 15 + 0. 0026 X weight(kgl (1) 0. 35 kg/cm' This pressure per unit surface area will generate 17. 2 kg (37. 8 lb) for the 7 cm X 7 cm mat samples. An 18 kg force was used... weight for an indrvidual was assumed to be 170 lb (77. 3 kg). Pressure = 0. 15 + 0. 0026 X weight(kgl (1) 0. 35 kg/cm' This pressure per unit surface area will generate 17. 2 kg (37. 8 lb) for the 7 cm X 7 cm mat samples. An 18 kg force was used...

Monford, Leo Gabriel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

247

American Healthy Homes Survey: A National Study of Residential Pesticides Measured from Floor Wipes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The American Healthy Home Survey presents the results of a cross-sectional national survey of select insecticides measured from hard surfaces in United State residential homes. ... AHHS sample collection included surface wipes from the kitchen area in homes, homeowner vacuum bags, and soil samples from outside the home. ... The results of this work support the hypothesis that the take-home exposure pathway contributes to residential pesticide contamination in agricultural homes where young children are present. ...

Daniel M. Stout II; Karen D. Bradham; Peter P. Egeghy; Paul A. Jones; Carry W. Croghan; Peter A. Ashley; Eugene Pinzer; Warren Friedman; Marielle C. Brinkman; Marcia G. Nishioka; David C. Cox

2009-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

248

The ORR NERPs Mesic Natural Area„Primeval Forest?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORR NERP's Mesic Natural Area-Primeval Forest? ORR NERP's Mesic Natural Area-Primeval Forest? Report to Pat Parr, Manager of DOE's Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park September 25, 2004 By John Devereux Joslin, Jr. Belowground Forest Research Introduction Description and Location The Department of Energy's (DOE) "Mesic Natural Area" (MSN) is located in the northeast portion of its Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR) and is part of DOE's Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park. The natural area encompasses on its north end approximately 25 acres of unique old-growth deciduous forest. This particular portion of the MSN is unique in the size of its overstory trees, the species composition of those trees, the forest floor flora, and the apparent lack of prior human disturbance.

249

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal Gradient Holes At Kilauea Summit Area (Keller, Et Al., 1979) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Summit Area Exploration Technique Thermal Gradient Holes Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes A deep borehole was drilled at the summit of Kilauea volcano, Hawaii, between April 6 and July 9, 1973. The hole is located approximately 1 km south of the edge of Halemaumau crater (Figs. 1 and 2), a crater within the summit caldera of the volcano. The total depth of the hole is 1262 m (4141 ft) measured from the derrick floor at an altitude of 1102 m (3616 ft). A description of the drilling program and some of the results obtained have

250

Forecast of Geological Gas Hazards for Three-Soft Coal Seams in Gliding Structural Areas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas outbursts from three-soft coal seams (soft roof, soft floor and soft coal) constitute a very serious problem in the Ludian gliding structure area in western Henan. By means of theories and methods of gas geology, structural geology, coal petrology and rock tests, we have discussed the effect of control of several physical properties of soft roof on gas preservation and proposed a new method of forecasting gas geological hazards under open structural conditions. The result shows that the areas with type III or IV soft roofs are the most dangerous areas where gas outburst most likely can take place. Therefore, countermeasures should be taken in these areas to prevent gas outbursts.

Zhi-rong WANG; Ling-xia CHEN; Cong-ren CHENG; Zhen-xiang LI

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Material Disposal Areas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas Material Disposal Areas, also known as MDAs, are sites where material was disposed of below the ground surface in excavated pits, trenches, or shafts. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Material Disposal Areas at LANL The following are descriptions and status updates of each MDA at LANL. To view a current fact sheet on the MDAs, click on LA-UR-13-25837 (pdf). MDA A MDA A is a Hazard Category 2 nuclear facility comprised of a 1.25-acre, fenced, and radiologically controlled area situated on the eastern end of Delta Prime Mesa. Delta Prime Mesa is bounded by Delta Prime Canyon to the north and Los Alamos Canyon to the south.

252

Sampling and analysis plan for sludge located on the floor and in the pits of the 105-K basins  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) provides direction for the sampling of the sludge found on the floor and in the remote pits of the 105-K Basins to provide: (1) basic data for the sludges that have not been characterized to-date and (2) representative Sludge material for process tests to be made by the SNF Project/K Basins sludge treatment process subproject. The sampling equipment developed will remove representative samples of the radioactive sludge from underwater at the K Basins, depositing them in shielded containers for transport to the Hanford Site laboratories. Included in the present document is the basic background logic for selection of the samples to meet the requirements established in the Data Quality Objectives (DQO), HNF-2033, for this sampling activity. The present document also includes the laboratory analyses, methods, procedures, and reporting that will be required to meet the DQO.

BAKER, R.B.

1998-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

253

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 7, JULY 2006 1289 Profile-Guided Microarchitectural Floor Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 25, NO. 7, JULY 2006 1289 Profile-Guided Microarchitectural Floor Planning for Deep Submicron Processor Design Mongkol integration (VLSI) process tech- nology migrates to nanoscale with a feature size of less than 100 nm, global

Lim, Sung Kyu

254

This form must be filled out in its entirety and returned to your academic advisor on the fourth floor of the IT building. Revised 2/2014  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

academic advisor on the fourth floor of the IT building. Revised 2/2014 FORM to enroll form with their academic advisor by April 1 for the fall semester and permission to enroll form must be completed and routed to your academic advisor

Zhou, Yaoqi

255

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2011 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2011 Cardboard is stored on the first floor. On Friday, one individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible to transport the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking

Rock, Chris

256

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL 2013 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department, the individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible for transporting the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking lot and in close

Rock, Chris

257

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL Fall 2012 Cardboard is stored on the first floor in the Department of Biological Sciences in the west  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TTUAB CARDBOARD RECYCLING PROTOCOL ­ Fall 2012 Cardboard is stored on the first floor. On Friday, the individual who signed up for the cardboard recycling is responsible to transport the collected cardboard to recycle bin next to Murray Hall (dumpster is next to that building in the R2 parking

Rock, Chris

258

SunFloor 3D: A Tool for Networks on Chip Topology Synthesis for 3D Systems on Ciprian Seiculescu , Srinivasan Murali  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SunFloor 3D: A Tool for Networks on Chip Topology Synthesis for 3D Systems on Chips Ciprian an efficient Network on Chip (NoC) intercon- nect for a 3D SoC that not only meets the application performance constraints, but also the constraints imposed by the 3D technology, is a significant challenge. In this work

De Micheli, Giovanni

259

area | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

area area Dataset Summary Description These estimates are derived from a composite of high resolution wind resource datasets modeled for specific countries with low resolution data originating from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (United States) and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (United States) as processed for use in the IMAGE model. The high resolution datasets were produced by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (United States), Risø DTU National Laboratory (Denmark), the National Institute for Space Research (Brazil), and the Canadian Wind Energy Association. The data repr Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords area capacity clean energy international National Renewable Energy Laboratory

260

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas NSTB Summarizes Vulnerable Areas Commonly Found in Energy Control Systems Experts at the National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) discovered some common areas of vulnerability in the energy control systems assessed between late 2004 and early 2006. These vulnerabilities ranged from conventional IT security issues to specific weaknesses in control system protocols. The paper "Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems" describes the vulnerabilities and recommended strategies for mitigating them. It should be of use to asset owners and operators, control system vendors, system integrators, and third-party vendors interested in enhancing the security characteristics of current and future products.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Neutron Science Research Areas | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home | Science & Discovery | Neutron Science | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas Neutron scattering research at ORNL covers four broad research areas: biology and soft...

262

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Loveland Area Projects November 29-30, 2011 2 Agenda * Overview of Western Area Power Administration * Post-1989 Loveland Area Projects (LAP) Marketing Plan * Energy Planning and Management Program * Development of the 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Proposal * 2025 PMI Comment Period & Proposal Information * Questions 3 Overview of Western Area Power Administration (Western) * One of four power marketing administrations within the Department of Energy * Mission: Market and deliver reliable, renewable, cost-based Federal hydroelectric power and related services within a 15-state region of the central and western U.S. * Vision: Provide premier power marketing and transmission services Rocky Mountain Region (RMR) is one of five regional offices 4 Rocky Mountain Region

263

Decontamination & decommissioning focus area  

SciTech Connect

In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Honey Lake Geothermal Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Honey Lake geothermal area is located in Lassen County, California and Washoe County, Nevada. There are three geothermal projects actively producing electrical power. They are located at Wendel...

265

AREA 5 RWMS CLOSURE  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

153 CLOSURE STRATEGY NEVADA TEST SITE AREA 5 RADIOACTIVE WASTE MANAGEMENT SITE Revision 0 Prepared by Under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 March 2007 DISCLAIMER Reference herein to...

