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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Correlative comparison of geomagnetic storms and auroral substorms using geomagnetic indeces. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Partial contents include the following: (1) Geomagnetic storm and substorm processes; (2) Magnetospheric structure; (3) Substorm processes; (4) Data description; (5) Geomagnetic indices; and (6) Data period and data sets.

Cade, W.B.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

SUN-TO-EARTH CHARACTERISTICS OF TWO CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS INTERACTING NEAR 1 AU: FORMATION OF A COMPLEX EJECTA AND GENERATION OF A TWO-STEP GEOMAGNETIC STORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On 2012 September 30-October 1 the Earth underwent a two-step geomagnetic storm. We examine the Sun-to-Earth characteristics of the coronal mass ejections (CMEs) responsible for the geomagnetic storm with combined heliospheric ...

Liu, Ying D.

3

The Automatic Predictability of Super Geomagnetic Storm from Halo CMEs Associated with Large Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetopause and this reconnection transports energy from the solar wind into the magnetosphere (Dungey 1961.S.A Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 U.S.A. Feb. 25, 2006 control systems, damage of electric power grids, etc. A geomagnetic storm is initiated when the energy

4

Common origin of positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and the geomagnetic activity effect at low latitudes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The author looks for a correlation between two different atmospheric effects. They are a positive atmospheric storm (an anomalous increase in the F2 region ionization density), observed at middle latitudes, and the geomagnetic activity effect (the anomalous changes of temperature and gas density seen in the thermosphere), observed at low latitudes. A temporal correlation is sought to test the argument that both of these effects are the result of travelling atmospheric disturbances (TAD). A TAD is a pulselike atmospheric wave thought to be generated by substorm activity, and to propagate with high velocity (600 m/s) from polar latitudes toward equatorial latitudes. The author looks at data from five separate events correlating magnetic, ionospheric, and neutral atmospheric measurements. The conclusion is that there is a positive correlation between magnetic substorm activity at high latitudes, and positive ionospheric storms at middle latitudes and geomagnetic activity at low latitudes. The time correlations are consistent with high propagation speeds between these events. The author also presents arguments which indicate that the middle latitude positive ionospheric storms are not the result of electric field effects.

Proelss, G.W. (Universitaet Bonn (Germany))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A density-temperature description of the outer electron radiation belt during geomagnetic storms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electron flux measurements from 7 satellites in geosynchronous orbit from 1990-2007 are fit with relativistic bi-Maxwellians, yielding a number density n and temperature T description of the outer electron radiation belt. For 54.5 spacecraft years of measurements the median value ofn is 3.7x10-4 cm-3 and the median value ofT is 142 keY. General statistical properties of n, T, and the 1.1-1.5 MeV flux J are investigated, including local-time and solar-cycle dependencies. Using superposed-epoch analysis triggered on storm onset, the evolution of the outer electron radiation belt through high-speed-steam-driven storms is investigated. The number density decay during the calm before the storm is seen, relativistic-electron dropouts and recoveries from dropout are investigated, and the heating of the outer electron radiation belt during storms is examined. Using four different triggers (SSCs, southward-IMF CME sheaths, southward-IMF magnetic clouds, and minimum Dst), CME-driven storms are analyzed with superposed-epoch techniques. For CME-driven storms an absence of a density decay prior to storm onset is found, the compression of the outer electron radiation belt at time of SSC is analyzed, the number-density increase and temperature decrease during storm main phase is seen, and the increase in density and temperature during storm recovery phase is observed. Differences are found between the density-temperature and the flux descriptions, with more information for analysis being available in the density-temperature description.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cayton, Thomas E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong geomagnetic storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Signature of the coronal hole near the north crest equatorial anomaly over Egypt during the strong hole effect. We use multi-instruments as SCINDA-GPS station at Helwan, Egypt (29.86 N, 31.32 E) and ASW-MAGDAS station at Aswan, Egypt (23.59 N, 32.51 E) in the equatorial region. At the beginning of the storm our

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

7

Flooding and Fire Ants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fire ants can be a serious problem during and after a flood. This publication explains how to protect yourself when you must return to flooded structures or deal with storm debris....

Nester, Paul

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

8

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Severe wind and snow storms hit the Pacific Northwest region on December 14 – 15, 2006, following severe flooding during the past few days. The severe weather resulted in major power outages through the region. At peak there were 1.8 million customers without power which included BC Hydro in Canada. Currently, there are over 1.5 million outages in the region as a result of the Pacific Northwest Storms. This represents about 42 percent of customers in affected utility service areas in Oregon and Washington. See table below. Because the current wind and snow storms are coming on the heels of extensive flooding in the region, electric utilities are experiencing damage. Wind gusts reached close to 100 mph in some areas of the region. The storm is expected to bring its strong winds and heavy snow into Idaho, Montana and Wyoming Friday and into the weekend. There are currently no reported major impacts to the petroleum and natural gas infrastructure.

none,

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Storm Water Analytical Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Storm Water Analytical Period Storm Water Analytical Period The Individual Permit authorizes the discharge of storm water associated with historical industrial activities at LANL...

10

Blackland's flood warning system protects soldiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the No. 1 reason for installing the FAST system was ?to protect soldiers by alerting them of dangerous flood conditions.? Equipment and personnel had been lost at low water crossings during storms, he said. Wolfe said the sensors, which constantly... said they also hope to use real-time stream level and weather data to develop a flood prediction model to forecast the likelihood of flooding across Fort Hood. Blackland?s f lood warning system protects soldiers ...

Wythe, Kathy

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Feasibility analysis and design of a flood barrier concept for the City of New York  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flooding has always been a major concern for coastal communities. However, many parts of New York City never had to worry about flooding until Hurricane Sandy hit in October 2012. The hurricane brought a record level storm ...

Ingilis, Demetres

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Geomagnetic Storms and Long-Term Impacts on Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory was commissioned to study the potential impact of a severe GIC event on the western U.S.-Canada power grid (referred to as the Western Interconnection). The study identified long transmission lines (length exceeding 150 miles) that did not include series capacitors. The basic assumption for the study is that a GIC is more likely to couple to long transmission lines, and that series capacitors would block the flow of the induced DC GIC. Power system simulations were conducted to evaluate impacts to the bulk power system if transformers on either end of these lines failed. The study results indicated that the Western Interconnection was not substantially at risk to GIC because of the relatively small number of transmission lines that met this criterion. This report also provides a summary of the Hydro-Québec blackout on March 13, 1989, which was caused by a GIC. This case study delves into the failure mechanisms of that event, lessons learned, and preventive measures that have been implemented to minimize the likelihood of its reoccurrence. Finally, the report recommends that the electric power industry consider the adoption of new protective relaying approaches that will prevent severe GIC events from catastrophically damaging transformers. The resulting changes may increase the likelihood of smaller disruptions but should prevent an unlikely yet catastrophic national-level event.

Kirkham, Harold; Makarov, Yuri V.; Dagle, Jeffery E.; DeSteese, John G.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Diao, Ruisheng

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

13

SciTech Connect: "geomagnetic storms"  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation InInformation In closing,--SpeedingSpeedingSpeeding"Sambeek, L.L. Van"

14

Protection of Coastal Infrastructure under Rising Flood Risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 2005 hurricane season was particularly damaging to the United States, contributing to significant losses to energy infrastructure—much of it the result of flooding from storm surge during hurricanes Katrina and Rita. ...

Lickley, M.J.

15

Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory Preparation for Tropical Storms or Hurricanes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Health and Safety Laboratory Preparation for Tropical Storms or Hurricanes damage, significant rainfall and possible campus flooding. Below are some guidelines that should exits and corridors are clear. Someone from the Environmental Health and Safety Department

Natelson, Douglas

16

STORM WATER Residential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE UCSC Residential Car Washing http THAT MAY CAUSE ENVIRONMENTAL HARM TO THE STORM WATER QUALITY HOTLINE: (831) 459-2553. LIKE US ON FACEBOOK AT UCSC STORM WATER MANAGEMENT PROGRAM! DID YOU KNOW? PRACTICAL SOLUTIONS > USE A COMMERCIAL CAR WASH

California at Santa Cruz, University of

17

Solar wind and geomagnetism: toward a standard classification of geomagnetic activity from 1868 to 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examined solar activity with a large series of geomagnetic data from 1868 to 2009. We have revisited the geomagnetic activity classification scheme of Legrand and Simon (1989) and improve their scheme by lowering the ...

Zerbo, J. L.

18

The Geology and Geography of Floods Jim E. O'Connor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

failures and terrestrial freshwater sources such as lakes and ice caps involve similar total volumes of ice caps and failures of ice and landslide Vlams. The fundamental limits to dam-failure floods primarily affected by individual storms, the largest flows are in areas where atmospheric moisture or storm

19

Storm Water Individual Permit.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

information meeting to discuss the biannual update on the NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit. Wednesday, January 22, 2014 5:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center 10 Cities of...

20

Location-Aided Flooding: An Energy-Efficient Data Dissemination Protocol for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Location-Aided Flooding: An Energy-Efficient Data Dissemination Protocol for Wireless Sensor such as the broadcast storm problem [6]. In this paper, we present an energy-efficient flooding mechanism, termed of battery and, hence, any solution must be energy-efficient. . Self-configuration. Since it is not feasible

Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Storm-induced changes of the topside ionosphere as deduced from incoherent-scatter radars. Master's thesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Incoherent scatter radar observations from Millstone Hill, Saint Santin, and Arecibo are used to illustrate changes of the topside ionosphere during a geomagnetic storm. These observations consist of electron density, electron and ion temperatures, and ion velocity components parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. These parameters can further describe changes in ion composition, electric fields, and neutral winds. Attention is given to a specific storm during the Equinox Transition Study (ETS) of September 1984. In order to isolate the storm effects in the topside ionosphere, a comparison will be made between a disturbed and quiet day. A novel result from this study is the finding of correlated oscillations between parallel and perpendicular ion velocity components which are apparently storm induced. Previously, these oscillations have been observed primarily at night, but now it's noticed that during storm conditions there are prominent oscillations during the day.

Lunn, K.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Individual Permit for Storm Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Compliance Miscellaneous EPA Submittals Public Meetings Renewal Application Construction Certifications Corrective Action Storm Water Analytical Period Get updates on LANL...

23

Ice Storm Supercomputer  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

"A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

None

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

24

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into storm drains, or suspicious activi- ties that may cause environmental harm to the Storm Water Quality was created for the Storm Water Management Program http://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Contact us at: cleanwater Management Program and UCSC Storm Water Management Plan at cleanwater.ucsc.edu Storm Water Management: 1

California at Santa Cruz, University of

25

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Joanne Yee, Storm Water Management Program Intern for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program. Like us on Facebook at UCSC Storm Water Management Program Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu (831) 459, Volume 5, Number 1 Learn more about the UCSC Storm Water Management Program and UCSC Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

26

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Joanne Yee, Storm Water Management Program Intern for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program. Like us on Facebook at UC Santa Cruz Storm Water Management Program Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu (831) 459, Volume 5, Number 1 Learn more about the UCSC Storm Water Management Program and UCSC Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

27

Storm Water Discharge Permits (Wisconsin)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Wisconsin's storm water runoff regulations include permitting requirements for construction sites and industrial facilities, including those processing or extracting coal or gas. The purpose of the...

28

ARM - Word Seek: Storms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc Documentation RUCProductstwrmrAre the Effects of Global Warming? OutreachStorms Outreach Home

29

Overview of the Storm Water Individual Permit.pdf  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the LANL Storm Water Individual Permit? Poster, Individual Permit for Storm Water, NPDES Permit No...

30

Friday, 06 August, 2010 Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: significance to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of this particular period of electron precipitation to neutral atmospheric chemistry. Building on an earlier study. Through application of the Sodankylä Ion and Neutral Chemistry model, we examine the significance-varying energy spectrum determined from the DEMETER satellite. We show that the large increases in odd nitrogen

Otago, University of

31

Geomagnetic effects modelling for the PJM interconnection system. Part 2; Geomagnetically induced current study results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development of a computer program for calculation of geomagnetically induced current (GIC) and a GIC power system model for the Pennsylvania-New Jersey-Maryland Interconnection is described in this paper. Results of GIC for three different ionospheric source configurations are shown. A new method is presented for estimating GIC in unmetered parts of the system based on a few measurements and precalculated geomagnetic disturbance conditions. The use of an interactive, menu driven GIC program to study mitigation concepts including the effects of line outages, line series capacitors, transformer neutral blocking resistors and transformer neutral blocking capacitors is also presented.

Prabhakara, F.S.; Hannett, L.N.; Ringlee, R.J. (Power Technologies, Inc., Schenectady, NY (United States)); Ponder, J.Z. (PJM Interconnection, Norristown, PA (US))

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

E-Print Network 3.0 - acoustically-induced geomagnetic perturbations...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

geomagnetically perturbed days cor- responding to the decreasing phase... -speed solar wind, mag- netic field disturbances in the interplanetary space and in the geomagnetic...

33

Report Concerns: Storm Water Quality Hotline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is imple- menting the Storm Water Manage- ment Plan (SWMP), which identifies many Best Management Practices Management Program Intern for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program. Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu Like us on Facebook at UCSC Storm Water Management Program (831) 459--4520 In this Issue: Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

34

Storm Water Quality Please report any concerns,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) 4594520 http://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Volunteer and intern with the Storm Water Management Program the Campus Stewardship Program Like us on Facebook at UC Santa Cruz Storm Water Management Program Learn more about the UCSC Storm Water Management Program and UCSC Storm Water Management Plan

California at Santa Cruz, University of

35

The Impact of Climate Change on Hurricane Flooding Inundation, Property Damages, and Population Affected  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bret Low Estimate 2030 ... 58 19 Flood Building Loss Estimation ................................................................. 61 xiii FIGURE...) studied historical shoreline changes in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to sea level, hurricanes and other strong storms can also greatly affect the morphology of barrier islands. This has been a popular topic of research in the past few years...

Frey, Ashley E.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

36

A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

Katul, Gabriel

37

Flooding of industrial facilities -Vulnerability rduction in practice A. Valle, B. Affeltranger, Ch. Duval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the flooding of a refinery in Mohammedia (Morocco) on 25th November 2002. Many damages were reported to the snow loads, wind or rain C2: Fire or damage on electric equipments caused by storm and lightning C3,version1-4Apr2014 Author manuscript, published in "13. International Symposium on Loss Prevention

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

NATURAL HAZARDS ON ALLUVIAL FANS: THE VENEZUELA DEBRIS FLOW AND FLASH FLOOD DISASTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURAL HAZARDS ON ALLUVIAL FANS: THE VENEZUELA DEBRIS FLOW AND FLASH FLOOD DISASTER In December Venezuela. Rainfall on December 2-3 totaled 200 millimeters (8 inches) and was followed by a major storm, Denver, Colorado, Naples, Italy, and Vargas, Venezuela. In time scales spanning thousands of years

Eaton, L. Scott

39

Physics of the Earth and Planetary Interiors 160 (2007) 5159 Making sound inferences from geomagnetic sounding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geomagnetic sounding Ashley E. Medin, Robert L. Parker, Steven Constable Green Institute of Geophysics

Constable, Steve

40

University of Minnesota StormWaterMasterPlan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.2 Storm Water Infrastructure and Management .................................................................................................. 17 3. Storm Water Management Recommendations .................................. 18 3.1.2 Alternative Approach to Storm Water Management

Minnesota, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geomagnetic equatorial anomaly in zonal plasma flow  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors report here on the observation of a geomagnetic signature in the zonal eastward plasma flow, which is a striking feature of the equatorial ionosphere in the evening quadrant. These observations were derived from (E {times} B)/B{sup 2} measurements made with the cylindrical double floating probe experiment carried on the Dynamics Explorer 2 (DE 2) satellite. The signature consists of a crest-trough-crest effect in the latitude dependence of the eastward plasma flow with the crests at {plus minus}8{degree} dip latitude and the trough nearly centered at the dip equator at all geographic longitudes. This phenomenon can be readioly interpreted in terms of the altitude dependence of the F region dynamo electric field, and it is related to dip equator signatures in the plasma density and the magnetic declinatoin which have been reported earlier.

Aggson, T.L.; Herrero, F.A.; Mayr, H.G.; Brace, L.H. (NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)); Maynard, N.C. (Air Force Geophysics, Hanscom AFB, MA (United States)); Liebrecht, M.C. (Science Applications Research, Inc., Lanham, MD (United States))

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Mosquito Problems after a Storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-042 8-08 Mark M. Johnsen, Texas AgriLife Extension Service, The Texas A&M System After a severe storm, mosquito populations can explode, and the diseases they carry can be a danger to humans. Mosquito problems occur in two distinct waves after.... Louis encephalitis. This mosquito species lays eggs in roadside ditches, storm sew- ers, birdbaths, or any container or depression that holds water. Eggs hatch in 7 days. West Nile virus (WNV) has two distinct clini- cal forms known as West Nile Fever...

Johnsen, Mark

2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

43

2011 Baird Holm LLP Storm Water Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for control of storm water runoff has been the use of best management practices ("BMPs") ­ Notwithstanding© 2011 Baird Holm LLP Storm Water Management ­ Shifting Paradigms John P. Heil, Esq. Baird Holm LLP@bairdholm.com #12;© 2011 Baird Holm LLP Introductory Summary · Storm water runoff is generated when precipitation

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

44

INTRODUCTION TO STORM SURGE Introduction to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a reference level Storm tide is the water level rise during a storm due to the combination of storm surge water levels to rise along the coast during a hurricane. Here are the others: Tides Water levels rise making decisions. Waves Breaking waves contribute to the water level rise through wave runup and wave

45

Storm Windows | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehicles »ExchangeDepartmentResolveFuture |Energy Steps toStorageStorm

46

Alkaline flooding injection strategy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

HEPPA 2011 Session 3. 3.6 Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: significance to middle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the significance of this particular period of electron precipitation to neutral atmospheric chemistry. Building in September 2005. Through application of the Sodankyl¨a Ion and Neutral Chemistry model, we examine by using a time-varying energy spectrum determined from the DEMETER satellite. We show that the large

Ulich, Thomas

48

Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability changes during CO{sub 2} flooding due to saturation changes, dissolution, and precipitation.

Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

49

Non-storm water discharges technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) submitted a Notice of Intent to the California State Water Resources Control Board (hereafter State Board) to discharge storm water associated with industrial activities under the California General Industrial Activity Storm Water National Pollutant Elimination System Discharge Permit (hereafter General Permit). As required by the General Permit, LLNL provided initial notification of non-storm water discharges to the Central Valley Regional Water Quality Control Board (hereafter Regional Board) on October 2, 1992. Additional findings and progress towards corrective actions were reported in subsequent annual monitoring reports. LLNL was granted until March 27, 1995, three years from the Notice of Intent submission date, to eliminate or permit the non-storm water discharges. On May 20, 1994, the Regional Board issued Waste Discharge Requirements (WDR Board Order No. 94-131, NPDES No. CA0081396) to LLNL for discharges of non-contact cooling tower wastewater and storm water related to industrial activities. As a result of the issuance of WDR 94-131, LLNL rescinded its coverage under the General Permit. WDR 94-131 allowed continued non-storm water discharges and requested a technical report describing the discharges LLNL seeks to permit. For the described discharges, LLNL anticipates the Regional Board will either waive Waste Discharge Requirements as allowed for in The Water Quality Control Plan for the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Valley Region (hereafter Basin Plan) or amend Board Order 94-131 as appropriate.

Mathews, S.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

UC Santa Cruz Storm Water SPRING 2010 Volume 3, Number 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

://cleanwater.ucsc.edu Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu or (831) 459-4520 Clean storm water Storm water is generally rainwater. Rainwater runoff enters the storm drains and is discharged into the campus's natural environment. Do into the storm drains!!! Storm drains are only for the collection of storm water. Basic storm water protection

California at Santa Cruz, University of

51

Colorado ClassicsColorado Classics --Our Legendary StormsOur Legendary Storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colorado ClassicsColorado Classics -- Our Legendary StormsOur Legendary Storms Nolan J.Nolan J. DoeskenDoesken Colorado Climate Center Colorado State University Presented at 7NEWS Winter Weather Seminar, Omni Interlocken Hotel, Broomfield, Colo, November 9, 2005 #12;1888 Colorado Historical Society, Call

52

Oilfield flooding polymer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A monomer, polymers containing the monomer, and the use of the polymer in oilfield flooding is disclosed. The subject monomer is represented by the general formula: ##STR1## wherein: n is an integer from 0 to about 4; m is an integer from 0 to about 6; a is an integer equal to at least 1 except where m is equal to 0, a must equal 0 and where m is equal to 1, a must equal 0 or 1; p is an integer from 2 to about 10; b is an integer equal to at least 1 and is of sufficient magnitude that the ratio b/p is at least 0.2; and q is an integer from 0 to 2. The number of hydroxy groups in the monomer is believed to be critical, and therefore the sum of (a+b) divided by the sum (m+p) should be at least 0.2. The moieties linked to the acrylic nitrogen can be joined to provide a ringed structure.

Martin, Fred D. (Socorro, NM); Hatch, Melvin J. (Socorro, NM); Shepitka, Joel S. (Socorro, NM); Donaruma, Lorraine G. (Syosset, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Electron loss rates from the outer radiation belt caused by the filling of the outer plasmasphere: the calm before the storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements from 7 spacecraft in geosynchronous orbit are analyzed to determine the decay rate of the number density of the outer electron radiation belt prior to the onset of high-speed-stream-driven geomagnetic storms. Superposed-data analysis is used wan(?) a collection of 124 storms. When there is a calm before the storm, the electron number density decays exponentially before the storm with a 3.4-day e-folding time: beginning about 4 days before storm onset, the density decreases from {approx}4x10{sup -4} cm{sup -3} to {approx}1X 10{sup -4} cm{sup -3}. When there is not a calm before the storm, the number-density decay is very smalL The decay in the number density of radiation-belt electrons is believed to be caused by pitch-angle scattering of electrons into the atmospheric loss cone as the outer plasmasphere fills during the calms. While the radiation-belt electron density decreases, the temperature of the electron radiation belt holds approximately constant, indicating that the electron precipitation occurs equally at all energies. Along with the number density decay, the pressure of the outer electron radiation belt decays and the specific entropy increases. From the measured decay rates, the electron flux to the atmosphere is calculated and that flux is 3 orders of magnitude less than thermal fluxes in the magnetosphere, indicating that the radiation-belt pitch-angle scattering is 3 orders weaker than strong diffusion. Energy fluxes into the atmosphere are calculated and found to be insufficient to produce visible airglow.

Borovsky, Joseph E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Denton, Michael H [LANCASTER UNIV

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Controlling Mold Growth after the Storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If your home has been flooded or damaged by rain, it is important to act quickly to prevent mold. This publication explains how to begin the clean-up process by drying surfaces and objects, removing carpet, etc....

Harris, Janie

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite a small storm that came through the area last night with wind gusts peaking at 45 MPH, progress continues to be made in restoring power to customers who lost power during the December 14-15 storms which hit the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 95,971 customers remain without power, down from 1.8 million customers. The wind storm which affected the area yesterday was not as bad as previously expected, with the majority of the customer outages in the BC Hydro region, and 3,000 additional customer outages in the Puget Sound Energy service area. The customers without power represent 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy, BC Hydro, and Seattle City Light.

none,

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

56

Storm smart planning for adaptation to sea level rise : addressing coastal flood risk in East Boston  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Regardless of how well we implement sustainability plans, now and in the future, the weight of scientific evidence indicates that mean sea level will continue to rise at an increasing rate over the next century. Thus, ...

Wolff, Victoria H

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Optimum Reservoir Operation for Flood Control and Conservation Purposes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. With stringent flood plain management, susceptibility to flooding could actually decrease over time as existing activities choose to leave the flood plain and regulation prevents other activities from moving into the flood plain. Reservoir sedimentation reduces...

Wurbs, Ralph A.; Cabezas, L. Morris; Tibbets, Michael N.

58

The project design flood and spillway for the Arroyo Seco Reservoir near San Antonio, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the remainder of a stand- ard storm. Recognised procedures for such extensions are published and are in regular use. In this case reference was made to Civil Engineer Bulletin No. 52-8, Department of the Army, Office of the Chief of Engi- neers( ) "Standard... Project Flood Determinations" ~ Employment of the procedure outlined therein, and described in the following section, produced a hypothetical rainfall pattern as follows: Period (hours duration) 1 Rainfall (inches) 15. 18 3 6 24 22 27 ' 75 45, 0...

Gilbreth, Joe Clyde

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

59

Flood Plain and Floodway Management Act (Montana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The state regulates flood-prone lands and waters to prevent and alleviate flooding threats to life and health and reduce private and public economic losses. The purpose of 76-5 MCA, parts 1-4 is to...

60

Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education delivery channels with speculatively pre- computed authorizations and actively recycling them on a just Security Keywords authorization recycling, authorization flooding, access con- trol, authorization, publish

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Challenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cleaned and retained as a Best Management Practice (BMP). Receives only non-industrial storm water on storm water are leading municipalities to change permitting practices. As a result, facilitiesChallenges of Handling Storm Water Runoff Through Municipal Sewer Systems A South Carolina Case

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

62

STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN (RISK LEVEL 1) for BUILDING 90 USER TEST BED FACILITY.G., GEOLOGIST/QSD (530) 222-4339 SWPPP Preparation Date: JUNE 10, 2012 #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan) 222-4339 Name and Title Telephone Number #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan Building 90 User

Eisen, Michael

63

On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On Parameter Estimation of Urban Storm-Water Runoff Model Pedro Avellaneda1 ; Thomas P. Ballestero2 of these parameters are provided for modeling purposes and other urban storm-water quality applications. A normal runoff models are commonly used for urban storm-water quality applications DeCoursey 1985; Tsi- hrintzis

64

ORIGINAL PAPER Surface runoff contribution of nitrogen during storm events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ecosystem Management Model for TKN. Water quality and storm flow data collected from January 2000 TKN concentrations during storm. A storm water sampling program was carried out to gather requisite research has focused primarily on the water quality impacts of urban and agricultural land uses, whereas

65

On the effects of solar storms to the decaying orbital space debris  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Any man-made object in Earth's orbit that no longer serves a useful purpose is classified as orbital debris. Debris objects come from a variety of sources. The majority is related to satellite fragmentation. Other major sources of debris are propulsion systems, and fragmentation of spent upper stages, payload and mission related debris. Serious concern about orbital debris has been growing. Knowledge of the future debris environment is important to both satellite designers, and mission planners, who need to know what hazards a satellite might encounter during the course of its mission. Therefore, it is important to know how much debris is in orbit, where it is located, and when it will decay. The debris environment is complex and dynamically evolving. Objects of different shape and size behave differently in orbit. The geoeffectiveness space environments include solar flux at 10.7 cm, solar energetic particles flux or speed, solar wind flow pressure, electric field, and geomagnetic indices. We study the decaying orbital debris from Tracking and Impact Prediction (TIP) messages in conjuction with geoeffectiveness space environments through time epoch correlation. We found that the decaying and reentry orbital debris are triggered by space environment enhancement within at least one week before reentry. It is not necessary a transient or high energetic and severe solar storm events are needed in decaying processes. We propose that the gradual enhancement processes of space environment will cause satellite surface charging due to energetic electron and enhance drag force.

Herdiwijaya, Dhani, E-mail: dhani@as.itb.ac.id [Astronomy Division and Bosscha Observatory, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Rachman, Abdul [Space Science Center, National Institute of Aeronautics and Space, Junjunan 133, Bandung 40173 (Indonesia)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

66

Storming the State Volunteers Recruited and Trained  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

State University, in response to the Fort Collins flood of 1997. More recently, the program has played, allowed Doesken, Pielke, and research coordinator Odie Bliss, as well as other Colorado Climate Center Administration Building 3001 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, CO 80523-3001 www.colostate.edu/Depts/AES Phone:(970

67

Origin of the high energy proton component below the geomagnetic cutoff in near earth orbit  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The high flux proton component observed by AMS below the geomagnetic cutoff can be well accounted for by assuming these particles to be secondaries originating from the interaction of Cosmic Ray protons with the atmosphere. Simulation results are reported

L. Derome; M. Buenerd; A. Barrau; A. Bouchet; A. Menchaca-Rocha; T. Thuillier

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

68

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 186,627 customers remain without power. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 6 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below.

none,

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 237,030 customers remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 8 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington.

none,

2006-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

FyreStorm Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URIFrontier,Jump to:Wilmette, ILFyreStorm Inc Jump to:

71

Investigation of Stinson Beach Park storm damage and evaluation of alternative shore protection measures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An investigation was made of storm damage during the winter of 1982-83 to the National Park Service's Stinson Beach Park. The investigation included an assessment of the storm damage, evaluation of physical processes contributing to the damage, subsequent beach recovery, and the feasibility of implementing shoreline protection measure to reduce future risk. During the winter of 1982-83, the beach was almost completely denuded of sand, wave overwash damaged the foredune, vegetation on the foredune was destroyed, and backshore flooding occurred. Two structures and a parking lot were endangered as the shoreline receded. Subsequent recovery of the park beach was rapid. By January 1982 sand had moved back onshore and a beach berm was beginning to reform. The foredune and dune vegetation received the only permanent damage. Four shoreline protection alternatives were evaluated. These include no action, dune development/enhancement, construction of a rock riprap revetment, and offshore installation of artificial seaweed. The first costs (estimated costs, excluding maintenance) range from about $90,000 to $475,000. The least-cost protection measure is riprap revetment, which protects the two structures and parking lot endangered during the 1982-83 winter storms. Construction of a foredune along the entire park beach is the highest cost protection measure. If no shore protection action measures are implemented, wave overwash of the foredune can be expected to occur on the average of every 2 to 3 years, and beach degradation, similar to that during the 1982-83 winter, can be expected to occur on the average of every 10 to 12 years. 12 references, 19 figures, 18 tables.

Ecker, R.M.; Whelan, G.

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Notice of Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intent (NOI) for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction Activities under TPDES General Permit (TXR150000) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to...

73

FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Instructions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate and Instructions...

74

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 468,200 customers, including Canada, remain without power. This is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent about 16 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. See table below. The Olympic pipeline reports that the pipeline is operational; however, pipeline throughput remains reduced since one substation along the line remains without power. Complete power restoration is expected later today. There are no reports of problems regarding fuel distribution and production.

none,

2006-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

75

Pacific Northwest Storms Situation Report # 6  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Significant progress has been made in restoring power to customers in the Pacific Northwest region. Currently, 134,868 customers remain without power. The number of outages is down from 1.8 million customers who lost power following severe wind and snow storms on December 14-15, 2006. The customers without power represent less than 5 percent of customers in the affected utility service areas of Oregon and Washington. The majority of customers without power are served by Puget Sound Energy and Seattle City Light.

none,

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

76

Flood protection in the swamps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LIBRA R Y A S N COLLEGE OF TEXAS FLOOD PROTECTION IN THE SWAMPS A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical School of Texas In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Professi. onal Degree of Civil... Joining points b, o, o , e tl ~Ke is a vertical cut-off wall extending downward from the bottom of the heel at its r1verside end. It has the dual function of reducing the uplift and xeinforcing the structure against sliding, and is defined by lines...

Reesby, Raymond George

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research needs to be done to further improve our ability to forecast weather events at longer time scales. Seasonal predictions have been statistical and only recently have studies begun to use ensemble simulations and historical observations to constrain such predictions. Understanding the mechanisms of large-scale atmospheric dynamics and its local impacts remain topics of intensive research. The ability to predict extreme events and provide policy makers with this information, along with climate change and hydrologic response information, will help to guide planning to form a more resilient infrastructure in the future.

Miller, Norman L.

