Sample records for flood geomagnetic storm

  1. New insights on geomagnetic storms from observations and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jordanova, Vania K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the response at Earth of the Sun's varying energy output and forecasting geomagnetic activity is of central interest to space science, since intense geomagnetic storms may cause severe damages on technological systems and affect communications. Episodes of southward (Bzgeomagnetic conditions are associated either with coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and possess long and continuous negative IMF Bz excursions, or with high speed solar wind streams (HSS) whose geoeffectiveness is due to IMF Bz profiles fluctuating about zero with various amplitudes and duration. We show examples of ring current simulations during two geomagnetic storms representative of each interplanetary condition with our kinetic ring current atmosphere interactions model (RAM), and investigate the mechanisms responsible for trapping particles and for causing their loss. We find that periods of increased magnetospheric convection coinciding with enhancements of plasma sheet density are needed for strong ring current buildup. During the HSS-driven storm the convection potential is highly variable and causes small sporadic injections into the ring current. The long period of enhanced convection during the CME-driven storm causes a continuous ring current injection penetrating to lower L shells and stronger ring current buildup.

  2. Evolution of the ring current during two geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lui, A.T.Y.; McEntire, R.W.; Krimigis, S.M.

    1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The progressive developments in the radial profiles of the particle pressure, plasma beta, and electric currents of the storm time ring current are investigated with data from the medium energy particle analyzer on the AMPTE Charged Particle Explorer spacecraft. Measurements of ions from 25 keV to 1 MeV, which carry 70--85% of the energy density of the entire ring current population, are used in this work. Two geomagnetic storms in September of 1984 are selected and four traversals of the equatorial ring current region during the course of each storm are studied. It is shown that enhancements in the particle pressure occur initially in the outer region and reach the inner region in the late phase of the storm. Structures suggestive of multiple particle injections are seen in the pressure profile. The leading and trailing edges of the particle injection structures are associated, respectively, with the depressions and enhancements of the westward current densities of the ring current. Plasma beta occasionally increases to values of the order of 1 in some regions of the ring current from prestorm values of the order of 0.1 or less. It is also found that the location of the maximum ring current particle pressure can be several earth radii from where the most intense westward ring current flows. This is a consequence of the dominance of pressure gradient current over the current associated with the magnetic field line curvature and particle anisotropy. copyright American Geophysical Union 1987

  3. SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Ying D.

    On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric ...

  4. Flooding/storm/gale Force Wind Remove Anyone From Immediate Danger If Safe To Do So

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Flooding/storm/gale Force Wind Remove Anyone From Immediate Danger If Safe To Do So Flooding 1/gale Force Wind 1. Move all people away from windows. 2. Close all curtains, drapes and blinds. 3. Shelter. If using a mobile phone, DiAl 0800 823-637. Flooding/storm/gale Force Wind #12;

  5. A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

  6. Geomagnetic Storms January 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    infrastructure are especially vulnerable: · Electrical Power Distribution: Massive ground currents resulting from to the world's electrical power grids, telecommunication systems and global satellite navigation networks. Re and permanent damage to transformers. Modern high voltage power grids are more vulnerable to space weather

  7. Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong geomagnetic storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong hole effect. We use multi-instruments as SCINDA-GPS station at Helwan, Egypt (29.86 N, 31.32 E) and ASW-MAGDAS station at Aswan, Egypt (23.59 N, 32.51 E) in the equatorial region. At the beginning of the storm our

  8. Cheap Textile Dam Protection of Seaport Cities against Hurricane Storm Surge Waves, Tsunamis, and Other Weather-Related Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Author offers to complete research on a new method and cheap applicatory design for land and sea textile dams. The offered method for the protection of the USA's major seaport cities against hurricane storm surge waves, tsunamis, and other weather-related inundations is the cheapest (to build and maintain of all extant anti-flood barriers) and it, therefore, has excellent prospective applications for defending coastal cities from natural weather-caused disasters. It may also be a very cheap method for producing a big amount of cyclical renewable hydropower, land reclamation from the ocean, lakes, riverbanks, as well as land transportation connection of islands, and islands to mainland, instead of very costly over-water bridges and underwater tunnels.

  9. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Taylor, E.R. Jr. [ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems` responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  10. Electric utility industry experience with geomagnetic disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnes, P.R.; Rizy, D.T.; McConnell, B.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Taylor, E.R. Jr. (ABB Power Systems, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)); Tesche, F.M.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geomagnetic disturbance (GMD) by its nature occurs globally and almost simultaneously. Severe geomagnetic storms cause problems for electric power systems. The vulnerability of electric power systems to such events has apparently increased during the last 10 to 20 years because power system transmission lines have become more interconnected and have increased in length and because power systems are now operated closer to their limits than in the past. In this report, the experience of electric utilities during geomagnetic storms is examined and analyzed. Measured data, effects on power system components, and power system impacts are considered. It has been found that electric power systems are susceptible to geomagnetically induced earth-surface potential gradients as small as few (2 to 3) volts per kilometer, corresponding to a storm of K-6 intensity over an area of high earth resistivity. The causes and effects are reasonably well understood, but additional research is needed to develop a better understanding of solar-induced geomagnetic storms and the responses of power systems to these types of storms. A better understanding of geomagnetic storms and the power systems' responses to GMDs is needed so that mitigation measures can be implemented that will make power systems less susceptible to severe geomagnetic disturbances. A GMD caused by a large high-altitude nuclear detonation is similar in many ways to that of solar-induced geomagnetic storms except that a nuclear-caused disturbance would be much more intense with a far shorter duration. 49 refs.

  11. Flood Management This impromptu activity was contrived by playing with a storm drain that entered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

    waterways. Concept: Students practice with hydrology and flood control terms as well as measuring drainage sloped downward to other water sources, we decided that this might be a good as guess as any for practice that "real" people do on a regular basis in which the students will complete the task in 1-2 hours (except

  12. Radiation Belt Storm Probes Ion Composition Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    current produced the "bays" (decreases in the ground-level geomagnetic field) measured in magnetogram current" around Earth and its association with geomagnetic storms began in the early days of the twentieth Storm Probes (RBSP) spacecraft is the magnetosphere ring current instrument that will provide data

  13. Some topics and historical episodes in geomagnetism and aeronomy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukushima, N. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author provides historical perspective on work in the area of geomagnetism and aeronomy. He discusses early ideas discussed in the literature, work by Birkelund on current flows, ideas on the curl-freeness of the geomagnetic fields, studies of auroral records recorded by man, studies of magnetic storms, geomagnetic field measurements, and of late the wealth of satellite information of the magnetosphere and solar wind effects.

  14. Storm-Substorm Relationships During the 4 October, 2000 Storm. IMAGE Global ENA Imaging Results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Geoffrey D.

    in geomagnetic storms and that the main-phase ring current is mostly partial where ions drift on open Mexico Global ion distributions in the 1-200 keV energy range from the main phase of the geomagnetic substorms occured during the main phase as can be seen from in-situ measurements from geosynchronous

  15. Nuclear Magnetohydrodynamic EMP, Solar Storms, and Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rabinowitz, M; Glytsis, E N; Cokkinides, G J; Rabinowitz, Mario; Glytsis, Elias N.; Cokkinides, George J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynarnic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E 10^-2 V/m and lasts >10^3 sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  16. Nuclear Magnetohydrodynamic EMP, Solar Storms, and Substorms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Rabinowitz; A. P. Sakis Meliopoulos; Elias N. Glytsis; George J. Cokkinides

    2003-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynarnic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E 10^-2 V/m and lasts >10^3 sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  17. Rotor heating effects from geomagnetic induced currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gish, W.B.; Feero, W.E.; Rockefeller, G.D. (Electric Research and Management, Inc., State College, PA (United States))

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The heating effects at the end-ring connection areas of the rotor due to the harmonic current generation of a saturating unit transformer from geomagnetic induced currents (GIC) on the transmission system have been calculated from observed data and from EMTP studies sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute. These calculations show that damage may occur during strong GIC storm activity. This damage can occur from unit transformer saturation or other transformers in the system near the generator. The possibility of damage should be monitored during strong GIC storms through the use of appropriate negative sequence current monitoring and alarms.

  18. High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otago, University of

    High latitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave induced current (GIC) in the Scottish power system in southern Scotland, during a storm event, and exhibit significantly different amplitude characteristics. Finally, we compared in detail the geomagnetic

  19. Nuclear magnetohydrodynamic EMP, solar storms, and substorms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabinowitz, M. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)); Meliopoulous, A.P.S.; Glytsis, E.N. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Electrical Engineering); Cokkinides, G.J. (Electrical Engineering Dept., Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States))

    1992-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In addition to a fast electromagnetic pulse (EMP), a high altitude nuclear burst produces a relatively slow magnetohydrodynamic EMP (MHD EMP), whose effects are like those from solar storm geomagnetically induced currents (SS-GIC). The MHD EMP electric field E [approx lt] 10[sup [minus] 1] V/m and lasts [approx lt] 10[sup 2] sec, whereas for solar storms E [approx gt] 10[sup [minus] 2] V/m and lasts [approx gt] 10[sup 3] sec. Although the solar storm electric field is lower than MHD EMP, the solar storm effects are generally greater due to their much longer duration. Substorms produce much smaller effects than SS-GIC, but occur much more frequently. This paper describes the physics of such geomagnetic disturbances and analyzes their effects.

  20. Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Steve

    Observing geomagnetic induction in magnetic satellite measurements and associated implications@ucsd.edu; cconstable@ucsd.edu) [1] Currents induced in Earth by temporal variations in the external magnetic field have by harmonic Dst (``disturbance storm time'') excitation of the magnetospheric ring current in satellite

  1. Geomagnetically Induced Currents / Telluric Currents and Potential for Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Geomagnetically Induced Currents / Telluric Currents and Potential for Power System Impacts from System Impacts for Extreme Size Storm Events #12;Space Weather ­ GIC & Power System Impacts Overview Aspects of Future Grid Expansion are Unsettled One Concept ~7 times increase in US 765kV Transmission

  2. Geomagnetic Temporal Spectrum Catherine Constable 1 GEOMAGNETIC TEMPORAL SPECTRUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Constable, Catherine G.

    of geomagnetic variations. The power spectral density S(f) is a measure of the power in geomagnetic field. At a distance of about 3 earth radii, the magnetospheric ring current for Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism measurements of the geomagnetic field to estimate the power spectrum. Power spectral estimation is usually

  3. Simulation of geomagnetic currents induced in a power system by magnetohydrodynamic electromagnetic pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rackliffe, G.B.; Crouse, J.C.; Legro, J.R.; Kruse, V.J.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper quantifies the quasi-dc currents induced on a power system by a simulated magnetohydrodynamic pulse (MHD-EMP). The determination of the quasi-dc currents is based upon the similarity between the effects of MHD-EMP and the impact of geomagnetic storms. The paper highlights how the methodology to calculate geomagnetic-induced currents from solar storms was modified to calculate the currents induced by a MHD-EMP event. After specification of the MHD-EMP environment and the selection of a power system to study, the quasi-dc currents induced in the power system were calculated.

  4. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

  5. Storm Water Analytical Period

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Protection Obeying Environmental Laws Individual Permit Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm...

  6. Feasibility analysis and design of a flood barrier concept for the City of New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingilis, Demetres

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flooding has always been a major concern for coastal communities. However, many parts of New York City never had to worry about flooding until Hurricane Sandy hit in October 2012. The hurricane brought a record level storm ...

  7. Initial Simulation Results of Storm-Time Ring Current in a Self-Consistent Magnetic Field Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Larry

    , and electrons. The ring current is greatly intensified during geomagnetic storms, and produces large measurement of the magnetic disturbances from all magnetospheric currents on the surface of the EarthInitial Simulation Results of Storm-Time Ring Current in a Self-Consistent Magnetic Field Model S

  8. Geomagnetic Storms and Long-Term Impacts on Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkham, Harold; Makarov, Yuri V.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; DeSteese, John G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Diao, Ruisheng

    2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was commissioned to study the potential impact of a severe GIC event on the western U.S.-Canada power grid (referred to as the Western Interconnection). The study identified long transmission lines (length exceeding 150 miles) that did not include series capacitors. The basic assumption for the study is that a GIC is more likely to couple to long transmission lines, and that series capacitors would block the flow of the induced DC GIC. Power system simulations were conducted to evaluate impacts to the bulk power system if transformers on either end of these lines failed. The study results indicated that the Western Interconnection was not substantially at risk to GIC because of the relatively small number of transmission lines that met this criterion. This report also provides a summary of the Hydro-Québec blackout on March 13, 1989, which was caused by a GIC. This case study delves into the failure mechanisms of that event, lessons learned, and preventive measures that have been implemented to minimize the likelihood of its reoccurrence. Finally, the report recommends that the electric power industry consider the adoption of new protective relaying approaches that will prevent severe GIC events from catastrophically damaging transformers. The resulting changes may increase the likelihood of smaller disruptions but should prevent an unlikely yet catastrophic national-level event.

  9. SciTech Connect: "geomagnetic storms"

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science,Speeding accessKuehn, Jeffery A"KERN,GREG" Name

  10. Protection of Coastal Infrastructure under Rising Flood Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lickley, M.J.

    The 2005 hurricane season was particularly damaging to the United States, contributing to significant losses to energy infrastructure—much of it the result of flooding from storm surge during hurricanes Katrina and Rita. ...

  11. STORM SURGE WARNING SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    warnings Early indication of storm surges 2 ­ 10 days before ECMWF Ensemble Prediction System 3-48 hrs1 STORM SURGE WARNING SERVICE SVSD by Jan Kroos Rijkswaterstaat / RIKZ #12;2 Overview · Organisation Storm Surge Warning Service · Allocation of tasks Authorities · Process of Storm Surge Warning

  12. Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory Preparation for Tropical Storms or Hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory Preparation for Tropical Storms or Hurricanes damage, significant rainfall and possible campus flooding. Below are some guidelines that should exits and corridors are clear. Someone from the Environmental Health and Safety Department

  13. Modeling the deep penetration of outer belt electrons during the ``Halloween'' magnetic storm in 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xinlin

    of this model is that the inputs are solely from measurements of current solar wind and energetic electrons. During the geomagnetic storm of October/November 2003, the intensity peak of the outer radiation belt model is developed, using the measurements of relativistic electrons at geosynchronous orbit

  14. STORM WATER Residential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

  15. Design Storm for Total Retention.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Recovery of water quality capture volume Design Storms Storm events: 24-hour storm) Percentile rainfall event (e.g., an 80th percentile rainfall event) Limitations: Actual storm...

  16. Solar wind and geomagnetism: toward a standard classification of geomagnetic activity from 1868 to 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zerbo, J. L.

    We examined solar activity with a large series of geomagnetic data from 1868 to 2009. We have revisited the geomagnetic activity classification scheme of Legrand and Simon (1989) and improve their scheme by lowering the ...

  17. Regional flood hazard assessment of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional flood-hazard assessments performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants are reviewed, compared, and contrasted to determine the relationship of probable maximum flood methodology with respect to US Department of Energy design and evaluation guidelines. The Paducah assessment was carried out using probable maximum flood methodology, while the Portsmouth assessment utilized probabilistic techniques. Results indicated that regional flooding along nearby rivers would not inundate either plant, and that the guidelines were satisfied. A comparison of results indicated that the probable maximum flood recurrence interval associated with the Paducah assessment exceeded the 10,000 years depending on the choice of the probabilistic model used to perform the assessment. It was concluded, based on an analysis of two data points, that smaller watersheds driven by single event storms could be assessed using probabilistic techniques, while probable maximum flood methodology could be applied to larger drainage basins flooded by storm sequences. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Strong coronal channelling and interplanetary evolution of a solar storm up to Earth and Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Möstl, Christian; Frahm, Rudy A; Liu, Ying D; Long, David M; Colaninno, Robin C; Reiss, Martin A; Temmer, Manuela; Farrugia, Charles J; Posner, Arik; Dumbovi?, Mateja; Janvier, Miho; Démoulin, Pascal; Boakes, Peter; Devos, Andy; Kraaikamp, Emil; Mays, Mona L; Vrsnak, Bojan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The severe geomagnetic effects of solar storms or coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are to a large degree determined by their propagation direction with respect to Earth. There is a lack of understanding of the processes that determine their non-radial propagation. Here we present a synthesis of data from seven different space missions of a fast CME, which originated in an active region near the disk centre and, hence, a significant geomagnetic impact was forecasted. However, the CME is demonstrated to be channelled during eruption into a direction + 37+/-10 degree (longitude) away from its source region, leading only to minimal geomagnetic effects. In situ observations near Earth and Mars confirm the channelled CME motion, and are consistent with an ellipse shape of the CME-driven shock provided by the new Ellipse Evolution model, presented here. The results enhance our understanding of CME propagation and shape, which can help to improve space weather forecasts.

  19. Location-Aided Flooding: An Energy-Efficient Data Dissemination Protocol for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Location-Aided Flooding: An Energy-Efficient Data Dissemination Protocol for Wireless Sensor such as the broadcast storm problem [6]. In this paper, we present an energy-efficient flooding mechanism, termed of battery and, hence, any solution must be energy-efficient. . Self-configuration. Since it is not feasible

  20. AGU: Journal of Geophysical Research geomagnetic ionosphere currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    variations Space Weather: Impacts on technological systems Space Weather: Geomagnetically induced currents

  1. Storm Water Individual Permit.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    information meeting to discuss the biannual update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit. Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of...

  2. Individual Permit for Storm Water

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Compliance Miscellaneous EPA Submittals Public Meetings Renewal Application Construction Certifications Corrective Action Storm Water Analytical Period Get updates on LANL...

  3. Weathering the storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burr, M.T.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When Hurricane Andrew struck, thousands were displaced from their homes in Florida and Louisiana. Now, months after the winds ceased blowing, the storm is causing hardship once again. Insurance companies sustaining large losses in recent months from a number of natural disasters - including the hurricane - are now passing those losses on to their customers. Independent power companies are no exception.

  4. Storm water pollution prevention plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rossmiller, R.L. (HDR Engineering, Inc., Bellevue, WA (United States))

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) general permit applications for industrial storm water discharge were to have been filed by October 1992. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and state agencies are now issuing permits based on these applications. One compliance aspect of the permits is the Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3). The plan must identify the facility's potential sources of storm water pollution and develop and implement best management practices (BMPs) to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff. The objectives of the NPDES storm water program are to eliminate illegal dumping and illicit connections, and to reduce pollutants in industrial storm water discharge. These regulations require industry to develop detailed facility site maps, and describe the types, amounts and locations of potential pollutants. Based on this information, industry can develop and implement best management practices to reduce pollutants in storm water runoff.

  5. EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Geomagnetic data provided by different

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan, University of

    (from measurements to modeling) in Encyclopedia of Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism [Gub- bins geomagnetic variations over a long time and at a given location. Currently, more than 70 countries oper- ateEOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Geomagnetic data provided by different platforms

  6. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  7. Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wisconsin's storm water runoff regulations include permitting requirements for construction sites and industrial facilities, including those processing or extracting coal or gas. The purpose of the...

  8. Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . What can I do to help protect storm water quality? Proper use and disposal of hazardous products on campus. Con- taminants, such as oil and grease, can be collected by storm water runoff, washed into storm

  9. Overview of the Storm Water Individual Permit.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the LANL Storm Water Individual Permit? Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No...

  10. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM HAUGHTON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment and enables moreFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Flooding Flood Forecasting Local Information Haughton ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins

  11. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM JOHNSTONE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins Flood

  12. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM NERANG RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ALERT System The Nerang River ALERT flood warning system was completed in the early 1990's as a coFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NERANG RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Nerang ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins

  13. artificial geomagnetic field: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    drivers of the largest geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) during the solar cycle 23. Interplanetary coronal mass ejections (ICMEs) are the major causes of intense...

  14. Storm Water Quality Please report any concerns,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Storm Water Quality Hotline: Please report any concerns, illegal dumping into storm drains, or suspicious activities that may cause environmental harm to the Storm Water Quality Hotline: (831) 4592553) 4594520 http://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Volunteer and intern with the Storm Water Management Program

  15. On the Differences in Storm Rainfall from Hurricanes Isidore and Lili. Part I: Satellite Observations and Rain Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, Haiyan

    and freshwater flooding is the number one cause of death from hurricanes in the United States (Elsberry 2002 1998­2000, Lonfat et al. (2004) showed that the maximum azimuthally averaged rainfall rate is about 12. of rain (24 h) 1 ] and Tropical Storm Allison (2001, $6 billion in damages, 27 deaths, 35­40 in. of rain

  16. Geomagnetic effects modelling for the PJM interconnection system. Part 2; Geomagnetically induced current study results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prabhakara, F.S.; Hannett, L.N.; Ringlee, R.J. (Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)); Ponder, J.Z. (PJM Interconnection, Norristown, PA (US))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a computer program for calculation of geomagnetically induced current (GIC) and a GIC power system model for the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection is described in this paper. Results of GIC for three different ionospheric source configurations are shown. A new method is presented for estimating GIC in unmetered parts of the system based on a few measurements and precalculated geomagnetic disturbance conditions. The use of an interactive, menu driven GIC program to study mitigation concepts including the effects of line outages, line series capacitors, transformer neutral blocking resistors and transformer neutral blocking capacitors is also presented.

  17. The Impact of Climate Change on Hurricane Flooding Inundation, Property Damages, and Population Affected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Ashley E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Bret Low Estimate 2030 ... 58 19 Flood Building Loss Estimation ................................................................. 61 xiii FIGURE...) studied historical shoreline changes in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to sea level, hurricanes and other strong storms can also greatly affect the morphology of barrier islands. This has been a popular topic of research in the past few years...

  18. A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

  19. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid/vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency – which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor™ operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor™ utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the column’s pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoint’s proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor™ is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plant’s distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BURDEKIN RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment below the DamFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURDEKIN RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Local Information Burdekin ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings

  1. Mosquito Problems after a Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Mark

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-042 8-08 Mark M. Johnsen, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, The Texas A&M System After a severe storm, mosquito populations can explode, and the diseases they carry can be a danger to humans. Mosquito problems occur in two distinct waves after.... Louis encephalitis. This mosquito species lays eggs in roadside ditches, storm sew- ers, birdbaths, or any container or depression that holds water. Eggs hatch in 7 days. West Nile virus (WNV) has two distinct clini- cal forms known as West Nile Fever...

  2. GIS-BASED PREDICTION OF HURRICANE FLOOD INUNDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUDI, DAVID [Los Alamos National Laboratory; KALYANAPU, ALFRED [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BERSCHEID, ALAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation environment is being developed for the prediction and analysis of the inundation consequences for infrastructure systems from extreme flood events. This decision support architecture includes a GIS-based environment for model input development, simulation integration tools for meteorological, hydrologic, and infrastructure system models and damage assessment tools for infrastructure systems. The GIS-based environment processes digital elevation models (30-m from the USGS), land use/cover (30-m NLCD), stream networks from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and soils data from the NRCS (STATSGO) to create stream network, subbasins, and cross-section shapefiles for drainage basins selected for analysis. Rainfall predictions are made by a numerical weather model and ingested in gridded format into the simulation environment. Runoff hydrographs are estimated using Green-Ampt infiltration excess runoff prediction and a 1D diffusive wave overland flow routing approach. The hydrographs are fed into the stream network and integrated in a dynamic wave routing module using the EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) to predict flood depth. The flood depths are then transformed into inundation maps and exported for damage assessment. Hydrologic/hydraulic results are presented for Tropical Storm Allison.

  3. Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    and disposal of hazardous products. (Photo at right) Do not pour anything down storm drains. Please contact car on campus. Con- taminants, such as oil and grease, can be collected by storm water runoff, washed

  4. 2011 Baird Holm LLP Storm Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    for control of storm water runoff has been the use of best management practices ("BMPs") ­ Notwithstanding© 2011 Baird Holm LLP Storm Water Management ­ Shifting Paradigms John P. Heil, Esq. Baird Holm LLP@bairdholm.com #12;© 2011 Baird Holm LLP Introductory Summary · Storm water runoff is generated when precipitation

  5. Dynamics of a Cytokine Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stengel, Robert F.

    profiles in a tissue, in the lungs, the location of the initial infection does not seem to be a determinant of acute lung injury (ALI) with respiratory failure, sepsis, and a cytokine storm." Tisoncik et al, "Into of lymphocytes and monocytes from 4th hour to 4th day" ! Multi-organ failure" ! Infiltrates in the lung

  6. GE Anna Heijbel / The Storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Weidong

    1 / GE Anna Heijbel / The Storm® Confocal Optics 50, 100, 200 µm 5 IQTL · ·DNA ·DNA Gels, blots, tissue sections (not in situ), radio-TLC & X-Ray diffraction #12;2 / GE Anna Heijbel / Phosphor µm 1010 43 x 35 cm43 x 35 cm Scanning Technology #12;3 / GE Anna Heijbel / Confocal Optics PMTPMT

  7. Overwash induced by storm conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Young Hyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of historical hurricanes data and March 1962 northeaster, Hurricanes Carla, Camille and Hugo were notorious for high surge and Hurricane Celia and Andrew were noted for high winds and Hurricane Beulah, Agnes and Floyd were recorded as extreme rainfall... ....................................................................................6 2.2. Tropical Storm and Hurricane Climatology and Parameters........................7 2.3. Overwash Processes .....................................................................................9 2.4. Impacts of Geological...