266

Geographic Area Month  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuels by PAD District and State (Cents per Gallon Excluding Taxes) - Continued Geographic Area Month No. 1 Distillate No. 2 Distillate a No. 4 Fuel b Sales to End Users Sales for...

267

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

268

Bay Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bay Area Bay Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Bay Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Bay Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Bay Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Bay Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Bay Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Bay Area Products and Services in the Bay Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

269

Texas Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Texas Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Texas Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Texas Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Texas Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Texas Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Texas Area Products and Services in the Texas Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

270

Rockies Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Area Rockies Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Rockies Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Rockies Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Rockies Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Rockies Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Rockies Area Products and Services in the Rockies Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

271

OLED area illumination source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an area illumination light source comprising a plurality of individual OLED panels. The individual OLED panels are configured in a physically modular fashion. Each OLED panel comprising a plurality of OLED devices. Each OLED panel comprises a first electrode and a second electrode such that the power being supplied to each individual OLED panel may be varied independently. A power supply unit capable of delivering varying levels of voltage simultaneously to the first and second electrodes of each of the individual OLED panels is also provided. The area illumination light source also comprises a mount within which the OLED panels are arrayed.

Foust, Donald Franklin (Scotia, NY); Duggal, Anil Raj (Niskayuna, NY); Shiang, Joseph John (Niskayuna, NY); Nealon, William Francis (Gloversville, NY); Bortscheller, Jacob Charles (Clifton Park, NY)

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermal simulation and system optimization of a chilled ceiling coupled with a floor containing a phase change material (PCM)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The integration of phase change materials (PCMs) for cooling applications in buildings reduces the amplitude of indoor air temperature fluctuations due to solar and internal gains, enabling passive solar, HVAC system downsizing or off-peak cooling designs. This work studies the use of radiant systems for discharging heat stored in a PCM; this approach differs from the typical practice of accomplishing this task by either night cooling ventilation or embedding an active heat exchanger into the PCM of the wall. In this study, a PCM is incorporated into the floor, and a hydronic radiant ceiling system is used as the energy discharge system. The advantages and disadvantages of this configuration in terms of cooling energy demands and thermal comforts of occupants are analyzed using the simulation software TRNSYS. Five design parameters are optimized using the software GENOPT. The simulation reveals that when accompanied by an air-to-air heat recovery system, this configuration can significantly reduce the cooling energy demand (more than 50% compared to the cooling energy demand of the same building without PCM) and can thus significantly reduce the energy consumption. However, the degrees of occupant comfort will inevitably vary (i.e., the predicted percent dissatisfied (PPD) increases by 25%).

J.F. Belmonte; P. Egua; A.E. Molina; J.A. Almendros-Ibez

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Subsurface contaminants focus area  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Functional Area Dean's Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Functional Area Dean's Office 1101 Ag & Resource Economics 1172 Animal Sciences 1171 Bio Ag Science and Pest Mgmt 1177 Hort & Landscape Architecture 1173 Soil & Crop Science 1170 Ag Colo Res Ctr 3046 Fiscal Officers Jessi Fuentes 1 1931 Val Parker 1 6953 Linda Moller 1 1441 Paula

275

Plutonium focus area  

SciTech Connect

To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 7: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington EA-1177: Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to salvage and demolish the 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area steam plants and their associated steam distribution piping equipment, and ancillary facilities at the U.S. Department of Energy Hanford Site in Richland, Washington. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Finding of No Significant Impact Salvage/Demolition of 200 West Area, 200 East Area, and 300 Area Steam Plants October 21, 1996 EA-1177: Final Environmental Assessment

277

Comparison of the effects of floor and cage housing on the performance of five strains and crosses of egg production stocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

strains, found average hen housed product, on of 176 eggs for birds housed on the floor compared with 154 eggs foz compaxable b'rds in layaway batteries. The xesponse differences among stxains were incons'stent. Rowevex, Millex (19/6) reported moxe... of suz'vivors while the caged pullets showed signif icantly lower mox tality and heavier eggs, Consistent significant differences could not be demonstrated for the traits studied, namely the production index and sexual maturity. Francis {19...

Bailey, Bernice Boyce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

278

Focus Area Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM information provided was consolidated from the original five focus areas for the EM Corporate QA Board. The status of QAP/QIP approvals etc. was accurate at the time of posting; however, additional approvals may have been achieved since that time. If you have any questions about the information provided, please contact Bob Murray at robert.murray@em.doe.gov Task # Task Description Status 1.1 Develop a brief questionnaire to send out to both commercial and EM contractors to describe their current approach for identifying the applicable QA requirements for subcontractors, tailoring the requirements based upon risk, process for working with procurement to ensure QA requirements are incorporated into subcontracts, and implementing verification of requirement flow-down by their

279

Focus Area 3 Deliverables  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 - Commercial Grade item and Services 3 - Commercial Grade item and Services Dedication Implementation and Nuclear Services Office of Environmental Management And Energy Facility Contractors Group Quality Assurance Improvement Project Plan Project Focus Area Task # and Description Deliverable Project Area 3-Commercial Grade Item and Services Dedication 3.1-Complete a survey of selected EM contractors to identify the process and basis for their CGI dedication program including safety classification of items being dedicated for nuclear applications within their facilities Completed Survey Approvals: Yes/No/NA Project Managers: S. Waisley, D. Tuttel Yes Executive Committee: D. Chung, J. Yanek, N. Barker, D. Amerine No EM QA Corporate Board: No Energy Facility Contractors Group

280

Argonne area restaurants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

area restaurants area restaurants Amber Cafe 13 N. Cass Ave. Westmont, IL 60559 630-515-8080 www.ambercafe.net Argonne Guest House Building 460 Argonne, IL 60439 630-739-6000 www.anlgh.org Ballydoyle Irish Pub & Restaurant 5157 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60515 630-969-0600 www.ballydoylepub.com Bd's Mongolian Grill The Promenade Shopping Center Boughton Rd. & I-355 Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-972-0450 www.gomongo.com Branmor's American Grill 300 Veterans Parkway Bolingbrook, IL 60440 630-226-9926 www.branmors.com Buca di Beppo 90 Yorktown Convenience Center Lombard, IL 60148 630-932-7673 www.bucadibeppo.com California Pizza Kitchen 551 Oakbrook Center Oak Brook, IL 60523 630-571-7800 www.cpk.com Capri Ristorante 5101 Main Street Downers Grove, IL 60516 630-241-0695 www.capriristorante.com Carrabba's Italian Grill

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

borrow_area.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

information information at Weldon Spring, Missouri. This site is managed by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. developed by the former WSSRAP Community Relations Department to provide comprehensive descriptions of key activities that took place throughout the cleanup process The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) approved a plan on June 9, 1995, allowing the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Weldon Spring Site Remedial Action Project (WSSRAP) to excavate nearly 2 million cubic yards of clay material from land in the Weldon Spring Conservation Area. Clay soil from a borrow area was used to construct the permanent disposal facility at the Weldon Spring site. Clay soil was chosen to construct the disposal facility because it has low permeability when

282

Geothermal Areas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Areas Geothermal Areas are specific locations of geothermal potential (e.g., Coso Geothermal Area). The base set of geothermal areas used in this database came from the 253 geothermal areas identified by the USGS in their 2008 Resource Assessment.[1] Additional geothermal areas were added, as needed, based on a literature search and on projects listed in the GTP's 2011 database of funded projects. Add.png Add a new Geothermal Resource Area Map of Areas List of Areas Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":2500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

283

Western Area Power Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

v*Zy- i , . v*Zy- i , . r ,v * -i S # Af [, (e- . - o -A tl }r- 0 v-" l^~4~S J l ^-)^ I^U^ck iM clti ^ Area Power Administration Follow-up to Nov. 25, 2008 Transition Meeting Undeveloped Transmission Right-of-Way Western has very little undeveloped transmission right-of-way. There is a 7-mile right- of-way between Folsom, CA and Roseville, CA where Western acquired a 250' wide right-of-way but is only using half of it. Another line could be built parallel to Western's line to relieve congestion in the Sacramento area. In addition, Western has rights-of- way for many transmission lines that could be rebuilt to increase transmission capacity. For example, Western's Tracy-Livermore 230-kV line is a single circuit line but the existing towers could support a double circuit line. These rights-of-way would have to

284

Fifth Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 5106 5107 5108 5109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 5110 5111 5112 5113 5206 5208 5207 5209 Bathroom Bathroom 5210 Student Advisor 5211 5301 5303 5305 5307 5302 5304 5309 5411 5018 Restroom 5016 Lounge 5017 Kitchen 5015 Data Closet Elevator 54085406 54095407 Student Advisor

Gering, Jon C.

285

Third Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 3106 3107 3108 3109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 3110 3111 3112 3113 3206 3208 3207 3209 Bathroom Bathroom 3210 Student Advisor 3211 3301 3303 3305 3307 3302 3304 3309 3411 3018 Restroom 3016 Lounge 3017 Kitchen 3015 Mechanical Elevator 34083406 34093407 Student Advisor

Gering, Jon C.