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

Kiran Maharjan Climate change and floods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

management processes by providing many kinds of information. The level of vulnerability of people towardsKiran Maharjan Climate change and floods Climate change and floods Vulnerability analysis of people, in the livelihoods of people. Hence, climate change is making everyone vulnerable to its impacts. Most of the people

Richner, Heinz

79

New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard February 5, 2015 - 10:55am Addthis...

80

Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk...

82

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Hidden Valley Ecological Garden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Storm Water Hidden Valley Ecological Garden Stream and Floodplain Restoration Project Report of 2005 Project Activities to Mecklenburg County Storm Water Services and Water Quality habitat is often inhibited by a lack of organic matter in the soils of restoration project sites, organic

83

Fermilab, Indiana University Horn Optimization for nuSTORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fermilab, Indiana University Horn Optimization for nuSTORM HPTW 05/21/2014 Fermilab, Indiana University Ao Liu* A. Bross, D. Neuffer Fermilab, Indiana University *www.frankliuao.com/research.html #12;Fermilab, Indiana University WHO WE ARE, WHAT WE DO nuSTORM Overview 5/23/2014 Ao Liu 1 #12;Fermilab

McDonald, Kirk

84

Geomagnetic effects on cosmic ray propagation under different conditions for Buenos Aires and Marambio, Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The geomagnetic field (Bgeo) sets a lower cutoff rigidity (Rc) to the entry of cosmic particles to Earth which depends on the geomagnetic activity. From numerical simulations of the trajectory of a proton using different models for Bgeo (performed with the MAGCOS code), we use backtracking to analyze particles arriving at the location of two nodes of the net LAGO (Large Aperture Gamma ray burst Observatory) that will be built in the near future: Buenos Aires and Marambio (Antarctica), Argentina. We determine the asymptotic trajectories and the values of Rc for different incidence directions, for each node. Simulations were done using several models for Bgeo that emulate different geomagnetic conditions. The presented results will help to make analysis of future observations of the flux of cosmic rays done at these two LAGO nodes.

Masías-Meza, Jimmy J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO(2) Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO(2) Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project was to improve the efficiency of miscible C0{sub 2} floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This objective was accomplished through experimental and modeling research in three task areas: (1) foams for selective mobility control in heterogeneous reservoirs,( 2) reduction of the amount of C0{sub 2} required in C0{sub 2} floods, and (3) low IFT processe and the possibility of C0{sub 2} flooding in fractured reservoirs. This report provides results from the three-year project for each of the three task areas.

Grigg, R.B.; Schechter, D.S.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Flood Zone Building Permits (District of Columbia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Building permits are required for new construction and development in the Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA). All development projects in SFHA must comply with Title 12 DCMR and Title 20 DCMR...

87

Matrix Acidizing Parallel Core Flooding Apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and provide this information to the field. To conduct various experiments, core flooding setups are created. The setup consists of a core holder, accumulator, overburden pump, injection pump, accumulator, pressure sensors, and a back pressure regulator...

Ghosh, Vivek

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Solar Storm Risks for Maine and the New England Electric Grid,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Storm Risks for Maine and the New England Electric Grid, and Potential Protective Measures.resilientsocieties.org #12;1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY A severe solar storm--a historical example being the Carrington Event of 1859 of the eastern United States. Severe solar storms--of the intensity of the 1921 New York Central Storm

Schrijver, Karel

90

Nondetection of impulsive radio signals from lightning in Martian dust storms using the radar receiver on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission from a Martian dust storm that they attribute to the excitation of Schumann [1952] resonances

Gurnett, Donald A.

91

Thermionic phenomena of the Earth's core and its effect on the geomagnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this model, we will show that the high-density quasi-plasma forms at the outer surface of the outer core and accounts for the geomagnetic field. The level of thermo-ionization at the outer surface of Earth's outer core is investigated...

Cao, Jiang

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

92

GEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOMAGNETIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE SOLAR FLARES DURING THE LAST HALE SOLAR CYCLE (II) Georgeta Maris@aira.astro.ro ABSTRACT/RESUME The effects of the solar energetic phenomena cover the entire terrestrial environment, from is the solar plasma that may originate from solar eruptive phenomena that take their energy from magnetic field

93

Ar Chronology of Late Pliocene and Early Pleistocene Geomagnetic and Glacial Events in Southern Argentina  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Southern Argentina Brad S. Singer1 , Laurie L. Brown2 , Jorge O. Rabassa3 , Hervé Guillou4 Cuaternario, CADIC-CONICET,Ushuaia, Tierra del Fuego, Argentina 4 Laboratoire des Sciences du Climat et de l sequence atop Cerro del Fraile, Argentina, contributed to the nascent Geomagnetic Polarity Time Scale (GPTS

Singer, Bradley S.

94

Unique observations of a geomagnetic SI+ Solar sources and associated solar wind fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, arising entirely from nonexplosive solar events. [4] Though the very first observations, by the Mariner 2Unique observations of a geomagnetic SI+ - SI- pair: Solar sources and associated solar wind- pair was closely correlated with corresponding variations in the solar wind density, while solar wind

Padmanabhan, Janardhan

95

Corotating solar wind streams and recurrent geomagnetic activity: Bruce T. Tsurutani,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

´n waves is the solar wind energy transfer mechanism. The acceleration of relativistic electrons occurs Laboratory, Oxfordshire, UK. 6 Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Toyo- kawa, JapanCorotating solar wind streams and recurrent geomagnetic activity: A review Bruce T. Tsurutani,1

Bergen, Universitetet i

96

An empirical model of magnetospheric chorus amplitude using solar wind and geomagnetic indices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hiss amplitude, also using THEMIS data [Golden et al., 2012]. Using the output of these models, we showAn empirical model of magnetospheric chorus amplitude using solar wind and geomagnetic indices D. I. The goal of this study is to design an empirical model of chorus amplitude, the output of which can be used

97

Geomagnetic control of the foF2 long-term trends A. V. Mikhailov1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in recent publications due to the problem of global climate changes (see reviews by Danilov, 1997, 1998 of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere and Radio Wave Propagation, Troitsk, Moscow Region 142092, Russia 2 National indication that F2-layer trends might be related to the long-term changes in geomagnetic activity. Further

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

98

AGENDA ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ADEP Surface Water Protection Project NPDES Storm Water Individual Permit Bi-Annual Update Public Meeting January 22, 2014 5:30-7:30 p.m. Cities of Gold Conference Center...

99

Applicability of radar observations to the prediction of storm runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Depaverne. (Yiembe~ 1967 (Yonwh) (Yea ) ABSTRACT Rainfall-runoff relaL'ronships fox 18 storms over the Little Nashita River basin in Oklahoma are studied in order to develop a method for predicting storm losses based on weather-radar observational..., for the use of their computer facilities. Credit is due Mr. M. A. Hartman, Chief Research Engineer, Agricultural Research Service, Chickasha, Oklahoma, for his assistance in obtaining treamflow and rainfall data from records maintained by the Agricultural...

Johnson, Odell Monroe

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Red Storm usage model :Version 1.12.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Red Storm is an Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) funded massively parallel supercomputer located at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The Red Storm Usage Model (RSUM) documents the capabilities and the environment provided for the FY05 Tri-Lab Level II Limited Availability Red Storm User Environment Milestone and the FY05 SNL Level II Limited Availability Red Storm Platform Milestone. This document describes specific capabilities, tools, and procedures to support both local and remote users. The model is focused on the needs of the ASC user working in the secure computing environments at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and SNL. Additionally, the Red Storm Usage Model maps the provided capabilities to the Tri-Lab ASC Computing Environment (ACE) requirements. The ACE requirements reflect the high performance computing requirements for the ASC community and have been updated in FY05 to reflect the community's needs. For each section of the RSUM, Appendix I maps the ACE requirements to the Limited Availability User Environment capabilities and includes a description of ACE requirements met and those requirements that are not met in that particular section. The Red Storm Usage Model, along with the ACE mappings, has been issued and vetted throughout the Tri-Lab community.

Jefferson, Karen L.; Sturtevant, Judith E.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Unexpected 2012 Draconid Meteor Storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An unexpected intense outburst of the Draconid meteor shower was detected by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) on October 8, 2012. The peak flux occurred at ~16:40 UT on October 8 with a maximum of 2.4 +/- 0.3 hr-1 km-2 (appropriate to meteoroid mass larger than 10-7 kg), equivalent to a ZHRmax = 9000 +/- 1000 using 5-minute intervals, using a mass distribution index of s = 1.88 +/- 0.01 as determined from the amplitude distribution of underdense Draconid echoes. This makes the out- burst among the strongest Draconid returns since 1946 and the highest flux shower since the 1966 Leonid meteor storm, assuming a constant power-law distribution holds from radar to visual meteoroid sizes. The weighted mean geocentric radiant in the time interval of 15-19h UT, Oct 8, 2012 was {\\alpha}g = 262.4 +/- 0.1 deg, {\\delta}g = 55.7 +/- 0.1 deg (epoch J2000.0). Visual observers also reported increased activity around the peak time, but with a much lower rate (ZHR 200), suggesting that the magnitude-cumulative num- ber r...

Ye, Quanzhi; Brown, Peter G; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D; Weryk, Robert J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Drops, Slugs, and FloodingDrops, Slugs, and Flooding in PEM Fuel Cellsin PEM Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drops, Slugs, and FloodingDrops, Slugs, and Flooding in PEM Fuel Cellsin PEM Fuel Cells A Study Fuel CellBackground: PEM Fuel Cell Graphic by Marc Marshall, Schatz Energy Research Center http ProjectDrag Project SetupSetup MFC (H2, N2 Inputs) Bubbler Current Humidity Sensor Modified PEM Fuel Cell

Petta, Jason

103

A new method to estimate annual solar wind parameters and contributions of different solar wind structures to geomagnetic activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we study two sets of local geomagnetic indices from 26 stations using the principal component (PC) and the independent component (IC) analysis methods. We demonstrate that the annually averaged indices can be accurately represented as linear combinations of two first components with weights systematically depending on latitude. We show that the annual contributions of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and high speed streams (HSSs) to geomagnetic activity are highly correlated with the first and second IC. The first and second ICs are also found to be very highly correlated with the strength of the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) and the solar wind speed, respectively, because solar wind speed is the most important parameter driving geomagnetic activity during HSSs while IMF strength dominates during CMEs. These results help in better understanding the long-term driving of geomagnetic activity and in gaining information about the long-term evolution of solar wind parameters and the different sol...

Holappa, Lauri; Asikainen, Timo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Los Alamos National Laboratory describes storm damage to environmental...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Email For years, sampling has shown no health risks due to floods and associated sediment in the canyons. Lab experts will be working in the coming weeks to collect samples of...

105

A methodology for forecasting carbon dioxide flooding performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A methodology was developed for forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) flooding performance quickly and reliably. The feasibility of carbon dioxide flooding in the Dollarhide Clearfork "AB" Unit was evaluated using the methodology. This technique is very...

Marroquin Cabrera, Juan Carlos

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Inland and coastal flooding: developments in prediction and prevention  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of meteorological causes of floods, hydraulics of flood water movement and coastal wind­wave-surge. Probabilistic effects of climatic trends on flooding, appropriate planning of rapidly growing urban areas could mitigate factors, namely, the historical advantages of these locations for trade and the unstable tendency of large

Hunt, Julian

107

Fuel cell flooding detection and correction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method and apparatus for monitoring an H.sub.2 -O.sub.2 PEM fuel cells to detect and correct flooding. The pressure drop across a given H.sub.2 or O.sub.2 flow field is monitored and compared to predetermined thresholds of unacceptability. If the pressure drop exists a threshold of unacceptability corrective measures are automatically initiated.

DiPierno Bosco, Andrew (Rochester, NY); Fronk, Matthew Howard (Honeoye Falls, NY)

2000-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

108

Caring for Important Papers after a Flood  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-003 6-06 Extension Family Development and Resource Management Specialists The Texas A&M University System If your important papers have been damaged by flooding or rainwater, you might be able to save them by following these instructions...

FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Mitigating floods : reconstructing Lives : rehabilitating Thatta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pakistan was struck by floods in July 2010, the effects of which left 20.36 million people affected and 1.9 million homes damaged or destroyed'. In the province of Sindh in Pakistan, most of the affected population of the ...

Gul, Marium

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

Lightning location characteristics and vertical structure analysis of isolated storm cells in the TOGA COARE region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

producing storm cells, and non-lightning producing cells over the tropical oceans. The characteristics of lightning locations with respect to radar reflectivity were also examined. Lightning characteristics of flashes associated with TOGA COARE storm cells...

Barnaby, Stephen Andrew

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - agricultural storm runoff Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

18 O, and Silica Dynamics for Two Storms at Five... flow were due primarily to new rainwater proportions of storm ... Source: McDonnell, Jeffrey J. - Department of Forest...

113

Spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance in the forested landscape of Ouachita Mountains, Arkansas and Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large-extent ice storms have received relatively little attention from researchers. This research investigates the effects of abiotic and biotic factors on the spatial patterns of ice storm disturbance on a forested landscape. This investigation...

Isaacs, Rachel E.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

114

Integrated impact analysis of yellow-dust storms : a regional case study in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dust storm is a meteorological event that is caused by strong winds and proceeds from arid and semi-arid regions, transporting a thick cloud of fine sediments. In China, the sediments of dust storms mainly come from ...

Ai, Ning, 1978-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm EI2 Insulation Helps Anxious Pooch Find Calm in the Storm Photo of a dog sitting on a bed or couch with a stuffed toy in...

116

Impact of a major ice storm on an old-growth hardwood forest  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forestière, produc- tivité forestière. [Traduit par la Rédaction] Hooper et al. 75 Introduction Ice storms litter produced by ice storms is a substantial, yet little studied, pool of energy, car- bonImpact of a major ice storm on an old-growth hardwood forest Michael C. Hooper, Ken Arii

Lechowicz, Martin J.

117

Improvement in urban storm water management: analysing the innovation process through the three  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SOYER 1 Improvement in urban storm water management: analysing the innovation process through to associate hard sciences and social sciences. Keywords Storm water management; observatories; innovation management is a good example: inefficient water networks in the city (regarding waste water as well as storm

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

118

Greenland's Pressure Drag and the Atlantic Storm Track THOMAS JUNG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenland's Pressure Drag and the Atlantic Storm Track THOMAS JUNG European Centre for Medium of Greenland on the Northern Hemisphere wintertime circulation are discussed. Inviscid pressure drag on Greenland's slopes, calculated from reanalysis data, is related to circulation patterns. Greenland lies

119

QUICK GUIDES UCF 2010-1 Caring for Storm-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

utility lines." Downed utility lines should be reported to utility companies or 911 operators. He adds a major storm, city officials, utility workers and private tree care firms must first focus on dealing· with a listing in the phone book, usually under "Tree Service." Ask to see current certificates of insurance

120

Record-breaking Storm Activity on Uranus in 2014  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In spite of an expected decline in convective activity following the 2007 equinox of Uranus, eight sizable storms were detected on the planet with the near-infrared camera NIRC2, coupled to the adaptive optics system, on the 10-m W. M. Keck telescope on UT 5 and 6 August 2014. All storms were on Uranus's northern hemisphere, including the brightest storm ever seen in this planet at 2.2 $\\mu$m, reflecting 30% as much light as the rest of the planet at this wavelength. The storm was at a planetocentric latitude of $\\sim$15$^{\\circ}$N and reached altitudes of $\\sim$330 mbar, well above the regular uppermost cloud layer (methane-ice) in the atmosphere. A cloud feature at a latitude of 32$^{\\circ}$N, that was deeper in the atmosphere (near $\\sim$2 bar), was later seen by amateur astronomers. We also present images returned from our HST ToO program, that shows both of these cloud features. We further report the first detection of a long-awaited haze over the north polar region.

de Pater, Imke; Fry, P M; Hammel, Heidi B; Baranec, Christoph; Sayanagi, Kunio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM in Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations KAUR TUTTELBERG Master of Science Thesis Carlo reactor physics criticality calculations. This is achieved by optimising the number of neutron for more efficient Monte Carlo reactor physics calculations, giving results with errors that can

Haviland, David

122

Flood analyses for Department of Energy Y-12, ORNL and K-25 Plants. Flood analyses in support of flood emergency planning  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The study involved defining the flood potential and local rainfall depth and duration data for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and K-25 plants. All three plants are subject to flooding from the Clinch River. In addition, the Y-12 plant is subject to flooding from East Fork Poplar and Bear Creeks, the ORNL plant from Whiteoak Creek and Melton Branch, and the K-25 plant from Poplar Creek. Determination of flood levels included consideration of both rainfall events and postulated failures of Norris and Melton Hill Dams in seismic events.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

9A.2 FORECAST CHALLENGES AT THE NWS STORM PREDICTION CENTER RELATING TO THE FREQUENCY OF FAVORABLE SEVERE STORM ENVIRONMENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the performance of convective watches issued by the NOAA Storm Prediction Center (SPC layer bulk wind shear, are linked to SPC convective watches and verification metrics forecast performance. 2. SPC CONVECTIVE WATCHES A convective watch is issued by the SPC

124

Imbibition flooding with CO?-enriched water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Imbibition of water into the pore space of the matrix is the dominant oil production factor in fractured reservoirs. Conventional water and gas injection methods fail to improve oil recovery in these reservoirs because of fluid channeling through... the fracture system. The largest fractured reservoirs in Texas are tight, dual porosity limestone reservoirs such as the Austin Chalk. Imbibition flooding is limited in tight fractured reservoirs because of low countercurrent water-oil imbibition flow rates...

Grape, Steven George

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Flash flooding events in south central Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Heights in Peters. (Fran Henry, 1981 I. TABLE 1. Station information for Del Rio, Stephenville, and Victoria (from Henry, 1981). Station Name Station Number Call Elevation Letters m Latitude Lon itude Del Rio 72261 Stephenville 72Z60 Victoria... Totals Index (TTI) was computed for each rawinsonde station using the following formula: 16 TABLE 5. Neteorological elements used to determine the state of the atmosphere orior to flash flooding events over South Central Texas in a triangular area...

Utley, Tom Wilson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

126

Scale-up of miscible flood processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying the interactions of physical mechanisms that control the scaling behavior of miscible floods. Displacement performance in a miscible flood is the result of a complex set of competing and interacting mechanisms. Phase behavior is of fundamental importance because the transfer of components from the oil to the injected fluid (as in most CO{sub 2} floods) or from the injected fluid to the oil (as in rich gas floods) can generate mixture compositions with displacement properties very different from those of pure CO{sub 2} and original oil. The goal of this project, is to make more accurate quantitative predictions of the impact of nonuniform flow, crossflow and phase behavior in flows in heterogeneous reservoir rocks. In past reports, we have discussed the instabilities arising from unfavorable mobility ratios that occur during injection of a solvent such as CO{sub 2}. In this report, two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computations by a particle-tracking technique are compared for unstable displacements in homogeneous porous media, with and without gravity. In homogeneous porous media without gravity, 2D fingering patterns and the length of the transition zone are nearly the same as those obtained in 3D displacements. When gravity is added, however, calculated gravity tongues and fingering patterns can be very different when viscous and gravity forces are of comparable magnitude. We summarize results obtained by Ph.D. student Hamdi Tchelepi concerning 2D and 3D fingering in homogeneous media, and we compare displacements with and without gravity segregation. The computations show conclusively that there are some situations in which 2D simulations reproduce 3D behavior well and others for which they do not.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Hurricanes are strong storms that cause life-and property-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

National Red Cross | Stock No. 658543 1/10 J Water--at least a 3-day supply; one gallon per person per day Weather Service (NWS). J Check your disaster supplies and replace or restock as needed. J Bring, heavy rains and other conditions that impact the U.S. For more information on flood insurance, please

Varela, Carlos

128

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Pantex Facility 10-Year Natural Phenomena Flood Hazard Analysis Presented by and October, 2011 Presentation Outline I. Introductions II. Pantex III. 10 Year Update IV. Final...

129

Determining Hydrological Controls on Flood Frequency | U.S. DOE...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

increasing aridity, variability increases. In contrast, BFI was found to exert a second-order control on flood frequency. Higher BFI, meaning higher contributions of subsurface...

130

Willows Aid Flood Recovery in Los Alamos Desert  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Associate Directorate of Environmental Programs (ADEP) has been busy with various flood recovery activities since last fall. 

131

Climate Change and Flood Operations in the Sacramento Basin, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Washington, D.C. : Climate Change Science Program andProgress in incorporating climate change into management ofJULY 2011 Climate Change and Flood Operations in the

Willis, Ann D.; Lund, Jay R.; Townsley, Edwin S.; Faber, Beth A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Generation of graphitic soot by an urban fire storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have obtained samples of aerosols deposited during the Hiroshima fire storm that was initiated by the atomic bomb detonated on August 6, 1945. These particles, which we extracted from streaks of black rain found on a plaster wall, are being studied. Initial studies show that the artifact appears to contain aerosol particles that may be representative of the aerosols that may lead to a nuclear winter. Aerosol generation in urban fire storms have been considered by studying these particles. The presence of graphite as a component of these particles is suggested by electron photomicrographs and has been confirmed using Raman spectroscopy, surface ionization mass spectroscopy, and electron scattering for chemical analysis. Several hypotheses are being considered to explain the presence of this form of carbon. Among these are generation in sooty clouds, in raindrops, in the interior of the first storm, and on the wall surface itself. The distribution of particle sizes suggests that the residence time of particles in the atmosphere would be long if they were not removed by rainout. An experimental and theoretical examination of the conditions necessary to produce graphitic soot is in progress.

Fields, D.E.; Cole, L.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Did geomagnetic activity challenge electric power reliability during solar cycle 23? Evidence from the PJM regional transmission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Did geomagnetic activity challenge electric power reliability during solar cycle 23? Evidence from through 30 April 2004. During this time period PJM coordinated the movement of wholesale electricity of challenged reliability is the incidence of out-of-economic-merit order dispatching due to adverse reactive

Schrijver, Karel

134

Evaluation of charred porous polymers as a method of storm water pollution prevention for shipyards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most shipyards have viable Best Management Practices (BMPs) in place to mitigate the transport of heavy metals to surface waters by storm water. Despite aggressive efforts to control storm water, shipyards have come under increased regulatory pressure to further reduce concentrations of heavy metals, such as copper and nickel, in storm water discharges. The tightening of regulatory requirements warrants research into additional BMPs. The objectives of this research project were to: (1) determine the feasibility of placing a replaceable cartridge of adsorbent material within a storm water collection system; and (2) evaluate two commercially available charred porous polymer adsorbents for the removal of heavy metals from storm water. The results indicated that there are commercially available storm water treatment components which could be adapted to house a cartridge of porous adsorbent material.

Clark, G.E.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Topeka, Kansas, Flood Damage Reduction Project 30 January 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with and approved by the necessary resource agencies. The long-term environmental and cultural consequences of planTopeka, Kansas, Flood Damage Reduction Project 30 January 2009 Abstract: The recommended plan provides for flood risk management and restores the reliability of the Topeka, Kansas, Levee System located

US Army Corps of Engineers

136

Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods Christopher P. Konrad  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tracer particles and bed load samplers have demonstrated that partial entrain- ment rather than completePartial entrainment of gravel bars during floods Christopher P. Konrad U.S. Geological Survey a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect

Montgomery, David R.

137

Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

insight into the gamut of shallow water waves, including kinematic, diffusion, dynamic, and gravity wavesDam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad Taher-shamsi2 ; and Ampar V. Shetty3 Abstract: An analytical model of flood wave propagation is used

Ponce, V. Miguel

138

Environmental Impact Statement Truckee Meadows Flood Control Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAFT Environmental Impact Statement for the Truckee Meadows Flood Control Project Nevada General Reevaluation Report Volume I ­ Draft Environmental Impact Statement prepared by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District May 2013 #12;#12;DRAFT Environmental Impact Statement for the Truckee Meadows Flood

US Army Corps of Engineers

139

A Mechanistic Model for Flooding in Vertical Tubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In a counter-current two-phase flow system, flooding can be defined as the onset of flow reversal of the liquid component which results in an upward co-current flow. Flooding in the surge line of pressurized water reactors poses a significant...

Hogan, Kevin J.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

140

Evaluation of Low-E Storm Windows in the PNNL Lab Homes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines the performance of exterior and interior low-e storm panels with a controlled whole home experimental design using PNNL's Lab Homes. Summing the estimated annual average heating and cooling savings, the installation of low-e storm panels resulted in approximately 10% annual energy savings. The results of the experiment will be used to determine and validate performance of low-e storm windows over double pane clear glass windows in a whole home setting.

Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Impact of microphysical parameterizations on simulated storm evolution and remotely-sensed characteristics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the storm structure. The dynamics, kinematics, thermodynamics, and the distribution of water in the storm were strongly altered by the inclusion of ice processes in the simulation of a supercell storm (Johnson et al., 1993). More importantly, the ice—phase... cover extensive areas and play important roles in determining the overall heat budgets. Moreover, the importance of ice-phase microphysics increases the longer a system persists (Tao et al., 1989a). Hence, a proper representation of the large, long...

Hristova-Veleva, Svetla M.

142

Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta March 27, 2014 | Tags:...

143

Capacity building for flood management in developing countries under climate change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Climate change will bring new flood threats, especially in developing countries. In addition, the contexts surrounding flood management have been shifting globally. If developing countries… (more)

Katsuhama, Yoshihiro

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Tracking Severe Weather Storms in Doppler Radar Images D. Cheng 1 , R. E. Mercer 1 , J. L. Barron 1 and P. Joe 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

meteorologist's perception. 1 Introduction Because of the devastation caused by severe storms, the forecasting we have developed an automatic storm tracking system. Tracking past storm movement is a prerequisite to forecasting future storm movement and minimizing property damage. Physically, a storm is an area of updraft

Barron, John

145

Techniques for estimating flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clark Method, modified slightly, was used to develop a synthetic dimensionless hydrograph that can be used to estimate flood hydrographs for ungaged urban watersheds. Application of the technique results in a typical (average) flood hydrograph for a given peak discharge. Input necessary to apply the technique is an estimate of basin lagtime and the recurrence interval peak discharge. Equations for this purpose were obtained from a recent nationwide study on flood frequency in urban watersheds. A regression equation was developed which relates flood volumes to drainage area size, basin lagtime, and peak discharge. This equation is useful where storage of floodwater may be a part of design or flood prevention. 6 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

Stricker, V.A.; Sauer, V.B.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Building America's Low-e Storm Window Adoption Program Plan (FY2014)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Low emissivity (low-e) storm windows/panels appear to hold promise for effectively reducing existing home heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) consumption. Due to the affordability of low-e storm windows and the large numbers of existing homes that have low-performing single-pane or double-pane clear windows, a tremendous opportunity exists to provide energy savings by transforming the low-e storm window market and increasing market adoption. This report outlines U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building America’s planned market transformation activities in support of low-e storm window adoption during fiscal year (FY) 2014.

Cort, Katherine A.

2013-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

File:Texas NOI for Storm Water Discharges Associated with Construction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

title environmental protection Author Janet Wyman Storm Water and Pretreatment Team Wastewater Permitting Section Water Quality Division TCEQ Texas Commission on Environmental...

148

Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation Handbook  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation" (McEwen, 1994: 359). Lawler (1992) recognised that little was known about the downstream change. It is suggested that downstream change in discharge is best represented as a power function in terms of channel

Birmingham, University of

149

NuSTORM {\\mu} Ring -- Design and Injection Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The design of the NuSTORM muon production beam line and storage ring is discussed. The facility includes a pion production target station with a pion collection horn and transport into a straight section of a storage ring. {\\pi} decay within that straight section provides {\\mu}'s that are stored within the ring for subsequent decay providing precision electron and muon neutrino beams. The ring and transport designs are described and optimized. Genetic Algorithm optimization of the horn and transport into the ring has been performed, providing a significant increase in intensity

Neuffer, David; Bross, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

STORM/PALM - Super Resolution Fluorescence Microscope | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromisingStoriesSANDIA REPORTSORNRecoverynaturalSTORM/PALM - Super

151

Managing Storm Aftermath in Alabama | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department of Energy Low-TemperatureEnergy Maine09 BalanceStorage andManaging Storm

152

Storm Lake I Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g GrantAtlas (PACAOpen Energy InformationStony Creek Wind FarmStorm

153

A NEW GENERATION CHEMICAL FLOODING SIMULATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. In this final report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 of the project.

Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Mojdeh Delshad

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Scale-up of miscible flood processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Flooding Experiments and Modeling for Improved Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Countercurrent two-phase flow and “flooding” phenomena in light water reactor systems are being investigated experimentally and analytically to improve reactor safety of current and future reactors. The aspects that will be better clarified are the effects of condensation and tube inclination on flooding in large diameter tubes. The current project aims to improve the level of understanding of flooding mechanisms and to develop an analysis model for more accurate evaluations of flooding in the pressurizer surge line of a Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR). Interest in flooding has recently increased because Countercurrent Flow Limitation (CCFL) in the AP600 pressurizer surge line can affect the vessel refill rate following a small break LOCA and because analysis of hypothetical severe accidents with the current flooding models in reactor safety codes shows that these models represent the largest uncertainty in analysis of steam generator tube creep rupture. During a hypothetical station blackout without auxiliary feedwater recovery, should the hot leg become voided, the pressurizer liquid will drain to the hot leg and flooding may occur in the surge line. The flooding model heavily influences the pressurizer emptying rate and the potential for surge line structural failure due to overheating and creep rupture. The air-water test results in vertical tubes are presented in this paper along with a semi-empirical correlation for the onset of flooding. The unique aspects of the study include careful experimentation on large-diameter tubes and an integrated program in which air-water testing provides benchmark knowledge and visualization data from which to conduct steam-water testing.

Solmos, M., Hogan, K.J., VIerow, K.

2008-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate-driven increases in storm frequency simplify kelp forest food webs J A R R E T T E . B Y R in the diversity and complexity of food webs of giant kelp forests, one of the most productive habitats on Earth. We demonstrate this by linking natural variation in storms with measured changes in kelp forest food

Cardinale, Bradley J.

157

UC Santa Cruz Storm Water SPRING 2010 Volume 2, Number 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Environmental Programs Assistant for the UCSC Storm Water Management Program http://cleanwater.ucsc. edu Contact us at: cleanwater@ucsc.edu or (831) 459-4520 Storm Water Management on Construction Sites Control Plan (ESCP). The ESCP must use all applicable Best Management Practices from Appendix E. Appendix

California at Santa Cruz, University of

158

ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/11 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

159

Water Quality and Hydrologic Performance of a Porous Asphalt Pavement as a Storm-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

examined the functionality of a porous pavement storm-water management system in coastal New Hampshire headings: Stormwater management; Runoff; Porous media; Pavements; Cold regions; Best Management Practice; Water quality; Water treatment. Author keywords: Storm-water management; Runoff; Porous pavements; Cold

160

ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. These activities and structural improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs9/14/10 1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal. Permittee (Agency Name): University of California Santa Cruz 2. Contact Person: _Courtney Trask, Storm Water

California at Santa Cruz, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Storm Water Management through Infiltration Trenches1 Bhagu R. Chahar1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. An infiltration trench alone or in combination with other storm10 water management practice is a key element and the drain time of trench, which is a key15 parameter in operation of storm water management practice systems (SUDS), water sensitive38 urban design (WSUD), best management practices (BMP) or low impact urban

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

162

ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2013 to June 30, 2014 (Year 5) The University of California at Santa Cruz's Storm Water Management improvements are referred to as Best Management Practices (BMPs). BMPs will be updated as appropriate1 ANNUAL REPORT General Permit for the Discharger of Storm Water from Small Municipal Separate

California at Santa Cruz, University of

163

Using CASA IP1 to Diagnose Kinematic and Microphysical Interactions in a Convective Storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

bulk hydrometeor identification and dual-Doppler wind retrievals. Comparisons are made with the nearby-band radars are used to observe a convective storm. A fuzzy logic hydrometeor identification algorithm the type of echoes in the network based on storm identification al- gorithms, then allocates radars

Rutledge, Steven

164

STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN BUILDING B51 AND BEVATRON DEMOLITION PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORM WATER POLLUTION PREVENTION PLAN FOR: BUILDING B51 AND BEVATRON DEMOLITION PROJECT PROJECT NO;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) Building B51 and Bevatron Demolition Project Lawrence............................................................................................300-3 300.4 Project Schedule/Water Pollution Control Schedule

165

Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National Parks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assessment of Inundation Risk from Sea Level Rise and Storm Surge in Northeastern Coastal National of inundation risk from sea level rise and storm surge in northeastern coastal national parks. Journal of Coastal Research, 00(0), 000­000. Coconut Creek (Florida), ISSN 0749-0208. Sea level rise and an increase

Wang, Y.Q. "Yeqiao"

166

9.5 SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF TORNADIC NEAR-STORM ENVIRONMENTS BY CONVECTIVE MODE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Thompson* , Bryan T. Smith, and Andrew R. Dean NOAA/NWS/Storm Prediction Center Norman OK Patrick T. Marsh/NWS/NCEP/Storm Prediction Center, 120 David L. Boren Blvd., Norman, OK 73072; email: Richard.Thompson@noaa.gov. 1 #12

167

TRMM precipitation bias in extreme storms in South America Kristen L. Rasmussen,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRMM precipitation bias in extreme storms in South America Kristen L. Rasmussen,1 Stella L. Choi,1 June 2013; published 9 July 2013. [1] Deep convective storms in subtropical South America are some and subtropical South America. Recent studies have suggested that the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM

Houze Jr., Robert A.

