Sample records for flood control lands

  1. Resource Management Services: Land Use, Part 501: Use of Flood Control Lands (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    No regulated activity or development is allowed to take place on lands used for flood control purposes unless a permit is obtained. These regulations describe provisions for the application,...

  2. Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an Adaptation Strategy in the Built Environment Green Infrastructure and Flood Resiliency-Land Use Management as an...

  3. Irrigation, Navigation Flood Control and Recreation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irrigation,-Navigation-Flood-Control-and-Recreation- Sign In About | Careers | Contact | Investors | bpa.gov Search News & Us Expand News & Us Projects & Initiatives Expand...

  4. A Decade of Changes in the Wildcat Creek Flood Control Channel, North Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginsberg, Ben

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Changes in the Wildcat Creek Flood Control Channel, NorthAbstract: The lower Wildcat Creek flood control and ripariancontinue. Introduction Wildcat Creek Watershed is located in

  5. Environmental Impact Statement Truckee Meadows Flood Control Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    DRAFT Environmental Impact Statement for the Truckee Meadows Flood Control Project Nevada General Reevaluation Report Volume I ­ Draft Environmental Impact Statement prepared by U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District May 2013 #12;#12;DRAFT Environmental Impact Statement for the Truckee Meadows Flood

  6. DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussex, University of

    DROWNED AND DAMMED Colonial Capitalism and Flood Control in Eastern India ROHAN D, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi. Drowned and Dammed comprehensively reconsiders the debate with physical infrastructure such as embankments, canal networks, and inevitably the Hirakud Dam. In seeking

  7. Flood control reservoir operations for conditions of limited storage capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivera Ramirez, Hector David

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Therefore, if the entire flood control capacity of a reservoir is available, only an extremely severe flood event would require the implementation of the EOS for most reservoir projects, and thus the bulk of the research has been focused on how to manage... operations objectives. In other words, the REOS provide a set of rules that reflect the risk of flooding upstream as well as downstream of the dams. The USACE and other reservoir management agencies may use the methodology proposed in this study...

  8. Flood Control and Watershed Management (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Counties and towns are required to issue permits for development within the 100-year floodplain. Development is broadly defined to include any man-made change to land, including grading, filling,...

  9. Hydropower at flood control reservoirs - the variable speed option

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laurence, K.; Yale, J. [Stone & Webster Engineering Corp., Denver, CO (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Application of hydroelectric turbine-generators to flood control has been limited due to the inability of a single turbine to operate efficiently over the wide head and flow ranges encountered. Multiple and different unit combinations have been applied to this problem, but the cost of the additional unit(s), powerhouse, and supporting facilities typically causes the project to become unfeasible. Variable speed operation can increase the operating range of a single turbine, and significantly improve efficiency over single speed units. This can make hydroelectric generation at flood control projects feasible. This paper presents a comparison of the application of variable speed units, two speed units, and single speed units at the Blue River Dam Hydroelectric Project. The project consists of the addition of a powerhouse to an existing Army Corps of Engineers flood control project. Efficiency data for the different types of units are compared and historical flow and release data are used in a computer model to simulate plant operation.

  10. Optimum Reservoir Operation for Flood Control and Conservation Purposes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph A.; Cabezas, L. Morris; Tibbets, Michael N.

    . With stringent flood plain management, susceptibility to flooding could actually decrease over time as existing activities choose to leave the flood plain and regulation prevents other activities from moving into the flood plain. Reservoir sedimentation reduces...

  11. 118 / JOURNAL OF WATER RESOURCES PLANNING AND MANAGEMENT / MAY/JUNE 2000 LINEAR PROGRAMMING FOR FLOOD CONTROL IN THE IOWA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasternack, Gregory B.

    obtained by operating the three reservoirs independently for 8 of the 10 largest flood events on record for optimizing the operation of existing systems rather than proposing/designing new flood- control projects flood-control operations for the Iowa/Des Moines River Reservoir System and to pro- vide insight

  12. Determining Hydrological Controls on Flood Frequency | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Federal Emergency Management AgencyAndrea Booher Aerial view of homes inundated with water following a 2011 flood in Minot, N.D. Researchers have compared data from hundreds of...

  13. Apollo: Adaptive power optimization and Control for the land Warrior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    Apollo: Adaptive power optimization and Control for the land Warrior Massoud Pedram Dept. of EE management Architecture organization techniquesArchitecture organization techniques Apollo TestbedApollo

  14. Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sturdivant, Allen W.; Lacewell, Ronald D.; Michelsen, Ari M.; Rister, M. Edward; Assadian, Naomi; Eriksson, Marian; Freeman, Roger; Jacobs, Jennifer H.; Madison, W. Tom; McGuckin, James T.; Morrison, Wendy; Robinson, John R.C.; Staats, Chris; Sheng, Zhuping; Srinivasan, R.; Villalobos, Joshua I.

    TR- 275 2004 Estimated Benefits of IBWC Rio Grande Flood-Control Projects in the United States Allen W. Sturdivant Ronald D. Lacewell Ari M. Michelsen M. Edward Rister Naomi Assadian Marian Eriksson Roger Freeman Jennifer H... Flood-Control Projects in the United States Prepared for: INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION, UNITED STATES SECTION EL PASO, TEXAS SEPTEMBER 2004 Prepared by: Texas Agriculture Experiment Station, and Texas Water Resources Institute of the Texas...

  15. Probable maximum flood control; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeGabriele, C.E.; Wu, C.L. [Bechtel National, Inc., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study proposes preliminary design concepts to protect the waste-handling facilities and all shaft and ramp entries to the underground from the probable maximum flood (PMF) in the current design configuration for the proposed Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigation (NNWSI) repository protection provisions were furnished by the United States Bureau of Reclamation (USSR) or developed from USSR data. Proposed flood protection provisions include site grading, drainage channels, and diversion dikes. Figures are provided to show these proposed flood protection provisions at each area investigated. These areas are the central surface facilities (including the waste-handling building and waste treatment building), tuff ramp portal, waste ramp portal, men-and-materials shaft, emplacement exhaust shaft, and exploratory shafts facility.

  16. HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Pierre Y.

    HYDROPOWER RESERVOIR FOR FLOOD CONTROL: A CASE STUDY ON RINGLET RESERVOIR, CAMERON HIGHLANDS, Malaysia 4 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Colorado State University, USA ABSTRACT: Hydropower as possible for daily hydropower generation as well as to prevent any spillage at dam. However

  17. Climate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    of climate warming can be very significant. Integrated water resources management is a promising wayClimate Change and Water Resources Management: Adaptations for Flood Control and Water Supply climate warming impacts on surface runoff, groundwater inflows and reservoir evaporation for distributed

  18. Analysis of process controls in land surface hydrological cycle over the continental United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Syed, Tajdarul Hassan; Lakshimi, V; Paleologos, E; Lohmann, D; Mitchell, K; Famiglietti, J S

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), Analysis of process controls in land surfacelack of understanding of the process controls in the surfacehydrologic cycle and the process controls can lead us to a

  19. The role of woodland in flood control: a landscape perspective T.R. Nisbet1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as part of a whole-catchment approach to sustainable flood management. Keywords: Woodland; water use; soil-125. IALE(UK), Oxford.] Abstract Sustainable flood management is increasingly looking to the role infiltration; hydraulic roughness; sustainable flood management Introduction A series of major floods across

  20. Control of microbiologically induced corrosion and accumulation of solids in a seawater flood system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewar, E.J.

    1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of sessile bacteria (mainly sulfate reducers) is important for controlling microbiologically-induced corrosion (MIC) and suspended solids in a large seawater flood system. Bactericide treatments and mechanical cleaning are the major bacteria control methods; when combined with oxygen removal, pH control, and flow maintenance, they permit relatively troublefree operation in terms of corrosion and water quality. Coupon corrosion rates decreased from monthly averages as high as 0.5 mm/y down to <0.05 mm/y when the sessile sulfate reducing bacteria counts decreased from about 4 x 10/sup 5/ cells/cm/sup 2/ down to 6 x 10/sup 2/. A suitable monitoring program is required for a timely detection of potential problems and for treatment evaluations. Sessile bacteria counts and bactericide demand are two of the techniques found useful.

  1. Evaluating resilience of DNP3-controlled SCADA systems against event buffer flooding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yan, Guanhua [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nicol, David M [UNIV OF IL; Jin, Dong [UNIV OF IL

    2010-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The DNP3 protocol is widely used in SCADA systems (particularly electrical power) as a means of communicating observed sensor state information back to a control center. Typical architectures using DNP3 have a two level hierarchy, where a specialized data aggregator device receives observed state from devices within a local region, and the control center collects the aggregated state from the data aggregator. The DNP3 communication between control center and data aggregator is asynchronous with the DNP3 communication between data aggregator and relays; this leads to the possibility of completely filling a data aggregator's buffer of pending events, when a relay is compromised or spoofed and sends overly many (false) events to the data aggregator. This paper investigates how a real-world SCADA device responds to event buffer flooding. A Discrete-Time Markov Chain (DTMC) model is developed for understanding this. The DTMC model is validated by a Moebius simulation model and data collected on real SCADA testbed.

  2. Flood Plain and Floodway Management Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state regulates flood-prone lands and waters to prevent and alleviate flooding threats to life and health and reduce private and public economic losses. The purpose of 76-5 MCA, parts 1-4 is to...

  3. Application of Polymer Gels as Conformance Control Agents for Carbon Dioxide for Floods in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Ali, Ali 1986-

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of Oil Saturated Core (Exp#7) ........................... 154 Fig. 4.64 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 1st PV of VW (Exp#7) ...... 155 Fig. 4.65 ? Vertical Slice CT Images of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 1st PV of VW (Exp#7...) ........................................................................................... 157 xiv Fig. 4.68 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 2nd PV of VW (Exp#7) ..... 158 Fig. 4.69 ? Vertical Slice CT Images of Oil Saturated Core Flooded With 2nd PV of VW (Exp#7...

  4. Application of Polymer Gels as Conformance Control Agents for Carbon Dioxide for Floods in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Ali, Ali 1986-

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) .................................................... 203 Fig. 4.110 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 1 PV of CO2 (CGI) .. 203 Fig. 4.111 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 3 PV of CO2 (CGI) .. 203 Fig. 4.112 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core (CGI-Fracked...) ...................................... 204 Fig. 4.113 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after Flooded with 1 PV of CO2 (CGI- Fracked) .................................................................................................. 204 Fig. 4.114 ? CT Image of Oil Saturated Core after...

  5. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid/vapor traffic that produce increased contact area and lead to substantial increases in separation efficiency – which translates to a 10% increase in energy efficiency on a BTU/bbl basis. The Flooding Predictor™ operates on the principle that between five to sixty minutes in advance of a flooding event, certain column variables experience an oscillation, a pre-flood pattern. The pattern recognition system of the Flooding Predictor™ utilizes the mathematical first derivative of certain column variables to identify the column’s pre-flood pattern(s). This pattern is a very brief, highly repeatable, simultaneous movement among the derivative values of certain column variables. While all column variables experience negligible random noise generated from the natural frequency of the process, subtle pre-flood patterns are revealed among sub-sets of the derivative values of column variables as the column approaches its hydraulic limit. The sub-set of column variables that comprise the pre-flood pattern is identified empirically through in a two-step process. First, 2ndpoint’s proprietary off-line analysis tool is used to mine historical data for pre-flood patterns. Second, the column is flood-tested to fine-tune the pattern recognition for commissioning. Then the Flooding Predictor™ is implemented as closed-loop advanced control strategy on the plant’s distributed control system (DCS), thus automating control of the column at its hydraulic limit.

  6. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1994--June 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaran, P.

    1994-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this contract is to elucidate the mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species will also be determined. Solids of relevant mineralogy and a multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability will be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes.

  7. Control System Architecture for a Remotely Operated Unmanned Land Vehicle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    developed for the control of industrial robots and automated manufacturing systems. In this application, RCS

  8. Conditional Reliability, Sub-Monthly Time Step, Flood Control, and Salinity Features of WRAP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar, A.A.; Olmos, H.E.; Hoffpauir, R.J.; Wurbs, R.A.

    .................................................................... 9 2.1 Conditional Reliability CR Record ................................................................................. 14 2.2 Beginning of SIM Output CRM File for the CRM Example .......................................... 25 2.3 TABLES Input... record field 9 to provide beginning reservoir storage for program SALT and TABLES 5CR2 record routines root1.SUB SIMD sub-monthly time step simulation results root1.FFA SIMD flood frequency analysis file with annual series of peak flow and storage...

  9. LandScape Command Set: Local Area Network Distributed Supervisory Control and Programming Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burchard, R.L.; Small, D.E.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the Local Area Network Distributed Supervisory Control and Programming Environment (LandScape) commands set that provides a Generic Device Subsystem Application Programmers Interface (API). These commands are implemented using the Common Object Request Broker Architecture (CORBA) specification with Orbix from Iona Technologies.

  10. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, September 30, 1992--December 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaran, P.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms of adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species will also be determined using solids of relevant mineralogy. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability will be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption of selected individual surfactants on oxide minerals was determined. The aim was to characterize the microstructure of the adsorbed layers. Work was began with alkyl phenoxy polyoxyether type nonionic surfactants and anionic meta xylene sulfonates.

  11. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. [Alkyl phenoxy polyoxyether type nonionic surfactants and anionic meta xylene sulfonates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaran, P.

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms of adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species will also be determined using solids of relevant mineralogy. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability will be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption of selected individual surfactants on oxide minerals was determined. The aim was to characterize the microstructure of the adsorbed layers. Work was began with alkyl phenoxy polyoxyether type nonionic surfactants and anionic meta xylene sulfonates.

  12. Characterization of side-slip dynamics in Land Rover LR3 for improved high speed autonomous control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truax, Robert D. (Robert Denison)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, the side slip control dynamics of the Land Rover LR3 platform are examined for autonomous control. As autonomy becomes implemented in high speed safety applications, the importance of an accurate model for ...

  13. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaran, P.

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this project is to elucidate the mechanisms of adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effect of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations and other inorganic and polymeric species will be determined using solids of relevant mineralogy. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability win be used to achieve the goals. The results of this study should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and also in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. Adsorption of selected individual surfactants on oxide minerals was studied. The aim was to determine the effect of structure on surfactant adsorption at the solid-liquid as well as at the liquid-air interface. Nonionic polyethoxylated alkyl phenols and anionic meta xylene sulfonates (MXS) were the surfactants studied. Electrokinetic behavior was also determined along with adsorption in order to determine the role of electrostatic forces in determining the adsorption. In addition, the effect of varying the number of ethylene oxide groups on the adsorption of polyethoxylated alkyl phenols on silica was determined since the ethoxyl groups offer unique opportunities to control adsorption as well as wettability. Effect of pH was studied both because it is a parameter with first order effect and also because pH effects can help in developing mechanisms.

  14. Development of an Advanced Simulator to Model Mobility Control and Geomechanics during CO{sub 2} Floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delshad, Mojdeh; Wheeler, Mary; Sepehrnoori, Kamy; Pope, Gary

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The simulator is an isothermal, three-dimensional, four-phase, compositional, equation-of– state (EOS) simulator. We have named the simulator UTDOE-CO2 capable of simulating various recovery processes (i.e., primary, secondary waterflooding, and miscible and immiscible gas flooding). We include both the Peng-Robinson EOS and the Redlich-Kwong EOS models. A Gibbs stability test is also included in the model to perform a phase identification test to consistently label each phase for subsequent property calculations such as relative permeability, viscosity, density, interfacial tension, and capillary pressure. Our time step strategy is based on an IMPEC-type method (implicit pressure and explicit concentration). The gridblock pressure is solved first using the explicit dating of saturation-dependent terms. Subsequently, the material balance equations are solved explicitly for the total concentration of each component. The physical dispersion term is also included in the governing equations. The simulator includes (1) several foam model(s) for gas mobility control, (2) compositional relative permeability models with the hysteresis option, (3) corner point grid and several efficient solvers, (4) geomechanics module to compute stress field as the result of CO{sub 2} injection/production, (5) the format of commercial visualization software, S3graf from Science-soft Ltd., was implemented for user friendly visualization of the simulation results. All tasks are completed and the simulator was fully tested and delivered to the DOE office including a user’s guide and several input files and the executable for Windows Pcs. We have published several SPE papers, presented several posters, and one MS thesis is completed (V. Pudugramam, 2013) resulting from this DOE funded project.

  15. Decentralized aircraft landing scheduling at single runway non-controlled airports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Yuanyuan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    that achieves decentralized aircraft landing scheduling with acceptable performance whereas a solution to the distributed coordination issues is presented. Finally real-time Monte Carlo flight simulations of multi-aircraft landing scenarios are conducted...

  16. Control of Major-Accident Hazards Involving Land Transmission Charlotte BOUISSOU, Project Manager for Pipelines Risk Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    aims to help authorities to balance the requirement of the new pipeline regulation with regardsControl of Major-Accident Hazards Involving Land Transmission Pipelines Charlotte BOUISSOU, Project Manager for Pipelines Risk Assessment Sandrine DESCOURRIERE, Project Manager for Plants Risk Assessment

  17. Aggressive landing maneuvers for unmanned aerial vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayraktar, Selcuk

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VTOL (Vertical Take Off and Landing) vehicle landing is considered to be a critically difficult task for both land, marine, and urban operations. This thesis describes one possible control approach to enable landing of ...

  18. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM HAUGHTON RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment and enables moreFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the HAUGHTON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Flooding Flood Forecasting Local Information Haughton ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins

  19. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM JOHNSTONE RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the JOHNSTONE RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins Flood

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM NERANG RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    ALERT System The Nerang River ALERT flood warning system was completed in the early 1990's as a coFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the NERANG RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Nerang ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River Height Bulletins

  1. Improving Gas Flooding Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid Grigg; Robert Svec; Zheng Zeng; Alexander Mikhalin; Yi Lin; Guoqiang Yin; Solomon Ampir; Rashid Kassim

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focuses on laboratory studies with related analytical and numerical models, as well as work with operators for field tests to enhance our understanding of and capabilities for more efficient enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Much of the work has been performed at reservoir conditions. This includes a bubble chamber and several core flood apparatus developed or modified to measure interfacial tension (IFT), critical micelle concentration (CMC), foam durability, surfactant sorption at reservoir conditions, and pressure and temperature effects on foam systems.Carbon dioxide and N{sub 2} systems have been considered, under both miscible and immiscible conditions. The injection of CO2 into brine-saturated sandstone and carbonate core results in brine saturation reduction in the range of 62 to 82% brine in the tests presented in this paper. In each test, over 90% of the reduction occurred with less than 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected, with very little additional brine production after 0.5 PV of CO{sub 2} injected. Adsorption of all considered surfactant is a significant problem. Most of the effect is reversible, but the amount required for foaming is large in terms of volume and cost for all considered surfactants. Some foams increase resistance to the value beyond what is practical in the reservoir. Sandstone, limestone, and dolomite core samples were tested. Dissolution of reservoir rock and/or cement, especially carbonates, under acid conditions of CO2 injection is a potential problem in CO2 injection into geological formations. Another potential change in reservoir injectivity and productivity will be the precipitation of dissolved carbonates as the brine flows and pressure decreases. The results of this report provide methods for determining surfactant sorption and can be used to aid in the determination of surfactant requirements for reservoir use in a CO{sub 2}-foam flood for mobility control. It also provides data to be used to determine rock permeability changes during CO{sub 2} flooding due to saturation changes, dissolution, and precipitation.

  2. Simulation and Economic Screening of Improved Oil Recovery Methods with Emphasis on Injection Profile Control Including Waterflooding, Polymer Flooding and a Thermally Activated Deep Diverting Gel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Okeke, Tobenna

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    recovery of hydrocarbons and premature well or field abandonment. Water production can be more problematic during waterflooding in a highly heterogeneous reservoir with vertical communication between layers leading to unevenness in the flood front, cross...

  3. Controls and Robotics Research at Michigan State University 1. Land Grant Legacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Jongeun

    Systems . 3 Controls Research Laboratory Mukherjee telerobotic. Cevat Gokcek Linear, Nonlinear Systems, Robust, Optimal Controls, Switched Systems . Clark Radcliffe , interfaces . (Choi . (Baek, Seungik),TamaraReidBush . 4. , , . . Linear Control Systems; Linear

  4. Improved Efficiency of Miscible CO2 Floods and Enhanced Prospects for CO2 Flooding Heterogeneous Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, Reid B.; Schechter, David S.

    1999-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project is to improve the efficiency of miscible CO2 floods and enhance the prospects for flooding heterogeneous reservoirs. This report provides results of the second year of the three-year project that will be exploring three principles: (1) Fluid and matrix interactions (understanding the problems). (2) Conformance control/sweep efficiency (solving the problems. 3) Reservoir simulation for improved oil recovery (predicting results).

  5. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BURDEKIN RIVER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river rises in the catchment below the DamFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BURDEKIN RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system Local Information Burdekin ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings

  6. Ground controlled precision landing delivery in the presence of radar disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Durocher, Cort Louis

    1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Introduction: The purpose of Air Traffic Control is to ensure separation of aircraft in the most efficient manner possible. The need for efficiency is becoming more important as air traffic continues to increase at a high ...

  7. Ecosystem Controls on C & N Sequestration Following Afforestation of Agricultural Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.A. Paul, S.J. Morris, R.T. Conant

    2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In our project, we proposed to continue analysis of our available soil samples and data, and to develop new studies to answer the following objectives: Objective 1) Broaden field based studies of ecosystem C and N compartments to enhance current understanding of C and N sequestration and dynamics. Objective 2) Improve our understanding of mechanism controlling C and N stabilization and dynamics. Objective 3) Investigate the interrelated role of soil temperature and organism type and activity as controlling mechanism in SOC dynamics and sequestration.

  8. The Effects of Quality Control on Decreasing Error Propagation in the LandScan USA Population Distribution Model: A Case Study of Philadelphia County

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patterson, Lauren [University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Myers, Aaron T [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscan USA is a high resolution dasymetric model incorporating multiple ancillary variables to distribute populations. LandScan USA is a valuable tool in determining the population at risk during emergency response situations. However, a critical evaluation is necessary to produce user confidence regarding model accuracy through the verification and validation of model outputs. Unfortunately, dynamic models, such as population distribution, are often not validated due to the difficulty of having multiple input datasets and lack of validated data. A validated dataset allows analysis of model accuracy, as well as quantifying the benefits and costs of improving input datasets compared to find a balance for producing the best model. This paper examines inaccuracies present within the input variables of two national school datasets incorporated in the model. Schools were chosen since a validated school dataset exists for Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania. Quality control efforts utilized throughout the LandScan USA process are quantified to determine the degree of quality control necessary to have a statistically significant effect on model output. Typical LandScan USA quality control resulted in 43% of school enrollment values changed, compared to 89% for the validated dataset. Normal quality control methods resulted in 36% of schools being spatially relocated compared to 87% for the validated dataset. However, the costs of increasing quality control from normal to the validated dataset equated to a 600% increase in manual labor time for statistically insignificant improvements in LandScan USA daytime. This study enabled validation verification of not only the quality control process for LandScan USA, but also provides confidence in model output and use for policy issues, planning and emergency situations.

  9. Inter-Organizational Controls in Public Land Concession Contracts Abstract: Research into the inter-organizational relationship (IOR) is proliferating. In several

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Inter-Organizational Controls in Public Land Concession Contracts Damien BO1 Abstract: Research into the inter-organizational relationship (IOR) is proliferating. In several social science disciplines, such as economy, strategy, organizational and management research the IOR has become a topic of substantial

  10. Flooding and Fire Ants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nester, Paul

    2008-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    of debris or in homes and other build- ings until they build new mounds in the soil. During flooding Avoid contact with floating mats of fire ants. If you are in a row boat, do not touch the ants with the oars. If you must work in flood water, try... within the first 15 to 20 minutes. Some people report that the irrita- tion of a fire ant sting can be relieved by applying a 50:50 solution of bleach and water. Other home remedies include ammonia, meat tenderizer, tea tree oil and camphor...

  11. Service Assessment Hurricane Floyd Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Service Assessment Hurricane Floyd Floods of September 1999 mm r u, /"' r U.S.DEPARTMENTOF COMMERCE: Hurricane Floyd Floods of September 1999. Aerial view of Grifton, North Carolina, with flooding from the Neuse River. (Photograph courtesy of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.) #12;Service Assessment Hurricane

  12. Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydraulic Effects of Changes in Bottom-Land Vegetation on Three Major Floods, Gila RiverKelvey, Director Library of Congress Cataloging in Publication Data Burkham, D. E. 1927 Hydraulic effects 19.16:655-J 1. Gila River-Floods. 2. Hydraulics. 3. Botany-Ecology-Gila River. 1. Title: Hydraulic

  13. Alkaline flooding injection strategy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to improved alkali-surfactant flooding methods, and this includes determining the proper design of injection strategy. Several different injection strategies have been used or suggested for recovering heavy oils with surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding methods. Oil recovery was compared for four different injection strategies: (1) surfactant followed by polymer, (2) surfactant followed by alkaline polymer, (3) alkaline surfactant followed by polymer, and (4) alkali, surfactant, and polymer mixed in a single formulation. The effect of alkaline preflush was also studied under two different conditions. All of the oil recovery experiments were conducted under optimal conditions with a viscous, non-acidic oil from Hepler (KS) oil field. The coreflood experiments were conducted with Berea sandstone cores since field core was not available in sufficient quantity for coreflood tests. The Tucker sand of Hepler field is a Class I fluvial dominated deltaic reservoir, as classified by the Department of Energy, which has been selected as the site of a DOE-sponsored field pilot test.

  14. Joint environmental assessment 1997--2001 of the California Department of Food and Agriculture Curly Top Virus Control Program for Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The DOE, Naval Petroleum reserves in California (NPRC), proposes to sign an Amendment to the Cooperative Agreement and Supplement with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) to extend the term of the Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) in California. This program involves Malathion spraying on NPRC lands to control the beet leafhopper, over a five year period from 1997 through 2001. It is expected that approximately 330 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 1 (NPR-1) and approximately 9,603 acres on Naval Petroleum Reserve Number 2 (NPR-2) will be treated with Malathion annually by CDFA during the course of this program. The actual acreage subject to treatment can vary from year to year. Pursuant to the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA), as amended, the potential impacts of the proposed action were analyzed in a Joint Environmental Assessment (DOE/EA-1011) with the US Department of Interior, Bureau of Land Management (BLM) acting as lead agency, in consultation with the CDFA, and the DOE acting as a cooperating agency. Based on the analysis in the EA, DOE has determined that the conduct of the Curly Top Virus Control Program in California is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the NEPA. Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required and DOE is consequently issuing a FONSI.

  15. Human spatial orientation perceptions during simulated lunar landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Torin Kristofer

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During crewed lunar landings, astronauts are expected to guide a stable and controlled descent to a landing zone that is level and free of hazards by either making landing point (LP) redesignations or taking direct manual ...