286

Fourth Floor Student Advisor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bathroom Bathroom Bathroom 4106 4107 4108 4109 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 4110 4111 4112 4113 4208 4207 4209 Bathroom Bathroom 4210 Student Advisor 4211 4301 4303 4305 4307 4302 4304 4309Bathroom Restroom 4016 Lounge 4017 Kitchen Elevator 44084406 44094407 Student Advisor Bathroom Bathroom 44044402

Gering, Jon C.

287

Western Area Power Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Western Area Power Administration Customer Meeting The meeting will begin at 12:30 pm MST We have logged on early for connectivity purposes Please stand-by until the meeting begins Please be sure to call into the conference bridge at: 888-989-6414 Conf. Code 60223 If you have connectivity issues, please contact: 866-900-1011 1 Introduction  Welcome  Introductions  Purpose of Meeting ◦ Status of the SLCA/IP Rate ◦ SLCA/IP Marketing Plan ◦ Credit Worthiness Policy ◦ LTEMP EIS update ◦ Access to Capital  Handout Materials http://www.wapa.gov/crsp/ratescrsp/default.htm 2 SLCA/IP Rate 3 1. Status of Repayment 2. Current SLCA/IP Firm Power Rate (SLIP-F9) 3. Revenue Requirements Comparison Table 4.SLCA/IP Rate 5. Next Steps

288

T-1 Training Area  

SciTech Connect

Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

None

2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

T-1 Training Area  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Another valuable homeland security asset at the NNSS is the T-1 training area, which covers more than 10 acres and includes more than 20 separate training venues. Local, County, and State first responders who train here encounter a variety of realistic disaster scenarios. A crashed 737 airliner lying in pieces across the desert, a helicopter and other small aircraft, trucks, buses, and derailed train cars are all part of the mock incident scene. After formal classroom education, first responders are trained to take immediate decisive action to prevent or mitigate the use of radiological or nuclear devices by terrorists. The Counterterrorism Operations Support Center for Radiological Nuclear Training conducts the courses and exercises providing first responders from across the nation with the tools they need to protect their communities. All of these elements provide a training experience that cannot be duplicated anywhere else in the country.

None

2015-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

290

Surface Water Management Areas (Virginia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation establishes surface water management areas, geographically defined surface water areas in which the State Water Control Board has deemed the levels or supply of surface water to be...

291

Focus Areas | Critical Materials Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Focus Areas FA 1: Diversifying Supply FA 2: Developing Substitutes FA 3: Improving Reuse and Recycling FA 4: Crosscutting Research...

292

Results of detailed analyses performed on boring cores extracted from the concrete floors of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant reactor buildings  

SciTech Connect

Due to the massive earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011, and the following severe accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, concrete surfaces within the reactor buildings were exposed to radioactive liquid and vapor phase contaminants. In order to clarify the situation of this contamination in the reactor buildings of Units 1, 2 and 3, selected samples were transported to the Fuels Monitoring Facility in the Oarai Engineering Center of JAEA where they were subjected to analyses to determine the surface radionuclide concentrations and to characterize the radionuclide distributions in the samples. In particular, penetration of radiocesium in the surface coatings layer and sub-surface concrete was evaluated. The analysis results indicate that the situation of contamination in the building of Unit 2 was different from others, and the protective surface coatings on the concrete floors provided significant protection against radionuclide penetration. The localized penetration of contamination in the concrete floors was found to be confined within a millimeter of the surface of the coating layer of some millimeters. (authors)

Maeda, Koji; Sasaki, S.; Kumai, M.; Sato, Isamu; Osaka, Masahiko; Fukushima, Mineo; Kawatsuma, Shinji [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Goto, Tetsuo; Sakai, Hitoshi [Toshiba Corporation, 8, Shinsugita, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8523 (Japan); Chigira, Takayuki; Murata, Hirotoshi [Tokyo Electric Power Company, 1-1-3 Uchisaiwai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo, 100-8560 (Japan)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Property:AreaGeology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AreaGeology AreaGeology Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AreaGeology Property Type String Description A description of the area geology This is a property of type String. Subproperties This property has the following 22 subproperties: A Amedee Geothermal Area B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Blue Mountain Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area D cont. Dixie Valley Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area K Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area

294

Fire Hazards Analysis for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area  

SciTech Connect

This documents the Fire Hazards Analysis (FHA) for the 200 Area Interim Storage Area. The Interim Storage Cask, Rad-Vault, and NAC-1 Cask are analyzed for fire hazards and the 200 Area Interim Storage Area is assessed according to HNF-PRO-350 and the objectives of DOE Order 5480 7A. This FHA addresses the potential fire hazards associated with the Interim Storage Area (ISA) facility in accordance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480 7A. It is intended to assess the risk from fire to ensure there are no undue fire hazards to site personnel and the public and to ensure property damage potential from fire is within acceptable limits. This FHA will be in the form of a graded approach commensurate with the complexity of the structure or area and the associated fire hazards.

JOHNSON, D.M.

2000-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

295

Final DOE Areas Feasibility Study  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

the area California Office of Historic Preservation, Northwest Information Center, Lee Jordan, Coordinator June 26, 1998 and April 12, 2000 Historical and Cultural Resources...

296

Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Northwest Area Foundation Horizons Program Final Evaluation Report ­ Executive Summary Diane L by the Northwest Area Foundation in partnership with two national organizations and delivered by a number to remember that Horizons was not designed to reduce poverty, but instead to contribute to the Foundations

Amin, S. Massoud

297

Area Health Education Center of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington Washington State University Extension's Area Health Education Center of Eastern Washington works with university and community allies to promote health for underserved and at-risk populations. It is part of a network of AHEC organiza- tions

Collins, Gary S.

298

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report Wildland Fire Area Hazard Report wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. How to report wildland fire hazard Use the following form to report any wildland fire area hazards or incidents that are non-life threatening only. Call 911 for all emergencies that require immediate assistance. Fill out this form as completely as possible so we can better assess the hazard. All submissions will be assessed as promptly as possible. For assistance with a non-emergency situation, contact the Operations Support Center at 667-6211. Name (optional): Hazard Type (check one): Wildlife Sighting (check box if animal poses serious threat) Trails (access/egress)

299

Authoring Support for Adaptive Hypermedia Applications Hongjing Wu, Geert-Jan Houben, Paul De Bra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications: AHAM (for Adaptive Hypermedia Application Model), which is an extension of the Dexter hypermedia reference model (Halasz et al., 1990, 1994). The goal of AHAM is to describe adaptive hypermedia applications, especially from the point of view of authors designing such applications. AHAM divides an AHS

Houben, Geert-Jan

300

Supporting User Adaptation in Adaptive Hypermedia Applications Hongjing Wu, Geert-Jan Houben, Paul De Bra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications, named AHAM (for Adaptive Hypermedia Application Model) [DHW99]. In AHAM knowledge is represented through hierarchies of large composite abstract concepts as well as small atomic ones. AHAM also divides. In this paper, we concentrate on the user modeling aspects of AHAM, but also describe how they relate

Houben, Geert-Jan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Generic Adaptation Framework: a Process-Oriented Perspective Evgeny Knutov, Paul De Bra, Mykola Pechenizkiy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Hyperdocuments). Later this was con- tinued in the adaptive hypermedia field with the most referenced AHAM model

De Bra, Paul

302

AHA! The Next Generation Paul De Bra, Ad Aerts, David Smits, Natalia Stash  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

features in AHA! are inspired by AHAM [4], a Dexter [6] based reference model for adaptive hypermedia. In 1999 we developed a reference model for adaptive hypermedia, called AHAM (Adaptive Hypermedia Application Model) [4,7]. Based on the formal Dexter model for hypermedia [6] AHAM provides a framework

De Bra, Paul

303

Supporting User Adaptation in Adaptive Hypermedia Applications Hongjing Wu, GeertJan Houben, Paul De Bra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

applications, named AHAM (for Adaptive Hypermedia Application Model) [DHW99]. In AHAM knowledge is represented through hierarchies of large composite abstract concepts as well as small atomic ones. AHAM also divides. In this paper, we concentrate on the user modeling aspects of AHAM, but also describe how they relate

De Bra, Paul

304

Nevada Geothermal Area | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Nevada Geothermal Area Nevada Geothermal Area The extensive Steamboat Springs geothermal area contains three geothermal power-generating plants. The plants provide approximately...

305

The Geysers Geothermal Area | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

The Geysers Geothermal Area The Geysers Geothermal Area The Geysers Geothermal area, north of San Francisco, California, is the world's largest dry-steam geothermal steam field....

306

Research Areas | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Research Areas Research Areas High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas (HEDLP) Research Areas During open solicitations proposals are sought...