168

Quality assurance flood source and method of making  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a is an improved flood source, and method of making the same, which emits an evenly distributed flow of energy from a gamma emitting radionuclide dispersed throughout the volume of the flood source. The flood source is formed by filling a bottom pan with a mix of epoxy resin with cobalt-57, preferably at 10 to 20 millicuries and then adding a hardener. The pan is secured to a flat, level surface to prevent the pan from warping and to act as a heat sink for removal of heat from the pan during the curing of the resin-hardener mixture.

Fisher, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Alexander, David L [West Richland, WA; Satz, Stanley [Surfside, FL

2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

169

Flood control reservoir operations for conditions of limited storage capacity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Therefore, if the entire flood control capacity of a reservoir is available, only an extremely severe flood event would require the implementation of the EOS for most reservoir projects, and thus the bulk of the research has been focused on how to manage... operations objectives. In other words, the REOS provide a set of rules that reflect the risk of flooding upstream as well as downstream of the dams. The USACE and other reservoir management agencies may use the methodology proposed in this study...

Rivera Ramirez, Hector David

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Reliability Aware Flooding Algorithm (RAFA) In Wireless Multi-hop Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Reliability Aware Flooding Algorithm (RAFA) In Wireless Multi-hop Networks Youndo Lee, Yoonbo the reliability of flooding, by using the retransmission mechanism. The retransmission policy of RBP is to perform on the retransmission- based flooding mechanism. RBP improves the reliability of flooding using the knowledge about

171

The role of woodland in flood control: a landscape perspective T.R. Nisbet1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as part of a whole-catchment approach to sustainable flood management. Keywords: Woodland; water use; soil-125. IALE(UK), Oxford.] Abstract Sustainable flood management is increasingly looking to the role infiltration; hydraulic roughness; sustainable flood management Introduction A series of major floods across

172

SPECIAL EDITION: FLOOD RECOVERY Thursday, September 22, 2011 | Fall 2011: Volume 2, Issue 5  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organizations wishing to publicize their events and service opportunities should e-mail all relevant details of Toiletries, Clothing, and Non-Perishable Food Clothing Drive CHOW Warehouse Needs Volunteers Flood Relief and Food Drive for Flood Victims Arts Benefit Show for Flood Relief GIM UNICEF Toy Drive for Flood

Suzuki, Masatsugu

173

Azimuthal modulation of cosmic ray flux as an effect of geomagnetic field in the ARGO-YBJ experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The geomagnetic field causes not only the East-West effect on the primary cosmic rays but also affects the trajectories of the secondary charged particles in the shower, causing their lateral distribution to be stretched along certain directions. Thus both the density of the secondaries near the shower axis and the trigger efficiency of a detector array decrease. The effect depends on the age and on the direction of the showers, thus involving the measured azimuthal distribution. Here the non-uniformity of the azimuthal distribution of the reconstructed events in the ARGO-YBJ experiment is deeply investigated for different zenith angles on the light of this effect. The influence of the geomagnetic field as well as geometric effects are studied by means of a Monte Carlo simulation.

Bernardini, P; He, H H; Mancarella, G; Perrone, L; Surdo, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Text-Alternative Version of Building America Webinar: Low-e Storms: The Next "Big Thing" in Window Retrofits  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Low-e Storms:  The Next “Big Thing” in Window RetrofitsOfficial Webinar Transcript (September 9, 2014)

175

The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity (SSEO): Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity (SSEO): Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous Prediction Center, Norman, OK Introduction The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) has developed a 7-member-scale models already available operationally to SPC. · provides a practical alternative to a formal storm

176

Flood survival: Getting a hydro plant back on line  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Remmel Dam and Hydro Plant of Arkansas Power and Light Company was flooded on May 20, 1990. This article describes the teamwork and innovation that went into restoring the powerhouse in a short amount of time.

Weatherford, C.W. (Entergy Services, Inc., Little Rock, AR (United States))

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Multiobjective Design and Optimization of Polymer Flood Performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The multiobjective genetic algorithm can be used to optimize two conflicting objectives, oil production and polymer utility factor in polymer flood design. This approach provides a set of optimal solutions which can be considered as trade-off curve...

Ekkawong, Peerapong

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

178

Chilean glacial lake outburst flood impacts on dam construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Four Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF) occurred in the Colonia Glacier (Northern Patagonia Icefield, Chile) from April 2008 to March 2009. Lago Cachet 2 emptied four times producing a maximum excess discharge in the ...

Tauro, Flavia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Generation of graphitic soots by an urban fire storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have obtained samples of aerosols deposited during the Hiroshima fire storm that was initiated by the atomic bomb detonated on August 6, 1945, from streaks of ''black rain'' found on a plaster wall. The artifact appears to contain aerosol particles that may be representative of the aerosols that may lead to a ''nuclear winter'' (Turco 1983). Gamma spectroscopy measurements indicate the presence of naturally-occurring radionuclides K-40, Ra-226, Ra-228, Th-232, and Th-234, along with the fission product, Cs-137. Sooty particles of varying sizes have been detected using optical photomicrography and examined using x-ray induced x-ray fluorescence. The elements Ca, Sr, Ba, Fe, and Zn, have been detected, and exhibit elemental composition ratios representative of Hiroshima soil. Particle composition and size studies indicate that the particle sizes have a mean diameter of 1.8 microns, and that 30% are less than 1 micron in mean diameter.

Fields, D.E.; Cole, L.L.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

A NEW GENERATION CHEMICAL FLOODING SIMULATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. We have made significant progress on all three tasks and we are on schedule on both technical and budget. In this report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 for the first six months of the second year of the project.

Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Mojdeh Delshad

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Flooding and conservation in the Albuquerque bosque  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the conservation of the Middle Rio Grande bosque has grown rapidly in the last decade. During that period, private organizations as well as governmental agencies have sharpened their focus on the issue, and in doing so have contributed to the development of a bosque biological management plan for the river reach between Cochiti Dam and Elephant Butte Reservoir. This increased regional attention reflects a growing national and international concern about human impacts on fluvial processes in large floodplain rivers. Because they impound large amounts of a river`s discharge and interfere with its natural flooding regime, dams can seriously disrupt the relationship between river basin hydrology and riparian zone functioning. In western North America, this interference reduces cottonwood germination and survival and, as will be discussed, negatively affects key ecological processes in riparian communities. In this paper the authors first review how the decoupling of basin hydrology from riparian forest processes has begun to affect the integrity of the Middle Rio Grande bosque ecosystem. Then they propose an alternative management scheme, with emphasis on the Albuquerque bosque, that centers on restoring its ecosystem functioning.

Crawford, C.S.; Molles, M.C. Jr.; Valett, H.M. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Biology

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

182

The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant`s electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant`s protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well.

Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States)] [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)] [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Nevada Test Site probable maximum flood study, part of US Geological Survey flood potential and debris hazard study, Yucca Mountain Site for US Department of Energy, Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Geological Survey (USGS), as part of the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP), is conducting studies at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The purposes of these studies are to provide hydrologic and geologic information to evaluate the suitability of Yucca Mountain for development as a high-level nuclear waste repository, and to evaluate the ability of the mined geologic disposal system (MGDS) to isolate the waste in compliance with regulatory requirements. In particular, the project is designed to acquire information necessary for the Department of Energy (DOE) to demonstrate in its environmental impact statement (EIS) and license application whether the MGDS will meet the requirements of federal regulations 10 CFR Part 60, 10 CFR Part 960, and 40 CFR Part 191. Complete study plans for this part of the project were prepared by the USGS and approved by the DOE in August and September of 1990. The US Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) was selected by the USGS as a contractor to provide probable maximum flood (PMF) magnitudes and associated inundation maps for preliminary engineering design of the surface facilities at Yucca Mountain. These PMF peak flow estimates are necessary for successful waste repository design and construction. The PMF technique was chosen for two reasons: (1) this technique complies with ANSI requirements that PMF technology be used in the design of nuclear related facilities (ANSI/ANS, 1981), and (2) the PMF analysis has become a commonly used technology to predict a ``worst possible case`` flood scenario. For this PMF study, probable maximum precipitation (PMP) values were obtained for a local storm (thunderstorm) PMP event. These values were determined from the National Weather Services`s Hydrometeorological Report No. 49 (HMR 49).

Bullard, K.L.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Storm-water management for construction activities. Developing pollution prevention plans and best management practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manual provides industrial facilities with comprehensive guidance on the development of storm water pollution prevention plans and identification of appropriate Best Management Practices (BMPs). It provides technical assistance and support to all facilities subject to pollution prevention requirements established under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for storm water point source discharges. EPA's storm water program significantly expands the scope and application of the existing NPDES permit system for municipal and industrial process wastewater discharges. It emphasizes pollution prevention and reflects a heavy reliance on BMPs to reduce pollutant loadings and improve water quality. The manual provides essential guidance in both of these areas.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Storm-water management for industrial activities. Developing pollution prevention plans and best management practices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manual provides industrial facilities with comprehensive guidance on the development of storm water pollution prevention plans and identification of appropriate Best Management Practices (BMPs). It provides technical assistance and support to all facilities subject to pollution prevention requirements established under National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permits for storm water point source discharges. EPA's storm water program significantly expands the scope and application of the existing NPDES permit system for municipal and industrial process wastewater discharges. It emphasizes pollution prevention and reflects a heavy reliance on BMPs to reduce pollutant loadings and improve water quality. The manual provides essential guidance in both of these areas.

Not Available

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

POISON SPIDER FIELD CHEMICAL FLOOD PROJECT, WYOMING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reservoir engineering and geologic study concluded that approximate 7,852,000 bbls of target oil exits in Poison Spider. Field pore volume, OOIP, and initial oil saturation are defined. Potential injection water has a total dissolved solids content of 1,275 mg/L with no measurable divalent cations. If the Lakota water consistently has no measurable cations, the injection water does not require softening to dissolve alkali. Produced water total dissolved solids were 2,835 mg/L and less than 20 mg/L hardness as the sum of divalent cations. Produced water requires softening to dissolve chemicals. Softened produced water was used to dissolve chemicals in these evaluations. Crude oil API gravity varies across the field from 19.7 to 22.2 degrees with a dead oil viscosity of 95 to 280 cp at 75 F. Interfacial tension reductions of up to 21,025 fold (0.001 dyne/cm) were developed with fifteen alkaline-surfactant combinations at some alkali concentration. An additional three alkaline-surfactant combinations reduced the interfacial tension greater than 5,000 fold. NaOH generally produced the lowest interfacial tension values. Interfacial tension values of less than 0.021 dyne/cm were maintained when the solutions were diluted with produced water to about 60%. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} when mixed with surfactants did not reduce interfacial tension values to levels at which incremental oil can be expected. NaOH without surfactant interfacial tension reduction is at a level where some additional oil might be recovered. Most of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions producing ultra low interfacial tension gave type II- phase behavior. Only two solutions produced type III phase behavior. Produced water dilution resulted in maintenance of phase type for a number of solutions at produced water dilutions exceeding 80% dilution. The average loss of phase type occurred at 80% dilution. Linear corefloods were performed to determine relative permeability end points, chemical-rock compatibility, polymer injectivity, dynamic chemical retention by rock, and recommended injected polymer concentration. Average initial oil saturation was 0.796 Vp. Produced water injection recovered 53% OOIP leaving an average residual oil saturation of 0.375 Vp. Poison Spider rock was strongly water-wet with a mobility ratio for produced water displacing the 280 cp crude oil of 8.6. Core was not sensitive to either alkali or surfactant injection. Injectivity increased 60 to 80% with alkali plus surfactant injection. Low and medium molecular weight polyacrylamide polymers (Flopaam 3330S and Flopaam 3430S) dissolved in either an alkaline-surfactant solution or softened produced water injected and flowed through Poison Spider rock. Recommended injected polyacrylamide concentration is 2,100 mg/L for both polymers for a unit mobility ratio. Radial corefloods were performed to evaluate oil recovery efficiency of different chemical solutions. Waterflood oil recovery averaged 46.4 OOIP and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery averaged an additional 18.1% OIP for a total of 64.6% OOIP. Oil cut change due to injection of a 1.5 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 0.05 wt% Petrostep B-100 plus 0.05 wt% Stepantan AS1216 plus 2100 mg/L Flopaam 3430S was from 2% to a peak of 23.5%. Additional study might determine the impact on oil recovery of a lower polymer concentration. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood field implementation outline report was written.

Douglas Arnell; Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Bridging the Gap between Chemical Flooding and Independent Oil Producers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ten Kanas oil reservoirs/leases were studied through geological and engineering analysis to assess the potential performance of chemical flooding to recover oil. Reservoirs/leases that have been efficiently waterflooded have the highest performance potential for chemical flooding. Laboratory work to identify efficient chemical systems and to test the oil recovery performance of the systems was the major effort of the project. Efficient chemical systems were identified for crude oils from nine of the reservoirs/leases. Oil recovery performance of the identified chemical systems in Berea sandstone rocks showed 90+ % recoveries of waterflood residual oil for seven crude oils. Oil recoveries increased with the amount of chemical injected. Recoveries were less in Indiana limestone cores. One formulation recovered 80% of the tertiary oil in the limestone rock. Geological studies for nine of the oil reservoirs are presented. Pleasant Prairie, Trembley, Vinland and Stewart Oilfields in Kansas were the most favorable of the studied reservoirs for a pilot chemical flood from geological considerations. Computer simulations of the performance of a laboratory coreflood were used to predict a field application of chemical flooding for the Trembley Oilfield. Estimates of field applications indicated chemical flooding is an economically viable technology for oil recovery.

Stan McCool; Tony Walton; Paul Whillhite; Mark Ballard; Miguel Rondon; Kaixu Song; Zhijun Liu; Shahab Ahmed; Peter Senior

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

188

Machine Learning Enhancement of Storm-Scale Ensemble Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation Forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Machine Learning Enhancement of Storm-Scale Ensemble Probabilistic Quantitative Precipitation uncertainty. Machine learning methods can produce calibrated probabilistic forecasts from the raw ensemble and machine learning are working to address these challenges. Numerical weather prediction (NWP) models

Xue, Ming

189

Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

Clean Water Compliance Section of the Environment Compliance Department

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

EPA STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL (SWMM), VERSIONS 4.31 & 4.4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EPA STORM WATER MANAGEMENT MODEL (SWMM), VERSIONS 4.31 & 4.4 Availability | Version 4.4h | SWMM5 and other best management practices (BMPs). Version 4.3 (May 1994) contains corrections and enhancements

Haller, Merrick

191

Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The storm water pollution prevention program at the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) intends to protect the quality of storm water runoff through: (1) reducing the exposure of metal accumulation areas to precipitation, (2) implementation of Best Management Practices, (3) sampling during rain events and subsequent analysis, and (4) routine surveillances. When prescribed, the analytical data is compared to a set of cut-off concentration values to determine how the Y-12 Complex relates to other metal fabrication industries in the state of Tennessee. The quality of the storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek indicated some improvement in 2011. This improvement is attributable to the completion of several construction, demolition and remediation projects which occurred in 2010 and 2011. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and the timely implementation of improved storm water control measures as deemed necessary.

Environment Compliance Department

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Real-time storm surge prediction for bays on the Texas Gulf coast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ocean basins, over long periods of simulated time. The United Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) model of Cardone et at. (1992) is used to generate hurricane wind and pressure fields from the elementary characteristics of a storm for input into ADCIRC...

Kelley, Sean William

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

The Electric Field and Waves Instruments on the Radiation Belt Storm Probes Mission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Electric Fields and Waves (EFW) Instruments on the two Radiation Belt Storm Probe (RBSP) spacecraft (recently renamed the Van Allen Probes) are designed to measure three dimensional quasi-static and low frequency ...

Wygant, J. R.

194

Trajectory Analysis of Saudi Arabian Dust Storms 1 Michael Notaro 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Trajectory Analysis of Saudi Arabian Dust Storms 1 2 Michael-Atmospheres 11 12 Abstract 13 14 Temporal and spatial characteristics of Saudi, are investigated using station and gridded weather 16 observations and remotely

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

195

Low-e Storm Windows: Market Assessment and Pathways to Market Transformation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Field studies sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have shown that the use of low-e storm windows can lead to significant heating and cooling energy savings in residential homes. This study examines the market for low-e storm windows based on market data, case studies, and recent experience with weatherization deployment programs. It uses information from interviews conducted with DOE researchers and industry partners involved in case studies and early deployment efforts related to low-e storm windows. In addition, this study examines potential barriers to market acceptance, assesses the market and energy savings potential, and identifies opportunities to transform the market for low-e storm windows and overcome market adoption barriers.

Cort, Katherine A.

2013-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

196

Characteristics of warm season precipitating storms in the Arkansas–Red River basin  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[1] Analysis of a multisensor precipitation product enables us to extract the precipitation from individual storms in the Arkansas–Red River drainage basin over a period of 11 years. We examine the year-to-year and ...

Tucker, Donna F.; Li, Xingong

2009-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

Building America Webinar: Low-E Storms: The Next Big Thing in Window Retrofits  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Building America webinar presented a new and improved low-e storm window that boasts a combination of curb appeal and energy efficiency, all for a fraction of the cost of window replacement, on Sept. 9, 2014.

198

Modeling Urban Storm-Water Quality Treatment: Model Development and Application to a Surface Sand Filter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water impacts has led us to the develop- ment of different storm-water treatment strategies. Previous knowledge regarding traditional water treatment systems drink- ing and wastewater and the evaluation

199

Coastal communities and climate change : a dynamic model of risk perception, storms, and adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change impacts, including sea-level rise and changes in tropical storm frequency and intensity, will pose signicant challenges to city planners and coastal zone managers trying to make wise investment and protection ...

Franck, Travis Read

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Urban Aerosol Impacts on Downwind Convective Storms SUSAN C. VAN DEN HEEVER AND WILLIAM R. COTTON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban Aerosol Impacts on Downwind Convective Storms SUSAN C. VAN DEN HEEVER AND WILLIAM R. COTTON. 2004; Givati and Rosenfeld 2004; Molders and Olson 2004; Jirak and Cotton 2006); 2) increased surface

Collett Jr., Jeffrey L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Storm surge analysis using numerical and statistical techniques and comparison with NWS model SLOSH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of development. These parameters include latitude and longitude of the eye of the storm, track direction and forward speed measured at the eye, radius to maximum wind, central and peripheral atmospheric pressures, and an estimate of the geostrophic wind speed...

Aggarwal, Manish

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

C h a p t e r 1 0 Island in the Storm: Disturbance Ecology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

depression forms from increasing low pressure that absorbs air and thermal energy from the ocean. The air Ocean. The same kind of storm in #12;282 M. R. Gannon and M. R. Willig the Pacific Ocean is a typhoon

Willig, Michael

203

Variational optimization analysis of the 8 June 1974 severe storms in Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VARIATIONAL OPTIMIZATION ANALYSIS OF THE 8 Ji3NE 1974 SEVERE STORMS IN OKLAHOMA A THESIS hy CHARLIE A. LILES Suhmitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM Hniversity pa -tie' fulfillment of the requiremert for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1976 Major Subjeot; Meteorology VARIATIONAL OPTIMIZATION ANALYSIS OF THE 8 JUNE 1974 SEVERE STORMS IN OKLAHOMA A THESIS by CHARLIE A. LILES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) L (Head of Depar ent...

Liles, Charlie A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

A study of the relationship between certain moisture parameters and severe convective storms in central Oklahoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CERTAIN MOISTURE PARAMETERS AND SEVERE CONVECTIVE STORMS IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CARVEN ALLEN SCOTT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1977 Major Subject: Meteorology A STUDY OF THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CERTAIN MOISTURE PARAMETERS AND SEVERE CONVECTIVE STORMS IN CENTRAL OKLAHOMA A Thesis by CARVEN ALLEN SCOTT Approved as to style...

Scott, Carven Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

The rainfall patterns associated with tropical storm Felice of September 1970  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RAINFALL PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL STORM FELICE OF SEPTEMBER 1970 A Thesis by LEWIS CALVIN NORTON Submitted to the Graduate College of Tc. . as ARM Univers ty in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1976 Major Subject: Meteorology THE RAINFALL PATTERNS ASSOCIATED WITH TROPICAL STORM FELICE OF SEPTEMBER 1970 A Thesis by LEWIS CALVIN NORTON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Head of Department) (Member...

Norton, Lewis Calvin

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydrodynamic model of Fukushima-Daiichi NPP Industrial site flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the Fukushima-Daiichi was designed and constructed the maximal tsunami height estimate was about 3 m based on analysis of statistical data including Chile earthquake in 1960. The NPP project industrial site height was 10 m. The further deterministic estimates TPCO-JSCE confirmed the impossibility of the industrial site flooding by a tsunami and therefore confirmed ecological safety of the NPP. However, as a result of beyond design earthquake of 11 March 2011 the tsunami height at the shore near the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP reached 15 m. This led to flooding and severe emergencies having catastrophic environmental consequences. This paper proposes hydrodynamic model of tsunami emerging and traveling based on conservative assumptions. The possibility of a tsunami wave reaching 15 m height at the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP shore was confirmed for deduced hydrodynamic resistance coefficient of 1.8. According to the model developed a possibility of flooding is determined not only by the industrial site height, magni...

Vaschenko, V N; Gerasimenko, T V; Vachev, B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hydropower at flood control reservoirs - the variable speed option  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Application of hydroelectric turbine-generators to flood control has been limited due to the inability of a single turbine to operate efficiently over the wide head and flow ranges encountered. Multiple and different unit combinations have been applied to this problem, but the cost of the additional unit(s), powerhouse, and supporting facilities typically causes the project to become unfeasible. Variable speed operation can increase the operating range of a single turbine, and significantly improve efficiency over single speed units. This can make hydroelectric generation at flood control projects feasible. This paper presents a comparison of the application of variable speed units, two speed units, and single speed units at the Blue River Dam Hydroelectric Project. The project consists of the addition of a powerhouse to an existing Army Corps of Engineers flood control project. Efficiency data for the different types of units are compared and historical flow and release data are used in a computer model to simulate plant operation.

Laurence, K.; Yale, J. [Stone & Webster Engineering Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

209

A first large-scale flood inundation forecasting model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At present continental to global scale flood forecasting focusses on predicting at a point discharge, with little attention to the detail and accuracy of local scale inundation predictions. Yet, inundation is actually the variable of interest and all flood impacts are inherently local in nature. This paper proposes a first large scale flood inundation ensemble forecasting model that uses best available data and modeling approaches in data scarce areas and at continental scales. The model was built for the Lower Zambezi River in southeast Africa to demonstrate current flood inundation forecasting capabilities in large data-scarce regions. The inundation model domain has a surface area of approximately 170k km2. ECMWF meteorological data were used to force the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) macro-scale hydrological model which simulated and routed daily flows to the input boundary locations of the 2-D hydrodynamic model. Efficient hydrodynamic modeling over large areas still requires model grid resolutions that are typically larger than the width of many river channels that play a key a role in flood wave propagation. We therefore employed a novel sub-grid channel scheme to describe the river network in detail whilst at the same time representing the floodplain at an appropriate and efficient scale. The modeling system was first calibrated using water levels on the main channel from the ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimeter and then applied to predict the February 2007 Mozambique floods. Model evaluation showed that simulated flood edge cells were within a distance of about 1 km (one model resolution) compared to an observed flood edge of the event. Our study highlights that physically plausible parameter values and satisfactory performance can be achieved at spatial scales ranging from tens to several hundreds of thousands of km2 and at model grid resolutions up to several km2. However, initial model test runs in forecast mode revealed that it is crucial to account for basin-wide hydrological response time when assessing lead time performances notwithstanding structural limitations in the hydrological model and possibly large inaccuracies in precipitation data.

Schumann, Guy J-P; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Voisin, Nathalie; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Pappenberger, Florian; Phanthuwongpakdee, Kay; Hall, Amanda C.; Bates, Paul D.

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

210

Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

211

Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Africa.gif Why it Matters: The...

212

Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An experimental study on flooding with steam and water in a large diameter vertical tube was conducted. This research has been performed to provide a better prediction of flooding in a pressurized water reactor (PWR) pressurizer surge line...

Williams, Susan Nicole

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Precipitation analysis for a flood early warning system in the Manafwa River Basin, Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The communities living in the Manafwa River Basin experience frequent floods threatening their lives and property. Climate change and anthropogenic perturbations to the natural environment increase flooding frequency. This ...

Cecinati, Francesca

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Addressing Crises More Effectively: The Other Answers to Rising Sea Levels, Storms, Floods, Desertification, Earthquakes and More Environmental Crises in the Sacramento Delta  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the EU’s mandatory greenhouse gas emissions trading scheme,the European Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS). “The cap onthe European Union’s emission trading scheme (Bounds and

Roe, Emery

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory investigations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory of methane from flooded unexploited coal seams Field experience from the flooding operations of the abandoned sorption capacity of coal in the dry-air state through determining the isotherm of methane sorption

Boyer, Edmond

216

Forestflood relation still tenuous comment on `Global evidence that deforestation amplifies flood risk and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest­flood relation still tenuous ­ comment on `Global evidence that deforestation amplifies cover change, and conclude that deforestation amplifies flood risk and severity in the developing world% of the variation in reported flood occurrences, considerably more than forest cover or deforestation (o10

Chappell, Nick A

217

Water Visualization and Flooding in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Water Visualization and Flooding in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Brian Holsclaw West- 2H2O e- e- e- e- e- H+ H+ H+ Membrane + Schematic of a PEMFC Operation #12;PFR PEM Fuel Cell Plug for membrane Two-phase flow in channels #12;CSTR PEM Fuel Cell Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor (CSTR) "Perfect

Petta, Jason

218

Relationships among probability distributions of stream discharges in floods, climate,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relationships among probability distributions of stream discharges in floods, climate, bed load of both follow power laws. The number N(Q) of days on which the discharge exceeds Q, or the number of the United States. To examine the effect of climate change on bed load transport and river incision, we

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

219

SPECIAL EDITION: FLOOD RECOVERY Thursday, September 15, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

their events and service opportunities should e-mail all relevant details to cce@binghamton.edu. Connect to help with this cause, contact Julie Lucia. Collection of Toiletries, Blankets, and Nonperishable Food and nonperishable food items are in high demand by victims of the flood. Donation boxes have been placed in Hinman

Suzuki, Masatsugu

220

Flood Operation Rules for a Single Reservoir Licheng Dong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of California - Davis 2012-12-12 Abstract This paper examines the theoretical behavior ecosystems. 2. Simple Inflow Hydrographs Three main factors affect the reservoir's inflow flood volume and peak outflow (Ergish, 2010): 1) inflow hydrograph volume and shape; 2) controllable reservoir storage

Lund, Jay R.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Field test of microemulsion flooding, Chateaurenard Field, France  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot test of microemulsion flooding was conducted in a single five-spot pattern in the Chateaurenard field in France. The test had to accommodate a 40-mPa*s (40-cp) oil viscosity and a regional pressure gradient across the pattern. A very clear oil bank was observed, resulting in a substantial increase in oil production. 9 refs.

Putz, A.; Chevalier, J.P.; Stock, G.; Philippot, J.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Mitigating Flood Loss through Local Comprehensive Planning in Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environment planning and policy. When sustainability was embraced by international organizations and governmental organizations managing development programs and projects, the term, ?sustainable development? became popular (Beatley, 1998). Currently...; and a more economically integrated and diverse population (Vale & Campanella, 2005). Based on previous literature (Beatley, 1998; Berke, 1995; Mileti, 1999), this study develops principles of sustainability that can be applied to flood mitigation...

Kang, Jung Eun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

224

Hello Everybody, and Welcome to BarnStorm: A Look into Theatrical Crisis Management and Problem Solving  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

iv Hello Everybody and Welcome toOF CALIFORNIA SANTA CRUZ HELLO EVERYBODY, AND WELCOME TOas BarnStorm’s new home iv   Hello Everybody, and Welcome to

Putnick, Marissa

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

7X performance results - final report : ASCI Red vs Red Storm.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the 7X performance testing was to assure Sandia National Laboratories, Cray Inc., and the Department of Energy that Red Storm would achieve its performance requirements which were defined as a comparison between ASCI Red and Red Storm. Our approach was to identify one or more problems for each application in the 7X suite, run those problems at multiple processor sizes in the capability computing range, and compare the results between ASCI Red and Red Storm. The first part of this report describes the two computer systems, the applications in the 7X suite, the test problems, and the results of the performance tests on ASCI Red and Red Storm. During the course of the testing on Red Storm, we had the opportunity to run the test problems in both single-core mode and dual-core mode and the second part of this report describes those results. Finally, we reflect on lessons learned in undertaking a major head-to-head benchmark comparison.

Dinge, Dennis C. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Davis, Michael E. (Cray Inc., Albuquerque, NM); Haskell, Karen H.; Ballance, Robert A.; Gardiner, Thomas Anthony; Stevenson, Joel O.; Noe, John P.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics Zerbo, J-L.1, 2, 4, C. Amory-Mazaudier 2, F. Ouattara 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. It is the same thing for Km and Am. The aa index Mayaud [1,2] informs on solar activity, mainly on the two2 Geomagnetism during solar cycle 23: Characteristics Zerbo, J-L.1, 2, 4, C. Amory-Mazaudier 2, F of morphological analysis of yearly and monthly values of the sunspot number, the aa index, the solar wind speed

227

Potential Release Site Sediment Concentrations Correlated to Storm Water Station Runoff through GIS Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research examined the relationship between sediment sample data taken at Potential Release Sites (PRSs) and storm water samples taken at selected sites in and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The PRSs had been evaluated for erosion potential and a matrix scoring system implemented. It was assumed that there would be a stronger relationship between the high erosion PRSs and the storm water samples. To establish the relationship, the research was broken into two areas. The first area was raster-based modeling, and the second area was data analysis utilizing the raster based modeling results and the sediment and storm water sample results. Two geodatabases were created utilizing raster modeling functions and the Arc Hydro program. The geodatabase created using only Arc Hydro functions contains very fine catchment drainage areas in association with the geometric network and can be used for future contaminant tracking. The second geodatabase contains sub-watersheds for all storm water stations used in the study along with a geometric network. The second area of the study focused on data analysis. The analytical sediment data table was joined to the PRSs spatial data in ArcMap. All PRSs and PRSs with high erosion potential were joined separately to create two datasets for each of 14 analytes. Only the PRSs above the background value were retained. The storm water station spatial data were joined to the table of analyte values that were either greater than the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Multi-Sector General Permit (MSGP) benchmark value, or the Department of Energy (DOE) Drinking Water Defined Contribution Guideline (DWDCG). Only the storm water stations were retained that had sample values greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Separate maps were created for each analyte showing the sub-watersheds, the PRSs over background, and the storm water stations greater than the NPDES MSGP benchmark value or the DOE DWDCG. Tables were then created for each analyte that listed the PRSs average value by storm water station allowing a tabular view of the mapped data. The final table that was created listed the number of high erosion PRSs and regular PRSs over background values that were contained in each watershed. An overall relationship between the high erosion PRSs or the regular PRSs and the storm water stations was not identified through the methods used in this research. However, the Arc Hydro data models created for this analysis were used to track possible sources of contamination found through sampling at the storm water gaging stations. This geometric network tracing was used to identify possible relationships between the storm water stations and the PRSs. The methods outlined for the geometric network tracing could be used to find other relationships between the sites. A cursory statistical analysis was performed which could be expanded and applied to the data sets generated during this research to establish a broader relationship between the PRSs and storm water stations.