  8. Geomagnetic equatorial anomaly in zonal plasma flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aggson, T.L.; Herrero, F.A.; Mayr, H.G.; Brace, L.H. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Maynard, N.C. (Air Force Geophysics, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States)); Liebrecht, M.C. (Science Applications Research, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States))

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors report here on the observation of a geomagnetic signature in the zonal eastward plasma flow, which is a striking feature of the equatorial ionosphere in the evening quadrant. These observations were derived from (E {times} B)/B{sup 2} measurements made with the cylindrical double floating probe experiment carried on the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite. The signature consists of a crest-trough-crest effect in the latitude dependence of the eastward plasma flow with the crests at {plus minus}8{degree} dip latitude and the trough nearly centered at the dip equator at all geographic longitudes. This phenomenon can be readioly interpreted in terms of the altitude dependence of the F region dynamo electric field, and it is related to dip equator signatures in the plasma density and the magnetic declinatoin which have been reported earlier.

  9. Flooding and Fire Ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nester, Paul

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of debris or in homes and other build- ings until they build new mounds in the soil. During flooding Avoid contact with floating mats of fire ants. If you are in a row boat, do not touch the ants with the oars. If you must work in flood water, try... within the first 15 to 20 minutes. Some people report that the irrita- tion of a fire ant sting can be relieved by applying a 50:50 solution of bleach and water. Other home remedies include ammonia, meat tenderizer, tea tree oil and camphor...

  10. Service Assessment Hurricane Floyd Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service Assessment Hurricane Floyd Floods of September 1999 mm r u, /"' r U.S.DEPARTMENTOF COMMERCE: Hurricane Floyd Floods of September 1999. Aerial view of Grifton, North Carolina, with flooding from the Neuse River. (Photograph courtesy of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.) #12;Service Assessment Hurricane

  11. Copyright 2012 IEEE. Reprinted, with permission from: Integration of Geomagnetic Disturbance Modeling into the Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    stability. GMDs cause quasi-dc, geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) in the transformers and transmission that there are two risks that occur with the introduction of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs). The first

  12. Copyright 2013 IEEE. Power Grid Sensitivity Analysis of Geomagnetically Induced Currents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright © 2013 IEEE. Power Grid Sensitivity Analysis of Geomagnetically Induced Currents Thomas J Transactions on Power Systems, March 2013. © IEEE, 2013 1 Abstract--Geomagnetically induced currents (GICs for such studies. Index Terms--GIC, Geomagnetically Induced Currents, GMD, Power System Sensitivity Analysis, Power

  13. Disturbances in the US electric grid associated with geomagnetic Carolus J. Schrijver* and Sarah D. Mitchell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Disturbances in the US electric grid associated with geomagnetic activity Carolus J. Schrijver on the US electric power grid for the period from 1992 through 2010. We find, with more than 3r significance. solar magnetic activity ­ geomagnetic disturbances ­ US electric power grid ­ geomagnetically induced

  14. Storm detection by electronic means

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wooten, Allen Dewey

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    equivalent circuit (figure 5), 14 ~744 r 50, 000 + r r = 7uu ouu ? 17u irrr 4. 1 Thus, the applied sigr 1 eg is not 245 volts, but 14 volts. This signal voltage is sufficient to cause Eb to drop froia 390 volts to 290 volts. I'Loni. , lly, C402 (Figure 3... and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the deEree of MASTER OF SCIENCE IN ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING 1949 CONTENTS Introduction Theoretic. . l Consideration oi' Radar Storm Detection II. Extending =ffective R~ge of Radar...

  15. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you sure you wantJoin us for|Idaho | DepartmentEnergy Steps toStorageStorm

  16. Storm Windows | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMayDepartment of StaffingStorage Water Heaters Storage Water HeatersStorm

  17. GEOMAGNETIC REVERSALS DRIVEN BY ABRUPT SEA LEVEL CHANGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muller, R.A.; Morris, D.E.

    1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the moment of inertia of the earth, brought about by the redistribution of ocean water from the tropics to ice at high latitudes, couple energy from the spin of the earth into convection in the liquid core. This mechanism may help provide the driving energy for the earth's dynamo. Sufficiently rapid ocean level changes can disrupt the dynamo, resulting (in half of the cases) in a geomagnetic field reversal. The model can account for the previously mysterious correlation reported between geomagnetic reversals and mass extinctions.

  18. Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental monitoring stations, canyons Stations supporting Santa...

  19. Effects of the Georgia flood of `94 on Lake Blackshear Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlay, R.C.; Northrop, J.H. [Northrop, Devine & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Crisp, R.L. Jr. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical Storm Alberto produced record rainfall in central Georgia in early July, 1994. The area drains into Lake Blackshear, formed in the Flint River by Lake Blackshear Dam. The level of the lake rose 3.5 m (11.5 ft) above normal and caused the worst flooding of the area in recorded history. The north embankment of the dam was overtopped, causing a 215 m (700 ft) breach. Prior to the breach, a few concentrated boils were observed in the tailwater downstream of the non-breached portion of the dam. This portion remained intact through the flood, but the presence of the boils raised questions regarding its integrity. The effects of the flood on the north embankment are discussed, as well as the geotechnical investigation conducted to assess subsurface conditions at the breach and intact portions and the plan for remediation.

  20. Mitigating Geomagnetic Noise in Airborne Magnetic Surveys using GPS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    Mitigating Geomagnetic Noise in Airborne Magnetic Surveys using GPS S. Skone Department and tropospheric effects on GPS. She has developed software for mitigation of atmospheric effects and is currently in this frequency band must be modeled, or measured, and mitigated. Despite reduction of many error sources for MAD

  1. Particle acceleration from reconnection in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birn, J.; Borovsky, J.E.; Thomsen, M.F.; McComas, D.J.; Reeves, G.D.; Belian, R.D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hesse, M. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Greenbelt, MD (United States). Goddard Space Flight Center; Schindler, K. [Ruhr-Univ., Bochum (Germany)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acceleration of charged particles in the near geomagnetic tail, associated with a dynamic magnetic reconnection process, was investigated by a combined effort of data analysis, using Los Alamos data from geosynchronous orbit, MHD modeling of the dynamic evolution of the magnetotail, and test particle tracing in the electric and magnetic fields obtained from the MHD simulation.

  2. Paleosecular variation and the average geomagnetic field at 20 latitude

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Catherine Louise

    -averaged field (TAF) for a two-parameter longitudinally symmetric (zonal) model. Values for our model parameters rocks, and oceanic sediments, but consistent with that from reversed polarity continental and igneous to paleosecular variation (PSV). We examine PSV at ±20° using virtual geomagnetic pole (VGP) dispersion

  3. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  4. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability changes during CO{sub 2} flooding due to saturation changes, dissolution, and precipitation.

  5. Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Many homeowners need help caring for or removing damaged trees after a natural disaster. This publication explains what a certified arborist is and how to select one. It also cautions against burning debris downed by a storm....

  6. Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirk, Melanie; Taylor, Eric; Foster, C. Darwin

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-040 5-06 Dealing with Storm-Damaged Trees Melanie R. Kirk, Extension Program Specialist, Eric L. Taylor, Assistant Professor and Extension Specialist, and C. Darwin Foster, Associate Department Head and Extension Program Leader for Forestry...

  7. Non-storm water discharges technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathews, S.

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) submitted a Notice of Intent to the California State Water Resources Control Board (hereafter State Board) to discharge storm water associated with industrial activities under the California General Industrial Activity Storm Water National Pollutant Elimination System Discharge Permit (hereafter General Permit). As required by the General Permit, LLNL provided initial notification of non-storm water discharges to the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (hereafter Regional Board) on October 2, 1992. Additional findings and progress towards corrective actions were reported in subsequent annual monitoring reports. LLNL was granted until March 27, 1995, three years from the Notice of Intent submission date, to eliminate or permit the non-storm water discharges. On May 20, 1994, the Regional Board issued Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR Board Order No. 94-131, NPDES No. CA0081396) to LLNL for discharges of non-contact cooling tower wastewater and storm water related to industrial activities. As a result of the issuance of WDR 94-131, LLNL rescinded its coverage under the General Permit. WDR 94-131 allowed continued non-storm water discharges and requested a technical report describing the discharges LLNL seeks to permit. For the described discharges, LLNL anticipates the Regional Board will either waive Waste Discharge Requirements as allowed for in The Water Quality Control Plan for the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Valley Region (hereafter Basin Plan) or amend Board Order 94-131 as appropriate.

  8. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enables. Flood ALERT System The initial Ipswich Creeks ALERT flood warning system was completed in the earlyFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH This brochure describes the flood warning

  9. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM This brochure describes the flood warning system operated by the Australian Government,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    's Flood Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the DON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Local Information Don ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River

  10. Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

  11. Oceanography Vol.21, No.4118 WiNter-SpriNg StormS aNd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oceanography Vol.21, No.4118 WiNter-SpriNg StormS aNd their iNflueNce oN SedimeNt reSuSpeNSioN, tra-grained materials to the southern basin, (4) resuspension surrogates based on 50 years of wave data show

  12. Oilfield flooding polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Fred D. (Socorro, NM); Hatch, Melvin J. (Socorro, NM); Shepitka, Joel S. (Socorro, NM); Donaruma, Lorraine G. (Syosset, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monomer, polymers containing the monomer, and the use of the polymer in oilfield flooding is disclosed. The subject monomer is represented by the general formula: ##STR1## wherein: n is an integer from 0 to about 4; m is an integer from 0 to about 6; a is an integer equal to at least 1 except where m is equal to 0, a must equal 0 and where m is equal to 1, a must equal 0 or 1; p is an integer from 2 to about 10; b is an integer equal to at least 1 and is of sufficient magnitude that the ratio b/p is at least 0.2; and q is an integer from 0 to 2. The number of hydroxy groups in the monomer is believed to be critical, and therefore the sum of (a+b) divided by the sum (m+p) should be at least 0.2. The moieties linked to the acrylic nitrogen can be joined to provide a ringed structure.

  13. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite a small storm that came through the area last night with wind gusts peaking at 45 MPH, progress continues to be made in restoring power to customers who lost power during the December 14-15 storms which hit the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 95,971 customers remain without power, down from 1.8 million customers. The wind storm which affected the area yesterday was not as bad as previously expected, with the majority of the customer outages in the BC Hydro region, and 3,000 additional customer outages in the Puget Sound Energy service area. The customers without power represent 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy, BC Hydro, and Seattle City Light.

  14. Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, N,

    Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States. We apply a model-based risk assessment methodology to investigate hurricane storm surge risk for New York City (NYC). We couple a statistical/deterministic ...

  15. Storm smart planning for adaptation to sea level rise : addressing coastal flood risk in East Boston

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolff, Victoria H

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regardless of how well we implement sustainability plans, now and in the future, the weight of scientific evidence indicates that mean sea level will continue to rise at an increasing rate over the next century. Thus, ...

  16. JOURNAL OF GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Altitude-Adjusted Corrected Geomagnetic Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepherd, Simon

    ]; and satellite measurements of particles and electric currents to determine magnetospheric boundaries and large Geomagnetic Coordinates: Definition and Functional Approximations S. G. Shepherd Thayer School of Engineering to transform between geo- graphic and Altitude-Adjusted Corrected Geomagnetic (AACGM) coordinates reveals

  17. Modeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    events (SPEs) the flux of high-energy protons from the Sun is markedly increased. In order to investigateModeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar charged particles of solar and cosmic origin. Therefore variations of the geomagnetic field occurring

  18. STORM/PALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STORMPALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope STORMPALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope EMSL has developed and offers Fluorescence, Super Resolution STORM...

  19. Optimum Reservoir Operation for Flood Control and Conservation Purposes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Cabezas, L. Morris; Tibbets, Michael N.

    . With stringent flood plain management, susceptibility to flooding could actually decrease over time as existing activities choose to leave the flood plain and regulation prevents other activities from moving into the flood plain. Reservoir sedimentation reduces...

  20. Effects of solar wind magnetosphere coupling recorded at different geomagnetic latitudes: Separation of directly-driven and storage/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    to isolate the responsible geomagnetic current systems. Citation: Finch, I. D., M. L. Lockwood, and A. PGL035399. 1. Introduction [2] A large number of different geomagnetic indices are currently in use ­ are concerned with measuring general geomagnetic activity rather than any single magnetospheric phenomenon

  1. Solar storm Risk to the north American electric grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Solar storm Risk to the north American electric grid #12;Key Contacts Trevor Maynard Exposure reserved #12;Solar storm risk to the north American electric grid 3 Contents 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 4 2 REFERENCES 19 #12;Solar storm risk to the north American electric grid 4 1 Executive Summary A Carrington

  2. Challenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

    cleaned and retained as a Best Management Practice (BMP). Receives only non-industrial storm water on storm water are leading municipalities to change permitting practices. As a result, facilitiesChallenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems A South Carolina Case

  3. STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisen, Michael

    STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1) for BUILDING 90 USER TEST BED FACILITY.G., GEOLOGIST/QSD (530) 222-4339 SWPPP Preparation Date: JUNE 10, 2012 #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan) 222-4339 Name and Title Telephone Number #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Building 90 User

  4. On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model Pedro Avellaneda1 ; Thomas P. Ballestero2 of these parameters are provided for modeling purposes and other urban storm-water quality applications. A normal runoff models are commonly used for urban storm-water quality applications DeCoursey 1985; Tsi- hrintzis

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Surface runoff contribution of nitrogen during storm events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ecosystem Management Model for TKN. Water quality and storm flow data collected from January 2000 TKN concentrations during storm. A storm water sampling program was carried out to gather requisite research has focused primarily on the water quality impacts of urban and agricultural land uses, whereas

  6. Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education delivery channels with speculatively pre- computed authorizations and actively recycling them on a just Security Keywords authorization recycling, authorization flooding, access con- trol, authorization, publish

  7. Flood Plain and Floodway Management Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state regulates flood-prone lands and waters to prevent and alleviate flooding threats to life and health and reduce private and public economic losses. The purpose of 76-5 MCA, parts 1-4 is to...

  8. INTRODUCTION TO STORM SURGE Introduction to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    tide. Inland Extent Storm surge can penetrate well inland from the coastline. During Hurricane Ike of a hurricane (left above) blows on the ocean surface and produces a vertical circulation in the ocean (right waters near the coast, the vertical circulation in the ocean becomes disrupted by the ocean bottom

  9. Graphite formation in the Hiroshima fire storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, D.E.; Crenshaw, M.; Yalcintas, M.G.; Strehlow, R.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)); Cole, L.L. (Prairie View A and M Univ., TX (USA))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to investigate what might be the composition and optical properties of particles that could lead to a nuclear winter, a search has been made for particles that had been generated in urban fire storms. Deposits containing small amounts of graphite have been found on an artifact from the Hiroshima fire storm. The fire storm was initiated on August 6, 1945, by the atomic bomb detonation. The particles were rained out of the atmosphere in the black rain that commenced following the urban fire storm. Initial studies using electron microscopy have revealed that the particles consist of a mixture of clay and amorphous sooty carbon. Scanning electron photomicrographs have suggested the presence of graphite. Its presence has been confirmed using laser Raman spectroscopy (LRS), surface ionization mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and electron scattering for chemical analysis (ESCA). Significant amounts of the sooty material consist of clay, and the graphite is probably present as short-range ordered structure in sooty microspheres. The results of this study are presented with a discussion of conditions that may lead to graphite formation.

  10. Blackland's flood warning system protects soldiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 28 Story by Kathy Wythe | pg. 28 A flood warning system resulting from a Texas AgriLife Research water quality monitoring project at Fort Hood is potentially saving lives and property. The Flood Alert System via Telemetry... said they also hope to use real-time stream level and weather data to develop a flood prediction model to forecast the likelihood of flooding across Fort Hood. Blackland?s f lood warning system protects soldiers ...

  11. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enablesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system of Meteorology operates a flood warning system for the Logan and Albert River catchments based on a rainfall

  12. On the effects of solar storms to the decaying orbital space debris

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herdiwijaya, Dhani, E-mail: dhani@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Rachman, Abdul [Space Science Center, National Institute of Aeronautics and Space, Junjunan 133, Bandung 40173 (Indonesia)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Any man-made object in Earth's orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose is classified as orbital debris. Debris objects come from a variety of sources. The majority is related to satellite fragmentation. Other major sources of debris are propulsion systems, and fragmentation of spent upper stages, payload and mission related debris. Serious concern about orbital debris has been growing. Knowledge of the future debris environment is important to both satellite designers, and mission planners, who need to know what hazards a satellite might encounter during the course of its mission. Therefore, it is important to know how much debris is in orbit, where it is located, and when it will decay. The debris environment is complex and dynamically evolving. Objects of different shape and size behave differently in orbit. The geoeffectiveness space environments include solar flux at 10.7 cm, solar energetic particles flux or speed, solar wind flow pressure, electric field, and geomagnetic indices. We study the decaying orbital debris from Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages in conjuction with geoeffectiveness space environments through time epoch correlation. We found that the decaying and reentry orbital debris are triggered by space environment enhancement within at least one week before reentry. It is not necessary a transient or high energetic and severe solar storm events are needed in decaying processes. We propose that the gradual enhancement processes of space environment will cause satellite surface charging due to energetic electron and enhance drag force.

  13. Disturbances in the U.S. electric grid associated with geomagnetic activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Carolus J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large solar explosions are responsible for space weather that can impact technological infrastructure on and around Earth. Here, we apply a retrospective cohort exposure analysis to quantify the impacts of geomagnetic activity on the U.S. electric power grid for the period from 1992 through 2010. We find, with more than 3-sigma significance, that approximately 4% of the disturbances in the U.S. power grid reported to the U.S. Department of Energy are attributable to strong geomagnetic activity and its associated geomagnetically induced currents.

  14. Auroral electrojet dynamics during magnetic storms, connection with plasma precipitation and large-scale structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Russian observatories (geomagnetic longitude $110 , corrected geomagnetic latitudes 74 b U b 51 the magnetic obser- vatories meridional chain were mapped to the magne- tosphere using the geomagnetic ®eld of the magnetospheric magnetic ®eld paraboloid model the in¯uence of the ring current and magnetospheric tail plasma

  15. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 186,627 customers remain without power. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 6 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below.

  16. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 237,030 customers remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 8 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington.

  17. Investigation of Stinson Beach Park storm damage and evaluation of alternative shore protection measures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation was made of storm damage during the winter of 1982-83 to the National Park Service's Stinson Beach Park. The investigation included an assessment of the storm damage, evaluation of physical processes contributing to the damage, subsequent beach recovery, and the feasibility of implementing shoreline protection measure to reduce future risk. During the winter of 1982-83, the beach was almost completely denuded of sand, wave overwash damaged the foredune, vegetation on the foredune was destroyed, and backshore flooding occurred. Two structures and a parking lot were endangered as the shoreline receded. Subsequent recovery of the park beach was rapid. By January 1982 sand had moved back onshore and a beach berm was beginning to reform. The foredune and dune vegetation received the only permanent damage. Four shoreline protection alternatives were evaluated. These include no action, dune development/enhancement, construction of a rock riprap revetment, and offshore installation of artificial seaweed. The first costs (estimated costs, excluding maintenance) range from about $90,000 to $475,000. The least-cost protection measure is riprap revetment, which protects the two structures and parking lot endangered during the 1982-83 winter storms. Construction of a foredune along the entire park beach is the highest cost protection measure. If no shore protection action measures are implemented, wave overwash of the foredune can be expected to occur on the average of every 2 to 3 years, and beach degradation, similar to that during the 1982-83 winter, can be expected to occur on the average of every 10 to 12 years. 12 references, 19 figures, 18 tables.

  18. Neutrinos from STORed Muons - nuSTORM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bross, Alan [Fermilab

    2013-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of LSND and MiniBooNE, along with the recent papers on a possible reactor neutrino flux anomaly, give tantalizing hints of new physics. Models beyond the nSM have been developed to explain these results and involve one or more additional neutrinos that are non-interacting or “sterile." Neutrino beams produced from the decay of muons in a racetrack-like decay ring provide a powerful way to study this potential new physics. In this talk, I will describe the facility, nuSTORM, and an appropriate far detector for neutrino oscillation searches at short baseline. I will present sensitivity plots that indicate that this experimental approach can provide well over 5 s confirmation or rejection of the LSND/MinBooNE results. In addition I will explain how the facility can be used to make neutrino interaction cross section measurements important to the next generation of long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments and, in general, add significantly to the study of neutrino interactions. The unique n beam available at the nuSTORM facility has the potential to be transformational in our approach to n interaction physics, offering a “n light source” to physicists from a number of disciplines. Finally, I will describe how nuSTORM can be used to facilitate accelerator R&D for future muon-based accelerator facilities.

  19. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006 resulting in major power outagesin the region. The storm is now moving off into southern Canada. A new weather disturbance nearing the Northwest coast may generate a few rain and snow showers across the Seattle and Portland areas today, but widespread active weather is not expected. There are roughly 950,000 customers in the region (including Canada) without power as a result of the Pacific Northweststorms, down from a peak of 1.8 million customers. This represents about 26 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. As of 12:30 PM EST, the Renton Control Center for the Olympic Pipeline (petroleum products) had power restored. The pipeline, serviced by Puget Sound Energy, was shut down after it lost power during the storm. According to a pipeline official, the pipeline is expected to restart in approximately 2-3 hours with some reduced throughput later today. SeaTac International Airport receives jet fuel from the pipeline; however, it’s been reported that the airport has approximately eight days of jet fuel inventories on hand. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel production. There are some temporary and minor distribution at retail gas stations due to lack of power. Fuel delivery is also slowed in some areas due to delays on some roads. ESF #12 has not been deployed

  20. Mitigation of geomagnetically induced and dc stray currents. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kappenman, J.G.

    1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report primarily describes several approaches to mitigate the effects of Geomagnetic Induced Currents (GIC) and dc stray currents in power systems; the engineering and design considerations for a neutral capacitor blocking device; and development and testing of a prototype device of this type. Modeling of the power system for computation of GIC are described. Results from three field tests, for documenting the effects of GIC by injecting direct current (dc) into the neutrals of the transformers, are presented. Several mitigation concepts are discussed and evaluated. The concept of blocking GIC and dc stray currents by a neutral capacitor is addressed in detail. The development and testing of the prototype blocking device is described. The technical requirements and specifications for the application of these devices are also included. A perspective on the economics of GIC mitigation is included. The effect of GIC and dc stray currents on HVdc converter operation, supported by computer simulations, is also discussed.

  1. Asphalt deposition in miscible floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Syed Mir Ahmed

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Petroleum Engineering ASPHALT DEPOSITION IN MISCIBLE FLOODS A Thesis By SYED MIR AHMED HASAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ommittee Member) Committee Member) Head of Department), (Co 'ttee Member) January, f964... Subject: Petroleum Engineering TABLE OF CONTENTS ABS TRAC T. Page 2. INTRODUCTION. 3 DESCRIPTION OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS. . . . . , . 6 4. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE 5. INTERPRETATION AND DISCUSSION OF RESULTS. . . . . . 13 6. CONCLUSIONS. 7...

  2. Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

  3. Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Atmosphere Model Visualizing Storms from NCAR's Atmosphere Model CCSM-sprabhat.png Global warming will likely change the statistics of tropical cyclones and hurricanes. In this...

  4. Irrigation, Navigation Flood Control and Recreation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irrigation,-Navigation-Flood-Control-and-Recreation- Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand...

  5. FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Instructions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate and Instructions...

  6. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants willows Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon...

  7. Flood Risk Management Every year floods sweep through communities across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management #12;Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States risk management activities of communities in both urban and rural areas throughout the United States management activities. At the direction of Congress, the Corps studies and implements flood risk management

  8. FLOOD WARNING This brochure describes the flood warning system operated by the Commonwealth Bureau of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    or stock to higher ground, or implement other temporary flood loss reduction measures. Warnings in the flood-threatened area believe the warning and take appropriate action in advance of being flooded. Roles below the floor level as well as bicycle and pedestrian paths. In rural areas removal of stock

  9. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 134,868 customers remain without power. The number of outages is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent less than 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy and Seattle City Light.