307

Outreach and Collaboration - Functional Area Analysis Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

i i Outreach and Collaboration ...At a glance Important Challenges * Advance DOE collaborative capabilities through new platforms * Create innovative solutions by using collaboration tools to gather input from all levels of an organization, from the "shop- floor" to executive offices * Create new interagency partnerships Accomplishments to Date * Member of the National Academy of Public Administration's Collaboration Project * Entered into Fellowships with National Defense University and the Center for Strategic and International Studies * Established Focus Group with labor, program secretarial officers, and stakeholders * Hosted visiting speakers from nationally recognized organizations and industry * Created a public website and fostered transparency Future Needs

308

4853 recreation area planning [n  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

landsc. plan. pol. recr....(Development of policies, strategies and measures to make an area attractive for recreation users);splanificacin [f] de reas tursticas y de recreo (Planificacin y apli...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Focus Area Tax Credits (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Focus Area Tax Credits for businesses in Baltimore City or Prince Georges County enterprise zones include: (1) Ten-year, 80% credit against local real property taxes on a portion of real property...

310

Fire in a contaminated area  

SciTech Connect

This document supports the development and presentation of the following accident scenario in the TWRS Final Safety Analysis Report: Fire in Contaminated Area. The calculations needed to quantify the risk associated with this accident scenario are included within.

Ryan, G.W., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

311

Security Area Vouching and Piggybacking  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

Establishes requirements for the Department of Energy (DOE) Security Area practice of "vouching" or "piggybacking" access by personnel. DOE N 251.40, dated 5-3-01, extends this directive until 12-31-01.

2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

312

Controlling Bats in Urban Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to avoid obstacles and capture insects. Bats also emit audible sounds that may be used for communi- cation. L-1913 4-08 Controlling BATS Damage In urban areas, bats may become a nuisance becauseoftheirsqueaking,scratchingandcrawl- inginattics...

Texas Wildlife Services

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Progress Update: M Area Closure  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A progress update of the Recovery Act at work at the Savannah River Site. The celebration of the first area cleanup completion with the help of the Recovery Act.

Cody, Tom

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

314

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transforming Parks and Protected Areas Policy and governance in a changing world Edited by Kevin S from the British Library Library of Congress Cataloging In Publication Data Transforming parks

Bolch, Tobias

315

Geologic characterization report for the Paradox Basin Study Region, Utah Study Areas. Volume 6. Salt Valley  

SciTech Connect

Surface landforms in the Salt Valley Area are generally a function of the Salt Valley anticline and are characterized by parallel and subparallel cuestaform ridges and hogbacks and flat valley floors. The most prominent structure in the Area is the Salt Valley anticline. Erosion resulting from the Tertiary uplift of the Colorado Plateau led to salt dissolution and subsequent collapse along the crest of the anticline. Continued erosion removed the collapse material, forming an axial valley along the crest of the anticline. Paleozoic rocks beneath the salt bearing Paradox Formation consist of limestone, dolomite, sandstone, siltstone and shale. The salt beds of the Paradox Formation occur in distinct cycles separated by an interbed sequence of anhydrite, carbonate, and clastic rocks. The Paradox Formation is overlain by Pennsylvanian limestone; Permian sandstone; and Mesozoic sandstone, mudstone, conglomerate and shale. No earthquakes have been reported in the Area during the period of the historic record and contemporary seismicity appears to be diffusely distributed, of low level and small magnitude. The upper unit includes the Permian strata and upper Honaker Trail Formation. The current data base is insufficient to estimate ground-water flow rates and directions in this unit. The middle unit includes the evaporites in the Paradox Formation and no laterally extensive flow systems are apparent. The lower unit consists of the rocks below the Paradox Formation where permeabilities vary widely, and the apparent flow direction is toward the west. 108 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

317

Los Azufres Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Michoaciin, Mexico Exploration Region: Transmexican Volcanic Belt GEA Development Phase: Coordinates:...

318

Sweden Building 05K0048 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Private company Private company Total floor area (BRA), m2 10660.0 OID, m2 10972.0 Interior height, m 3.0 Year of construction 1 (taxation year) 1997 Year of construction 2 (Year of construction) 1997 County Stockholm County, Sweden Mean annual temperature during the calculation period[1] 7.6 Mean annual temperature at the site 6.6 Start of the period (first day of the month) 2004/01/01 End of the period (last day of the month) 2004/12/01 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Areas by category, m2 (Gross Floor Area) - Offices 10320.0 - Heated garages (> 10 °C) 340.0 Total 10660.0 References Swedish Energy Agency[2] Purchased energy for the period [MWh/year] Electricity, total 2455.0 District heating 0.0 Oil-fired boiler 0.0 Natural gas 0.0 Town gas 0.0 Digester / landfill gas 0.0

319

Focus Areas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mission » Focus Areas Mission » Focus Areas Focus Areas Safety With this focus on cleanup completion and risk reducing results, safety still remains the utmost priority. EM will continue to maintain and demand the highest safety performance. All workers deserve to go home as healthy as they were when they came to the job in the morning. There is no schedule or milestone worth any injury to the work force. Project Management EM is increasing its concentration on project management to improve its overall performance toward cost-effective risk reduction. This will involve review of validated project baselines, schedules, and assumptions about effective identification and management of risks. Instrumental in refining the technical and business approaches to project management are the senior

320

100 Areas CERCLA ecological investigations  

SciTech Connect

This document reports the results of the field terrestrial ecological investigations conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company during fiscal years 1991 and 1992 at operable units 100-FR-3, 100-HR-3, 100-NR-2, 100-KR-4, and 100-BC-5. The tasks reported here are part of the Remedial Investigations conducted in support of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 studies for the 100 Areas. These ecological investigations provide (1) a description of the flora and fauna associated with the 100 Areas operable units, emphasizing potential pathways for contaminants and species that have been given special status under existing state and/or federal laws, and (2) an evaluation of existing concentrations of heavy metals and radionuclides in biota associated with the 100 Areas operable units.

Landeen, D.S.; Sackschewsky, M.R.; Weiss, S.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) TECH AREA GALLERY (LARGE) Los Alamos: The Laboratory Resources > Photo Gallery All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If this page is taking a long time to load, click here for a photo gallery with smaller versions of the same images. There is a map of the Tech Area at the top and again at the bottom. The first image below is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. All of the other photographs are reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society). This is a reprint of an unpublished volume originally written in 1946 by 2nd Lieutenant Edith C. Truslow, a member of the Women's Army Corps, as a contribution to the Manhattan Engineer District History.

322

Estimation of CO2 effluxes from suburban forest floor and grass using a process-based model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Carbon dioxide is an important greenhouse gas, and its atmospheric concentration has been predicted to increase in the future. The objective of this study was to quantify the soil CO2 efflux in a suburban area including mixed deciduous forest and grass by numerically modeling the CO2 transport through the soil profile. Three stations per land-cover (forest and grass) were selected at the Cub Hill site (MD, USA), where the US Forest Service operates an urban flux tower. Six VAISALA CO2 sensors (Vaisala Inc., Finland) per monitoring station were horizontally installed at 6 different depths (soil surface, 0.02, 0.05, 0.10, 0.20, and 0.30m from the soil surface) in the mid of May, 2011. Temperature and volumetric soil moisture measurements were taken using thermistors and EC-5 sensors (Decagon devices, Pullman, WA, USA) that were installed at the same depths as the CO2 sensors except for the soil surface. These data were recorded every 10min. To evaluate the numerical model (SOILCO2), CO2 efflux using the standard chamber method was measured once a week. The CO2 effluxes from the standard chamber method ranged from 3.32נ10?9 to 7.28נ10?8m3m?2s?1 and 6.79נ10?9 to 1.45נ10?7m3m?2s?1 for forest and grass, respectively. The CO2 effluxes from bare soil at the grass site varied with the range of 3.63נ10?8 to 9.37נ10?8m3m?2s?1. The pulse effect (a rapid increase of CO2 concentrations right after rainfall events) in grass, where changes in soil moisture were larger than in the forest, was more apparent than in the forest. Diurnal patterns similar to those of temperature were observed from CO2 profiles in soils. The SOILCO2 model estimated the soil CO2 effluxes with coefficients of correlation of 0.64 and 0.76 at forest and grass, respectively, and root mean square error (RMSE) of 1.58נ10?8 and 2.06נ10?8m3m?2s?1 for forest and grass, respectively. This study suggests that the SOILCO2 model can provide a better understanding of the contribution of the soil ecosystem to the carbon cycle in suburban environments including mixed deciduous forest and grass.