C.T. McLean

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FOR THE NPDES STORM WATER COMPLIANCE ALTERNATIVES AT THE SRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) prepared this environmental assessment (EA) to evaluate the potential environmental impacts associated with proposed and alternative actions to achieve water quality permit compliance at 38 storm water outfalls located at the Savannah River Site (SRS) (Figure 1-1). Effluent monitoring data indicates that some of these outfalls may not presently comply with new National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) Storm Water General Permit effluent standards that became effective July 1, 2005 (SCR000000). The NPDES permit requires that best management practices (BMPs) be implemented and maintained, as necessary, to ensure that storm water discharges at SRS do not cause or contribute to the contravention of applicable state water quality standards (WQS).

Shedrow, C

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Thompson, R. L., B. T. Smith, A. R. Dean, and P. T. Marsh, 2014: Spatial distributions of tornadic near-storm environments by convective mode. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (5), 122.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. SMITH, AND ANDREW R. DEAN NOAA/NWS/NCEP Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma PATRICK T. MARSH* University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma (Submitted 19 February 2013; in final form 08 September 2013: NOAA/NWS/NCEP Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma. ____________________ Corresponding author

230

Database of Low-e Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is an update of a report that describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone.

Culp, Thomas D.; Cort, Katherine A.

2014-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

Applications of digital radar in the analysis of severe local storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

August 1973 Major Subject: Meteorology APPLICATIONS OF DIGITAL RADAR IN THE ANALYSIS OF SEVERE LOCAL STORMS A Thesis JOHN EVERETT VOGEL Approved as to style and content by: (Co-Chairman of Committee) / /. Lier &. i i . 3 I r1 ~ '-d (ri 'i ~ ~ i...(& V (Co-Chairman of Committee) k. )&7 I). *v 'e(C' & ~. (Head of Department) (Member) ( ember) August 1973 ABSTRACT Applications of Digital Radar in the Analysis of Severe Local Storms (August 1973) John E. Vogel, B. S. , Texas A&M University...

Vogel, John Everett

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Storm water quantity control has long been a challenge for highway designers. Traditionally, centralized best management practice designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on centralized detention-based best man- agement practices (BMPs) that reduce the amount of storm water released and environmentally sound storm water management practice (1, 6). Numerous studies and other research efforts have, centralized best management practice designs are often cost prohibitive and inefficient in many rural highway

Fiedler, Fritz R.

233

Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition of Hurricane Helene (2006)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predictability of a Mediterranean Tropical-Like Storm Downstream of the Extratropical Transition downstream. The present study focuses on the predictability of a Mediterranean tropical-like storm (Medicane) on 26 September 2006 downstream of the ET of Hurricane Helene from 22 to 25 September. While

Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

AUGUST 1999 507C O R F I D I The Birth and Early Years of the Storm Prediction Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. CORFIDI NOAA/NWS/NCEP/Storm Prediction Center, Norman, Oklahoma (Manuscript received 12 August 1998 tornado to strike Tinker Air Force Base in one week on 25 March 1948. The success of this and later's Weather Radar Laboratory to form the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL) in Norman, Oklahoma, in 1964

235

A Snowstorm Puzzle: The Relationship Between Federal Declarations of Impact and Storm Tracks for Extreme Midwestern Blizzards  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storms NOAA, HPC, GISS, and Storm Data Monthly Frequency of Extreme Midwestern Blizzards 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 Jan uar y Feb rua ry Ma rch April May Sep tem ber Oc tob er No vem ber De cem ber 9/1/66-5/31/87 9/1/87-5/31/08 Frequency of Federal...

Atkinson, Christopher John

2009-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

236

Rebuilding your flooded home: Guidelines for incorporating energy efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Repairs to your flood-damaged home can add energy efficiency at the same time you address pressing structural needs, mainly by replacing and upgrading insulation in walls and floors, and checking your foundation for flood damage. Many energy efficiency options are available to you today that may not have been widely available when you built your house even if that was only a few years ago. Cost-effectiveness depends on several factors, including cost of fuel and materials, efficiency levels of the structure and components, and climate. This booklet offers some general tips to improve the efficiency of your home`s shell and equipment. Additional information on any issue covered in this booklet is available from various agencies within or near your community, including your state energy office, local community action agency, utilities, Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) offices.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

CO/sub 2/ foam flooding performance vs. rock wettability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO/sub 2/ flooding projects have shown large potential for oil recovery, but in many cases the volumetric sweep efficiency is greatly limited by gravity tonguing and/or viscous fingering. To reduce these effects foam could be used as an alternative to WAG CO/sub 2/ injection. Experiments on the CO/sub 2/ foam process were conducted in a 1/4 5-spot reservoir model in order to investigate the effect of rock wetting state and total CO/sub 2/ slug size on secondary and tertiary extra-oil recovery. Laboratory model results show that the process is more successful in an oil-wet medium than in a water-wet medium due to larger surfactant adsorption in the water-wet medium. Also, requirements for optimal CO/sub 2/ slug size are smaller than in the WAG process, with larger extra oil recovery for both secondary and tertiary floods.

Lescure, B.M.; Claridge, E.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

A mathematical and experimental study of caustic flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Dr. Ching Buang Wu A simple non-equilibrium chemical displacement model for continuous, linear, caustic flooding of crude oil is presented. The laboratory experiments were conducted to support the numerical simulation and to verify the results.... The unique feature of this mathematic study is that it includes the chemistry of the acid hydrolysis to produce surfactants and the chemical reaction rate under the non- equilibrium state. The in-situ generated surfactant was presumed to alter the oil...

Shen, Tsu-Cheng

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Laboratory methods for enhanced oil recovery core floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is investigating microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to oil reservoirs. Laboratory corefloods are invaluable in developing technology necessary for a field application of MEOR. Methods used to prepare sandstone cores for experimentation, coreflooding techniques, and quantification of coreflood effluent are discussed in detail. A technique to quantify the small volumes of oil associated with laboratory core floods is described.

Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and pressures was a major part of the phase II studies. A high pressure core holder was developed and set inside a temperature regulated in-house constructed oven for this purpose. The core face flushing method was developed for conducting imbibition... and the field for improving oil recovery. The most common techniques used to increase oil recovery include water injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, carbon dioxide (CO&) injection, chemical flooding and caustic injection. Currently, however, due...

Sharif, Qamar Javaid

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Development of cost-effective surfactant flooding technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 1 of this research was the development of a high-resolution, fully implicit, finite-difference, multiphase, multicomponent, compositional simulator for chemical flooding. The major physical phenomena modeled in this simulator are dispersion, heterogeneous permeability and porosity, adsorption, interfacial tension, relative permeability and capillary desaturation, compositional phase viscosity, compositional phase density and gravity effects, capillary pressure, and aqueous-oleic-microemulsion phase behavior. Polymer and its non-Newtonian rheology properties include shear-thinning viscosity, permeability reduction, inaccessible pore volume, and adsorption. Options of constant or variable space grids and time steps, constant-pressure or constant-rate well conditions, horizontal and vertical wells, and multiple slug injections are also available in the simulator. The solution scheme used in this simulator is fully implicit. The pressure equation and the mass-conservation equations are solved simultaneously for the aqueous-phase pressure and the total concentrations of each component. A third-order-in-space, second-order-in-time finite-difference method and a new total-variation-diminishing (TVD) third-order flux limiter are used that greatly reduce numerical dispersion effects. Task 2 was the optimization of surfactant flooding. The code UTCHEM was used to simulate surfactant polymer flooding.

Pope, G.A.; Sepehrnoori, K.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Annual Report: 2011-2012 Storm Season Sampling, Non-Dry Dock Stormwater Monitoring for Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual PSNS non-dry dock storm water monitoring results for 2011-2012 storm season. Included are a brief description of the sampling procedures, storm event information, laboratory methods and data collection, a results and discussion section, and the conclusions and recommendations.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Rupert, Brian; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhart, Christine

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

P9.137 The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity: Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous Weather Testbed Spring Forecasting Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P9.137 The SPC Storm-Scale Ensemble of Opportunity: Overview and Results from the 2012 Hazardous) available to forecasters at the Storm Prediction Center (SPC) has been increasing over the past few years to examine and scrutinize the data in creating a forecast has not changed. Thus, the concept of the SPC Storm

244

Missoula flood dynamics and magnitudes inferred from sedimentology of slack-water deposits on the Columbia Plateau, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentological study of late Wisconsin, Missoula-flood slack-water sediments deposited along the Columbia and Tucannon Rivers in southern Washington reveals important aspects of flood dynamics. Most flood facies were deposited by energetic flood surges (velocities>6 m/sec) entering protected areas along the flood tract, or flowing up and then directly out of tributary valleys. True still-water facies are less voluminous and restricted to elevations below 230 m. High flood stages attended the initial arrival of the flood wave and were not associated with subsequent hydraulic ponding upslope from channel constrictions. Among 186 flood beds studied in 12 sections, 57% have bioturbated tops, and about half of these bioturbated beds are separated from overlying flood beds by nonflood sediments. A single graded flood bed was deposited at most sites during most floods. Sequences in which 2-9 graded beds were deposited during a single flood are restricted to low elevations. These sequences imply complex, multi-peaked hydrographs in which the first flood surge was generally the largest, and subsequent surges were attenuated by water already present in slack-water areas. Slack-water - sediment stratigraphy suggests a wide range of flood discharges and volumes. Of >40 documented late Wisconsin floods that inundated the Pasco Basin, only about 20 crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. Floods younger than the set-S tephras from Mount St.Helens were generally smaller than earlier floods of late Wisconsin age, although most still crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. These late floods primarily traversed the Cheney-Palouse scabland because stratigraphy of slack-water sediment along the Columbia River implies that the largest flood volumes did not enter the Pasco Basin by way of the Columbia River. 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

Smith, G.A. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Direct climate effect of black carbon in China and its impact on dust storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.shtml, 22 March 2002). [3] Observations indicate that the total days of dust storm occurrence per yearClick Here for Full Article Direct climate effect of black carbon in China and its impact on dust and the surrounding areas critically impact weather, climate, and public health in China and neighboring Pacific Rim

Liou, K. N.

246

Annual Storm Water Report for the Y-12 National Security Complex Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the second annual storm water report prepared in accordance with the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12 Complex) on December 1, 2011, and the corresponding Y-12 Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWP3) which became effective on September 7, 2012. However, Appendix A does contain some analytical data gathered under the previous NPDES permit and SWP3 for comparison purposes. The quality of storm water exiting the Y-12 Complex via East Fork Poplar Creek remained relatively stable from 2012 to 2013. However, there was one largely unexpected high concentration of mercury noted in an area that is not known to have previously been a mercury use area. This was noted in Sector AA, Outfall 014. This outfall is normally sampled on a rotating basis but, due this elevated concentration, will be sampled again in 2014. The Y-12 Complex will continue to implement appropriate BMPs and reduce outside material storage ares where possible. Emphasis will continue to be placed on site inspections and timely implementation of proper storm water control measures.

None

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Optimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Location of Infiltration-Based Best Management Practices for Storm Water Management and water quality impacts. The concept of best manage- ment practices BMPs encompasses a wide variety with a genetic algorithm to determine the optimal location of infiltration-based best management practices BMPs

Vogel, Richard M.

248

Green's function approximation from cross-correlations of 20100 Hz noise during a tropical storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green's function approximation from cross-correlations of 20­100 Hz noise during a tropical storm Approximation of Green's functions through cross-correlation of acoustic signals in the ocean, a method referred-bottom-reflected interarray hydrophone travel times. The extracted Green's function depends on the propagating noise

Gerstoft, Peter

249

Granulometric characterization of sediments transported by surface runoff generated by moving storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to investigate the influence of moving rainfall storms on the dynamics of sediment transport by surface runoff. Experiments were carried out, using a rain simulator and a soil flume. The movement of rainfall was generated by moving the rain simulator at a...

de Lima, J. L. M. P.; Souza, C. C. S.; Singh, V. P.

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

250

Using Reconstructed Dust Climatology to Study the Impacts of Martian Dust Storms on Dynamics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using Reconstructed Dust Climatology to Study the Impacts of Martian Dust Storms on Dynamics L@atm.ox.ac.uk) Abstract We have reconstructed the climatology of the dust on Mars using available retrievals and estimates) a reconstruction of the dust optical depth climatology based on weighted gridding for Martian years 24

Cambridge, University of

251

Analytical study of the energy rate balance equation for the magnetospheric storm-ring current  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analytical study of the energy rate balance equation for the magnetospheric storm-ring current A. L of the analytical integration of the energy rate balance equation, assum- ing that the input energy rate of the energy function to ht times a constant factor in the energy rate balance equation (e.g. Gonzalez et al

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

252

An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique to Identify Storm Cells in Geospatial Images Valliappa and are not transferrable between different types of geospatial images. Yet, with the multitude of remote sensing on different types of geospatial radar and satel- lite images. Pointers are provided on the effective choice

Lakshmanan, Valliappa

253

Environmental control of cloud-to-ground lightning polarity in severe storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

polarity of severe storms by directly affecting their structural, dynamical, and microphysical properties, which in turn directly control cloud electrification and CG flash polarity. A more specific hypothesis, which has been supported by past............................................................................... 23 a. Thunderstorm electrification ................................................ 23 1) Charging mechanisms and typical charge structure ... 23 2) Cloud-to-ground lightning flash................................. 27 3...

Buffalo, Kurt Matthew

2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Global P, PP, and PKP wave microseisms observed from distant storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and there is thus no coupling of ocean-wave energy at the primary frequency into seismic energy at the seafloor cannot generate primary microseisms in deep water, this energy is most likely generated by coastalGlobal P, PP, and PKP wave microseisms observed from distant storms Peter Gerstoft,1 Peter M

Buckingham, Michael

255

262 SDSU General Catalog 2014-2015 OFFICE: Storm Hall 314  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as the arrangement of societies on the earth's surface, water and land use patterns, urban- ization and urban life262 SDSU General Catalog 2014-2015 OFFICE: Storm Hall 314 TELEPHONE: 619-594-5437 / FAX: 619 modeling applied to environmental, ecological, health, and geographical systems, is the third holder

Gallo, Linda C.

256

Seasonal variation of upper-level mobile trough development upstream of the Pacific storm track  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to provide at least a partial explanation of midwinter suppression of the Pacific storm track. From 19 years of analysis, a strong stretching deformation zone (DZ) is defined over East Asia. We examine the number, average intensity and intensity change...

Myoung, Boksoon

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems Author: Email: lsrf@mail.nerc-essc.ac.uk #12;Abstract The prediction of extratropical cyclones Prediction (NCEP) Ensemble Prediction Systems (EPS) has been investigated using an objective feature tracking

Begstsson, Lennart

258

The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Prediction of Extratropical Storm Tracks by the ECMWF and NCEP Ensemble Prediction Systems 2006) ABSTRACT The prediction of extratropical cyclones by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) and the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) ensemble prediction systems

Froude, Lizzie

259

Interactions between Catchbasin and Street Cleaning in Urban Drainages and Sediment Transport in Storm Drainage Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Interactions between Catchbasin and Street Cleaning in Urban Drainages and Sediment Transport ...................................................................................................................................................................24 Abstract Much research has been conducted on the transport, settling, and scour of gross solids transport in separate storm drainage has not been considered to be a significant problem for public works

Pitt, Robert E.

260

On the current conditions along the Ormen Lange pipeline path during an extreme, idealized storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On the current conditions along the Ormen Lange pipeline path during an extreme, idealized storm-shore for processing by means of a pipeline. Due to the abrupt topography this pipeline will have many long free spans along a possible path for the pipeline, and in a simulation study the effects on the flow due

Avlesen, Helge

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ice storm impacts on woody debris and debris dam formation in northeastern U.S. streams Clifford E and associated streams. During 1999 and 2000, tree canopy damage, stream physical habitat, and wood deposition were evaluated within 51 first-, second-, and third-order streams located within five eastern

Kraft, Clifford E.

262

Increase of storm events during the Holocene cold events in NW Mediterranean Sea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mediterranean region is one of the world's areas most vulnerable to the climate change (Giorgi, 2006). Regional cyclone development over the Mediterranean Sea under future climate change conditions. However the Mediterranean climate at Holocene timescale, in relation to severe storm activity 1. Introduction

Demouchy, Sylvie

263

Intense storm activity during the Little Ice Age on the French Mediterranean coast L. Dezileau a,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storm activity is important for assessing whether changes are controlled by climate evolution response will be crucial to predicting the impacts of future climate change. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All pre-industrial times (Solomon et al., 2007). The effects of climate change on extreme events

Demouchy, Sylvie

264

CBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Storm Clouds Darkening Again on the Nevada Economy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Statistics. The Nevada Coincident Employment Index includes four employment measures ­ household employmentCBER-DETR Nevada Coincident and Leading Employment Indexes1 Storm Clouds Darkening Again on the Nevada Economy The Nevada Coincident Employment Index measures the ups and downs of the Nevada economy

Ahmad, Sajjad

265

Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface drag  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 29 April 2009 , CD zU ln~ #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction High and/or extreme wind speeds , CD ? #12;Background Air-Sea Interaction High and/or extreme wind speeds ­ Dynamics Sensitivity High and/or extreme wind speeds ­ Dynamics Sensitivity of the wind stress and storm surges to surface

Vries, Hans de

266

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,, Mary A. Cialone a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential of wetlands in reducing storm surge Ty V. Wamsley a,Ă?, Mary A. Cialone a , Jane M to be the potential contribution of wetlands to the lowering of surges as they propagate inland from the coast. Consequently, an accurate method to quantify the effect of wetlands on coastal surge levels is required

US Army Corps of Engineers

267

Geosynthetic Filters for Water Quality Improvement of Urban Storm Water Runoff  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water treatment are retention ponds, detention basins, wetland ponds, and grass swales (Strecker et al are common subsurface storm water runoff treatment systems used in urban areas. Large subsurface fil- ters the treatment system (SEMCOG 2008). Removal of filtration media such as sand is highly labor

Aydilek, Ahmet

268

Evaluation and Enhancement of Carbon Dioxide Flooding Through Sweep Improvement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide displacement is a common improved recovery method applied to light oil reservoirs (30-45{degrees}API). The economic and technical success of CO{sub 2} floods is often limited by poor sweep efficiency or large CO{sub 2} utilization rates. Projected incremental recoveries for CO{sub 2} floods range from 7% to 20% of the original oil in place; however, actual incremental recoveries range from 9% to 15% of the original oil in place, indicating the potential for significant additional recoveries with improved sweep efficiency. This research program was designed to study the effectiveness of carbon dioxide flooding in a mature reservoir to identify and develop methods and strategies to improve oil recovery in carbon dioxide floods. Specifically, the project has focused on relating laboratory, theoretical and simulation studies to actual field performance in a CO{sub 2} flood in an attempt to understand and mitigate problems of areal and vertical sweep efficiency. In this work the focus has been on evaluating the status of existing swept regions of a mature CO{sub 2} flood and developing procedures to improve the design of proposed floods. The Little Creek Field, Mississippi has been studied through laboratory, theoretical, numerical and simulation studies in an attempt to relate performance predictions to historical reservoir performance to determine sweep efficiency, improve the understanding of the reservoir response to CO{sub 2} injection, and develop scaling methodologies to relate laboratory data and simulation results to predicted reservoir behavior. Existing laboratory information from Little Creek was analyzed and an extensive amount of field data was collected. This was merged with an understanding of previous work at Little Creek to generate a detailed simulation study of two portions of the field – the original pilot area and a currently active part of the field. This work was done to try to relate all of this information to an understanding of where the CO{sub 2} went or is going and how recovery might be improved. New data was also generated in this process. Production logs were run to understand where the CO{sub 2} was entering the reservoir related to core and log information and also to corroborate the simulation model. A methodology was developed and successfully tested for evaluating saturations in a cased-hole environment. Finally an experimental and theoretical program was initiated to relate laboratory work to field scale design and analysis of operations. This work found that an understanding of vertical and areal heterogeneity is crucial for understanding sweep processes as well as understanding appropriate mitigation techniques to improve the sweep. Production and injection logs can provide some understanding of that heterogeneity when core data is not available. The cased-hole saturation logs developed in the project will also be an important part of the evaluation of vertical heterogeneity. Evaluation of injection well/production well connectivities through statistical or numerical techniques were found to be as successful in evaluating CO{sub 2} floods as they are for waterfloods. These are likely to be the lowest cost techniques to evaluate areal sweep. Full field simulation and 4D seismic techniques are other possibilities but were beyond the scope of the project. Detailed simulation studies of pattern areas proved insightful both for doing a “post-mortem” analysis of the pilot area as well as a late-term, active portion of the Little Creek Field. This work also evaluated options for improving sweep in the current flood as well as evaluating options that could have been successful at recovering more oil. That simulation study was successful due to the integration of a large amount of data supplied by the operator as well as collected through the course of the project. While most projects would not have the abundance of data that Little Creek had, integration of the available data continues to be critical for both the design and evaluation stages of CO{sub 2} floods. For cases w

Hughes, Richard

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Climate Change Effects on the Sacramento Basin's Flood Control Projects ANN DENISE FISSEKIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate Change Effects on the Sacramento Basin's Flood Control Projects By ANN DENISE FISSEKIS B.......................................................................6 Chapter III. Climate Change................................................................11 models...........................................................20 Climate change data

Lund, Jay R.

271

The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; ,

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tucker sand from Hepler field, Crawford County, Kansas, was characterized using routine and advanced analytical methods. The characterization is part of a chemical flooding pilot test to be conducted in the field, which is classified as a DOE Class I (fluvial-dominated delta) reservoir. Routine and advanced methods of characterization were compared. Traditional wireline logs indicate that the reservoir is vertically compartmentalized on the foot scale. Routine core analysis, X-ray computed tomography (CT), minipermeameter measurement, and petrographic analysis indicate that compartmentalization and lamination extend to the microscale. An idealized model of how the reservoir is probably structured (complex layering with small compartments) is presented. There was good agreement among the several methods used for characterization, and advanced characterization methods adequately explained the coreflood and tracer tests conducted with short core plugs. Tracer and chemical flooding tests were conducted in short core plugs while monitoring with CT to establish flow patterns and to monitor oil saturations in different zones of the core plugs. Channeling of injected fluids occurred in laboratory experiments because, on core plug scale, permeability streaks extended the full length of the core plugs. A graphic example of how channeling in field core plugs can affect oil recovery during chemical injection is presented. The small scale of compartmentalization indicated by plugs of the Tucker sand may actually help improve sweep between wells. The success of field-scale waterflooding and the fluid flow patterns observed in highly heterogeneous outcrop samples are reasons to expect that reservoir flow patterns are different from those observed with short core plugs, and better sweep efficiency may be obtained in the field than has been observed in laboratory floods conducted with short core plugs.

French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur.

Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: Chemical flood predictive model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical Flood Predictive Model (CFPM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp for the US Department of Energy and was used in the National Petroleum Council's (NPC) 1984 survey of US enhanced oil recovery potential (NPC, 1984). The CFPM models micellar (surfactant)-polymer (MP) floods in reservoirs which have been previously waterflooded to residual oil saturation. Thus, only true tertiary floods are considered. An option is available in the model which allows a rough estimate of oil recovery by caustic (alkaline) or caustic-polymer processes. This ''caustic'' option, added for the NPC survey, is not modeled as a separate process. Rather, the caustic and caustic-polymer oil recoveries are computed simply as 15% and 40%, respectively, of the MP oil recovery. In the CFPM, an oil rate versus time function for a single pattern is computed and the results are passed to the economic routines. To estimate multi-pattern project behavior, a pattern development schedule must be specified. After-tax cash flow is computed by combining revenues with capital costs for drilling, conversion and upgrading of wells, chemical handling costs, fixed and variable operating costs, injectant costs, depreciation, royalties, severance, state, federal, and windfall profit taxes, cost and price inflation rates, and the discount rate. A lumped parameter uncertainty routine is used to estimate risk, and allows for variation in computed project performance within an 80% confidence interval. The CFPM uses theory and the results of numerical simulation to predict MP oil recovery in five-spot patterns. Oil-bank and surfactant breakthrough and project life are determined from fractional flow theory. A Koval-type factor, based on the Dykstra-Parsons (1950) coefficient, is used to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity on surfactant and oil bank velocities. 18 refs., 17 figs., 27 tabs.

Ray, R.M.; Munoz, J.D.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

REMEDIATION OF LEON WATER FLOOD, BUTLER COUNTY, KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Leon Water Flood site has undergone one season of soil amendments and growth of specialized plants meant to colonize and accelerate the remediation of the salt-impacted site. The researchers characterized the impacted soil as to chemistry, added soil amendments, and planted several species of seedlings, and seeded the scarred areas. After the first growing season, the surface soil was again characterized and groundcover was also characterized. While plant growth was quite meager across the area, soil chemistry did improve over most of the two scars.

M.L. Korphage; Kelly Kindscher; Bruce G. Langhus

2001-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

276

Geographic Visualization of the 1993 Midwest Flood Water Balance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, flooding, and water storage. By the middle of July, large amounts of water were being stored in the southern part of the UMRB, particularly around the St. Louis area where the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers meet. Water was also being stored in larger...) includes the Mississippi River basin from the river’s headwaters in Minnesota to Cairo, Illinois, and the Lower Missouri River basin below Gavins Point dam, South Dakota, to St. Louis, Missouri (Figure 1.1). Using a digital elevation model of the study...

White, W. Scott; Ridd, Merrill K.; Mizgalewicz, Pawel J.; Maidment, David R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program webpage | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6 NoSan Leandro,LawFEMA - National Flood Insurance Program

278

CityFIT Urban Guide: Modelling and Deploying indicators of Property Exposure to Flooding in Lagos using LIDAR DEM and DSM data   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

application was prototyped for disseminating time-series flood model information and for reporting details of flood events as they occur to serve for model calibration and enhancement, thereby completing the flood modelling lifecycle....

Mosuro, Sulaiman

2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

On the Differences in Storm Rainfall from Hurricanes Isidore and Lili. Part I: Satellite Observations and Rain Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations and Rain Potential HAIYAN JIANG AND JEFFREY B. HALVERSON Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology 2007) ABSTRACT It has been well known for years that the heavy rain and flooding of tropical cyclones's potential for inland flooding 3­4 days in advance of landfall. 1. Introduction The combination of rain

Jiang, Haiyan

280

The influence of free gas saturation on water flood performance - variations caused by changes in flooding rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 1971) Anil Kumar Dandona, B. S. , Indian School of Mines Directed by: Dr. R. A. Morse It has been recognised that the presence of a free gas satura- tion prior to water flooding can have an important influence on oil recovery. The published results... studies such as the disappearance of part or all of the free gas by solution in the oil bank. Also, it has been realised that gravity forces make it impossible to initiate and maintain a uniforxn gas saturation fram top to bottom of the production...

Dandona, Anil Kumar

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Floods on Nottely River and Martin, Peachtree, and Slow Creeks in Cherokee County, North Carolina. Flood report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the flood situation along the Nottely River from the North Carolina-Georgia State line, at stream mile 18.72, downstream to the head of Hiwassee Reservoir backwater, stream mile 6.50; Martin Creek from mile 6.12 downstream to mile 1.38; Peachtree Creek from Ammon Bottom at mile 4.78 downstream to its mouth at Hiwassee River mile 100,68; and Slow Creek from mile 3.15 downstream to its mouth at Peachtree Creek mile 1.98.

Not Available

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The effect of flooding velocity and degree of reservoir depletion on the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

allowables and transfer of allowables from injection wells to producing wells. In some states, waterflood allowables are deter- mined solely by the capacity of the reservoir to produce i. e. unres- 1 tricted production As in the case of primary production... the flood water Q injected ~he eil is pro- ducec4- Other considerations of an economic nature leading to in- creased allowables include the high initial cost of a waterflood develop- ment and the recovery of oil from a reservoir which would be un...

Hall, Phillips C

1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Simulating and Optimizing Storm Water Management Strategies in an Urban Watershed  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and more frequent flooding. Best Management Practices (BMP) and Low Impact development (LID) are a few of the set of measures which are used to mitigate the impact of urbanization. Peak flow, runoff volume are few of the conventional metrics which are used...

Damodaram, Chandana

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

284

Landscape fragmentation and ice storm damage in eastern ontario forests J. Pasher and D.J. King*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1998). Due to interactions amongst biological and physiographic factors, damage and mortality, such as wind- storms and fire, which have return times of 100­ 1000 years (Van Dyke 1999). Large-scale ice

285

Characterization of Flood Sediments from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and Potential Implications for Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Characterization of Flood Sediments from Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and Potential Implications of sediments up to many centimeters thick on streets, lawns, parking lots, and other flat surfaces (fig. 1). During the flood dewatering and subsequent cleanup, there were concerns that these sediments might

Torgersen, Christian

286

A kinematic wave model for rivers with flood plains and other irregular geometries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A kinematic wave model for rivers with flood plains and other irregular geometries Pablo M. Jacovkis Esteban G. Tabak March 2006 Abstract A general kinematic wave model for flood propagation) This kinematic wave equation, which has been studied by [3], can be derived from the complete system (1, 2) under

Tabak, Esteban G.

287

Links Between Flood Frequency and Annual Water Balance Behaviors: A Basis for Similarity and Regionalization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of a data based comparative study of several hundred catchments across continental United States belonging to the MOPEX dataset, which systematically explored the connection between the flood frequency curve and measures of mean annual water balance. Two different measures of mean annual water balance are used: (i) a climatic aridity index, AI, which is a measure of the competition between water and energy availability at the annual scale; and, (ii) baseflow index, BFI, the ratio of slow runoff to total runoff also at the annual time scale, reflecting the role of geology, soils, topography and vegetation. The data analyses showed that the aridity index, AI, has a first order control on both the mean and Cv of annual maximum floods. While mean annual flood decreases with increasing aridity, Cv increases with increasing aridity. BFI appeared to be a second order control on the magnitude and shape of the flood frequency curve. Higher BFI, meaning more subsurface flow and less surface flow leads to a decrease of mean annual flood whereas lower BFI leads to accumulation of soil moisture and increased flood magnitudes that arise from many events acting together. The results presented in this paper provide innovative means to delineate homogeneous regions within which the flood frequency curves can be assumed to be functionally similar. At another level, understanding the connection between annual water balance and flood frequency will be another building block towards developing comprehensive understanding of catchment runoff behavior in a holistic way.