  16. SHARED CONTROL BETWEEN HUMAN AND MACHINE: USING A HAPTIC STEERING WHEEL TO AID IN LAND VEHICLE GUIDANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gillespie, Brent

    with an automatic controller. We present a fixed-base driving simulator experiment in which subjects take advantage. INTRODUCTION In man-machine systems, the mechanical response of the control interface (e.g., knob, mouse processing, and fast response. Drivers use automatic control of speed today in autos (cruise control). GPS

  17. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enables. Flood ALERT System The initial Ipswich Creeks ALERT flood warning system was completed in the earlyFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BREMER RIVER TO IPSWICH This brochure describes the flood warning

  18. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM This brochure describes the flood warning system operated by the Australian Government,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    's Flood Warning Centre in Brisbane. The system provides early warning of heavy rainfall and river risesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the DON RIVER This brochure describes the flood warning system operated Local Information Don ALERT System Flood Warnings and Bulletins Interpreting Flood Warnings and River

  19. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current project is a systematic research effort aimed at quantifying the interactions of physical mechanisms that control the scaling behavior of miscible floods. Displacement performance in a miscible flood is the result of a complex set of competing and interacting mechanisms. Phase behavior is of fundamental importance because the transfer of components from the oil to the injected fluid (as in most CO{sub 2} floods) or from the injected fluid to the oil (as in rich gas floods) can generate mixture compositions with displacement properties very different from those of pure CO{sub 2} and original oil. The goal of this project, is to make more accurate quantitative predictions of the impact of nonuniform flow, crossflow and phase behavior in flows in heterogeneous reservoir rocks. In past reports, we have discussed the instabilities arising from unfavorable mobility ratios that occur during injection of a solvent such as CO{sub 2}. In this report, two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) computations by a particle-tracking technique are compared for unstable displacements in homogeneous porous media, with and without gravity. In homogeneous porous media without gravity, 2D fingering patterns and the length of the transition zone are nearly the same as those obtained in 3D displacements. When gravity is added, however, calculated gravity tongues and fingering patterns can be very different when viscous and gravity forces are of comparable magnitude. We summarize results obtained by Ph.D. student Hamdi Tchelepi concerning 2D and 3D fingering in homogeneous media, and we compare displacements with and without gravity segregation. The computations show conclusively that there are some situations in which 2D simulations reproduce 3D behavior well and others for which they do not.

  20. Floods in Pakistan: Socio-political and 'techno-nature' challenges a first glance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Floods in Pakistan: Socio-political and 'techno-nature' challenges ­ a first glance Urs Geiser 1. Over the coming days, rains continued not only in Northwest Pakistan, but in Baluchistan as well quarter of Pakistan's land area is inundated. The spatial spread of the disaster is well known

  1. Delaware Land Protection Act (Delaware)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Land Protection Act requires the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Control to work with the Delaware Open Space Council to develop standards and criteria for determining the...

  2. A first large-scale flood inundation forecasting model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schumann, Guy J-P; Neal, Jeffrey C.; Voisin, Nathalie; Andreadis, Konstantinos M.; Pappenberger, Florian; Phanthuwongpakdee, Kay; Hall, Amanda C.; Bates, Paul D.

    2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    At present continental to global scale flood forecasting focusses on predicting at a point discharge, with little attention to the detail and accuracy of local scale inundation predictions. Yet, inundation is actually the variable of interest and all flood impacts are inherently local in nature. This paper proposes a first large scale flood inundation ensemble forecasting model that uses best available data and modeling approaches in data scarce areas and at continental scales. The model was built for the Lower Zambezi River in southeast Africa to demonstrate current flood inundation forecasting capabilities in large data-scarce regions. The inundation model domain has a surface area of approximately 170k km2. ECMWF meteorological data were used to force the VIC (Variable Infiltration Capacity) macro-scale hydrological model which simulated and routed daily flows to the input boundary locations of the 2-D hydrodynamic model. Efficient hydrodynamic modeling over large areas still requires model grid resolutions that are typically larger than the width of many river channels that play a key a role in flood wave propagation. We therefore employed a novel sub-grid channel scheme to describe the river network in detail whilst at the same time representing the floodplain at an appropriate and efficient scale. The modeling system was first calibrated using water levels on the main channel from the ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) laser altimeter and then applied to predict the February 2007 Mozambique floods. Model evaluation showed that simulated flood edge cells were within a distance of about 1 km (one model resolution) compared to an observed flood edge of the event. Our study highlights that physically plausible parameter values and satisfactory performance can be achieved at spatial scales ranging from tens to several hundreds of thousands of km2 and at model grid resolutions up to several km2. However, initial model test runs in forecast mode revealed that it is crucial to account for basin-wide hydrological response time when assessing lead time performances notwithstanding structural limitations in the hydrological model and possibly large inaccuracies in precipitation data.

  3. Oilfield flooding polymer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Fred D. (Socorro, NM); Hatch, Melvin J. (Socorro, NM); Shepitka, Joel S. (Socorro, NM); Donaruma, Lorraine G. (Syosset, NY)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monomer, polymers containing the monomer, and the use of the polymer in oilfield flooding is disclosed. The subject monomer is represented by the general formula: ##STR1## wherein: n is an integer from 0 to about 4; m is an integer from 0 to about 6; a is an integer equal to at least 1 except where m is equal to 0, a must equal 0 and where m is equal to 1, a must equal 0 or 1; p is an integer from 2 to about 10; b is an integer equal to at least 1 and is of sufficient magnitude that the ratio b/p is at least 0.2; and q is an integer from 0 to 2. The number of hydroxy groups in the monomer is believed to be critical, and therefore the sum of (a+b) divided by the sum (m+p) should be at least 0.2. The moieties linked to the acrylic nitrogen can be joined to provide a ringed structure.

  4. Surfactant loss control in chemical flooding: Spectroscopic and calorimetric study of adsorption and precipitation on reservoir minerals. Quarterly technical progress report, July 1, 1994--October 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Somasundaran, P.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interactions between surfactants and solids can be understood completely by studying desorption as well as adsorption. During this report period, desorption of tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC) and pentadecylethoxylated nonyl phenol (NP-15) mixtures from the alumina-water interface was studied. It was found that in tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC) rich mixtures the desorption of the two surfactants from the interface was controlled by the TTAC and was similar to the desorption of TTAC alone. At high concentrations the adsorption of the mixtures was reversible. At low concentrations, however, the desorption of TTAC showed some positive hysteresis. Since the adsorption of NP-15 was dependent upon the presence of TTAC, polyethoxylated nonyl phenol (NP-15) also, like TTAC, showed some positive desorption hysteresis. In contrast, the desorption of both these surfactants from a 1:1 TTAC:NP-15 mixture showed some negative hysteresis. It was clear that the desorption behavior of the components in the mixture system studied here can be controlled by adjusting the ratio of the two surfactants. With an increase of NP-15 in the mixtures, the desorption of surfactants becomes easier. In an attempt to understand adsorption and desorption behavior of mixed surfactant systems, regular solution theory was used to model the interactions between tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (TTAC) and nonyl phenol polyethoxylated alcohol with fifteen ethylene oxide groups (NP-15). The interaction parameter P and the monomer concentrations were calculated for different mixtures.

  5. Links Between Flood Frequency and Annual Water Balance Behaviors: A Basis for Similarity and Regionalization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Jiali; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Guo, Shenglian; Liu, Pan; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of a data based comparative study of several hundred catchments across continental United States belonging to the MOPEX dataset, which systematically explored the connection between the flood frequency curve and measures of mean annual water balance. Two different measures of mean annual water balance are used: (i) a climatic aridity index, AI, which is a measure of the competition between water and energy availability at the annual scale; and, (ii) baseflow index, BFI, the ratio of slow runoff to total runoff also at the annual time scale, reflecting the role of geology, soils, topography and vegetation. The data analyses showed that the aridity index, AI, has a first order control on both the mean and Cv of annual maximum floods. While mean annual flood decreases with increasing aridity, Cv increases with increasing aridity. BFI appeared to be a second order control on the magnitude and shape of the flood frequency curve. Higher BFI, meaning more subsurface flow and less surface flow leads to a decrease of mean annual flood whereas lower BFI leads to accumulation of soil moisture and increased flood magnitudes that arise from many events acting together. The results presented in this paper provide innovative means to delineate homogeneous regions within which the flood frequency curves can be assumed to be functionally similar. At another level, understanding the connection between annual water balance and flood frequency will be another building block towards developing comprehensive understanding of catchment runoff behavior in a holistic way.

  6. Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flooding and Recycling Authorizations Konstantin (Kosta) Beznosov Laboratory for Education delivery channels with speculatively pre- computed authorizations and actively recycling them on a just Security Keywords authorization recycling, authorization flooding, access con- trol, authorization, publish

  7. Blackland's flood warning system protects soldiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    tx H2O | pg. 28 Story by Kathy Wythe | pg. 28 A flood warning system resulting from a Texas AgriLife Research water quality monitoring project at Fort Hood is potentially saving lives and property. The Flood Alert System via Telemetry... said they also hope to use real-time stream level and weather data to develop a flood prediction model to forecast the likelihood of flooding across Fort Hood. Blackland?s f lood warning system protects soldiers ...

  8. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    . The system provides early warning of heavy rainfalls and river rises throughout the catchment and enablesFLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the LOGAN & ALBERT RIVERS This brochure describes the flood warning system of Meteorology operates a flood warning system for the Logan and Albert River catchments based on a rainfall

  9. GIS-BASED PREDICTION OF HURRICANE FLOOD INUNDATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JUDI, DAVID [Los Alamos National Laboratory; KALYANAPU, ALFRED [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BERSCHEID, ALAN [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simulation environment is being developed for the prediction and analysis of the inundation consequences for infrastructure systems from extreme flood events. This decision support architecture includes a GIS-based environment for model input development, simulation integration tools for meteorological, hydrologic, and infrastructure system models and damage assessment tools for infrastructure systems. The GIS-based environment processes digital elevation models (30-m from the USGS), land use/cover (30-m NLCD), stream networks from the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) and soils data from the NRCS (STATSGO) to create stream network, subbasins, and cross-section shapefiles for drainage basins selected for analysis. Rainfall predictions are made by a numerical weather model and ingested in gridded format into the simulation environment. Runoff hydrographs are estimated using Green-Ampt infiltration excess runoff prediction and a 1D diffusive wave overland flow routing approach. The hydrographs are fed into the stream network and integrated in a dynamic wave routing module using the EPA's Storm Water Management Model (SWMM) to predict flood depth. The flood depths are then transformed into inundation maps and exported for damage assessment. Hydrologic/hydraulic results are presented for Tropical Storm Allison.

  10. Land Use and Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Daniel; Polsky, Colin; Bolstad, Paul V.; Brody, Samuel D.; Hulse, David; Kroh, Roger; Loveland, Thomas; Thomson, Allison M.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A contribution to the 3rd National Climate Assessment report, discussing the following key messages: 1. Choices about land-use and land-cover patterns have affected and will continue to affect how vulnerable or resilient human communities and ecosystems are to the effects of climate change. 2. Land-use and land-cover changes affect local, regional, and global climate processes. 3. Individuals, organizations, and governments have the capacity to make land-use decisions to adapt to the effects of climate change. 4. Choices about land use and land management provide a means of reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas levels.

  11. Irrigation, Navigation Flood Control and Recreation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |

  12. Asphalt deposition in miscible floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasan, Syed Mir Ahmed

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Petroleum Engineering ASPHALT DEPOSITION IN MISCIBLE FLOODS A Thesis By SYED MIR AHMED HASAN Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) ommittee Member) Committee Member) Head of Department), (Co 'ttee Member) January, f964... Subject: Petroleum Engineering TABLE OF CONTENTS ABS TRAC T. Page 2. INTRODUCTION. 3 DESCRIPTION OF EQUIPMENT AND MATERIALS. . . . . , . 6 4. EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURE 5. INTERPRETATION AND DISCUSSION OF RESULTS. . . . . . 13 6. CONCLUSIONS. 7...

  13. From negotiation to auction : Land-Conveyance Reform in China and its institutional and social impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Zhiyu (Zhiyu Jerry)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The land market and the associated land-development-control mechanism in China have been experiencing a series of reforms since the 1990s, of which Land Conveyance Reform (LCR) in 2004 is a very recent and an important ...

  14. Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koptur, Suzanne

    Primitive Land Plants 37 PRIMITIVE LAND PLANTS These are the plants that were present soon after land was colonized, over 400 mil- lion years ago. A few plants living today are closely related to those ancient plants, and we often call them "living fossils". Two major lineages of plants evolved

  15. Free, Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) : does it give indigenous peoples more control over development of their lands in the Philippines?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Co, Ronilda R. (Ronilda Rosario)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1998 Indigenous Peoples Rights Act (IPRA) grants indigenous peoples (IPs) in the Philippines the right to Free, Prior, and Informed Consent (FPIC) with regard to development projects undertaken on their ancestral lands. ...

  16. Design of an Automatic Landing System for the Meridian UAV using Fuzzy Logic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Royer, David Andrew

    2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    antennas attached below the wings. Fuzzy logic is determined the ideal application for an automatic landing controller based on its ability to control uncertain and nonlinear systems. Using fuzzy logic, a longitudinal automatic landing controller...

  17. FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Instructions Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program Elevation Certificate and Instructions...

  18. Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    plants willows Los Alamos plants willows for flood recovery The Laboratory's Corrective Actions Program (CAP) planted nearly 10,000 willows to help preserve the Pueblo Canyon...

  19. Flood Risk Management Every year floods sweep through communities across the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management #12;Every year floods sweep through communities across the United States risk management activities of communities in both urban and rural areas throughout the United States management activities. At the direction of Congress, the Corps studies and implements flood risk management

  20. FLOOD WARNING This brochure describes the flood warning system operated by the Commonwealth Bureau of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    or stock to higher ground, or implement other temporary flood loss reduction measures. Warnings in the flood-threatened area believe the warning and take appropriate action in advance of being flooded. Roles below the floor level as well as bicycle and pedestrian paths. In rural areas removal of stock

  1. Flood protection in the swamps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reesby, Raymond George

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    LIBRA R Y A S N COLLEGE OF TEXAS FLOOD PROTECTION IN THE SWAMPS A Thesis Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical School of Texas In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Professi. onal Degree of Civil... Joining points b, o, o , e tl ~Ke is a vertical cut-off wall extending downward from the bottom of the heel at its r1verside end. It has the dual function of reducing the uplift and xeinforcing the structure against sliding, and is defined by lines...

  2. Federal Flood Risk Management Standard

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT OF DAVIDThe data dashboardA A 1ChipSteven Bass,Flood

  3. New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard New Executive Order Establishes a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard February 5, 2015 - 10:55am Addthis...

  4. Kiran Maharjan Climate change and floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    management processes by providing many kinds of information. The level of vulnerability of people towardsKiran Maharjan Climate change and floods Climate change and floods Vulnerability analysis of people, in the livelihoods of people. Hence, climate change is making everyone vulnerable to its impacts. Most of the people

  5. School Land Board (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board oversees the use of land owned by the state or held in trust for use and benefit by the state or one of its departments, boards, or agencies. The Board is responsible for...

  6. Chesapeake Forest Lands (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Chesapeake Forest Lands are most of the former land holdings of the Chesapeake Forest Products Company, which now includes more than 66,000 acres in five lower Eastern Shore counties. These...

  7. Land Reclamation Act (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to balance surface mining interests with the conservation of natural resources and land preservation. This Act authorizes the Land Reclamation Commission of the...

  8. Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South Park, Park County, Colorado 2003 Delivery Colorado State University #12;Survey of Critical Wetlands Bureau of Land Management Lands South

  9. Improvement of CO sub 2 flood performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, D.F.; Heller, J.P.

    1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a six-year research project devoted to the study of processes of oil displacement using dense carbon dioxide. The topics studied have included phase behavior and physical properties of mixtures of crude oil with CO{sub 2}, the phenomena involved in the displacement of oil through reservoir rock under oilfield conditions, the influence of stabilized lamella or CO{sub 2}-foam on this displacement and the development of computer programs to simulate the displacement. In addition, the occurrence of nonuniformities in the displacement pattern has also been considered. The effect on displacement of permeability heterogeneities in the reservoir have been studied geostatistically and by direct numerical modelling. Displacement nonuniformities that are induced by viscosity and density differences between displaced and displacing fluids have also been considered, and efforts are described for the development of two different types of additive for purposes of mobility control of CO{sub 2} floods. One of these is the so-called CO{sub 2}-foam, formed by simultaneous flow through the formation of dense CO{sub 2} with a water solution of a special surfactant. The second type under development in the project is known as direct thickener, and consists of a polymer that is soluble in dense CO{sub 2} and able to viscosify it. Significant progress is reported on all of the topics mentioned above. 174 refs., 186 figs., 41 tabs.

  10. Flood Zone Building Permits (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Building permits are required for new construction and development in the Special Flood Hazard Areas (SFHA). All development projects in SFHA must comply with Title 12 DCMR and Title 20 DCMR...

  11. Aqueous flooding methods for tertiary oil recovery

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peru, Deborah A. (Bartlesville, OK)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of aqueous flooding of subterranean oil bearing formation for tertiary oil recovery involves injecting through a well into the formation a low alkaline pH aqueous sodium bicarbonate flooding solution. The flooding solution's pH ranges from about 8.25 to 9.25 and comprises from 0.25 to 5 weight percent and preferably about 0.75 to 3.0 weight percent of sodium bicarbonate and includes a petroleum recovery surfactant of 0.05 to 1.0 weight percent and between 1 and 20 weight percent of sodium chloride. After flooding, an oil and water mixture is withdrawn from the well and the oil is separated from the oil and water mixture.

  12. VNU Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 1 (2013) 38-44 Development of an Online Supporting System Flood Warning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and they are also the types causing most economic, social and environmental damages. According to recent fiveVNU Journal of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Vol. 29, No. 1 (2013) 38-44 38 Development the affects of flood-related damage was provided to residents at risk in the low land areas of the Vu Gia

  13. Flood Management This impromptu activity was contrived by playing with a storm drain that entered

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benitez-Nelson, Claudia

    waterways. Concept: Students practice with hydrology and flood control terms as well as measuring drainage sloped downward to other water sources, we decided that this might be a good as guess as any for practice that "real" people do on a regular basis in which the students will complete the task in 1-2 hours (except

  14. A flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    control in urban storm water runoff [Kirby et al., 2005], and linking tidal hydrodynamic forcing to flow and field studies. The proposed model asymptotically recovers the flow resistance formulation when the waterA flow resistance model for assessing the impact of vegetation on flood routing mechanics Gabriel G

  15. An ecological perceptual aid for precision vertical landings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Cristin Anne

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pilots of vertical landing vehicles face numerous control challenges which often involve the loss of outside visual perceptual cues or the control of flight parameters within tight constraints. These challenges are often ...

  16. Hierarchical Marginal Land Assessment for Land Use Planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Shujiang [ORNL; Post, Wilfred M [ORNL; Wang, Dali [ORNL; Nichols, Dr Jeff A [ORNL; Bandaru, Vara Prasad [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Marginal land provides an alternative potential for food and bioenergy production in the face of limited land resources; however, effective assessment of marginal lands is not well addressed. Concerns over environmental risks, ecosystem services and sustainability for marginal land have been widely raised. The objective of this study was to develop a hierarchical marginal land assessment framework for land use planning and management. We first identified major land functions linking production, environment, ecosystem services and economics, and then classified land resources into four categories of marginal land using suitability and limitations associated with major management goals, including physically marginal land, biologically marginal land, environmental-ecological marginal land, and economically marginal land. We tested this assessment framework in south-western Michigan, USA. Our results indicated that this marginal land assessment framework can be potentially feasible on land use planning for food and bioenergy production, and balancing multiple goals of land use management. We also compared our results with marginal land assessment from the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) and land capability classes (LCC) that are used in the US. The hierarchical assessment framework has advantages of quantitatively reflecting land functions and multiple concerns. This provides a foundation upon which focused studies can be identified in order to improve the assessment framework by quantifying high-resolution land functions associated with environment and ecosystem services as well as their criteria are needed to improve the assessment framework.

  17. Consequences of Flooding on Spectral Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsten Rudolf; Normann Mertig; Steffen Löck; Arnd Bäcker

    2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We study spectral statistics in systems with a mixed phase space, in which regions of regular and chaotic motion coexist. Increasing their density of states, we observe a transition of the level-spacing distribution P(s) from Berry-Robnik to Wigner statistics, although the underlying classical phase-space structure and the effective Planck constant remain unchanged. This transition is induced by flooding, i.e., the disappearance of regular states due to increasing regular-to-chaotic couplings. We account for this effect by a flooding-improved Berry-Robnik distribution, in which an effectively reduced size of the regular island enters. To additionally describe power-law level repulsion at small spacings, we extend this prediction by explicitly considering the tunneling couplings between regular and chaotic states. This results in a flooding- and tunneling-improved Berry-Robnik distribution which is in excellent agreement with numerical data.

  18. A methodology for forecasting carbon dioxide flooding performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marroquin Cabrera, Juan Carlos

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology was developed for forecasting carbon dioxide (CO2) flooding performance quickly and reliably. The feasibility of carbon dioxide flooding in the Dollarhide Clearfork "AB" Unit was evaluated using the methodology. This technique is very...

  19. Costs and Consequences of Flooding Camilo Sarmiento, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costs and Consequences of Flooding Camilo Sarmiento, Ph.D. Senior Economist Fannie Mae #12 the impact that the NFIP has had on the flooding costs and the distribution of these costs among payers the NFIP loss database, the model examines losses in known flood events, infers total losses by cost

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER ABOVE WIVENHOE DAM This brochure describes the flood above Wivenhoe Dam. It includes reference information which will be useful for understanding Flood above Wivenhoe Dam drains an area of approximately 7,000 square kilometres. The Brisbane River rises

  1. Biological assessment for the transfer of the DP land tract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keller, D.C.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is proposing to transfer to the County of Los Alamos up to 10-ha (25-ac) of federal land located in Technical Area-21 to be developed for commercial uses. Previous studies for the proposed land transfer area indicate that potential habitat for four threatened, endangered, and sensitive species occurs in or adjacent to the proposed land transfer area. These include the northern goshawk (federal species of concern), Mexican spotted owl (federal threatened), the spotted bat (federal species of concern, state threatened), die peregrine falcon (federal endangered, state endangered), and the. In order to determine the possible influences of the land transfer on these organisms, information from species-specific surveys was collected. These surveys were used to confirm the presence of these species or to infer their absence in or near the project area. It was concluded that none of die above mentioned species occur in the project area. Stretches of the stream channel within Los Alamos Canyon have been identified as palustrine and riverine, temporarily flooded wetlands. The proposed land transfer should not affect these wetlands.

  2. Mitigating floods : reconstructing Lives : rehabilitating Thatta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gul, Marium

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pakistan was struck by floods in July 2010, the effects of which left 20.36 million people affected and 1.9 million homes damaged or destroyed'. In the province of Sindh in Pakistan, most of the affected population of the ...

  3. Cheap Textile Dam Protection of Seaport Cities against Hurricane Storm Surge Waves, Tsunamis, and Other Weather-Related Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Author offers to complete research on a new method and cheap applicatory design for land and sea textile dams. The offered method for the protection of the USA's major seaport cities against hurricane storm surge waves, tsunamis, and other weather-related inundations is the cheapest (to build and maintain of all extant anti-flood barriers) and it, therefore, has excellent prospective applications for defending coastal cities from natural weather-caused disasters. It may also be a very cheap method for producing a big amount of cyclical renewable hydropower, land reclamation from the ocean, lakes, riverbanks, as well as land transportation connection of islands, and islands to mainland, instead of very costly over-water bridges and underwater tunnels.

  4. Flood analyses for Department of Energy Y-12, ORNL and K-25 Plants. Flood analyses in support of flood emergency planning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study involved defining the flood potential and local rainfall depth and duration data for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Y-12, Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and K-25 plants. All three plants are subject to flooding from the Clinch River. In addition, the Y-12 plant is subject to flooding from East Fork Poplar and Bear Creeks, the ORNL plant from Whiteoak Creek and Melton Branch, and the K-25 plant from Poplar Creek. Determination of flood levels included consideration of both rainfall events and postulated failures of Norris and Melton Hill Dams in seismic events.

  5. Imbibition flooding with CO?-enriched water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grape, Steven George

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    performance for a typical Austin Chalk field. METHODOLOGY Imbibition flood testing in core samples is a "saturate and soak" process. Core samples are first dried, then saturated with water. After weighing, the sample is saturated with oil down to minimum... carbonated water. Any changes in saturation or permeability are noted. The procedure is then repeated using carbonated water. Two types of experiments were performed on core samples during this project. Field Core testing on 4" diameter cores...

  6. Land-use Leakage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Calvin, Katherine V.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Kim, Son H.; Wise, Marshall A.; Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Leakage occurs whenever actions to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions in one part of the world unleash countervailing forces elsewhere in the world so that reductions in global emissions are less than emissions mitigation in the mitigating region. While many researchers have examined the concept of industrial leakage, land-use policies can also result in leakage. We show that land-use leakage is potentially as large as or larger than industrial leakage. We identify two potential land-use leakage drivers, land-use policies and bioenergy. We distinguish between these two pathways and run numerical experiments for each. We also show that the land-use policy environment exerts a powerful influence on leakage and that under some policy designs leakage can be negative. International “offsets” are a potential mechanism to communicate emissions mitigation beyond the borders of emissions mitigating regions, but in a stabilization regime designed to limit radiative forcing to 3.7 2/m2, this also implies greater emissions mitigation commitments on the part of mitigating regions.

  7. Energy and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the land use impacts of past and future energy development and summarizes the major federal and state legislation which influences the potential land use impacts of energy facilities and can thus influence the locations and timing of energy development. In addition, this report describes and presents the data which are used to measure, and in some cases, predict the potential conflicts between energy development and alternative uses of the nation's land resources. The topics section of this report is divided into three parts. The first part describes the myriad of federal, state and local legislation which have a direct or indirect impact upon the use of land for energy development. The second part addresses the potential land use impacts associated with the extraction, conversion and combustion of energy resources, as well as the disposal of wastes generated by these processes. The third part discusses the conflicts that might arise between agriculture and energy development as projected under a number of DOE mid-term (1990) energy supply and demand scenarios.

  8. Lands & Community

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland to receiveLand ManagementLands

  9. Land acquisition practices by Texas municipal park and recreation agencies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuwsaat, Michael Arthur

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    control over the use of that land. Hecause of the total control of the land, park and recreation agencies have tradit1 onal ly run into little res1 stance in the acquisition of such rights. In the past few years the acquisition of fee simple interests... Ownership Interest Ownership of the total interest 1n land, legally referred to as fee simple, was the type most frequently acquired by Texas park and recreation agencies. Fee s1mple ownership was acquired by Bl%%d of the agencies followed by leasehold 1...

  10. alkaline flooding: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basins Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: To adapt to climate change which results in increasing flood frequency and intensity, the European Community has...

  11. alkaline flooding formulations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    basins Edinburgh, University of - Research Archive Summary: To adapt to climate change which results in increasing flood frequency and intensity, the European Community has...

  12. Willows Aid Flood Recovery in Los Alamos Desert

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Associate Directorate of Environmental Programs (ADEP) has been busy with various flood recovery activities since last fall. 