  10. Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2006-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 468,200 customers, including Canada, remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 16 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below. The Olympic pipeline reports that the pipeline is operational; however, pipeline throughput remains reduced since one substation along the line remains without power. Complete power restoration is expected later today. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel distribution and production.

  11. Storm Water Permits at LANL.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic WeeklyStores Catalog Thea Storm

  12. FyreStorm Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdf Jump1946865°, -86.0529604°Wisconsin:FyreStorm Inc Jump to: navigation,

  13. Flood protection in the swamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reesby, Raymond George

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRA R Y A S N COLLEGE OF TEXAS FLOOD PROTECTION IN THE SWAMPS A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical School of Texas In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Professi. onal Degree of Civil... Joining points b, o, o , e tl ~Ke is a vertical cut-off wall extending downward from the bottom of the heel at its r1verside end. It has the dual function of reducing the uplift and xeinforcing the structure against sliding, and is defined by lines...

  14. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT OF DAVIDThe data dashboardA A 1ChipSteven Bass,Flood

  15. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research needs to be done to further improve our ability to forecast weather events at longer time scales. Seasonal predictions have been statistical and only recently have studies begun to use ensemble simulations and historical observations to constrain such predictions. Understanding the mechanisms of large-scale atmospheric dynamics and its local impacts remain topics of intensive research. The ability to predict extreme events and provide policy makers with this information, along with climate change and hydrologic response information, will help to guide planning to form a more resilient infrastructure in the future.

  16. Mid-Atlantic Coastal Storms and Hurricane Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    Mid-Atlantic Coastal Storms and Hurricane Sandy Daniel J. Leathers Department of Geography-Atlantic tropical systems and extra-tropical coastal storms. · Observing Hurricane Sandy in Delaware. · Unusual characteristics of Hurricane Sandy. · Impacts of Sandy on Delaware. #12;Some things to discuss... · A brief

  17. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  18. Lab 3 GEO 465/565 Storm Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    1 Lab 3 ­ GEO 465/565 Storm Water Pollution The Nation's Most Significant Water Quality Problem our rivers, lakes and coastal waters by controlling pollution from industry and sewage treatment, is that we have not done enough to stop storm water pollution, or non-point source pollution, that runs off

  19. Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

  20. New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard February 5, 2015 - 10:55am Addthis...

  1. File:Texas NOI for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NOI for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities (TXR150000).pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Texas NOI for Storm...

  2. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance Lucheng Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof Storm Water Retention and Runoff Reduction Performance ......................................................................................................................... 2 2. Hamerschlag Hall Green Roof .............................................................................. 13 4. Methods of Storm Analysis and Green Roof Performance Analysis

  3. Kiran Maharjan Climate change and floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    management processes by providing many kinds of information. The level of vulnerability of people towardsKiran Maharjan Climate change and floods Climate change and floods Vulnerability analysis of people, in the livelihoods of people. Hence, climate change is making everyone vulnerable to its impacts. Most of the people

  4. Further constraints on electron acceleration in solar noise storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prasad Subramanian; Peter A. Becker

    2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We reexamine the energetics of nonthermal electron acceleration in solar noise storms. A new result is obtained for the minimum nonthermal electron number density required to produce a Langmuir wave population of sufficient intensity to power the noise storm emission. We combine this constraint with the stochastic electron acceleration formalism developed by Subramanian & Becker (2005) to derive a rigorous estimate for the efficiency of the overall noise storm emission process, beginning with nonthermal electron acceleration and culminating in the observed radiation. We also calculate separate efficiencies for the electron acceleration -- Langmuir wave generation stage and the Langmuir wave -- noise storm production stage. In addition, we obtain a new theoretical estimate for the energy density of the Langmuir waves in noise storm continuum sources.

  5. Evidence for current sheet acceleration in the geomagnetic tail

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyons, L.R.; Speiser, T.W.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of the current sheet and the dawn to dusk electric field in the geomagnetic tail implies there is particle energization in the tail current sheet of the order 2--10% of the total solar wind energy incident upon the dayside magnetopause. In this paper we determine that ion acceleration in a current sheet with a small magnetic field across the sheet, via single-particle motion which violates the guiding center approximation, can account for this large energization in the tail. We calculate the distribution of accelerated ions which result from the urrent sheet acceleration and compare the results with distributions of accelerated ions frequently observed flowing earthwards along the outer boundary of the plasma sheet. The comparison indicates that the observed earthward flowing ions result from current sheet acceleration. Comparison with measurements of auroral ion predictions at low precipitation at low altitudes implies that the accelerated ions ejected from the current sheet are also an important source of auroral ion precipitation. In addition, these acceletated ions may be an important source of plasma sheet ions.

  6. Assessment of an Ionosphere Storm Occurrence N. Suard(1)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gadat, Sébastien

    index (daily or 3 hours), measuring the earth geomagnetism/ionosphere activities and the monthly SSN like CE-GPS, EURIDIS, ESTB and now EGNOS and WAAS. He is currently more specifically in charge is currently in charge of the Integrity and Continuity of Service (I&CoS) file of EGNOS system at Thales Alenia

  7. A case for variational geomagnetic data assimilation: insights from a one-dimensional, nonlinear, and sparsely observed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    variations of the geomagnetic field have been measured with a continuously im- proving accuracy duringA case for variational geomagnetic data assimilation: insights from a one-dimensional, nonlinear-mentioned coupled system ­ some version being currently under construction ­ the question is debated in this paper

  8. Structure of the poleward wall of the trough and the inclination of the geomagnetic eld above the EISCAT radar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the International Geomagnetic Reference Field Model. However, few measurements can be found in the literature of the geomagnetic ®eld in space being determined from ground-based observations. One such measurement. A discrepancy of about 1° was found between the Jicamarca measurements and the then current ®eld models which

  9. Ar/Ar ages from transitionally magnetized lavas on La Palma, Canary Islands, and the geomagnetic instability timescale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Bradley S.

    Ar/Ar ages from transitionally magnetized lavas on La Palma, Canary Islands, and the geomagnetic the north and south walls of Barranco de los Tilos on the island of La Palma, Canary Islands, reveals from transitionally magnetized lavas on La Palma, Canary Islands, and the geomagnetic instability

  10. Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics Zerbo, J-L.1, 2, 4, C. Amory-Mazaudier 2, F. Ouattara 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is given in nT. Kp and Ap are the same measure of geomagnetic activity on two different scales2 Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics Zerbo, J-L.1, 2, 4, C. Amory-Mazaudier 2, F and interplanetary magnetic field, we point out the particularities of geomagnetic activity during the period 1996

  11. Solar Storm Risks for Maine and the New England Electric Grid,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Solar Storm Risks for Maine and the New England Electric Grid, and Potential Protective Measures.resilientsocieties.org #12;1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A severe solar storm--a historical example being the Carrington Event of 1859 of the eastern United States. Severe solar storms--of the intensity of the 1921 New York Central Storm

  12. Flood Zone Building Permits (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building permits are required for new construction and development in the Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA). All development projects in SFHA must comply with Title 12 DCMR and Title 20 DCMR...

  13. Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

  14. AGENDA ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Bi-Annual Update Public Meeting January 22, 2014 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center...

  15. Climate Change and Energy Infrastructure Exposure to Storm Surge...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    found that an extensive amount of U.S. energy infrastructure is currently exposed to damage from hurricane storm surge and that climate change is likely to substantially increase...

  16. Dispersion of radioactive pollutant in a tornadic storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pepper, D.W.

    1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A three-dimensional numerical model is used to calculate ground-level air concentration and deposition (due to precipitation scavenging) after a hypothetical tornado strike at a plutonium fabrication facility in Pennsylvania. Plutonium particles less than 10 ..mu..m in diameter are assumed to be lifted into the tornadic storm cell by the vortex. The rotational characteristics of the tornadic storm are embedded within the larger mesoscale flow of the storm system. The design-basis translational wind values are based on probabilities associated with existing records of tornado strikes in the vicinity of the plant site. Turbulence exchange coefficients are based on empirical values deduced from experimental data in severe storms and from theoretical assumptions obtained from the literature. The quasi-Lagrangian method of moments is used to model the transport of concentration within a grid cell volume. In all case studies, the effects of updrafts and downdrafts, coupled with scavenging of the particulates by precipitation, account for most of the material being deposited within 20 to 45 km downwind of the plant site. Ground-level isopleths in the x-y plane show that most of the material is deposited behind and slightly to the left of the centerline trajectory of the storm. Approximately 5% of the material is dispersed into the stratosphere and anvil section of the storm.

  17. Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

  18. Concerning the generation of geomagnetic giant pulsations by drift-bounce resonance ring current instabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Concerning the generation of geomagnetic giant pulsations by drift-bounce resonance ring current magnetic and electric ®eld data and proton ¯ux measurements made in the geostationary orbit have been21 Æ 4, is in accord with the value m À27 Æ 6 determined from ground-magnetic measurements. A more

  19. INTRODUCTION The role of geomagnetic field cues in behaviors such as navigation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phillips, John B.

    compass directions (i.e. north, south, east or west) in their natural environment (Roonwal, 1958 mellifera) (Martin and Lindauer, 1977). A more recent study of resting American cockroaches (Periplaneta by the geomagnetic field could increase the accuracy of a path integration system (Cheung et al., 2008

  20. Ar Chronology of Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene Geomagnetic and Glacial Events in Southern Argentina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Bradley S.

    in Southern Argentina Brad S. Singer1 , Laurie L. Brown2 , Jorge O. Rabassa3 , Hervé Guillou4 Cuaternario, CADIC-CONICET,Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina 4 Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l sequence atop Cerro del Fraile, Argentina, contributed to the nascent Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS

  1. Geomagnetic control of the foF2 long-term trends A. V. Mikhailov1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    in recent publications due to the problem of global climate changes (see reviews by Danilov, 1997, 1998 of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142092, Russia 2 National indication that F2-layer trends might be related to the long-term changes in geomagnetic activity. Further

  2. GEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II) Georgeta Maris@aira.astro.ro ABSTRACT/RESUME The effects of the solar energetic phenomena cover the entire terrestrial environment, from is the solar plasma that may originate from solar eruptive phenomena that take their energy from magnetic field

  3. Corotating solar wind streams and recurrent geomagnetic activity: Bruce T. Tsurutani,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergen, Universitetet i

    ´n waves is the solar wind energy transfer mechanism. The acceleration of relativistic electrons occurs Laboratory, Oxfordshire, UK. 6 Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Toyo- kawa, JapanCorotating solar wind streams and recurrent geomagnetic activity: A review Bruce T. Tsurutani,1

  4. An empirical model of magnetospheric chorus amplitude using solar wind and geomagnetic indices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    hiss amplitude, also using THEMIS data [Golden et al., 2012]. Using the output of these models, we showAn empirical model of magnetospheric chorus amplitude using solar wind and geomagnetic indices D. I. The goal of this study is to design an empirical model of chorus amplitude, the output of which can be used

  5. Storm/substorm signatures in the outer belt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korth, A.; Friedel, R.H.W.; Mouikis, C. [Max-Planck-Inst. fuer Aeronomie, Lindau (Germany); Fennell, J.F. [Aerospace Corp., El Segundo, CA (United States)

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of the ring current region is compared for periods of storm and substorm activity, with an attempt to isolate the contributions of both processes. The authors investigate CRRES particle data in an overview format that allows the display of long-term variations of the outer radiation belt. They compare the evolution of the ring current population to indicators of storm (Dst) and substorm (AE) activity and examine compositional changes. Substorm activity leads to the intensification of the ring current at higher L (L {approximately} 6) and lower ring current energies compared to storms (L {approximately} 4). The O{sup +}/H{sup +} ratio during substorms remains low, near 10%, but is much enhanced during storms (can exceed 100%). They conclude that repeated substorms with an AE {approximately} 900 nT lead to a {Delta}Dst of {approximately} 30 nT, but do not contribute to Dst during storm main phase as substorm injections do not form a symmetric ring current during such disturbed times.

  6. Consequences of Flooding on Spectral Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Rudolf; Normann Mertig; Steffen Löck; Arnd Bäcker

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study spectral statistics in systems with a mixed phase space, in which regions of regular and chaotic motion coexist. Increasing their density of states, we observe a transition of the level-spacing distribution P(s) from Berry-Robnik to Wigner statistics, although the underlying classical phase-space structure and the effective Planck constant remain unchanged. This transition is induced by flooding, i.e., the disappearance of regular states due to increasing regular-to-chaotic couplings. We account for this effect by a flooding-improved Berry-Robnik distribution, in which an effectively reduced size of the regular island enters. To additionally describe power-law level repulsion at small spacings, we extend this prediction by explicitly considering the tunneling couplings between regular and chaotic states. This results in a flooding- and tunneling-improved Berry-Robnik distribution which is in excellent agreement with numerical data.

  7. A new method to estimate annual solar wind parameters and contributions of different solar wind structures to geomagnetic activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holappa, Lauri; Asikainen, Timo

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study two sets of local geomagnetic indices from 26 stations using the principal component (PC) and the independent component (IC) analysis methods. We demonstrate that the annually averaged indices can be accurately represented as linear combinations of two first components with weights systematically depending on latitude. We show that the annual contributions of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and high speed streams (HSSs) to geomagnetic activity are highly correlated with the first and second IC. The first and second ICs are also found to be very highly correlated with the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the solar wind speed, respectively, because solar wind speed is the most important parameter driving geomagnetic activity during HSSs while IMF strength dominates during CMEs. These results help in better understanding the long-term driving of geomagnetic activity and in gaining information about the long-term evolution of solar wind parameters and the different sol...

  8. A methodology for forecasting carbon dioxide flooding performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marroquin Cabrera, Juan Carlos

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology was developed for forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) flooding performance quickly and reliably. The feasibility of carbon dioxide flooding in the Dollarhide Clearfork "AB" Unit was evaluated using the methodology. This technique is very...

  9. Costs and Consequences of Flooding Camilo Sarmiento, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costs and Consequences of Flooding Camilo Sarmiento, Ph.D. Senior Economist Fannie Mae #12 the impact that the NFIP has had on the flooding costs and the distribution of these costs among payers the NFIP loss database, the model examines losses in known flood events, infers total losses by cost

  10. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM This brochure describes the flood above Wivenhoe Dam. It includes reference information which will be useful for understanding Flood above Wivenhoe Dam drains an area of approximately 7,000 square kilometres. The Brisbane River rises

  11. EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm Photo of a dog sitting on a bed or couch with a stuffed toy in...

  12. Integrated impact analysis of yellow-dust storms : a regional case study in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ai, Ning, 1978-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The dust storm is a meteorological event that is caused by strong winds and proceeds from arid and semi-arid regions, transporting a thick cloud of fine sediments. In China, the sediments of dust storms mainly come from ...

  13. Performance of the NSSL hail detection algorithm for multicell storms over the Coastal Southern Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bellue, Kyle Gordon

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the National Severe Storm Laboratory's (NSSL'S) Hail Detection Algorithm (HDA) has been performed for over 20 different multicell storm systems that occurred over the coastal region of the southern Great Plains. Since the HDA...

  14. Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isaacs, Rachel E.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Large-extent ice storms have received relatively little attention from researchers. This research investigates the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance on a forested landscape. This investigation...

  15. Lightning location characteristics and vertical structure analysis of isolated storm cells in the TOGA COARE region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnaby, Stephen Andrew

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    producing storm cells, and non-lightning producing cells over the tropical oceans. The characteristics of lightning locations with respect to radar reflectivity were also examined. Lightning characteristics of flashes associated with TOGA COARE storm cells...

  16. Real-time storm surge prediction for bays on the Texas Gulf coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Sean William

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    storm Frances. The simulation data for hurricane Alicia compare very well to the actual measured total water level increase cause by the storm. The model results for hurricane Carla poorly represent the measured water level increases for stations located...

  17. Mitigating floods : reconstructing Lives : rehabilitating Thatta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gul, Marium

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pakistan was struck by floods in July 2010, the effects of which left 20.36 million people affected and 1.9 million homes damaged or destroyed'. In the province of Sindh in Pakistan, most of the affected population of the ...

  18. Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

    1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

  19. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States); Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  20. Harmonic effects of solar geomagnetically induced currents on the electrical distribution system in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, D.P. (Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)); Kasturi, S. (MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)); Subudhi, M.; Gunther, W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most previous analysis on the effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GIC) on electric utility systems has steady-state phenomena, with the main interest in the generator step-up transformer and the off-site power system. This paper begins to investigate the possible effects that a GIC event might have on the power plant itself, by examining the harmonic distortion that could exist at various voltage levels in the on-site distribution system.

  1. Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City K. A. Emanuel,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emanuel, Kerry A.

    Risk assessment of hurricane storm surge for New York City N. Lin,1 K. A. Emanuel,2 J. A. Smith,1 September 2010. [1] Hurricane storm surge presents a major hazard for the United States. We apply a modelbased risk assessment methodology to investigate hurricane storm surge risk for New York City (NYC). We

  2. Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand management; Urban areas; Hydraulic models; Sand, filter; Parameters; Estimation; Water treatment. Author. Optimized model parameter values were calculated on a storm by storm basis. Thereafter, a gamma distribution

  3. STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG Master of Science Thesis Carlo reactor physics criticality calculations. This is achieved by optimising the number of neutron for more efficient Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations, giving results with errors that can

  4. Greenland's Pressure Drag and the Atlantic Storm Track THOMAS JUNG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenland's Pressure Drag and the Atlantic Storm Track THOMAS JUNG European Centre for Medium of Greenland on the Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation are discussed. Inviscid pressure drag on Greenland's slopes, calculated from reanalysis data, is related to circulation patterns. Greenland lies

  5. Record-breaking Storm Activity on Uranus in 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Pater, Imke; Fry, P M; Hammel, Heidi B; Baranec, Christoph; Sayanagi, Kunio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In spite of an expected decline in convective activity following the 2007 equinox of Uranus, eight sizable storms were detected on the planet with the near-infrared camera NIRC2, coupled to the adaptive optics system, on the 10-m W. M. Keck telescope on UT 5 and 6 August 2014. All storms were on Uranus's northern hemisphere, including the brightest storm ever seen in this planet at 2.2 $\\mu$m, reflecting 30% as much light as the rest of the planet at this wavelength. The storm was at a planetocentric latitude of $\\sim$15$^{\\circ}$N and reached altitudes of $\\sim$330 mbar, well above the regular uppermost cloud layer (methane-ice) in the atmosphere. A cloud feature at a latitude of 32$^{\\circ}$N, that was deeper in the atmosphere (near $\\sim$2 bar), was later seen by amateur astronomers. We also present images returned from our HST ToO program, that shows both of these cloud features. We further report the first detection of a long-awaited haze over the north polar region.

  6. Flood analyses for Department of Energy Y-12, ORNL and K-25 Plants. Flood analyses in support of flood emergency planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study involved defining the flood potential and local rainfall depth and duration data for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and K-25 plants. All three plants are subject to flooding from the Clinch River. In addition, the Y-12 plant is subject to flooding from East Fork Poplar and Bear Creeks, the ORNL plant from Whiteoak Creek and Melton Branch, and the K-25 plant from Poplar Creek. Determination of flood levels included consideration of both rainfall events and postulated failures of Norris and Melton Hill Dams in seismic events.

  7. 9A.2 FORECAST CHALLENGES AT THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER RELATING TO THE FREQUENCY OF FAVORABLE SEVERE STORM ENVIRONMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the performance of convective watches issued by the NOAA Storm Prediction Center (SPC layer bulk wind shear, are linked to SPC convective watches and verification metrics forecast performance. 2. SPC CONVECTIVE WATCHES A convective watch is issued by the SPC

  8. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying the interactions of physical mechanisms that control the scaling behavior of miscible floods. Displacement performance in a miscible flood is the result of a complex set of competing and interacting mechanisms. Phase behavior is of fundamental importance because the transfer of components from the oil to the injected fluid (as in most CO{sub 2} floods) or from the injected fluid to the oil (as in rich gas floods) can generate mixture compositions with displacement properties very different from those of pure CO{sub 2} and original oil. The goal of this project, is to make more accurate quantitative predictions of the impact of nonuniform flow, crossflow and phase behavior in flows in heterogeneous reservoir rocks. In past reports, we have discussed the instabilities arising from unfavorable mobility ratios that occur during injection of a solvent such as CO{sub 2}. In this report, two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computations by a particle-tracking technique are compared for unstable displacements in homogeneous porous media, with and without gravity. In homogeneous porous media without gravity, 2D fingering patterns and the length of the transition zone are nearly the same as those obtained in 3D displacements. When gravity is added, however, calculated gravity tongues and fingering patterns can be very different when viscous and gravity forces are of comparable magnitude. We summarize results obtained by Ph.D. student Hamdi Tchelepi concerning 2D and 3D fingering in homogeneous media, and we compare displacements with and without gravity segregation. The computations show conclusively that there are some situations in which 2D simulations reproduce 3D behavior well and others for which they do not.

  9. Imbibition flooding with CO?-enriched water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grape, Steven George

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance for a typical Austin Chalk field. METHODOLOGY Imbibition flood testing in core samples is a "saturate and soak" process. Core samples are first dried, then saturated with water. After weighing, the sample is saturated with oil down to minimum... carbonated water. Any changes in saturation or permeability are noted. The procedure is then repeated using carbonated water. Two types of experiments were performed on core samples during this project. Field Core testing on 4" diameter cores...

  10. Methane storms as a driver of Titan's dune orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charnay, Benjamin; Rafkin, Scot; Narteau, Clément; Lebonnois, Sébastien; Rodriguez, Sébastien; Pont, Sylvain Courrech du; Lucas, Antoine

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Titan's equatorial regions are covered by eastward propagating linear dunes. This direction is opposite to mean surface winds simulated by Global Climate Models (GCMs), which are oriented westward at these latitudes, similar to trade winds on Earth. Different hypotheses have been proposed to address this apparent contradiction, involving Saturn's gravitational tides, large scale topography or wind statistics, but none of them can explain a global eastward dune propagation in the equatorial band. Here we analyse the impact of equinoctial tropical methane storms developing in the superrotating atmosphere (i.e. the eastward winds at high altitude) on Titan's dune orientation. Using mesoscale simulations of convective methane clouds with a GCM wind profile featuring superrotation, we show that Titan's storms should produce fast eastward gust fronts above the surface. Such gusts dominate the aeolian transport, allowing dunes to extend eastward. This analysis therefore suggests a coupling between superrotation, tro...

  11. A case for variational geomagnetic data assimilation: insights from a one-dimensional, nonlinear, and sparsely observed MHD system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, Alexandre; Alboussière, Thierry

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Secular variations of the geomagnetic field have been measured with a continuously improving accuracy during the last few hundred years, culminating nowadays with satellite data. It is however well known that the dynamics of the magnetic field is linked to that of the velocity field in the core and any attempt to model secular variations will involve a coupled dynamical system for magnetic field and core velocity. Unfortunately, there is no direct observation of the velocity. Independently of the exact nature of the above-mentioned coupled system -- some version being currently under construction -- the question is debated in this paper whether good knowledge of the magnetic field can be translated into good knowledge of core dynamics. Furthermore, what will be the impact of the most recent and precise geomagnetic data on our knowledge of the geomagnetic field of the past and future? These questions are cast into the language of variational data assimilation, while the dynamical system considered in this pape...

  12. Generation of graphitic soot by an urban fire storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, D.E.; Cole, L.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors have obtained samples of aerosols deposited during the Hiroshima fire storm that was initiated by the atomic bomb detonated on August 6, 1945. These particles, which we extracted from streaks of black rain found on a plaster wall, are being studied. Initial studies show that the artifact appears to contain aerosol particles that may be representative of the aerosols that may lead to a nuclear winter. Aerosol generation in urban fire storms have been considered by studying these particles. The presence of graphite as a component of these particles is suggested by electron photomicrographs and has been confirmed using Raman spectroscopy, surface ionization mass spectroscopy, and electron scattering for chemical analysis. Several hypotheses are being considered to explain the presence of this form of carbon. Among these are generation in sooty clouds, in raindrops, in the interior of the first storm, and on the wall surface itself. The distribution of particle sizes suggests that the residence time of particles in the atmosphere would be long if they were not removed by rainout. An experimental and theoretical examination of the conditions necessary to produce graphitic soot is in progress.

  13. alkaline flooding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basins Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: To adapt to climate change which results in increasing flood frequency and intensity, the European Community has...

  14. alkaline flooding formulations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basins Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: To adapt to climate change which results in increasing flood frequency and intensity, the European Community has...

  15. Willows Aid Flood Recovery in Los Alamos Desert

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Associate Directorate of Environmental Programs (ADEP) has been busy with various flood recovery activities since last fall. 