Guo, Jiali; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Sivapalan, Murugesu

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

288

Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes) was tested as a catalyst binder in a microbial fuel cell. 2012 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Anti-flooding Catalyst binder a b s t r a c

289

HighResolution Numerical Methods for MicellarPolymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

been used to study the micellar­ polymer flooding process in enhanced oil recovery [12], [18], [19 in practical im­ plementation of enhanced oil recovery techniques at this time, there is increasing interestHigh­Resolution Numerical Methods for Micellar­Polymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer

Trangenstein, John A.

290

An optimal viscosity profile in enhanced oil recovery by polymer flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An optimal viscosity profile in enhanced oil recovery by polymer flooding Prabir Daripa a,*, G in oil reservoir is one of the effective methods of enhanced (tertiary) oil recovery. A classical model reserved. Keywords: Enhanced oil recovery; Polymer flooding; Linear stability 0020-7225/$ - see front

Daripa, Prabir

291

Earth'sFuture Accelerated flooding along the U.S. East Coast: On the impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth'sFuture Accelerated flooding along the U.S. East Coast: On the impact of sea-level rise accelerated in recent years for most coastal locations from the Gulf of Maine to Florida. The average increase­1990 to 1991­2013; spatial variations in acceleration of flooding resemble the spatial variations

Ezer,Tal

292

Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2013 vol 6 no 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of decision models for planning new risk mitigation projects. Latent semantic analysis (LSA) is another tool is to be a system of models that will support decision making in emergency situations, like flood risk managementFlood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2013 vol 6 no 3 Fstocoll Table of Contents Social

US Army Corps of Engineers

293

Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell BRUNO KIEFFER1, ETHIOPIA 4 DEEPARTEMENT DES SCIENCES DE LA TERRE ET DE L'ENVIRONNEMENT, UNIVERSITEE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES 50 the shield volcanoes. KEY WORDS: Ethiopia; flood basalts; shield volcanism; superswell INTRODUCTION According

Demouchy, Sylvie

294

Johns, R. H., D. W. Burgess, C. A. Doswell III, M. S. Gilmore, J. A. Hart, and S. F. Piltz, 2013: The 1925 Tri-State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 133.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mi) east-northeast of the apparent end of the Tri- State tornado damage path in Pike County, IN: The 1925 Tri- State tornado damage path and associated storm system. Electronic J. Severe Storms Meteor., 8 (2), 1­33. 1 The 1925 Tri-State Tornado Damage Path and Associated Storm System ROBERT H. JOHNS

Doswell III, Charles A.

295

STORMVEX: The Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment Science and Operations Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the Storm Peak Lab Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX), a substantial correlative data set of remote sensing observations and direct in situ measurements from fixed and airborne platforms will be created in a winter season, mountainous environment. This will be accomplished by combining mountaintop observations at Storm Peak Laboratory and the airborne National Science Foundation-supported Colorado Airborne Multi-Phase Cloud Study campaign with collocated measurements from the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2). We describe in this document the operational plans and motivating science for this experiment, which includes deployment of AMF2 to Steamboat Springs, Colorado. The intensive STORMVEX field phase will begin nominally on 1 November 2010 and extend to approximately early April 2011.

Mace, J; Matrosov, S; Shupe, M; Lawson, P; Hallar, G; McCubbin, I; Marchand, R; Orr, B; Coulter, R; Sedlacek, A; Avallone, L; Long, C

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

296

Local drainage analyses of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Local drainage analyses have been performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants during an extreme storm having an approximate 10,000-yr recurrence interval. This review discusses the methods utilized to accomplish the analyses in accordance with US Department of Energy (DOE) design and evaluation guidelines, and summarizes trends, results, generalizations, and uncertainties applicable to other DOE facilities. Results indicate that some culverts may be undersized, and that the storm sewer system cannot drain the influx of precipitation from the base of buildings. Roofs have not been designed to sustain ponding when the primary drainage system is clogged. Some underground tunnels, building entrances, and ground level air intakes may require waterproofing.

Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Centennial Coffee-Table Book: Earth's Art An important part of the Bureau's Centennial was the printing of a coffee-table book titled Earth's Art: Celebrating the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, continental margins, wetlands, storms and floods, gas hydrates, fractures, folds, and faults; coalbed methane

Texas at Austin, University of

298

Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

Aglan, H.

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

299

The performance and evaluation of the damaging downburst prediction and detection algorithm for bow echo storms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION OF THE DAMAGING DOWNBURST PREDICTION AND DETECTION ALGORITHM FOR BOW ECHO STORMS A Thesis by BETH ANN KARL Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2000 Major Subject: Atmospheric Sciences THE PERFORMANCE AND EVALUATION OF THE DAMAGING DOWNBURST PREDICTION...

Karl, Beth Ann

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

An investigation of dust storm generation in the Southern Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation of dust sto'rms in the Southern Great Plains was conducted to determine correlations between dust and precipitation, Antecedent Precipitation Index (API), wind, time of occurrence, and dew-point depression. Re- lationships between blowing dust... Summary of favorable parameters and conditions for springtime generation of blowing dust in local areas of the Southern Great Plains 66 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Title Page Physiographic regions of the United States and their dominant landf orms (after...

Pollard, Marshall Conrad

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Effects of baroclinicity on storm divergence and stratiform rain in a precipitating subtropical region  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the spectral transform of the Doppler radar ?purl? divergence measurements 7 and Fig. 3b shows the model-derived temperature perturbation fields that exist six hours after mesoscale latent heating sources have begun. These ?purl? measurements were... was Texas? wettest and Oklahoma?s fourth wettest summer on record. Similarly, March 2007 was Texas? wettest March on record. (http://lwf.ncdc.noaa.gov/oa/climate/research/2007/cmb-prod-us-2007.html) 15 2. BAROCLINICITY AND STORM TYPES...

Hopper, Jr., Larry John

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Impact of the 2008 Ice Storm on Moso Bamboo plantations in southeast China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A massive ice and snow storm occurred in early 2008 in South China and caused extensive damage to forests. Thirty-six plots of moso bamboo (Phyllostachys pubescens) plantation were established following the ice storm in the central growth area of moso bamboo, Fenyi, Jiangxi province, China. The topographical condition and stand attributes, and the ice storm impact on moso bamboo plantations were investigated. We found that an average of 54.48% ( 17.58%) bamboo culms was damaged. The damage patterns included bending, snapping and uprooting, which accounted for 17.01% ( 7.28%), 22.37% ( 11.58%) and 15.11% ( 11.54%) of the total respectively. An average of 16.42 ( 7.09) tons per hectare dead dry biomass was produced, accounting for 37.73% ( 14.41%) of total aboveground biomass. A mean value of 8.21 ( 3.55) Mg C per hectare was shifted from living biomass to dead. Stand level analysis showed a significant increase in damage level and dead biomass production at north-oriented slopes, and with high stand density (between 3000 and 4500 culm/ha). High altitude caused a higher proportion of snapped culms but a lower proportion of uprooted. Analysis at individual culm level suggested that the susceptibility for a culm to break or uproot due to ice storm would rise as its diameter increased, while the susceptibility to bend would decline. The young (one year old) culm was more susceptible to snapping or bending while over-mature (>5 years old) culm was more susceptible to uprooting, implying it is a good managing practice to harvest mature culm timely.

Zhou, Dr. Benzhi [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Li, Zhengcai [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Cao, Yonghui [Chinese Academy of Forestry; An, Yanfei [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Deng, Dr. Zongfu [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Wang, Gang [Chinese Academy of Forestry; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

File:06COBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history

304

File:06HIBHawaiiConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File

305

File:06MTBConstructionStormWaterPermit (7).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to: navigation,Energy

306

File:06NVBConstructionStormWaterPermit (1).pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to:

307

File:06TXBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump

308

Characterization of Energy Savings and Thermal Comfort Improvements Derived from Using Interior Storm Windows  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This field study of a single historic home in Seattle, WA documents the performance of Indow Windows’s interior storm window inserts. Energy use and the temperature profile of the house were monitored before and after the installation of the window inserts and changes in the two recorded metrics were examined. Using the defined analysis approach, it was determined that the interior storm windows produced a 22% reduction of the HVAC energy bill and had an undetermined effect on the thermal comfort in the house. Although there was no measurable changes in the thermal comfort of the house, the occupant noted the house to be “warmer in the winter and cooler in the summer” and that the “temperatures are more even (throughout the house).” The interior storm windows were found to be not cost effective, largely due to the retrofits completed on its heating system. However, if the economic analysis was conducted based on the old heating system, a 72% efficient oil fired furnace, the Indow Windows proved to be economical and had a simple payback period of 9.0 years.

Knox, Jake R.; Widder, Sarah H.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

309

PUBLISHED BY THE AMERICAN ARACHNOLOGICAL SOCIETY A new approach to examining scorpion peg sensilla: the mineral oil flood technique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

an improved method of chemical stimulus delivery called the mineral oil flood technique, which uses non: the mineral oil flood technique Elizabeth D. Knowlton and Douglas D. Gaffin: Department of Zoology, University peg sensilla: the mineral oil flood technique Elizabeth D. Knowlton and Douglas D. Gaffin: Department

Gaffin, Doug

310

Flood management in a complex river basin with a real-time decision support system based on hydrological forecasts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Portes du Scex,!) and in the hydropower plants "If a risk of overflowing exists, the Decision Support System MINDS proposes the optimal hydropower plants management for flood peak reduction PREDICTING FLOODS! ...taking profit of the existing hydropower schemes for reducing flood damages ...warning authorities

311

Problems with flooding in the Ronneburg mining district  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the most important uranium deposits of Wismut, the biggest uranium producer of the eastern world, was the Ronneburg mining area, located 10 km east of Gera in the central part of Germany. 110,000 t of uranium were produced in this ore field from 1950 to 1989. Mining in the Ronneburg ore field requires a knowledge of the hydrodynamic relationships during and after ground water recharge and preplanning of the flooding sequence in the mine. The technology necessary for recharge of the ground water layer and the open pit were established by flow models. Calculations were made of the transport of radioisotopes in the ground water. Preliminary results of these calculations are reported in this paper.

Eckart, M. [Wismut GmbH, Gera (Germany)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies the effects of such things as temperature, electrolyte concentration and the effect of different types of electrolytes were taken into consideration.

Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

313

Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding with weak alkalis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of Project BE4B in FY90 was to develop cost-effective and efficient chemical flooding formulations using surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemical systems. Chemical systems were studied that mitigate the deleterious effects of divalent ions. The experiments were conducted with carbonate mixtures and carbonate/phosphate mixtures of pH 10.5, where most of the phosphate ions exist as the monohydrogen phosphate species. Orthophosphate did not further reduce the deleterious effect of divalent ions on interfacial tension behavior in carbonate solutions, where the deleterious effect of the divalent ions is already very low. When added to a carbonate mixture, orthophosphate did substantially reduce the adsorption of an atomic surfactant, which was an expected result; however, there was no correlation between the amount of reduction and the divalent ion levels. For acidic oils, a variety of surfactants are available commercially that have potential for use between pH 8.3 and pH 9.5. Several of these surfactants were tested with oil from Wilmington (CA) field and found to be suitable for use in that field. Two low-acid crude oils, with acid numbers of 0.01 and 0.27 mg KOH/g of oil, were studied. It was shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding does have merit for use with these low-acid crude oils. However, each low-acid oil tested was found to behave differently, and it was concluded that the applicability of the method must be experimentally determined for any given low-acid crude oil. 19 refs., 10 figs. 4 tabs.

French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Application of Polymer Gels as Conformance Control Agents for Carbon Dioxide for Floods in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) .................................................... 203 Fig. 4.110 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 1 PV of CO2 (CGI) .. 203 Fig. 4.111 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 3 PV of CO2 (CGI) .. 203 Fig. 4.112 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core (CGI-Fracked...) ...................................... 204 Fig. 4.113 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 1 PV of CO2 (CGI- Fracked) .................................................................................................. 204 Fig. 4.114 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after...

Al Ali, Ali 1986-

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

317

Investigation of the scaling factor LVuw in the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

rnediuxn and. the Buid system, but also by the length of the flooded system and the x'ate of irjection. They further cor eluded that for floods performed in identical porous media and with the same oil-water viscosity ratio, the total length... water) as a scaling w coefficient. In other words, all floods conducted in a given porous rnediuxn, with a given oil-watex viscosity ratio and haVing the same value of this scalixxg coefficient must behave similarly and yield equal recoveries fax...

McWilliams, Morris Hampton

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Implications of the 1100 UT March 22, 1979 CDAW 6 substorm event for the role of magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The event of March 22, 1979 has been the object of a concentrated study effort as a part of the Coordinated Data Analysis Workshop activity designated CDAW-6. Energetic electron and magnetic field measurements from a set of four satellites aligned from 6.6 to 13 R/sub E/ at the 0200 LT meridian at the time of the magnetospheric substorm event of 1100 UT are presented. These data are used to show that a magnetic X-line formed spontaneously in the vicinity of 7 R/sub E/ in response to a steady build-up of magnetic stress in the geomagnetic tail.

Fritz, T.A.; Baker, D.N.; McPherron, R.L.; Lennartsson, W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

File:06CABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage

320

File:06ORBConstructionStormWaterPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic UtilitiesCABConstructionStormWaterProgram.pdf Jump to:NVCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Jump to:

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

FLOODING AND GAS EMISSIONS OF OLD IRON MINES IN LORAIN LAGNY Candice1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

related to abandoned mine workings. This study has been extended to other sectors of the Lorraine basin reservoirs of "Rosselange", Franchepré and "Orne". Then, investigation was made in non-flooded reservoirs

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

322

After the flood : crisis, voice and innovation in Maputo's solid waste management sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores responses to the problem of solid waste management (SWM) in two neighborhoods of Maputo, Mozambique in the wake of catastrophic flooding in 2000. In these neighborhoods, small-scale service providers ...

Kruks-Wisner, Gabrielle (Gabrielle K.)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, J.S.; Westmoreland, C.G.

1982-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

324

Model studies to investigate the effects of fixed streamlines on water flooding performance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODEL STUDIES TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECTS OF FIXED STREAMLINES ON WATER FLOODING PERFORMANCE A Thesis by Axel Venton Green Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ASrM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Green, Axel Venton

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, Jr., James S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Westmoreland, Clyde G. (Rockwood, TN)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

327

Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

328

Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TR- 275 2004 Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States Allen W. Sturdivant Ronald D. Lacewell Ari M. Michelsen M. Edward Rister Naomi Assadian Marian Eriksson Roger Freeman Jennifer H... Flood-Control Projects in the United States Prepared for: INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES SECTION EL PASO, TEXAS SEPTEMBER 2004 Prepared by: Texas Agriculture Experiment Station, and Texas Water Resources Institute of the Texas...

Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Michelsen, Ari M.; Rister, M. Edward; Assadian, Naomi; Eriksson, Marian; Freeman, Roger; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Madison, W. Tom; McGuckin, James T.; Morrison, Wendy; Robinson, John R.C.; Staats, Chris; Sheng, Zhuping; Srinivasan, R.; Villalobos, Joshua I.

329

Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

Arnold, Marion Denson

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

330

Winter Storms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun DengWISPWind Industry2W e l c o mWinterFY0

331

Assessing the Effects of Anthropogenic Aerosols on Pacific Storm Track Using a Multiscale Global Climate Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Atmospheric aerosols impact weather and global general circulation by modifying cloud and precipitation processes, but the magnitude of cloud adjustment by aerosols remains poorly quantified and represents the largest uncertainty in estimated forcing of climate change. Here we assess the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the Pacific storm track using a multi-scale global aerosol-climate model (GCM). Simulations of two aerosol scenarios corresponding to the present day and pre-industrial conditions reveal long-range transport of anthropogenic aerosols across the north Pacific and large resulting changes in the aerosol optical depth, cloud droplet number concentration, and cloud and ice water paths. Shortwave and longwave cloud radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere are changed by - 2.5 and + 1.3 W m-2, respectively, by emission changes from pre-industrial to present day, and an increased cloud-top height indicates invigorated mid-latitude cyclones. The overall increased precipitation and poleward heat transport reflect intensification of the Pacific storm track by anthropogenic aerosols. Hence, this work provides for the first time a global perspective of the impacts of Asian pollution outflows from GCMs. Furthermore, our results suggest that the multi-scale modeling framework is essential in producing the aerosol invigoration effect of deep convective clouds on the global scale.

Wang, Yuan; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Renyi; Ghan, Steven J.; Lin, Yun; Hu, Jiaxi; Pan, Bowen; Levy, Misti; Jiang, Jonathan; Molina, Mario J.

2014-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Implementation of the El Mar (Delaware) Unit CO2 flood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Union Royalty, Inc., Amoco Production Company, and Enron Liquids Pipeline Company recently announced that they have commenced operations of an innovative enhanced oil recovery project at the El Mar (Delaware) Unit in Loving County, Texas, about 100 miles west of Midland, Texas. The project will convert the unit`s existing oil recovery system from a secondary (waterflood) system to a tertiary (CO2 flood) system designed to use carbon dioxide and water to increase crude oil production from the unit. What makes this EOR project unique is the creative deal structured by the partners involved. Amoco, Union Royalty, and Enron have worked out an unprecedented arrangement whereby Amoco essentially trades CO2 for an interest in Union Royalty`s future oil production from the unit. By pioneering this innovative deal new production life has been restored to a field that otherwise might dry up. Enron is participating in the project by transporting CO2 to the unit via a 40-mile expansion of its Central Basin Pipeline system from the Dollarhide oil field in Andrews county, Texas. The project will be implemented in four phases. The first phase in operation today comprises seven CO2 injection wells which have begun to process the reservoir with CO2. Plans now call for more CO2 injectors to be installed during the next three to five years until a total of 65 CO2 injectors and an on-site CO2 compression facility serve the unit`s 70 production wells.

McKnight, T.N. Jr. [Union Royalty, Inc., Midland, TX (United States); Merchant, D.L.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Horizontal well improves oil recovery from polymer flood--  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Horizontal drilling associated with an injection scheme appears to be highly promising for obtaining additional oil recovery. Horizontal well CR 163H, in the Chateaurenard field is discussed. It demonstrated that a thin unconsolidated sand can be successfully drilled and cased. The productivity index (PI) of the well was much greater than vertical wells, and an unproduced oil bank was successfully intersected. On the negative side, it was necessary to pump low in a very deviated part of the well, and the drilling cost was high compared to an onshore vertical well. CR 163H was the fifth and probably most difficult horizontal well drilled by Elf Aquitaine. Located within a polymer-flood project, the target was a 7-m thick sand reservoir at a vertical depth of 590:0080 m. In this inverted seven-spot configuration with one injector in the center and six producers at a distance of 400 m, a polymer solution was injected from 1977 to 1983, followed by water injection.

Bruckert, L. (Elf Aquitaine, Boussens, (FR))

1989-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

335

Impact of rising greenhouse gases on mid-latitude storm tracks and associated hydroclimate variability and change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Project Summary This project aimed to advance physical understanding of how and why the mid-latitude jet streams and storm tracks shift in intensity and latitude in response to changes in radiative forcing with an especial focus on rising greenhouse gases. The motivation, and much of the work, stemmed from the importance that these mean and transient atmospheric circulation systems have for hydroclimate. In particular drying and expansion of the subtropical dry zones has been related to a poleward shift of the mid-latitude jets and storm tracks. The work involved integrated assessment of observation and model projections as well as targeted model simulations.

Seager, Richard

2014-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

336

Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Data from Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

In October 2010, the initial deployment of the second ARM Mobile Facility (AMF2) took place at Steamboat Springs, Colorado, for the Storm Peak Laboratory Cloud Property Validation Experiment (STORMVEX). The objective of this field campaign was to obtain data about liquid and mixed-phase clouds using AMF2 instruments in conjunction with Storm Peak Laboratory (located at an elevation of 3220 meters on Mt. Werner), a cloud and aerosol research facility operated by the Desert Research Institute. STORMVEX datasets are freely available for viewing and download. Users are asked to register with the ARM Archive; the user's email address is used from that time forward as the login name.

337

Impacts of Beam Broadening and Earth Curvature on Storm-Scale 3D Variational Data Assimilation of Radial Velocity with Two Doppler Radars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. They can be used to determine the physical location of each radar measurement and to properly map by simplifications vary with the distance between the analyzed storm and the radar. For single time level wind of Radial Velocity with Two Doppler Radars GUOQING GE Center for Analysis and Prediction of Storms

Gao, Jidong

338

Modeling of Coastal Inundation, Storm Surge, and Relative Sea-Level Rise at Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, Virginia, U.S.A.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Coastal Inundation, Storm Surge, and Relative Sea- Level Rise at Naval Station Norfolk. Modeling of coastal inundation, storm surge, and relative sea-level rise at Naval Station Norfolk, Norfolk, and relative sea-level-rise (RSLR) scenarios were examined at the U.S. Naval Station, Norfolk, Virginia

US Army Corps of Engineers

339

Remediation of Mercury-Contaminated Storm Sewer Sediments from the West End Mercury Area at the Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, Tennessee - 12061  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Y-12 National Security Complex in Oak Ridge, TN has faced an ongoing challenge from mercury entrapped in soils beneath and adjacent to buildings, storm sewers, and process pipelines. Previous actions to reduce the quantity and/or mobilization of mercury-contaminated media have included plugging of building floor drains, cleaning of sediment and sludge from sumps, manholes, drain lines, and storm sewers, lining/relining of storm sewers and replacement of a portion of the storm sewer trunk line, re-routing and removal of process piping, and installation of the Central Mercury Treatment System to capture and treat contaminated sump water. Despite the success of these actions, mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls that discharge to Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) continues to pose a threat to long-term water quality. A video camera survey of the storm sewer network revealed several sections of storm sewer that had large cracks, separations, swells, and accumulations of sediment/sludge and debris. The selected remedy was to clean and line the sections of storm sewer pipe that were determined to be primary contributors to the mercury flux in the storm sewer out-falls. The project, referred to as the West End Mercury Area (WEMA) Storm Sewer Remediation Project, included cleaning sediment and debris from over 2,460 meters of storm sewer pipe followed by the installation of nearly 366 meters of cure-in-place pipe (CIPP) liner. One of the greatest challenges to the success of this project was the high cost of disposal associated with the mercury-contaminated sludge and wastewater generated from the storm sewer cleaning process. A contractor designed and operated an on-site wastewater pre-treatment system that successfully reduced mercury levels in 191 cubic meters of sludge to levels that allowed it to be disposed at Nevada Nuclear Security Site (NNSS) disposal cell as a non-hazardous, low-level waste. The system was also effective at pre-treating over 1,514,000 liters of wastewater to levels that met the waste acceptance criteria for the on-site West End [wastewater] Treatment Facility (WETF). This paper describes the storm sewer cleaning and lining process and the methods used to process the mercury-contaminated sludge and wastewater, as well as several 'lessons learned' that would be relevant to any future projects involving storm sewer cleaning and debris remediation. (authors)

Tremaine, Diana [Science and Ecology Corporation, Knoxville, Tennessee, 37931 (United States); Douglas, Steven G. [B and W Y-12, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, 37831 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Non-Adjoint Surfactant Flood Optimization of Net Present Value and Incorporation of Optimal Solution Under Geological and Economic Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

follows the style of SPE Journal. 2 2. LITERATURE REVIEW Literature reviews for this research involved studying the past history of surfactant flood optimization and water flood optimization. Each area was unique in its perspective... that it is not purely a physical problem but an economical problem also. They continued in their analysis of past work by critiquing the work that argues for optimal salinity as vital in designing optimal surfactant floods (Porzucek, et al., 1988a). Assimilating...

Odi, Uchenna O.

2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Augmenting a Microbial Selective Plugging Technique with Polymer Flooding to Increase the Efficiency of Oil Recovery - A Search for Synergy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project was to determine if the effectiveness of a microbial permeability profile modification technique can be improved through polymer flooding.

Brown, Lewis R.; Pittman Jr., Charles U.; Lynch, F. Leo; Vadie, A. Alex; French, W. Todd

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

342

17Solar Storm Energy and Pie Graphs The pie charts below show approximately how various forms of energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17Solar Storm Energy and Pie Graphs The pie charts below show approximately how various forms of energy are involved in a solar flare. Flares occur when stored magnetic energy is suddenly released magnetic energy Graph of solar flare energy forms Problem 1 - About what percentages of each of the four

343

Chemical composition of dust storms in Beijing and implications for the mixing of mineral aerosol with pollution aerosol  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with pollution aerosol on the pathway Yele Sun,1 Guoshun Zhuang,1,2,3 Ying Wang,1 Xiujuan Zhao,1,4 Jie Li,5 Zifa direction could be seen as the ``polluted'' pathway and the north-northwesterly direction as the relatively ``less-polluted'' one. Dust storms not only delivered large amounts of mineral elements but also carried

344

STORM TIME SEASONAL VARIATION OF TEC IN THE SOUTHERN HEMISPHERE MID-LATITUDE REGIONS USING SIGNALS FROM GPS SATELLITE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

region. The main source of this heating is the joule dissipation of electric currents (Förster & Jakowski SIGNALS FROM GPS SATELLITE E. Yizengaw1 and E. A. Essex Cooperative Research Center for Satellite Systems AND METHODS During an ionospheric storm there is heating of the lower part of the thermosphere in the auroral

Kassie, Endawoke Yizengaw

345

Magnetic storm acceleration of radiation belt electrons observed by the Scintillating Fibre Detector (SFD) onboard EQUATOR-S  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the 500±67300 km, 4° inclination EQUATOR-S orbit show that the increase of the energetic electron Żux of electrons in the outer radiation belt has been attributed to Pc 5 band ULF waves excited by high speed solar wind Żow associated with magnetic storms (Rostoker et al., 1998). The main features

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

346

World-Unique Wind Facilities Designed to protect us from storms, harness the power of wind and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

World-Unique Wind Facilities Designed to protect us from storms, harness the power of wind new ones to maximize energy savings and production from the power of wind Disaster Mitigation Research and develop sustainable cities, the Wind Engineering, Energy and the Environment (WindEEE) Institute

Denham, Graham

347

P2.3 DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE SEVERE WEATHER FORECAST VERIFICATION SYSTEM AT THE STORM PREDICTION CENTER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: Andrew R. Dean, CIMMS, Univ. of Oklahoma, National Weather Center, Suite 2300, Norman, OK 73072-7268; e PREDICTION CENTER Andrew R. Dean*1,2 , Russell S. Schneider 2 , and Joseph T. Schaefer 2 1 Cooperative Institute for Mesoscale Meteorological Studies, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 2 NOAA/NWS Storm

348

Instruments aboard the ship, the Pacific Storm, ping sound waves toward the cable. The oceanographer's eyes flicker  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Instruments aboard the ship, the Pacific Storm, ping sound waves toward the cable-pound Humboldt squid, and the sound waves, set at 38 kilohertz, bounce off the squid. An image shows up, and it attacks the tethered animal. The oceanographer screams. Fade to black. Seeing with Sound "Actually, I

Benoit-Bird, Kelly J.

349

1. MOTIVATION AND OVERVIEW Each year across the United States, floods,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

winds, lightning, and winter storms ­ so-called mesoscale weather events -- cause hundreds of deaths and Carbone 2002). Although mitigating the impacts of such events would yield enormous economic and societal that cannot accommodate the real time, on-demand, and dynamically-adaptive needs of mesoscale weather research

Xue, Ming

350

PPPL scientists take key step toward solving a major astrophysical...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

after reconnection. Magnetic reconnection can trigger geomagnetic storms that disrupt cell phone service, damage satellites and blackout power grids. But how reconnection, in...

351

ace inhibitory activity: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

HURRICANE FORECASTS FOR 2011 activity. 3 12;DEFINITIONS AND ACRONYMS Accumulated Cyclone Energy (ACE) - A measure of a named storm 234 The Geomagnetic Field Experiment...

352

A retrospective tiered environmental assessment of the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility, West Virginia,USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bird and bat fatalities from wind energy projects are an environmental and public concern, with post-construction fatalities sometimes differing from predictions. Siting facilities in this context can be a challenge. In March 2012 the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) released Land-based Wind Energy Guidelines to assess collision fatalities and other potential impacts to species of concern and their habitats to aid in siting and management. The Guidelines recommend a tiered approach for assessing risk to wildlife, including a preliminary site evaluation that may evaluate alternative sites, a site characterization, field studies to document wildlife and habitat and to predict project impacts, post construction studies to estimate impacts, and other post construction studies. We applied the tiered assessment framework to a case study site, the Mount Storm Wind Energy Facility in Grant County, West Virginia, USA, to demonstrate the use of the USFWS assessment approach, to indicate how the use of a tiered assessment framework might have altered outputs of wildlife assessments previously undertaken for the case study site, and to assess benefits of a tiered ecological assessment framework for siting wind energy facilities. The conclusions of this tiered assessment for birds are similar to those of previous environmental assessments for Mount Storm. This assessment found risk to individual migratory tree-roosting bats that was not emphasized in previous preconstruction assessments. Differences compared to previous environmental assessments are more related to knowledge accrued in the past 10 years rather than to the tiered structure of the Guidelines. Benefits of the tiered assessment framework include good communication among stakeholders, clear decision points, a standard assessment trajectory, narrowing the list of species of concern, improving study protocols, promoting consideration of population-level effects, promoting adaptive management through post-construction assessment and mitigation, and sharing information that can be used in other assessments.

Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Day, Robin [No Affiliation; Strickland, M. Dale [Western EcoSystems Technology

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. IV. Unusual Magnetic Cloud and Overall Scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The geomagnetic superstorm of 20 November 2003 with Dst = -422 nT, one of the most intense in history, is not well understood. The superstorm was caused by a moderate solar eruptive event on 18 November, comprehensively studied in our preceding Papers I-III. The analysis has shown a number of unusual and extremely complex features, which presumably led to the formation of an isolated right-handed magnetic-field configuration. Here we analyze the interplanetary disturbance responsible for the 20 November superstorm, compare some of its properties with the extreme 28-29 October event, and reveal a compact size of the magnetic cloud (MC) and its disconnection from the Sun. Most likely, the MC had a spheromak configuration and expanded in a narrow angle of spheromak in an enhanced-density environment constituted by the tails of the preceding ICMEs. Additional circumstances favoring the su...

Grechnev, V V; Chertok, I M; Belov, A V; Filippov, B P; Slemzin, V A; Jackson, B V

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

The investigation of the effects of wettability on residual oil after water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS OF WETTABILITY ON RESIDUAL OIL AFTER WATER FLOODING A Thesis BY E. 0, BUR JA Approved as to style and content by: (Cha rman of C mmittee (Head of Department) (Mo th (Year) THE INVESTIGATION OF THE EFFECTS... OF WETTABILITY ON RESIDUAL OIL AFTER WATER FLOODING By E. O. Burja A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject...

Burja, Edward Oscar

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Grain sorghum response to different flooding periods at the early boot stage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRAIN SORGHUM RESPONSE TO DIFFERENT FLOODING PERIODS AT THE EARLY BOOT STAGE A Thesis by OSCAR ZOLEZZI DEL RIO Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A)M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE May 1976 Major Subject: Agricultural Engineering GRAIN SORGHUM RESPONSE TO DIFFERENT FLOODING PERIODS AT THE EARLY BOOT STAGE A Thesis by OSCAR 2OLE22I DEL RIO Approved as to style and content by: airman o ommzttee Hea o Departme t e er...

Zolezzi del Rio, Oscar

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

357

The effect on oil recovery of water flooding at pressures above and below the bubble point  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if the reservoir is water flooded in the presence of a {9) {10) free gas phase. Guerrero and Kennedy conducted a study using Woodbine sand and East Texas crude oil on the effect of surface-active agents on oil recovery by water flooding, They made several f.... Once the gas saturation increases to a value such that its mo- bility is as great as the mobility ef the otl it no longer can act as a blocking agent. , but probably the water is still forced to flush some of the more tortuous channels which normally...