  13. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Recreation Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  14. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Ungulates Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  15. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Agriculture Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  16. RCW - 43.21B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    B - Environmental and Land Use Hearings Office - Pollution Control Hearings Board Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  17. National Forest Land Scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Community Right to Buy. Communities are encouraged to register an interest in the land they wish to buy Ministers to make a late registration of interest. When Forestry Commission Scotland decides to sell, a community organisation could consider the opportunities for working in partnership with Forestry Commission

  18. Seasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand CaymanSeasonally Flooded Grasslands -Grand Cayman 0 1 2 3 4 50.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Exeter, University of

    Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers Cayman Islands National Biodiversity;Seasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman BracSeasonally Flooded Grasslands - Cayman Brac 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2-Modified Areas - Little CaymanUrban and Man-Modified Areas - Little Cayman 0 0.5 1 1.5 2 2.50.25 Kilometers

  19. County Land Preservation and Use Commissions (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This ordinance creates Land Preservation and Use Commissions in each county to provide for the orderly use and development of land, to protect agricultural land from nonagricultural development,...

  20. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2011 vol 4 no 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2011 vol 4 no 3 Focusing on ­ Asset Management Table of Contents New Flood Risk Management Program Leaders...........................................1 USACE USACE Flood Risk Management & Silver Jackets Workshop......................................... 16 MMC

  1. Imbibition flooding with CO?-enriched water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grape, Steven George

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    light weight, 25 - 35 degree API, diesel oil. Diesel oil was selected because CO, can cause asphaltene precipitation in some heavier crudes. Asphaltene precipitation would ruin the ability of the core to perform mulflple runs. The carbonated water... o e u e Q. 30 20 10 0 20 40 60 60 100 120 Effluent from Core Chamber, om3 Fig. 10. - Imbibition in Sandstone Field Core. 25 The results of the carbonated water flood show a higher initial production of oil. This may be a result of oil...

  2. Caring for Important Papers after a Flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FCS Project Team - FDRM UNIT

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    process, it may be worth the effort. Separate the pages to prevent musty odors. ? When the books are thoroughly dry, close them and use C-clamps to help them retain their shape. Wipe vinyl and leather book covers with a light coating of petroleum jelly..., University of California Cooperative Extension. Caring for Important Papers after a Flood Produced by AgriLife Communications and Marketing, The Texas A&M System Extension publications can be found on the Web at: http://AgriLifebookstore.org Visit the Texas...

  3. Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area, Clark County, Nevada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    1 Geologic Assessment of Piedmont and Playa Flood Hazards in the Ivanpah Valley Area, Clark County..................................................................................................................................... 4 Piedmont Geomorphology and Related Flood Hazards..................... 6 The Field Area

  4. Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta Human-induced climate change reduces chance of flooding in Okavango Delta March 27, 2014 | Tags:...

  5. Were the 2010 Pakistan floods predictable? P. J. Webster,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, Peter J.

    Were the 2010 Pakistan floods predictable? P. J. Webster,1 V. E. Toma,1 and H.M. Kim1 Received 30 July 2010, a series of monsoonal deluges over northern Pakistan resulted in catastrophic flooding, loss, especially in North Pakistan was exceptionally rare as deduced from limited data. The location of the deluges

  6. Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas Environmental Health Buford Highway NE (F-60) Atlanta, GA 30341 March 2011 #12;2 Guidance on Microbial Contamination in Previously Flooded Outdoor Areas Problem Statement Microbial contamination--both bacterial and viral

  7. Flooding of Industrial Facilities -Vulnerability Reduction in Practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    any improvement. As human activities historically developed in river areas and floodplains, industrial-use planning in flood-prone areas and vulnerability reduction in flood-prone facilities. This paper focuses of hazardous material, soil or water pollutions by hazardous substances for the environment, fires, explosions

  8. Partial entrainment of gravel bars during floods Christopher P. Konrad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, David R.

    tracer particles and bed load samplers have demonstrated that partial entrain- ment rather than completePartial entrainment of gravel bars during floods Christopher P. Konrad U.S. Geological Survey a gravel bar during a flood, or partial entrainment, had an approximately normal distribution with respect

  9. Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ponce, V. Miguel

    Dam-Breach Flood Wave Propagation Using Dimensionless Parameters Victor M. Ponce, M.ASCE1 ; Ahmad to study the sensitivity of dam-breach flood waves to breach-outflow hydrograph volume, peak discharge the channel. A dam-breach Froude number is defined to enable analysis through a wide range of site and flow

  10. A Mechanistic Model for Flooding in Vertical Tubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Kevin J.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In a counter-current two-phase flow system, flooding can be defined as the onset of flow reversal of the liquid component which results in an upward co-current flow. Flooding in the surge line of pressurized water reactors poses a significant...

  11. The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model v1.0 coupled to the CABLE land surface scheme v1.4b: evaluation of the control climatology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mao, Jiafu [ORNL; Phipps, S.J. [University of New South Wales; Pitman, A.J. [University of New South Wales; Wang, Yingping [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Abramowitz, G. [University of New South Wales; Pak, B. [CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CSIRO Mk3L climate system model, a reduced-resolution coupled general circulation model, has previously been described in this journal. The model is configured for millennium scale or multiple century scale simulations. This paper reports the impact of replacing the relatively simple land surface scheme that is the default parameterisation in Mk3L with a sophisticated land surface model that simulates the terrestrial energy, water and carbon balance in a physically and biologically consistent way. An evaluation of the new model s near-surface climatology highlights strengths and weaknesses, but overall the atmospheric variables, including the near-surface air temperature and precipitation, are simulated well. The impact of the more sophisticated land surface model on existing variables is relatively small, but generally positive. More significantly, the new land surface scheme allows an examination of surface carbon-related quantities including net primary productivity which adds significantly to the capacity of Mk3L. Overall, results demonstrate that this reduced-resolution climate model is a good foundation for exploring long time scale phenomena. The addition of the more sophisticated land surface model enables an exploration of important Earth System questions including land cover change and abrupt changes in terrestrial carbon storage.

  12. Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation Handbook

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    Modelling downstream change in river flood power: a novel approach based on the UK Flood Estimation" (McEwen, 1994: 359). Lawler (1992) recognised that little was known about the downstream change. It is suggested that downstream change in discharge is best represented as a power function in terms of channel

  13. Control of Mesquite on Grazing Lands.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, C. E.; Meadors, C. H.; Behrens, R.; Robinson, E. D.; Marion, P. T.; Morton, H. L.

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rights-of-ways, along fence ro~vs and around wa- 112ring facilities. DESCRIPTION AND DISTRIBUTION Mesquite (Prosofiis izlliflora) belongs to the Mi- 1 nnsa family (Mimosacene) and is distributed in ( Irarm, mostly dry, hot areas of United States...

  14. LANL completes high-priority flood and erosion control work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointedKyungmin Ham,work under wayLANLLab

  15. A NEW GENERATION CHEMICAL FLOODING SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Mojdeh Delshad

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. In this final report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 of the project.

  16. Policy message Access to land and land rights,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    agriculture can reduce land deg- radation, support agricultural development, and mitigate rural poverty conservation tech- niques by producing food, fodder, fibre, or fuel. · Sustainable farming practices produce

  17. Scale-up of miscible flood processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  18. Land Management - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home asLCLSLaboratoryRowland to receiveLand Management About

  19. Flood Risk Management Newsletter June 2014 vol 7 no 3 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter June 2014 · vol 7 no 3 1 Table of Contents Annual Spring Connecting Flood Risk, Emergency Managers and Silver Jackets: Annual Spring Flood Assessment Karen Durham; Flood Risk Management Newsletter June 2014 · vol 7 no 3 2 these areas of concern were attributed

  20. Flood Storage Allocation Rules for Parallel Reservoirs B.S. (Tsinghua University, China) 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lund, Jay R.

    i Flood Storage Allocation Rules for Parallel Reservoirs By RUI HUI B.S. (Tsinghua University and minimize flood damage. However, for different hydrograph shapes, corresponding flood storage volumes often differ for the same peak flow reductions. Meanwhile, it is often the case that flood storage volume

  1. Quality assurance flood source and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fisher, Darrell R [Richland, WA; Alexander, David L [West Richland, WA; Satz, Stanley [Surfside, FL

    2002-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a is an improved flood source, and method of making the same, which emits an evenly distributed flow of energy from a gamma emitting radionuclide dispersed throughout the volume of the flood source. The flood source is formed by filling a bottom pan with a mix of epoxy resin with cobalt-57, preferably at 10 to 20 millicuries and then adding a hardener. The pan is secured to a flat, level surface to prevent the pan from warping and to act as a heat sink for removal of heat from the pan during the curing of the resin-hardener mixture.

  2. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from January 1, 2002 to March 31, 2002. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. In addition, evaluation of the economics of commercial application in the surrounding area was performed. In a meeting on January 14, 2002 the possibility of staging the demonstration, starting with a 10-acre sub-pattern flood was raised and the decision made to investigate this plan in detail. The influence of carbon dioxide on oil properties and the influence of binary interaction parameters (BIP) used in the VIP simulator were investigated. VIP calculated swelling factors are in good agreement with published values up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Swelling factor and saturated liquid density are relatively independent of the BIP over the range of BIPs used (0.08-0.15) up to 65% mole-fraction CO2. Assuming a CO2 EOR recovery rate projected as being most likely by current modeling, commercial scale CO2 flooding at $20/BO is possible in the leases in Hall-Gurney field. Relatively small floods (240-320 acres, 4-6 patterns) are economically viable at $20/BO in areas of very high primary and secondary productivity (>14 MBO/net acre recovery). Leases with moderately high primary and secondary productivity (> 10 MBO/net acre recovery) can be economic when combined with high productivity leases to form larger floods (>640 acres, 9 or more patterns).

  3. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Forestry Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural

  4. Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: 1966 Land Use Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed by Natural Resources

  5. Protection of Coastal Infrastructure under Rising Flood Risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lickley, M.J.

    The 2005 hurricane season was particularly damaging to the United States, contributing to significant losses to energy infrastructure—much of it the result of flooding from storm surge during hurricanes Katrina and Rita. ...

  6. Multiobjective Design and Optimization of Polymer Flood Performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekkawong, Peerapong

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    (Pareto front) to maximize oil production while preserving polymer performance. Then an optimal polymer flood design can be considered from post-optimization analysis. A 2D synthetic example, and a 3D field-scale application, accounting for geologic...

  7. Chilean glacial lake outburst flood impacts on dam construction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tauro, Flavia

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four Glacial Lake Outburst Floods (GLOF) occurred in the Colonia Glacier (Northern Patagonia Icefield, Chile) from April 2008 to March 2009. Lago Cachet 2 emptied four times producing a maximum excess discharge in the ...

  8. Multiobjective Design and Optimization of Polymer Flood Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ekkawong, Peerapong

    2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The multiobjective genetic algorithm can be used to optimize two conflicting objectives, oil production and polymer utility factor in polymer flood design. This approach provides a set of optimal solutions which can be considered as trade-off curve...

  9. Bus Rapid Transit Impacts on Land Uses and Land Values in Seoul, Korea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cervero, Robert; Kang, Chang Deok

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an ambitious campaign of land reclamation, taking valuablehub of Seoul’s ambitious land reclamation and redevelopment

  10. The effect of flooding velocity and degree of reservoir depletion on the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Phillips C

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I3 at 110 F 19 Observed Variation of Gas Saturation and Residual Oil Saturation . 21 5, Observed Pressure and Gas-Oil Ratio Histories As A Function of the Cumulative Recovery. . . . . . . . . . . 21 Waterflood Recovery At A Constant Pressure... ~ ~ ( ~ ~ ~ ~ Waterflood Recovery As A Function of Initial Gas SB'turatlon ~ ~ ~ ~ o ~ a ~ ~ ~ o o e ~ ~ ~ ~ 4 s a a a ~ 10. Residual Oil Saturation After Primary, Water. Flooding and Final Pressure Depletion. . . ~. . . . . ~ . . 30 Results of laboratory flooding...

  11. A NEW GENERATION CHEMICAL FLOODING SIMULATOR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary A. Pope; Kamy Sepehrnoori; Mojdeh Delshad

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The premise of this research is that a general-purpose reservoir simulator for several improved oil recovery processes can and should be developed so that high-resolution simulations of a variety of very large and difficult problems can be achieved using state-of-the-art algorithms and computers. Such a simulator is not currently available to the industry. The goal of this proposed research is to develop a new-generation chemical flooding simulator that is capable of efficiently and accurately simulating oil reservoirs with at least a million gridblocks in less than one day on massively parallel computers. Task 1 is the formulation and development of solution scheme, Task 2 is the implementation of the chemical module, and Task 3 is validation and application. We have made significant progress on all three tasks and we are on schedule on both technical and budget. In this report, we will detail our progress on Tasks 1 through 3 for the first six months of the second year of the project.

  12. Oil and Gas on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The School Land Board may choose to lease lands for the production of oil and natural gas, on the condition that oil and gas resources are leased together and separate from other minerals. Lands...

  13. Evaluating the purity of a {sup 57}Co flood source by PET

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DiFilippo, Frank P., E-mail: difilif@ccf.org [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195 (United States)

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Flood sources of {sup 57}Co are commonly used for quality control of gamma cameras. Flood uniformity may be affected by the contaminants {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co, which emit higher energy photons. Although vendors specify a maximum combined {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity, a convenient test for flood source purity that is feasible in a clinical environment would be desirable. Methods: Both {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co emit positrons with branching 19.6% and 14.9%, respectively. As is known from {sup 90}Y imaging, a positron emission tomography (PET) scanner is capable of quantitatively imaging very weak positron emission in a high single-photon background. To evaluate this approach, two {sup 57}Co flood sources were scanned with a clinical PET/CT multiple times over a period of months. The {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co activity was clearly visible in the reconstructed PET images. Total impurity activity was quantified from the PET images after background subtraction of prompt gamma coincidences. Results: Time-of-flight PET reconstruction was highly beneficial for accurate image quantification. Repeated measurements of the positron-emitting impurities showed excellent agreement with an exponential decay model. For both flood sources studied, the fit parameters indicated a zero intercept and a decay half-life consistent with a mixture of {sup 56}Co and {sup 58}Co. The total impurity activity at the reference date was estimated to be 0.06% and 0.07% for the two sources, which was consistent with the vendor’s specification of <0.12%. Conclusions: The robustness of the repeated measurements and a thorough analysis of the detector corrections and physics suggest that the accuracy is acceptable and that the technique is feasible. Further work is needed to validate the accuracy of this technique with a calibrated high resolution gamma spectrometer as a gold standard, which was not available for this study, and for other PET detector models.

  14. POISON SPIDER FIELD CHEMICAL FLOOD PROJECT, WYOMING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Arnell; Malcolm Pitts; Jie Qi

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A reservoir engineering and geologic study concluded that approximate 7,852,000 bbls of target oil exits in Poison Spider. Field pore volume, OOIP, and initial oil saturation are defined. Potential injection water has a total dissolved solids content of 1,275 mg/L with no measurable divalent cations. If the Lakota water consistently has no measurable cations, the injection water does not require softening to dissolve alkali. Produced water total dissolved solids were 2,835 mg/L and less than 20 mg/L hardness as the sum of divalent cations. Produced water requires softening to dissolve chemicals. Softened produced water was used to dissolve chemicals in these evaluations. Crude oil API gravity varies across the field from 19.7 to 22.2 degrees with a dead oil viscosity of 95 to 280 cp at 75 F. Interfacial tension reductions of up to 21,025 fold (0.001 dyne/cm) were developed with fifteen alkaline-surfactant combinations at some alkali concentration. An additional three alkaline-surfactant combinations reduced the interfacial tension greater than 5,000 fold. NaOH generally produced the lowest interfacial tension values. Interfacial tension values of less than 0.021 dyne/cm were maintained when the solutions were diluted with produced water to about 60%. Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} when mixed with surfactants did not reduce interfacial tension values to levels at which incremental oil can be expected. NaOH without surfactant interfacial tension reduction is at a level where some additional oil might be recovered. Most of the alkaline-surfactant-polymer solutions producing ultra low interfacial tension gave type II- phase behavior. Only two solutions produced type III phase behavior. Produced water dilution resulted in maintenance of phase type for a number of solutions at produced water dilutions exceeding 80% dilution. The average loss of phase type occurred at 80% dilution. Linear corefloods were performed to determine relative permeability end points, chemical-rock compatibility, polymer injectivity, dynamic chemical retention by rock, and recommended injected polymer concentration. Average initial oil saturation was 0.796 Vp. Produced water injection recovered 53% OOIP leaving an average residual oil saturation of 0.375 Vp. Poison Spider rock was strongly water-wet with a mobility ratio for produced water displacing the 280 cp crude oil of 8.6. Core was not sensitive to either alkali or surfactant injection. Injectivity increased 60 to 80% with alkali plus surfactant injection. Low and medium molecular weight polyacrylamide polymers (Flopaam 3330S and Flopaam 3430S) dissolved in either an alkaline-surfactant solution or softened produced water injected and flowed through Poison Spider rock. Recommended injected polyacrylamide concentration is 2,100 mg/L for both polymers for a unit mobility ratio. Radial corefloods were performed to evaluate oil recovery efficiency of different chemical solutions. Waterflood oil recovery averaged 46.4 OOIP and alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood oil recovery averaged an additional 18.1% OIP for a total of 64.6% OOIP. Oil cut change due to injection of a 1.5 wt% Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} plus 0.05 wt% Petrostep B-100 plus 0.05 wt% Stepantan AS1216 plus 2100 mg/L Flopaam 3430S was from 2% to a peak of 23.5%. Additional study might determine the impact on oil recovery of a lower polymer concentration. An alkaline-surfactant-polymer flood field implementation outline report was written.

  15. Bridging the Gap between Chemical Flooding and Independent Oil Producers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stan McCool; Tony Walton; Paul Willhite; Mark Ballard; Miguel Rondon; Kaixu Song; Zhijun Liu; Shahab Ahmend; Peter Senior

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten Kanas oil reservoirs/leases were studied through geological and engineering analysis to assess the potential performance of chemical flooding to recover oil. Reservoirs/leases that have been efficiently waterflooded have the highest performance potential for chemical flooding. Laboratory work to identify efficient chemical systems and to test the oil recovery performance of the systems was the major effort of the project. Efficient chemical systems were identified for crude oils from nine of the reservoirs/leases. Oil recovery performance of the identified chemical systems in Berea sandstone rocks showed 90+ % recoveries of waterflood residual oil for seven crude oils. Oil recoveries increased with the amount of chemical injected. Recoveries were less in Indiana limestone cores. One formulation recovered 80% of the tertiary oil in the limestone rock. Geological studies for nine of the oil reservoirs are presented. Pleasant Prairie, Trembley, Vinland and Stewart Oilfields in Kansas were the most favorable of the studied reservoirs for a pilot chemical flood from geological considerations. Computer simulations of the performance of a laboratory coreflood were used to predict a field application of chemical flooding for the Trembley Oilfield. Estimates of field applications indicated chemical flooding is an economically viable technology for oil recovery.

  16. Minerals on Public Lands (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Any tract of land that belongs to the state, including islands, salt and freshwater lakes, bays, inlets, marshes, and reefs owned by the state within tidewater limits, the part of the Gulf of...

  17. Riparian Rights: State Land (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The state reserves the power to sell, transfer, and convey, as provided by law, rights-of-way in public land for several purposes, including pipelines, gas pipelines, water pipelines, sewer lines,...

  18. Land and Facility Use Planning

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1996-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Land and Facility Use Planning process provides a way to guide future site development and reuse based on the shared long-term goals and objectives of the Department, site and its stakeholders. Does not cancel other directives.

  19. Climatology of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fountain, Andrew G.

    Climatology of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica of katabatic winds largely controls winter (June to August) temperatures, increasing 1°C per 1% increase of katabatic winds in the McMurdo dry valleys, southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, J. Geophys. Res., 109, D

  20. Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

  1. Hydrodynamic model of Fukushima-Daiichi NPP Industrial site flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaschenko, V N; Gerasimenko, T V; Vachev, B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the Fukushima-Daiichi was designed and constructed the maximal tsunami height estimate was about 3 m based on analysis of statistical data including Chile earthquake in 1960. The NPP project industrial site height was 10 m. The further deterministic estimates TPCO-JSCE confirmed the impossibility of the industrial site flooding by a tsunami and therefore confirmed ecological safety of the NPP. However, as a result of beyond design earthquake of 11 March 2011 the tsunami height at the shore near the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP reached 15 m. This led to flooding and severe emergencies having catastrophic environmental consequences. This paper proposes hydrodynamic model of tsunami emerging and traveling based on conservative assumptions. The possibility of a tsunami wave reaching 15 m height at the Fukushima-Daiichi NPP shore was confirmed for deduced hydrodynamic resistance coefficient of 1.8. According to the model developed a possibility of flooding is determined not only by the industrial site height, magni...

  2. Precipitation analysis for a flood early warning system in the Manafwa River Basin, Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cecinati, Francesca

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The communities living in the Manafwa River Basin experience frequent floods threatening their lives and property. Climate change and anthropogenic perturbations to the natural environment increase flooding frequency. This ...

  3. Subcooling Effects for Flooding Experiments with Steam and Water in a Large Diameter Vertical Tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cullum, Wes

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A counter current annular flow experiment was performed to determine flooding conditions for varying degrees of subcooling using steam and water. The findings can be used in reactor safety codes to provide an improved model of flooding during...

  4. Feasibility analysis and design of a flood barrier concept for the City of New York

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingilis, Demetres

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flooding has always been a major concern for coastal communities. However, many parts of New York City never had to worry about flooding until Hurricane Sandy hit in October 2012. The hurricane brought a record level storm ...

  5. Simulation Study for Improving Seawater Polymer Flood Performance in Stratified High Temperature Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Geng

    2014-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Polymer flood has achieved technical and commercial success, especially for its large-scale application in the Daqing oilfield in China. However, previous field tests indicated polymer flood was not economically successful for high temperature...

  6. Soil Testing Following Flooding, Overland Flow of Wastewater and other Freshwater Disasters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Provin, Tony; Feagley, Sam E.; Pitt, John L.; McFarland, Mark L.

    2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Freshwater flooding can seriously affect soil fertility and the physical and chemical properties of soil. This publication explains how to reclaim flooded soil. Having the soil tested for microbes, pesticides, hydrocarbons and other contaminants...

  7. Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Human-Induced Climate Change Reduces Chance of Flooding in Okavango Delta Africa.gif Why it Matters: The...

  8. Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Global Climate Change,Global Climate Change, Land Cover Change, andLand Cover Change Changes · Due to ­ Climate Change ­ Land Cover / Land Use Change ­ Interaction of Climate and Land Cover Change · Resolution ­ Space ­ Time Hydro-Climatic Change · Variability vs. Change (Trends) · Point data

  9. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 December 2013 vol 7 no 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 December 2013 vol 7 no 2 Fstocoll Table of Contents Mark Roupas to Flood Risk Management, Emergency Management, and Critical Infrastructure Protection and Resilience for his role overseeing emergency management and flood risk management activities. Roupas served twenty

  10. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 April 2014 vol 7 no 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 April 2014 vol 7 no 3 Fstocoll Table of Contents Reflections Conferences...................................................12 Reflections on the Flood Risk Management in a series of recurring messages to the flood risk management community of practice, my first thought was

  11. Flood Risk Management Newsletter October 2014 vol 8 no 1 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter October 2014 · vol 8 no 1 1 Table of Contents Informal Management and Flood Risk Management (FRM) Communities of Practice. For the purpose of this article of the USACE October 2014 · vol 8 no 1 Mark Roupas #12; Flood Risk Management Newsletter October 2014 · vol

  12. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2013 vol 6 no 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 March 2013 vol 6 no 3 Fstocoll Table of Contents Social-Cognitive Aspects of Risk and Performance Management in Flood Response is to be a system of models that will support decision making in emergency situations, like flood risk management

  13. Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory investigations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Methane emission from flooded coal seams in abandoned mines, in the light of laboratory of methane from flooded unexploited coal seams Field experience from the flooding operations of the abandoned gassy coal seams in abandoned mines. The tests included the following main stages: - Determining

  14. Flooding/storm/gale Force Wind Remove Anyone From Immediate Danger If Safe To Do So

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hickman, Mark

    Flooding/storm/gale Force Wind Remove Anyone From Immediate Danger If Safe To Do So Flooding 1/gale Force Wind 1. Move all people away from windows. 2. Close all curtains, drapes and blinds. 3. Shelter. If using a mobile phone, DiAl 0800 823-637. Flooding/storm/gale Force Wind #12;

  15. Forestflood relation still tenuous comment on `Global evidence that deforestation amplifies flood risk and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappell, Nick A

    Forest­flood relation still tenuous ­ comment on `Global evidence that deforestation amplifies cover change, and conclude that deforestation amplifies flood risk and severity in the developing world% of the variation in reported flood occurrences, considerably more than forest cover or deforestation (o10

  16. Water Visualization and Flooding in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petta, Jason

    Water Visualization and Flooding in Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Brian Holsclaw West- 2H2O e- e- e- e- e- H+ H+ H+ Membrane + Schematic of a PEMFC Operation #12;PFR PEM Fuel Cell Plug for membrane Two-phase flow in channels #12;CSTR PEM Fuel Cell Continuous Stirred-Tank Reactor (CSTR) "Perfect

  17. History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    History of Floods in the South Platte River Basin Nolan Doesken Colorado Climate Center Colorado State University 25th South Platte Forum Longmont, CO October 22, 2014 #12;Acknowledgment: Thanks is it -- the History Annual Peak Flows S. Platte River at Julesburg 1902-2013 #12;#12;#12;Now, let's head upstream

  18. Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems: Responding to Power Outages and Floods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin; Alexander, Rachel

    2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    People and the environment can be harmed if a home's onsite wastewater treatment system does not work properly after a flood or power outage. This publication explains the steps to take after such an event to get the system back into service. 4 pp...

  19. CEDAR RIVER, CEDAR RAPIDS, IOWA, FLOOD RISK MANAGEMENT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    developed as standard designs in order to minimize estimated construction cost. The estimated total cost: The purpose of the Project is to provide cost effective, environmentally-sensitive, and technically feasible lies within the 100-year floodplain. Historically, major floods have resulted from a combination

  20. FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenslade, Diana

    FLOOD WARNING SYSTEM for the BRISBANE RIVER BELOW WIVENHOE DAM TO BRISBANE CITY This brochure for the Brisbane River below Wivenhoe Dam to Brisbane City. It includes reference information which will be useful kilometres of which about half is below Wivenhoe Dam. The Lockyer-Laidley Valley drains into the Brisbane

  1. Mitigating Flood Loss through Local Comprehensive Planning in Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Jung Eun

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    and environment planning and policy. When sustainability was embraced by international organizations and governmental organizations managing development programs and projects, the term, ?sustainable development? became popular (Beatley, 1998). Currently...; and a more economically integrated and diverse population (Vale & Campanella, 2005). Based on previous literature (Beatley, 1998; Berke, 1995; Mileti, 1999), this study develops principles of sustainability that can be applied to flood mitigation...