  16. Seasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity;Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman BracSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman Brac 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2-Modified Areas - Little CaymanUrban and Man-Modified Areas - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers

  17. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2011 vol 4 no 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2011 vol 4 no 3 Focusing on ­ Asset Management Table of Contents New Flood Risk Management Program Leaders...........................................1 USACE USACE Flood Risk Management & Silver Jackets Workshop......................................... 16 MMC

  18. Evaluation of charred porous polymers as a method of storm water pollution prevention for shipyards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, G.E.

    1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Most shipyards have viable Best Management Practices (BMPs) in place to mitigate the transport of heavy metals to surface waters by storm water. Despite aggressive efforts to control storm water, shipyards have come under increased regulatory pressure to further reduce concentrations of heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, in storm water discharges. The tightening of regulatory requirements warrants research into additional BMPs. The objectives of this research project were to: (1) determine the feasibility of placing a replaceable cartridge of adsorbent material within a storm water collection system; and (2) evaluate two commercially available charred porous polymer adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from storm water. The results indicated that there are commercially available storm water treatment components which could be adapted to house a cartridge of porous adsorbent material.

  19. Imbibition flooding with CO?-enriched water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grape, Steven George

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    light weight, 25 - 35 degree API, diesel oil. Diesel oil was selected because CO, can cause asphaltene precipitation in some heavier crudes. Asphaltene precipitation would ruin the ability of the core to perform mulflple runs. The carbonated water... o e u e Q. 30 20 10 0 20 40 60 60 100 120 Effluent from Core Chamber, om3 Fig. 10. - Imbibition in Sandstone Field Core. 25 The results of the carbonated water flood show a higher initial production of oil. This may be a result of oil...

  20. Caring for Important Papers after a Flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    process, it may be worth the effort. Separate the pages to prevent musty odors. ? When the books are thoroughly dry, close them and use C-clamps to help them retain their shape. Wipe vinyl and leather book covers with a light coating of petroleum jelly..., University of California Cooperative Extension. Caring for Important Papers after a Flood Produced by AgriLife Communications and Marketing, The Texas A&M System Extension publications can be found on the Web at: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Visit the Texas...

  1. Ionospheric currents correlated with geomagnetic induced currents; Freja magnetic field measurements and the sunburst monitor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zanetti, L.J.; Potemra, T.A.; Anderson, B.J.; Erlandson, R.E.; Holland, D.B. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States)] [Johns Hopkins Univ., Laurel, MD (United States); Acuna, M.H. [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States); Kappenman, J. [Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States)] [Minnesota Power, Duluth, MN (United States); Lesher, R.; Feero, B. [Electric Research and Management, Inc., State College, PA (United States)] [Electric Research and Management, Inc., State College, PA (United States)

    1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporal and spatial fluctuations of large-scale electric currents totaling millions of amperes in the ionosphere have long been known to induce current and voltage in the Earth`s surface and on large manmade conductive structures. A strong, persistent solar wind can interact with the geomagnetic environment and produce auroral zone currents at mid latitudes. Presented here is a specific correlation of ionospheric auroral currents inferred from magnetic field measurements from the Swedish Freja satellite and induced current in the electric power distribution system on the east coast of the United States, in particular the Chalk Point, Maryland, transformer station. The event discussed here registered a Kp level of 6 to 8 and occurred on April 4-5, 1993. An important aspect is that information from both of these space- and ground-based monitoring systems is available automatically and in real time. In addition, satellite data from earlier local times, e.g., data monitored from European ground stations, can give precursor information of later North American geomagnetic activity. 24 refs., 2 figs.

  2. Can Core Flows inferred from Geomagnetic Field Models explain the Earth's Dynamo?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaeffer, Nathanaël; Pais, Maria Alexandra

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We test the ability of velocity fields inferred from geomagnetic secular variation data to produce the global magnetic field of the Earth. Our kinematic dynamo calculations use quasi-geostrophic (QG) flows inverted from geomagnetic field models which, as such, incorporate flow structures that are Earth-like and may be important for the geodynamo. Furthermore, the QG hypothesis allows straightforward prolongation of the flow from the core surface to the bulk. As expected from previous studies, we check that a simple quasi-geostrophic flow is not able to sustain the magnetic field against ohmic decay. Additional complexity is then introduced in the flow, inspired by the action of the Lorentz force. Indeed, on centenial timescales, the Lorentz force can balance the Coriolis force and strict quasi-geostrophy may not be the best ansatz. When the columnar flow is modified to account for the action of the Lorentz force, magnetic field is generated for Elsasser numbers larger than 0.25 and magnetic Reynolds numbers l...

  3. Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the performance of exterior and interior low-e storm panels with a controlled whole home experimental design using PNNL's Lab Homes. Summing the estimated annual average heating and cooling savings, the installation of low-e storm panels resulted in approximately 10% annual energy savings. The results of the experiment will be used to determine and validate performance of low-e storm windows over double pane clear glass windows in a whole home setting.

  4. A Decade of Changes in the Wildcat Creek Flood Control Channel, North Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginsberg, Ben

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Changes in the Wildcat Creek Flood Control Channel, NorthAbstract: The lower Wildcat Creek flood control and ripariancontinue. Introduction Wildcat Creek Watershed is located in

  5. Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area, Clark County, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    1 Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area, Clark County..................................................................................................................................... 4 Piedmont Geomorphology and Related Flood Hazards..................... 6 The Field Area

  6. Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta March 27, 2014 | Tags:...

  7. Building America's Low-e Storm Window Adoption Program Plan (FY2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Low emissivity (low-e) storm windows/panels appear to hold promise for effectively reducing existing home heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) consumption. Due to the affordability of low-e storm windows and the large numbers of existing homes that have low-performing single-pane or double-pane clear windows, a tremendous opportunity exists to provide energy savings by transforming the low-e storm window market and increasing market adoption. This report outlines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America’s planned market transformation activities in support of low-e storm window adoption during fiscal year (FY) 2014.

  8. Were the 2010 Pakistan floods predictable? P. J. Webster,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    Were the 2010 Pakistan floods predictable? P. J. Webster,1 V. E. Toma,1 and H.M. Kim1 Received 30 July 2010, a series of monsoonal deluges over northern Pakistan resulted in catastrophic flooding, loss, especially in North Pakistan was exceptionally rare as deduced from limited data. The location of the deluges

  9. Environmental Impact Statement Truckee Meadows Flood Control Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DRAFT Environmental Impact Statement for the Truckee Meadows Flood Control Project Nevada General Reevaluation Report Volume I ­ Draft Environmental Impact Statement prepared by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District May 2013 #12;#12;DRAFT Environmental Impact Statement for the Truckee Meadows Flood

  10. Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas Environmental Health Buford Highway NE (F-60) Atlanta, GA 30341 March 2011 #12;2 Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas Problem Statement Microbial contamination--both bacterial and viral

  11. Flooding of Industrial Facilities -Vulnerability Reduction in Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    any improvement. As human activities historically developed in river areas and floodplains, industrial-use planning in flood-prone areas and vulnerability reduction in flood-prone facilities. This paper focuses of hazardous material, soil or water pollutions by hazardous substances for the environment, fires, explosions

  12. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods Christopher P. Konrad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    tracer particles and bed load samplers have demonstrated that partial entrain- ment rather than completePartial entrainment of gravel bars during floods Christopher P. Konrad U.S. Geological Survey a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect

  13. Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad to study the sensitivity of dam-breach flood waves to breach-outflow hydrograph volume, peak discharge the channel. A dam-breach Froude number is defined to enable analysis through a wide range of site and flow

  14. A Mechanistic Model for Flooding in Vertical Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Kevin J.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In a counter-current two-phase flow system, flooding can be defined as the onset of flow reversal of the liquid component which results in an upward co-current flow. Flooding in the surge line of pressurized water reactors poses a significant...

  15. Did geomagnetic activity challenge electric power reliability during solar cycle 23? Evidence from the PJM regional transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Did geomagnetic activity challenge electric power reliability during solar cycle 23? Evidence from through 30 April 2004. During this time period PJM coordinated the movement of wholesale electricity of challenged reliability is the incidence of out-of-economic-merit order dispatching due to adverse reactive

  16. Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation" (McEwen, 1994: 359). Lawler (1992) recognised that little was known about the downstream change. It is suggested that downstream change in discharge is best represented as a power function in terms of channel

  17. Investigation of storm intensity by means of sferics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sievers, Henry Emmett

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    was about 0. 02. On 15 May, a funnel aloft was sight- ed neer Fort Sherman~ Grayson County~ at a time when 175 kc ratio was about 0. 32. On 18 May~ a funnel aloft occurred at Port Neches when sferics ratio was 0. 1; on the 28th~ a funnel aloft occurred... LIBRARy' A & M COLLEGE OF TEXAS INVESTIGATION OF STORM INTENSITY BY MEANS OF SFERICS A Thesis By HENRY EMMETT SIEVERS Major U. S. A. F. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5 CampaignSP2 Deployment at StormVEx ARM

  19. Washington Construction Storm Water General Permit | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTown ofNationwide PermitInformation Construction Storm Water General PermitLegal

  20. Managing Storm Aftermath in Alabama | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7Processes to TheirEnergy Midwest MIEMakingManaging Storm

  1. Storm Lake I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎SolarCityInformationStopwattch Jump to: navigation,Storm

  2. Overview of the Storm Water Individual Permit.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for RenewableSpeedingBiomass and BiofuelsOversight Board TheOverview of thethe LANL Storm

  3. A NEW GENERATION CHEMICAL FLOODING SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Mojdeh Delshad

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. In this final report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 of the project.

  4. 9.5 SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TORNADIC NEAR-STORM ENVIRONMENTS BY CONVECTIVE MODE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Thompson* , Bryan T. Smith, and Andrew R. Dean NOAA/NWS/Storm Prediction Center Norman OK Patrick T. Marsh/NWS/NCEP/Storm Prediction Center, 120 David L. Boren Blvd., Norman, OK 73072; email: Richard.Thompson@noaa.gov. 1 #12

  5. Model bias correction for dust storm forecast using ensemble Kalman filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model bias correction for dust storm forecast using ensemble Kalman filter Caiyan Lin,1,2 Jiang Zhu Kalman filter (EnKF) assimilation targeting heavy dust episodes during the period of 15­24 March 2002. Wang (2008), Model bias correction for dust storm forecast using ensemble Kalman filter, J. Geophys

  6. A Three-Dimensional Geographic and Storm Surge Data Integration System for Evacuation Planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Shu-Ching

    @fiu.edu Abstract The rise of offshore water caused by the high winds of a low pressure weather system, or storm to construct a three-dimensional ocean po- sitioned over the terrain models. Ambient details such as wind, vegetation, ocean waves, and traffic are animated based on up-to-date wind and storm surge data. Videos

  7. Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardinale, Bradley J.

    Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs J A R R E T T E . B Y R in the diversity and complexity of food webs of giant kelp forests, one of the most productive habitats on Earth. We demonstrate this by linking natural variation in storms with measured changes in kelp forest food

  8. UC Santa Cruz Storm Water SPRING 2010 Volume 2, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    : Environmental Programs Assistant for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program http://cleanwater.ucsc. edu Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu or (831) 459-4520 Storm Water Management on Construction Sites Control Plan (ESCP). The ESCP must use all applicable Best Management Practices from Appendix E. Appendix

  9. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/11 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

  10. Water Quality and Hydrologic Performance of a Porous Asphalt Pavement as a Storm-Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    examined the functionality of a porous pavement storm-water management system in coastal New Hampshire headings: Stormwater management; Runoff; Porous media; Pavements; Cold regions; Best Management Practice; Water quality; Water treatment. Author keywords: Storm-water management; Runoff; Porous pavements; Cold

  11. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    . These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/10 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

  12. Storm Water Management through Infiltration Trenches1 Bhagu R. Chahar1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . An infiltration trench alone or in combination with other storm10 water management practice is a key element and the drain time of trench, which is a key15 parameter in operation of storm water management practice systems (SUDS), water sensitive38 urban design (WSUD), best management practices (BMP) or low impact urban

  13. ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , 2013 to June 30, 2014 (Year 5) The University of California at Santa Cruz's Storm Water Management improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs will be updated as appropriate1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

  14. Damage Assessment from Storm Surge to Coastal Cities: Lessons from the Miami Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    , Hurricane Andrew hit Dade County with Category 5 force, generating 17-foot (more than 5 meters) storm surges evolution of hurricane intensity and sea level rise. The area of Miami represents a clear hotspot of human sea level, considering different hurricane parameters (storm category and direction, wind speed

  15. Storm water pollution prevention plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) published the final storm water regulation on November 16, 1990. The storm water regulation is included in the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) regulations. An NPDES permit was issued for the Y-12 Plant on April 28, 1995, and was effective on July 1, 1995. The permit requires that a Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) be developed by December 28, 1995, and be fully implemented by July 1, 1996; this plan has been developed to fulfill that requirement. The outfalls and monitoring points described in this plan contain storm water discharges associated with industrial activities as defined in the NPDES regulations. For storm water discharges associated with industrial activity, including storm water discharges associated with construction activity, that are not specifically monitored or limited in this permit, Y-12 Plant personnel will meet conditions of the General Storm Water Rule 1200-4-10. This document presents the programs and physical controls that are in place to achieve the following objectives: ensure compliance with Section 1200-4-10-.04(5) of the TDEC Water Quality Control Regulations and Part 4 of the Y-12 Plant NPDES Permit (TN0002968); provide operating personnel with guidance relevant to storm water pollution prevention and control requirements for their facility and/or project; and prevent or reduce pollutant discharge to the environment, in accordance with the Clean Water Act (CWA) and the Tennessee Water Quality Control Act.

  16. STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN BUILDING B51 AND BEVATRON DEMOLITION PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN FOR: BUILDING B51 AND BEVATRON DEMOLITION PROJECT PROJECT NO;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) Building B51 and Bevatron Demolition Project Lawrence............................................................................................300-3 300.4 Project Schedule/Water Pollution Control Schedule

  17. 2 1 APPLICATION GALLERY 1.1 Tracking ``Fuzzy'' Storms in Doppler Radar Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barron, John

    and tornadoes. The Doppler radar generates intensity and radial velocity images, examples of which are shown Doppler radar radial and velocity image (a) (b) (c) (d) Figure 1.2: The storm tracks for the (a) 5 th , (b2 1 APPLICATION GALLERY 1.1 Tracking ``Fuzzy'' Storms in Doppler Radar Images J. L. Barron 1 , R. E

  18. Research papers Temporal and spatial variability in fall storm induced sediment resuspension

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Research papers Temporal and spatial variability in fall storm induced sediment resuspension February 2011 Received in revised form 20 July 2012 Accepted 3 August 2012 Keywords: Sediment resuspension a b s t r a c t Storm-driven sediment resuspension is an episodic process that is an important

  19. Emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a Martian dust storm Christopher Ruf,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    and forced by large-scale electric discharge. Thus, the non-thermal radiation was probably caused by electric#12;Emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a Martian dust storm Christopher Ruf,1 Nilton O report evidence for the emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a deep Martian dust storm

  20. Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National Parks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

    Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National of inundation risk from sea level rise and storm surge in northeastern coastal national parks. Journal of Coastal Research, 00(0), 000­000. Coconut Creek (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Sea level rise and an increase

  1. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  2. The quiet geomagnetic field at geosynchronous orbit and its dependence on solar wind dynamic pressure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufenach, C.L.; Schaper, J. (NOAA Space Environmental Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)); McPherron, R.L. (Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vector magnetic fields at geosynchronous orbit were measured during 1980-1984 using the operational GOES 2, GOES 5, and GOES 6 spacecraft magnetometers. The authors corrected these spacecraft measurements for offsets due to spacecraft state and then used these field estimates to create a data base with 1-min resolution. Hourly quiet field values were calculated for these years from this data base using the ground-based geomagnetic index criteria AE < 120 nT and {vert bar}Dst{vert bar} < 20 nT. These quiet field components, rotated into dipole HVD coordinates, were approximated by the first two coefficients of a two-dimensional Fourier series in time of day and season. The quiet geosynchronous field components, to first order, are given by mean values of about 90 nT, {minus}60 nT, and 5 nT; and sinusoidal diurnal amplitudes of about 21 nT, 5 nT, and 5 nT, respectively, for H, V, and D where the spacecraft magnetometer was located near the geomagnetic meridian. The second harmonic diurnal amplitudes and the first and second harmonic seasonal amplitudes are typically of the order of a few nanoteslas or less except for the D component, which exhibits a larger seasonal variation. Furthermore, a one-dimensional Fourier series in time of day was used to study the quiet field dependence on solar wind dynamic pressure, P{sub d}, by indexing the measurements into five pressure ranges during 1980. These quiet H measurements, including the pressure dependence, are compared with a first-order field model superimposed with a tail current, resulting in magnetospheric currents (magnetopause and tail) in agreement with previous model values.

  3. Flood Risk Management Newsletter June 2014 vol 7 no 3 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter June 2014 · vol 7 no 3 1 Table of Contents Annual Spring Connecting Flood Risk, Emergency Managers and Silver Jackets: Annual Spring Flood Assessment Karen Durham; Flood Risk Management Newsletter June 2014 · vol 7 no 3 2 these areas of concern were attributed

  4. Flood Storage Allocation Rules for Parallel Reservoirs B.S. (Tsinghua University, China) 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Flood Storage Allocation Rules for Parallel Reservoirs By RUI HUI B.S. (Tsinghua University and minimize flood damage. However, for different hydrograph shapes, corresponding flood storage volumes often differ for the same peak flow reductions. Meanwhile, it is often the case that flood storage volume

  5. The role of woodland in flood control: a landscape perspective T.R. Nisbet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as part of a whole-catchment approach to sustainable flood management. Keywords: Woodland; water use; soil-125. IALE(UK), Oxford.] Abstract Sustainable flood management is increasingly looking to the role infiltration; hydraulic roughness; sustainable flood management Introduction A series of major floods across

  6. Quality assurance flood source and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Alexander, David L [West Richland, WA; Satz, Stanley [Surfside, FL

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a is an improved flood source, and method of making the same, which emits an evenly distributed flow of energy from a gamma emitting radionuclide dispersed throughout the volume of the flood source. The flood source is formed by filling a bottom pan with a mix of epoxy resin with cobalt-57, preferably at 10 to 20 millicuries and then adding a hardener. The pan is secured to a flat, level surface to prevent the pan from warping and to act as a heat sink for removal of heat from the pan during the curing of the resin-hardener mixture.

  7. Flood control reservoir operations for conditions of limited storage capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Ramirez, Hector David

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Therefore, if the entire flood control capacity of a reservoir is available, only an extremely severe flood event would require the implementation of the EOS for most reservoir projects, and thus the bulk of the research has been focused on how to manage... operations objectives. In other words, the REOS provide a set of rules that reflect the risk of flooding upstream as well as downstream of the dams. The USACE and other reservoir management agencies may use the methodology proposed in this study...

  8. Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Low-e Storms:  The Next “Big Thing” in Window RetrofitsOfficial Webinar Transcript (September 9, 2014)

  9. The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity (SSEO): Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity (SSEO): Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous Prediction Center, Norman, OK Introduction The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) has developed a 7-member-scale models already available operationally to SPC. · provides a practical alternative to a formal storm

  10. Determining Hydrological Controls on Flood Frequency | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Federal Emergency Management AgencyAndrea Booher Aerial view of homes inundated with water following a 2011 flood in Minot, N.D. Researchers have compared data from hundreds of...

  11. Multiobjective Design and Optimization of Polymer Flood Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekkawong, Peerapong

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    (Pareto front) to maximize oil production while preserving polymer performance. Then an optimal polymer flood design can be considered from post-optimization analysis. A 2D synthetic example, and a 3D field-scale application, accounting for geologic...

  12. Chilean glacial lake outburst flood impacts on dam construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tauro, Flavia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF) occurred in the Colonia Glacier (Northern Patagonia Icefield, Chile) from April 2008 to March 2009. Lago Cachet 2 emptied four times producing a maximum excess discharge in the ...

  13. DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control in Eastern India ROHAN D, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Drowned and Dammed comprehensively reconsiders the debate with physical infrastructure such as embankments, canal networks, and inevitably the Hirakud Dam. In seeking

  14. Multiobjective Design and Optimization of Polymer Flood Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekkawong, Peerapong

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The multiobjective genetic algorithm can be used to optimize two conflicting objectives, oil production and polymer utility factor in polymer flood design. This approach provides a set of optimal solutions which can be considered as trade-off curve...

  15. Generation of graphitic soots by an urban fire storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, D.E.; Cole, L.L.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained samples of aerosols deposited during the Hiroshima fire storm that was initiated by the atomic bomb detonated on August 6, 1945, from streaks of ''black rain'' found on a plaster wall. The artifact appears to contain aerosol particles that may be representative of the aerosols that may lead to a ''nuclear winter'' (Turco 1983). Gamma spectroscopy measurements indicate the presence of naturally-occurring radionuclides K-40, Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-232, and Th-234, along with the fission product, Cs-137. Sooty particles of varying sizes have been detected using optical photomicrography and examined using x-ray induced x-ray fluorescence. The elements Ca, Sr, Ba, Fe, and Zn, have been detected, and exhibit elemental composition ratios representative of Hiroshima soil. Particle composition and size studies indicate that the particle sizes have a mean diameter of 1.8 microns, and that 30% are less than 1 micron in mean diameter.

  16. Azimuthal modulation of cosmic ray flux as an effect of geomagnetic field in the ARGO-YBJ experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernardini, P; He, H H; Mancarella, G; Perrone, L; Surdo, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geomagnetic field causes not only the East-West effect on the primary cosmic rays but also affects the trajectories of the secondary charged particles in the shower, causing their lateral distribution to be stretched along certain directions. Thus both the density of the secondaries near the shower axis and the trigger efficiency of a detector array decrease. The effect depends on the age and on the direction of the showers, thus involving the measured azimuthal distribution. Here the non-uniformity of the azimuthal distribution of the reconstructed events in the ARGO-YBJ experiment is deeply investigated for different zenith angles on the light of this effect. The influence of the geomagnetic field as well as geometric effects are studied by means of a Monte Carlo simulation.

  17. The effect of flooding velocity and degree of reservoir depletion on the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Phillips C

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I3 at 110 F 19 Observed Variation of Gas Saturation and Residual Oil Saturation . 21 5, Observed Pressure and Gas-Oil Ratio Histories As A Function of the Cumulative Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . 21 Waterflood Recovery At A Constant Pressure... ~ ~ ( ~ ~ ~ ~ Waterflood Recovery As A Function of Initial Gas SB'turatlon ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ a ~ ~ ~ o o e ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 s a a a ~ 10. Residual Oil Saturation After Primary, Water. Flooding and Final Pressure Depletion. . . ~. . . . . ~ . . 30 Results of laboratory flooding...

  18. Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bullard, K.L.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

  19. A NEW GENERATION CHEMICAL FLOODING SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Mojdeh Delshad

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. We have made significant progress on all three tasks and we are on schedule on both technical and budget. In this report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 for the first six months of the second year of the project.

  20. Improvement of CO sub 2 flood performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.F.; Heller, J.P.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a six-year research project devoted to the study of processes of oil displacement using dense carbon dioxide. The topics studied have included phase behavior and physical properties of mixtures of crude oil with CO{sub 2}, the phenomena involved in the displacement of oil through reservoir rock under oilfield conditions, the influence of stabilized lamella or CO{sub 2}-foam on this displacement and the development of computer programs to simulate the displacement. In addition, the occurrence of nonuniformities in the displacement pattern has also been considered. The effect on displacement of permeability heterogeneities in the reservoir have been studied geostatistically and by direct numerical modelling. Displacement nonuniformities that are induced by viscosity and density differences between displaced and displacing fluids have also been considered, and efforts are described for the development of two different types of additive for purposes of mobility control of CO{sub 2} floods. One of these is the so-called CO{sub 2}-foam, formed by simultaneous flow through the formation of dense CO{sub 2} with a water solution of a special surfactant. The second type under development in the project is known as direct thickener, and consists of a polymer that is soluble in dense CO{sub 2} and able to viscosify it. Significant progress is reported on all of the topics mentioned above. 174 refs., 186 figs., 41 tabs.

  1. Storm-water management for construction activities. Developing pollution prevention plans and best management practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides industrial facilities with comprehensive guidance on the development of storm water pollution prevention plans and identification of appropriate Best Management Practices (BMPs). It provides technical assistance and support to all facilities subject to pollution prevention requirements established under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for storm water point source discharges. EPA's storm water program significantly expands the scope and application of the existing NPDES permit system for municipal and industrial process wastewater discharges. It emphasizes pollution prevention and reflects a heavy reliance on BMPs to reduce pollutant loadings and improve water quality. The manual provides essential guidance in both of these areas.