Bass, Daniel Materson

1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean continental drift and the oldest known  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean in the Nullagine Synclinorium (and Meentheena Centrocline) of the East Pilbara Basin, Western Australia, has been. Langereis, Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean

Utrecht, Universiteit

359

FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR FLOOD MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT variability/change; risk assessment; flood management; water resources flexibility.) DiFrancesco, Kara N of Assessment Measures for Flood Management Systems. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA

Tullos, Desiree

360

A graphical method to study suspended sediment dynamics during flood events in the Wadi Sebdou, NW Algeria (19732004)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A graphical method to study suspended sediment dynamics during flood events in the Wadi Sebdou, NW sediment concentration Semiarid watershed Flood Wadi Algeria s u m m a r y Small sub-basins are numerous period (1973­2004) was analyzed at the outlet of the Wadi Sebdou basin (256 km2 ) in northwest Algeria

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Improved efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhanced prospects for CO{sub 2} flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. Annual report, April 18, 1995--April 17, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO{sub 2} floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This objective is being accomplished by extending experimental and modeling research in three task areas: (1) foams for selective mobility control in heterogeneous reservoirs, (2) reduction of the amount of CO{sub 2} required in CO{sub 2} floods, and (3) low IFT processes and the possibility of CO{sub 2} flooding in fractured reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project for each of the three task areas. In the first task, we are investigating a desirable characteristic of CO{sub 2}-foam called Selective Mobility Reduction (SMR) that results in an improvement in displacement efficiency by reducing the effects of reservoir heterogeneity. Research on SMR of foam during the past year has focused on three subjects: (1) to verify SMR in different rock permeabilities that are in capillary contact; (2) to test additional surfactants for the SMR property; and (3) to develop a modeling approach to assess the oil recovery efficiency of SMR in CO{sub 2}-foam on a reservoir scale. The experimental results from the composite cores suggest that the rock heterogeneity has significant effect on two phase (CO{sub 2}/brine) flow behavior in porous media, and that foam can favorably control CO{sub 2} mobility. The numerical modeling results suggest that foam with SMR can substantially increase the sweep efficiency and therefore improve oil recovery.

Grigg, R.B.; Schechter, D.S.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

Schmeltzer, J. S., Millier, J. J., Gustafson, D. L.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-STORM 100 Storage Modules at Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for two modules at the Diablo Canyon Power Plant ISFSI identified as candidates for inspection. These are HI-STORM 100 modules of a site-specific design for storing PWR 17x17 fuel in MPC-32 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions. • storage module overpack configuration based on FSAR documentation of HI-STORM100S-218, Version B; due to unavailability of site-specific design data for Diablo Canyon ISFSI modules • Individual assembly and total decay heat loadings for each canister, based on at-loading values provided by PG&E, “aged” to time of inspection using ORIGEN modeling o Special Note: there is an inherent conservatism of unquantified magnitude – informally estimated as up to approximately 20% -- in the utility-supplied values for at-loading assembly decay heat values • Axial decay heat distributions based on a bounding generic profile for PWR fuel. • Axial location of beginning of fuel assumed same as WE 17x17 OFA fuel, due to unavailability of specific data for WE17x17 STD and WE 17x17 Vantage 5 fuel designs • Ambient conditions of still air at 50°F (10°C) assumed for base-case evaluations o Wind conditions at the Diablo Canyon site are unquantified, due to unavailability of site meteorological data o additional still-air evaluations performed at 70°F (21°C), 60°F (16°C), and 40°F (4°C), to cover a range of possible conditions at the time of the inspection. (Calculations were also performed at 80°F (27°C), for comparison with design basis assumptions.) All calculations are for steady-state conditions, on the assumption that the surfaces of the module that are accessible for temperature measurements during the inspection will tend to follow ambient temperature changes relatively closely. Comparisons to the results of the inspections, and post-inspection evaluations of temperature measurements obtained in the specific modules, will be documented in a separate follow-on report, to be issued in a timely manner after the inspection has been performed.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2014-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Developing a GIS tool to assess potential damage of future floods J. Eleutrio1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis, vulnerability assessment, natural hazard, decision support tool. 1 Introduction Flood risk brings and A. Rozan1 1 UMR Cemagref/ENGEES GESTE, Territorial Management of Water and Environment, France 2 UTR Urban Hydraulics - UMR CNRS/UdS/ ENGEES Mechanical Institute of Fluids and Solids, France Abstract

Boyer, Edmond

365

RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-RELEASES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 RESERVOIR RELEASE FORECAST MODEL FOR FLOOD OPERATION OF THE FOLSOM PROJECT INCLUDING PRE-line Planning Mode, the Reservoir Release Forecast Model (RRFM) is being used to test alternatives operating River Forecast Center. The RRFM will make possible the risk-based operation of the Folsom Project

Bowles, David S.

366

Cedar River, Cedar Rapids, Iowa Flood Risk Management Feasibility Study Report with Integrated Environmental Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Engineers (USACE) has developed a plan for the flood risk management for the Cedar River, Cedar Rapids, Iowa all 12 comments. 1. IEPR Comment - High Significance: The analysis of existing cultural resources Resources was revised to explain why the resolution of the cultural resources will not exceed the budgeted

US Army Corps of Engineers

367

Flow and sediment processes in a cutoff meander of the Danube Delta during episodic flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flow and sediment processes in a cutoff meander of the Danube Delta during episodic flooding Laura as sediment storage locations, essentially removing channel and point bar sediments from the active sediment) in order to investigate the distribution of the flow and sediment and his impact on sedimentation

368

Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

network by forcing users to take detours. In a risk preventive viewpoint, the network administrator has 1 Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis Jean in the water level and its consequences on the road network vulnerability. The first part focuses

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

369

A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the New Orleans Flood Protection System Stphane Hallegatte1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such a hurricane protection a rational investment, even if countervailing risks and moral hazard issues1 A Cost-Benefit Analysis of the New Orleans Flood Protection System Stéphane Hallegatte1 Center for Environmental Sciences and Policy, Stanford University, and Centre International de Recherche sur l

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

370

CO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- The Westphalian deposit is constituted by numerous exploited coal seams of different thicknesses. These seamsCO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area Candice Lagnya, a former coal mining area. To understand the origin of this production, a borehole of 90 meters deep

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

371

High-speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack Yoohwan Kim',Ju-Yeon Jo', H during the Distributed Denial-oJService (DDoS) attack. By allocating bandwidths separately for TCP.9% of the attack trafic while legitimate traflc showed nearly identical performance as in the non-attacked

Chao, Jonathan

372

High-Speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 High-Speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack Yoohwan Kim1 , Ju-Yeon Jo1 Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 ABSTRACT Protection from Distributed Denial-of-Service attacks has been of a great interest recently and substantial progress has been made for preventing some attack

Merat, Francis L.

373

Climate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of climate warming can be very significant. Integrated water resources management is a promising wayClimate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply climate warming impacts on surface runoff, groundwater inflows and reservoir evaporation for distributed

Lund, Jay R.

374

Ecosystem effects of environmental flows: modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

physical system using: (1) a reservoir operations model to simulate reservoir releases and reservoir water experimental floods on the differential mortality of native and exotic riparian trees, on beaver dam integrity of model applications and experimental flow releases are contributing to adaptive flow management

375

Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise Rik is related with the low shelf gradient and a strong acceleration of the East Asian sea-level rise from 34 depositional systems change into estuaries and eventually drown when sea-level rise overtakes the sediment

Wetzel, Andreas

376

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise Jochen Hinkela,1st century sea-level rise are assessed on a global scale taking into account a wide range- ment and sea-level rise. Uncertainty in global mean and regional sea level was derived from four

Marzeion, Ben

377

Indonesian official blames Illegal loggers for flood BUKIT LAWANG, Indonesia (AP) --Indonesia's environment minister on  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indonesian official blames Illegal loggers for flood BUKIT LAWANG, Indonesia (AP) -- Indonesia. Environmentalists say unchecked logging in Indonesia, a sprawling archipelago with 210 million inhabitants, disrupts, Indonesia's largest environmental group, said that up to 20% of Leuser National Park, which overlooks Bukit

378

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

Julien, Pierre Y.

379

FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Prabir Daripa developed flows in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In a recent exhaustive study [Transport in Porous Media, 93 fluid flows that occur in porous media during tertiary dis- placement process of chemical enhanced oil

Daripa, Prabir

380

Culvert Design for Flood Routing considering Sediment Transport W.J. Rahmeyer PhD.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Culvert Design for Flood Routing considering Sediment Transport W.J. Rahmeyer PhD.1 and W routing methodologies do not consider sediment bed-load transport through the culverts or pipelines of road crossings. Many practitioners either ignore the transport of sediment through a culvert or assume

Rahmeyer, William J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Building boundary is necessary for the real estate industry, flood management, and homeland security applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract Building boundary is necessary for the real estate industry, flood management, and homeland security applications. The extraction of building boundary is also a crucial and difficult step, and Purdue University campus are evaluated. Introduction Airborne lidar (light detection and ranging

Shan, Jie

382

The effect of surface and interfacial tensions upon the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE EFFECT OF SURFACE AND INTERFACIAL TENSIONS UPON THE RECOVERY OF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Dissertation By ERASMO T . GUERRERO Approved as to style and content by: J t Q J w & U 7 T Chsfirman of Cfommittee f Head of Department TABLE....................................................................................................... .......... 25 Surface and Interfacial Tensions..........................................................26 Adsorption............................... .................. . ........................................ .......... 31 Flow Tests...

Guerrero, Erasmo Trevino

1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Impact of Climate Change on Urban Flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

www.exeter.ac.uk/inspiring-science Impact of Climate Change on Urban Flooding: a fairy taleMatiCs and PhysiCal sCienCes 2011ceMPS45 Dr Ole Mark is a specialist in climate change and urban water systems-years' experience in both developed and developing countries. Dr Mark is a key partner in the CORFU

Mumby, Peter J.

384

Freshwater flooding from rivers, overflowing sewage and septic systems and other sources can have a signifi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

there is no hazardous flood debris such as pro- pane tanks, pressurized-gas cylinders, refrigerators, air conditioners/sewer lines and oil/ gas pipelines, but you will be told whether or not you will have to contact those will locate all electrical, natural gas, communications and telephone lines.It may or may not locate water

385

How Accurate are Disaster Loss Data? The Case of U.S. Flood Damage  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

disaster assistance programs. Comparison of early damage estimates with actual expenditures in a California.S. National Weather Service (NWS) has compiled annual flood loss estimates for each state since 1955 the provision of disaster relief assistance, e.g., how much, when, and in what form. Loss estimates provide

Colorado at Boulder, University of

386

Defra FCERM Innovation Fund PROJECT SLD2316: RESTORING FLOODPLAIN WOODLAND FOR FLOOD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

London SW1P 2AL Tel: 020 7238 3000 Fax: 020 7238 6187 www.defra.gov.uk/environ/fcd © Crown copyright of facilitating the establishment of a sizeable area of floodplain woodland (15 ha) to help reduce flood risk results demonstrated that planting woodland at four sites in the River Laver catchment, totalling an area

387

Antioch University and EPA Webinar: Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency Webinar  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Hosted by the Antioch University and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), this webinar, which is part of a series, will address assessment, planning, and adaptation to not only better prepare for the next emergency, but to sustainably manage flooding and stormwater to maintain human health and a local economy.

388

Robust Optimization of Oil Reservoir Flooding G.M. van Essen, M.J. Zandvliet,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Robust Optimization of Oil Reservoir Flooding G.M. van Essen, M.J. Zandvliet, P.M.J. Van den Hof the reservoir to the subsurface. The injection wells inject water into the oil reservoir with the aim to push reservoirs, the oil-water front does not travel uniformly towards the pro- duction wells, but is usually

Van den Hof, Paul

389

A modeling study of coastal inundation induced by storm surge, sea-level rise, and subsidence in the Gulf of Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The northern coasts of the Gulf of Mexico are highly vulnerable to the direct threats of climate change, such as hurricane-induced storm surge, and such risks can be potentially exacerbated by land subsidence and global sea level rise. This paper presents an application of a coastal storm surge model to study the coastal inundation process induced by tide and storm surge, and its response to the effects of land subsidence and sea level rise in the northern Gulf coast. An unstructured-grid Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model was used to simulate tides and hurricane-induced storm surges in the Gulf of Mexico. Simulated distributions of co-amplitude and co-phase of semi-diurnal and diurnal tides are in good agreement with previous modeling studies. The storm surges induced by four historical hurricanes (Rita, Katrina, Ivan and Dolly) were simulated and compared to observed water levels at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration tide stations. Effects of coastal subsidence and future global sea level rise on coastal inundation in the Louisiana coast were evaluated using a parameter “change of inundation depth” through sensitivity simulations that were based on a projected future subsidence scenario and 1-m global sea level rise by the end of the century. Model results suggested that hurricane-induced storm surge height and coastal inundation could be exacerbated by future global sea level rise and subsidence, and that responses of storm surge and coastal inundation to the effects of sea level rise and subsidence are highly nonlinear and vary on temporal and spatial scales.

Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Kraucunas, Ian P.; Rice, Jennie S.; Preston, Benjamin; Wilbanks, Thomas

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

390

Risk prevention and policy formulation : responding to the 1999 mud-floods catastrophe in El Litoral Central, Venezuela  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifteen days of constant and intense rainfall in Venezuela culminated on December 16 1999, in catastrophic landslides and flooding along 25 miles of the Vargas State coastal strip. This catastrophe ravaged the Caracas ...

Parisca-Blanco, Sonia

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Development of a HEC-HMS model to inform river gauge placement for a flood early warning system in Uganda  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Communities in the downstream region of the Manafwa River Basin in eastern Uganda experience floods caused by heavy precipitation upstream. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has partnered with the Red Cross ...

Kaatz, Joel Alan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Incorporating daily flood control objectives into a monthly stochastic dynamic programming model for a hydroelectric complex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A monthly stochastic dynamic programing model was recently developed and implemented at British Columbia (B.C.) Hydro to provide decision support for short-term energy exports and, if necessary, for flood control on the Peace River in northern British Columbia. The model established the marginal cost of supplying energy from the B.C. Hydro system, as well as a monthly operating policy for the G.M. Shrum and Peace Canyon hydroelectric plants and the Williston Lake storage reservoir. A simulation model capable of following the operating policy then determines the probability of refilling Williston Lake and possible spill rates and volumes. Reservoir inflows are input to both models in daily and monthly formats. The results indicate that flood control can be accommodated without sacrificing significant export revenue.

Druce, D.J. (British Columbia Hydro and Power Authority, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N2 gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application.

William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

Three-dimensional effects of liquid water flooding in the cathode of a PEM fuel cell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Researchers all over the world are focusing on optimizing this system to be cost competitive with energy conversion devices currently available. It is a well known fact that the cathode of the PEM fuel cell is the performance limiting component due...THREE DIMENSIONAL EFFECTS OF LIQUID WATER FLOODING IN THE CATHODE OF A PEM FUEL CELL by Dilip Natarajan and Trung Van Nguyen* Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering University of Kansas Lawrence, KS 66045, USA Submitted...

Natarajan, Dilip; Van Nguyen, Trung

2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

395

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2002 to March 31, 2002. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. In addition, evaluation of the economics of commercial application in the surrounding area was performed. In a meeting on January 14, 2002 the possibility of staging the demonstration, starting with a 10-acre sub-pattern flood was raised and the decision made to investigate this plan in detail. The influence of carbon dioxide on oil properties and the influence of binary interaction parameters (BIP) used in the VIP simulator were investigated. VIP calculated swelling factors are in good agreement with published values up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Swelling factor and saturated liquid density are relatively independent of the BIP over the range of BIPs used (0.08-0.15) up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Assuming a CO2 EOR recovery rate projected as being most likely by current modeling, commercial scale CO2 flooding at $20/BO is possible in the leases in Hall-Gurney field. Relatively small floods (240-320 acres, 4-6 patterns) are economically viable at $20/BO in areas of very high primary and secondary productivity (>14 MBO/net acre recovery). Leases with moderately high primary and secondary productivity (> 10 MBO/net acre recovery) can be economic when combined with high productivity leases to form larger floods (>640 acres, 9 or more patterns).

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

396

Appendix A. Individual Evaluations of 30 Peak Discharges from 28 Extraordinary Floods in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

States #12;#12;Appendix A: Seco Creek 55 Location: This flood site is located at 29.4750 N and 99.3000 W,000 ft3 /s, as published in Crippen and Bue (1977). The rating is poor. Drainage area: 142 mi2 . Data by several gaging-station records in the area that show a major peak discharge occurring on or about May 31

397

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. MV Energy has received informal notification that GE Capital will approve sale of the portion of the Colliver lease involved in the pilot. Murfin Drilling Company is seeking local small independent partners for the pilot and has received commitment from White Eagle Energy and John O. Farmer Oil Company to date. A Contract was signed between the Kansas Department of Commerce & Housing and Murfin formalizing the KSDOC&H contribution of $88,000 to the pilot project. This money will be used for well rework and testing. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Understanding the Hydrologic Characteristics and Absorption Capacity of Bioretention Areas Kathryn Shepard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of storm water best management practices. Available at http://cfpub.epa.gov/npdes storm events. REFERENCES Atlanta Regional Commission. 2001. Georgia storm water management manual Building, Room 2401 Historically, stormwater management has focused primarily on flood control

Arnold, Jonathan

399

nuSTORM - Neutrinos from STORed Muons: Letter of Intent to the Fermilab Physics Advisory Committee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The idea of using a muon storage ring to produce a high-energy ({approx_equal} 50 GeV) neutrino beam for experiments was first discussed by Koshkarev in 1974. A detailed description of a muon storage ring for neutrino oscillation experiments was first produced by Neuffer in 1980. In his paper, Neuffer studied muon decay rings with E{sub {mu}} of 8, 4.5 and 1.5 GeV. With his 4.5 GeV ring design, he achieved a figure of merit of {approx_equal} 6 x 10{sup 9} useful neutrinos per 3 x 10{sup 13} protons on target. The facility we describe here ({nu}STORM) is essentially the same facility proposed in 1980 and would utilize a 3-4 GeV/c muon storage ring to study eV-scale oscillation physics and, in addition, could add significantly to our understanding of {nu}{sub e} and {nu}{sub {mu}} cross sections. In particular the facility can: (1) address the large {Delta}m{sup 2} oscillation regime and make a major contribution to the study of sterile neutrinos, (2) make precision {nu}{sub e} and {bar {nu}}{sub e} cross-section measurements, (3) provide a technology ({mu} decay ring) test demonstration and {mu} beam diagnostics test bed, and (4) provide a precisely understood {nu} beam for detector studies. The facility is the simplest implementation of the Neutrino Factory concept. In our case, 60 GeV/c protons are used to produce pions off a conventional solid target. The pions are collected with a focusing device (horn or lithium lens) and are then transported to, and injected into, a storage ring. The pions that decay in the first straight of the ring can yield a muon that is captured in the ring. The circulating muons then subsequently decay into electrons and neutrinos. We are starting with a storage ring design that is optimized for 3.8 GeV/c muon momentum. This momentum was selected to maximize the physics reach for both oscillation and the cross section physics. See Fig. 1 for a schematic of the facility.

Kyberd, P.; Smith, D.R.; /Brunel U.; Coney, L.; /UC, Riverside; Pascoli, S.; /Durham U., IPPP; Ankenbrandt, C.; Brice, S.J.; Bross, A.D.; Cease, H.; Kopp, J.; Mokhov, N.; Morfin, J.; /Fermilab /Yerkes Observ. /Glasgow U. /Imperial Coll., London /Valencia U. /Jefferson Lab /Kyoto U. /Northwestern U. /Osaka U.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. Assessment of the demonstration site has defined many aspects of the reservoir. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. Further analysis of the pilot site by the partners has indicated that a staged demonstration is considered optimal. A phased approach to implementation of the demonstration is proposed to reduce the risk of uncertainties as to whether the reservoir has basic properties (connectivity and ability to pressure-up) conducive to a meaningful CO2 flood demonstration. The proposed plan is to flood a 10+-acre pattern. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale ({approx}60-acre) demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. In general, the following significant modifications to the original Statement of Work are proposed: (1) The proposed plan would extend the period of Budget Period 1 to May 7, 2003. (2) Redefine the period of Budget Period 2 from 3/7/01-3/7/05 to 5/7/03-3/7/08. (3) Redefine the period of Budget Period 3 from 3/7/05-3/7/06 to 3/7/08-3/7/09. (4) To allow initial verification of the viability of the process before proceeding into the flood demonstration, move activities involved with preparing wells in the flood pattern (Task 5.1), repressurizing the pattern (Task 5.2), and constructing surface facilities (Task 5.3) from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1. (5) Allow US Energy Partners (USEP) to be a supplier of carbon dioxide from the ethanol plant in Russell, Kansas. (6) Change the pilot flood pattern, including the number and location of wells involved in the pilot. (7) Expenses are shifted from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1 to cover costs of additional reservoir characterization. All modified activities and tasks would maintain the existing required industry match of 55% in Budget Period 1, 65% in Budget Period 2, and 90% in Budget Period 3. Carbon dioxide supplied by the USEP ethanol facility would be valued such that the total cost of CO2 delivered to the demonstration site injection wellhead would not exceed the $3.00/MCF cost of supplying CO2 from Guymon, OK. Total cost of the modified project is $4,415,300 compared with $5,388,064 in the original project. The modified project would require no additional funding from US DOE.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Database of Low-E Storm Window Energy Performance across U.S. Climate Zones (Task ET-WIN-PNNL-FY13-01_5.3)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes process, assumptions, and modeling results produced in support of the Emerging Technologies Low-e Storm Windows Task 5.3: Create a Database of U.S. Climate-Based Analysis for Low-E Storm Windows. The scope of the overall effort is to develop a database of energy savings and cost effectiveness of low-E storm windows in residential homes across a broad range of U.S. climates using the National Energy Audit Tool (NEAT) and RESFEN model calculations. This report includes a summary of the results, NEAT and RESFEN background, methodology, and input assumptions, and an appendix with detailed results and assumptions by cliamte zone. Both sets of calculation results will be made publicly available through the Building America Solution Center.

Cort, Katherine A.; Culp, Thomas D.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

24/11/2010 10:22AGU: Radiation belt electron precipitation due to geomagnetic storms: Significance to middle atmosphere ozone chemistry Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/ja/ja1011/2010JA015599/2010JA015599.xml  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precipitation to neutral atmospheric chemistry. Building on an earlier study, we refine the quantification of the Sodankylä Ion and Neutral Chemistry model, we examine the significance of this particular period of electron of the electron precipitation flux into the atmosphere by using a timevarying energy spectrum determined from

Ulich, Thomas

403

Mobility control and scaleup for chemical flooding. Annual report, October 1981-September 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ongoing objectives of this project are: (1) to determine quantitatively the effects of dispersion, relative permeabilities, apparent viscosity and inaccessible pore volume on micellar/polymer flooding, and (2) to develop numerical simulators which incorporate these and other features of the process, so that mobility control design and scaleup of the micellar/polymer flooding process can be better accomplished. Section 2 of this report includes the results for capillary desaturation experiments for low tension fluids in Berea. These results show that some residual brine remains during microemulsion flooding even at the highest capillary number obtained in this experiment. Section 2 also includes more extensive results from the dispersion and relative permeability experiments. This section also includes data which extends the dispersion and relative permeability results from the case of two-phase flow to include initial results of three-phase flow at steady state. Section 3 is a complete description of our updated simulator. Section 4 describes and gives the results of an oil recovery experiment. Section 5 compares the results of this oil recovery experiment with our simulator. The agreement is the best obtained so far. Section 6 compares our simulator with a Sloss experiment reported by Gupta. Again, the agreement is good and demonstrates the capability of the improved simulator to account for the separation of alcohol and surfactant. Section 7 contains the results of several 2-D areal simulations involving new features of the 2-D simulator reported last year. Section 8 is a list of some of the major conclusions of this simulation research. Section 9 is an SPE paper combining the results of Senol with Walsh, a Ph.D. student of Lake and Schechter. Her polymer experiments were interpreted using Walsh's geochemical simulator. 133 references, 118 figures, 21 tables.

Pope, G.A.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project: Final report. [October 21, 1992-April, 30, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. Comprehensive reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations of the Monument Butte, Travis and Boundary units were presented in the two published project yearly reports. The primary and the secondary production from the Monument Butte unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close to its bubble point. The water flood in the smaller Travis unit appeared affected by natural and possibly by large interconnecting hydraulic fractures. Water flooding the boundary unit was considered more complicated due to the presence of an oil water contact in one of the wells. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter c ore, Formation Micro Imaging logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir characterization efforts identified new reservoirs in the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2000 barrels per day.

Deo, M.D. [Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering, University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US); Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc., Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (US); Nielson, D.L.; Lutz, S.J. [Energy and Geoscience Institute at the University of Utah, Salt Lake City (US)

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

Eric P. Robertson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Water balance of Pin-Point and Flush-Flood irrigated rice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant m '. The planting dates were May 26 and May 18 for the 1994 and 1995 growing seasons, respectively. At the first tiller stage, a mix of Quinclorac (Facet) and Bentazon (Basagran) herbicide was applied to the Flush-Flood (FF) plots only, at a... rate of 400g of active ingredient of Quinclorac and 800g of active 19 ingredient of Bentazon per hectare. The herbicide application was necessary to control mainly barnyardgrass (Kchinodoa spp. ) and sedges on the FF plots in both years. Pin- Point...

Roel Dellazoppa, Alvaro

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A correlation between wettability and the recovery of oil by water flooding  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in color and dispersible in hard watez. Petronate L (32) is a low molecular weight& highly refined petroleum sulfonate It is insoluble in waterz highly soluble in kerosene& and is a very viscous~ dark brown liquid. Ethofat 2/+2/60 (33) i. s a tall oil... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE ~ust 1~6 Major Subject Petroleum ineerin A COHRELAT ION BETWEEN WETTABILlTY AND THE RECOVERY CF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis ROBERT T KLLIK Approved as to style and content by...

Miller, Robert Thomas

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

AP1000{sup R} design robustness against extreme external events - Seismic, flooding, and aircraft crash  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Both the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) require existing and new nuclear power plants to conduct plant assessments to demonstrate the unit's ability to withstand external hazards. The events that occurred at the Fukushima-Dai-ichi nuclear power station demonstrated the importance of designing a nuclear power plant with the ability to protect the plant against extreme external hazards. The innovative design of the AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant provides unparalleled protection against catastrophic external events which can lead to extensive infrastructure damage and place the plant in an extended abnormal situation. The AP1000 plant is an 1100-MWe pressurized water reactor with passive safety features and extensive plant simplifications that enhance construction, operation, maintenance and safety. The plant's compact safety related footprint and protection provided by its robust nuclear island structures prevent significant damage to systems, structures, and components required to safely shutdown the plant and maintain core and spent fuel pool cooling and containment integrity following extreme external events. The AP1000 nuclear power plant has been extensively analyzed and reviewed to demonstrate that it's nuclear island design and plant layout provide protection against both design basis and extreme beyond design basis external hazards such as extreme seismic events, external flooding that exceeds the maximum probable flood limit, and malicious aircraft impact. The AP1000 nuclear power plant uses fail safe passive features to mitigate design basis accidents. The passive safety systems are designed to function without safety-grade support systems (such as AC power, component cooling water, service water, compressed air or HVAC). The plant has been designed to protect systems, structures, and components critical to placing the reactor in a safe shutdown condition within the steel containment vessel which is further surrounded by a substantial 'steel concrete' composite shield building. The containment vessel is not affected by external flooding, and the shield building design provides hazard protection beyond that provided by a comparable reinforced concrete structure. The intent of this paper is to demonstrate the robustness of the AP1000 design against extreme events. The paper will focus on the plants ability to withstand extreme external events such as beyond design basis flooding, seismic events, and malicious aircraft impact. The paper will highlight the robustness of the AP1000 nuclear island design including the protection provided by the unique AP1000 composite shield building. (authors)

Pfister, A.; Goossen, C.; Coogler, K.; Gorgemans, J. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Low-frequency QPO, Magnetic Flood and the states of GRS 1915+105  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We sum up progress accomplished, since the last microquasar workshop, on the physics of the Accretion-Ejection Instability (AEI), and its ability to explain the properties of the low-frequency QPO of microquasars. These results concern the basic theory of the instability, its numerical simulation and the resulting modelisation of the QPO, as well as detailed observations of the QPO properties. They converge to reinforce the `magnetic flood' scenario, extrapolated from the AEI to explain the ~ 30 minutes cycles of G1915. We then discuss directions in which this scenario might be extended toward a more global view of the evolution of this source.

M. Tagger

2002-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

410

Modeling Storm Water Runoff and Soil Interflow in a Managed Forest, Upper Coastal Plain of the Southeast US.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Forest Service-Savannah River is conducting a hectare-scale monitoring and modeling study on forest productivity in a Short Rotation Woody Crop plantation at the Savannah River Site, which is on Upper Coastal Plain of South Carolina. Detailed surveys, i.e., topography, soils, vegetation, and dainage network, of small (2-5 ha) plots have been completed in a 2 square-km watershed draining to Fourmile Creek, a tributary of the Savannah River. We wish to experimentally determine the relative importance of interflow on water yield and water quality at this site. Interflow (shallow subsurface lateral flow) can short-circuit rainfall infiltration, preventing deep seepage and resulting in water and chemical residence times in the watershed much shorter than that if deep seepage were the sole component of infiltration. The soil series at the site (Wagram, Dothan, Fuquay, Ogeechee, and Vaucluse) each have a clay-rich B horizon of decimeter-scale thickness at depths of 1-2 m below surface. As interflow is affected by rainfall intensity and duration and soil properties such as porosity, permeability, and antecedent soil moisture, our calculations made using the Green and Ampt equation show that the intensity and duration of a storm event must be greater than about 3 cm per hour and 2 hours, respectively, in order to initiate interflow for the least permeable soils series (Vaucluse). Tabulated values of soil properties were used in these preliminary calculations. Simulations of the largest rainfall events from 1972-2002 data using the Green and Ampt equation provide an interflow: rainfall ratio of 0 for the permeable Wagram soil series (no interflow) compared to 0.46 for the less permeable Vaucluse soil series. These initial predictions will be compared to storm water hydrographs of interflow collected at the outflow point of each plot and refined using more detailed soil property measurements.

Callahan, T.J.; Cook, J.D.; Coleman, Mark D.; Amatya, Devendra M.; Trettin, Carl C.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

CO2 flood tests on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone, Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geological sequestration of CO2, whether by enhanced oil recovery (EOR), coal-bed methane (CBM) recovery, or saline aquifer injection is a promising near-term sequestration methodology. While tremendous experience exists for EOR, and CBM recovery has been demonstrated in existing fields, saline aquifer injection studies have only recently been initiated. Studies evaluating the availability of saline aquifers suitable for CO2 injection show great potential, however, the long-term fate of the CO2 injected into these ancient aqueous systems is still uncertain. For the subject study, a series of laboratory-scale CO2 flood tests were conducted on whole core samples of the Mt. Simon sandstone from the Illinois Basin. By conducting these tests on whole core samples rather than crushed core, an evaluation of the impact of the CO2 flood on the rock mechanics properties as well as the geochemistry of the core and brine solution has been possible. This empirical data could provide a valuable resource for the validation of reservoir models under development for these engineered CO2 systems.