J.A. Chun; K. Szlavecz; M. Bernard; D. Ferrer; J. Hom; N. Saliendra

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area (Redirected from Blackfoot Reservoir Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

324

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area (Redirected from Wister Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

325

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Teels Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

326

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area (Redirected from Truckhaven Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

327

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area (Redirected from Mokapu Penninsula Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

328

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kilauea Summit Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

329

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area (Redirected from Flint Geothermal Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

330

Spherical torus plasma interactions with large-area liquid lithium surfaces in CDX-U  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The current drive experiment-upgrade (CDX-U) device at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) is a spherical torus (ST) dedicated to the exploration of liquid lithium as a potential solution to reactor first-wall problems such as heat load and erosion, neutron damage and activation, and tritium inventory and breeding. Initial lithium limiter experiments were conducted with a toroidally-local liquid lithium rail limiter (L3) from the University of California at San Diego (UCSD). Spectroscopic measurements showed a clear reduction of impurities in plasmas with the L3, compared to discharges with a boron carbide limiter. The evidence for a reduction in recycling was less apparent, however. This may be attributable to the relatively small area in contact with the plasma, and the presence of high-recycling surfaces elsewhere in the vacuum chamber. This conclusion was tested in subsequent experiments with a fully toroidal lithium limiter that was installed above the floor of the vacuum vessel. The new limiter covered over ten times the area of the L3 facing the plasma. Experiments with the toroidal lithium limiter have recently begun. This paper describes the conditioning required to prepare the lithium surface for plasma operations, and effect of the toroidal liquid lithium limiter on discharge performance.

R Kaita; R Majeski; M Boaz; P Efthimion; B Jones; D Hoffman; H Kugel; J Menard; T Munsat; A Post-Zwicker; V Soukhanovskii; J Spaleta; G Taylor; J Timberlake; R Woolley; L Zakharov; M Finkenthal; D Stutman; G Antar; R Doerner; S Luckhardt; R Maingi; M Maiorano; S Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

RHIC | New Areas of Physics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A New Area of Physics A New Area of Physics RHIC has created a new state of hot, dense matter out of the quarks and gluons that are the basic particles of atomic nuclei, but it is a state quite different and even more remarkable than had been predicted. Instead of behaving like a gas of free quarks and gluons, as was expected, the matter created in RHIC's heavy ion collisions is more like a liquid. Quarks Gluons and quarks Ions Ions about to collide Impact Just after collision Perfect Liquid The "perfect" liquid hot matter Hot Nuclear Matter A review article in the journal Science describes groundbreaking discoveries that have emerged from RHIC, synergies with the heavy-ion program at the Large Hadron Collider, and the compelling questions that will drive this research forward on both sides of the Atlantic.

332

CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

r r r r r t r r t r r r * r r r r r r CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA ,FACILITY RECORDS 1970 UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMlSSION NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE LAS VEGAS, NEVADA September 1970 Prepared By Holmes & Narver. Inc. On-Continent Test Division P.O. Box 14340 Las Vegas, Nevada 338592 ...._- _._--_ .. -- - - - - - - .. .. - .. - - .. - - - CENTRAL NEVPJJA SUPPLEMENTAL TEST AREA FACILITY RECORDS 1970 This page intentionally left blank - - .. - - - PURPOSE This facility study has been prepared in response to a request of the AEC/NVOO Property Management Division and confirmed by letter, W. D. Smith to L. E. Rickey, dated April 14, 1970, STS Program Administrative Matters. The purpose is to identify each facility, including a brief description, the acquisition cost either purchase and/or construction, and the AE costs if identi- fiable. A narrative review of the history of the subcontracts

333

Carlsbad Area Office Executive Summary  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

June 1998 June 1998 Carlsbad Area Office Executive Summary The mission of the Carlsbad Area Office (CAO) is to protect human health and the environment by opening and operating the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) for safe disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste and by establishing an effective system for management of TRU waste from generation to disposal. It includes personnel assigned to CAO, WIPP site operations, transportation, and other activities associated with the National TRU Program (NTP). The CAO develops and directs implementation of the TRU waste program, and assesses compliance with the program guidance, as well as the commonality of activities and assumptions among all TRU waste sites. A cornerstone of the Department of Energy's (DOE) national cleanup strategy, WIPP is

334

Nuclear criticality safety: 300 Area  

SciTech Connect

This Standard applies to the receipt, processing, storage, and shipment of fissionable material in the 300 Area and in any other facility under the control of the Reactor Materials Project Management Team (PMT). The objective is to establish practices and process conditions for the storage and handling of fissionable material that prevent the accidental assembly of a critical mass and that comply with DOE Orders as well as accepted industry practice.

Not Available

1991-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Innovation investment area: Technology summary  

SciTech Connect

The mission of Environmental Management`s (EM) Office of Technology Development (OTD) Innovation Investment Area is to identify and provide development support for two types of technologies that are developed to characterize, treat and dispose of DOE waste, and to remediate contaminated sites. They are: technologies that show promise to address specific EM needs, but require proof-of-principle experimentation; and (2) already proven technologies in other fields that require critical path experimentation to demonstrate feasibility for adaptation to specific EM needs. The underlying strategy is to ensure that private industry, other Federal Agencies, universities, and DOE National Laboratories are major participants in developing and deploying new and emerging technologies. To this end, about 125 different new and emerging technologies are being developed through Innovation Investment Area`s (IIA) two program elements: RDDT&E New Initiatives (RD01) and Interagency Agreements (RD02). Both of these activities are intended to foster research and development partnerships so as to introduce innovative technologies into other OTD program elements for expedited evaluation.

Not Available

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

White Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

White Mountains Geothermal Area White Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: White Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Hampshire Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

337

Truckhaven Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Truckhaven Geothermal Area Truckhaven Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Truckhaven Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

338

Honokowai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Honokowai Geothermal Area Honokowai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Honokowai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

339

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Blackfoot Reservoir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Idaho Exploration Region: Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

340

Wister Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wister Geothermal Area Wister Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Wister Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Recommendation 199: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

9: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas of the Oak Ridge Reservation from the National Priorities List Recommendation 199: Recommendation to Remove Uncontaminated Areas of...

342

Ahuachapan Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: El Salvador Exploration Region: Central American Volcanic Arc Chain GEA Development Phase: Phase...

343

Berln Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: El Salvador Exploration Region: Central American Volcanic Arc Chain GEA Development Phase: Phase...

344

Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery Act Western Area Power Administration Borrowing Authority, Recovery Act Microsoft Word - PSRP May 15 2009 WAPA...

345

Aurora Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Aurora Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4...

346

Clean Energy Research Areas | Clean Energy | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools & Resources Newsletters and Media News and Awards Supporting Organizations Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas SHARE Research Areas...

347

Aquifer Protection Area Land Use Regulations (Connecticut)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These regulations describe allowable activities within aquifer protection areas, the procedure by which such areas are delineated, and relevant permit requirements. The regulations also describe...

348

Imperial Valley Geothermal Area | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Imperial Valley Geothermal Area Imperial Valley Geothermal Area The Imperial Valley Geothermal project consists of 10 generating plants in the Salton Sea Known Geothermal Resource...

349

Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) |...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Meeting arravt061tibingham2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project (CAAFDP) Chicago Area Alternative Fuels Deployment Project...

350

Los Humeros Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Chignautla, Puebla, Mexico Exploration Region: Transmexican Volcanic Belt GEA Development Phase: Phase IV -...

351

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Lualualei Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content

352

AREA USA LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AREA USA LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: AREA USA LLC Place: Washington, DC Zip: 20004 Sector: Services Product: Washington, D.C.-based division of Fabiani & Company...

353

Fukushima Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fukushima, Japan Exploration Region: Northeast Honshu Arc GEA Development Phase: Coordinates:...

354

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area (Redirected from Chena Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

355

Tanks focus area. Annual report  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management is tasked with a major remediation project to treat and dispose of radioactive waste in hundreds of underground storage tanks. These tanks contain about 90,000,000 gallons of high-level and transuranic wastes. We have 68 known or assumed leaking tanks, that have allowed waste to migrate into the soil surrounding the tank. In some cases, the tank contents have reacted to form flammable gases, introducing additional safety risks. These tanks must be maintained in the safest possible condition until their eventual remediation to reduce the risk of waste migration and exposure to workers, the public, and the environment. Science and technology development for safer, more efficient, and cost-effective waste treatment methods will speed up progress toward the final remediation of these tanks. The DOE Office of Environmental Management established the Tanks Focus Area to serve as the DOE-EM`s technology development program for radioactive waste tank remediation in partnership with the Offices of Waste Management and Environmental Restoration. The Tanks Focus Area is responsible for leading, coordinating, and facilitating science and technology development to support remediation at DOE`s four major tank sites: the Hanford Site in Washington State, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory in Idaho, Oak Ridge Reservation in Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The technical scope covers the major functions that comprise a complete tank remediation system: waste retrieval, waste pretreatment, waste immobilization, tank closure, and characterization of both the waste and tank. Safety is integrated across all the functions and is a key component of the Tanks Focus Area program.