  2. Storm-water management for industrial activities. Developing pollution prevention plans and best management practices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The manual provides industrial facilities with comprehensive guidance on the development of storm water pollution prevention plans and identification of appropriate Best Management Practices (BMPs). It provides technical assistance and support to all facilities subject to pollution prevention requirements established under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for storm water point source discharges. EPA's storm water program significantly expands the scope and application of the existing NPDES permit system for municipal and industrial process wastewater discharges. It emphasizes pollution prevention and reflects a heavy reliance on BMPs to reduce pollutant loadings and improve water quality. The manual provides essential guidance in both of these areas.

  3. POISON SPIDER FIELD CHEMICAL FLOOD PROJECT, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Arnell; Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir engineering and geologic study concluded that approximate 7,852,000 bbls of target oil exits in Poison Spider. Field pore volume, OOIP, and initial oil saturation are defined. Potential injection water has a total dissolved solids content of 1,275 mg/L with no measurable divalent cations. If the Lakota water consistently has no measurable cations, the injection water does not require softening to dissolve alkali. Produced water total dissolved solids were 2,835 mg/L and less than 20 mg/L hardness as the sum of divalent cations. Produced water requires softening to dissolve chemicals. Softened produced water was used to dissolve chemicals in these evaluations. Crude oil API gravity varies across the field from 19.7 to 22.2 degrees with a dead oil viscosity of 95 to 280 cp at 75 F. Interfacial tension reductions of up to 21,025 fold (0.001 dyne/cm) were developed with fifteen alkaline-surfactant combinations at some alkali concentration. An additional three alkaline-surfactant combinations reduced the interfacial tension greater than 5,000 fold. NaOH generally produced the lowest interfacial tension values. Interfacial tension values of less than 0.021 dyne/cm were maintained when the solutions were diluted with produced water to about 60%. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} when mixed with surfactants did not reduce interfacial tension values to levels at which incremental oil can be expected. NaOH without surfactant interfacial tension reduction is at a level where some additional oil might be recovered. Most of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions producing ultra low interfacial tension gave type II- phase behavior. Only two solutions produced type III phase behavior. Produced water dilution resulted in maintenance of phase type for a number of solutions at produced water dilutions exceeding 80% dilution. The average loss of phase type occurred at 80% dilution. Linear corefloods were performed to determine relative permeability end points, chemical-rock compatibility, polymer injectivity, dynamic chemical retention by rock, and recommended injected polymer concentration. Average initial oil saturation was 0.796 Vp. Produced water injection recovered 53% OOIP leaving an average residual oil saturation of 0.375 Vp. Poison Spider rock was strongly water-wet with a mobility ratio for produced water displacing the 280 cp crude oil of 8.6. Core was not sensitive to either alkali or surfactant injection. Injectivity increased 60 to 80% with alkali plus surfactant injection. Low and medium molecular weight polyacrylamide polymers (Flopaam 3330S and Flopaam 3430S) dissolved in either an alkaline-surfactant solution or softened produced water injected and flowed through Poison Spider rock. Recommended injected polyacrylamide concentration is 2,100 mg/L for both polymers for a unit mobility ratio. Radial corefloods were performed to evaluate oil recovery efficiency of different chemical solutions. Waterflood oil recovery averaged 46.4 OOIP and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery averaged an additional 18.1% OIP for a total of 64.6% OOIP. Oil cut change due to injection of a 1.5 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 0.05 wt% Petrostep B-100 plus 0.05 wt% Stepantan AS1216 plus 2100 mg/L Flopaam 3430S was from 2% to a peak of 23.5%. Additional study might determine the impact on oil recovery of a lower polymer concentration. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood field implementation outline report was written.

  4. Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate seasonal and interannual statistics of troughs associated with the Pacific storm track and quantify the influence of deformation on trough development upstream of the western Pacific. The goal...

  5. Low-e Storm Windows: Market Assessment and Pathways to Market Transformation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.

    2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Field studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have shown that the use of low-e storm windows can lead to significant heating and cooling energy savings in residential homes. This study examines the market for low-e storm windows based on market data, case studies, and recent experience with weatherization deployment programs. It uses information from interviews conducted with DOE researchers and industry partners involved in case studies and early deployment efforts related to low-e storm windows. In addition, this study examines potential barriers to market acceptance, assesses the market and energy savings potential, and identifies opportunities to transform the market for low-e storm windows and overcome market adoption barriers.

  6. Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Building America webinar presented a new and improved low-e storm window that boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement, on Sept. 9, 2014.

  7. Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myoung, Boksoon

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this thesis is to investigate seasonal and interannual statistics of troughs associated with the Pacific storm track and quantify the influence of deformation on trough development upstream of the western Pacific. The goal...

  8. Coastal communities and climate change : a dynamic model of risk perception, storms, and adaptation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franck, Travis Read

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change impacts, including sea-level rise and changes in tropical storm frequency and intensity, will pose signicant challenges to city planners and coastal zone managers trying to make wise investment and protection ...

  9. Seasonal Performance Variations for Storm-Water Management Systems in Cold Climate Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    headings: Stormwater management; Best management practice; Performance characteristics; Water qualitySeasonal Performance Variations for Storm-Water Management Systems in Cold Climate Conditions. An examination of six varied LID designs, in contrast with conventional best-management practices BMPs

  10. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  11. EPA STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL (SWMM), VERSIONS 4.31 & 4.4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haller, Merrick

    EPA STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL (SWMM), VERSIONS 4.31 & 4.4 Availability | Version 4.4h | SWMM5 and other best management practices (BMPs). Version 4.3 (May 1994) contains corrections and enhancements

  12. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Environment Compliance Department

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

  13. The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wygant, J. R.

    The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency ...

  14. Characteristics of warm season precipitating storms in the Arkansas–Red River basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tucker, Donna F.; Li, Xingong

    2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    [1] Analysis of a multisensor precipitation product enables us to extract the precipitation from individual storms in the Arkansas–Red River drainage basin over a period of 11 years. We examine the year-to-year and ...

  15. Radar and lightning analyses of gigantic jet-producing storms Tiffany C. Meyer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    Radar and lightning analyses of gigantic jet-producing storms Tiffany C. Meyer,1,2 Timothy J. Lang of gigantic jets, similar to prior modeling studies. Citation: Meyer, T. C., T. J. Lang, S. A. Rutledge, W. A

  16. C h a p t e r 1 0 Island in the Storm: Disturbance Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willig, Michael

    depression forms from increasing low pressure that absorbs air and thermal energy from the ocean. The air Ocean. The same kind of storm in #12;282 M. R. Gannon and M. R. Willig the Pacific Ocean is a typhoon

  17. Particle scattering and current sheet stability in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pulkkinen, T.I.; Pellinen, R.J.; Koskinen, H.E.J. (Finnish Meteorological Inst., Helsinki (Finland)); Baker, D.N. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Buechner, J. (Max-Planck-Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, Aussenstellung Berlin (Germany)); Lopez, R.E. (Applied Research Corp., Landover, MD (United States)); Dyson, R.L.; Frank, L.A. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States))

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The degree of pitch angle scattering and chaotization of various particle populations in the geomagnetic tail during the substorm growth phase is studied by utilizing the Tsyganenko 1989 magnetic field model. A temporally evolving magnetic field model for the growth phase is constructed by enhancing the near-Earth currents and thinning the current sheet from the values given by the static Tsyganenko model. Changing the field geometry toward an increasingly taillike configuration leads to pitch angle scattering of particles whose Larmor radii become comparable to the field line radius of curvature. Several different cases representing substorms with varying levels of magnetic disturbance have been studied. In each case, the field development during the growth phase leads to considerable scattering of the thermal electrons relatively close to the Earth. The current sheet regions where the electron motion is chaotic are magnetically mapped to the ionosphere and compared with low-altitude measurements of electron precipitation. The chaotization of the thermal electron population occurs within a few minutes of the substorm onset, and the ionospheric mappings of the chaotic regions in the equatorial plane compare well with the region of brightening auroras. Even though the temporal evolution of the complex plasma system cannot be self-consistently described by the temporal evolution of the empirical field model, these models can provide the most accurate estimates of the field parameters for tail stability calculations.

  18. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)] [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant`s electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant`s protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well.

  19. An investigation of dust storm generation in the Southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollard, Marshall Conrad

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AN INVESTIGATION OF DUST STORM GENERATION IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS A Thesis by NARSHALL CONRAD POLLARD Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASH University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of HASTER... OF SCIFNCE December 1977 H. -ior S?b]ect: Jleteorology AN INVESTIGATION OF DUST STORM GENERATION IN THE SOUTHERN GREAT PLAINS A Thesis by MARSHALL CONRAD POLLARD Approved as to style and content by: Chairman of Committ ) (Head of Department...

  20. The rainfall patterns associated with tropical storm Felice of September 1970

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Lewis Calvin

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE RAINFALL PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL STORM FELICE OF SEPTEMBER 1970 A Thesis by LEWIS CALVIN NORTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Tc. . as ARM Univers ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1976 Major Subject: Meteorology THE RAINFALL PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL STORM FELICE OF SEPTEMBER 1970 A Thesis by LEWIS CALVIN NORTON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member...

  1. Bridging the Gap between Chemical Flooding and Independent Oil Producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan McCool; Tony Walton; Paul Willhite; Mark Ballard; Miguel Rondon; Kaixu Song; Zhijun Liu; Shahab Ahmend; Peter Senior

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten Kanas oil reservoirs/leases were studied through geological and engineering analysis to assess the potential performance of chemical flooding to recover oil. Reservoirs/leases that have been efficiently waterflooded have the highest performance potential for chemical flooding. Laboratory work to identify efficient chemical systems and to test the oil recovery performance of the systems was the major effort of the project. Efficient chemical systems were identified for crude oils from nine of the reservoirs/leases. Oil recovery performance of the identified chemical systems in Berea sandstone rocks showed 90+ % recoveries of waterflood residual oil for seven crude oils. Oil recoveries increased with the amount of chemical injected. Recoveries were less in Indiana limestone cores. One formulation recovered 80% of the tertiary oil in the limestone rock. Geological studies for nine of the oil reservoirs are presented. Pleasant Prairie, Trembley, Vinland and Stewart Oilfields in Kansas were the most favorable of the studied reservoirs for a pilot chemical flood from geological considerations. Computer simulations of the performance of a laboratory coreflood were used to predict a field application of chemical flooding for the Trembley Oilfield. Estimates of field applications indicated chemical flooding is an economically viable technology for oil recovery.

  2. Hydropower at flood control reservoirs - the variable speed option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence, K.; Yale, J. [Stone & Webster Engineering Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of hydroelectric turbine-generators to flood control has been limited due to the inability of a single turbine to operate efficiently over the wide head and flow ranges encountered. Multiple and different unit combinations have been applied to this problem, but the cost of the additional unit(s), powerhouse, and supporting facilities typically causes the project to become unfeasible. Variable speed operation can increase the operating range of a single turbine, and significantly improve efficiency over single speed units. This can make hydroelectric generation at flood control projects feasible. This paper presents a comparison of the application of variable speed units, two speed units, and single speed units at the Blue River Dam Hydroelectric Project. The project consists of the addition of a powerhouse to an existing Army Corps of Engineers flood control project. Efficiency data for the different types of units are compared and historical flow and release data are used in a computer model to simulate plant operation.

  3. Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

  4. Hydrodynamic model of Fukushima-Daiichi NPP Industrial site flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaschenko, V N; Gerasimenko, T V; Vachev, B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the Fukushima-Daiichi was designed and constructed the maximal tsunami height estimate was about 3 m based on analysis of statistical data including Chile earthquake in 1960. The NPP project industrial site height was 10 m. The further deterministic estimates TPCO-JSCE confirmed the impossibility of the industrial site flooding by a tsunami and therefore confirmed ecological safety of the NPP. However, as a result of beyond design earthquake of 11 March 2011 the tsunami height at the shore near the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP reached 15 m. This led to flooding and severe emergencies having catastrophic environmental consequences. This paper proposes hydrodynamic model of tsunami emerging and traveling based on conservative assumptions. The possibility of a tsunami wave reaching 15 m height at the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP shore was confirmed for deduced hydrodynamic resistance coefficient of 1.8. According to the model developed a possibility of flooding is determined not only by the industrial site height, magni...

  5. Precipitation analysis for a flood early warning system in the Manafwa River Basin, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecinati, Francesca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communities living in the Manafwa River Basin experience frequent floods threatening their lives and property. Climate change and anthropogenic perturbations to the natural environment increase flooding frequency. This ...

  6. Subcooling Effects for Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullum, Wes

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A counter current annular flow experiment was performed to determine flooding conditions for varying degrees of subcooling using steam and water. The findings can be used in reactor safety codes to provide an improved model of flooding during...

  7. Simulation Study for Improving Seawater Polymer Flood Performance in Stratified High Temperature Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Geng

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer flood has achieved technical and commercial success, especially for its large-scale application in the Daqing oilfield in China. However, previous field tests indicated polymer flood was not economically successful for high temperature...

  8. Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

  9. Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Africa.gif Why it Matters: The...

  10. A first large-scale flood inundation forecasting model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, Guy J-P; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Voisin, Nathalie; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Pappenberger, Florian; Phanthuwongpakdee, Kay; Hall, Amanda C.; Bates, Paul D.

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    At present continental to global scale flood forecasting focusses on predicting at a point discharge, with little attention to the detail and accuracy of local scale inundation predictions. Yet, inundation is actually the variable of interest and all flood impacts are inherently local in nature. This paper proposes a first large scale flood inundation ensemble forecasting model that uses best available data and modeling approaches in data scarce areas and at continental scales. The model was built for the Lower Zambezi River in southeast Africa to demonstrate current flood inundation forecasting capabilities in large data-scarce regions. The inundation model domain has a surface area of approximately 170k km2. ECMWF meteorological data were used to force the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) macro-scale hydrological model which simulated and routed daily flows to the input boundary locations of the 2-D hydrodynamic model. Efficient hydrodynamic modeling over large areas still requires model grid resolutions that are typically larger than the width of many river channels that play a key a role in flood wave propagation. We therefore employed a novel sub-grid channel scheme to describe the river network in detail whilst at the same time representing the floodplain at an appropriate and efficient scale. The modeling system was first calibrated using water levels on the main channel from the ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimeter and then applied to predict the February 2007 Mozambique floods. Model evaluation showed that simulated flood edge cells were within a distance of about 1 km (one model resolution) compared to an observed flood edge of the event. Our study highlights that physically plausible parameter values and satisfactory performance can be achieved at spatial scales ranging from tens to several hundreds of thousands of km2 and at model grid resolutions up to several km2. However, initial model test runs in forecast mode revealed that it is crucial to account for basin-wide hydrological response time when assessing lead time performances notwithstanding structural limitations in the hydrological model and possibly large inaccuracies in precipitation data.

  11. 27/10/2010 12:48AGU: Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/rs/rs1002/2009RS004215/2009RS004215.xml&t=

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    27/10/2010 12:48AGU: Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low Abstract Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave characteristics. Finally, we compared in detail the geomagnetic induced current (GIC) in the Scottish power system

  12. Spread-F during the magnetic storm of 22 January 2004 at low latitudes: Effect of IMF-Bz in relation to local

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Janardhan

    measurements at an electrojet station Thumba. This phenomenon is found to occur during geomagnetic quiet of the orthogonal horizontal electric field and the geomagnetic field gives rise to several distinct features Electrojet (EEJ), a band of intense daytime eastward current in the ionosphere (100 km) within ± 3 latitudes

  13. Differences in geomagnetic Sq field representations due to variations in spherical harmonic analysis techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, W.H. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA))

    1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various methods for the spherical harmonic analysis of the quiet daily variation of geomagnetic fields (Sq) measured at the Earth's surface have been used to represent the separation of the external (source) and internal (induced) currents. The results of such methods differ because the modeling techniques often reflect differing special objectives of the researcher. One method utilizes the observed field measurements at all world locations determined at a specific instant of time. A second method uses only observations in one primary hemisphere, appropriately mirroring field values for the analysis in the opposite hemisphere. The third method, a variation of the second, uses field values in the opposite hemisphere that are mirrored from a primary region that is shifted in time by 6 months. A variation of these three methods utilizes only a longitude line of observatories and assumes that the 24 hours of Sq field variation represents a 360{degree} rotation of the analysis sphere. For the comparison, power spectral representation, global current patterns in different seasons, and deviations of model-computed field values from the surface observations were all evaluated. The power spectral study showed that the spherical harmonic analysis of Sq should be extended to order m = 6 and degree n = m + 17. The northern hemisphere current system seemed to be consistently stronger than the southern hemisphere system. Exclusion of the mid-latitude vortex polynomials with (n {minus} m) = 0 and 1 was shown to be a useful technique for exposing the unique polar cap current pattern S{sup p}{sub q}. The global method was generally best for modeling; however, the hemisphere mirroring methods with 6-month time shift were almost as good in their representation of the Sq fields. Different special regions of effective and poor modeling were identified for all three methods.

  14. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 December 2013 vol 7 no 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 December 2013 vol 7 no 2 Fstocoll Table of Contents Mark Roupas to Flood Risk Management, Emergency Management, and Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience for his role overseeing emergency management and flood risk management activities. Roupas served twenty

  15. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 April 2014 vol 7 no 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 April 2014 vol 7 no 3 Fstocoll Table of Contents Reflections Conferences...................................................12 Reflections on the Flood Risk Management in a series of recurring messages to the flood risk management community of practice, my first thought was

  16. Flood Risk Management Newsletter October 2014 vol 8 no 1 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter October 2014 · vol 8 no 1 1 Table of Contents Informal Management and Flood Risk Management (FRM) Communities of Practice. For the purpose of this article of the USACE October 2014 · vol 8 no 1 Mark Roupas #12; Flood Risk Management Newsletter October 2014 · vol

  17. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2013 vol 6 no 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2013 vol 6 no 3 Fstocoll Table of Contents Social-Cognitive Aspects of Risk and Performance Management in Flood Response is to be a system of models that will support decision making in emergency situations, like flood risk management

  18. Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory of methane from flooded unexploited coal seams Field experience from the flooding operations of the abandoned gassy coal seams in abandoned mines. The tests included the following main stages: - Determining

  19. Forestflood relation still tenuous comment on `Global evidence that deforestation amplifies flood risk and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    Forest­flood relation still tenuous ­ comment on `Global evidence that deforestation amplifies cover change, and conclude that deforestation amplifies flood risk and severity in the developing world% of the variation in reported flood occurrences, considerably more than forest cover or deforestation (o10

  20. Addressing Crises More Effectively: The Other Answers to Rising Sea Levels, Storms, Floods, Desertification, Earthquakes and More Environmental Crises in the Sacramento Delta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Emery

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the EU’s mandatory greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme,the European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS). “The cap onthe European Union’s emission trading scheme (Bounds and

  1. Water Visualization and Flooding in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Water Visualization and Flooding in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Brian Holsclaw West- 2H2O e- e- e- e- e- H+ H+ H+ Membrane + Schematic of a PEMFC Operation #12;PFR PEM Fuel Cell Plug for membrane Two-phase flow in channels #12;CSTR PEM Fuel Cell Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor (CSTR) "Perfect

  2. History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Colorado State University 25th South Platte Forum Longmont, CO October 22, 2014 #12;Acknowledgment: Thanks is it -- the History Annual Peak Flows S. Platte River at Julesburg 1902-2013 #12;#12;#12;Now, let's head upstream

  3. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

  4. CEDAR RIVER, CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    developed as standard designs in order to minimize estimated construction cost. The estimated total cost: The purpose of the Project is to provide cost effective, environmentally-sensitive, and technically feasible lies within the 100-year floodplain. Historically, major floods have resulted from a combination

  5. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM TO BRISBANE CITY This brochure for the Brisbane River below Wivenhoe Dam to Brisbane City. It includes reference information which will be useful kilometres of which about half is below Wivenhoe Dam. The Lockyer-Laidley Valley drains into the Brisbane

  6. Mitigating Flood Loss through Local Comprehensive Planning in Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jung Eun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and environment planning and policy. When sustainability was embraced by international organizations and governmental organizations managing development programs and projects, the term, ?sustainable development? became popular (Beatley, 1998). Currently...; and a more economically integrated and diverse population (Vale & Campanella, 2005). Based on previous literature (Beatley, 1998; Berke, 1995; Mileti, 1999), this study develops principles of sustainability that can be applied to flood mitigation...

  7. 7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

  8. Thompson, R. L., B. T. Smith, A. R. Dean, and P. T. Marsh, 2014: Spatial distributions of tornadic near-storm environments by convective mode. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (5), 122.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . SMITH, AND ANDREW R. DEAN NOAA/NWS/NCEP Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma PATRICK T. MARSH* University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma (Submitted 19 February 2013; in final form 08 September 2013: NOAA/NWS/NCEP Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma. ____________________ Corresponding author

  9. Potential Release Site Sediment Concentrations Correlated to Storm Water Station Runoff through GIS Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    C.T. McLean

    2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research examined the relationship between sediment sample data taken at Potential Release Sites (PRSs) and storm water samples taken at selected sites in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The PRSs had been evaluated for erosion potential and a matrix scoring system implemented. It was assumed that there would be a stronger relationship between the high erosion PRSs and the storm water samples. To establish the relationship, the research was broken into two areas. The first area was raster-based modeling, and the second area was data analysis utilizing the raster based modeling results and the sediment and storm water sample results. Two geodatabases were created utilizing raster modeling functions and the Arc Hydro program. The geodatabase created using only Arc Hydro functions contains very fine catchment drainage areas in association with the geometric network and can be used for future contaminant tracking. The second geodatabase contains sub-watersheds for all storm water stations used in the study along with a geometric network. The second area of the study focused on data analysis. The analytical sediment data table was joined to the PRSs spatial data in ArcMap. All PRSs and PRSs with high erosion potential were joined separately to create two datasets for each of 14 analytes. Only the PRSs above the background value were retained. The storm water station spatial data were joined to the table of analyte values that were either greater than the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) benchmark value, or the Department of Energy (DOE) Drinking Water Defined Contribution Guideline (DWDCG). Only the storm water stations were retained that had sample values greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Separate maps were created for each analyte showing the sub-watersheds, the PRSs over background, and the storm water stations greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Tables were then created for each analyte that listed the PRSs average value by storm water station allowing a tabular view of the mapped data. The final table that was created listed the number of high erosion PRSs and regular PRSs over background values that were contained in each watershed. An overall relationship between the high erosion PRSs or the regular PRSs and the storm water stations was not identified through the methods used in this research. However, the Arc Hydro data models created for this analysis were used to track possible sources of contamination found through sampling at the storm water gaging stations. This geometric network tracing was used to identify possible relationships between the storm water stations and the PRSs. The methods outlined for the geometric network tracing could be used to find other relationships between the sites. A cursory statistical analysis was performed which could be expanded and applied to the data sets generated during this research to establish a broader relationship between the PRSs and storm water stations.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NPDES STORM WATER COMPLIANCE ALTERNATIVES AT THE SRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shedrow, C

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed and alternative actions to achieve water quality permit compliance at 38 storm water outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). Effluent monitoring data indicates that some of these outfalls may not presently comply with new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water General Permit effluent standards that became effective July 1, 2005 (SCR000000). The NPDES permit requires that best management practices (BMPs) be implemented and maintained, as necessary, to ensure that storm water discharges at SRS do not cause or contribute to the contravention of applicable state water quality standards (WQS).

  11. Applications of digital radar in the analysis of severe local storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, John Everett

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Severe storm data 3. ANALYSIS PROCEDURES a. General b. Constant altitude reflectivity displays c. Vertical integration of liquid water (VIL) and displays of VIL 13 33 4. PRESENTATION AND DISCUSSION OF RESULTS 42 a. Case I, storm of April 26, 1969... values to 100 n mi, thus 21ogr = 4. Using a value of 0. 9 for K (Greene, 1971) and the value of C 2 obtained earlier, we have log CK = -10. 5. 2 (7) 11 DIGITAL RADAR DATA FORMAT op IE A. /+~ +~ Eb g Q PV THRESHOlD LEVEL OF V INTEGERS- (dbm ) ~ I...

  12. Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

    2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This is an update of a report that describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone.