O'Connor, William K.; Rush, Gilbert E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of December 2004, 11.39 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 242 MCFD. Vent losses were excessive during June as ambient temperatures increased. Installation of smaller plungers in the carbon dioxide injection pump reduced the recycle and vent loss substantially. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May and in the second production well in August. No channeling of carbon dioxide was observed. The GOR has remained within the range of 3000-4000 for most the last six months. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.35 B/D for the six month period between July 1 and December 31. Cumulative oil production was 814 bbls. Neither well has experienced increased oil production rates expected from the arrival of the oil bank generated by carbon dioxide injection.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfn; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2004-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery: CO/sub 2/ miscible flood predictive model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The CO/sub 2/ Miscible Flood Predictive Model (CO2PM) was developed by Scientific Software-Intercomp for the US Department of Energy and was used in the National Petroleum Council's (NPC) 1984 survey of US enhanced oil recovery potential (NPC, 1984). The CO2PM is applicable to both secondary (mobile oil) and tertiary (residual oil) floods, and to either continuous CO/sub 2/ injection or water-alternating-gas (WAG) processes. In the CO2PM, an oil rate versus time function for a single pattern is computed, the results of which are passed to the economic calculations. To estimate multi-pattern project behavior a pattern development schedule is required. After-tax cash flow is computed by combining revenues with costs for drilling, conversion and well workovers, CO/sub 2/ compression and recycle, fixed and variable operating costs, water treating and disposal costs, depreciation, royalties, severance, state, federal and windfall profit taxes, cost and price inflation rates, and the discount rate. A lumped parameter uncertainty model is used to estimate risk, allowing for variation in computed project performance within an 80% confidence interval. The CO2PM is a three-dimensional (layered, five-spot), two-phase (aqueous and oleic), three component (oil, water, and CO/sub 2/) model. It computes oil and CO/sub 2/ breakthrough and recovery from fractional theory modified for the effects of viscous fingering, areal sweep, vertical heterogeneity and gravity segregation. 23 refs., 19 figs., 57 tabs.

Ray, R.M.; Munoz, J.D.

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A technical and economic comparison of waterflood infill drilling and CO2 flooding for Monahans Clearfork Unit of West Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF WATERFIXK)D INFILL DRILLING AND CO2 FLOODING FOR MONAHANS CLEARFORK UNIT OF WEST TEXAS A Thesis by GUOPING XUE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1993 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering A TECHNICAL AND ECONOMIC COMPARISON OF WATERFLOOD INFILL DRILLING AND CO2 FLOODING FOR MONAHANS CLEARFORK UNIT OF WEST TEXAS A Thesis by GUOPING XUE...

Xue, Guoping

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Discussion of "Development and Verification of an Analytical Solution for Fore-casting Nonlinear Kinematic Flood Waves" by Sergio E. Serrano  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinematic Flood Waves" by Sergio E. Serrano Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, July/August 2006, Vol. 11, No presents an interesting method to forecast nonlinear kinematic flood waves (Serrano, 2006). As a first to the Kinematic Wave Equation (KWE). The range of time lags for which this analytical solution is applicable being

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

416

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principle objective of this project is to demonstrate the economic viability and widespread applicability of an innovative reservoir management and carbon dioxide (CO2) flood project development approach for improving CO2 flood project economics in shallow shelf carbonate (SSC) reservoirs.

Czirr, K.L.; Gaddis, M.P.; Moshell, M.K.

2002-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

417

Flooding in urban drainage systems: Coupling hyperbolic conservation laws for sewer systems and surface flow  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we propose a model for a sewer network coupled to surface flow and investigate it numerically. In particular, we present a new model for the manholes in storm sewer systems. It is derived using the balance of the total energy in the complete network. The resulting system of equations contains, aside from hyperbolic conservation laws for the sewer network and algebraic relations for the coupling conditions, a system of ODEs governing the flow in the manholes. The manholes provide natural points for the interaction of the sewer system and the run off on the urban surface modelled by shallow water equations. Finally, a numerical method for the coupled system is presented. In several numerical tests we study the influence of the manhole model on the sewer system and the coupling with 2D surface flow.

Borsche, Raul

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Geomagnetic Temporal Spectrum Catherine Constable 1 GEOMAGNETIC TEMPORAL SPECTRUM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a result of dayside solar heating. Lightning generates high frequency Schumann resonances in the Earth

Constable, Catherine G.

419

The detection of atmospheric rivers in atmospheric reanalyses and their links to British winter floods and the large-scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and deliver is also essential for water resources and supply [Dettinger et al., 2011]. [3] Knowledge about of the vertically integrated horizontal water vapor transport for the detection of persistent ARs (lasting 18 h as the cause of heavy precipitation and flooding over mid- latitude landmasses [e.g., Ralph et al., 2006

Allan, Richard P.

420

266 VOLUME 13 | NUMBER 3 | MARCH 2007 NATURE MEDICINE After decades of drought, new drug possibilities floodTB pipeline  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

possibilities floodTB pipeline For the first time in decades, there are nearly 30 drugs for tuberculosis (TB--but less than just five years ago, the pipeline was running empty. The newest drug used to treat the infection and don't interact with AIDS medications. "The drug pipeline is larger than it has ever been

Cai, Long

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flood performance, springer ''A'' sand, NE Purdy Unit, Garvin County, OK  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes and presents results of an overall program of monitoring and evaluation of a carbon dioxide flood being conducted in the Northeast Purdy Springer ''A'' Sand Unit in Garvin County, Oklahoma. The response of one specific five-spot pattern is described through detailed reservoir simulation utilizing data from observation well logging, pressure transient analysis, carbon dioxide injection profiling, sampling of produced fluids, and monitoring of production rates. A reservoir description satisfying primary, secondary and tertiary performance is also described in detail. History matching of the carbon dioxide flood performance is being utilized to define the effects on reservoir performance of waterblocking, viscous fingering and residual oil saturation to carbon dioxide flooding. These parameters are not laboratory defined. Sensitivity work was conducted to design the best process. In-situ saturation changes obtained from an observation well logging program are presented and correlated with model calculated saturation changes and indicate that oil is being mobilized as predicted by the simulator. A comparison of carbon dioxide injection profiles to water injection profiles and the results of observation well logging indicates that the carbon dioxide is flooding certain reservoir layers that were not waterflooded. The model reservoir description was modified to include these layers. Results of compositional analyses of produced fluids are presented.

Fox, M.J.; Beaty, W.G.; Simlote, V.N.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Evaluating resilience of DNP3-controlled SCADA systems against event buffer flooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DNP3 protocol is widely used in SCADA systems (particularly electrical power) as a means of communicating observed sensor state information back to a control center. Typical architectures using DNP3 have a two level hierarchy, where a specialized data aggregator device receives observed state from devices within a local region, and the control center collects the aggregated state from the data aggregator. The DNP3 communication between control center and data aggregator is asynchronous with the DNP3 communication between data aggregator and relays; this leads to the possibility of completely filling a data aggregator's buffer of pending events, when a relay is compromised or spoofed and sends overly many (false) events to the data aggregator. This paper investigates how a real-world SCADA device responds to event buffer flooding. A Discrete-Time Markov Chain (DTMC) model is developed for understanding this. The DTMC model is validated by a Moebius simulation model and data collected on real SCADA testbed.

Yan, Guanhua [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nicol, David M [UNIV OF IL; Jin, Dong [UNIV OF IL

2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

423

Field results of the polymer flooding pilot project in eastern Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Moran field in Allen County, Kans., has been producing since the early 1900s. Flooding became the principal means of production in this pool in 1957. Inexco purchased the Moran field in 1968. In June of 1975, Inexco Oil Co. initiated a Polymer Pilot Project on the Kreiger Lease in the Moran field. In March of 1977, this project was expanded from it's original 20 acres to a 126-acre project. This case history addresses the financial and technical success of this project and is considered significant in terms of the future of enhanced recovery projects in this type of reservoir. Inexco has demonstrated the feasibility and successful recovery of additional oil from the Moran Pool by means of the addition of polymer to the existing waterflood. This work describes the operations and interpretation of the results.

McCauley, R.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide was injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide was injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By March 7,2010, 8,736 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver A7, Colliver A3, Colliver A14 and Graham A4 located on adjacent leases. About 19,166 bbl of incremental oil were estimated to have been produced from these wells as of March 7, 2010. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Estimated oil recovery attributed to the CO2 flood is 27,902 bbl which is equivalent to a gross CO2 utilization of 4.8 MCF/bbl. The pilot project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Richard Pancake; JyunSyung Tsau; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2003 to March 31, 2003. A water supply well was permitted, drilled, and completed in the shallow, fresh-water, Dakota Sandstone. The pumphouse has been put in place and the long-term injection equipment is being set-up. Although the short-term injectivity test was cut short by power failure following an ice storm, results indicate the well exhibits sufficient injectivity to proceed with the long-term injectivity test, which will start in the beginning of the second quarter. The CO2 Project No.10 and No.12 wells were reworked and the Lansing-Kansas City (LKC) ''C'' interval in both wells isolated. The CO2 Project No.16 well was drilled deeper, cored in the LKC ''C'' and ''G'' zones, and cased to the ''C'' zone and will be perforated and stimulated in the beginning of second quarter. Initial wireline log analysis and examination of the core indicate that the porosity of the ''C'' zone in this location may be lower than in other parts of the pattern by 3-5 porosity units. Log analysis indicates water saturations are near 60% consistent with predicted residual oil saturation to waterflood modeling. Lower porosities may indicate lower permeability may also be present. Core analysis is being conducted and results will be available in the first week of the second quarter. A draft letter agreement has been presented to FLOCO2 Company for supply of CO2 storage and injection pump equipment.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave VanderGriend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Uganda Manafwa River early flood warning system development hydrologic watershed modeling using HEC-HMS, HEC-RAS, ArcGIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Manafwa River basin spans several districts in Eastern Uganda. Over the years, frequent floods have constantly posed a great threat to the local communities in these districts. The Uganda Red Cross Society (URCS) intends ...

Ma, Yan, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Simulation and Economic Screening of Improved Oil Recovery Methods with Emphasis on Injection Profile Control Including Waterflooding, Polymer Flooding and a Thermally Activated Deep Diverting Gel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recovery of hydrocarbons and premature well or field abandonment. Water production can be more problematic during waterflooding in a highly heterogeneous reservoir with vertical communication between layers leading to unevenness in the flood front, cross...

Okeke, Tobenna

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

429

Development and verification of simplified prediction models for enhanced oil recovery applications. CO/sub 2/ (miscible flood) predictive model. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A screening model for CO/sub 2/ miscible flooding has been developed consisting of a reservoir model for oil rate and recovery and an economic model. The reservoir model includes the effects of viscous fingering, reservoir heterogeneity, gravity segregation and areal sweep. The economic model includes methods to calculate various profitability indices, the windfall profits tax, and provides for CO/sub 2/ recycle. The model is applicable to secondary or tertiary floods, and to solvent slug or WAG processes. The model does not require detailed oil-CO/sub 2/ PVT data for execution, and is limited to five-spot patterns. A pattern schedule may be specified to allow economic calculations for an entire project to be made. Models of similar architecture have been developed for steam drive, in-situ combustion, surfactant-polymer flooding, polymer flooding and waterflooding. 36 references, 41 figures, 4 tables.

Paul, G.W.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2001 to December 31, 2001. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre) CO{sub 2} demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. Testing of present Colliver lease injection water on Lansing-Kansas City (L-KC) oomoldic rock indicates that injection brine must be filtered to < {approx}3-5 um and <15 um to prevent plugging of rocks with permeability as low as 1 md (millidarcy; 0.001 um2) and 10 md (0.01 um2), respectively. Pressure build-up testing on the Carter-Colliver No.7 well is interpreted to indicate the L-KC reservoir surrounding this well is {approx}9 ft (2.7 m) thick having an average effective water permeability of 25-35 md (0.025-0.035 um2) that is connected to the wellbore by either a high permeability fracture, bed, or region with low skin. Reservoir simulation evaluation of gridcell size effect on model oil recovery prediction indicates that, based on the model prediction of distribution of produced oil and CO{sub 2} volumes, oil recovery is strongly influenced by gravity segregation of CO{sub 2} into the upper higher permeability layers and indicates the strong control that vertical permeability and permeability barriers between depositional flood cycles exert on the CO{sub 2} flooding process. Simulations were performed on modifications of the 60-acre, two-injector pattern to evaluate oil recovery using other large-scale patterns. Simulations indicated that several 73-acre patterns with a single injector located near the Colliver No.7 could provide improved economics without increasing the amount of CO{sub 2} injected. The US Energy Partners ethanol plant in Russell, KS began operations in October ahead of schedule.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2003 to September 30, 2003. Conductivity testing between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 was performed over the period 08/20/03 through 09/05/03. Observed response in CO{sub 2} 13 production rates to changes in CO{sub 2}I No.1 injection rates are consistent with sufficient permeability between CO{sub 2}I No.1 and CO{sub 2} No.13 for a viable CO{sub 2} flood with a sufficient Process Pore Volume Rate (PPV). Based on the permeabilities near the CO{sub 2} No.16, a 2-producing well pattern has been determined to be optimal but may be changed during the flood depending on the response observed in the CO{sub 2} No.16. Present inter-well test results indicate there is greater permeability architecture complexity than originally predicted and that a low-permeability region or barrier that restricts but does stop flow may exist between the CO{sub 2}I No.1 and the CO{sub 2} No.13. Pilot area repressurization began on 09/05/03, immediately after CO{sub 2}I No.1-CO{sub 2} No.13 conductivity testing was complete, by increasing injection in the CO{sub 2}I No.1, CO{sub 2} No.10, and CO{sub 2} No.18. Adequate reservoir pressure in the portion of the pilot area needed to be above minimum miscibility pressure should be reached in November at which time initial CO{sub 2} injection could begin. It is estimated the 2-producing well, 10+-acre (4.05 ha) producing pattern will produce 18,000-21,000 BO (barrels oil; 2,880-3,360 m{sup 3}). Depending primarily on surface facilities costs, operating expenses, and the price of oil, for the predicted range of oil recovery the pilot is estimated to either break-even or be profitable from this point forward. Final arrangements and agreements for CO{sub 2} supply and delivery are being worked on and will be finalized in the next month.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

432

Field Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Miscible Flooding in the Lansing-Kansas City Formation, Central Kansas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and three production wells. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. By December 31, 2006, 79,072 bbls of water were injected into CO2 I-1 and 3,923 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Water injection rates into CO2 I-1, CO2 No.10 and CO2 No.18 were stabilized during this period. Oil production rates increased from 4.7 B/D to 5.5 to 6 B/D confirming the arrival of an oil bank at CO2 No.12. Production from wells to the northwest of the pilot region indicates that oil displaced from carbon dioxide injection was produced from Colliver No.7, Colliver No.3 and possibly Graham A4 located on an adjacent property. There is evidence of a directional permeability trend toward the NW through the pilot region. The majority of the injected carbon dioxide remains in the pilot region, which has been maintained at a pressure at or above the minimum miscibility pressure. Our management plan is to continue water injection maintaining oil displacement by displacing the carbon dioxide remaining in the C zone,. If the decline rate of production from the Colliver Lease remains as estimated and the oil rate from the pilot region remains constant, we estimate that the oil production attributed to carbon dioxide injection will be about 12,000 bbl by December 31, 2007. Oil recovery would be equivalent to 12 MCF/bbl, which is consistent with field experience in established West Texas carbon dioxide floods. The project is not economic.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2007-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

433

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from April 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003. The pilot water injection plant became operational 4/18/03 and began long-term injection in the CO2I No.1 on 4/23/03. The CO2I No.1 exhibits sufficient injectivity for pilot requirements with average absolute permeability surrounding this well equal to {approx}85 millidarcies. Response to injection in the CO2I No.1 has established that conductivity between CO2I No.1 and CO2 No.12, No.10, No.18 and TB Carter No.5 is sufficient for the demonstration. Workovers of the CO2 No.16 and CO2 No.13 were completed in April and May, respectively. Pressure response indicates No.16 communicates with the flood pattern area but core, swab-test, and pressure response data indicate permeability surrounding No.16 is not adequate to maintain the production rates needed to support the original pattern as the well is presently completed. Decisions concerning possible further testing and stimulation have been postponed until after testing of the No.13 is complete. Production rates for the No.13 are consistent with a surrounding reservoir average absolute permeability of {approx}80 md. However, pressure and rate tests results, partially due to the nature of the testing conducted to date, have not confirmed the nature of the CO2I No.1-CO2 No.13 conductivity. A build-up test and conductivity test are planned to begin the first weeks of the next quarter to obtain reservoir properties data and establish the connectivity and conductivity between CO2 I-1 and CO2 No.13. A new geomodel of the pattern area has been developed based on core from No.16 and the new wireline logs from the No.10, No.12, No.16, and No.13. The new geomodel is currently being incorporated into the basic calculations of reservoir volume and flood design and predicted response as well as the reservoir simulators. Murfin signed a letter agreement with FLOCO2 of Odessa, TX for supply of CO2 storage and injection equipment. Technology transfer activities have included presentations to the Environmental Protection Agency, Prof. Accountants Soc. of KS, Am. Assoc. of Petroleum Geologists, and a US Congressional aide staff member. The Associated Press also released a story concerning the project that was picked up by many Kansas newspapers.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By the end of December 2005, 14,115 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,091 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Continued injection of water is planned to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

435

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. The reservoir zone is an oomoldic carbonate located at a depth of about 2900 feet. The pilot consists of one carbon dioxide injection well and two production wells on about 10 acre spacing. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2005, 16.19 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Injection was converted to water on June 21, 2005 to reduce operating costs to a breakeven level with the expectation that sufficient carbon dioxide has been injected to displace the oil bank to the production wells by water injection. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February 2004, increasing to an average of about 3.78 B/D for the six month period between January 1 and June 30, 2005 before declining. By June 30, 2006, 41,566 bbls of water were injected into CO2I-1 and 2,726 bbl of oil were produced from the pilot. Injection rates into CO2I-1 declined with time, dropping to an unacceptable level for the project. The injection pressure was increased to reach a stable water injection rate of 100 B/D. However, the injection rate continued to decline with time, suggesting that water was being injected into a region with limited leakoff and production. Oil production rates remained in the range of 3-3.5 B/D following conversion to water injection. Oil rates increased from about 3.3 B/D for the period from January through March to about 4.7 B/D for the period from April through June. If the oil rate is sustained, this may be the first indication of the arrival of the oil bank mobilized by carbon dioxide injection. A sustained fluid withdrawal rate of about 200 B/D from CO2 No.12 and CO2 No.13 appears to be necessary to obtain higher oil rates. There is no evidence that the oil bank generated by injection of carbon dioxide has reached either production well. Water injection will continue to displace oil mobilized by carbon dioxide to the production wells and to maintain the pressure in the PPV region at a level that supports continued miscible displacement as the carbon dioxide is displaced by the injected water.

Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, April 1--June 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems; Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements; Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs; Compositional flow visualization experiments; Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems; Design estimates for nearly miscible displacements; Design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs; Compositional flow visualization experiments; and Simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ANALYSIS OF PWR SBO CAUSED BY EXTERNAL FLOODING USING THE RISMC TOOLKIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existing fleet of nuclear power plants is in the process of extending its lifetime and increasing the power generated from these plants via power uprates. In order to evaluate the impacts of these two factors on the safety of the plant, the Risk Informed Safety Margin Characterization project aims to provide insights to decision makers through a series of simulations of the plant dynamics for different initial conditions (e.g., probabilistic analysis and uncertainty quantification). This paper focuses on the impacts of power uprate on the safety margin of a boiling water reactor for a flooding induced station black-out event. Analysis is performed by using a combination of thermal-hydraulic codes and a stochastic analysis tool currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory, i.e. RAVEN. We employed both classical statistical tools, i.e. Monte-Carlo, and more advanced machine learning based algorithms to perform uncertainty quantification in order to quantify changes in system performance and limitations as a consequence of power uprate. Results obtained give a detailed investigation of the issues associated with a plant power uprate including the effects of station black-out accident scenarios. We were able to quantify how the timing of specific events was impacted by a higher nominal reactor core power. Such safety insights can provide useful information to the decision makers to perform risk informed margins management.

Mandelli, Diego; Smith, Curtis; Prescott, Steven; Alfonsi, Andrea; Rabiti, Cristian; Cogliati, Joshua; Kinoshita, Robert

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7.degree. F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88.degree. F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

440

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/ F. at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/ F. it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products.

Kamath, K.

1984-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

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441

Fire flood method for recovering petroleum from oil reservoirs of low permeability and temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a method of enhanced oil recovery by fire flooding petroleum reservoirs characterized by a temperature of less than the critical temperature of carbon dioxide, a pore pressure greater than the saturated vapor pressure of carbon dioxide at said temperature (87.7/sup 0/F at 1070 psia), and a permeability in the range of about 20 to 100 millidarcies. The in situ combustion of petroleum in the reservoir is provided by injecting into the reservoir a combustion supporting medium consisting essentially of oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof. The heat of combustion and the products of this combustion which consist essentially of gaseous carbon dioxide and water vapor sufficiently decrease the viscosity of oil adjacent to fire front to form an oil bank which moves through the reservoir towards a recovery well ahead of the fire front. The gaseous carbon dioxide and the water vapor are driven into the reservoir ahead of the fire front by pressure at the injection well. As the gaseous carbon dioxide cools to less than about 88/sup 0/F it is converted to liquid which is dissolved in the oil bank for further increasing the mobility thereof. By using essentially pure oxygen, ozone, or a combination thereof as the combustion supporting medium in these reservoirs the permeability requirements of the reservoirs are significantly decreased since the liquid carbon dioxide requires substantially less voidage volume than that required for gaseous combustion products. 1 table.

Kamath, K.

1983-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

442

Scale-up of miscible flood processes. [Quarterly report], January 1--April 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Efficient application of miscible floods to heterogeneous reservoirs requires the designer to take advantage of more than one of the physical mechanisms that act and interact to determine displacement performance. In this report, the investigators summarize the interactions of phase behavior, nonuniform flow, and crossflow and based on novel results obtained during the course of their experimental efforts. They suggest design opportunities for application of gas injection to near-miscible recovery processes, to enhanced gravity drainage, and even to fractured reservoirs. To design such processes intelligently, the quantitative scaling of the interplay of phase equilibria, reservoir heterogeneity, viscous fingering and particularly crossflow must be understood. In essence, they propose to make use of crossflow, i.e. transport in the direction transverse to the basic flow direction, to sweep portions of reservoirs that can be reached only very slowly by direct displacement. In this report, the core displacement and flow visualization experiments described suggest that the effects of low interfacial tensions (IFT`s) and gravity can be used to advantage in the design of multicontact miscible displacements for heterogeneous reservoirs, including fractured reservoirs.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO{sub 2} gas floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

Raible, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Improvement in oil recovery using cosolvents with CO sub 2 gas floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of investigations to improve oil recovery using cosolvents in CO{sub 2} gas floods. Laboratory experiments were conducted to evaluate the application and selection of cosolvents as additives to gas displacement processes. A cosolvent used as a miscible additive changed the properties of the supercritical gas phase. Addition of a cosolvent resulted in increased viscosity and density of the gas mixture, and enhanced extraction of oil compounds into the CO{sub 2} rich phase. Gas phase properties were measured in an equilibrium cell with a capillary viscometer and a high pressure densitometer. A number of requirements must be considered in the application of a cosolvent. Cosolvent miscibility with CO{sub 2}, brine solubility, cosolvent volatility and relative quantity of the cosolvent partitioning into the oil phase were factors that must be considered for the successful application of cosolvents. Coreflood experiments were conducted with selected cosolvents to measure oil recovery efficiency. The results indicate lower molecular weight additives, such as propane, are the most effective cosolvents to increase oil recovery.

Raible, C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

PPPL launches a $4.3 million project to expand research on magnetic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gives rise to the northern lights, solar flares and geomagnetic storms that can disrupt cell-phone service and black out power grids. The new 4.3 million device will probe...

446

EVALUATION OF THE FLOOD POTENTIAL OF THE SOUTH HOUSE (BLINEBRY) FIELD, LEA COUNTY, NEW MEXICO  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Blinebry (Permian) formation of eastern Lea County, NM has a long history of exploitation for petroleum and continues even today to be a strong target horizon for new drilling in the Permian Basin. Because of this long-standing interest it should be classified of strategic interest to domestic oil production; however, the formation has gained a reputation as a primary production target with limited to no flooding potential. In late May of 1999, a project to examine the feasibility of waterflooding the Blinebry formation was proposed to the U.S. Department of Energy's National Petroleum Technology Office (Tulsa, OK). A new well was proposed in one region (the South House area) to examine the reputation by acquiring core and borehole logging data for the collection of formation property data in order to conduct the waterflood evaluation. Notice of the DOE award was received on August 19, 1999 and the preparations for drilling, coring and logging were immediately made for a drilling start on 9/9/99. The Blinebry formation at 6000 feet, foot depth was reached on 9/16/99 and the coring of two 60 foot intervals of the Blinebry was completed on 9/19/99 with more than 98% core recovery. The well was drilled to a total depth of 7800 feet and the Blinebry interval was logged with spectral gamma ray, photoelectric cross section, porosity, resistivity, and borehole image logs on 8/24/99. The well was determined to be likely productive from the Blinebry interval and five & 1/2 inch casing was cemented in the hole on 9/25/99. Detailed core descriptions including environment of deposition have been accomplished. Whole core (a 4-inch diameter) and plug (1.5 inch diameter) testing for formation properties has been completed and are reported. Acquisition and analysis of the borehole logging results have been completed and are reported. Perforation of the Blinebry intervals was accomplished on November 8, 1999. The intervals were acidized and hydrofraced on 11/9 and 11/11 respectively. Production of oil and gas has been established with several months of production now available to make a reserve analysis. Production histories and reserves estimation are provided. An assessment of the flood potential for the South House project area has been completed with work concentrated on South House rock property and pay thickness characterization and analog studies. For the analogs, the North Robertson area, located twenty miles to the northeast, and the Teague Field, located 20 miles to the south, have been utilized due to their readily available database and previous waterflood studies. The South House area does appear to merit further examination as the rock quality compares favorably with both analog Fields; however, current well spacings of 40-acres will provide only marginal economics based upon $23.00/barrel oil prices. Permeability and porosity relationships are provided as a conditional demonstration that rock quality may be sufficient for successful waterflooding of the project area. Further rock property work and pay continuity studies are recommended.

L. Stephen Melzer

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Origin of Scale-Dependent Dispersivity and Its Implications For Miscible Gas Flooding  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dispersive mixing has an important impact on the effectiveness of miscible floods. Simulations routinely assume Fickian dispersion, yet it is well established that dispersivity depends on the scale of measurement. This is one of the main reasons that a satisfactory method for design of field-scale miscible displacement processes is still not available. The main objective of this project was to improve the understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of dispersion and mixing, particularly at the pore scale. To this end, microsensors were developed and used in the laboratory to measure directly the solute concentrations at the scale of individual pores; the origin of hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated from first principles of laminar flow and diffusion at the grain scale in simple but geometrically completely defined porous media; techniques to use flow reversal to distinguish the contribution to dispersion of convective spreading from that of true mixing; and the field scale impact of permeability heterogeneity on hydrodynamic dispersion was evaluated numerically. This project solved a long-standing problem in solute transport in porous media by quantifying the physical basis for the scaling of dispersion coefficient with the 1.2 power of flow velocity. The researchers also demonstrated that flow reversal uniquely enables a crucial separation of irreversible and reversible contributions to mixing. The interpretation of laboratory and field experiments that include flow reversal provides important insight. Other advances include the miniaturization of long-lasting microprobes for in-situ, pore-scale measurement of tracers, and a scheme to account properly in a reservoir simulator (grid-block scale) for the contributions of convective spreading due to reservoir heterogeneity and of mixing.

Steven Bryant; Russ Johns; Larry Lake; Thomas Harmon

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2002 to December 31, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. On November 1, 2002 Murfin Drilling Company purchased the 70-acre pilot area and will continue as the operator of the pilot. Murfin is seeking working interest partners and meetings with local small independents were conducted. To date, White Eagle Resources and John O. Farmer Oil Company have committed to working interest in the project. Arrangements have been made with Rein Operating to test the Rein No. 7 water supply well on the neighboring lease. Based on review of wellbore conditions in the Colliver No. 9 and No. 16 it has been decided to use the No. 16 in the pilot. A new tank battery was installed near the Colliver No. 10 well and the existing producers plumbed to the new tank battery to isolate production from the pilot area. Reservoir simulations have indicated that the low-permeability interval in the Carter-Colliver CO2I No. 1 injection well below 2,900 ft does not exhibit sufficient injectivity to warrant special stimulation or conformance treatment programs at the present time. Discussions have been initiated with FLOCO2 and preliminary conditions have been agreed upon for the exchange of CO2 for the use of storage and pump equipment at the pilot. A short-term injection test and the well reworks have been scheduled. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report. A presentation was given at the DOE Class II Review Meeting in Midland, TX on December 12, 2002.

Alan P. Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of gas injection processes are reported. The research examines how the physical mechanisms at work during a gas injection project interact to determine process performance. In particular, the authors examine: the interactions of equilibrium phase behavior and two-phase flow that determine local displacement efficiency and minimum miscibility pressure, the combined effects of viscous fingering, gravity segregation and heterogeneity that control sweep efficiency in 2- and 3-dimensional porous media, the use of streamtube/streamline methods to create very efficient simulation technique for multiphase compositional displacements, the scaling of viscous, capillary and gravity forces for heterogeneous reservoirs, and the effects of the thin films and spreading behavior on three-phase flow. The following key results are documented: rigorous procedures for determination of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) or minimum miscibility enrichment (MME) for miscibility have been developed for multicomponent systems; the complex dependence of MMP`s for nitrogen/methane floods on oil and injection gas composition observed experimentally is explained for the first time; the presence of layer-like heterogeneities strongly influences the interplay of gravity segregation and viscous fingering, as viscous fingers adapt to preferential flow paths and low permeability layers restrict vertical flow; streamtube/streamline simulation techniques are demonstrated for a variety of injection processes in 2 and 3 dimensions; quantitative scaling estimates for the transitions from capillary-dominated to gravity-dominated to viscous-dominated flows are reported; experimental results are given that demonstrate that high pressure CO{sub 2} can be used to generate low IFT gravity drainage in fractured reservoirs if fractures are suitably connected; and the effect of wetting and spreading behavior on three-phase flow is described. 209 refs.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Surviving Operation Desert Storm  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The importance of aircraft survivability during the invasion of Iraq is examined detailing anecdotal evidence of susceptibility and vulnerability reduction. Among the aircraft used that were designed to be more survivable than their predecessors were the F-117, A-10, F/A-18, and the AH-64. Reduced vulnerability is incorporated into the aircraft designs in the form of damage tolerant components, redundancy, self-sealing fluid systems, and miniaturization.

Vice, J. (Booz, Allen and Hamilton, Inc., Dayton, OH (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Storm Water Individual Permit.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4American'!Stores Catalog Thecordially

452

Storm Water Analytical Period  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAbout » Staff125,849 127,174Storage/Handlingstories/

453

The Gathering Storm:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScience andFebruaryTheFarrel W.

454

A Challenging Solar Eruptive Event of 18 November 2003 and the Causes of the 20 November Geomagnetic Superstorm. III. Catastrophe of the Eruptive Filament in a Magnetic Null Point and Formation of an Opposite-Handedness CME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our analysis in Papers I and II (Grechnev et al., 2014, Solar Phys. 289, 289 and 1279) of the 18 November 2003 solar event responsible for the 20 November geomagnetic superstorm has revealed a complex chain of eruptions. In particular, the eruptive filament encountered a topological discontinuity located near the solar disk center at a height of about 100 Mm, bifurcated, and transformed into a large cloud, which did not leave the Sun. Concurrently, an additional CME presumably erupted close to the bifurcation region. The conjectures about the responsibility of this compact CME for the superstorm and its disconnection from the Sun are confirmed in Paper IV (Grechnev et al., Solar Phys., submitted), which concludes about its probable spheromak-like structure. The present paper confirms the presence of a magnetic null point near the bifurcation region and addresses the origin of the magnetic helicity of the interplanetary magnetic clouds and their connection to the Sun. We find that the orientation of a magnetic...