  2. Regional flood hazard assessment of the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.O.; Wang, J.C.; Lee, D.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional flood-hazard assessments performed for the Paducah and Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plants are reviewed, compared, and contrasted to determine the relationship of probable maximum flood methodology with respect to US Department of Energy design and evaluation guidelines. The Paducah assessment was carried out using probable maximum flood methodology, while the Portsmouth assessment utilized probabilistic techniques. Results indicated that regional flooding along nearby rivers would not inundate either plant, and that the guidelines were satisfied. A comparison of results indicated that the probable maximum flood recurrence interval associated with the Paducah assessment exceeded the 10,000 years depending on the choice of the probabilistic model used to perform the assessment. It was concluded, based on an analysis of two data points, that smaller watersheds driven by single event storms could be assessed using probabilistic techniques, while probable maximum flood methodology could be applied to larger drainage basins flooded by storm sequences. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  3. 2011LandesBioscience. Donotdistribute.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /November/December 2011; © 2011 Landes Bioscience MethODs & techNicaL aDvaNces MethODs & techNicaL a of the GFP- or YFP-expressing balancers has specific advantages, but all share a common draw- back a Tubby1 (Tb1 ) dominant transgene. Flies heterozygous for these FM7a and CyO derivatives exhibit

  4. Minerals on School and Public Lands

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Commissioner of School and Public Lands is authorized to lease the mineral interests of such lands for development. Section 5-7 of the SD Codified Laws describes provisions for the leasing of...

  5. Marginal, Erodible Land Retirement Policy (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is state policy to encourage the retirement of marginal, highly erodible land, particularly land adjacent to public waters and drainage systems, from crop production and to reestablish a cover...

  6. Mapping Savanna Land Change of Belize 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Lauren

    2011-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    was assessed using a confusion matrix. The results of the research confirmed the capabilities of Landsat imagery for mapping savannas and their land use. The classification of forest and savanna along with major land use pressures from agriculture...

  7. Addressing land-based discrimination in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    , feudalism was based on ownership of land, the dominant mode of production. Political power was dominated by absolute kings and feudal overlords. Wealth and position in society was derived from the land ownership

  8. Coastal Public Lands Management Act (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The coastal public lands of the state are managed in accordance with the following principles: (a) The natural resources of the surface land, including their aesthetic value and their ability to...

  9. Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Modification ofregional groundwater regimes by land reclamation Jiu Jimmy Jiao Department ofEarth Sciences, The University ofHong Kong, P. R. China Abstract JJ.Jiao Land reclamation has played;Bouchardetal., 1998;Schofield etal., 1992). While reclamation provides valuable land, it also creates various

  10. CO/sub 2/ foam flooding performance vs. rock wettability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lescure, B.M.; Claridge, E.L.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CO/sub 2/ flooding projects have shown large potential for oil recovery, but in many cases the volumetric sweep efficiency is greatly limited by gravity tonguing and/or viscous fingering. To reduce these effects foam could be used as an alternative to WAG CO/sub 2/ injection. Experiments on the CO/sub 2/ foam process were conducted in a 1/4 5-spot reservoir model in order to investigate the effect of rock wetting state and total CO/sub 2/ slug size on secondary and tertiary extra-oil recovery. Laboratory model results show that the process is more successful in an oil-wet medium than in a water-wet medium due to larger surfactant adsorption in the water-wet medium. Also, requirements for optimal CO/sub 2/ slug size are smaller than in the WAG process, with larger extra oil recovery for both secondary and tertiary floods.

  11. Rebuilding your flooded home: Guidelines for incorporating energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Repairs to your flood-damaged home can add energy efficiency at the same time you address pressing structural needs, mainly by replacing and upgrading insulation in walls and floors, and checking your foundation for flood damage. Many energy efficiency options are available to you today that may not have been widely available when you built your house even if that was only a few years ago. Cost-effectiveness depends on several factors, including cost of fuel and materials, efficiency levels of the structure and components, and climate. This booklet offers some general tips to improve the efficiency of your home`s shell and equipment. Additional information on any issue covered in this booklet is available from various agencies within or near your community, including your state energy office, local community action agency, utilities, Red Cross and Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) offices.

  12. Laboratory methods for enhanced oil recovery core floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, E.P.; Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Current research at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) is investigating microbially enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) systems for application to oil reservoirs. Laboratory corefloods are invaluable in developing technology necessary for a field application of MEOR. Methods used to prepare sandstone cores for experimentation, coreflooding techniques, and quantification of coreflood effluent are discussed in detail. A technique to quantify the small volumes of oil associated with laboratory core floods is described.

  13. Managing Floods and Resources at the Arroyo Las Positas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez, L; Van Hattem, M; Mathews, S

    2002-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers and water resource professionals are challenged with protecting facilities from flood events within environmental resource protection, regulatory, and economic constraints. One case in point is the Arroyo Las Positas (ALP), an intermittent stream that traverses the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. Increased runoff from post-drought rainfall, upstream development, and new perennial discharges from LLNL activities have resulted in increased dry weather flows and wetland vegetation. These new conditions have recently begun to provide improved habitat for the federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana aurora draytonii; CRLF), but the additional vegetation diminishes the channel's drainage capacity and increases flood risk. When LLNL proposed to re-grade the channel to reestablish the 100-year flood capacity, traditional dredging practices were no longer being advocated by environmental regulatory agencies. LLNL therefore designed a desilting maintenance plan to protect LLNL facility areas from flooding, while minimizing impacts to wetland resources and habitat. The result was a combination of structural upland improvements and the ALP Five Year Maintenance Plan (Maintenance Plan), which includes phased desilting in segments so that the entire ALP is desilted after five years. A unique feature of the Maintenance Plan is the variable length of the segments designed to minimize LLNL's impact on CRLF movement. State and federal permits also added monitoring requirements and additional constraints on desilting activities. Two years into the Maintenance Plan, LLNL is examining the lessons learned on the cost-effectiveness of these maintenance measures and restrictions and reevaluating the direction of future maintenance activities.

  14. Laboratory studies of imbibition flooding using carbonated brine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharif, Qamar Javaid

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressures was a major part of the phase II studies. A high pressure core holder was developed and set inside a temperature regulated in-house constructed oven for this purpose. The core face flushing method was developed for conducting imbibition... and the field for improving oil recovery. The most common techniques used to increase oil recovery include water injection, steam injection, in-situ combustion, carbon dioxide (CO&) injection, chemical flooding and caustic injection. Currently, however, due...

  15. A mathematical and experimental study of caustic flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Tsu-Cheng

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Dr. Ching Buang Wu A simple non-equilibrium chemical displacement model for continuous, linear, caustic flooding of crude oil is presented. The laboratory experiments were conducted to support the numerical simulation and to verify the results...-water fractional flow curves depending on its local concentration and water saturation. The numerical study was supported by caustic displacement testing of Sacroc crude oil. Quantitative agreements were found between the results from mathematical and experimen...

  16. Missoula flood dynamics and magnitudes inferred from sedimentology of slack-water deposits on the Columbia Plateau, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, G.A. (Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque (United States))

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sedimentological study of late Wisconsin, Missoula-flood slack-water sediments deposited along the Columbia and Tucannon Rivers in southern Washington reveals important aspects of flood dynamics. Most flood facies were deposited by energetic flood surges (velocities>6 m/sec) entering protected areas along the flood tract, or flowing up and then directly out of tributary valleys. True still-water facies are less voluminous and restricted to elevations below 230 m. High flood stages attended the initial arrival of the flood wave and were not associated with subsequent hydraulic ponding upslope from channel constrictions. Among 186 flood beds studied in 12 sections, 57% have bioturbated tops, and about half of these bioturbated beds are separated from overlying flood beds by nonflood sediments. A single graded flood bed was deposited at most sites during most floods. Sequences in which 2-9 graded beds were deposited during a single flood are restricted to low elevations. These sequences imply complex, multi-peaked hydrographs in which the first flood surge was generally the largest, and subsequent surges were attenuated by water already present in slack-water areas. Slack-water - sediment stratigraphy suggests a wide range of flood discharges and volumes. Of >40 documented late Wisconsin floods that inundated the Pasco Basin, only about 20 crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. Floods younger than the set-S tephras from Mount St.Helens were generally smaller than earlier floods of late Wisconsin age, although most still crossed the Palouse-Snake divide. These late floods primarily traversed the Cheney-Palouse scabland because stratigraphy of slack-water sediment along the Columbia River implies that the largest flood volumes did not enter the Pasco Basin by way of the Columbia River. 47 refs., 17 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Land Tenure (to the End of the Ptolemaic Period)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katary, Sally

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for highly successful land reclamation in the Fayum,successful large-scale land reclamation (Kehoe 2010: 316).

  18. Regional Cost Estimates for Reclamation Practices on Arid and Semiarid Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army uses the Integrated Training Area Management program for managing training land. One of the major objectives of the Integrated Training Area Management program has been to develop a method for estimating training land carrying capacity in a sustainable manner. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology measures training load in terms of Maneuver Impact Miles. One Maneuver Impact Mile is the equivalent impact of an M1A2 tank traveling one mile while participating in an armor battalion field training exercise. The Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology is also designed to predict land maintenance costs in terms of dollars per Maneuver Impact Mile. The overall cost factor is calculated using the historical cost of land maintenance practices and the effectiveness of controlling erosion. Because land maintenance costs and effectiveness are influenced by the characteristics of the land, Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity cost factors must be developed for each ecological region of the country. Costs for land maintenance activities are presented here for the semiarid and arid regions of the United States. Five ecoregions are recognized, and average values for reclamation activities are presented. Because there are many variables that can influence costs, ranges for reclamation activities are also presented. Costs are broken down into six major categories: seedbed preparation, fertilization, seeding, planting, mulching, and supplemental erosion control. Costs for most land reclamation practices and materials varied widely within and between ecological provinces. Although regional cost patterns were evident for some practices, the patterns were not consistent between practices. For the purpose of estimating land reclamation costs for the Army Training and Testing Area Carrying Capacity methodology, it may be desirable to use the ''Combined Average'' of all provinces found in the last row of each table to estimate costs for arid lands in general.

  19. New Technologies to Reclaim Arid Lands User's Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. K. Ostler

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 70 percent of all U.S. military training lands are located in arid and semi-arid areas. Training activities in such areas frequently adversely affect vegetation, damaging plants and reducing the resilience of vegetation to recover once disturbed. Fugitive dust resulting from a loss of vegetation creates additional problems for human health, increasing accidents due to decreased visibility, and increasing maintenance costs for roads, vehicles, and equipment. Under conventional technologies to mitigate these impacts, it is estimated that up to 35 percent of revegetation projects in arid areas will fail due to unpredictable natural environmental conditions, such as drought, and reclamation techniques that were inadequate to restore vegetative cover in a timely and cost-effective manner. New reclamation and restoration techniques are needed in desert ranges to help mitigate the adverse effects of military training and other activities to arid-land environments. In 1999, a cooperative effort between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the US. Department of Defense (DoD), and selected university scientists was undertaken to focus on mitigating military impacts in arid lands. As arid lands are impacted due to DoD and DOE activities, biological and soil resources are gradually lost and the habitat is altered. A conceptual model of that change in habitat quality is described for varying levels of disturbance in the Mojave Desert. As the habitat quality degrades and more biological and physical resources are lost from training areas, greater costs are required to return the land to sustainable levels. The purpose of this manual is to assist land managers in recognizing thresholds associated with habitat degradation and provide reclamation planning and techniques that can reduce the costs of mitigation for these impacted lands to ensure sustainable use of these lands. The importance of reclamation planning is described in this manual with suggestions about establishing project objectives, scheduling, budgeting, and selecting cost-effective techniques. Reclamation techniques include sections describing: (1) erosion control (physical, chemical, and biological), (2) site preparation, (3) soil amendments, (4) seeding, (5) planting, (6) grazing and weed control, (7) mulching, (8) irrigation, and (9) site protection. Each section states the objectives of the technique, the principles, an in-depth look at the techniques, and any special considerations as it relates to DoD or DOE lands. The need for monitoring and remediation is described to guide users in monitoring reclamation efforts to evaluate their cost-effectiveness. Costs are provided for the proposed techniques for the major deserts of the southwestern U.S. showing the average and range of costs. A set of decision tools are provided in the form of a flow diagram and table to guide users in selecting effective reclamation techniques to achieve mitigation objectives. Recommendations are provided to help summarize key reclamation principles and to assist users in developing a successful program that contributes to sustainable uses of DoD and DOE lands. The users manual is helpful to managers in communicating to installation management the needs and consequences of training decisions and the costs required to achieve successful levels of sustainable use. This users manual focuses on the development of new reclamation techniques that have been implemented at the National Training Center at Fort Irwin, California, and are applicable to most arid land reclamation efforts.

  20. The effect on oil recovery of water flooding at pressures above and below the bubble point

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bass, Daniel Materson

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Dykstra, H. ~ and Parsons, R. L. , "The Predict ion of Oil Recovery by Water Flooding", Secondar Recovery of Oil in the United States, API, (1950), Second Edition. (4}. Bzeston, J. N. , "A Survey of Injection of Natural Gas Before and During Water... Pictures of Equipment 4. Physical Characteristics of Fluid A Physical Characteristics of Fluid B P V behavior of Natural Gas Effect of Flooding Pressure on Oil Recovery, Fluid A Effect of Initial Gas Saturation on Residual Oil Saturation After Flood...

  1. Stewardship of public school land by the General Land Office

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zechiel, Tod Peter

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (a V. Nrelnh Nnl da (L Nr(PN Huis I. Veil Ill(en S. Hncnf th hraa( 4 hn Ihpr. i ha Ner(n J. (Irasr ~ Veiler N. Irene Caryn @riot( S. ladler laali ~ N. Seal Nalrnvl lie J. R Ie Saa Nrrcn J Mf((ay Satan 1. Srpp ~ (luhorttlls liar ll ~ 9(5/bh... AND CHARACTERISTICS OF THE RANGELAND The Area Under Stewardshi p Climate of the Trans-Pecos Vegetational Associations of the Trans-Pecos Uses of the Range Resources OPERATIONS OF THE ALPINE FIELD OFFICE Responsibi 1ities Assisting the Land Management Division...

  2. Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex Natural Phenomena Hazards Flood Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerald Sehlke; Paul Wichlacz

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of flood hazards analyses performed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC) and the adjacent Transient Reactor Experiment and Test Facility (TREAT) located at Idaho National Laboratory. The requirements of these analyses are provided in the U.S. Department of Energy Order 420.1B and supporting Department of Energy (DOE) Natural Phenomenon Hazard standards. The flood hazards analyses were performed by Battelle Energy Alliance and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The analyses addressed the following: • Determination of the design basis flood (DBFL) • Evaluation of the DBFL versus the Critical Flood Elevations (CFEs) for critical existing structures, systems, and components (SSCs).

  3. Evaluation and Enhancement of Carbon Dioxide Flooding Through Sweep Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, Richard

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon dioxide displacement is a common improved recovery method applied to light oil reservoirs (30-45{degrees}API). The economic and technical success of CO{sub 2} floods is often limited by poor sweep efficiency or large CO{sub 2} utilization rates. Projected incremental recoveries for CO{sub 2} floods range from 7% to 20% of the original oil in place; however, actual incremental recoveries range from 9% to 15% of the original oil in place, indicating the potential for significant additional recoveries with improved sweep efficiency. This research program was designed to study the effectiveness of carbon dioxide flooding in a mature reservoir to identify and develop methods and strategies to improve oil recovery in carbon dioxide floods. Specifically, the project has focused on relating laboratory, theoretical and simulation studies to actual field performance in a CO{sub 2} flood in an attempt to understand and mitigate problems of areal and vertical sweep efficiency. In this work the focus has been on evaluating the status of existing swept regions of a mature CO{sub 2} flood and developing procedures to improve the design of proposed floods. The Little Creek Field, Mississippi has been studied through laboratory, theoretical, numerical and simulation studies in an attempt to relate performance predictions to historical reservoir performance to determine sweep efficiency, improve the understanding of the reservoir response to CO{sub 2} injection, and develop scaling methodologies to relate laboratory data and simulation results to predicted reservoir behavior. Existing laboratory information from Little Creek was analyzed and an extensive amount of field data was collected. This was merged with an understanding of previous work at Little Creek to generate a detailed simulation study of two portions of the field – the original pilot area and a currently active part of the field. This work was done to try to relate all of this information to an understanding of where the CO{sub 2} went or is going and how recovery might be improved. New data was also generated in this process. Production logs were run to understand where the CO{sub 2} was entering the reservoir related to core and log information and also to corroborate the simulation model. A methodology was developed and successfully tested for evaluating saturations in a cased-hole environment. Finally an experimental and theoretical program was initiated to relate laboratory work to field scale design and analysis of operations. This work found that an understanding of vertical and areal heterogeneity is crucial for understanding sweep processes as well as understanding appropriate mitigation techniques to improve the sweep. Production and injection logs can provide some understanding of that heterogeneity when core data is not available. The cased-hole saturation logs developed in the project will also be an important part of the evaluation of vertical heterogeneity. Evaluation of injection well/production well connectivities through statistical or numerical techniques were found to be as successful in evaluating CO{sub 2} floods as they are for waterfloods. These are likely to be the lowest cost techniques to evaluate areal sweep. Full field simulation and 4D seismic techniques are other possibilities but were beyond the scope of the project. Detailed simulation studies of pattern areas proved insightful both for doing a “post-mortem” analysis of the pilot area as well as a late-term, active portion of the Little Creek Field. This work also evaluated options for improving sweep in the current flood as well as evaluating options that could have been successful at recovering more oil. That simulation study was successful due to the integration of a large amount of data supplied by the operator as well as collected through the course of the project. While most projects would not have the abundance of data that Little Creek had, integration of the available data continues to be critical for both the design and evaluation stages of CO{sub 2} floods. For cases w

  4. Wind Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Haukaas; Dale Osborn; Belvin Pete

    2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Background: The Rosebud Sioux Tribe (RST) is located in south central South Dakota near the Nebraska border. The nearest community of size is Valentine, Nebraska. The RST is a recipient of several Department of Energy grants, written by Distributed Generation Systems, Inc. (Disgen), for the purposes of assessing the feasibility of its wind resource and subsequently to fund the development of the project. Disgen, as the contracting entity to the RST for this project, has completed all the pre-construction activities, with the exception of the power purchase agreement and interconnection agreement, to commence financing and construction of the project. The focus of this financing is to maximize the economic benefits to the RST while achieving commercially reasonable rates of return and fees for the other parties involved. Each of the development activities required and its status is discussed below. Land Resource: The Owl Feather War Bonnet 30 MW Wind Project is located on RST Tribal Trust Land of approximately 680 acres adjacent to the community of St. Francis, South Dakota. The RST Tribal Council has voted on several occasions for the development of this land for wind energy purposes, as has the District of St. Francis. Actual footprint of wind farm will be approx. 50 acres. Wind Resource Assessment: The wind data has been collected from the site since May 1, 2001 and continues to be collected and analyzed. The latest projections indicate a net capacity factor of 42% at a hub height of 80 meters. The data has been collected utilizing an NRG 9300 Data logger System with instrumentation installed at 30, 40 and 65 meters on an existing KINI radio tower. The long-term annual average wind speed at 65-meters above ground level is 18.2 mph (8.1 mps) and 18.7 mph (8.4 mps) at 80-meters agl. The wind resource is excellent and supports project financing.

  5. CityFIT Urban Guide: Modelling and Deploying indicators of Property Exposure to Flooding in Lagos using LIDAR DEM and DSM data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosuro, Sulaiman

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    application was prototyped for disseminating time-series flood model information and for reporting details of flood events as they occur to serve for model calibration and enhancement, thereby completing the flood modelling lifecycle....

  6. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding field project. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Tucker sand from Hepler field, Crawford County, Kansas, was characterized using routine and advanced analytical methods. The characterization is part of a chemical flooding pilot test to be conducted in the field, which is classified as a DOE Class I (fluvial-dominated delta) reservoir. Routine and advanced methods of characterization were compared. Traditional wireline logs indicate that the reservoir is vertically compartmentalized on the foot scale. Routine core analysis, X-ray computed tomography (CT), minipermeameter measurement, and petrographic analysis indicate that compartmentalization and lamination extend to the microscale. An idealized model of how the reservoir is probably structured (complex layering with small compartments) is presented. There was good agreement among the several methods used for characterization, and advanced characterization methods adequately explained the coreflood and tracer tests conducted with short core plugs. Tracer and chemical flooding tests were conducted in short core plugs while monitoring with CT to establish flow patterns and to monitor oil saturations in different zones of the core plugs. Channeling of injected fluids occurred in laboratory experiments because, on core plug scale, permeability streaks extended the full length of the core plugs. A graphic example of how channeling in field core plugs can affect oil recovery during chemical injection is presented. The small scale of compartmentalization indicated by plugs of the Tucker sand may actually help improve sweep between wells. The success of field-scale waterflooding and the fluid flow patterns observed in highly heterogeneous outcrop samples are reasons to expect that reservoir flow patterns are different from those observed with short core plugs, and better sweep efficiency may be obtained in the field than has been observed in laboratory floods conducted with short core plugs.

  7. Erosion potential from Missoula floods in the Pasco Basin, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig, R.G.; Hanson, J.P.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Localities within the Pasco Basin preserve evidence of Missoula floods. Deposits are 46% sand-sized, 36% gravel-sized, and 18% finer than sand-sized. Mean thickness is 39 meters. High water marks at Wallula Gap require a discharge of approximately 12.5 Mcms. At Sentinel Gap, the slope-area method shows that the high water marks require a discharge of 34.6 Mcms. Since this discharge greatly exceeds any estimated for Missoula floods, there must have been backwater ponding from Wallula Gap. Projecting the slope of the water surface at the upper end of Wallula Gap to the downstream cross section at Gable Mountain leads to a discharge of 9.5 Mcms at Sentinel Gap. The HEC-6 steady state code and four sediment transport equations were applied. Assuming sand-sized particles, DuBoys function estimated 4 to 9 meters of scour. Yang's equation estimated 3 to 4 meters of scour. These are a minimum. A hydrograph synthesized for the boundaries of the Pasco Basin shows the maxima of the flood would occur after 90 h at Sentinel Gap, and at 114 h at Wallula Gap. The 200 areas will remain inundated for four days and six hours. With a quasi-dynamic sediment transport computation, HEC-6 scour estimates range from 0.61 meters to 0.915 meters. This is a minimum amount and erosion is highly variable suggesting reworking of sediment. The Meyer-Peter Meuller equations show less than 1 meter of net scour in the 200 areas. More extensive erosion was achieved during particular time steps of this analysis suggesting that sediment re-working would occur.

  8. Geographic Visualization of the 1993 Midwest Flood Water Balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, W. Scott; Ridd, Merrill K.; Mizgalewicz, Pawel J.; Maidment, David R.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , flooding, and water storage. By the middle of July, large amounts of water were being stored in the southern part of the UMRB, particularly around the St. Louis area where the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers meet. Water was also being stored in larger...) includes the Mississippi River basin from the river’s headwaters in Minnesota to Cairo, Illinois, and the Lower Missouri River basin below Gavins Point dam, South Dakota, to St. Louis, Missouri (Figure 1.1). Using a digital elevation model of the study...

  9. FEMA - National Flood Insurance Program webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 NoEurope BV Jump to:FAS Technologies LLC JumpNational Flood

  10. Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Brochure describes the Tribal Energy Program, which provides American Indian tribes with financial and technical assistance for developing renewable energy projects on tribal land.

  11. Land and Renewable Resources | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a rich and thorough analysis to determine what areas of public lands are best suited for solar, wind, and geothermal project development and assess the associated environmental,...

  12. Albeni Falls land acquisitions.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Idaho The Bonneville Power Administration is working with the Idaho Department of Fish and Game to acquire and manage two parcels of land in northern Idaho to preserve,...

  13. Global Biofuels Modeling and Land Use

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Biofuels Modeling and Land Use DOE Bioenergy Technologies Office (BETO) 2015 Project Peer Review Strategic Analysis & Cross-cutting Sustainability March 25 2015 Gbadebo Oladosu...

  14. Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and Market Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margulis, Harry L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    465– Margulis: Landholders, Residential Land Conversion, and1983. An Analysis of Residential Developer Location FactorsHow Regulation Affects New Residential Development. New

  15. Sustainable Land Management in Northern Namibia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and low water holding capacity (Bolivia) #12;Perspective Similar soil (Kavango) #12;Increased Demand for Food + Energy Production Expansion onto Less Resilient Lands Reduced Production per Unit Area

  16. Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title: Canada Land Inventory: Land Capability for Waterfowl Wildlife Data Creator / Copyright Owner: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division Publisher: National Archives of Canada, Visual and Sound Archives Division; developed under the auspices of Environment Canada; distributed

  17. Modeling the effect of land cover land use change on estuarine environmental flows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahoo, Debabrata

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental flows are important to maintain the ecological integrity of the estuary. In a watershed, it is influenced by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, ...

  18. Determining the optimal river gauge location for a flood early warning system in Uganda using HEC-RAS and AHP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheung, Joyce, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flooding of the Manafwa River in Eastern Uganda causes significant damage in the district of Butaleja, and often occurs without advance warning. In 2012, the American Red Cross in Uganda requested MIT to develop a flood ...

  19. Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    Multiscale analysis of three consecutive years of anomalous flooding in Pakistan By K. L. Rasmussen investigation into three years of anomalous floods in Pakistan provides insight into their formation, unifying for the formation of anomalous easterly midlevel flow across central India into Pakistan that advected deep

  20. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 September 2011 vol 5 no 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 September 2011 vol 5 no 1 Table of Contents Awards for the NFRMP Risk Management Program Judy Soutiere, SPK In October 2011, we celebrate the 2nd anniversary of the guidance establishing the National Flood Risk Management Program in each Division and District of the Corps

  1. Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Uncertainty analysis of river flooding and dam failure risks using local sensitivity computations) for uncertainty analysis with respect to two major types of risk in river hydrodynamics: flash flood and dam failure. LSA is com- pared to a Global Uncertainty Analysis (GUA) consisting in running Monte Carlo

  2. The Geology and Geography of Floods Jim E. O'Connor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -documented dam-failure floods have been during Pleistocene ice ages when glaciers and changing hydrologic of ice caps and failures of ice and landslide Vlams. The fundamental limits to dam-failure floods of natural dam failures. In this paper, we outline some of the primary factors that influence the magnitude

  3. Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novel anti-flooding poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) catalyst binder for microbial fuel cell cathodes) was tested as a catalyst binder in a microbial fuel cell. 2012 Keywords: Microbial fuel cell Poly(dimethylsiloxane) Anti-flooding Catalyst binder a b s t r a c

  4. Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Flood and Shield Basalts from Ethiopia: Magmas from the African Superswell BRUNO KIEFFER1, ETHIOPIA 4 DEEPARTEMENT DES SCIENCES DE LA TERRE ET DE L'ENVIRONNEMENT, UNIVERSITEE LIBRE DE BRUXELLES 50 the shield volcanoes. KEY WORDS: Ethiopia; flood basalts; shield volcanism; superswell INTRODUCTION According

  5. Flood Risk Management Newsletter 1 June 2010 vol 3 no 4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    . He has also worked in private practice as well as in County and State government. Mr. Rabbon Operations...........2 Workshop on Beach Nourishment Design ..... 8 Who Looks Good in a Silver Jacket reviews; emergency management ­ inspection of completed works program, flood preparedness, and flood

  6. Location-Aided Flooding: An Energy-Efficient Data Dissemination Protocol for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chakrabarty, Krishnendu

    Location-Aided Flooding: An Energy-Efficient Data Dissemination Protocol for Wireless Sensor such as the broadcast storm problem [6]. In this paper, we present an energy-efficient flooding mechanism, termed of battery and, hence, any solution must be energy-efficient. . Self-configuration. Since it is not feasible

  7. Environmental Hazards 2 (2000) 157168 Modeling flooding extent from Hurricane Floyd in the coastal plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Pitt County, North Carolina. The patterns of flood extent derived from the two models were compared of Pitt County, North Carolina. The patterns of flood extent derived from the two models were compared plains of North Carolina Jeffrey D. Colby*, Karen A. Mulcahy, Yong Wang Department of Geography, East

  8. A kinematic wave model for rivers with flood plains and other irregular geometries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabak, Esteban G.