Frey, J.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

History of 100-B Area  

SciTech Connect

The initial three production reactors and their support facilities were designated as the 100-B, 100-D, and 100-F areas. In subsequent years, six additional plutonium-producing reactors were constructed and operated at the Hanford Site. Among them was one dual-purpose reactor (100-N) designed to supply steam for the production of electricity as a by-product. Figure 1 pinpoints the location of each of the nine Hanford Site reactors along the Columbia River. This report documents a brief description of the 105-B reactor, support facilities, and significant events that are considered to be of historical interest. 21 figs.

Wahlen, R.K.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Carlsbad Area Office strategic plan  

SciTech Connect

This edition of the Carlsbad Area Office Strategic Plan captures the U.S. Department of Energy`s new focus, and supercedes the edition issued previously in 1995. This revision reflects a revised strategy designed to demonstrate compliance with environmental regulations earlier than the previous course of action; and a focus on the selected combination of scientific investigations, engineered alternatives, and waste acceptance criteria for supporting the compliance applications. An overview of operations and historical aspects of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico is presented.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Manhattan Project: Tech Area Gallery  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

SMALL) SMALL) Los Alamos: The Laboratory Resources > Photo Gallery All of the photographs below are of the "Tech Area" at Los Alamos during or shortly after the wartime years. If you have a fast internet connection, you may wish to click here for a photo gallery with larger versions of the same images. There is a map of the Tech Area at the top and again at the bottom. The first image below is courtesy the Los Alamos National Laboratory. All of the other photographs are reproduced from Edith C. Truslow, with Kasha V. Thayer, ed., Manhattan Engineer District: Nonscientific Aspects of Los Alamos Project Y, 1942 through 1946 (Los Alamos, NM: Manhattan Engineer District, ca. 1946; first printed by Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory as LA-5200, March 1973; reprinted in 1997 by the Los Alamos Historical Society). This is a reprint of an unpublished volume originally written in 1946 by 2nd Lieutenant Edith C. Truslow, a member of the Women's Army Corps, as a contribution to the Manhattan Engineer District History.

359

Geothermal resource evaluation of the Yuma area  

SciTech Connect

This report presents an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the Yuma, Arizona area. A description of the study area and the Salton Trough area is followed by a geothermal analysis of the area, a discussion of the economics of geothermal exploration and exploitation, and recommendations for further testing. It was concluded economic considerations do not favor geothermal development at this time. (ACR)

Poluianov, E.W.; Mancini, F.P.

1985-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

360

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Southern CA Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southern CA Area Southern CA Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Southern CA Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Southern CA Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Southern CA Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Southern CA Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Southern CA Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Southern CA Area Products and Services in the Southern CA Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

362

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

363

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Whiskey Flats Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

364

Pacific Northwest Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pacific Northwest Area Pacific Northwest Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Pacific Northwest Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Pacific Northwest Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Pacific Northwest Area Products and Services in the Pacific Northwest Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

365

Chena Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chena Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Technical Problems and Solutions 8 Geology of the Area 9 Heat Source 10 Geofluid Geochemistry 11 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 12 Exploration Activities (9) 13 References Map: Chena Geothermal Area Chena Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fairbanks, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

366

Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greater Boston Area Greater Boston Area Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Clean Energy Clusters in the Greater Boston Area 1.1 Products and Services in the Greater Boston Area 1.2 Research and Development Institutions in the Greater Boston Area 1.3 Networking Organizations in the Greater Boston Area 1.4 Investors and Financial Organizations in the Greater Boston Area 1.5 Policy Organizations in the Greater Boston Area Clean Energy Clusters in the Greater Boston Area Products and Services in the Greater Boston Area Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":500,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

367

Ashland Area Support Substation Project  

SciTech Connect

The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) provides wholesale electric service to the City of Ashland (the City) by transferring power over Pacific Power Light Company's (PP L) 115-kilovolt (kV) transmission lines and through PP L's Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. The City distributes power over a 12.5-kV system which is heavily loaded during winter peak periods and which has reached the limit of its ability to serve peak loads in a reliable manner. Peak loads under normal winter conditions have exceeded the ratings of the transformers at both the Ashland and Oak Knoll Substations. In 1989, the City modified its distribution system at the request of PP L to allow transfer of three megawatts (MW's) of electric power from the overloaded Ashland Substation to the Oak Knoll Substation. In cooperation with PP L, BPA installed a temporary 6-8 megavolt-amp (MVA) 115-12.5-kV transformer for this purpose. This additional transformer, however, is only a temporary remedy. BPA needs to provide additional, reliable long-term service to the Ashland area through additional transformation in order to keep similar power failures from occurring during upcoming winters in the Ashland area. The temporary installation of another 20-MVA mobile transformer at the Ashland Substation and additional load curtailment are currently being studied to provide for sustained electrical service by the peak winter period 1992. Two overall electrical plans-of-service are described and evaluated in this report. One of them is proposed for action. Within that proposed plan-of-service are location options for the substation. Note that descriptions of actions that may be taken by the City of Ashland are based on information provided by them.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Corrective Action Decision Document for Corrective Action Unit 254: Area 25 R-MAD Decontamination Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This Corrective Action Decision Document identifies and rationalizes the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office's selection of a recommended corrective action alternative (CAA) appropriate to facilitate the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 254, R-MAD Decontamination Facility, under the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. Located in Area 25 at the Nevada Test Site in Nevada, CAU 254 is comprised of Corrective Action Site (CAS) 25-23-06, Decontamination Facility. A corrective action investigation for this CAS as conducted in January 2000 as set forth in the related Corrective Action Investigation Plan. Samples were collected from various media throughout the CAS and sent to an off-site laboratory for analysis. The laboratory results indicated the following: radiation dose rates inside the Decontamination Facility, Building 3126, and in the storage yard exceeded the average general dose rate; scanning and static total surface contamination surveys indicated that portions of the locker and shower room floor, decontamination bay floor, loft floor, east and west decon pads, north and south decontamination bay interior walls, exterior west and south walls, and loft walls were above preliminary action levels (PALs). The investigation-derived contaminants of concern (COCs) included: polychlorinated biphenyls, radionuclides (strontium-90, niobium-94, cesium-137, uranium-234 and -235), total volatile and semivolatile organic compounds, total petroleum hydrocarbons, and total Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (Metals). During the investigation, two corrective action objectives (CAOs) were identified to prevent or mitigate human exposure to COCs. Based on these CAOs, a review of existing data, future use, and current operations at the Nevada Test Site, three CAAs were developed for consideration: Alternative 1 - No Further Action; Alternative 2 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey; and Alternative 3 - Unrestricted Release Decontamination and Verification Survey and Dismantling of Building 3126. These alternatives were evaluated based on four general corrective action standards and five remedy selection decision factors, and the preferred CAA chosen on technical merit was Alternative 2. This CAA was judged to meet all requirements for the technical components evaluated and applicable state and federal regulations for closure of the site, and reduce the potential for future exposure pathways.

U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Floor San Francisco, CA 94104  

Energy Savers (EERE)

with other water users. Additionally, discharge from power plants kills billions of fish annually and overheats downstream waters. For these power plants, Section 316(b) of the...

370

Tsunamigenic Sea-Floor Deformations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geodetic data. The qualitative characteristics (that is, variation of...real-time estimation of source characteristics of the TREMORS model [HN12...of Mw , Okal compares the characteristics of the source at high and...the Internet and dedicated intranets. In 1986, NOAA's Pacific...

Costas Synolakis; Philip Liu; H. Abelson Philip; George Carrier; Harry Yeh

1997-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

371

Safety analysis, 200 Area, Savannah River Plant: Separations area operations  

SciTech Connect

The nev HB-Line, located on the fifth and sixth levels of Building 221-H, is designed to replace the aging existing HB-Line production facility. The nev HB-Line consists of three separate facilities: the Scrap Recovery Facility, the Neptunium Oxide Facility, and the Plutonium Oxide Facility. There are three separate safety analyses for the nev HB-Line, one for each of the three facilities. These are issued as supplements to the 200-Area Safety Analysis (DPSTSA-200-10). These supplements are numbered as Sup 2A, Scrap Recovery Facility, Sup 2B, Neptunium Oxide Facility, Sup 2C, Plutonium Oxide Facility. The subject of this safety analysis, the, Plutonium Oxide Facility, will convert nitrate solutions of {sup 238}Pu to plutonium oxide (PuO{sub 2}) powder. All these new facilities incorporate improvements in: (1) engineered barriers to contain contamination, (2) barriers to minimize personnel exposure to airborne contamination, (3) shielding and remote operations to decrease radiation exposure, and (4) equipment and ventilation design to provide flexibility and improved process performance.