Uralov, A M; Rudenko, G V; Myshyakov, I I; Chertok, I M; Filippov, B P; Slemzin, V A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Modeling the Effects of Low Impact Development Practices on Streams at the Watershed Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban growth contributes to increasing storm water runoff which in turn causes an increase in the frequency and severity of flooding. Moreover, increased storm water runoff contributes to changing the character and volume of energy inputs...

Shannak, Sa'D A

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

456

Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II Safety Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated.

Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutoy, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling floods in theAmmer catchment:limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach 833 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(6), 833847 (2003) © EGU Modelling floods in the Ammer catchment: limitations and challenges with a coupled meteo-hydrological model approach R. Ludwig1

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

458

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once a year for a period of 2-3 months. By  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Figure 1. The wet area is flooded by damming up a small stream adjacent to the study area once. Figure 1.g The wet area is flooded by damming up a small streamded by damming up a smded by damwet area Vegetation data are obtained from two ri- parian grassland sites with strong hydro- logical gradients

Schierup, Mikkel Heide

459

Chapter I  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

to more flooding, faster sea-level rise, and increasingly powerful storms from global climate change-have been growing even as society's dependence on the grid has...

460

Mobile UPI | About UPI | UPI en Espaol | UPI Arabic | UPIU | My Account Search: Articles Type in your Search Term Go Defense Department Hamas-Fatah Royal Wedding Deadly storms Ullman: missions impossible  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in your Search Term Go Defense Department · Hamas-Fatah · Royal Wedding · Deadly storms · Ullman: missionsMobile UPI | About UPI | UPI en Español | UPI Arabic | UPIU | My Account Search: Articles Type 2010: Year in Review or see all Science News stories Join the conversation Enter comment here leave

Suslick, Kenneth S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Mathis, J. T. et al., (2012). Storm-induced upwelling of high pCO2 waters onto the continental shelf of the western Arctic Ocean and implications for carbonate mineral saturation states. Geophysical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mathis, J. T. et al., (2012). Storm-induced upwelling of high pCO2 waters onto the continental. Zhao, and G. Vargo (2011). Did the northeastern Gulf of Mexico become greener after the Deepwater-driven sediment transport on sediment accumulation in the Cariaco Basin, Venezuela. Marine Geology. Muhling, B

Meyers, Steven D.

462

Storms exploding off the surface of the sun can wreak havoc on technologies like satellites, phones, GPS, and electrical power grids. As society's dependence on these technologies grows, so does our vulnerability to changes on the Sun and in space.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Storms exploding off the surface of the sun can wreak havoc on technologies like satellites, phones vulnerability to changes on the Sun and in space. For example, GPS is present in almost all aspects of our is expected to total $75 billion by 2013. Meanwhile, the Sun is approaching a heightened period of activity

463

TRANSPORT AND PHASE EQUILIBRIA PROPERITIES FOR STEAM FLOODING OF HEAVY OILS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon/water and CO{sub 2} systems are frequently found in petroleum recovery processes, petroleum refining, and gasification of coals, lignites and tar sands. Techniques to estimate the phase volume and phase composition are indispensable to design and improve oil recovery processes such as steam, hot water, or CO{sub 2}/steam combinations of flooding techniques typically used for heavy oils. An interdisciplinary research program to quantify transport, PVT, and equilibrium properties of selected oil/CO{sub 2}/water mixtures at pressures up to 10,000 psia and at temperatures up to 500 F has been put in place. The objectives of this research include experimental determination and rigorous modeling and computation of phase equilibrium diagrams, and volumetric properties of hydrocarbon/CO{sub 2}/water mixtures at pressures and temperatures typical of steam injection processes for thermal recovery of heavy oils. Highlighting the importance of phase behavior, researchers ([1], and [2]) insist on obtaining truly representative reservoir fluids samples for experimental analysis. The prevailing sampling techniques used for compositional analysis of the fluids have potential for a large source of error. These techniques bring the sample to atmospheric conditions and collect the liquid and vapor portion of the samples for further analysis. We developed a new experimental technique to determine phase volumes, compositions and equilibrium K-values at reservoir conditions. The new methodology is able to measure phase volume and composition at reservoir like temperatures and pressures. We use a mercury free PVT system in conjunction with a Hewlett Packard gas chromatograph capable of measuring compositions on line at high pressures and temperatures. This is made possible by an essentially negligible disturbance of the temperature and pressure equilibrium during phase volume and composition measurements. In addition, not many samples are withdrawn for compositional analysis because a negligible volume (0.1 {micro}l to 0.5 {micro}l) is sent directly to the gas chromatograph through sampling valves. These amounts are less than 1 x 10{sup -5} % of total volume and do not affect the overall composition or equilibrium of the system. A new method to compute multi-component phase equilibrium diagrams based on an improved version of the Peng-Robinson equation has been developed [3]. This new version of the Peng-Robinson equation uses a new volume translation scheme and new mixing rules to improve the accuracy of the calculations. Calculations involving multicomponent mixtures of CO{sub 2}/water and hydrocarbons have been completed. A scheme to lump multi-component materials such as, oils into a small set of ''pseudo-components'' according to the technique outlined by Whitson [4] has been implemented. This final report presents the results of our experimental and predicted phase behavior diagrams and calculations for mixtures of CO{sub 2}/water and real oils at high pressures and temperatures.

Jorge Gabitto; Maria Barrufet

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

COLLINS, KELLY ALYSSA. A Field Evaluation of Four Types of Permeable Pavement with Respect to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to Water Quality Improvement and Flood Control. (Under the direction of Dr.William F. Hunt.) In North were compared to permeable pavement exfiltrate quality for pH and concentrations of total nitrogen (TN capabilities in reducing runoff, but are not credited for improving water quality. To further test

Hunt, William F.

465

814 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 4, NO. 4, DECEMBER 2011 Deriving Water Fraction and Flood Maps From  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Spectral Scanner (MSS), Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM), the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR-flood studies may be classified into two types: 1) passive, in which the sensor receives energy naturally illumination and records the amount of incident energy returned from the imaged Manuscript received June 14

Sun, Donglian

466

[Email response for project 35057 -Habitat Condition and Restoration Potential of Columbia River Flood Plains: A Critical, Missing Element of Fisheries Recovery Science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Response: We agree that social and economic considerations should be part of our prioritization process a need for a social/economic analysis of options on flood plains being considered for restoration riparian habitat condition) but will now also include analysis of social and economic constraints

467

Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) EGU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Operational hydro-meteorological warning and real-time flood forecasting:the Piemonte region case study 457 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 457466 (2005) © EGU Operational hydro forecasting system in the context of the Piemonte Regions hydro-meteorological operational alert procedure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

468

Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal), Class I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project outlines a proposal to improve the recovery of light oil from waterflooded fluvial dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoir through a miscible carbon dioxide (CO2) flood. The site is the Port Neches Field in Orange County, Texas. The field is well explored and well exploited. The project area is 270 acres within the Port Neches Field.

Bou-Mikael, Sami

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

469

Post Waterflood CO2 Miscible Flood in Light Oil, Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoir (Pre-Work and Project Proposal - Appendix)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of the Port Neches Project was to determine the feasibility and producibility of CO2 miscible flooding techniques enhanced with horizontal drilling applied to a Fluvial Dominated Deltaic reservoir. The second was to disseminate the knowledge gained through established Technology Transfer mechanisms to support DOE's programmatic objectives of increasing domestic oil production and reducing abandonment of oil fields.

Bou-Mikael, Sami

2002-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

470

Modelling the long-term evolution of groundwater's quality in a flooded iron-ore mine using a reactive transport pipe network model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modelling the long-term evolution of groundwater's quality in a flooded iron- ore mine using, groundwater quality, ePanet Introduction in lorraine (France), industrial mining began in the 19th century make classic groundwater modelling insuitable for predicting the impact of mining activities

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

471

GEOPHYSICS, VOL. 63, NO. 4 (JULY-AUGUST 1998); P. 11371149, 10 FIGS., 1 TABLE. Electrical conductivity of steam-flooded,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conductivity of steam-flooded, clay-bearing geologic materials David B. Butler and Rosemary J. Knight ABSTRACT the conductivity of a steam zone by providing a surface conduction path that is enhanced strongly by temperature increases. Clay also increases the residual water saturation in a steam zone, further increasing

Knight, Rosemary

472

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Under very extreme conditions a flood that threatens to overtop a dam may be combined with strong winds that generate waves in the reservoir. Prolonged wave overtopping or a combination of wave the actions of wind generated waves and wave overtopping. The uneven elevations of the dam crest

Bowles, David S.

473

VNU Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 1 (2013) 38-44 Development of an Online Supporting System Flood Warning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and they are also the types causing most economic, social and environmental damages. According to recent fiveVNU Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 1 (2013) 38-44 38 Development the affects of flood-related damage was provided to residents at risk in the low land areas of the Vu Gia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Estimates of incremental oil recoverable by carbon dioxide flooding and related carbon dioxide supply requirements for flooding major carbonate reservoirs in the Permian, Williston, and other Rocky Mountain basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to build a solid engineering foundation (in) carbonate reservoirs for the purpose of extending the technology base in carbon dioxide miscible flooding. This report presents estimates of incremental oil recovery and related carbon dioxide supply requirements for selected carbonate reservoirs in the Permian, Williston, and Rocky Mountain Basins. The estimates presented here are based on calculations using a volumetric model derived and described in this report. The calculations utilized data developed in previous work. Calculations were made for a total of 279 reservoirs in the Permian, Williston, and several smaller Rocky Mountain Basins. Results show that the carbonate reservoirs of the Permian Basin constitute an order of magnitude larger target for carbon dioxide flooding than do all the carbonate reservoirs of the Williston and Rocky Mountain intermontane basins combined. Review of the calculated data in comparison with information from earlier work indicates that the figures given here are probably optimistic in that incremental oil volumes may be biased toward the high side while carbon dioxide supply requirements may be biased toward the low side. However, the information available would not permit further practical refinement of the calculations. Use of the incremental oil figures given for individual reservoirs as an official estimate is not recommended because of various uncertainties in individual field data. Further study and compilation of data for field projects as they develop appears warranted to better calibrate the calculation procedures and thus to develop more refined estimates of incremental oil potential and carbon dioxide supply requirements. 11 figures, 16 tables.

Goodrich, J.H.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Water/sand flooded and immersed critical experiment and analysis performed in support of the TOPAZ-II safety program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Presented is a brief description of the Narciss-M2 critical assemblies, which simulate accidental water/wet-sand immersion of the TOPAZ-II reactor as well as water-flooding of core cavities. Experimental results obtained from these critical assemblies, including experiments with several fuel elements removed from the core, are shown. These configurations with several extracted fuel elements simulate a proposed fuel-out anticriticality-device modification to the TOPAZ-II reactor. Preliminary computational analysis of these experiments using the Monte Carlo neutron-transport method is outlined. Nuclear criticality safety of the TOPAZ-II reactor with an incorporated anticriticality unit is demonstrated. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Institute} {ital of} {ital Physics}

Glushkov, E.S.; Ponomarev-Stepnoi, N.N.; Bubelev, V.G.; Garin, V.P.; Gomin, E.A.; Kompanietz, G.V.; Krutov, A.M.; Lobynstev, V.A.; Maiorov, L.V.; Polyakov, D.N.; Chunyaev, E.I. [RRC Kurchatov Institute, Moscow 123182 (Russian Federation); Marshall, A.C. [International Nuclear Safety, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Sapir, J.L.; Pelowitz, D.B. [Reactor Design and Analysis Group, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

476

Chernobyl nuclear accident hydrologic analysis and emergency evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Dnieper River, Ukraine, during the 1993 summer flood  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes joint activities of Program 7.1.F, ``Radionuclide Transport in Water and Soil Systems,`` of the USA/Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) Joint Coordinating Committee of Civilian Nuclear Reactor Safety to study the hydrogeochemical behavior of radionuclides released to the Pripyat and Dnieper rivers from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant in Ukraine. These joint activities included rapid evaluation of radionuclide distributions in the Pripyat and Dnieper river system and field data evaluation and modeling for the 1993 summer flood to assist the Ukrainian government in their emergency response during the flood. In July-August 1993, heavy rainfall over the Pripyat River Catchment in Belarus and Ukraine caused severe flooding, significantly raising {sup 90}Sr concentrations in the river. Near the Chernobyl area, the maximum {sup 90}Sr concentration in the Pripyat River reached 20--25 PCi/L in early August; near the Pripyat River mouth, the concentration rose to 35 pCi/L. The peak {sup 90}Sr concentration in the Kiev Reservoir (a major source of drinking water for Kiev) was 12 pCi/L. Based on these measured radionuclide levels, additional modeling results and the assumption of water purification in a water treatment station, {sup 90}Sr concentrations in Kiev`s drinking water were estimated to be less than 8 pCi/L. Unlike {sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs concentrations in the Pripyat River during the flood did not rise significantly to the pre-flood levels. Estimated {sup 137}Cs concentrations for the Kiev drinking water were two orders of magnitude lower than the drinking water standard of 500 pCi/L for {sup 137}Cs.

Voitsekhovitch, O.V. [Ukrainian Hydrometeorological Inst., Kiev (Ukraine); Zheleznyak, M.J. [Ukrainian Academy of Sciences, Kiev (Ukraine). Cybernetics Center; Onishi, Y. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Ring current inuence on auroral electrojet predictions H. Gleisner and H. Lundstedt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

March 1999 Abstract. Geomagnetic storms and substorms develop under strong control of the solar wind the solar wind alone. A consequence of the strong control by a common source is that substorm and storm of internal magnetospheric processes, such as a ring-current modulation of the solar wind-ei relation

Boyer, Edmond

478

Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Quarterly report, 1 January--31 March 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying relationships between process mechanisms that can lead to improved recovery from gas injection processes performed in heterogeneous Class 1 and Class 2 reservoirs. It will provide a rational basis for the design of displacement processes that take advantage of crossflow due to capillary, gravity and viscous forces to offset partially the adverse effects of heterogeneity. In effect, the high permeability zones are used to deliver fluid by crossflow to zones that would otherwise be flooded only very slowly. Thus, the research effort is divided into five areas: Development of miscibility in multicomponent systems; design estimates for nearly miscible displacements; design of miscible floods for fractured reservoirs; compositional flow visualization experiments; simulation of near-miscible flow in heterogeneous systems. The status of the research effort in each area is reviewed briefly in the following section. From this work, we can make the following conclusions: (1) We demonstrated theoretically and experimentally that a linear combination of gravity and viscous forces can be used to correlate residual nonwetting phase saturations for both gravity-favorable and gravity-unfavorable displacements. (2) When gravity forces are comparable to or larger than the viscous forces) gravity unfavorable displacements have significantly higher residual nonwetting phase saturation than gravity-favorable displacements. (3) Because soils have much higher permeabilities than oil reservoirs, gravity effects on residual nonwetting phase saturations are much more significant in spilled-oil clean-up than in oil recovery processes. (4) The effective correlation length for a percolation process can be related to a linear combination of the gravity and viscous forces.

Orr, F.M. Jr.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

BEHAVIOR OF SURFACTANT MIXTURES AT SOLID/LIQUID AND OIL/LIQUID INTERFACES IN CHEMICAL FLOODING SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of the project is to develop a knowledge base to help the design of enhanced processes for mobilizing and extracting untrapped oil. We emphasize evaluation of novel surfactant mixtures and obtaining optimum combinations of the surfactants for efficient chemical flooding EOR processes. In this regard, an understanding of the aggregate shape, size and structure is crucial since these properties govern the crude oil removal efficiency. During the three-year period, the adsorption and aggregation behavior of sugar-based surfactants and their mixtures with other types of surfactants have been studied. Sugar-based surfactants are made from renewable resources, nontoxic and biodegradable. They are miscible with water and oil. These environmentally benign surfactants feature high surface activity, good salinity, calcium and temperature tolerance, and unique adsorption behavior. They possess the characteristics required for oil flooding surfactants and have the potential for replacing currently used surfactants in oil recovery. A novel analytical ultracentrifugation technique has been successfully employed for the first time, to characterize the aggregate species present in mixed micellar solution due to its powerful ability to separate particles based on their size and shape and monitor them simultaneously. Analytical ultracentrifugation offers an unprecedented opportunity to obtain important information on mixed micelles, structure-performance relationship for different surfactant aggregates in solution and their role in interfacial processes. Initial sedimentation velocity investigations were conducted using nonyl phenol ethoxylated decyl ether (NP-10) to choose the best analytical protocol, calculate the partial specific volume and obtain information on sedimentation coefficient, aggregation mass of micelles. Four softwares: OptimaTM XL-A/XL-I data analysis software, DCDT+, Svedberg and SEDFIT, were compared for the analysis of sedimentation velocity experimental data. The results have been compared to that from Light Scattering. Based on the tests, Svedberg and SEDFIT analysis were chosen for further studies.

P. Somasundaran

2004-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

480

spe438-20 page 1 Garrison, N.J., Busby, C.J., Gans, P.B., Putirka, K., and Wagner, D.L., 2008, A mantle plume beneath California? The mid-Miocene Lovejoy flood basalt, northern  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Miocene Lovejoy flood basalt, northern California Noah J. Garrison Cathy J. Busby Phillip B. Gans Department the eastern Snake River Plain toward the Yellowstone caldera (Armstrong et al., 1975; Rodgers et al., 1990

Busby, Cathy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "flood geomagnetic storm" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Evaluation of potential severe accidents during low power and shutdown operations at Surry, Unit 1: Analysis of core damage frequency from internal floods during mid-loop operations. Volume 4  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objective of the Surry internal flood analysis was to provide an improved understanding of the core damage scenarios arising from internal flood-related events. The mean core damage frequency of the Surry plant due to internal flood events during mid-loop operations is 4.8E-06 per year, and the 5th and 95th percentiles are 2.2E-07 and 1.8E-05 per year, respectively. Some limited sensitivity calculations were performed on three plant improvement options. The most significant result involves modifications of intake-level structure on the canal, which reduced core damage frequency contribution from floods in mid-loop by about 75%.

Kohut, P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Investigating impacts of natural and human-induced environmental changes on hydrological processes and flood hazards using a GIS-based hydrological/hydraulic model and remote sensing data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a GISbased hydrological and hydraulic modeling system, which incorporates state-of-the-art remote sensing data to simulate flood under various scenarios. The conceptual framework and technical issues of incorporating multi-scale remote sensing data...

Wang, Lei

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

483

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of Hi-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Nuclear Power Station ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report fulfills the M3 milestone M3FT-13PN0810022, “Report on Inspection 1”, under Work Package FT-13PN081002. Thermal analysis is being undertaken at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of inspections of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States, as part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development. This report documents pre-inspection predictions of temperatures for four modules at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI that have been identified as candidates for inspection in late summer or early fall/winter of 2013. These are HI-STORM 100S-218 Version B modules storing BWR 8x8 fuel in MPC-68 canisters. The temperature predictions reported in this document were obtained with detailed COBRA-SFS models of these four storage systems, with the following boundary conditions and assumptions.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

484

Preliminary Thermal Modeling of HI-Storm 100S-218 Version B Storage Modules at Hope Creek Cuclear Power Station ISFSI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign of the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE) Fuel Cycle Research and Development, a consortium of national laboratories and industry is performing visual inspections and temperature measurements of selected storage modules at various locations around the United States. This report documents thermal analyses in in support of the inspections at the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station ISFSI. This site utilizes the HI-STORM100 vertical storage system developed by Holtec International. This is a vertical storage module design, and the thermal models are being developed using COBRA-SFS (Michener, et al., 1987), a code developed by PNNL for thermal-hydraulic analyses of multi assembly spent fuel storage and transportation systems. This report describes the COBRA-SFS model in detail, and presents pre-inspection predictions of component temperatures and temperature distributions. The final report will include evaluation of inspection results, and if required, additional post-test calculations, with appropriate discussion of results.

Cuta, Judith M.; Adkins, Harold E.

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

485

A KNOWLEDGE DISCOVERY STRATEGY FOR RELATING SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FREQUENCIES OF TROPICAL STORMS AND GENERATING PREDICTIONS OF HURRICANES UNDER 21ST-CENTURY GLOBAL WARMING SCENARIOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The connections among greenhouse-gas emissions scenarios, global warming, and frequencies of hurricanes or tropical cyclones are among the least understood in climate science but among the most fiercely debated in the context of adaptation decisions or mitigation policies. Here we show that a knowledge discovery strategy, which leverages observations and climate model simulations, offers the promise of developing credible projections of tropical cyclones based on sea surface temperatures (SST) in a warming environment. While this study motivates the development of new methodologies in statistics and data mining, the ability to solve challenging climate science problems with innovative combinations of traditional and state-of-the-art methods is demonstrated. Here we develop new insights, albeit in a proof-of-concept sense, on the relationship between sea surface temperatures and hurricane frequencies, and generate the most likely projections with uncertainty bounds for storm counts in the 21st-century warming environment based in turn on the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report on Emissions Scenarios. Our preliminary insights point to the benefits that can be achieved for climate science and impacts analysis, as well as adaptation and mitigation policies, by a solution strategy that remains tailored to the climate domain and complements physics-based climate model simulations with a combination of existing and new computational and data science approaches.

Race, Caitlin [University of Minnesota; Steinbach, Michael [University of Minnesota; Ganguly, Auroop R [ORNL; Semazzi, Fred [North Carolina State University; Kumar, Vipin [University of Minnesota

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

IMPROVED MISCIBLE NITROGEN FLOOD PERFORMANCE UTILIZING ADVANCED RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION AND HORIZONTAL LATERALS IN A CLASS I RESERVOIR - EAST BINGER (MARCHAND) UNIT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is two-fold. It will demonstrate use of nitrogen as a widely available, cost-effective and environmentally superior injectant for miscible floods. It will also demonstrate the effectiveness of horizontal wellbores in reducing gas breakthrough and cycling. It is expected that the demonstration will lead to implementation of nitrogen injection projects in areas without readily available carbon dioxide sources. Technology transfer will occur throughout the project.

Joe Sinner

2002-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

487

Design and Implementation of a CO2 Flood Utilizing Advanced Reservoir Characterization and Horizontal Injection Wells In a Shallow Shelf Carbonate Approaching Waterflood Depletion, Class II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this project was to economically design an optimum carbon dioxide (CO2) flood for a mature waterflood nearing its economic abandonment. The original project utilized advanced reservoir characterization and CO2 horizontal injection wells as the primary methods to redevelop the South Cowden Unit (SCU). The development plans; project implementation and reservoir management techniques were to be transferred to the public domain to assist in preventing premature abandonment of similar fields.

Wier, Don R. Chimanhusky, John S.; Czirr, Kirk L.; Hallenbeck, Larry; Gerard, Matthew G.; Dollens, Kim B.; Owen, Rex; Gaddis, Maurice; Moshell, M.K.

2002-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

488

Chemical flood progress evaluation test, South Pass Block 27 field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. Final report, September 28, 1979-May 16, 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A field test of a surfactant flooding process has been designed for a reservoir located in the South Pass Block 27 field, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. The objectives of the test are to continue chemical flooding research by applying the process in a reservoir which is a candidate for this enhanced oil recovery technique if the process is proved economically viable. The plan is to acquire field data which will lead to a better understanding of how the process works under reservoir conditions at a well-to-well distance intermediate to laboratory floods and economic well spacing. The initial step in starting the field test began late in 1979 when the first pilot injection-residual oil saturation determination well was drilled and pressured cored in the selected test reservoir, the N/sub 4/ sand Reservoir B, at about 8000 feet. A log-inject-log measurement in this well has also been completed to provide an added evaluation. This report documents the results of the N/sub 4/, sand residual oil saturation measurements in Well SL 1011 No. 88. The Shell-DOE contract is restricted to this phase of the field test. Results indicate a waterswept residual oil saturation less than 20% at the objective location based on coring and PNC log-inject-log measurements. The value is lower than anticipated. Consequently, an alternate test site must be selected if the field test plans are continued.

Johnston, J. R.; Guillory, A. J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Development of an Advanced Simulator to Model Mobility Control and Geomechanics during CO{sub 2} Floods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulator is an isothermal, three-dimensional, four-phase, compositional, equation-of– state (EOS) simulator. We have named the simulator UTDOE-CO2 capable of simulating various recovery processes (i.e., primary, secondary waterflooding, and miscible and immiscible gas flooding). We include both the Peng-Robinson EOS and the Redlich-Kwong EOS models. A Gibbs stability test is also included in the model to perform a phase identification test to consistently label each phase for subsequent property calculations such as relative permeability, viscosity, density, interfacial tension, and capillary pressure. Our time step strategy is based on an IMPEC-type method (implicit pressure and explicit concentration). The gridblock pressure is solved first using the explicit dating of saturation-dependent terms. Subsequently, the material balance equations are solved explicitly for the total concentration of each component. The physical dispersion term is also included in the governing equations. The simulator includes (1) several foam model(s) for gas mobility control, (2) compositional relative permeability models with the hysteresis option, (3) corner point grid and several efficient solvers, (4) geomechanics module to compute stress field as the result of CO{sub 2} injection/production, (5) the format of commercial visualization software, S3graf from Science-soft Ltd., was implemented for user friendly visualization of the simulation results. All tasks are completed and the simulator was fully tested and delivered to the DOE office including a user’s guide and several input files and the executable for Windows Pcs. We have published several SPE papers, presented several posters, and one MS thesis is completed (V. Pudugramam, 2013) resulting from this DOE funded project.

Delshad, Mojdeh; Wheeler, Mary; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Pope, Gary

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

490

The following article was published in the British publicationWeather, November 1994; Vol. 49, Issue No. 11, pages 370-383 and is reprinted with Editorial permission. Weather is a monthly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flooding, thus adding to the drought. This article provides a review of the destruction. Some in the text. 'supercell' storms generated some of the tor- The combined flooding/drought losses for nadoes for the flood- and drought-ravaged areas, and seven federal agencies were involved in this disaster relief

491

Storm detection by electronic means  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), between the plate of V4018 . nd tn~ grid of V40iA, has a. potenti 1 dif- ference of 390 volts, but when U4oJ. B conducts there is, = volt- age drop of 100 voits at tne plate; and C40'', not being able to adJust itself at oiice, wiii be charged to a... will energize the Recorder, pulling an iniiing p ? down . . ?d ie=ving a permanent record! of the disturbance on a t!!po which is !!ov- ing siovrly acros' tne pen. After a snort whi?, the exact time depending u& on HC consta?ts of tho !umtivibrator, Vi...

Wooten, Allen Dewey

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Overwash induced by storm conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wave height and period from offshore buoy in January,abcde abcd2004.......................................................................................................................53 3.19 Observed significant wave height and period from... offshore buoy inabcdef abcdFebruary, 2004......................................................................................................53 3.20 Observed significant wave height and period from offshore buoy in April,abcdef abcd2004...

Park, Young Hyun

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

Individual Permit for Storm Water  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest Region service area.Portaldefault Sign In AboutIn the News

494

Sandia National Laboratories: ice storms  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1development Sandia,evaluatingfullhigher-performancestoragei-GATE ECIS and i-GATE:ice

495

storm | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskey Flatshydro Home Water

496

OpenEI Community - storm  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth'sOklahoma/Geothermal < Oklahomast,Logistics Agency (DLA) RFP - Deadline

497

Global Warming* The Perfect Storm  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hydrates Shale Oil Tar Sands ? ** #12;Caption if needed #12;"Free Will" Alternative 1. Phase Out Coal CO2 Oil Gas Coal GtC Reserve growth Proven reserves* Emissions (CDIAC) EIA IPCC CO2(ppmv) 600 400 200 100 300 0 500 *Oil & gas from EIA ** Unconventional oil & gas; uncertain, could be large Other Methane

Hansen, James E.

498

Decontaminating Flooded Wells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ER-011 6-06 Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist; Diane E. Boellstorff, Program Specialist Water Quality; Tony L. Provin, Associate Professor and Extension Soil Chemist; Monty C. Dozier, Assistant... and local hospitals may also test water samples for bacteria. The cost of the test ranges from $8 to $30, depending on the lab. Well disinfection does not eliminate hydrocarbons (fuels, oils), pesticides, heavy metals or other types of nonbiological...

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

499

Decontaminating Flooded Wells (Spanish)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Profesor Adjunto y Especialista en Recursos H?dricos de Extensi?n; Nikkoal J. Dictson, Especialista en Programa Calidad de Agua Sistema Universitario Texas A&M Si se ha inundado su pozo, debe asumir que el agua en ?l se ha contaminado. No utilice el... agua del pozo para beber, cocinar, preparar hielo, cepillarse los dientes o asearse hasta no estar seguro de que no est? contaminada. El agua proveniente de la inundaci?n puede resultar contaminada por sustancias arrastradas como esti?rcol, residuos...

Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

2007-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

500

Chemical Method to Improve CO{sub 2} Flooding Sweep Efficiency for Oil Recovery Using SPI-CO{sub 2} Gels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem in CO{sub 2} flooding lies with its higher mobility causing low conformance or sweep efficiency. This is an issue in oilfield applications where an injected fluid or gas used to mobilize and produce the oil in a marginal field has substantially higher mobility (function of viscosity and density and relative permeability) relative to the crude oil promoting fingering and early breakthrough. Conformance is particularly critical in CO{sub 2} oilfield floods where the end result is less oil recovered and substantially higher costs related to the CO{sub 2}. The SPI-CO{sub 2} (here after called “SPI”) gel system is a unique silicate based gel system that offers a technically effective solution to the conformance problem with CO{sub 2} floods. This SPI gel system remains a low viscosity fluid until an external initiator (CO{sub 2}) triggers gelation. This is a clear improvement over current technologies where the gels set up as a function of time, regardless of where it is placed in the reservoir. In those current systems, the internal initiator is included in the injected fluid for water shut off applications. In this new research effort, the CO{sub 2} is an external initiator contacted after SPI gel solution placement. This concept ensures in the proper water wet reservoir environment that the SPI gel sets up in the precise high permeability path followed by the CO{sub 2}, therefore improving sweep efficiency to a greater degree than conventional systems. In addition, the final SPI product in commercial quantities is expected to be low cost over the competing systems. This Phase I research effort provided “proof of concept” that SPI gels possess strength and may be formed in a sand pack reducing the permeability to brine and CO{sub 2} flow. This SPI technology is a natural extension of prior R & D and the Phase I effort that together show a high potential for success in a Phase II follow-on project. Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) is a major by-product of hydrocarbon combustion for energy, chemical and fertilizer plants. For example, coal fired power plants emit large amounts of CO{sub 2} in order to produce electrical energy. Carbon dioxide sequestration is gaining attention as concerns mount over possible global climate change caused by rising emissions of greenhouse gases. Removing the CO{sub 2} from the energy generation process would make these plants more environmentally friendly. In addition, CO{sub 2} flooding is an attractive means to enhance oil and natural gas recovery. Capture and use of the CO{sub 2} from these plants for recycling into CO{sub 2} flooding of marginal reservoirs provides a “dual use” opportunity prior to final CO{sub 2} sequestration in the depleted reservoir. Under the right pressure, temperature and oil composition conditions, CO{sub 2} can act as a solvent, cleaning oil trapped in the microscopic pores of the reservoir rock. This miscible process greatly increases the recovery of crude oil from a reservoir compared to recovery normally seen by waterflooding. An Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) project that uses an industrial source of CO{sub 2} that otherwise would be vented to the atmosphere has the added environmental benefit of sequestering the greenhouse gas.

Burns, Lyle D.

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z