    A kinematic wave model for rivers with flood plains and other irregular geometries Pablo M. Jacovkis Esteban G. Tabak March 2006 Abstract A general kinematic wave model for flood propagation) This kinematic wave equation, which has been studied by [3], can be derived from the complete system (1, 2) under

  9. An optimal viscosity profile in enhanced oil recovery by polymer flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    An optimal viscosity profile in enhanced oil recovery by polymer flooding Prabir Daripa a,*, G in oil reservoir is one of the effective methods of enhanced (tertiary) oil recovery. A classical model reserved. Keywords: Enhanced oil recovery; Polymer flooding; Linear stability 0020-7225/$ - see front

  10. HighResolution Numerical Methods for MicellarPolymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer Remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trangenstein, John A.

    been used to study the micellar­ polymer flooding process in enhanced oil recovery [12], [18], [19 in practical im­ plementation of enhanced oil recovery techniques at this time, there is increasing interestHigh­Resolution Numerical Methods for Micellar­Polymer Flooding and Surfactant Enhanced Aquifer

  11. Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

  12. State-Ocean City Beach Erosion Control District (Maryland)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A Beach Erosion Control District constitutes part of the Ocean City shoreline. Land clearing, construction activity, or the construction or placement of permanent structures within the district is...

  13. Brush Busters: How to Estimate Costs for Controlling Pricklypear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckert, Darrell; McGinty, Allan

    1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple directions help you determine the density of pricklypear on your land, and then estimate the cost of controlling these plants with the pad or stem spray method....

  14. Field Testing of Energy-Efficient Flood-Damage-Resistant Residential Envelope Systems Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglan, H.

    2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary purpose of the project was to identify materials and methods that will make the envelope of a house flood damage resistant. Flood damage resistant materials and systems are intended to be used to repair houses subsequent to flooding. This project was also intended to develop methods of restoring the envelopes of houses that have been flooded but are repairable and may be subject to future flooding. Then if the house floods again, damage will not be as extensive as in previous flood events and restoration costs and efforts will be minimized. The purpose of the first pair of field tests was to establish a baseline for typical current residential construction practice. The first test modules used materials and systems that were commonly found in residential envelopes throughout the U.S. The purpose of the second pair of field tests was to begin evaluating potential residential envelope materials and systems that were projected to be more flood-damage resistant and restorable than the conventional materials and systems tested in the first pair of tests. The purpose of testing the third slab-on-grade module was to attempt to dry flood proof the module (no floodwater within the structure). If the module could be sealed well enough to prevent water from entering, then this would be an effective method of making the interior materials and systems flood damage resistant. The third crawl space module was tested in the same manner as the previous modules and provided an opportunity to do flood tests of additional residential materials and systems. Another purpose of the project was to develop the methodology to collect representative, measured, reproducible (i.e. scientific) data on how various residential materials and systems respond to flooding conditions so that future recommendations for repairing flood damaged houses could be based on scientific data. An additional benefit of collecting this data is that it will be used in the development of a standard test procedure which could lead to the certification of building materials and systems as flood damage resistant.

  15. Land Reform and Exclusion of Poor Jagat Basnet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    141 CHAPTER 6 Land Reform and Exclusion of Poor People Jagat Basnet 6.1 Land Questions Firstly, by land reform, it is widely understood to be a process of confiscating someone's land and award Planning Commission (NPC). Land reform is an important factor for improving the economic status

  16. Land Tenure Center 50th Anniversary Celebration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    + implementation. Jon Unruh will summarize land tenure obstacles to the implementation of carbon sequestration that clarifying tenure and carbon rights will be necessary for effective REDD+ implementation. REDD stands 2011 Madison workshop on Land Tenure and Forest Carbon Management. Barney Barnes will summarize

  17. 21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    427 21 Sustainable Land Management and Global Development: Factors Affecting Land Users' Efforts for Sustainable Development: Foundations, Experiences, and Perspectives 428 North-South perspectives 21 the concept of sustainable develop- ment and a clearer focus on operational implications, Hurni and colleagues

  18. Biofuels and indirect land use change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

  19. Practice Note Planning for brownfield land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Practice Note Planning for brownfield land regeneration to woodland and wider green infrastructure 1FCPN022 Gail Atkinson and Kieron Doick March 2014 The regeneration of brownfield land to green of brownfield regeneration to woodland in order to inform project planning, raise awareness of lessons learnt

  20. APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL GEOLOGICAL FIELD INVESTIGATION IN EARLY APOLLO MANNED LUNAR LANDING MISSIONS Abstract and Techi~icalSection E. M.Shoemaker, U. S-investigator November 1965 #12;APOLLO MANNED 1,UNAR I,ANDING SCIENTIFIC EXPERIMENT PROPOSAL GEOLOGICAL FIETADINi

  1. All farming operations that land apply manure or agricultural process wastewater, whether they generate the manure or import it from another operation, must have a written Manure Management Plan. All farming operations that include an Animal Concentra-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiltinan, Mark

    All farming operations that land apply manure or agricultural process wastewater, whether. Pennsylvania Chapter 91 regulations address pollution control and prevention at agricultural operations

  2. Division of Water, Part 666: Regulation for Administration and Management of the Wild, Scenic and Recreational Rivers System in New York State Excepting Private Land in the Adirondack Park (New York)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act establishes statewide regulations for the management, protection, enhancement and control of land use and development in river areas on all designated wild, scenic and recreational rivers...

  3. Heilougjiang adopts measures to strengthen land management-each square millimeter of land is utterly cherished and rationally used

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan Peiquan; Liu, Y.

    1983-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This article reports on how a Chinese province with a large area of land and a small population has adopted a series of measures to strengthen land management, to stop the illegal occupying of land, and to protect land resources. Investigations of land resources and of the state of land use, as well as soil surveys, have been launched in order to determine the rights of land ownership and use. Many counties and cities have experimented with dividing farm areas into districts and comprehensive land planning, established land files, trained key personnel in land management skills, and have launched scientific land research. Illegal occupation, waste and destruction of land have risen with the increase in population and construction. Per capita cultivated acreage has declined to 4.1 mu. An effort has been made to reach the people in urban and rural areas with this message: ''Cherish every square millimeter of land utterly and use it rationally''.

  4. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from October 1, 2001 to December 31, 2001. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre) CO{sub 2} demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. While this review process is being conducted, work is proceeding on well testing to obtain reservoir properties and on the VIP reservoir simulation model to improve model prediction and better understand the controls that certain parameters exert on predicted performance. Testing of present Colliver lease injection water on Lansing-Kansas City (L-KC) oomoldic rock indicates that injection brine must be filtered to < {approx}3-5 um and <15 um to prevent plugging of rocks with permeability as low as 1 md (millidarcy; 0.001 um2) and 10 md (0.01 um2), respectively. Pressure build-up testing on the Carter-Colliver No.7 well is interpreted to indicate the L-KC reservoir surrounding this well is {approx}9 ft (2.7 m) thick having an average effective water permeability of 25-35 md (0.025-0.035 um2) that is connected to the wellbore by either a high permeability fracture, bed, or region with low skin. Reservoir simulation evaluation of gridcell size effect on model oil recovery prediction indicates that, based on the model prediction of distribution of produced oil and CO{sub 2} volumes, oil recovery is strongly influenced by gravity segregation of CO{sub 2} into the upper higher permeability layers and indicates the strong control that vertical permeability and permeability barriers between depositional flood cycles exert on the CO{sub 2} flooding process. Simulations were performed on modifications of the 60-acre, two-injector pattern to evaluate oil recovery using other large-scale patterns. Simulations indicated that several 73-acre patterns with a single injector located near the Colliver No.7 could provide improved economics without increasing the amount of CO{sub 2} injected. The US Energy Partners ethanol plant in Russell, KS began operations in October ahead of schedule.

  5. California climate change, hydrologic response, and flood forecasting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, Norman L.

    2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There is strong evidence that the lower atmosphere has been warming at an unprecedented rate during the last 50 years, and it is expected to further increase at least for the next 100 years. Warmer air mass implies a higher capacity to hold water vapor and an increased likelihood of an acceleration of the global water cycle. This acceleration is not validated and considerable new research has gone into understanding aspects of the water cycle (e.g. Miller et al. 2003). Several significant findings on the hydrologic response to climate change can be reported. It is well understood that the observed and expected warming is related to sea level rise. In a recent seminar at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, James Hansen (Director of the Institute for Space Studies, National Aeronautics and Space Administration) stressed that a 1.25 Wm{sup -2} increase in radiative forcing will lead to an increase in the near surface air temperature by 1 C. This small increase in temperature from 2000 levels is enough to cause very significant impacts to coasts. Maury Roos (Chief Hydrologist, California Department of Water Resources) has shown that a 0.3 m rise in sea level shifts the San Francisco Bay 100-year storm surge flood event to a 10-year event. Related coastal protection costs for California based on sea level rise are shown. In addition to rising sea level, snowmelt-related streamflow represents a particular problem in California. Model studies have indicated that there will be approximately a 50% decrease in snow pack by 2100. This potential deficit must be fully recognized and plans need to be put in place well in advance. In addition, the warmer atmosphere can hold more water vapor and result in more intense warm winter-time precipitation events that result in flooding. During anticipated high flow, reservoirs need to release water to maintain their structural integrity. California is at risk of water shortages, floods, and related ecosystem stresses. More research needs to be done to further improve our ability to forecast weather events at longer time scales. Seasonal predictions have been statistical and only recently have studies begun to use ensemble simulations and historical observations to constrain such predictions. Understanding the mechanisms of large-scale atmospheric dynamics and its local impacts remain topics of intensive research. The ability to predict extreme events and provide policy makers with this information, along with climate change and hydrologic response information, will help to guide planning to form a more resilient infrastructure in the future.

  6. DESIGN OF HYDRAULIC CONTROLS AND STRUCTURES 16.1. A spillway on a flood control dam is designed to pass a flood with an exceedance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowen, James D.

    · Lead-zinc mine · April 25, 1998, tailings dam failure · 4-5M m3 of tailings slurries into Rio Agrio

  7. Design-Basis Flood Estimation for Site Characterization at Nuclear Power Plants in the United States of America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prasad, Rajiv; Hibler, Lyle F.; Coleman, Andre M.; Ward, Duane L.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to describe approaches and methods for estimation of the design-basis flood at nuclear power plant sites. Chapter 1 defines the design-basis flood and lists the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) regulations that require estimation of the design-basis flood. For comparison, the design-basis flood estimation methods used by other Federal agencies are also described. A brief discussion of the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Agency for estimation of the design-basis floods in its member States is also included.

  8. Problems with flooding in the Ronneburg mining district

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eckart, M. [Wismut GmbH, Gera (Germany)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important uranium deposits of Wismut, the biggest uranium producer of the eastern world, was the Ronneburg mining area, located 10 km east of Gera in the central part of Germany. 110,000 t of uranium were produced in this ore field from 1950 to 1989. Mining in the Ronneburg ore field requires a knowledge of the hydrodynamic relationships during and after ground water recharge and preplanning of the flooding sequence in the mine. The technology necessary for recharge of the ground water layer and the open pit were established by flow models. Calculations were made of the transport of radioisotopes in the ground water. Preliminary results of these calculations are reported in this paper.

  9. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, Land Management Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To reflect the requirement of section 4 of the Wastes Isolation Pilot Plant Land Withdrawal Act (the Act) (Public Law 102-579), this land management plan has been written for the withdrawal area consistent with the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976. The objective of this document, per the Act, is to describe the plan for the use of the withdrawn land until the end of the decommissioning phase. The plan identifies resource values within the withdrawal area and promotes the concept of multiple-use management. The plan also provides opportunity for participation in the land use planning process by the public and local, State, and Federal agencies. Chapter 1, Introduction, provides the reader with the purpose of this land management plan as well as an overview of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Chapter 2, Affected Environment, is a brief description of the existing resources within the withdrawal area. Chapter 3, Management Objectives and Planned Actions, describes the land management objectives and actions taken to accomplish these objectives.

  10. Pollution on the Federal Lands II: Water Pollution Law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glicksman, Robert L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    text. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION nonpoint sources. 19Comment, Nonpoint Source Pollution, Groundwater, and theat 622. FEDERAL LANDS WATER POLLUTION The third requirement,

  11. arid land: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and indirect land use change The case for mitigation 359 Practice Note Planning for brownfield land Renewable Energy Websites Summary: space can deliver multiple benefits to...

  12. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding with weak alkalis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    French, T.R.; Josephson, C.B.

    1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Project BE4B in FY90 was to develop cost-effective and efficient chemical flooding formulations using surfactant-enhanced, lower pH (weak) alkaline chemical systems. Chemical systems were studied that mitigate the deleterious effects of divalent ions. The experiments were conducted with carbonate mixtures and carbonate/phosphate mixtures of pH 10.5, where most of the phosphate ions exist as the monohydrogen phosphate species. Orthophosphate did not further reduce the deleterious effect of divalent ions on interfacial tension behavior in carbonate solutions, where the deleterious effect of the divalent ions is already very low. When added to a carbonate mixture, orthophosphate did substantially reduce the adsorption of an atomic surfactant, which was an expected result; however, there was no correlation between the amount of reduction and the divalent ion levels. For acidic oils, a variety of surfactants are available commercially that have potential for use between pH 8.3 and pH 9.5. Several of these surfactants were tested with oil from Wilmington (CA) field and found to be suitable for use in that field. Two low-acid crude oils, with acid numbers of 0.01 and 0.27 mg KOH/g of oil, were studied. It was shown that surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding does have merit for use with these low-acid crude oils. However, each low-acid oil tested was found to behave differently, and it was concluded that the applicability of the method must be experimentally determined for any given low-acid crude oil. 19 refs., 10 figs. 4 tabs.

  13. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies the effects of such things as temperature, electrolyte concentration and the effect of different types of electrolytes were taken into consideration.

  14. Scale-up of miscible flood processes. Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of the physical mechanisms of miscible floods are reported. Advanced techniques for analysis of crude oils are considered in Chapter 2. Application of supercritical fluid chromatography is demonstrated for characterization of crude oils for equation-of-state calculations of phase equilibrium. Results of measurements of crude oil and phase compositions by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry are also reported. The theory of development of miscibility is considered in detail in Chapter 3. The theory is extended to four components, and sample solutions for a variety of gas injection systems are presented. The analytical theory shows that miscibility can develop even though standard tie-line extension criteria developed for ternary systems are not satisfied. In addition, the theory includes the first analytical solutions for condensing/vaporizing gas drives. In Chapter 4, methods for simulation of viscous fingering are considered. The scaling of the growth of transition zones in linear viscous fingering is considered. In addition, extension of the models developed previously to three dimensions is described, as is the inclusion of effects of equilibrium phase behavior. In Chapter 5, the combined effects of capillary and gravity-driven crossflow are considered. The experimental results presented show that very high recovery can be achieved by gravity segregation when interfacial tensions are moderately low. We argue that such crossflow mechanisms are important in multicontact miscible floods in heterogeneous reservoirs. In addition, results of flow visualization experiments are presented that illustrate the interplay of crossflow driven by gravity with that driven by viscous forces.

  15. Investigation of the scaling factor LVuw in the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McWilliams, Morris Hampton

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rnediuxn and. the Buid system, but also by the length of the flooded system and the x'ate of irjection. They further cor eluded that for floods performed in identical porous media and with the same oil-water viscosity ratio, the total length... water) as a scaling w coefficient. In other words, all floods conducted in a given porous rnediuxn, with a given oil-watex viscosity ratio and haVing the same value of this scalixxg coefficient must behave similarly and yield equal recoveries fax...

  16. Making land fly : the institutionalization of China's land quota markets and its implications for urbanization, property rights, and intergovernmental politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao, Yuan, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation investigates China's land quota markets, a recent land policy innovation that virtually transfers urbanization permission from the countryside to cities. To circumvent national government's quota restrictions ...

  17. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, Terry R. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release.

  18. Method and apparatus for controlling accidental releases of tritium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galloway, T.R.

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improvement is described in a tritium control system based on a catalytic oxidation reactor wherein accidental releases of tritium into room air are controlled by flooding the catalytic oxidation reactor with hydrogen when the tritium concentration in the room air exceeds a specified limit. The sudden flooding with hydrogen heats the catalyst to a high temperature within seconds, thereby greatly increasing the catalytic oxidation rate of tritium to tritiated water vapor. Thus, the catalyst is heated only when needed. In addition to the heating effect, the hydrogen flow also swamps the tritium and further reduces the tritium release. 1 fig.

  19. RESTORING SUSTAINABLE FORESTS ON APPALACHIAN MINED LANDS FOR WOOD PRODUCTS, RENEWABLE ENERGY, CARBON SEQUESTRATION, AND OTHER ECOSYSTEM SERVICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonathan Aggett

    2003-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall purpose of this project is to evaluate the biological and economic feasibility of restoring high-quality forests on mined land, and to measure carbon sequestration and wood production benefits that would be achieved from forest restoration procedures. In this segment of work, our goal was to review methods for estimating tree survival, growth, yield and value of forests growing on surface mined land in the eastern coalfields of the USA, and to determine the extent to which carbon sequestration is influenced by these factors. Public Law 95-87, the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), mandates that mined land be reclaimed in a fashion that renders the land at least as productive after mining as it was before mining. In the central Appalachian region, where prime farmland and economic development opportunities for mined land are scarce, the most practical land use choices are hayland/pasture, wildlife habitat, or forest land. Since 1977, the majority of mined land has been reclaimed as hayland/pasture or wildlife habitat, which is less expensive to reclaim than forest land, since there are no tree planting costs. As a result, there are now hundreds of thousands of hectares of grasslands and scrublands in various stages of natural succession located throughout otherwise forested mountains in the U.S. A literature review was done to develop the basis for an economic feasibility study of a range of land-use conversion scenarios. Procedures were developed for both mixed hardwoods and white pine under a set of low product prices and under a set of high product prices. Economic feasibility is based on land expectation values. Further, our review shows that three types of incentive schemes might be important: (1) lump sum payment at planting (and equivalent series of annual payments); (2) revenue incentive at harvest; and (3) benefit based on carbon volume.

  20. Climate Change and Flood Operations in the Sacramento Basin, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willis, Ann D.; Lund, Jay R.; Townsley, Edwin S.; Faber, Beth A.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yuba River, California: water control manual. Sacramento (River, California: water control manual. Sacramento (CA):Nov 9. [DWR] Department of Water Resources. 1969. California

  1. Marine Habitats and Land Use (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Marine Resources Commission has jurisdiction over submerged lands off the state's coast and in inland rivers and streams, wetlands and tidal wetlands, coastal sand dunes and beaches,...

  2. Biomass Energy and Competition for Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, John

    We describe an approach for incorporating biomass energy production and competition for land into the MIT Emissions Prediction and Policy Analysis (EPPA) model, a computable general equilibrium model of the world economy, ...

  3. LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;LAND USE AND WATER QUALITY MANAGEMENT IN THE BRIDGE CREEK BASIN Prepared for: Water Quality ............................................. DESCRIPTION OF BRIDGE CREEK BASIN ........................ PHYSICAL SETTING'T. ................................ 5.1 CUMULATIVE IMPACTS ....................................... 5.1.1 Bridge Creek basin upstream

  4. Hydroelectric Resources on State Lands (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter authorizes the leasing of state lands for the development of hydroelectric resources. It provides regulations for the granting and duration of leases, as well as for the inspection of...

  5. Management and Use of Public Lands (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Virginia Department of Conservation and Recreation may elect to lease its lands for the development of mineral interests (defined herein as petroleum, natural gas, coal, ore, rock and any other...

  6. Land Assemblage Tax Credit Program (Missouri)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Land Assemblage Tax Credit Programs the redevelopment of blighted areas in Missouri into productive use. Redevelopers must incur acquisition costs for at least 50 acres of 75+ acre parcels,...

  7. A framework for benchmarking land models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their inclu- sion in Earth system models (ESMs). State-of-land models cou- pled to Earth system models should simulateland models within Earth system models, however, can help

  8. Land and its uses - actual and potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Last, F.T.; Bell, B.G.; Holz, M.C.B.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book discusses information on the following topics: identification of ecological factors characterizing the range of terrestrial habitats (urban, rural); land classifications; water resources; conservation and landscape; remote sensing; and case studies.

  9. Wilderness designation of Bureau of Land Management lands and impacts on the availability of energy resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oakes, E.H.; Voelker, A.H.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1964 Congress mandated the establishment of the National Wilderness Preservation System - a collection of federal lands dedicated to the preservation of selected parts of our once vast wilderness. Because wilderness management precludes many traditional land uses, controversy has plagued the efforts of land-management agencies to select and recommend areas for wilderness inclusion. This study examines potential impacts on the supply of energy resources from the possible withdrawal by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) of some part of the 24.3 million acres of public lands now under study for inclusion in the wilderness system. Except for uranium, the energy-resource potential of the total WSA-acreage is low. Wilderness designation of some WSAs is therefore not expected to cause serious impacts on the future availability of energy resources. Because the significance of land withdrawals by the BLM will depend to some extent on the availability of other federal lands for mineral activities, an up-to-date estimate of the current and future status-of-access to western federal lands for mineral activities was prepared. Overall conclusions of the report are that (1) the inclusion of some BLM land in the National Wilderness Preservation System will not interfere with the nation's required supply of energy resources, (2) there is sufficient federal land currently available in the West for mineral activities, (3) the availability of western federal land for mineral activities will increase in the future, (4) the administration should continue to support the major land-review programs, and (5) the administration should accelerate the review process for WSAs in regions that have a high energy-resource potential.

  10. Local Land-Use Controls and Aging-Friendliness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenthal, Larry A.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. 2001. “Aging and Smart Growth: Building Aging-Sensitivebuilding such product exclusively, or predominantly, because it creates homogenous-age zones, defeats smart-

  11. MARS IN A MINUTE: How Do You Land on Mars? How do you land on Mars?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to land safely! Here are some options: 1. With a small- to mid-size rover, use a cushion of airbags along

  12. Flooding The Vote: Hurricane Katrina and Voter Participation in New Orleans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinclair, Betsy

    2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The flooding of New Orleans from Hurricane Katrina resulted in a massive and rapid exodus of individuals from New Orleans to locations around the United States. In the midst of the hurricane recovery, the City of New Orleans ...

  13. PROGRESSION OF STREAMBANK EROSION DURING A LARGE FLOOD, RIO PUERCO ARROYO, NEW MEXICO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PROGRESSION OF STREAMBANK EROSION DURING A LARGE FLOOD, RIO PUERCO ARROYO, NEW MEXICO Eleanor R includes uplands of north-central New Mexico. The Rio Puerco is the principal source of sediment

  14. Calibration of a Distributed Flood Forecasting Model with Input Uncertainty Using a Bayesian Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Calibration of a Distributed Flood Forecasting Model with Input Uncertainty Using a Bayesian, Berkeley, CA, United States. In the process of calibrating distributed hydrological models, accounting in calibrating GBHM parameters and in estimating their associated uncertainty. The calibration ignoring input

  15. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, J.S. Jr.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1980-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  16. FLOODING AND GAS EMISSIONS OF OLD IRON MINES IN LORAIN LAGNY Candice1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    related to abandoned mine workings. This study has been extended to other sectors of the Lorraine basin reservoirs of "Rosselange", Franchepré and "Orne". Then, investigation was made in non-flooded reservoirs

  17. After the flood : crisis, voice and innovation in Maputo's solid waste management sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruks-Wisner, Gabrielle (Gabrielle K.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores responses to the problem of solid waste management (SWM) in two neighborhoods of Maputo, Mozambique in the wake of catastrophic flooding in 2000. In these neighborhoods, small-scale service providers ...

  18. The effect of surface flooding on the physical-biogeochemical dynamics of a warm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baird, Mark

    Stirling Highway, Crawley, WA 6009, Australia Abstract Warm core eddies (WCEs) formed from the East suggest that EAC WCEs with relatively shallow surface flooding contain more phy- toplankton biomass than

  19. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.S.; Westmoreland, C.G.

    1982-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  20. Sacrificial adsorbate for surfactants utilized in chemical floods of enhanced oil recovery operations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jr., James S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Westmoreland, Clyde G. (Rockwood, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sacrificial or competitive adsorbate for surfactants contained in chemical flooding emulsions for enhanced oil recovery operations. The adsorbate to be utilized in the method of the present invention is a caustic effluent from the bleach stage or the weak black liquor from the digesters and pulp washers of the kraft pulping process. This effluent or weak black liquor is injected into an oil-bearing subterranean earth formation prior to or concurrent with the chemical flood emulsion and is adsorbed on the active mineral surfaces of the formation matrix so as to effectively reduce adsorption of surfactant in the chemical flood. Alternatively, the effluent or liquor can be injected into the subterranean earth formation subsequent to a chemical flood to displace the surfactant from the mineral surfaces for the recovery thereof.

  1. Flooding of the continental shelves as a contributor to deglacial CH4 rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Flooding of the continental shelves as a contributor to deglacial CH4 rise ANDY RIDGWELL,1 MARK of the continental shelves that were exposed and vegetated during the glacial sea-level low stand and that can help

  2. agricultural land based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparing a Conservation Plan INTRODUCTION Conservation of land, water and other natural features. Examples of goals...

  3. Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Marion Denson

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

  4. Green River Formation Water Flood Demonstration Project. Annual report, April 1, 1994--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomax, J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The successful water flood of the Green River Formation in the Monument Butte unit was analyzed in detail in the last yearly report. It was shown that primary recovery and the water flood in the unit were typical of oil production from an undersaturated oil reservoir close its bubble point. The reservoir performance of the smaller Travis unit was also analyzed. The Monument Butte unit is currently producing at around 300 barrels per day of oil. Two of the new wells drilled in the unit had zones pressurized by the water flood. The third well produced from pressurized as well as from zones which were unaffected by the water flood. The water flood response of the Travis unit is slow possibly due to problems of reservoir continuity. Plans for water flooding the Boundary unit were drawn. Core description and Formation Micro Imaging log of well 14a-28 provided insight about the important Lower Douglas Creek sandstone. It was determined that this sandstone was extensively fractured and detailed fracture characteristics were obtained through comprehensive interpretation of the FMI log. Reservoir modeling and simulation studies of all the three units were also continued. A larger, more detailed model of the Monument Butte unit was built in order to study the performance of the new development wells being drilled. Three alternate models developed to explain the performance of the Travis flood revealed that intersecting hydraulic fractures may have also provided paths for water channeling observed in this unit. The reservoir characterization activities identified new reservoirs in the Travis unit. Reservoir simulations helped design an injection program in Travis, unit expansion plans on the west and north sides of the Monument Butte until and to evaluate the infill drilling. The reservoir simulations are being used to examine the role of the aquifer underlying the oil bearing D2 sandstone in Boundary on water flood strategies and injection patterns.