  13. Storm Windows (Even with a Low-E Coating!) | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary900Steep SlopeStochastic WeeklyStores Catalog Thea StormStorm

  14. Storm water quantity control has long been a challenge for highway designers. Traditionally, centralized best management practice designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiedler, Fritz R.

    on centralized detention-based best man- agement practices (BMPs) that reduce the amount of storm water released and environmentally sound storm water management practice (1, 6). Numerous studies and other research efforts have, centralized best management practice designs are often cost prohibitive and inefficient in many rural highway

  15. Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Helene (2006)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition downstream. The present study focuses on the predictability of a Mediterranean tropical-like storm (Medicane) on 26 September 2006 downstream of the ET of Hurricane Helene from 22 to 25 September. While

  16. GLOBAL IMAGING OF O+ FROM IMAGE/HENA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    content of the ring current depends on the magnitude of a geomagnetic storm (as measured by the storm was measured from one orbit to the next of spacecraft that cut through the storm-time ring current the commencement of a geomagnetic storm the oxygen ENA display 30 min intense bursts. Only very weak corresponding

  17. CO/sub 2/ foam flooding performance vs. rock wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lescure, B.M.; Claridge, E.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO/sub 2/ flooding projects have shown large potential for oil recovery, but in many cases the volumetric sweep efficiency is greatly limited by gravity tonguing and/or viscous fingering. To reduce these effects foam could be used as an alternative to WAG CO/sub 2/ injection. Experiments on the CO/sub 2/ foam process were conducted in a 1/4 5-spot reservoir model in order to investigate the effect of rock wetting state and total CO/sub 2/ slug size on secondary and tertiary extra-oil recovery. Laboratory model results show that the process is more successful in an oil-wet medium than in a water-wet medium due to larger surfactant adsorption in the water-wet medium. Also, requirements for optimal CO/sub 2/ slug size are smaller than in the WAG process, with larger extra oil recovery for both secondary and tertiary floods.

  18. Rebuilding your flooded home: Guidelines for incorporating energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repairs to your flood-damaged home can add energy efficiency at the same time you address pressing structural needs, mainly by replacing and upgrading insulation in walls and floors, and checking your foundation for flood damage. Many energy efficiency options are available to you today that may not have been widely available when you built your house even if that was only a few years ago. Cost-effectiveness depends on several factors, including cost of fuel and materials, efficiency levels of the structure and components, and climate. This booklet offers some general tips to improve the efficiency of your home`s shell and equipment. Additional information on any issue covered in this booklet is available from various agencies within or near your community, including your state energy office, local community action agency, utilities, Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) offices.

  19. Laboratory methods for enhanced oil recovery core floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is investigating microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to oil reservoirs. Laboratory corefloods are invaluable in developing technology necessary for a field application of MEOR. Methods used to prepare sandstone cores for experimentation, coreflooding techniques, and quantification of coreflood effluent are discussed in detail. A technique to quantify the small volumes of oil associated with laboratory core floods is described.

  20. Managing Floods and Resources at the Arroyo Las Positas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, L; Van Hattem, M; Mathews, S

    2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers and water resource professionals are challenged with protecting facilities from flood events within environmental resource protection, regulatory, and economic constraints. One case in point is the Arroyo Las Positas (ALP), an intermittent stream that traverses the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. Increased runoff from post-drought rainfall, upstream development, and new perennial discharges from LLNL activities have resulted in increased dry weather flows and wetland vegetation. These new conditions have recently begun to provide improved habitat for the federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii; CRLF), but the additional vegetation diminishes the channel's drainage capacity and increases flood risk. When LLNL proposed to re-grade the channel to reestablish the 100-year flood capacity, traditional dredging practices were no longer being advocated by environmental regulatory agencies. LLNL therefore designed a desilting maintenance plan to protect LLNL facility areas from flooding, while minimizing impacts to wetland resources and habitat. The result was a combination of structural upland improvements and the ALP Five Year Maintenance Plan (Maintenance Plan), which includes phased desilting in segments so that the entire ALP is desilted after five years. A unique feature of the Maintenance Plan is the variable length of the segments designed to minimize LLNL's impact on CRLF movement. State and federal permits also added monitoring requirements and additional constraints on desilting activities. Two years into the Maintenance Plan, LLNL is examining the lessons learned on the cost-effectiveness of these maintenance measures and restrictions and reevaluating the direction of future maintenance activities.

  1. Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, Qamar Javaid

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressures was a major part of the phase II studies. A high pressure core holder was developed and set inside a temperature regulated in-house constructed oven for this purpose. The core face flushing method was developed for conducting imbibition... and the field for improving oil recovery. The most common techniques used to increase oil recovery include water injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, carbon dioxide (CO&) injection, chemical flooding and caustic injection. Currently, however, due...

  2. A mathematical and experimental study of caustic flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Tsu-Cheng

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. Ching Buang Wu A simple non-equilibrium chemical displacement model for continuous, linear, caustic flooding of crude oil is presented. The laboratory experiments were conducted to support the numerical simulation and to verify the results...-water fractional flow curves depending on its local concentration and water saturation. The numerical study was supported by caustic displacement testing of Sacroc crude oil. Quantitative agreements were found between the results from mathematical and experimen...

  3. Annual Report: 2011-2012 Storm Season Sampling, Non-Dry Dock Stormwater Monitoring for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Rupert, Brian; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhart, Christine

    2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Annual PSNS non-dry dock storm water monitoring results for 2011-2012 storm season. Included are a brief description of the sampling procedures, storm event information, laboratory methods and data collection, a results and discussion section, and the conclusions and recommendations.

  4. P9.137 The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity: Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Forecasting Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P9.137 The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity: Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous) available to forecasters at the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) has been increasing over the past few years to examine and scrutinize the data in creating a forecast has not changed. Thus, the concept of the SPC Storm

  5. Missoula flood dynamics and magnitudes inferred from sedimentology of slack-water deposits on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.A. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentological study of late Wisconsin, Missoula-flood slack-water sediments deposited along the Columbia and Tucannon Rivers in southern Washington reveals important aspects of flood dynamics. Most flood facies were deposited by energetic flood surges (velocities>6 m/sec) entering protected areas along the flood tract, or flowing up and then directly out of tributary valleys. True still-water facies are less voluminous and restricted to elevations below 230 m. High flood stages attended the initial arrival of the flood wave and were not associated with subsequent hydraulic ponding upslope from channel constrictions. Among 186 flood beds studied in 12 sections, 57% have bioturbated tops, and about half of these bioturbated beds are separated from overlying flood beds by nonflood sediments. A single graded flood bed was deposited at most sites during most floods. Sequences in which 2-9 graded beds were deposited during a single flood are restricted to low elevations. These sequences imply complex, multi-peaked hydrographs in which the first flood surge was generally the largest, and subsequent surges were attenuated by water already present in slack-water areas. Slack-water - sediment stratigraphy suggests a wide range of flood discharges and volumes. Of >40 documented late Wisconsin floods that inundated the Pasco Basin, only about 20 crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. Floods younger than the set-S tephras from Mount St.Helens were generally smaller than earlier floods of late Wisconsin age, although most still crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. These late floods primarily traversed the Cheney-Palouse scabland because stratigraphy of slack-water sediment along the Columbia River implies that the largest flood volumes did not enter the Pasco Basin by way of the Columbia River. 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Impact of current-wave interaction on storm surge simulation: A case study for Hurricane Bob

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Changsheng

    Impact of current-wave interaction on storm surge simulation: A case study for Hurricane Bob,2 Received 2 January 2013; revised 5 April 2013; accepted 18 April 2013; published 30 May 2013. [1] Hurricane was developed and applied to simulate and examine the coastal ocean responses to Hurricane Bob. Results from

  7. Interactions between Catchbasin and Street Cleaning in Urban Drainages and Sediment Transport in Storm Drainage Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    1 Interactions between Catchbasin and Street Cleaning in Urban Drainages and Sediment Transport ...................................................................................................................................................................24 Abstract Much research has been conducted on the transport, settling, and scour of gross solids transport in separate storm drainage has not been considered to be a significant problem for public works

  8. UC Santa Cruz Storm Water Fall 2010 Volume 5, Number 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    materials (food wastes), oil and grease, toxic chemicals in cleaning products, and disinfectants. Practices quality and damage to the natural ecosystem. (Photo / UCSC Vehicle Maintenance and Storm Water) Fats, oil) 459-4520 Keep cooking oil waste containers clean and covered ­ clean up spills. Do not dump cooking

  9. Analytical study of the energy rate balance equation for the magnetospheric storm-ring current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Analytical study of the energy rate balance equation for the magnetospheric storm-ring current A. L of the analytical integration of the energy rate balance equation, assum- ing that the input energy rate of the energy function to ht times a constant factor in the energy rate balance equation (e.g. Gonzalez et al

  10. An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakshmanan, Valliappa

    An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images Valliappa and are not transferrable between different types of geospatial images. Yet, with the multitude of remote sensing on different types of geospatial radar and satel- lite images. Pointers are provided on the effective choice

  11. Green's function approximation from cross-correlations of 20100 Hz noise during a tropical storm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerstoft, Peter

    Green's function approximation from cross-correlations of 20­100 Hz noise during a tropical storm Approximation of Green's functions through cross-correlation of acoustic signals in the ocean, a method referred-bottom-reflected interarray hydrophone travel times. The extracted Green's function depends on the propagating noise

  12. Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the second annual storm water report prepared in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) on December 1, 2011, and the corresponding Y-12 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) which became effective on September 7, 2012. However, Appendix A does contain some analytical data gathered under the previous NPDES permit and SWP3 for comparison purposes. The quality of storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek remained relatively stable from 2012 to 2013. However, there was one largely unexpected high concentration of mercury noted in an area that is not known to have previously been a mercury use area. This was noted in Sector AA, Outfall 014. This outfall is normally sampled on a rotating basis but, due this elevated concentration, will be sampled again in 2014. The Y-12 Complex will continue to implement appropriate BMPs and reduce outside material storage ares where possible. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and timely implementation of proper storm water control measures.

  13. Optimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogel, Richard M.

    Optimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management and water quality impacts. The concept of best manage- ment practices BMPs encompasses a wide variety with a genetic algorithm to determine the optimal location of infiltration-based best management practices BMPs

  14. Circulation during winter and northerly storm events in southern Lake Michigan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Circulation during winter and northerly storm events in southern Lake Michigan Y. R. Rao National Laboratory, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA C. R. Murthy National Water Research Institute, Burlington, Ontario. [1] Moored observations of winds, currents, and temperature made off the southeastern Lake Michigan

  15. Environmental control of cloud-to-ground lightning polarity in severe storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buffalo, Kurt Matthew

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    polarity of severe storms by directly affecting their structural, dynamical, and microphysical properties, which in turn directly control cloud electrification and CG flash polarity. A more specific hypothesis, which has been supported by past............................................................................... 23 a. Thunderstorm electrification ................................................ 23 1) Charging mechanisms and typical charge structure ... 23 2) Cloud-to-ground lightning flash................................. 27 3...

  16. Storm water control plan for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek Operable Unit, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the Environmental Restoration Program with information about the erosion and sediment control, storm water management, maintenance, and reporting and record keeping practices to be employed during Phase II of the remediation project for the Lower East Fork Poplar Creek (LEFPC) Operable Unit.

  17. Florida International University Technical Report TR-2006-09-02 STORM: An Approach to Database Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rangaswami, Raju

    Storage Management in Data Center Environments Kaushik Dutta Raju Rangaswami Florida International University Miami, FL 33199 kaushik.dutta@fiu.edu raju@cs.fiu.edu #12;STORM: An Approach to Database Storage Sciences Florida International University Miami, FL - 33199, USA raju@cs.fiu.edu Abstract Database storage

  18. 262 SDSU General Catalog 2014-2015 OFFICE: Storm Hall 314

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallo, Linda C.

    as the arrangement of societies on the earth's surface, water and land use patterns, urban- ization and urban life262 SDSU General Catalog 2014-2015 OFFICE: Storm Hall 314 TELEPHONE: 619-594-5437 / FAX: 619 modeling applied to environmental, ecological, health, and geographical systems, is the third holder

  19. Moist synoptic transport of CO2 along the midlatitude storm track

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

    into the polar vortex, while cold dry air, low in CO2, that had been transported into the polar vortex earlier by equatorward transport by sinking cold dry air following a "dry air intrusion (DI)" behind cold fronts [CooperMoist synoptic transport of CO2 along the midlatitude storm track N. C. Parazoo,1 A. S. Denning,1 J

  20. The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begstsson, Lennart

    The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems Author: Email: lsrf@mail.nerc-essc.ac.uk #12;Abstract The prediction of extratropical cyclones Prediction (NCEP) Ensemble Prediction Systems (EPS) has been investigated using an objective feature tracking

  1. The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Froude, Lizzie

    The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems 2006) ABSTRACT The prediction of extratropical cyclones by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) ensemble prediction systems

  2. Increase of storm events during the Holocene cold events in NW Mediterranean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    The Mediterranean region is one of the world's areas most vulnerable to the climate change (Giorgi, 2006). Regional cyclone development over the Mediterranean Sea under future climate change conditions. However the Mediterranean climate at Holocene timescale, in relation to severe storm activity 1. Introduction

  3. Intense storm activity during the Little Ice Age on the French Mediterranean coast L. Dezileau a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    storm activity is important for assessing whether changes are controlled by climate evolution response will be crucial to predicting the impacts of future climate change. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All pre-industrial times (Solomon et al., 2007). The effects of climate change on extreme events

  4. Andreas Sterl, SEAMOCS, Malta, 17.03.2009 Hot temperatures and storm surges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Andreas Sterl, SEAMOCS, Malta, 17.03.2009 Hot temperatures and storm surges: Modelling the change #12;Andreas Sterl, SEAMOCS, Malta, 17.03.2009 Climate ­ what's that? Climate = statistics of weather" #12;Andreas Sterl, SEAMOCS, Malta, 17.03.2009 The climate system AR4, FAQ 1.2, Fig. 1 #12;Andreas

  5. Geosynthetic Filters for Water Quality Improvement of Urban Storm Water Runoff

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    water treatment are retention ponds, detention basins, wetland ponds, and grass swales (Strecker et al are common subsurface storm water runoff treatment systems used in urban areas. Large subsurface fil- ters the treatment system (SEMCOG 2008). Removal of filtration media such as sand is highly labor

  6. Feasibility Study for Measuring Geomagnetic Conversion of Solar Axions to X-rays in Low Earth Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davoudiasl, Hooman

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed computation of the expected rate for Geomagnetic Conversion of Solar Axions to X-rays (GECOSAX) along the orbit of an x-ray satellite. We use realistic satellite orbits and propagation in time. A realistic model for the Earth's magnetic field, which properly accounts for its spatial non-uniformity, is used. We also account for the effect of the Earth's atmosphere on the propagation of x-rays in our calculation of axion-photon conversion probability. To estimate possible sensitivities to the axion-photon coupling g_{a\\gamma}, we use an actual measurement of the expected backgrounds by the SUZAKU satellite. Assuming a detector area of 10^3 cm^2 and about 10^6 s of data, we show that a 2 \\sigma limit of g_{a\\gamma} current laboratory sensitivities to g_{a\\gamma}.

  7. Feasibility Study for Measuring Geomagnetic Conversion of Solar Axions to X-rays in Low Earth Orbits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hooman Davoudiasl; Patrick Huber

    2009-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed computation of the expected rate for Geomagnetic Conversion of Solar Axions to X-rays (GECOSAX) along the orbit of an x-ray satellite. We use realistic satellite orbits and propagation in time. A realistic model for the Earth's magnetic field, which properly accounts for its spatial non-uniformity, is used. We also account for the effect of the Earth's atmosphere on the propagation of x-rays in our calculation of axion-photon conversion probability. To estimate possible sensitivities to the axion-photon coupling g_{a\\gamma}, we use an actual measurement of the expected backgrounds by the SUZAKU satellite. Assuming a detector area of 10^3 cm^2 and about 10^6 s of data, we show that a 2 \\sigma limit of g_{a\\gamma} current laboratory sensitivities to g_{a\\gamma}.

  8. The effect on oil recovery of water flooding at pressures above and below the bubble point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Daniel Materson

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Dykstra, H. ~ and Parsons, R. L. , "The Predict ion of Oil Recovery by Water Flooding", Secondar Recovery of Oil in the United States, API, (1950), Second Edition. (4}. Bzeston, J. N. , "A Survey of Injection of Natural Gas Before and During Water... Pictures of Equipment 4. Physical Characteristics of Fluid A Physical Characteristics of Fluid B P V behavior of Natural Gas Effect of Flooding Pressure on Oil Recovery, Fluid A Effect of Initial Gas Saturation on Residual Oil Saturation After Flood...

  9. Application of Polymer Gels as Conformance Control Agents for Carbon Dioxide for Floods in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Ali, Ali 1986-

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of Oil Saturated Core (Exp#7) ........................... 154 Fig. 4.64 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 1st PV of VW (Exp#7) ...... 155 Fig. 4.65 ? Vertical Slice CT Images of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 1st PV of VW (Exp#7...) ........................................................................................... 157 xiv Fig. 4.68 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 2nd PV of VW (Exp#7) ..... 158 Fig. 4.69 ? Vertical Slice CT Images of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 2nd PV of VW (Exp#7...

  10. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  11. Evaluation and Enhancement of Carbon Dioxide Flooding Through Sweep Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Richard

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide displacement is a common improved recovery method applied to light oil reservoirs (30-45{degrees}API). The economic and technical success of CO{sub 2} floods is often limited by poor sweep efficiency or large CO{sub 2} utilization rates. Projected incremental recoveries for CO{sub 2} floods range from 7% to 20% of the original oil in place; however, actual incremental recoveries range from 9% to 15% of the original oil in place, indicating the potential for significant additional recoveries with improved sweep efficiency. This research program was designed to study the effectiveness of carbon dioxide flooding in a mature reservoir to identify and develop methods and strategies to improve oil recovery in carbon dioxide floods. Specifically, the project has focused on relating laboratory, theoretical and simulation studies to actual field performance in a CO{sub 2} flood in an attempt to understand and mitigate problems of areal and vertical sweep efficiency. In this work the focus has been on evaluating the status of existing swept regions of a mature CO{sub 2} flood and developing procedures to improve the design of proposed floods. The Little Creek Field, Mississippi has been studied through laboratory, theoretical, numerical and simulation studies in an attempt to relate performance predictions to historical reservoir performance to determine sweep efficiency, improve the understanding of the reservoir response to CO{sub 2} injection, and develop scaling methodologies to relate laboratory data and simulation results to predicted reservoir behavior. Existing laboratory information from Little Creek was analyzed and an extensive amount of field data was collected. This was merged with an understanding of previous work at Little Creek to generate a detailed simulation study of two portions of the field – the original pilot area and a currently active part of the field. This work was done to try to relate all of this information to an understanding of where the CO{sub 2} went or is going and how recovery might be improved. New data was also generated in this process. Production logs were run to understand where the CO{sub 2} was entering the reservoir related to core and log information and also to corroborate the simulation model. A methodology was developed and successfully tested for evaluating saturations in a cased-hole environment. Finally an experimental and theoretical program was initiated to relate laboratory work to field scale design and analysis of operations. This work found that an understanding of vertical and areal heterogeneity is crucial for understanding sweep processes as well as understanding appropriate mitigation techniques to improve the sweep. Production and injection logs can provide some understanding of that heterogeneity when core data is not available. The cased-hole saturation logs developed in the project will also be an important part of the evaluation of vertical heterogeneity. Evaluation of injection well/production well connectivities through statistical or numerical techniques were found to be as successful in evaluating CO{sub 2} floods as they are for waterfloods. These are likely to be the lowest cost techniques to evaluate areal sweep. Full field simulation and 4D seismic techniques are other possibilities but were beyond the scope of the project. Detailed simulation studies of pattern areas proved insightful both for doing a “post-mortem” analysis of the pilot area as well as a late-term, active portion of the Little Creek Field. This work also evaluated options for improving sweep in the current flood as well as evaluating options that could have been successful at recovering more oil. That simulation study was successful due to the integration of a large amount of data supplied by the operator as well as collected through the course of the project. While most projects would not have the abundance of data that Little Creek had, integration of the available data continues to be critical for both the design and evaluation stages of CO{sub 2} floods. For cases w

  12. CityFIT Urban Guide: Modelling and Deploying indicators of Property Exposure to Flooding in Lagos using LIDAR DEM and DSM data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosuro, Sulaiman

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    application was prototyped for disseminating time-series flood model information and for reporting details of flood events as they occur to serve for model calibration and enhancement, thereby completing the flood modelling lifecycle....

  13. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tucker sand from Hepler field, Crawford County, Kansas, was characterized using routine and advanced analytical methods. The characterization is part of a chemical flooding pilot test to be conducted in the field, which is classified as a DOE Class I (fluvial-dominated delta) reservoir. Routine and advanced methods of characterization were compared. Traditional wireline logs indicate that the reservoir is vertically compartmentalized on the foot scale. Routine core analysis, X-ray computed tomography (CT), minipermeameter measurement, and petrographic analysis indicate that compartmentalization and lamination extend to the microscale. An idealized model of how the reservoir is probably structured (complex layering with small compartments) is presented. There was good agreement among the several methods used for characterization, and advanced characterization methods adequately explained the coreflood and tracer tests conducted with short core plugs. Tracer and chemical flooding tests were conducted in short core plugs while monitoring with CT to establish flow patterns and to monitor oil saturations in different zones of the core plugs. Channeling of injected fluids occurred in laboratory experiments because, on core plug scale, permeability streaks extended the full length of the core plugs. A graphic example of how channeling in field core plugs can affect oil recovery during chemical injection is presented. The small scale of compartmentalization indicated by plugs of the Tucker sand may actually help improve sweep between wells. The success of field-scale waterflooding and the fluid flow patterns observed in highly heterogeneous outcrop samples are reasons to expect that reservoir flow patterns are different from those observed with short core plugs, and better sweep efficiency may be obtained in the field than has been observed in laboratory floods conducted with short core plugs.

  14. Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur.

  15. Geographic Visualization of the 1993 Midwest Flood Water Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, W. Scott; Ridd, Merrill K.; Mizgalewicz, Pawel J.; Maidment, David R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , flooding, and water storage. By the middle of July, large amounts of water were being stored in the southern part of the UMRB, particularly around the St. Louis area where the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers meet. Water was also being stored in larger...) includes the Mississippi River basin from the river’s headwaters in Minnesota to Cairo, Illinois, and the Lower Missouri River basin below Gavins Point dam, South Dakota, to St. Louis, Missouri (Figure 1.1). Using a digital elevation model of the study...

  16. FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to:FAS Technologies LLC JumpNational Flood

  17. Johns, R. H., D. W. Burgess, C. A. Doswell III, M. S. Gilmore, J. A. Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: The 1925 Tri-State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 133.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doswell III, Charles A.

    mi) east-northeast of the apparent end of the Tri- State tornado damage path in Pike County, IN: The 1925 Tri- State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 1­33. 1 The 1925 Tri-State Tornado Damage Path and Associated Storm System ROBERT H. JOHNS

  18. Landscape fragmentation and ice storm damage in eastern ontario forests J. Pasher and D.J. King*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1998). Due to interactions amongst biological and physiographic factors, damage and mortality, such as wind- storms and fire, which have return times of 100­ 1000 years (Van Dyke 1999). Large-scale ice

  19. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; ,

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  20. STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

    2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

  1. Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing.

  2. Determining the optimal river gauge location for a flood early warning system in Uganda using HEC-RAS and AHP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Joyce, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flooding of the Manafwa River in Eastern Uganda causes significant damage in the district of Butaleja, and often occurs without advance warning. In 2012, the American Red Cross in Uganda requested MIT to develop a flood ...

  3. Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan By K. L. Rasmussen investigation into three years of anomalous floods in Pakistan provides insight into their formation, unifying for the formation of anomalous easterly midlevel flow across central India into Pakistan that advected deep

  4. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 September 2011 vol 5 no 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 September 2011 vol 5 no 1 Table of Contents Awards for the NFRMP Risk Management Program Judy Soutiere, SPK In October 2011, we celebrate the 2nd anniversary of the guidance establishing the National Flood Risk Management Program in each Division and District of the Corps

  5. Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations) for uncertainty analysis with respect to two major types of risk in river hydrodynamics: flash flood and dam failure. LSA is com- pared to a Global Uncertainty Analysis (GUA) consisting in running Monte Carlo

  6. The Geology and Geography of Floods Jim E. O'Connor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -documented dam-failure floods have been during Pleistocene ice ages when glaciers and changing hydrologic of ice caps and failures of ice and landslide Vlams. The fundamental limits to dam-failure floods of natural dam failures. In this paper, we outline some of the primary factors that influence the magnitude

  7. Links Between Flood Frequency and Annual Water Balance Behaviors: A Basis for Similarity and Regionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jiali; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a data based comparative study of several hundred catchments across continental United States belonging to the MOPEX dataset, which systematically explored the connection between the flood frequency curve and measures of mean annual water balance. Two different measures of mean annual water balance are used: (i) a climatic aridity index, AI, which is a measure of the competition between water and energy availability at the annual scale; and, (ii) baseflow index, BFI, the ratio of slow runoff to total runoff also at the annual time scale, reflecting the role of geology, soils, topography and vegetation. The data analyses showed that the aridity index, AI, has a first order control on both the mean and Cv of annual maximum floods. While mean annual flood decreases with increasing aridity, Cv increases with increasing aridity. BFI appeared to be a second order control on the magnitude and shape of the flood frequency curve. Higher BFI, meaning more subsurface flow and less surface flow leads to a decrease of mean annual flood whereas lower BFI leads to accumulation of soil moisture and increased flood magnitudes that arise from many events acting together. The results presented in this paper provide innovative means to delineate homogeneous regions within which the flood frequency curves can be assumed to be functionally similar. At another level, understanding the connection between annual water balance and flood frequency will be another building block towards developing comprehensive understanding of catchment runoff behavior in a holistic way.