Perkins, W.C.; Lee, R.; Allen, P.M.; Gouge, A.P.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Tectonostratigraphic reconstruction and lithofacies distribution of tertiary slope sedimentary rocks in the Western Mississippi Canyon area  

SciTech Connect

The distribution of upper Tertiary, sandstone-prone, deep-water sedimentary rocks from the vicinity of Cognac field, Mississippi Canyon (MC) 194, south of Mars field (MC763) is presented based on an integrated sequence stratigraphic analysis of seismic, well log, and biostratigraphic data. Paleo-salt distributions were reconstructed by plotting the changing positions of depocenters on five isopach maps generated from six key sequence boundaries. Depositional trends, projected under allochthonous salt sheets, indicated subsalt prospectivity. Sixteen sequences were interpreted and subdivided into three lowstand depositional units (basin-floor fan, slope fan, and prograding wedge). Thirty isochron/seismic facies maps were made to reveal the stratigraphic pattern through the late Tertiary. During the early Miocene, a salt-rimmed syncline centered north of Mars field in MC455 accumulated sediments. The salt rim collapsed, creating a middle Miocene turtle structure. Middle-late Miocene sand-rich turbidites bypassed this structure and were deposited to the south around Mars field and beyond. At the same time, another depotrough 30 mi east of Mars field channeled deep-water sands to the MC730 area. A late Miocene-early Pliocene counterregional fault striking parallel to the shelf edge formed as salt evacuated the area on the south side of the Cognac (MC194) and Lena (MC280) fields. This fault trapped the Pliocene reservoir sandstones that produce in these fields. Sedimentation during the late Pliocene-early Pleistocene was very slow (0.2m/1,000 yr) and characterized by thin, stacked, condensed sections of hemipelagic shale. Since the mid-Pleistocene, the Mississippi River has supplied sediments to the Mississippi Canyon area that have induced salt deformation that has in turn affected recent sedimentation.

Hannan, A.E.; Risch, D.L.; Chowdhury, A.N. [Geco-Prakla, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

373

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area (Redirected from Gabbs Valley Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

374

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area (Redirected from Salt Wells Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

375

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area (Redirected from Marysville Mt Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

376

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area (Redirected from Fort Bliss Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

377

Amedee Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Amedee Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Amedee Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Map: Amedee Geothermal Area Amedee Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

378

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area (Redirected from New River Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

379

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kawaihae Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

380

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area (Redirected from Maui Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area (Redirected from Glass Buttes Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

382

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area (Redirected from Obsidian Cliff Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

383

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Pueblo Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

384

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Socorro Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

385

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area (Redirected from Kauai Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

386

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area (Redirected from Dixie Meadows Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

387

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area (Redirected from Jemez Mountain Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed.

388

Alderwood Area Service Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect

Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) proposal to build a new 115-kV transmission line and 115-12.5-kV, 25-MW substation in the Alderwood, Oregon, area is discussed in the attached Environmental Assessment. The proposed substation site has been relocated about 500 feet east of the site outlined in the Environmental Assessment, but in the same field. This is not a substantial change relevant to environmental concerns. Environmental impacts of the new site differ only in that: Two residences will be visually affected. The substation will be directly across Highway 36 from two houses and would be seen in their primary views. This impact will be mitigated by landscaping the substation to create a vegetative screen. To provide access to the new site and provide for Blachly-Lane Cooperative's distribution lines, a 60-foot-wide right-of-way about 200 feet long will be needed. The total transmission line length will be less than originally planned. However, the tapline into the substation will be about 50 feet longer. 4 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Salt Wells Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Salt Wells Geothermal Area Salt Wells Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Salt Wells Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Future Plans 5 Exploration History 6 Well Field Description 7 Research and Development Activities 8 Technical Problems and Solutions 9 Geology of the Area 9.1 Regional Setting 9.2 Stratigraphy 9.3 Structure 10 Hydrothermal System 11 Heat Source 12 Geofluid Geochemistry 13 NEPA-Related Analyses (9) 14 Exploration Activities (28) 15 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: Operational"Operational" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

390

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kilauea Summit Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (12) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

391

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Florida Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

392

Molokai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Molokai Geothermal Area Molokai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Molokai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

393

Maui Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maui Geothermal Area Maui Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maui Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

394

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area (Redirected from Rhodes Marsh Area) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase:

395

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jersey Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: near Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

396

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Glass Buttes Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (14) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

397

Separation Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Separation Creek Geothermal Area Separation Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Separation Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Oregon Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

398

Areas Participating in the Reformulated Gasoline Program  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reformulated Gasoline Program Reformulated Gasoline Program Contents * Introduction * Mandated RFG Program Areas o Table 1. Mandated RFG Program Areas * RFG Program Opt-In Areas o Table 2. RFG Program Opt-In Areas * RFG Program Opt-Out Procedures and Areas o Table 3. History of EPA Rulemaking on Opt-Out Procedures o Table 4. RFG Program Opt-Out Areas * State Programs o Table 5. State Reformulated Gasoline Programs * Endnotes Spreadsheets Referenced in this Article * Reformulated Gasoline Control Area Populations Related EIA Short-Term Forecast Analysis Products * Demand and Price Outlook for Phase 2 Reformulated Gasoline, 2000 * Environmental Regulations and Changes in Petroleum Refining Operations * Areas Participating in Oxygenated Gasoline Program

399

Kauai Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kauai Geothermal Area Kauai Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kauai Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

400

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Rhodes Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Kawaihae Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kawaihae Geothermal Area Kawaihae Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kawaihae Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

402

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mokapu Penninsula Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

403

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Socorro Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (10) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

404

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

405

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (3) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Fallon, NV Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

406

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Marysville Mt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Montana Exploration Region: Other GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

407

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Flint Geothermal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Colorado Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

408

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lualualei Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

409

New River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New River Geothermal Area New River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: New River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (13) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

410

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Bristol Bay Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Exploration Region: Alaska Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: none"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

411

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Teels Marsh Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (8) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

412

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Haleakala Volcano Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Hawaii Exploration Region: Hawaii Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

413

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fort Bliss Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (22) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Texas Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

414

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Jemez Pueblo Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: New Mexico Exploration Region: Rio Grande Rift GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

415

Local Area Networks - Applications to Energy Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LOCAL AREA NETWORKS - APPLICATIONS TO MERCY MANAGmNT Advanced BRUCE M. BAKKEN Software bfanager Micro Syatems Corporation Milwaukee, WI ABSTRACT One of the newest advances in computer technology is the Local Area Network. Its many...

Bakken, B. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Navy 1 Geothermal Area | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Geothermal Area Navy 1 Geothermal Area The Navy 1 Geothermal Project is located on the test and evaluation ranges of the Naval Air Weapons Station, China Lake. At its peak, the...

417

BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the 1999 Operable Unit (OU) III Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study(RI/FS) and was designated as AreaOU III BUILDING 96 RECOMMENDATION FOR SOURCE AREA REMEDIATION FINAL Prepared by: Brookhaven REMEDIATION Executive Summary

418

Utah Geothermal Area | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Utah Geothermal Area Utah Geothermal Area Utah has two geothermal electric plants: the 23-megawatt Roosevelt Hot Springs facility near Milford run by Utah Power and CalEnergy...

419

Casa Diablo Geothermal Area | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers (EERE)

Casa Diablo Geothermal Area Casa Diablo Geothermal Area The Mammoth-Pacific geothermal power plants at Casa Diablo on the eastern front of the Sierra Nevada Range generate enough...

420

Desert Queen Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Desert Queen Geothermal Area Desert Queen Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Desert Queen Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Dixie Meadows Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (6) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

422

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lester Meadow Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

423

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Ranier Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (2) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Washington Exploration Region: Cascades GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate Mean Reservoir Temp: Estimated Reservoir Volume: Mean Capacity: Click "Edit With Form" above to add content History and Infrastructure Operating Power Plants: 0 No geothermal plants listed. Add a new Operating Power Plant Developing Power Projects: 0

424

Considering LEDs for Street and Area Lighting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

View Jim Brodrick's keynote video from the September 2009 IES Street and Area Lighting Conference in Philadelphia.

425

Functional Area Qualification Standard Reference Guides  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The reference guides have been developed to address the competency statements in DOE Functional Area Qualification Standard.

426

Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic Information System At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia (Nash, Et Al., 2002) Exploration...

427

PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY OF THE TEST AREA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

PHYSICAL OCEANOGRAPHY OF TIIE TEST AREA. PAUL L. HORRER. PROCEDURE. Current Measurements. Methods of determining currents arc varied.

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

428

Local control of area-preserving maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a method of control of chaos in area-preserving maps. This method gives an explicit expression of a control term which is added to a given area-preserving map. The resulting controlled map which is a small and suitable modification of the original map, is again area-preserving and has an invariant curve whose equation is explicitly known.

Cristel Chandre; Michel Vittot; Guido Ciraolo

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

West Central North East Area of Tucson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson #Individuals Anna Broad-billed Costa Rufous Black-chinned 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 West Central North East Area of Tucson not be conflicting, and urban areas may actually provide valuable surrogates for degraded habitats. Our knowledge

Hall, Sharon J.