  5. Effects of fluid properties and initial gas saturation on oil recovery by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Marion Denson

    1959-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D. ARNOLD Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August, 1959 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLUID PROPERTIES AND INITIAL GAS SATURATION ON OIL RECOVERY BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis By MARION D, ARNOLD Approved as to style and content by...

  6. The effect of cross flow in a stratified reservoir during a water flood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommers, Gordon Edmund

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the displacement of oil by water in a porous medium. In most conventional engineer- ing methods used to predict the reservoir performance of a water- flood, crossflow between beds of different permeability is neglected, This study was concerned... in a water flood. Conventional engineering methods assuming no crossflow and the numerical model solution were in agreement when the effects of vertical communication were neglected. However, when vertical communication was considered, model...

  7. Adaptive control for Mars atmospheric flight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Restrepo, Carolina Isabel

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    landing accuracy requirements for a manned space vehicle make it necessary to ?y a controlled entry trajectory rather than a more robust ballistic entry trajectory used for some robotic missions. The large variations in Mars atmospheric properties make a...

  8. Land Tenure and Land Administration Issues in Guatemala Danielle Kelly Donovan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Onsrud, Harlan J.

    Civilization's hierarchical system and the Spanish exploitation. The Mayan Civilization involved communally by Mexico, on the southeast by Honduras and El Salvador, and on the southwest by the Pacific Ocean in 1523 lead to ruthless exploitation of Mayan land. Geography, amount and accessibility of arable land

  9. Green River Formation water flood demonstration project. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pennington, B.I.; Dyer, J.E.; Lomax, J.D. [Inland Resources, Inc. (United States); [Lomax Exploration Co., Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Deo, M.D. [Utah Univ., Salt Lake City, UT (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Fuels Engineering

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of the project were to understand the oil production mechanisms in the Monument Butte unit via reservoir characterization and reservoir simulations and to transfer the water flooding technology to similar units in the vicinity, particularly the Travis and the Boundary units. The reservoir characterization activity in the project basically consisted of extraction and analysis of a full diameter core, Formation Micro Imaging (FMI) logs from several wells and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) logs from two wells. In addition, several side-wall cores were drilled and analyzed, oil samples from a number of wells were physically and chemically characterized (using high-temperature gas chromatography), oil-water relative permeabilities were measured and pour points and cloud points of a few oil samples were determined. The reservoir modeling activity comprised of reservoir simulation of all the three units at different scales and near well-bore modeling of the wax precipitation effects. The reservoir simulation activities established the extent of pressurization of the sections of the reservoirs in the immediate vicinity of the Monument Butte unit. This resulted in a major expansion of the unit and the production from this expanded unit increased from about 300 barrels per day to about 2,000 barrels per day.

  10. Electron Flood Charge Compensation Device for Ion Trap Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelhans, Anthony David; Ward, Michael Blair; Olson, John Eric

    2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses of organophosphorous compounds adsorbed onto soils, the measured anion signals were lower than expected and it was hypothesized that the low signals could be due to sample charging. An electron flood gun was designed, constructed and used to investigate sample charging of these and other sample types. The flood gun was integrated into one end cap of an ion trap secondary ion mass spectrometer and the design maintained the geometry of the self-stabilizing extraction optics used in this instrument. The SIMION ion optics program was used to design the flood gun, and experimental results agreed with the predicted performance. Results showed the low anion signals from the soils were not due to sample charging. Other insulating and conducting samples were tested using both a ReO4- and a Cs+ primary ion beam. The proximity of the sample and electron source to the ion trap aperture resulted in generation of background ions in the ion trap via electron impact (EI) ionization during the period the electron gun was flooding the sample region. When using the electron gun with the ReO4- primary beam, the required electron current was low enough that the EI background was negligible; however, the high electron flood current required with the Cs+ beam produced background EI ions that degraded the quality of the mass spectra. The consequences of the EI produced cations will have to be evaluated on a sample-by-sample basis when using electron flood. It was shown that the electron flood gun could be intentionally operated to produce EI spectra in this instrument. This offers the opportunity to measure, nearly simultaneously, species evaporating from a sample, via EI, and species bound to the surface, via SIMS.

  11. Development of High Resolution Land Surface Parameters for the Community Land Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ke, Yinghai; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Huang, Maoyi; Coleman, Andre M.; Li, Hongyi; Wigmosta, Mark S.

    2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing need for high-resolution land surface parameters as land surface models are being applied at increasingly higher spatial resolution offline as well as in regional and global models. The default land surface parameters for the most recent version of the Community Land Model (i.e. CLM 4.0) are at 0.5° or coarser resolutions, released with the Community Earth System Model (CESM). Plant Functional Types (PFTs), vegetation properties such as Leaf Area Index (LAI), Stem Area Index (SAI), and non-vegetated land covers were developed using remotely sensed datasets retrieved in late 1990’s and the beginning of this century. In this study, we developed new land surface parameters for CLM 4.0, specifically PFTs, LAI, SAI and non-vegetated land cover composition, at 0.05° resolution globally based on the most recent MODIS land cover and improved MODIS LAI products. Compared to the current CLM 4.0 parameters, the new parameters produced a decreased coverage by bare soil and trees, but an increased coverage by shrub, grass, and cropland. The new parameters result in a decrease in global seasonal LAI, with the biggest decrease in boreal forests; however, the new parameters also show a large increase in LAI in tropical forest. Differences between the new and the current parameters are mainly caused by changes in the sources of remotely sensed data and the representation of land cover in the source data. Advantages and disadvantages of each dataset were discussed in order to provide guidance on the use of the data. The new high-resolution land surface parameters have been used in a coupled land-atmosphere model (WRF-CLM) applied to the western U.S. to demonstrate their use in high-resolution modeling. A remapping method from the latitude/longitude grid of the CLM data to the WRF grids with map projection was also demonstrated. Future work will include global offline CLM simulations to examine the impacts of source data resolution and subsequent land parameter changes on simulated land surface processes.

  12. A framework for benchmarking land models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luo, Yiqi; Randerson, J.; Abramowitz, G.; Bacour, C.; Blyth, E.; Carvalhais, N.; Ciais, Philippe; Dalmonech, D.; Fisher, J.B.; Fisher, R.; Friedlingstein, P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Hoffman, F. M.; Huntzinger, Deborah; Jones, C.; Koven, C.; Lawrence, David M.; Li, D.J.; Mahecha, M.; Niu, S.L.; Norby, Richard J.; Piao, S.L.; Qi, X.; Peylin, P.; Prentice, I.C.; Riley, William; Reichstein, M.; Schwalm, C.; Wang, Y.; Xia, J. Y.; Zaehle, S.; Zhou, X. H.

    2012-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Land models, which have been developed by the modeling community in the past few decades to predict future states of ecosystems and climate, have to be critically evaluated for their performance skills of simulating ecosystem responses and feedback to climate change. Benchmarking is an emerging procedure to measure performance of models against a set of defined standards. This paper proposes a benchmarking framework for evaluation of land model performances and, meanwhile, highlights major challenges at this infant stage of benchmark analysis. The framework includes (1) targeted aspects of model performance to be evaluated, (2) a set of benchmarks as defined references to test model performance, (3) metrics to measure and compare performance skills among models so as to identify model strengths and deficiencies, and (4) model improvement. Land models are required to simulate exchange of water, energy, carbon and sometimes other trace gases between the atmosphere and land surface, and should be evaluated for their simulations of biophysical processes, biogeochemical cycles, and vegetation dynamics in response to climate change across broad temporal and spatial scales. Thus, one major challenge is to select and define a limited number of benchmarks to effectively evaluate land model performance. The second challenge is to develop metrics of measuring mismatches between models and benchmarks. The metrics may include (1) a priori thresholds of acceptable model performance and (2) a scoring system to combine data–model mismatches for various processes at different temporal and spatial scales. The benchmark analyses should identify clues of weak model performance to guide future development, thus enabling improved predictions of future states of ecosystems and climate. The near-future research effort should be on development of a set of widely acceptable benchmarks that can be used to objectively, effectively, and reliably evaluate fundamental properties of land models to improve their prediction performance skills.

  13. Augmenting a Microbial Selective Plugging Technique with Polymer Flooding to Increase the Efficiency of Oil Recovery - A Search for Synergy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Lewis R.; Pittman Jr., Charles U.; Lynch, F. Leo; Vadie, A. Alex; French, W. Todd

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to determine if the effectiveness of a microbial permeability profile modification technique can be improved through polymer flooding.

  14. South African Association of Geomorphologists, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2000 Flood plain formation in semi-arid central Australia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bourke, Mary C.

    South African Association of Geomorphologists, Johannesburg, South Africa, 2000 Flood plain of sediment waves and the close succession of a series of high-energy overbank flows contribute

  15. Thinking globally - acting locally an energy company`s response to land stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, D. [Sasaki Associates, Inc., Watertown, MA (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the application of contemporary land use planning principles in the Kingdom of Saudi Aramco, the world`s largest oil company, relative to Company-controlled land located in the Eastern Province of the Kingdom. The Eastern Province is the world`s most productive hydrocarbon resource. The Province has witnessed extraordinary industrialization over 25 years due to the exploitation of the oil resource. Saudi Aramco commissioned the planning study to set a course of action which fully considers the consequences such development may have on the social, economic and environmental characteristics of the metropolitan area. In addition to existing developed areas, the study area encompasses a unique desert environment including salts flats, native vegetation, habitat for migrating wildlife and extraordinary geologic formations overlying an important water resource. A Master Plan established a framework of land use, open space, transportation and infrastructure to guide the development of the region over the next 25 years. The Plan emphasizes the redevelopment of industrialized areas for other uses leveraging capital investment to improve quality of the built environment and establishes institutional mechanisms necessary to fully achieve implementation. The study is innovative because (1) a global energy company assumes a leadership role in stewarding its land resource, (2) incorporates contemporary land use planning techniques within a context where such planning is absent, (3) emphasizes redevelopment of industrialized areas, where historically development has simply been directed to the next available undeveloped site, and (4) applies the principles of sustainable land use planning by responding to cultural influences, strengthening local economies and preserving important natural assets. The study establishes a precendent for {open_quotes}corporate environmentalism{close_quotes}and offers a model approach to land use planning in the developing world.

  16. Recent Trends in Land Tenure in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motheral, Joe

    1944-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    colored; in Harrison County, 70 per cent; in Gregg County, 60 per cent; in San Jacinto County, 57 per cent; and in Walker County, 51 per cent. Almost one-third of the farm operators in counties along the lower reaches of the Colorado and Brazos rivers...RECENT TRENDS IN LAND TENURE IN TEXAS JOE MOTHERAL Division of Farm and Ranch Economics [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] Public interest in the subject of land tenure has been height- ened by the swift changes, in the tenure pattern...

  17. Carbon Sequestration on Surface Mine Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner; Carmen Agouridis

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the implementation of the federal Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA) in May of 1978, many opportunities have been lost for the reforestation of surface mines in the eastern United States. Research has shown that excessive compaction of spoil material in the backfilling and grading process is the biggest impediment to the establishment of productive forests as a post-mining land use (Ashby, 1998, Burger et al., 1994, Graves et al., 2000). Stability of mine sites was a prominent concern among regulators and mine operators in the years immediately following the implementation of SMCRA. These concerns resulted in the highly compacted, flatly graded, and consequently unproductive spoils of the early post-SMCRA era. However, there is nothing in the regulations that requires mine sites to be overly compacted as long as stability is achieved. It has been cultural barriers and not regulatory barriers that have contributed to the failure of reforestation efforts under the federal law over the past 27 years. Efforts to change the perception that the federal law and regulations impede effective reforestation techniques and interfere with bond release must be implemented. Demonstration of techniques that lead to the successful reforestation of surface mines is one such method that can be used to change perceptions and protect the forest ecosystems that were indigenous to these areas prior to mining. The University of Kentucky initiated a large-scale reforestation effort to address regulatory and cultural impediments to forest reclamation in 2003. During the three years of this project 383,000 trees were planted on over 556 acres in different physiographic areas of Kentucky (Table 1, Figure 1). Species used for the project were similar to those that existed on the sites before mining was initiated (Table 2). A monitoring program was undertaken to evaluate growth and survival of the planted species as a function of spoil characteristics and reclamation practice. In addition, experiments were integrated within the reforestation effort to address specific questions pertaining to sequestration of carbon (C) on these sites.

  18. Ecological perspectives of land use history: The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) Reserve

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinds, N R; Rogers, L E

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study was to gather information on the land use history of the Arid Land Ecology (ALE) Reserve so that current ecological research could be placed within a historical perspective. The data were gathered in the early 1980s by interviewing former users of the land and from previously published research (where available). Interviews with former land users of the ALE Reserve in Benton County, Washington, revealed that major land uses from 1880 to 1940 were homesteading, grazing, oil/gas production, and road building. Land use practices associated with grazing and homesteading have left the greatest impact on the landscape. Disturbed sites where succession is characterized by non-native species, plots where sagebrush was railed away, and sheep trails are major indications today of past land uses. Recent estimates of annual bunchgrass production do ALE do not support the widespread belief that bunchgrass were more productive during the homesteading era, though the invasion of cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), Jim Hill mustard (Sisymbrium altissium), and other European alien plant species has altered pre-settlement succession patterns. 15 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Characterization of oil and gas reservoirs and recovery technology deployment on Texas State Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Major, R.P.; Holtz, M.H. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Texas State Lands oil and gas resources are estimated at 1.6 BSTB of remaining mobile oil, 2.1 BSTB, or residual oil, and nearly 10 Tcf of remaining gas. An integrated, detailed geologic and engineering characterization of Texas State Lands has created quantitative descriptions of the oil and gas reservoirs, resulting in delineation of untapped, bypassed compartments and zones of remaining oil and gas. On Texas State Lands, the knowledge gained from such interpretative, quantitative reservoir descriptions has been the basis for designing optimized recovery strategies, including well deepening, recompletions, workovers, targeted infill drilling, injection profile modification, and waterflood optimization. The State of Texas Advanced Resource Recovery program is currently evaluating oil and gas fields along the Gulf Coast (South Copano Bay and Umbrella Point fields) and in the Permian Basin (Keystone East, Ozona, Geraldine Ford and Ford West fields). The program is grounded in advanced reservoir characterization techniques that define the residence of unrecovered oil and gas remaining in select State Land reservoirs. Integral to the program is collaboration with operators in order to deploy advanced reservoir exploitation and management plans. These plans are made on the basis of a thorough understanding of internal reservoir architecture and its controls on remaining oil and gas distribution. Continued accurate, detailed Texas State Lands reservoir description and characterization will ensure deployment of the most current and economically viable recovery technologies and strategies available.

  20. Scale-up of miscible flood processes for heterogeneous reservoirs. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orr, F.M. Jr.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of a wide-ranging investigation of the scaling of gas injection processes are reported. The research examines how the physical mechanisms at work during a gas injection project interact to determine process performance. In particular, the authors examine: the interactions of equilibrium phase behavior and two-phase flow that determine local displacement efficiency and minimum miscibility pressure, the combined effects of viscous fingering, gravity segregation and heterogeneity that control sweep efficiency in 2- and 3-dimensional porous media, the use of streamtube/streamline methods to create very efficient simulation technique for multiphase compositional displacements, the scaling of viscous, capillary and gravity forces for heterogeneous reservoirs, and the effects of the thin films and spreading behavior on three-phase flow. The following key results are documented: rigorous procedures for determination of minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) or minimum miscibility enrichment (MME) for miscibility have been developed for multicomponent systems; the complex dependence of MMP`s for nitrogen/methane floods on oil and injection gas composition observed experimentally is explained for the first time; the presence of layer-like heterogeneities strongly influences the interplay of gravity segregation and viscous fingering, as viscous fingers adapt to preferential flow paths and low permeability layers restrict vertical flow; streamtube/streamline simulation techniques are demonstrated for a variety of injection processes in 2 and 3 dimensions; quantitative scaling estimates for the transitions from capillary-dominated to gravity-dominated to viscous-dominated flows are reported; experimental results are given that demonstrate that high pressure CO{sub 2} can be used to generate low IFT gravity drainage in fractured reservoirs if fractures are suitably connected; and the effect of wetting and spreading behavior on three-phase flow is described. 209 refs.

  1. Center for Environmental Management of Military Lands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for professionalism and hard work. Sincerely, Dr. Lee Barber, Director Center for Environmental Management of MilitaryCenter for Environmental Management of Military Lands 1490 Campus Delivery Fort Collins, Colorado extent been due to our ability to address our sponsors' natural and cultural resource management

  2. www.publiclandsday.org Public Lands Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    awareness of local public lands and issues #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook.com - Fan Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page http://www.facebook.com/pages/create.php #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Fan Page #12;www.publiclandsday.org Facebook Event

  3. The land use climate change energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Efroymson, Rebecca Ann [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape ecology focuses on the spatial patterns and processes of ecological and human interactions. These patterns and processes are being altered both by changing human resource-management practices and changing climate conditions associated, in part, with increases in atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases. Dominant resource extraction and land management activities involve energy, and the use of fossil energy is one of the key drivers behind increasing greenhouse gas emissions as well as land-use changes. Alternative energy sources (such as wind, solar, nuclear, and bioenergy) are being explored to reduce greenhouse gas emission rates. Yet, energy production, including alternative-energy options, can have a wide range of effects on land productivity, surface cover, albedo, and other factors that affect carbon, water and energy fluxes and, in turn, climate. Meanwhile, climate influences the potential output, relative efficiencies and sustainability of alternative energy sources. Thus climate change, energy choices, and land-use change are linked, and any analysis in landscape ecology that considers one of these factors should consider them all. This analysis explores the implications of those linkages and points out ecological patterns and processes that may be affected by these interactions.

  4. Mitigating climate change through land use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    , offsetting the use of fossil fuels and reducing carbon emissions. Avoiding deforestation, increasing plant storage through afforestation or plant management, and substituting bioenergy for fossil fuels all use increasing deforestation by increasing demand for crop land, undermining the primary GHG emissions reduction

  5. Purdue extension PurdueLandUseTeam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue extension Val Slack Jon Cain Co-Chairs, PurdueLandUseTeam PurdueUniversity ID-351 CAFOs. The role of the Agricultural & Natural Resources (ANR) Educator as a plan commission member is to help plan and natural resources and provide insight into the impact on these two areas when there are proposed changes

  6. Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment and Land in Bushbuckridge, South Africa © 2002, Professor Robert Thornton Department of Anthropology University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa Acknowledgements: Research), and by the Centre for Science Development, Human Sciences Research Council, Pretoria, South Africa. Printed:24 April

  7. Land Use Baseline Report Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noah, J.C.

    1995-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to serve as a resource for Savannah River Site managers, planners, and SRS stakeholders by providing a general description of the site and land-use factors important to future use decisions and plans. The intent of this document is to be comprehensive in its review of SRS and the surrounding area.

  8. Arid Lands Ecology Facility management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Arid Lands Ecology (ALE) facility is a 312-sq-km tract of land that lies on the western side of the Hanford Site in southcentral Washington. The US Atomic Energy Commission officially set aside this land area in 1967 to preserve shrub-steppe habitat and vegetation. The ALE facility is managed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) for ecological research and education purposes. In 1971, the ALE facility was designated the Rattlesnake Hills Research Natural Area (RNA) as a result of an interagency federal cooperative agreement, and remains the largest RNA in Washington. it is also one of the few remaining large tracts of shrub-steppe vegetation in the state retaining a predominant preeuropean settlement character. This management plan provides policy and implementation methods for management of the ALE facilities consistent with both US Department of Energy Headquarters and the Richland Field Office decision (US Congress 1977) to designate and manage ALE lands as an RNA and as a component of the DOE National Environmental Research Park System.

  9. Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utah, University of

    Bureau of Land Management Oil Shale Development Unconventional Fuels Conference University of Utah May 17, 2011 #12;#12;Domestic Oil Shale Resources Primary oil shale resources in the U.S. are in the Green River Formation in Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. 72 % of this oil shale resource is on Federal

  10. Climate Effects of Global Land Cover Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbard, S G; Caldeira, K; Bala, G; Phillips, T; Wickett, M

    2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two competing effects of global land cover change on climate: an albedo effect which leads to heating when changing from grass/croplands to forest, and an evapotranspiration effect which tends to produce cooling. It is not clear which effect would dominate in a global land cover change scenario. We have performed coupled land/ocean/atmosphere simulations of global land cover change using the NCAR CAM3 atmospheric general circulation model. We find that replacement of current vegetation by trees on a global basis would lead to a global annual mean warming of 1.6 C, nearly 75% of the warming produced under a doubled CO{sub 2} concentration, while global replacement by grasslands would result in a cooling of 0.4 C. These results suggest that more research is necessary before forest carbon storage should be deployed as a mitigation strategy for global warming. In particular, high latitude forests probably have a net warming effect on the Earth's climate.

  11. Land and Atmospheric Science GRAD STUDENT HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    , transport, and fate of pollutants in soil, air, and water; improving and protecting land, air, and water, Policy and Management Agricultural Industries and Marketing The Department occupies the entire Soil are predominantly occupied by Soil Morphology and Genesis, Environmental Biophysics, and Atmospheric Sciences, plus

  12. Acquiring Land Use Rights in Today's China: A Snapshot from on the Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stein, Gregory M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the effectiveness of land reclamation, noting that reclaimedand that reclamation of marginally fertile land may havereclamation process as "turning mud into agri- cultural land."

  13. Inexpensive CO2 Thickening Agents for Improved Mobility Control of CO2 Floods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Enick; Eric Beckman; Andrew Hamilton

    2005-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research was the design, synthesis and evaluation of inexpensive, non-fluorous carbon dioxide thickening agents. We followed the same strategy employed in the design of fluorinated CO{sub 2} polymeric thickeners. First, a highly CO{sub 2}-philic, hydrocarbon-based monomer was to be identified. Polymers or oligomers of this monomer were then synthesized. The second step was to design a CO{sub 2}-thickener based on these CO{sub 2}-philic polymers. Two types of thickeners were considered. The first was a copolymer in which the CO{sub 2}-philic monomer was combined with a small proportion of CO{sub 2}-phobic associating groups that could cause viscosity-enhancing intermolecular interactions to occur. The second was a small hydrogen-bonding compound with urea groups in the core to promote intermolecular interactions that would cause the molecules to 'stack' in solution while the arms were composed of the CO{sub 2}-philic oligomers. Although we were not able to develop a viable thickener that exhibited high enough CO{sub 2} solubility at EOR MMP conditions to induce a viscosity increase, we made significant progress in our understanding of CO{sub 2}-soluble compounds that can be used in subsequent studies to design CO{sub 2}-soluble thickeners or CO{sub 2}-soluble surfactant-based foaming agents. These findings are detailed in this final report. In summary, we assessed many polymers and verified that the most CO{sub 2}-soluble oxygenated hydrocarbon polymer is poly(vinyl acetate), PVAc. This is primarily due to the presence of both ether and carbonyl oxygens associated with acetate-rich compounds. In addition to polymers, we also made small acetate-rich molecules that were also capable of associating in solution via the inclusion of hydrogen-bonding groups in hopes of forming viscosity-enhancing macromolecules. Despite the presence of multiple acetate groups in these compounds, which can impart incredible CO{sub 2}-solubility to many compounds, our attempts to make acetate-rich high molecular weight polymers and small hydrogen-bonding compounds did not yield a highly CO{sub 2}-soluble polymer or hydrogen-bonding associative thickener. The conclusions of our molecular modeling calculations confirmed that although acetates are indeed 'CO{sub 2}-philic', nitrogen-containing amines also interact favorably with CO{sub 2} and should also be examined. Therefore we obtained and synthesized many N-rich (e.g. amine-containing) polymers. Unfortunately, we found that the intermolecular polymer-polymer interactions between the amines were so strong that the polymers were essentially insoluble in CO{sub 2}. For the convenience of the reader, a table of all of the polymers evaluated during this research is provided.

  14. A Decade of Changes in the Wildcat Creek Flood Control Channel, North Richmond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginsberg, Ben

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    requires help in the form of dredging. Methods In order toor unnatural processes, such as dredging of the channel. Theto these changes is the dredging of the channel in September

  15. A water quality characterization of a tidally influenced flood control canal of Galveston Bay, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polasek, Jeffrey Steven

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H), specific conductance, sulfide, total organic carbon (TOC), and turbidity samples were collected at seven stations in HBDC and from the effluent of two municipal wastewater treatment plants (MWTP) discharging into HBDC in order to detect significant... to MWTP outfall. Specific conductance patterns mirrored salinity trends. TOC levels showed a steady bayward decrease. Turbidity levels were consistently highest in bottom waters. No trends were apparent for COD, pH, and sulfide. HBDC water quality...

  16. Hydrologic investigation of concrete flood control channel at UC Berkeley’s Richmond Field Station

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Courtney; Nichols, Patrick

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal Interagency Stream Restoration Working Group. 1998,http://www.usda.gov/stream_restoration/newtofc.htm U.S.The Federal Interagenc y Stream Restoration Working Group,

  17. Manual on Conditional Reliability, Daily Time Step, Flood Control, and Salinity Features of WRAP (Draft)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurbs, Ralph

    files describing the hydrology and the water management facilities and practices for the river basin or region of concern along with other related information. The programs are connected through input/output files. Certain programs create files... ......................................................................................................... 245 LIST OF FIGURES 2.1 System Schematic for the Example ................................................................................. 22 3.1 Stream Flow Hydrograph and Water Management Targets...

  18. Hydrological and habitat controls of algal biodiversity and biomass in a subtropical flood-pulsed wetland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    ;Microalgae, base of aquatic food webs Ecosystem services. Provisioning: food, fiber and fuel. Regulating

  19. LANL closes road, trails for safety reasons; flooding and erosion control

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as ReadyAppointedKyungmin Ham,work under way Road,

  20. Developing Lunar Landing Vehicle Display Requirements through Content Analysis of Apollo Lunar Landing Voice Communications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, C. A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The lengthy period since the Apollo landings limits present-day engineers attempting to draw from the experiences of veteran Apollo engineers and astronauts in the design of a new lunar lander. In order to circumvent these ...