  8. Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes) was tested as a catalyst binder in a microbial fuel cell. 2012 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Anti-flooding Catalyst binder a b s t r a c

  9. Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell BRUNO KIEFFER1, ETHIOPIA 4 DEEPARTEMENT DES SCIENCES DE LA TERRE ET DE L'ENVIRONNEMENT, UNIVERSITEE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES 50 the shield volcanoes. KEY WORDS: Ethiopia; flood basalts; shield volcanism; superswell INTRODUCTION According

  10. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 June 2010 vol 3 no 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . He has also worked in private practice as well as in County and State government. Mr. Rabbon Operations...........2 Workshop on Beach Nourishment Design ..... 8 Who Looks Good in a Silver Jacket reviews; emergency management ­ inspection of completed works program, flood preparedness, and flood

  11. Environmental Hazards 2 (2000) 157168 Modeling flooding extent from Hurricane Floyd in the coastal plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Pitt County, North Carolina. The patterns of flood extent derived from the two models were compared of Pitt County, North Carolina. The patterns of flood extent derived from the two models were compared plains of North Carolina Jeffrey D. Colby*, Karen A. Mulcahy, Yong Wang Department of Geography, East

  12. A kinematic wave model for rivers with flood plains and other irregular geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabak, Esteban G.

    A kinematic wave model for rivers with flood plains and other irregular geometries Pablo M. Jacovkis Esteban G. Tabak March 2006 Abstract A general kinematic wave model for flood propagation) This kinematic wave equation, which has been studied by [3], can be derived from the complete system (1, 2) under

  13. An optimal viscosity profile in enhanced oil recovery by polymer flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    An optimal viscosity profile in enhanced oil recovery by polymer flooding Prabir Daripa a,*, G in oil reservoir is one of the effective methods of enhanced (tertiary) oil recovery. A classical model reserved. Keywords: Enhanced oil recovery; Polymer flooding; Linear stability 0020-7225/$ - see front

  14. HighResolution Numerical Methods for MicellarPolymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trangenstein, John A.

    been used to study the micellar­ polymer flooding process in enhanced oil recovery [12], [18], [19 in practical im­ plementation of enhanced oil recovery techniques at this time, there is increasing interestHigh­Resolution Numerical Methods for Micellar­Polymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer

  15. Simulating and Optimizing Storm Water Management Strategies in an Urban Watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damodaram, Chandana

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    watershed scenarios are described based on land use coverage characteristics and implementation of a detention pond ............................ 23 4 No. of Parking Lots and Rooftops being retrofit based on the percentage of area... ecosystems (USEPA 2000; Coffman 2000). Low Impact Development (LID) practices are an alternative approach for controlling storm water at the source like rooftops, parking lots and sidewalks. LID technologies include permeable pavements, rainwater...

  16. The performance and evaluation of the damaging downburst prediction and detection algorithm for bow echo storms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karl, Beth Ann

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION OF THE DAMAGING DOWNBURST PREDICTION AND DETECTION ALGORITHM FOR BOW ECHO STORMS A Thesis by BETH ANN KARL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences THE PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION OF THE DAMAGING DOWNBURST PREDICTION...

  17. Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglan, H.

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

  18. CAN A LONG NANOFLARE STORM EXPLAIN THE OBSERVED EMISSION MEASURE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ACTIVE REGION CORES?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mulu-Moore, Fana M.; Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: fanamariam.mulumoore@nasa.gov [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    All theories that attempt to explain the heating of the high-temperature plasma observed in the solar corona are based on short bursts of energy. The intensities and velocities measured in the cores of quiescent active regions, however, can be steady over many hours of observation. One heating scenario that has been proposed to reconcile such observations with impulsive heating models is the 'long nanoflare storm', where short-duration heating events occur infrequently on many sub-resolution strands; the emission of the strands is then averaged together to explain the observed steady structures. In this Letter, we examine the emission measure distribution predicted for such a long nanoflare storm by modeling an arcade of strands in an active region core. Comparisons of the computed emission measure distributions with recent observations indicate that the long nanoflare storm scenario implies greater than five times more 1 MK emission than is actually observed for all plausible combinations of loop lengths, heating rates, and abundances. We conjecture that if the plasma had 'super coronal' abundances, the model may be able to match the observations at low temperatures.

  19. Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

  20. 118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR FLOOD CONTROL IN THE IOWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    obtained by operating the three reservoirs independently for 8 of the 10 largest flood events on record for optimizing the operation of existing systems rather than proposing/designing new flood- control projects flood-control operations for the Iowa/Des Moines River Reservoir System and to pro- vide insight

  1. Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

  2. Problems with flooding in the Ronneburg mining district

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckart, M. [Wismut GmbH, Gera (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important uranium deposits of Wismut, the biggest uranium producer of the eastern world, was the Ronneburg mining area, located 10 km east of Gera in the central part of Germany. 110,000 t of uranium were produced in this ore field from 1950 to 1989. Mining in the Ronneburg ore field requires a knowledge of the hydrodynamic relationships during and after ground water recharge and preplanning of the flooding sequence in the mine. The technology necessary for recharge of the ground water layer and the open pit were established by flow models. Calculations were made of the transport of radioisotopes in the ground water. Preliminary results of these calculations are reported in this paper.

  3. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding with weak alkalis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Project BE4B in FY90 was to develop cost-effective and efficient chemical flooding formulations using surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemical systems. Chemical systems were studied that mitigate the deleterious effects of divalent ions. The experiments were conducted with carbonate mixtures and carbonate/phosphate mixtures of pH 10.5, where most of the phosphate ions exist as the monohydrogen phosphate species. Orthophosphate did not further reduce the deleterious effect of divalent ions on interfacial tension behavior in carbonate solutions, where the deleterious effect of the divalent ions is already very low. When added to a carbonate mixture, orthophosphate did substantially reduce the adsorption of an atomic surfactant, which was an expected result; however, there was no correlation between the amount of reduction and the divalent ion levels. For acidic oils, a variety of surfactants are available commercially that have potential for use between pH 8.3 and pH 9.5. Several of these surfactants were tested with oil from Wilmington (CA) field and found to be suitable for use in that field. Two low-acid crude oils, with acid numbers of 0.01 and 0.27 mg KOH/g of oil, were studied. It was shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding does have merit for use with these low-acid crude oils. However, each low-acid oil tested was found to behave differently, and it was concluded that the applicability of the method must be experimentally determined for any given low-acid crude oil. 19 refs., 10 figs. 4 tabs.

  4. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies the effects of such things as temperature, electrolyte concentration and the effect of different types of electrolytes were taken into consideration.

  5. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  6. Investigation of the scaling factor LVuw in the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Morris Hampton

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rnediuxn and. the Buid system, but also by the length of the flooded system and the x'ate of irjection. They further cor eluded that for floods performed in identical porous media and with the same oil-water viscosity ratio, the total length... water) as a scaling w coefficient. In other words, all floods conducted in a given porous rnediuxn, with a given oil-watex viscosity ratio and haVing the same value of this scalixxg coefficient must behave similarly and yield equal recoveries fax...

  7. Application of Polymer Gels as Conformance Control Agents for Carbon Dioxide for Floods in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Ali, Ali 1986-

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) .................................................... 203 Fig. 4.110 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 1 PV of CO2 (CGI) .. 203 Fig. 4.111 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 3 PV of CO2 (CGI) .. 203 Fig. 4.112 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core (CGI-Fracked...) ...................................... 204 Fig. 4.113 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 1 PV of CO2 (CGI- Fracked) .................................................................................................. 204 Fig. 4.114 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after...

  8. PrelimDrainage, a software system for preliminary design of storm drainage systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Keith Kim

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) Keith Kim Williams, B. A. , Texas Tech University; M. S. , Texas Tech University; Ph, D. , University of Oklahoma Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Donald K. Friesen PrelimDrainage is a computer program that simulates an expert engineer's reasoning... flood flow rates are computed with formulas commonly accepted in hydrology. The expert decision making is achieved through an algorithm developed specially for this program, based on a scalar product calculation for a pattern classifier, which...

  9. Storm water runoff for the Y-12 Plant and selected parking lots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collins, E.T.

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparison of storm water runoff from the Y-12 Plant and selected employee vehicle parking lots to various industry data is provided in this document. This work is an outgrowth of and part of the continuing Non-Point Source Pollution Elimination Project that was initiated in the late 1980s. This project seeks to identify area pollution sources and remediate these areas through the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act/Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (RCRA/CERCLA) process as managed by the Environmental Restoration Organization staff. This work is also driven by the Clean Water Act Section 402(p) which, in part, deals with establishing a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit for storm water discharges. Storm water data from events occurring in 1988 through 1991 were analyzed in two reports: Feasibility Study for the Best Management Practices to Control Area Source Pollution Derived from Parking Lots at the DOE Y-12 Plant, September 1992, and Feasibility Study of Best Management Practices for Non-Point Source Pollution Control at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, February 1993. These data consisted of analysis of outfalls discharging to upper East Fork Poplar Creek (EFPC) within the confines of the Y-12 Plant (see Appendixes D and E). These reports identified the major characteristics of concern as copper, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, nitrate (as nitrogen), zinc, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solids (TSS), fecal coliform, and aluminum. Specific sources of these contaminants were not identifiable because flows upstream of outfalls were not sampled. In general, many of these contaminants were a concern in many outfalls. Therefore, separate sampling exercises were executed to assist in identifying (or eliminating) specific suspected sources as areas of concern.

  10. Location and prediction of storms from measurement of atmospherics at different frequencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canterbury, Samuel Luther

    1945-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 have observed the direc? tion of a storm from a single observation station by observing the atmospherics radiated by the associated lightning. Some investi- 16 ' 17 18gations 9 9 have been carried out whereby... kilocycles was less than that at 36 and 52 kilocycles* 7Mr* L* W. Austin made some studies, on the Isthmus of Panama, of atmospherics at 15 and 21*4 kilocycles in an effort to determine their P iP 'S per M /nu fc. 19 21 origin# He found...

  11. ARM - Field Campaign - Colorado: SP2 Deployment at StormVEx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8LigovCampaignsCLEX-5 CampaignSP2 Deployment at StormVEx ARM Data

  12. File:06CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealandORCEncroachment.pdf Jump to:-FD-a -NVBSundryNotice (2).pdf Jump6CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf

  13. File:06COBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealandORCEncroachment.pdf Jump to:-FD-a -NVBSundryNotice (2).pdfCOBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf Jump to:

  14. File:06ORBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealandORCEncroachment.pdf Jump to:-FD-aIDCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf JumpORBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf

  15. Flooding The Vote: Hurricane Katrina and Voter Participation in New Orleans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Betsy

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The flooding of New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina resulted in a massive and rapid exodus of individuals from New Orleans to locations around the United States. In the midst of the hurricane recovery, the City of New Orleans ...

  16. PROGRESSION OF STREAMBANK EROSION DURING A LARGE FLOOD, RIO PUERCO ARROYO, NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROGRESSION OF STREAMBANK EROSION DURING A LARGE FLOOD, RIO PUERCO ARROYO, NEW MEXICO Eleanor R includes uplands of north-central New Mexico. The Rio Puerco is the principal source of sediment

  17. Calibration of a Distributed Flood Forecasting Model with Input Uncertainty Using a Bayesian Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Calibration of a Distributed Flood Forecasting Model with Input Uncertainty Using a Bayesian, Berkeley, CA, United States. In the process of calibrating distributed hydrological models, accounting in calibrating GBHM parameters and in estimating their associated uncertainty. The calibration ignoring input

  18. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  19. FLOODING AND GAS EMISSIONS OF OLD IRON MINES IN LORAIN LAGNY Candice1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    related to abandoned mine workings. This study has been extended to other sectors of the Lorraine basin reservoirs of "Rosselange", Franchepré and "Orne". Then, investigation was made in non-flooded reservoirs

  20. After the flood : crisis, voice and innovation in Maputo's solid waste management sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruks-Wisner, Gabrielle (Gabrielle K.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores responses to the problem of solid waste management (SWM) in two neighborhoods of Maputo, Mozambique in the wake of catastrophic flooding in 2000. In these neighborhoods, small-scale service providers ...

  1. Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

  2. The effect of surface flooding on the physical-biogeochemical dynamics of a warm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Mark

    Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia Abstract Warm core eddies (WCEs) formed from the East suggest that EAC WCEs with relatively shallow surface flooding contain more phy- toplankton biomass than

  3. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.S.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1982-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  4. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., James S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Westmoreland, Clyde G. (Rockwood, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  5. Flooding of the continental shelves as a contributor to deglacial CH4 rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Flooding of the continental shelves as a contributor to deglacial CH4 rise ANDY RIDGWELL,1 MARK of the continental shelves that were exposed and vegetated during the glacial sea-level low stand and that can help

  6. Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Michelsen, Ari M.; Rister, M. Edward; Assadian, Naomi; Eriksson, Marian; Freeman, Roger; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Madison, W. Tom; McGuckin, James T.; Morrison, Wendy; Robinson, John R.C.; Staats, Chris; Sheng, Zhuping; Srinivasan, R.; Villalobos, Joshua I.

    TR- 275 2004 Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States Allen W. Sturdivant Ronald D. Lacewell Ari M. Michelsen M. Edward Rister Naomi Assadian Marian Eriksson Roger Freeman Jennifer H... Flood-Control Projects in the United States Prepared for: INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES SECTION EL PASO, TEXAS SEPTEMBER 2004 Prepared by: Texas Agriculture Experiment Station, and Texas Water Resources Institute of the Texas...

  7. Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Marion Denson

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

  8. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project. Annual report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomax, J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful water flood of the Green River Formation in the Monument Butte unit was analyzed in detail in the last yearly report. It was shown that primary recovery and the water flood in the unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close its bubble point. The reservoir performance of the smaller Travis unit was also analyzed. The Monument Butte unit is currently producing at around 300 barrels per day of oil. Two of the new wells drilled in the unit had zones pressurized by the water flood. The third well produced from pressurized as well as from zones which were unaffected by the water flood. The water flood response of the Travis unit is slow possibly due to problems of reservoir continuity. Plans for water flooding the Boundary unit were drawn. Core description and Formation Micro Imaging log of well 14a-28 provided insight about the important Lower Douglas Creek sandstone. It was determined that this sandstone was extensively fractured and detailed fracture characteristics were obtained through comprehensive interpretation of the FMI log. Reservoir modeling and simulation studies of all the three units were also continued. A larger, more detailed model of the Monument Butte unit was built in order to study the performance of the new development wells being drilled. Three alternate models developed to explain the performance of the Travis flood revealed that intersecting hydraulic fractures may have also provided paths for water channeling observed in this unit. The reservoir characterization activities identified new reservoirs in the Travis unit. Reservoir simulations helped design an injection program in Travis, unit expansion plans on the west and north sides of the Monument Butte until and to evaluate the infill drilling. The reservoir simulations are being used to examine the role of the aquifer underlying the oil bearing D2 sandstone in Boundary on water flood strategies and injection patterns.

  9. Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Marion Denson

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

  10. The effect of cross flow in a stratified reservoir during a water flood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Gordon Edmund

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the displacement of oil by water in a porous medium. In most conventional engineer- ing methods used to predict the reservoir performance of a water- flood, crossflow between beds of different permeability is neglected, This study was concerned... in a water flood. Conventional engineering methods assuming no crossflow and the numerical model solution were in agreement when the effects of vertical communication were neglected. However, when vertical communication was considered, model...

  11. Winter Storms

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron SpinPrincetonUsingWhat is abig world of2 BONNEVILLENREL Winners0

  12. Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

    2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

  13. Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seager, Richard

    2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

  14. Modeling of Coastal Inundation, Storm Surge, and Relative Sea-Level Rise at Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.A.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Modeling of Coastal Inundation, Storm Surge, and Relative Sea- Level Rise at Naval Station Norfolk. Modeling of coastal inundation, storm surge, and relative sea-level rise at Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, and relative sea-level-rise (RSLR) scenarios were examined at the U.S. Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia

  15. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  16. Contaminant Concentrations in Storm Water Entering the Sinclair/Dyes Inlet Subasin of the Puget Sound, USA, During Storm Event and Baseflow Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Johnston, Robert K.; Leisle, D. E.; Beckwith, B.; Sherrell, Gerald; Mettallo, David; Pingree, Ryan

    2007-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) due to fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for the contaminant mass balance calculations conducted for the watershed. This paper summarizes the contaminant concentrations in representative streams and outfalls discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets during 18 storm events and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. This paper serves as a portion of the report titled, “Surface and Stormwater Quality Assessment for Sinclair and Dyes Inlet, Washington” (Brandenberger et al. 2007).

  17. Electron Flood Charge Compensation Device for Ion Trap Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Anthony David; Ward, Michael Blair; Olson, John Eric

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of organophosphorous compounds adsorbed onto soils, the measured anion signals were lower than expected and it was hypothesized that the low signals could be due to sample charging. An electron flood gun was designed, constructed and used to investigate sample charging of these and other sample types. The flood gun was integrated into one end cap of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer and the design maintained the geometry of the self-stabilizing extraction optics used in this instrument. The SIMION ion optics program was used to design the flood gun, and experimental results agreed with the predicted performance. Results showed the low anion signals from the soils were not due to sample charging. Other insulating and conducting samples were tested using both a ReO4- and a Cs+ primary ion beam. The proximity of the sample and electron source to the ion trap aperture resulted in generation of background ions in the ion trap via electron impact (EI) ionization during the period the electron gun was flooding the sample region. When using the electron gun with the ReO4- primary beam, the required electron current was low enough that the EI background was negligible; however, the high electron flood current required with the Cs+ beam produced background EI ions that degraded the quality of the mass spectra. The consequences of the EI produced cations will have to be evaluated on a sample-by-sample basis when using electron flood. It was shown that the electron flood gun could be intentionally operated to produce EI spectra in this instrument. This offers the opportunity to measure, nearly simultaneously, species evaporating from a sample, via EI, and species bound to the surface, via SIMS.

  18. ace inhibitory activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HURRICANE FORECASTS FOR 2011 activity. 3 12;DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) - A measure of a named storm 234 The Geomagnetic Field Experiment...

  19. Augmenting a Microbial Selective Plugging Technique with Polymer Flooding to Increase the Efficiency of Oil Recovery - A Search for Synergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Lewis R.; Pittman Jr., Charles U.; Lynch, F. Leo; Vadie, A. Alex; French, W. Todd

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to determine if the effectiveness of a microbial permeability profile modification technique can be improved through polymer flooding.

  20. South African Association of Geomorphologists, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2000 Flood plain formation in semi-arid central Australia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourke, Mary C.

    South African Association of Geomorphologists, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2000 Flood plain of sediment waves and the close succession of a series of high-energy overbank flows contribute

  1. P2.3 DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE SEVERE WEATHER FORECAST VERIFICATION SYSTEM AT THE STORM PREDICTION CENTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Andrew R. Dean, CIMMS, Univ. of Oklahoma, National Weather Center, Suite 2300, Norman, OK 73072-7268; e PREDICTION CENTER Andrew R. Dean*1,2 , Russell S. Schneider 2 , and Joseph T. Schaefer 2 1 Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 2 NOAA/NWS Storm

  2. Instruments aboard the ship, the Pacific Storm, ping sound waves toward the cable. The oceanographer's eyes flicker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

    Instruments aboard the ship, the Pacific Storm, ping sound waves toward the cable-pound Humboldt squid, and the sound waves, set at 38 kilohertz, bounce off the squid. An image shows up, and it attacks the tethered animal. The oceanographer screams. Fade to black. Seeing with Sound "Actually, I

  3. World-Unique Wind Facilities Designed to protect us from storms, harness the power of wind and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denham, Graham

    World-Unique Wind Facilities Designed to protect us from storms, harness the power of wind and develop sustainable cities, the Wind Engineering, Energy and the Environment (WindEEE) Institute at Western University is home to the world's first three-dimensional wind-testing chamber. Its facilities

  4. Magnetic storm acceleration of radiation belt electrons observed by the Scintillating Fibre Detector (SFD) onboard EQUATOR-S

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    on the 500±67300 km, 4° inclination EQUATOR-S orbit show that the increase of the energetic electron ¯ux of electrons in the outer radiation belt has been attributed to Pc 5 band ULF waves excited by high speed solar wind ¯ow associated with magnetic storms (Rostoker et al., 1998). The main features

  5. 17Solar Storm Energy and Pie Graphs The pie charts below show approximately how various forms of energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    17Solar Storm Energy and Pie Graphs The pie charts below show approximately how various forms of energy are involved in a solar flare. Flares occur when stored magnetic energy is suddenly released magnetic energy Graph of solar flare energy forms Problem 1 - About what percentages of each of the four

  6. Chemical composition of dust storms in Beijing and implications for the mixing of mineral aerosol with pollution aerosol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with pollution aerosol on the pathway Yele Sun,1 Guoshun Zhuang,1,2,3 Ying Wang,1 Xiujuan Zhao,1,4 Jie Li,5 Zifa direction could be seen as the ``polluted'' pathway and the north-northwesterly direction as the relatively ``less-polluted'' one. Dust storms not only delivered large amounts of mineral elements but also carried

  7. 1. MOTIVATION AND OVERVIEW Each year across the United States, floods,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Ming

    winds, lightning, and winter storms ­ so-called mesoscale weather events -- cause hundreds of deaths and Carbone 2002). Although mitigating the impacts of such events would yield enormous economic and societal that cannot accommodate the real time, on-demand, and dynamically-adaptive needs of mesoscale weather research

  8. A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Day, Robin [No Affiliation; Strickland, M. Dale [Western EcoSystems Technology

    2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post-construction assessment and mitigation, and sharing information that can be used in other assessments.

  9. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

  10. FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR FLOOD MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT variability/change; risk assessment; flood management; water resources flexibility.) DiFrancesco, Kara N of Assessment Measures for Flood Management Systems. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA

  11. Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean continental drift and the oldest known

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean in the Nullagine Synclinorium (and Meentheena Centrocline) of the East Pilbara Basin, Western Australia, has been. Langereis, Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean

  12. A graphical method to study suspended sediment dynamics during flood events in the Wadi Sebdou, NW Algeria (19732004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A graphical method to study suspended sediment dynamics during flood events in the Wadi Sebdou, NW sediment concentration Semiarid watershed Flood Wadi Algeria s u m m a r y Small sub-basins are numerous period (1973­2004) was analyzed at the outlet of the Wadi Sebdou basin (256 km2 ) in northwest Algeria

  13. Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmeltzer, J. S., Millier, J. J., Gustafson, D. L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

  14. A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. IV. Unusual Magnetic Cloud and Overall Scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grechnev, V V; Chertok, I M; Belov, A V; Filippov, B P; Slemzin, V A; Jackson, B V

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geomagnetic superstorm of 20 November 2003 with Dst = -422 nT, one of the most intense in history, is not well understood. The superstorm was caused by a moderate solar eruptive event on 18 November, comprehensively studied in our preceding Papers I-III. The analysis has shown a number of unusual and extremely complex features, which presumably led to the formation of an isolated right-handed magnetic-field configuration. Here we analyze the interplanetary disturbance responsible for the 20 November superstorm, compare some of its properties with the extreme 28-29 October event, and reveal a compact size of the magnetic cloud (MC) and its disconnection from the Sun. Most likely, the MC had a spheromak configuration and expanded in a narrow angle of spheromak in an enhanced-density environment constituted by the tails of the preceding ICMEs. Additional circumstances favoring the su...