430

THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADJUSTED. #12;WHAT IS THE BIGGEST PROBLEM IN THE HOUSTON AREA TODAY? (1982-2012) 51 47 25 1510 36 71 27 10THE 2012 KINDER HOUSTON AREA SURVEY: Perspectives on a City inTransition STEPHEN L. KLINEBERG The GHP-Kinder Institute Luncheon and Release of the Findings, 24 April 2012 #12;KINDER HOUSTON AREA

431

Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Original article Photosynthesis, leaf area and productivity of 5 poplar clones during; The stem volume and biomass (stem + branches) production, net photosynthesis of mature leaves and leaf area found in volume production, woody biomass production, total leaf area and net photosynthesis. Above

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

432

1333 day-use recreation area [n] [US] (1)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

recr. (Area which is frequented by ? day trippers [US] /day-trippers [UK]; ? hiking area [US] /rambling area [UK]); s...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal br Resource br Area Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region MW K Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone Mesozoic Granitic MW K Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Dixie Valley Geothermal Area Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Stepover or Relay Ramp in Normal Fault Zones major range front fault Jurassic Basalt MW K Geysers Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Holocene Magmatic Geothermal Region Pull Apart in Strike Slip Fault Zone intrusion margin and associated fractures MW K Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Walker Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Displacement Transfer Zone Caldera Margin Quaternary Rhyolite MW K

434

Wide-area egomotion from omnidirectional video and coarse 3D structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes a method for real-time vision-based localization in human-made environments. Given a coarse model of the structure (walls, floors, ceilings, doors and windows) and a video sequence, the system computes ...

Koch, Olivier (Olivier A.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Redfield Campus Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Redfield Campus Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Redfield Campus Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region GEA Development Phase: 2008 USGS Resource Estimate

436

Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Gabbs Valley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (4) 9 Exploration Activities (11) 10 References Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: Nevada Exploration Region: Central Nevada Seismic Zone GEA Development Phase: None"None" is not in the list of possible values (Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification, Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation, Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development, Phase IV - Resource Production and Power Plant Construction) for this property.

437

Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Map: Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Chocolate Mountains Geothermal Area Location Map Area Overview Geothermal Area Profile Location: California Exploration Region: Gulf of California Rift Zone GEA Development Phase: Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Coordinates: 33.352°, -115.353° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.352,"lon":-115.353,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

438

Crane Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Crane Creek Geothermal Area Crane Creek Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Crane Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.3064,"lon":-116.7447,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

439

Mother Goose Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mother Goose Geothermal Area Mother Goose Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mother Goose Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.18,"lon":-157.0183,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

440

Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fireball Ridge Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.92,"lon":-119.07,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Newcastle Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newcastle Geothermal Area Newcastle Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Newcastle Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.66166667,"lon":-113.5616667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

442

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Klamath Falls Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.23333333,"lon":-121.7666667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

443

Clear Creek Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Clear Creek Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.85,"lon":-162.3,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

444

Heber Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Heber Geothermal Area Heber Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Heber Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Heat Source 8 Geofluid Geochemistry 9 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 10 Exploration Activities (2) 11 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.71666667,"lon":-115.5283333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

445

South Brawley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Brawley Geothermal Area South Brawley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: South Brawley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.90607,"lon":-115.54,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

446

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Medicine Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (1) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.57,"lon":-121.57,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

447

Fernley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fernley Geothermal Area Fernley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fernley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.598803,"lon":-119.110415,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

448

Lakeview Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lakeview Geothermal Area Lakeview Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Lakeview Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.2,"lon":-120.36,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

449

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Drum Mountain Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.544722222222,"lon":-112.91611111111,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

450

The Needles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Needles Geothermal Area The Needles Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: The Needles Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (15) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.15,"lon":-119.68,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

451

Mt Signal Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Signal Geothermal Area Signal Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mt Signal Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.65,"lon":-115.71,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

452

Carson River Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

River Geothermal Area River Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Carson River Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.77,"lon":-119.715,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

453

Harney Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Geothermal Area Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Harney Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.18166667,"lon":-119.0533333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

454

Maazama Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Maazama Well Geothermal Area Maazama Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Maazama Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.8965,"lon":-121.9865,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

455

False Pass Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

False Pass Geothermal Area False Pass Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: False Pass Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.93,"lon":-163.24,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

456

Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Okpilak Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":69.3,"lon":-144.0333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

457

Hot Pot Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hot Pot Geothermal Area Hot Pot Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hot Pot Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (6) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.922,"lon":-117.108,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Stillwater Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stillwater Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Stillwater Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (3) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.51666667,"lon":-118.5516667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

459

Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Well Geothermal Area Well Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Willow Well Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.6417,"lon":-150.095,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

460

Area Guide - National Transportation Research Center (NTRC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Area Guide Area Guide Recreational & Cultural Opportunities Some Things To Do In and Around the NTRC Area Area Attractions Big South Fork The following links offer general information about parks, cultural events, and recreational opportunities available. All locations listed are within a few hours' drive. Big South Fork National River and Recreation Area of the U.S. National Park Service, located near Oak Ridge. Biltmore Estate- A 250-room historical chateau in located in Asheville, North Carolina (about 3 hours from Oak Ridge); open all year Knoxville, Tennessee Women's Basketball Hall of Fame, Knoxville Star of Knoxville Riverboat Ice Rinks Ice Chalet Icearium Korrnet - Website for area nonprofit organizations Big South Fork Park - Canoeing, fishing, camping, hiking; located near

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (7) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.1469,"lon":-165.9078,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

462

Fallon Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fallon Geothermal Area Fallon Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Fallon Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (1) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.38,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

463

Randsburg Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Randsburg Geothermal Area Randsburg Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Randsburg Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.38333333,"lon":-117.5333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

464

Kwiniuk Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kwiniuk Geothermal Area Kwiniuk Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Kwiniuk Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":64.70787,"lon":-162.46488,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

465

Worswick Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Worswick Geothermal Area Worswick Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Worswick Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.5636,"lon":-114.7986,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

466

Area Information | Y-12 National Security Complex  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Visiting Us / Area Information Visiting Us / Area Information Area Information Guides, Area Maps, Airport... Airport, About: McGhee Tyson Airport Airport: map to Oak Ridge/Knoxville Oak Ridge: City Guide for City of Oak Ridge, Tennessee Knoxville: maps for visitors Oak Ridge: area map with location of Y-12 Visitor's Center Oak Ridge: map of city streets Roane County: Roane County Guide Resources: News, History... Knoxville: Knoxville, Tennessee Knoxville: Museums Knoxville: Knoxville News-Sentinel Oak Ridge: City of Oak Ridge Oak Ridge: Chamber of Commerce Oak Ridge: Convention and Visitors Bureau Oak Ridge: Oak Ridger Oak Ridge: Secret City History Area Attractions: To Do and See Knoxville: Clarence Brown Theater Knoxville: Frank H. McClung Museum Knoxville: Knoxville Opera Company, Francis Graffeo, General

467

Radio Towers Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radio Towers Geothermal Area Radio Towers Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Radio Towers Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.03666667,"lon":-115.4566667,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

468

Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Newberry Caldera Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (2) 9 Exploration Activities (18) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.71666667,"lon":-121.2333333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

469

Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Serpentine Springs Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.85703165,"lon":-164.7097211,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

470

North Brawley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North Brawley Geothermal Area North Brawley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: North Brawley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":33.0153,"lon":-115.5153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

471

Canby Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canby Geothermal Area Canby Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Canby Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.438,"lon":-120.8676,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

472

Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mcleod 88 Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.028,"lon":-117.136,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

473

Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Mitchell Butte Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.763,"lon":-117.156,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

474

Circle Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Circle Geothermal Area Circle Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Circle Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.48236057,"lon":-144.6372556,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

475

Patua Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Patua Geothermal Area Patua Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Patua Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (11) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.598611111111,"lon":-119.215,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

476

Ophir Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ophir Geothermal Area Ophir Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Ophir Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":61.1925,"lon":-159.8589,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

477

Hawthorne Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hawthorne Geothermal Area Hawthorne Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Hawthorne Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (9) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.53,"lon":-118.65,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

478

Manley Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Manley Geothermal Area Manley Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Manley Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65,"lon":-150.633333,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

479

Routt Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Routt Geothermal Area Routt Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Routt Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.56,"lon":-106.85,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

480

Definition: Reliability Coordinator Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coordinator Area Coordinator Area Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reliability Coordinator Area The collection of generation, transmission, and loads within the boundaries of the Reliability Coordinator. Its boundary coincides with one or more Balancing Authority Areas.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, Reliability Coordinator, Balancing Authority Area, transmission line, balancing authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inlin LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. e Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Reliability_Coordinator_Area&oldid=502626" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "floor area bra" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Paso Robles Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Paso Robles Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.657,"lon":-120.6945,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

482

Emmons Lake Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lake Geothermal Area Lake Geothermal Area Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Resource Area: Emmons Lake Geothermal Area Contents 1 Area Overview 2 History and Infrastructure 3 Regulatory and Environmental Issues 4 Exploration History 5 Well Field Description 6 Geology of the Area 7 Geofluid Geochemistry 8 NEPA-Related Analyses (0) 9 Exploration Activities (0) 10 References Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"TERRAIN","zoom":6,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"300px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.3333,"lon":-1