  1. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A pilot carbon dioxide miscible flood was initiated in the Lansing Kansas City C formation in the Hall Gurney Field, Russell County, Kansas. Continuous carbon dioxide injection began on December 2, 2003. By the end of June 2004, 6.26 MM lb of carbon dioxide were injected into the pilot area. Carbon dioxide injection rates averaged about 250 MCFD. Carbon dioxide was detected in one production well near the end of May. The amount of carbon dioxide produced was small during this period. Wells in the pilot area produced 100% water at the beginning of the flood. Oil production began in February, increasing to an average of about 2.5 B/D in May and June. Operational problems encountered during the initial stages of the flood were identified and resolved.

  2. Effects of the Georgia flood of `94 on Lake Blackshear Dam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Findlay, R.C.; Northrop, J.H. [Northrop, Devine & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Crisp, R.L. Jr. [and others

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Tropical Storm Alberto produced record rainfall in central Georgia in early July, 1994. The area drains into Lake Blackshear, formed in the Flint River by Lake Blackshear Dam. The level of the lake rose 3.5 m (11.5 ft) above normal and caused the worst flooding of the area in recorded history. The north embankment of the dam was overtopped, causing a 215 m (700 ft) breach. Prior to the breach, a few concentrated boils were observed in the tailwater downstream of the non-breached portion of the dam. This portion remained intact through the flood, but the presence of the boils raised questions regarding its integrity. The effects of the flood on the north embankment are discussed, as well as the geotechnical investigation conducted to assess subsurface conditions at the breach and intact portions and the plan for remediation.

  3. Precipitation, Recycling, and Land Memory: An Integrated Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.

    A synthesis of several approaches to quantifying land–atmosphere interactions is presented. These approaches use data from observations or atmospheric reanalyses applied to atmospheric tracer models and stand-alone land ...

  4. Relative efficiency of land surface energy balance components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bateni, S. M.

    [1] The partitioning of available energy into dissipative fluxes over land surfaces is dependent on the state variable of the surface energy balance (land surface temperature) and the state variable of the surface water ...

  5. RADBOUDUNIVERSITY NIJMEGEN, THE NETHERLANDS ICT for Ethiopia's land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Peter

    RADBOUDUNIVERSITY NIJMEGEN, THE NETHERLANDS ICT for Ethiopia's land administration Bachelor Thesis Information Science Sander van Hooft 7/15/2009 Supervisor: Luca Consoli, Phd. #12;ICT for Ethiopia........................................................................................... 5 4.1 Ethiopia's history of land administration

  6. admiral cockburn land: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NSCAT Views Land and Ice David G. Long Engineering Websites Summary: NSCAT Views Land and Ice David G. Long Brigham YoungUniversityMicrowaveEarth Remote Sensing- ment Agency of...

  7. Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar Regulatory Impacts for Renewable Energy Projects on Indian Lands Webinar June 24, 2015 11:00AM to 12:30PM...

  8. CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

  9. Conditions and effectiveness of land use as a mobility tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Ming, 1963 Apr. 22-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the potential of land use as a mobility tool to affect travel, a subject of long and ongoing policy debate. Land use strategies such as densification, mixed-use development, and non-driving-oriented ...

  10. arnhem land northern: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1,476 24.7 Total Land 5,972 100.0 Note: Campus areas include land leased by Rutgers. Source: Office of Facilities and Capital Planning Office Garfunkel, Eric 105...

  11. Geothermal Power Plants — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    For energy production and development, geothermal power plants don't use much land compared to coal and nuclear power plants. And the environmental impact upon the land they use is minimal.

  12. agricultural land final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    land change science, to better understand of the three foci outlined in the science plan of the Land-use and -cover change (LUCC) project (Turner et al Brown, Daniel G. 273...

  13. agricultural land evaluation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    land change science, to better understand of the three foci outlined in the science plan of the Land-use and -cover change (LUCC) project (Turner et al Brown, Daniel G. First...

  14. Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference Green Lands Blue Water 2014 Fall Conference November 18, 2014 10:00AM CST to November 20, 2014 4:00PM CST Richland Community College...

  15. Chapter 10. Land Application of Biosolids Gregory K. Evanylo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaye, Jason P.

    Chapter 10. Land Application of Biosolids Gregory K. Evanylo Department of Crop and Soil..................................................................................................................... 228 What are biosolids and how are they different from sewage sludge?......................... 228 Benefits of land application of biosolids

  16. arid lands ecology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, the 8th largest city... Sahoo, Debabrata 2009-05-15 84 A study of...

  17. arid land ecology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by land use land cover (LULC) change, climate variability, and water regulations. San Antonio, Texas, the 8th largest city... Sahoo, Debabrata 2009-05-15 84 A study of...

  18. Land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cronin, Timothy (Timothy Wallace)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    I present work on several topics related to land-atmosphere interaction and radiative-convective equilibrium: the first two research chapters invoke ideas related to land-atmosphere interaction to better understand ...

  19. Erosional Consequence of Saltcedar Control Kirk R. Vincent Jonathan M. Friedman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erosional Consequence of Saltcedar Control Kirk R. Vincent Ć Jonathan M. Friedman Ć Eleanor R habitat for native species. Widespread control of dominant species, however, can lead to unintended reach during this flood was inconsequential. Sand eroded from channel banks was transported an average

  20. An appraisal of the Texas veterans' land program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dorries, W. L.

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and Mr. L. C. Jackson, Executive Secretary of the Veterans' Land Board, who made the Land Board records available for this study. Credit also belongs to the many veterans who gave information concerning their land purchases. Finally, the writer 'V... is indebted to his wife, Virginia Dorries^ for reading the disserta- tion and offering valuable suggestions. m CONTENTS I. Introduction and historical background--------------------- - 1 II. Provisions for a Veterans* Land Board purchase--------------- 1...

  1. FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT MEASURES FOR FLOOD MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    FLEXIBILITY IN WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT: REVIEW OF CONCEPTS AND DEVELOPMENT OF ASSESSMENT variability/change; risk assessment; flood management; water resources flexibility.) DiFrancesco, Kara N of Assessment Measures for Flood Management Systems. Journal of the American Water Resources Association (JAWRA

  2. Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean continental drift and the oldest known

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utrecht, Universiteit

    Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean in the Nullagine Synclinorium (and Meentheena Centrocline) of the East Pilbara Basin, Western Australia, has been. Langereis, Palaeomagnetism of flood basalts in the Pilbara Craton, Western Australia: Late Archaean

  3. A graphical method to study suspended sediment dynamics during flood events in the Wadi Sebdou, NW Algeria (19732004)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A graphical method to study suspended sediment dynamics during flood events in the Wadi Sebdou, NW sediment concentration Semiarid watershed Flood Wadi Algeria s u m m a r y Small sub-basins are numerous period (1973­2004) was analyzed at the outlet of the Wadi Sebdou basin (256 km2 ) in northwest Algeria

  4. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2007-2009 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources and Environmental Sciences Department The Department of Land Resources and Environmental Sciences (LRES) will undertake a continuing assessment

  5. Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land Acquisition Prepared by: Ben Floyd, Economic & Engineering Services May 2004 Introduction Land taxpayer pockets"), and require no specific economic return to justify the expenditure. · There is also a general perception that long-term negative economic impacts may result if additional lands are taken out

  6. Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land use planning and early warning systems for limiting drought impacts and promoting recovery J response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Land classification based on the land's potential: soils response 3b. Drought early warning systems #12;Grassland Shrubland ­ high wind erosion Knowledge

  7. CLASSIFYING AGRICULTURAL LAND IN AN URBAN LANDSCAPE WITH APPLICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CLASSIFYING AGRICULTURAL LAND IN AN URBAN LANDSCAPE WITH APPLICATION TO WATERFOWL CONSERVATION: Master of Resource Management Title of Research Project: Classifying Agricultural Land in an Urban to remotely sense agricultural lands and demonstrates how the results can be used for waterfowl conservation

  8. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Determining air permeability in reclaimed coastal land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract Coastal land reclamation is a common practice in many regions around Tidal fluctuations Á Type curves Á Water table variation Introduction Coastal land reclamation in these regions and countries are from the coastal land reclamation (Plant et al. 1998; Lee 2010). The reclaimed

  9. Analytical studies on transient groundwater flow induced by land reclamation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Analytical studies on transient groundwater flow induced by land reclamation Litang Hu,1 Jiu Jimmy materials into the sea. Land reclamation may have a significant effect on groundwater regimes, especially when the reclamation is at large scale. Analytical studies on the impact of land reclamation on steady

  10. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Determining air permeability in reclaimed coastal land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    / Published online: 24 September 2011 Ó Springer-Verlag 2011 Abstract Coastal land reclamation is a common land reclamation is a common practice in many regions and countries around the world, including Nether, airfield and urban expansion in these regions and countries are from the coastal land reclamation (Plant et

  11. Technical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy

    Technical Note/ Impact of Coastal Land Reclamation on Ground Water Level and the Sea Water Interface by Haipeng Guo1 and Jiu Jimmy Jiao2 Abstract Land reclamation in coastal areas may have water (Fetter 1972; Jiao and Tang 1999), but such an interaction may be modified by land reclamation

  12. Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingólfsson, Ólafur

    Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland OLE BENNIKE Bennike, O. 2002 (September): Late Quaternary history of Washington Land, North Greenland. Boreas, Vol. 31, 260­272. Oslo. ISSN 0300-9483. During the last glacial stage, Washington Land in western North Greenland was probably completely inun

  13. Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Measuring the poverty reduction potential of land in rural Mexico Frederico Finan, Elisabeth debate on the role of land as an instrument for poverty reduction, we analyze the conditions under which access to land reduces poverty in Mexican rural communities. Semi-parametric regression results show

  14. The Legal Environment for Hardwood Lands in California1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    and suburban expansion have served to focus new demands on hardwood lands. Concerns today focus upon (1, residential, and agricultural uses. The use of California's hardwood lands is evolving rapidly stocking or hardwood land use. This inventory of state and Federal statutes was then combined with profiles

  15. PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Habib, Ayman

    PETROLEUM LAND MANAGEMENT (PLMA) Bachelor of Commerce Degree The Haskayne School of Business offers a Bachelor of commerce degree with a concentration in Petroleum Land Management that prepares graduates average, and other documentation. Two third-year courses, PLMA 475 (Introduction to Petroleum Land

  16. Flood Assessment at the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site and the Proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit, DOE/Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmeltzer, J. S., Millier, J. J., Gustafson, D. L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A flood assessment at the Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) and the proposed Hazardous Waste Storage Unit (HWSU) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed to determine the 100-year flood hazard at these facilities. The study was conducted to determine whether the RWMS and HWSU are located within a 100-year flood hazard as defined by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, and to provide discharges for the design of flood protection.

  17. Moving towards pro-poor systems of land administration: Challenges for land and asset distribution in Africa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deininger, Klaus

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    resources to finance public services, discourage speculation, and generate incentives for effective land use (Bird and Slack

  18. Land surface cleanup of plutonium at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebeling, L.L.; Evans, R.B.; Walsh, E.J.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) covers approximately 3300 km{sup 2} of high desert and is located approximately 100 km northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada. Soil contaminated by plutonium exists on the NTS and surrounding areas from safety tests conducted in the 1950s and 1960s. About 150 curies of contamination have been measured over 1200 hectares of land surface. Most contamination is found in the top 5 cm of soil but may be found deep as 25 cm. The cost of conventional removal and disposal of the full soil volume has been estimated at over $500,000,000. This study is directed toward minimizing the volume of waste which must be further processed and disposed of by precisely controlling soil removal depth. The following soil removal machines were demonstrated at the NTS: (1) a CMI Corporation Model PR-500FL pavement profiler, (2) a CMI Corporation Model Tr-225B trimmer reclaimer, (3) a Caterpillar Model 623 elevating scraper equipped with laser depth control, (4) a Caterpillar Model 14G motor grader equipped with laser depth control, (5) a Caterpillar Model 637 auger scraper, and (6) a XCR Series Guzzler vacuum truck. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial neural networks 313 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 9(4), 313321 (2005) © EGU Simulation of flood flow in a river system using artificial Artificial neural networks (ANNs) provide a quick and flexible means of developing flood flow simulation

  20. Stable water isotope simulation by current land-surface schemes:Results of IPILPS phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson-Sellers, A.; Fischer, M.; Aleinov, I.; McGuffie, K.; Riley, W.J.; Schmidt, G.A.; Sturm, K.; Yoshimura, K.; Irannejad, P.

    2005-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase 1 of isotopes in the Project for Intercomparison of Land-surface Parameterization Schemes (iPILPS) compares the simulation of two stable water isotopologues ({sup 1}H{sub 2} {sup 18}O and {sup 1}H{sup 2}H{sup 16}O) at the land-atmosphere interface. The simulations are off-line, with forcing from an isotopically enabled regional model for three locations selected to offer contrasting climates and ecotypes: an evergreen tropical forest, a sclerophyll eucalypt forest and a mixed deciduous wood. Here we report on the experimental framework, the quality control undertaken on the simulation results and the method of intercomparisons employed. The small number of available isotopically-enabled land-surface schemes (ILSSs) limits the drawing of strong conclusions but, despite this, there is shown to be benefit in undertaking this type of isotopic intercomparison. Although validation of isotopic simulations at the land surface must await more, and much more complete, observational campaigns, we find that the empirically-based Craig-Gordon parameterization (of isotopic fractionation during evaporation) gives adequately realistic isotopic simulations when incorporated in a wide range of land-surface codes. By introducing two new tools for understanding isotopic variability from the land surface, the Isotope Transfer Function and the iPILPS plot, we show that different hydrological parameterizations cause very different isotopic responses. We show that ILSS-simulated isotopic equilibrium is independent of the total water and energy budget (with respect to both equilibration time and state), but interestingly the partitioning of available energy and water is a function of the models' complexity.

  1. Land Use Manager Application Ensures Protectiveness Following Remediation on the Oak Ridge Reservation - 13355

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garland, Sid; Brown, Sally; Sims, Lynn [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc., P.O. Box 4699, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Darby, Jason [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)] [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Management, Oak Ridge Site (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-term stewardship is the set of activities necessary to return contaminated land to safe and beneficial use. The activities include physical and legal controls to prevent inappropriate exposure to contamination left in place at a site. It is the longest phase of the Department of Energy's Environmental Management Program and ensures the protection of human health and the environment for varied end uses. At the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge Reservation an automated program has been developed and implemented that tracks the multitude of long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation is a large site that currently has over 50 actions requiring long-term stewardship activities. The Oak Ridge Reservation consists primarily of three plant sites, and long-term stewardship will enable these sites to be leased to private entities (East Tennessee Technology Park), modernized for an evolving national security mission (Y-12 National Security Complex), and revitalized to continue multi-disciplinary research (Oak Ridge National Laboratory). The varied site end uses of the individual plant sites coupled with the multitude of controls required by leaving waste in place presents challenges. A single remedial action may include surveillance and maintenance activities, media monitoring, property record notices as well as physical controls such as fences and signs. Thus, the array of long-term stewardship activities is complex and intermingled (over 200 inspections each year at various frequencies are required currently) and requires an effective tracking program, termed the Land Use Manager. The Land Use Manager is a web-based data management application for use by personnel responsible for implementing, maintaining, and verifying engineering and land use controls on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The program is a data entry and tracking tool, as well as a notification tool. The status and performance of engineering and land use controls are checked annually for evaluation in the required Remediation Effectiveness Report, and the automated Land Use Manager collects, maintains, tracks, notifies, monitors, and manages the information necessary to perform this evaluation. Land Use Manager tracks site information including type of contamination, regulatory requirements, locates land use controls; provides information on inspections, certification, and reporting; and provides reports. Most data access features, e.g., view, print, query, and download, are available to all users; however, data input, updating, and editing are restricted to the personnel directly responsible for monitoring and inspection. The Land Use Manager application was developed for the Department of Energy Oak Ridge Office by URS - CH2M Oak Ridge LLC, Restoration Services Incorporated, and MIJARA Corporation to meet the specific needs of long-term stewardship tracking on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The successful implementation of long-term stewardship enables the future government and private activities being planned on the Oak Ridge Reservation to proceed. (authors)

  2. Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of Land-use Changes on Biofuels ORNL History of Exploring Changes in Land Use in the United. Building from their work on environmental costs and benefits associated with biofuel production, ORNL positively impact the sustainability of the biofuels industry. Building understanding of land-use change from

  3. The mutagenic potential of soil and runoff water from land treatment of three hazardous industrial wastes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davol, Phebe

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (EPA, 1983). Land tr eatment may be a viable disposal alternative for many petroleum based hazardous wastes. This technology involves the controlled incorporation of wastes into the surface layer of soil resulting in degradation, immobilization... increased as the waste degraded, but began to decrease by the end of the study. Although the mechanism to explain this phenomena is unknown, it is possible that non-mutagenic compounds in the waste may have degraded into mutagenic compounds...

  4. Building boundary is necessary for the real estate industry, flood management, and homeland security applications.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Jie

    Abstract Building boundary is necessary for the real estate industry, flood management, and homeland security applications. The extraction of building boundary is also a crucial and difficult step, and Purdue University campus are evaluated. Introduction Airborne lidar (light detection and ranging

  5. The effect of surface and interfacial tensions upon the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero, Erasmo Trevino

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECT OF SURFACE AND INTERFACIAL TENSIONS UPON THE RECOVERY OF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Dissertation By ERASMO T . GUERRERO Approved as to style and content by: J t Q J w & U 7 T Chsfirman of Cfommittee f Head of Department TABLE....................................................................................................... .......... 25 Surface and Interfacial Tensions..........................................................26 Adsorption............................... .................. . ........................................ .......... 31 Flow Tests...

  6. Using Polymer to Maximize CO2 Flooding Performance in Light Oils 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Weirong

    2014-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    -permeability zones and natural fractures, the condition is even worse. Two methods related to polymers are studied to improve CO2 flooding performance. One is adding polymers to water to increase water viscosity during the water-alternating-gas (WAG) process, named...

  7. ERDC/EL TN-11-1 Flood Risk Management: Insights from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    ERDC/EL TN-11-1 March 2011 Flood Risk Management: Insights from an Expert Modeling Process by M. D preparedness planning that harmonizes efforts of implementing agencies and stakeholders. Risk management are essential for effective risk management policy. Formal (versus ad hoc) analyses of risk manager and stake

  8. Culvert Design for Flood Routing considering Sediment Transport W.J. Rahmeyer PhD.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmeyer, William J.

    Culvert Design for Flood Routing considering Sediment Transport W.J. Rahmeyer PhD.1 and W routing methodologies do not consider sediment bed-load transport through the culverts or pipelines of road crossings. Many practitioners either ignore the transport of sediment through a culvert or assume

  9. Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Calibration of a distributed flood forecasting model with input uncertainty using a Bayesian; revised 20 June 2012; accepted 28 June 2012; published 15 August 2012. [1] In the process of calibrating that the developed method generally is effective in calibrating GBHM parameters and in estimating their associated

  10. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas for electrical shock. NOTIFY University Police. What should I do if I smell natural or propane gas? LEAVE/Repair line, 7-6333, or CALL the Campus University Police or Security at (561) 297-3500 or 911

  11. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES ELECTRICAL OR PLUMBING FAILURE/FLOODING/WATER LEAK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES ELECTRICAL OR PLUMBING FAILURE/FLOODING/WATER LEAK NATURAL GAS - F 8a - 5p HBOI@FAU Security (772) 216-1124 Afterhours, Weekends or Holidays What should I do Police 911. · NOTIFY Building Safety personnel when possible. What should I do if I smell natural

  12. UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas or

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    UTILITIES PROBLEMS AND FAILURES Electrical or plumbing failure/Flooding/Water leak/Natural gas Physical Plant (772) 242-2246 M - F 8a - 5p (954) 762-5040 HBOI@FAU Security (772) 216-1124 Afterhours University Police. NOTIFY Building Safety personnel when possible. What should I do if I smell natural

  13. Peak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Received 6 May 2005 Availble online 7 February 2006 Abstract The failure of a lava dam 165,000 yr ago dam-failure and unsteady flow modeling to estimate a peak discharge and flow hydrograph. FailurePeak discharge of a Pleistocene lava-dam outburst flood in Grand Canyon, Arizona, USA Cassandra R

  14. Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    network by forcing users to take detours. In a risk preventive viewpoint, the network administrator has 1 Impact of relief accuracy on flood simulations and road network vulnerability analysis Jean in the water level and its consequences on the road network vulnerability. The first part focuses

  15. 7200 years of Rho^ne river flooding activity in Lake Le Bourget, France: a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    -level fluctuations. While the intensity of the MS signal might be widely affected by the human impact on soil conditions in the NW Alps. Key words: River discharge, floods, palaeohydrology, climate, human impact). In order to understand these natural oscillations and then to compare them to modern human-induced `global

  16. CO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    - The Westphalian deposit is constituted by numerous exploited coal seams of different thicknesses. These seamsCO2 gas production understanding above a partly flooded coal post-mining area Candice Lagnya, a former coal mining area. To understand the origin of this production, a borehole of 90 meters deep

  17. High-speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chao, Jonathan

    High-speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack Yoohwan Kim',Ju-Yeon Jo', H during the Distributed Denial-oJService (DDoS) attack. By allocating bandwidths separately for TCP.9% of the attack trafic while legitimate traflc showed nearly identical performance as in the non-attacked

  18. High-Speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merat, Francis L.

    1 High-Speed Router Filter for Blocking TCP Flooding under DDoS Attack Yoohwan Kim1 , Ju-Yeon Jo1 Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, NY 11201 ABSTRACT Protection from Distributed Denial-of-Service attacks has been of a great interest recently and substantial progress has been made for preventing some attack

  19. ach year across the US, mesoscale weather events--flash floods, tornadoes, hail,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plale, Beth

    E ach year across the US, mesoscale weather events--flash floods, tornadoes, hail, strong winds of mesoscale weather research; its disparate, high-volume data sets and streams; or the tremendous urgent need for a comprehensive national cyberinfrastructure in mesoscale meteorology--particularly one

  20. What You Should Do If Your Water Well Has Been Flooded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for at least 1 hour before the disinfection process. Household plumbing, including the water heater, alsoWhat You Should Do If Your Water Well Has Been Flooded Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist Diane E. Boellstorff, Program Specialist Water Quality Tony L. Provin

  1. Developing a GIS tool to assess potential damage of future floods J. Eleutrio1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    analysis, vulnerability assessment, natural hazard, decision support tool. 1 Introduction Flood risk brings and A. Rozan1 1 UMR Cemagref/ENGEES GESTE, Territorial Management of Water and Environment, France 2 UTR Urban Hydraulics - UMR CNRS/UdS/ ENGEES Mechanical Institute of Fluids and Solids, France Abstract

  2. Nutrient dynamics in marsh sediments contaminated by an oil spill following a flood 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Benjamin Cord

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research involves a study of the natural recovery of a brackish marsh impacted by an oil spill and fire in which the area was naturally enhanced with elevated nutrient levels. Flood waters during October, 1994, ruptured a group of pipelines...

  3. A Probabilistic Model of Flooding Loads on Transverse Watertight Bulkheads in the Event of Hull Damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhattacharya, Baidurya

    -board explosions, weapons effects, and ex- treme wave environments. Although the structural loading or reliability WTB loads. Poisson arrival is assumed for damage events, and the maximum life-time load effect (Chan et al 2002), the effect of water in a flooded compartment on motions (Yildiz 1983, Chan et al 2002

  4. Changes in Crested Wheatgrass Root Exudation Caused by Flood, Drought, and Nutrient Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doucette, William J.

    rather than stimulation of exudate production per gram of plant. Plant water status can alter exudation carbon (TOC) and organic acid content to compare treatment effects. Plants in the low K1 treatment exuded cumulative TOC exuded per gram dry plant by 71% (p 5 0.05). The flooded treatment increased TOC exuded per

  5. DEVELOPMENT OF REAL TIME FLOOD PREDICTION CAPABILITIES IN PUERTO RICO TO EVALUATE UNCERTAINTIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    DEVELOPMENT OF REAL TIME FLOOD PREDICTION CAPABILITIES IN PUERTO RICO TO EVALUATE UNCERTAINTIES of Electrical and Computer Engineering 1,2,3 University of Puerto Rico at Mayagüez Abstract Due to the complex terrain and the tropical influence, Puerto Rico is characterized by small watersheds, high rainfall

  6. Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Impact of Jitter-based Techniques on Flooding over Wireless Ad hoc Networks: Model and Analysis Philippe.Jacquet@inria.fr Emmanuel Baccelli INRIA, France Emmanuel.Baccelli@inria.fr Abstract--Jitter. This paper investigates on the impact of the standardized jitter mechanism on network-wide packet

  7. Ecosystem effects of environmental flows: modelling and experimental floods in a dryland river

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    physical system using: (1) a reservoir operations model to simulate reservoir releases and reservoir water experimental floods on the differential mortality of native and exotic riparian trees, on beaver dam integrity of model applications and experimental flow releases are contributing to adaptive flow management

  8. The Impact of Climate Change on Hurricane Flooding Inundation, Property Damages, and Population Affected

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frey, Ashley E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Bret Low Estimate 2030 ... 58 19 Flood Building Loss Estimation ................................................................. 61 xiii FIGURE...) studied historical shoreline changes in the Gulf of Mexico. In addition to sea level, hurricanes and other strong storms can also greatly affect the morphology of barrier islands. This has been a popular topic of research in the past few years...

  9. FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daripa, Prabir

    FLUID DYNAMICAL AND MODELING ISSUES OF CHEMICAL FLOODING FOR ENHANCED OIL RECOVERY Prabir Daripa developed flows in enhanced oil recovery (EOR). In a recent exhaustive study [Transport in Porous Media, 93 fluid flows that occur in porous media during tertiary dis- placement process of chemical enhanced oil

  10. Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    Coastal flood damage and adaptation costs under 21st century sea-level rise Jochen Hinkela,1st century sea-level rise are assessed on a global scale taking into account a wide range- ment and sea-level rise. Uncertainty in global mean and regional sea level was derived from four

  11. Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wetzel, Andreas

    Infilling and flooding of the Mekong River incised valley during deglacial sea-level rise Rik is related with the low shelf gradient and a strong acceleration of the East Asian sea-level rise from 34 depositional systems change into estuaries and eventually drown when sea-level rise overtakes the sediment

  12. Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohanty, Binayak P.