  15. Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks 313 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) © EGU Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial Artificial neural networks (ANNs) provide a quick and flexible means of developing flood flow simulation

  16. Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

  17. Storm Water Quality in Los Alamos Canyon following the Cerro Grande Fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Johansen; B. Enz; B. Gallaher; K. Mullen; D. Kraig

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned about 7400 acres of forest on the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and about 10,000 acres in watersheds above LANL on Santa Fe National Forest lands. The resulting burned landscapes raised concerns of increased storm water runoff and transport of contaminants by runoff in the canyons traversing LANL. On June 2 and 3, 2000, rain fell in the Los Alamos Canyon watershed generating storm water runoff in the canyon bottom. This event was important in that it was the first significant runoff on LANL following the fire and occurred in a canyon containing known legacy waste sites. Samples from this runoff were analyzed for radionuclide, metal, inorganic, and organic constituents. Results show radionuclide concentrations at or below previous (pre-fire) maximum levels at locations on LANL and downstream. However, greater concentrations of some fallout-associated radionuclides (cesium-137 and strontium-90) were seen arriving on LANL from upstream areas compared to pre-fire conditions. Tests indicate most of the radionuclides in the samples were bound to sediments, not dissolved in water. Most radionuclide concentrations in sediments were below LANL Screening Action Levels, with cesium-137 and strontium-90 as exceptions. Most radionuclide concentrations in samples taken at LANL's downstream boundary were greater than those taken upstream, indicating the presence of contributing sources on LANL. For comparison purposes, doses were calculated on a mrem per liter of unfiltered water basis for 11 radionuclides commonly associated with atmospheric fallout and with LANL operations. The maximum dose was 0.094 mrem per liter unfiltered water and was largely associated with plutonium-239/240. In contrast, all filtered samples had total doses less than 0.001 mrem per liter. Compared to past data, potential doses were not increased by the fire during this initial runoff event. Of the 25 metals tested for, seven were above pre-fire levels, including copper, lead, manganese, selenium, strontium, uranium, and zinc. However, dissolved metal concentrations did not exceed State livestock and wildlife standards. Of the 18 general chemistry parameters tested, eight exceeded historic norms, including calcium, potassium, total phosphorus, cyanide, and magnesium.

  18. Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Brumbelow, K.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China Building Commissioning for Energy Efficiency and Comfort, Vol.VI-10-2 Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation Zi Liu, Ph... guidance on how political subdivisions can assist the TCEQ in taking credit for emissions reductions from energy efficiency measures implemented at the political subdivision level. According to this TCEQ guidance energy efficiency, renewable energy...

  19. Development of a Web-Based, Emissions Reduction Calculator for Storm Water/Infiltration Sanitary Sewage Separation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Z.; Haberl, J. S.; Brumbelow, K.; Culp, C.; Gilman, D.; Yazdani, B.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICEBO2006, Shenzhen, China 1 DEVELOPMENT OF A WEB-BASED, EMISSIONS REDUCTION CALCULATOR FOR STORM WATER/INFILTRATION SANITARY SEWAGE SEPARATION Zi Liu, Ph.D. Research Engineer Energy Systems Laboratory Charles Culp, Ph.D., P.../Renewable Energy (EE/RE) projects into the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) mandated State Implementation Plan (SIP): A Guide for Local Entities?, which provides guidance on how political subdivisions can assist the TCEQ in taking credit for emissions...

  20. Building boundary is necessary for the real estate industry, flood management, and homeland security applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    Abstract Building boundary is necessary for the real estate industry, flood management, and homeland security applications. The extraction of building boundary is also a crucial and difficult step, and Purdue University campus are evaluated. Introduction Airborne lidar (light detection and ranging

  1. The effect of surface and interfacial tensions upon the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Erasmo Trevino

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SURFACE AND INTERFACIAL TENSIONS UPON THE RECOVERY OF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Dissertation By ERASMO T . GUERRERO Approved as to style and content by: J t Q J w & U 7 T Chsfirman of Cfommittee f Head of Department TABLE....................................................................................................... .......... 25 Surface and Interfacial Tensions..........................................................26 Adsorption............................... .................. . ........................................ .......... 31 Flow Tests...

  2. Floods in Pakistan: Socio-political and 'techno-nature' challenges a first glance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Floods in Pakistan: Socio-political and 'techno-nature' challenges ­ a first glance Urs Geiser 1. Over the coming days, rains continued not only in Northwest Pakistan, but in Baluchistan as well quarter of Pakistan's land area is inundated. The spatial spread of the disaster is well known

  3. Using Polymer to Maximize CO2 Flooding Performance in Light Oils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weirong

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -permeability zones and natural fractures, the condition is even worse. Two methods related to polymers are studied to improve CO2 flooding performance. One is adding polymers to water to increase water viscosity during the water-alternating-gas (WAG) process, named...

  4. ERDC/EL TN-11-1 Flood Risk Management: Insights from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/EL TN-11-1 March 2011 Flood Risk Management: Insights from an Expert Modeling Process by M. D preparedness planning that harmonizes efforts of implementing agencies and stakeholders. Risk management are essential for effective risk management policy. Formal (versus ad hoc) analyses of risk manager and stake

  5. Culvert Design for Flood Routing considering Sediment Transport W.J. Rahmeyer PhD.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmeyer, William J.

    Culvert Design for Flood Routing considering Sediment Transport W.J. Rahmeyer PhD.1 and W routing methodologies do not consider sediment bed-load transport through the culverts or pipelines of road crossings. Many practitioners either ignore the transport of sediment through a culvert or assume

  6. Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian; revised 20 June 2012; accepted 28 June 2012; published 15 August 2012. [1] In the process of calibrating that the developed method generally is effective in calibrating GBHM parameters and in estimating their associated

  7. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas for electrical shock. NOTIFY University Police. What should I do if I smell natural or propane gas? LEAVE/Repair line, 7-6333, or CALL the Campus University Police or Security at (561) 297-3500 or 911

  8. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES ELECTRICAL OR PLUMBING FAILURE/FLOODING/WATER LEAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES ELECTRICAL OR PLUMBING FAILURE/FLOODING/WATER LEAK NATURAL GAS - F 8a - 5p HBOI@FAU Security (772) 216-1124 Afterhours, Weekends or Holidays What should I do Police 911. · NOTIFY Building Safety personnel when possible. What should I do if I smell natural

  9. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas Physical Plant (772) 242-2246 M - F 8a - 5p (954) 762-5040 HBOI@FAU Security (772) 216-1124 Afterhours University Police. NOTIFY Building Safety personnel when possible. What should I do if I smell natural

  10. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received 6 May 2005 Availble online 7 February 2006 Abstract The failure of a lava dam 165,000 yr ago dam-failure and unsteady flow modeling to estimate a peak discharge and flow hydrograph. FailurePeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  11. Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    network by forcing users to take detours. In a risk preventive viewpoint, the network administrator has 1 Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis Jean in the water level and its consequences on the road network vulnerability. The first part focuses

  12. 7200 years of Rho^ne river flooding activity in Lake Le Bourget, France: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    -level fluctuations. While the intensity of the MS signal might be widely affected by the human impact on soil conditions in the NW Alps. Key words: River discharge, floods, palaeohydrology, climate, human impact). In order to understand these natural oscillations and then to compare them to modern human-induced `global

  13. CO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - The Westphalian deposit is constituted by numerous exploited coal seams of different thicknesses. These seamsCO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area Candice Lagnya, a former coal mining area. To understand the origin of this production, a borehole of 90 meters deep

  14. High-speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Jonathan

    High-speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack Yoohwan Kim',Ju-Yeon Jo', H during the Distributed Denial-oJService (DDoS) attack. By allocating bandwidths separately for TCP.9% of the attack trafic while legitimate traflc showed nearly identical performance as in the non-attacked

  15. High-Speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merat, Francis L.

    1 High-Speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack Yoohwan Kim1 , Ju-Yeon Jo1 Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 ABSTRACT Protection from Distributed Denial-of-Service attacks has been of a great interest recently and substantial progress has been made for preventing some attack

  16. ach year across the US, mesoscale weather events--flash floods, tornadoes, hail,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    E ach year across the US, mesoscale weather events--flash floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds of mesoscale weather research; its disparate, high-volume data sets and streams; or the tremendous urgent need for a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology--particularly one

  17. What You Should Do If Your Water Well Has Been Flooded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for at least 1 hour before the disinfection process. Household plumbing, including the water heater, alsoWhat You Should Do If Your Water Well Has Been Flooded Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist Diane E. Boellstorff, Program Specialist Water Quality Tony L. Provin

  18. Developing a GIS tool to assess potential damage of future floods J. Eleutrio1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    analysis, vulnerability assessment, natural hazard, decision support tool. 1 Introduction Flood risk brings and A. Rozan1 1 UMR Cemagref/ENGEES GESTE, Territorial Management of Water and Environment, France 2 UTR Urban Hydraulics - UMR CNRS/UdS/ ENGEES Mechanical Institute of Fluids and Solids, France Abstract

  19. Nutrient dynamics in marsh sediments contaminated by an oil spill following a flood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Benjamin Cord

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research involves a study of the natural recovery of a brackish marsh impacted by an oil spill and fire in which the area was naturally enhanced with elevated nutrient levels. Flood waters during October, 1994, ruptured a group of pipelines...

  20. HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

  1. A Probabilistic Model of Flooding Loads on Transverse Watertight Bulkheads in the Event of Hull Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    -board explosions, weapons effects, and ex- treme wave environments. Although the structural loading or reliability WTB loads. Poisson arrival is assumed for damage events, and the maximum life-time load effect (Chan et al 2002), the effect of water in a flooded compartment on motions (Yildiz 1983, Chan et al 2002

  2. Changes in Crested Wheatgrass Root Exudation Caused by Flood, Drought, and Nutrient Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doucette, William J.

    rather than stimulation of exudate production per gram of plant. Plant water status can alter exudation carbon (TOC) and organic acid content to compare treatment effects. Plants in the low K1 treatment exuded cumulative TOC exuded per gram dry plant by 71% (p 5 0.05). The flooded treatment increased TOC exuded per

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF REAL TIME FLOOD PREDICTION CAPABILITIES IN PUERTO RICO TO EVALUATE UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    DEVELOPMENT OF REAL TIME FLOOD PREDICTION CAPABILITIES IN PUERTO RICO TO EVALUATE UNCERTAINTIES of Electrical and Computer Engineering 1,2,3 University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez Abstract Due to the complex terrain and the tropical influence, Puerto Rico is characterized by small watersheds, high rainfall

  4. Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis Philippe.Jacquet@inria.fr Emmanuel Baccelli INRIA, France Emmanuel.Baccelli@inria.fr Abstract--Jitter. This paper investigates on the impact of the standardized jitter mechanism on network-wide packet

  5. Climate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    of climate warming can be very significant. Integrated water resources management is a promising wayClimate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply climate warming impacts on surface runoff, groundwater inflows and reservoir evaporation for distributed

  6. Ecosystem effects of environmental flows: modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physical system using: (1) a reservoir operations model to simulate reservoir releases and reservoir water experimental floods on the differential mortality of native and exotic riparian trees, on beaver dam integrity of model applications and experimental flow releases are contributing to adaptive flow management

  7. FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Prabir Daripa developed flows in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In a recent exhaustive study [Transport in Porous Media, 93 fluid flows that occur in porous media during tertiary dis- placement process of chemical enhanced oil

  8. Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise Jochen Hinkela,1st century sea-level rise are assessed on a global scale taking into account a wide range- ment and sea-level rise. Uncertainty in global mean and regional sea level was derived from four

  9. Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Andreas

    Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise Rik is related with the low shelf gradient and a strong acceleration of the East Asian sea-level rise from 34 depositional systems change into estuaries and eventually drown when sea-level rise overtakes the sediment

  10. Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field: Model measured NO3 flux concentrations in a subsurface tile drain, several monitoring wells and nested reasonably well. However, NO3 flux concentrations in the subsurface tile drain and piezometers at the field

  11. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1992 a water main break at the Site flooded a tailings pond that overflowed into Clear Creek. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area at the west end of the former tailings pond area previously cleaned up by EPA was found to contain

  12. Multicriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments with complex terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of 40 tipping bucket rain gauges, this studyMulticriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments. [1] Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2 ) and temporal (5­15 min

  13. 09/02/2011 16:07Satellite and ground based observations of a large-scale electron precipitation event Page 1 of 2http://www.agu.org/cgi-bin/SFgate/SFgate?language=English&verbo...9%2051467797%20%2fdata2%2fepubs%2fwais%2fdata%2ffm10%2ffm10.txt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    observations are currently poorly suited to providing measurements of energetic and relativistic electron 2005 geomagnetic storms. The study augments large-scale regional observations using VLF measurements how geomagnetic storms couple to the upper atmosphere, and hence to atmospheric chemistry and dynamics

  14. Ann. Geophys., 24, 989999, 2006 www.ann-geophys.net/24/989/2006/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    current. A measure of these variations is provided by the Disturbance Storm Time index (Dst ), which Annales Geophysicae Geomagnetic Dst index forecast based on IMF data only G. Pallocchia, E. Amata, G weather an important role is played by geomagnetic storms, which are comprised of pro- cesses occurring

  15. A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

    2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

  16. Development of a HEC-HMS model to inform river gauge placement for a flood early warning system in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaatz, Joel Alan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Communities in the downstream region of the Manafwa River Basin in eastern Uganda experience floods caused by heavy precipitation upstream. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has partnered with the Red Cross ...

  17. Risk prevention and policy formulation : responding to the 1999 mud-floods catastrophe in El Litoral Central, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parisca-Blanco, Sonia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifteen days of constant and intense rainfall in Venezuela culminated on December 16 1999, in catastrophic landslides and flooding along 25 miles of the Vargas State coastal strip. This catastrophe ravaged the Caracas ...

  18. Understanding the Hydrologic Characteristics and Absorption Capacity of Bioretention Areas Kathryn Shepard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    of storm water best management practices. Available at http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes storm events. REFERENCES Atlanta Regional Commission. 2001. Georgia storm water management manual Building, Room 2401 Historically, stormwater management has focused primarily on flood control

  19. Simulation Study to Investigate the Effect of Natural Fractures on the Performance of Surfactant-Polymer Flood in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayedakram, Nawaf Ibrahim A

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    (Salehi 5 - 1? BN (>5) is -current of , 1999). -surfactant , 2009). 6 2. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES The main objective of this research is to study the effect of natural fractures on surfactant polymer flood (SPF... SIMULATION STUDY TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECT OF NATURAL FRACTURES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOOD IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS A Thesis by NAWAF IBRAHIM A. SAYEDAKRAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  20. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N2 gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application.

  1. Dambreak flood analyses and emergency action plan: West branch and main stem of the Penobscot River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingert, R. [Northrop, Devine, & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Paul, W. [Great Northern Paper Co., Millinocket, ME (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1994, Great Northern Paper (GNP) updated the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) for their hydro system on the Penobscot River in northern Maine. The EAP update incorporated results of dam failure analyses conducted to determine the extent of flooding resulting from the postulated failure of GNP dams under Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) conditions with the implementation of current operation and emergency response procedures. GNP hydro operators, in consultation with public safety agencies, reorganized and modified the EAP to make it easier to use by the actual planholders, thus improving its overall effectiveness. A key for the effectiveness of the EAP update was the development of new notification maps using the ARC/INFO Geographic Information System (GIS).

  2. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Annual report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasan, D.T.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the authors present the results of experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties.

  3. Analysis of core-concrete interaction event with flooding for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses salient aspects of the methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from an accident involving a molten core-concrete interaction event (with and without flooding) in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for this postulated severe accident. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during this severe accident. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms, which are then used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for the support of the Conceptual Safety Analysis Report for ANS. The results are also to be used to examine the effectiveness of subpile room flooding during this type of severe accident.

  4. Conditional Reliability, Sub-Monthly Time Step, Flood Control, and Salinity Features of WRAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, A.A.; Olmos, H.E.; Hoffpauir, R.J.; Wurbs, R.A.

    .................................................................... 9 2.1 Conditional Reliability CR Record ................................................................................. 14 2.2 Beginning of SIM Output CRM File for the CRM Example .......................................... 25 2.3 TABLES Input... record field 9 to provide beginning reservoir storage for program SALT and TABLES 5CR2 record routines root1.SUB SIMD sub-monthly time step simulation results root1.FFA SIMD flood frequency analysis file with annual series of peak flow and storage...

  5. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2002 to March 31, 2002. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. In addition, evaluation of the economics of commercial application in the surrounding area was performed. In a meeting on January 14, 2002 the possibility of staging the demonstration, starting with a 10-acre sub-pattern flood was raised and the decision made to investigate this plan in detail. The influence of carbon dioxide on oil properties and the influence of binary interaction parameters (BIP) used in the VIP simulator were investigated. VIP calculated swelling factors are in good agreement with published values up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Swelling factor and saturated liquid density are relatively independent of the BIP over the range of BIPs used (0.08-0.15) up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Assuming a CO2 EOR recovery rate projected as being most likely by current modeling, commercial scale CO2 flooding at $20/BO is possible in the leases in Hall-Gurney field. Relatively small floods (240-320 acres, 4-6 patterns) are economically viable at $20/BO in areas of very high primary and secondary productivity (>14 MBO/net acre recovery). Leases with moderately high primary and secondary productivity (> 10 MBO/net acre recovery) can be economic when combined with high productivity leases to form larger floods (>640 acres, 9 or more patterns).

  6. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded SNF Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary.

  7. The investigation of the effects of wettability on residual oil after water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burja, Edward Oscar

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flooding, " Producers Monthly, (1951), 15-16, 15. 6. Schilthuis, Ralph J. : "Connate Water in Oil and Gas Sands, " Trans. AIME. , (1938), 127, 199-214. 7. Bartell, F. E. : "Function of Water in the Production of Oil from Reservoirs?" Report, API...: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING 1953 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Summary . 2. Introduction 3. Review of Literature . 4. Description of Materials 16 Cores 16 Oil, Gas and Brine 18 Surface Active Chemicals 19 Crystals 22 5. Description of Procedure...

  8. The development of a flood routing model for the flow analyses of mine tailings materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rokohl, Don Richard

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FLOOD ROUTING MODEL FOR THE FLOW ANALYSES OF MINE TAILINGS MATERIALS A Thesis DON RICHARD ROKOHL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PLOOD ROUTING MODEL POR THE FLOW ANALTSES OF MINE TAILINGS MATERIALS A Thesis by DON RICHARD ROKOHL Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle (Co...

  9. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. MV Energy has received informal notification that GE Capital will approve sale of the portion of the Colliver lease involved in the pilot. Murfin Drilling Company is seeking local small independent partners for the pilot and has received commitment from White Eagle Energy and John O. Farmer Oil Company to date. A Contract was signed between the Kansas Department of Commerce & Housing and Murfin formalizing the KSDOC&H contribution of $88,000 to the pilot project. This money will be used for well rework and testing. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report.

  10. nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

  11. Database of Low-E Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones (Task ET-WIN-PNNL-FY13-01_5.3)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cort, Katherine A.; Culp, Thomas D.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced in support of the Emerging Technologies Low-e Storm Windows Task 5.3: Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone. Both sets of calculation results will be made publicly available through the Building America Solution Center.

  12. Evaluating the purity of a {sup 57}Co flood source by PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiFilippo, Frank P., E-mail: difilif@ccf.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Flood sources of {sup 57}Co are commonly used for quality control of gamma cameras. Flood uniformity may be affected by the contaminants {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co, which emit higher energy photons. Although vendors specify a maximum combined {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity, a convenient test for flood source purity that is feasible in a clinical environment would be desirable. Methods: Both {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co emit positrons with branching 19.6% and 14.9%, respectively. As is known from {sup 90}Y imaging, a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is capable of quantitatively imaging very weak positron emission in a high single-photon background. To evaluate this approach, two {sup 57}Co flood sources were scanned with a clinical PET/CT multiple times over a period of months. The {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity was clearly visible in the reconstructed PET images. Total impurity activity was quantified from the PET images after background subtraction of prompt gamma coincidences. Results: Time-of-flight PET reconstruction was highly beneficial for accurate image quantification. Repeated measurements of the positron-emitting impurities showed excellent agreement with an exponential decay model. For both flood sources studied, the fit parameters indicated a zero intercept and a decay half-life consistent with a mixture of {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co. The total impurity activity at the reference date was estimated to be 0.06% and 0.07% for the two sources, which was consistent with the vendor’s specification of <0.12%. Conclusions: The robustness of the repeated measurements and a thorough analysis of the detector corrections and physics suggest that the accuracy is acceptable and that the technique is feasible. Further work is needed to validate the accuracy of this technique with a calibrated high resolution gamma spectrometer as a gold standard, which was not available for this study, and for other PET detector models.

  13. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. Assessment of the demonstration site has defined many aspects of the reservoir. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. Further analysis of the pilot site by the partners has indicated that a staged demonstration is considered optimal. A phased approach to implementation of the demonstration is proposed to reduce the risk of uncertainties as to whether the reservoir has basic properties (connectivity and ability to pressure-up) conducive to a meaningful CO2 flood demonstration. The proposed plan is to flood a 10+-acre pattern. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale ({approx}60-acre) demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. In general, the following significant modifications to the original Statement of Work are proposed: (1) The proposed plan would extend the period of Budget Period 1 to May 7, 2003. (2) Redefine the period of Budget Period 2 from 3/7/01-3/7/05 to 5/7/03-3/7/08. (3) Redefine the period of Budget Period 3 from 3/7/05-3/7/06 to 3/7/08-3/7/09. (4) To allow initial verification of the viability of the process before proceeding into the flood demonstration, move activities involved with preparing wells in the flood pattern (Task 5.1), repressurizing the pattern (Task 5.2), and constructing surface facilities (Task 5.3) from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1. (5) Allow US Energy Partners (USEP) to be a supplier of carbon dioxide from the ethanol plant in Russell, Kansas. (6) Change the pilot flood pattern, including the number and location of wells involved in the pilot. (7) Expenses are shifted from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1 to cover costs of additional reservoir characterization. All modified activities and tasks would maintain the existing required industry match of 55% in Budget Period 1, 65% in Budget Period 2, and 90% in Budget Period 3. Carbon dioxide supplied by the USEP ethanol facility would be valued such that the total cost of CO2 delivered to the demonstration site injection wellhead would not exceed the $3.00/MCF cost of supplying CO2 from Guymon, OK. Total cost of the modified project is $4,415,300 compared with $5,388,064 in the original project. The modified project would require no additional funding from US DOE.

  14. Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011: Evidence for ammonia and water ices from analysis of VIMS spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sromovsky, Lawrence; Fry, Patrick

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our analysis of Cassini/VIMS near-infrared spectra of Saturn's Great Storm of 2010-2011 reveals a multi-component aerosol composition comprised primarily of ammonia ice, with a significant component of water ice. The most likely third component is ammonium hydrosulfide or some weakly absorbing material similar to what dominates visible clouds outside the storm region. Horizontally heterogeneous models favor ammonium hydrosulfide as the third component, while horizontally uniform models favor the weak absorber. Both models rely on water ice absorption to compensate for residual spectral gradients produced by ammonia ice from 3.0 microns to 3.1 microns and need the third component to fill in the sharp ammonia ice absorption peak near 2.96 microns. The best heterogeneous model has spatial coverage fractions of 55% ammonia ice, 22% water ice, and 23% ammonium hydrosulfide. The best homogeneous model has an optically thin layer of weakly absorbing particles above an optically thick layer of water ice particles coa...

  15. Oklahoma City Flash Flood Event, 31 May -1 June 2013 Annual Exceedance Probabilities (AEPs) for Worst Case 4-hour and 6-hour Rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma City Flash Flood Event, 31 May - 1 June 2013 Annual Exceedance Probabilities (AEPs HOLDENVILLEHOLDENVILLE MIDWEST CITYMIDWEST CITY OKLAHOMA CITYOKLAHOMA CITY Hydrometeorological Design Studies Center

  16. Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

  17. A correlation between wettability and the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Robert Thomas

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in color and dispersible in hard watez. Petronate L (32) is a low molecular weight& highly refined petroleum sulfonate It is insoluble in waterz highly soluble in kerosene& and is a very viscous~ dark brown liquid. Ethofat 2/+2/60 (33) i. s a tall oil... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE ~ust 1~6 Major Subject Petroleum ineerin A COHRELAT ION BETWEEN WETTABILlTY AND THE RECOVERY CF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis ROBERT T KLLIK Approved as to style and content by...

  18. Grain sorghum response to different flooding periods at the early boot stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zolezzi del Rio, Oscar

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following steps should be considered in this drainage research program: 1. Compile as much of the drainage data as is possible and publish it in one report, 2. Since there are so many parameters that effect drainage, try to work with models to eliminate... of inundations of different lengths at the sensitive early vegetative growth stage have been determined. The purpose of the research reported herein was to determine the effects of different lengths of flooding at the other sensitive stage, the early...

  19. Flooded First Street at Y-12 Plant | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorking Outside theFlooded First Street at

  20. Effect of solar wind pressure enhancements on storm time ring current Y. Shi, E. Zesta, L. R. Lyons, and A. Boudouridis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyons, Larry

    Effect of solar wind pressure enhancements on storm time ring current asymmetry Y. Shi, E. Zesta, L; accepted 12 July 2005; published 8 October 2005. [1] The effect of solar wind pressure enhancements be explained by considering the local energization of the preexisting ring current particles by the azimuthal