    Preferential transport of nitrate to a tile drain in an intermittent-flood-irrigated field: Model measured NO3 flux concentrations in a subsurface tile drain, several monitoring wells and nested reasonably well. However, NO3 flux concentrations in the subsurface tile drain and piezometers at the field

  13. COLORADO SCHOOL OF MINES RESEARCH INSTITUTE (CSMRI) SITE FLOOD PLAIN AREA CLEANUP FACT SHEET & PROJECT SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In 1992 a water main break at the Site flooded a tailings pond that overflowed into Clear Creek. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency excavated and stockpiled soil from the tailings pond and surrounding area at the west end of the former tailings pond area previously cleaned up by EPA was found to contain

  14. Multicriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments with complex terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Troch, Peter

    events. Using weather radar observations and a dense network of 40 tipping bucket rain gauges, this studyMulticriteria design of rain gauge networks for flash flood prediction in semiarid catchments. [1] Despite the availability of weather radar data at high spatial (1 km2 ) and temporal (5­15 min

  15. Environmental assessment of a proposed steam flood of the Shallow Oil Zone, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (Elk Hills), Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy proposes to develop a limited enhanced oil recovery project in the Shallow Oil Zone at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1) Elk Hills. The project would employ steam forced into the oil-bearing formation through injector wells, and would involve two phases. The initiation of the second phase would be dependent on the economic success of the first phase. The total project would require the drilling of 22 new wells in a 45-acre area supporting seven existing production wells. It would also require construction of various surface facilities including a tank setting (gas-oil separation system), steam generators, and a water treatment plant. Adverse environmental impacts associated with the proposed steam flood project would include the effects on vegetation, wildlife and land-use resulting from the total reconfiguration of the topography within the project bondaries. Other adverse impacts include the emission of oxides of nitrogen, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and particulates from steam generators, vehicles and associated surface facilities. Minor adverse impacts include localized noise and dust during constuction, and reduction of visual quality. 48 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  16. Autonomous land navigation in a structured environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klarer, P.R. (Sandia National Lab., Advanced Technology Div., Albuquerque, NM (US))

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a hardware and software system developed to perform autonomous navigation of a land vehicle in a structured environment. The vehicle used for development and testing of the system was the Jeep Cherokee Mobile Robotics Testbed Vehicle developed at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque. Since obstacle detection and avoidance have not yet been incorporated into the system, a structured environment is postulated that presumes the paths to be traversed are free of obstacles. The system performs path planning and execution based on maps constructed using the vehicle's on board navigation system and map-maker. The system software, hardware and performance data are discussed.

  17. how much land | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel's Homeguidance documentmuch land Home

  18. pv land use | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Home Rmckeel'slinkedpolicy Homepv land use Home

  19. AG Land 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00 U.S.ratios in CenozoicACALADAAG Land 2

  20. AG Land 4 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00 U.S.ratios in CenozoicACALADAAG Land 24

  1. AG Land 6 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind6:00-06:00 U.S.ratios in CenozoicACALADAAG Land 246

  2. Land-Use Change Data Analysis

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment ofLetter Report:40PM toLEDControl Concept |Energy MicroGrid |Land

  3. Ewing Land Development Services | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: Energy Resources(RECP)Coolers JumpOpenRoadEwing Land

  4. IDRISI Land Change Modeler | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEIHesperia,IDGWP Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search NameIDRISI Land

  5. Land O Lakes Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea PartsLLNLLaizhouLand O Lakes Inc Jump to:

  6. Land Use Assessment Toolkit | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |Jilin Zhongdiantou NewKorea PartsLLNLLaizhouLand O Lakes Inc

  7. Land Use Change in theLand Use Change in the United States:United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    . This would require a 10-fold increase in biomass supply, . . . how much land? Future Biofuel Production Flexibility Program for Bioenergy Producers Section 9011: Biomass Crop Assistance Program Section 9012: Forest of fuel a year; 30% would be about 95 billion gallons, which would require 1 billion tons of biomass

  8. Land Reclamation Program annual report, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Argonne Land Reclamation Program, sponsored by the United States Department of Energy's Assistant Secretary for Environment, is a joint effort of two Argonne divisions: Energy and Environmental Systems and Environmental Impact Studies. The program is carried out by a multidisciplinary team of scientists and engineers and has three primary objectives: (1) to develop energy-efficient and cost-effective mining and reclamation techniques; (2) to assist industry in evaluating the viability of environmental regulations and demonstrating techniques to meet these regulations; and (3) to supply data and evaluation techniques to decisionmakers concerned with trade-offs between energy development and environmental quality. Six integrated field research sites have been established to address problems associated with surface mining operations. This program relies heavily on input from industry and has developed working arrangements with coal companies at each of the current mining sites. A major area of interest is the development of a ten-year environmental mining and reclamation research plan for the Assistant Secretary for Environment. The Land Reclamation Program assigns the highest priority to the transfer to users of information generated by its research.

  9. all weather landing systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    likely that unambiguous habitable zone terrestrial planets of unknown water content will soon be discovered. Water content helps determine surface land fraction, which influences...

  10. Bureau of Land Management, Colorado collaborate to advance efficient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Colorado collaborate to advance efficient geothermal development Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Memorandum: Bureau of Land Management, Colorado...

  11. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Division of Forestry and Wildlife Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl St., Room 325 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

  12. Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented Commodity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Market-Oriented Commodity Development: Case studies from Ethiopia Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sustainable Land Management Through Market-Oriented...

  13. Reclamation of Land Used for Mineral Mining (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This legislation aims to provide for the rehabilitation and conservation of land affected by the mining of minerals through proper planning, proper use of appropriate methods of mining,...

  14. Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motivating GHG Emission Reduction Strategies Jump to: navigation, search Name Land Transport Sector in Bangladesh: An Analysis Toward Motivating GHG Emission Reduction...

  15. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ODonnell, Thomas Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

  16. Precision Measurement of Neutrino Oscillation Parameters with KamLAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Donnell, Thomas

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    default and new reactor-spectra calculations are given inusing the default reactor-spectrum calculation presented incores for reactor neutrino flux calculations for the KamLAND

  17. Land use regulation and intraregional population-employment interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, JH; Hewings, GJD

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Levine J (2006) Zoned out: Regulation, markets, and choicesprices, externalities, and regulation in U.S. metropolitanCT (2000) Land use regulation and new construction. Regional

  18. What's Happening in the Texas Farm and Ranch Land Market.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, F. B.; Wooten, A. B.

    1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the 1963 Texas land market activity is based on information JJ. obtained from 26 sample counties in 16 of the 17 type-of-farming area\\. In each sample county, specific data were obtained from warranty deed recortl\\ cri all bona fide sales containing 20... farm and ranch income has fluctuated. Results of the 196r land market study deviated from this pattern. Land prices continued to ~icr and volume of land sales increased, reversing its position from the trend of a constant decrease. Net farm and ranch...

  19. Omak Creek land acquisition Fact Sheet.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    factsheet factsheet Omak Creek acquisition to protect summer steelhead habitat The Bonneville Power Administration is proposing to fund the purchase of two adjacent land parcels to...

  20. Cougar Creek land acquisition Fact Sheet.indd

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of wildlife habitat along Cougar Creek The Bonneville Power Administration proposes to fund the acquisition of wildlife mitigation lands in the Cougar Creek watershed in Shoshone...

  1. automated cultivation land: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Websites Summary: . In the meanwhile, the USA funded the DARPA Autonomous Land Vehicle (ALV) project. Here, laser-based (ERIM full automation with the first DARPA Grand...

  2. Coordination of Federal Transmission Permitting on Federal Lands...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    transmission facilities on federal lands. In most instances, the Departments of Agriculture or Interior will be the Lead Agency, since they have jurisdiction over most of the...

  3. Iowa Land Recycling and Environmental Remediation Standards Act (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This chapter establishes remediation standards for land, other than standards for water quality, hazardous conditions, underground storage tanks, and groundwater protection, which are discussed in...

  4. Land Reclamation and the Resource Extraction Reclamation Act (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection's Mining Program is responsible for enacting and implementing regulations pertaining to land reclamation. The program primarily focuses on the reclamation...

  5. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources Commission on Water Resource Management Address: Kalanimoku Building 1151 Punchbowl Street Room 227 Place: Honolulu, Hawaii Zip:...

  6. Texas General Land Office Construction Certificate and Dune Protection...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Texas General Land Office Construction Certificate and Dune Protection Permit Requirements Checklist Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Permitting...

  7. Land Acquisition protects fish habitat in Wahkiakum County -...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (BPA) is proposing to fund the Columbia Land Trust (CLT) through its contract with the Lower Columbia River Estuary Partnership (LCREP) to acquire 305 acres of hillside forest,...

  8. Energy Corridors on Federal Lands | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Federal Lands in States Identified by EPAct 2005 (August 2011) Related Links West-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic EIS Information Center East-wide Energy Corridor Programmatic...

  9. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Wind Power Siting: Public Acceptance and Land Use Suzanne Tegen WINDExchange Webinar June 17, 2015 2 Overview * Current NREL Research *...

  10. Geothermal Direct-Use — Minimizing Land Use and Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With geothermal direct-use applications, land use issues usually only arise during exploration and development when geothermal reservoirs are located in or near urbanized areas, critical habitat...

  11. Moving Toward Exclusive Tribal Autonomy over Lands and Natural Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeds, Stacy L.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (implying that when land is held in fee by a non- Indian there is a presumption against tribal jurisdiction). 446 [Vol. 46 TOWARD TRIBAL AUTONOMY OF LANDS held in fee, even when the tribal government is the land owner. 56 Federal courts have determined... of Discovery in American Indian Law, 42 IDAHO L. REV. 1, 115 (2005). NATURAL RESOURCES JOURNAL government would take on a brief supervisory and protectorate role as trustee over the newly allotted lands. 4 After an adjustment period for the new individual...

  12. Development of a HEC-HMS model to inform river gauge placement for a flood early warning system in Uganda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaatz, Joel Alan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Communities in the downstream region of the Manafwa River Basin in eastern Uganda experience floods caused by heavy precipitation upstream. The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) has partnered with the Red Cross ...

  13. Risk prevention and policy formulation : responding to the 1999 mud-floods catastrophe in El Litoral Central, Venezuela

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parisca-Blanco, Sonia

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fifteen days of constant and intense rainfall in Venezuela culminated on December 16 1999, in catastrophic landslides and flooding along 25 miles of the Vargas State coastal strip. This catastrophe ravaged the Caracas ...

  14. ENHANCEMENT OF TERRESTRIAL CARBON SINKS THROUGH RECLAMATION OF ABANDONED MINE LANDS IN THE APPALACHIAN REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Kronrad

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S.D.I. Office of Surface Mining (OSM) estimates that there are approximately 1 million acres of abandoned mine land (AML) in the Appalachian region. AML lands are classified as areas that were inadequately reclaimed or were left unreclaimed prior to the passage of the 1977 Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act, and where no federal or state laws require any further reclamation responsibility to any company or individual. Reclamation and afforestation of these sites have the potential to provide landowners with cyclical timber revenues, generate environmental benefits to surrounding communities, and sequester carbon in the terrestrial ecosystem. Through a memorandum of understanding, the OSM and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) have decided to investigate reclaiming and afforesting these lands for the purpose of mitigating the negative effects of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This study determined the carbon sequestration potential of northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.), one of the major reclamation as well as commercial species, planted on West Virginia AML sites. Analyses were conducted to (1) calculate the total number of tons that can be stored, (2) determine the cost per ton to store carbon, and (3) calculate the profitability of managing these forests for timber production alone and for timber production and carbon storage together. The Forest Management Optimizer (FORMOP) was used to simulate growth data on diameter, height, and volume for northern red oak. Variables used in this study included site indices ranging from 40 to 80 (base age 50), thinning frequencies of 0, 1, and 2, thinning percentages of 20, 25, 30, 35, and 40, and a maximum rotation length of 100 years. Real alternative rates of return (ARR) ranging from 0.5% to 12.5% were chosen for the economic analyses. A total of 769,248 thinning and harvesting combinations, net present worths, and soil expectation values were calculated in this study. Results indicate that the cost per ton to sequester carbon ranges from $6.54 on site index 80 land at a 12.5% ARR to $36.68 on site index 40 land at an ARR of 0.5%. Results also indicate that the amount of carbon stored during one rotation ranges between 38 tons per acre on site index 40 land to 58 tons per acre on site index 80 land. The profitability of afforestation on these AML sites in West Virginia increases as the market price for carbon increases from $0 to $100 per ton.

  15. Simulation Study to Investigate the Effect of Natural Fractures on the Performance of Surfactant-Polymer Flood in Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sayedakram, Nawaf Ibrahim A

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    (Salehi 5 - 1? BN (>5) is -current of , 1999). -surfactant , 2009). 6 2. RESEARCH OBJECTIVES The main objective of this research is to study the effect of natural fractures on surfactant polymer flood (SPF... SIMULATION STUDY TO INVESTIGATE THE EFFECT OF NATURAL FRACTURES ON THE PERFORMANCE OF SURFACTANT-POLYMER FLOOD IN CARBONATE RESERVOIRS A Thesis by NAWAF IBRAHIM A. SAYEDAKRAM Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  16. Charge Retention by Gold Clusters on Surfaces Prepared Using Soft Landing of Mass Selected Ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Priest, Thomas A.; Laskin, Julia

    2012-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Monodisperse gold clusters have been prepared on surfaces in different charge states through soft landing of mass-selected ions. Ligand-stabilized gold clusters were prepared in methanol solution by reduction of chloro(triphenylphosphine)gold(I) with borane tert-butylamine complex in the presence of 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane. Electrospray ionization was used to introduce the clusters into the gas-phase and mass-selection was employed to isolate a single ionic cluster species (Au11L53+, L = 1,3-bis(diphenylphosphino)propane) which was delivered to surfaces at well controlled kinetic energies. Using in-situ time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) it is demonstrated that the Au11L53+ cluster retains its 3+ charge state when soft landed onto the surface of a 1H,1H,2H,2H-

  17. DEVELOPMENT OF MORE-EFFICIENT GAS FLOODING APPLICABLE TO SHALLOW RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William R. Rossen; Russell T. Johns; Gary A. Pope

    2003-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this research is to widen the applicability of gas flooding to shallow oil reservoirs by reducing the pressure required for miscibility using gas enrichment and increasing sweep efficiency with foam. Task 1 examines the potential for improved oil recovery with enriched gases. Subtask 1.1 examines the effect of dispersion processes on oil recovery and the extent of enrichment needed in the presence of dispersion. Subtask 1.2 develops a fast, efficient method to predict the extent of enrichment needed for crude oils at a given pressure. Task 2 develops improved foam processes to increase sweep efficiency in gas flooding. Subtask 2.1 comprises mechanistic experimental studies of foams with N2 gas. Subtask 2.2 conducts experiments with CO{sub 2} foam. Subtask 2.3 develops and applies a simulator for foam processes in field application.

  18. Dambreak flood analyses and emergency action plan: West branch and main stem of the Penobscot River

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingert, R. [Northrop, Devine, & Tarbell, Inc., Portland, ME (United States); Paul, W. [Great Northern Paper Co., Millinocket, ME (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1994, Great Northern Paper (GNP) updated the Emergency Action Plan (EAP) for their hydro system on the Penobscot River in northern Maine. The EAP update incorporated results of dam failure analyses conducted to determine the extent of flooding resulting from the postulated failure of GNP dams under Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) conditions with the implementation of current operation and emergency response procedures. GNP hydro operators, in consultation with public safety agencies, reorganized and modified the EAP to make it easier to use by the actual planholders, thus improving its overall effectiveness. A key for the effectiveness of the EAP update was the development of new notification maps using the ARC/INFO Geographic Information System (GIS).

  19. Surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. Annual report, 1992--1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasan, D.T.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, the authors present the results of experimental and theoretical studies in surfactant-enhanced alkaline flooding for light oil recovery. The overall objective of this work is to develop a very cost-effective method for formulating a successful surfactant-enhanced alkaline flood by appropriately choosing mixed alkalis which form inexpensive buffers to obtain the desired pH (between 8.5 and 12.0) for ultimate spontaneous emulsification and ultralow interfacial tension. In addition, the authors have (1) developed a theoretical interfacial activity model for determining equilibrium interfacial tension, (2) investigated the mechanisms for spontaneous emulsification, (3) developed a technique to monitor low water content in oil, and (4) developed a technique to study water-in-oil emulsion film properties.

  20. Analysis of core-concrete interaction event with flooding for the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.H.; Taleyarkhan, R.P.; Georgevich, V.; Navarro-Valenti, S.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses salient aspects of the methodology, assumptions, and modeling of various features related to estimation of source terms from an accident involving a molten core-concrete interaction event (with and without flooding) in the Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Various containment configurations are considered for this postulated severe accident. Several design features (such as rupture disks) are examined to study containment response during this severe accident. Also, thermal-hydraulic response of the containment and radionuclide transport and retention in the containment are studied. The results are described as transient variations of source terms, which are then used for studying off-site radiological consequences and health effects for the support of the Conceptual Safety Analysis Report for ANS. The results are also to be used to examine the effectiveness of subpile room flooding during this type of severe accident.

  1. Impact of Aluminum on Anticipated Corrosion in a Flooded SNF Multi Canister Overpack (MCO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DUNCAN, D.R.

    1999-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Corrosion reactions in a flooded MCO are examined to determine the impact of aluminum corrosion products (from aluminum basket grids and spacers) on bound water estimates and subsequent fuel/environment reactions during storage. The mass and impact of corrosion products were determined to be insignificant, validating the choice of aluminum as an MCO component and confirming expectations that no changes to the Technical Databook or particulate mass or water content are necessary.

  2. The investigation of the effects of wettability on residual oil after water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burja, Edward Oscar

    1953-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flooding, " Producers Monthly, (1951), 15-16, 15. 6. Schilthuis, Ralph J. : "Connate Water in Oil and Gas Sands, " Trans. AIME. , (1938), 127, 199-214. 7. Bartell, F. E. : "Function of Water in the Production of Oil from Reservoirs?" Report, API...: PETROLEUM ENGINEERING 1953 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1. Summary . 2. Introduction 3. Review of Literature . 4. Description of Materials 16 Cores 16 Oil, Gas and Brine 18 Surface Active Chemicals 19 Crystals 22 5. Description of Procedure...

  3. The development of a flood routing model for the flow analyses of mine tailings materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rokohl, Don Richard

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE DEVELOPMENT OF A FLOOD ROUTING MODEL FOR THE FLOW ANALYSES OF MINE TAILINGS MATERIALS A Thesis DON RICHARD ROKOHL Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1984 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF A PLOOD ROUTING MODEL POR THE FLOW ANALTSES OF MINE TAILINGS MATERIALS A Thesis by DON RICHARD ROKOHL Approved as to style and content by: Harry M. Coyle (Co...

  4. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. On September 27, 2002 the US DOE approved the proposed modified plan to flood a 10+-acre pattern. MV Energy has received informal notification that GE Capital will approve sale of the portion of the Colliver lease involved in the pilot. Murfin Drilling Company is seeking local small independent partners for the pilot and has received commitment from White Eagle Energy and John O. Farmer Oil Company to date. A Contract was signed between the Kansas Department of Commerce & Housing and Murfin formalizing the KSDOC&H contribution of $88,000 to the pilot project. This money will be used for well rework and testing. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. Proposed modifications to the project plan were reviewed in the previous quarterly technical progress report.

  5. Trace Metal Retention in the Incorporation Zone of Land-Applied

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    , with agricultural, forest, and range lands as well as land reclamation sites increasingly used for land applicationTrace Metal Retention in the Incorporation Zone of Land-Applied Sludge T A M M O S . S T E E N H U, Ithaca, New York 14853 Recycling nutrients in wastewater sludge (biosolids) via land application

  6. Global Soil Change: Land Use, Soil and Water SWS4231C, SWS5234

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Lena

    of the soil system to withstand global-scale perturbations (e.g., climate or land use change, spread Properties 4. Land Use Change Impacts on Soils 5. Land Use and Agriculture (Irrigation and Fertilization In Soil) 6. Land Use and Soil Erosion 7. Climate Change Impacts on Soils 8. Land Use-Climate

  7. Sarah Privoznik Photo by Phil Bush

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, sudden changes in temperature and salinity due to flood control and nuclear power plants can to threats brought on by coastal development, land-based sources of pollution, and damage by boats. In South

  8. Draft 2-5-06 appendix B: Land Leases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    background Draft 2-5-06 appendix B: Land Leases appendices tract / Parcel / Buildings acres Wilson (Grizzly Peak Substation) 0.50 The Berkeley Lab main site is a 202 acre parcel of land owned and managed Figure F.1 3 Photo the new Molecular Foundry building earned the u.s. green building council's "silver

  9. Land Use and natUraL resoUrces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Land Use and natUraL resoUrces summer 2012 Including: Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies Overview of Environmental Statistics Green Building Design Studio CONTINuING AND PrOFessIONAL eDuCATION #12Ndar........................................................................................................................4 laNd USe plaNNiNg Climate Change and Local Planning Strategies

  10. MSU Departmental Assessment Plan Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU Departmental Assessment Plan 2009-2010 Department: Land Resources and Environmental Sciences: Ecology and Environmental Sciences (cross-college) #12;Student Outcomes Assessment Plan Land Resources Department Head: Tracy M. Sterling Assessment Coordinator: Cathy Zabinski Degrees/Majors/Options Offered

  11. Geospatial Analysis of Renewable Energy Technical Potential on Tribal Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doris, E.; Lopez, A.; Beckley, D.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical report uses an established geospatial methodology to estimate the technical potential for renewable energy on tribal lands for the purpose of allowing Tribes to prioritize the development of renewable energy resources either for community scale on-tribal land use or for revenue generating electricity sales.

  12. Important land tenure influences on soil conservation in the southwest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern, John Hoyle

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for landoening bas bosn eoononio returns through inoacs from orops, or froc sale of lend 'Land hunger" as esproseed by en attitude of olinging to the seourity of land through all phases of a Oyelis esmany ie nst generally Oiaraeteriotie Of 1andhslding...

  13. ITAM SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ITAM SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS CEMML | 1490 Campus Delivery://www.cemml.colostate.edu The Integrated Training Area Management (ITAM) Program maintains training lands so that they meet Army doctrinal with conservation of the soils, water, flora, and fauna on military installations. The ITAM Program comprises four

  14. Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center: Long, D. G., M. R. Drinkwater, B. Holt, S. Saatchi, and C. Bertoia, Global ice and land climate studies

  15. CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marco, Shmuel "Shmulik"

    CHARACTERIZATION OF LAND DEGRADATION PROCESSES USING AIRBORNE LASER SCANNING Sagi Filin1 , Amit@tau.ac.il Commission VIII/8 KEY WORDS: Airborne laser scanning, Geomorphology, Dead Sea, Land Degradation, Sinkholes of collapse sinkholes in high resolution using airborne laser scanning technology. As a study case, we use

  16. In this issue: New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    In this issue: · New Tax Incentives for Land in Conservation · Florida's Outstanding Tree Farmers Quantifies Economic Impact of Private, Working Forests · New Longleaf Book for Landowners and Foresters · Get Landowners and Resource Professionals Volume 16, No. 4 Spring 2010 New Tax Incentives for Land

  17. Assessment of Biomass Resources from Marginal Lands in APEC Economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milbrandt, A.; Overend, R. P.

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this study is to examine the marginal lands in Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) economies and evaluate their biomass productivity potential. Twelve categories of marginal lands are identified using the Global Agro-Ecological Zones system of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization.

  18. Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae State of Hawaii

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared for the U.S. Department agency thereof. #12;Analysis of Land Suitable for Algae Production State of Hawaii Prepared by Mele University of Hawaii at Manoa August 2011 #12;i Executive Summary Algae are considered to be a viable crop

  19. The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use Suhail Ahmad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad B.E., Avionics Engineering National, Technology and Policy Program #12;#12;3 The Impact of Biofuel Mandates on Land Use by Suhail Ahmad Submitted of Master of Science in Technology and Policy ABSTRACT The use of biofuels in domestic transportation sector

  20. FLORISTICS LABORATORY CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . A baseline floristic survey is an essential element for management of military lands. This information, and supports adequate training sites. The Center conducts comprehensive planning level surveys to document conservation measures. In addition invasive plants are documented to aid in land management decisions. Surveys

  1. Symposium Essay: The Energy-Land Use Nexus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Outka, Uma

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of U.S. energy policy tilts away from fossil fuels. The Essay argues that the energy-land use nexus provides a useful frame for approaching policy to minimize points of conflict between energy goals on the one hand and land conservation on the other....

  2. Land Cover, Land Use of twoLand Cover, Land Use of two bioluminescent bays in Puerto Ricobioluminescent bays in Puerto Ricobioluminescent bays in Puerto Ricobioluminescent bays in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    Bay inin ViequesVieques andandLandLand aroundaround PuertoPuerto MosquitoMosquito BayBay inin ViequesVieques andand LaLa PargueraParguera BioluminescenceBioluminescence BayBay inin Lajas,Lajas, PuertoPuerto RicoBioluminescent BayBay hashas shownshown aa decreasedecrease inin itsits bioluminescencebioluminescence byby

  3. Probability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dai, Aiguo

    . Jones, A. Dai, S. Biner, D. Caya, and K. Winger (2010), Probability distributions of land surface wind distribution used for estimation of wind climate and annual winProbability distributions of land surface wind speeds over North America Yanping He,1 Adam Hugh

  4. POLLUTION AND LAND USE: OPTIMUM AND DECENTRALIZATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hochman, Oded; Rausser, Gordon C.; Arnott, Richard J

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The case of internalizing pollution externalities, Journaltension between industrial pollution and households has beenas a means of controlling pollution. Separating polluter and

  5. CLIMATE, CYCLONES, AND LARGE FLOODS IN THE ASIA-AUSTRALIA MONSOON National University of Singapore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the effects of Global Warming. Biosketch - Professor Robert Wasson Trained as a geomorphologist with early degradation of Australia's arid lands, and trying to separate natural change from human impact. This interest

  6. Mapping the Potential for Biofuel Production on Marginal Lands: Differences in Definitions, Data and Models across Scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Sarah M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    D. Land availability for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.of land available for biofuel production. Environ. Sci.so marginal land for biofuel crops is limited. Energy Policy

  7. FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE MISCIBLE FLOODING IN THE LANSING-KANSAS CITY FORMATION, CENTRAL KANSAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alan Byrnes; G. Paul Willhite; Don Green; Martin Dubois; Richard Pancake; Timothy Carr; W. Lynn Watney; John Doveton; Willard Guy; Rodney Reynolds; Rajesh Kunjithaya; Dave Murfin; James Daniels; Niall Avison; Russell Martin; William Flanders; Dave Vander Griend; Eric Mork; Paul Cantrell

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is reported for the period from July 1, 2002 to September 30, 2002. Assessment of the demonstration site has defined many aspects of the reservoir. Technical design and budget for a larger (60-acre, 24.3 ha) CO2 demonstration project are being reviewed by the US DOE for approval. Further analysis of the pilot site by the partners has indicated that a staged demonstration is considered optimal. A phased approach to implementation of the demonstration is proposed to reduce the risk of uncertainties as to whether the reservoir has basic properties (connectivity and ability to pressure-up) conducive to a meaningful CO2 flood demonstration. The proposed plan is to flood a 10+-acre pattern. The results of this small flood will be used to evaluate the viability of performing a larger-scale ({approx}60-acre) demonstration and will be used by the partners to decide their role in a larger-scale demonstration. The 10+-acre pattern requires the least up-front expense to all parties to obtain the data required to accurately assess the viability and economics of CO2 flooding in the L-KC and of a larger-scale demonstration. In general, the following significant modifications to the original Statement of Work are proposed: (1) The proposed plan would extend the period of Budget Period 1 to May 7, 2003. (2) Redefine the period of Budget Period 2 from 3/7/01-3/7/05 to 5/7/03-3/7/08. (3) Redefine the period of Budget Period 3 from 3/7/05-3/7/06 to 3/7/08-3/7/09. (4) To allow initial verification of the viability of the process before proceeding into the flood demonstration, move activities involved with preparing wells in the flood pattern (Task 5.1), repressurizing the pattern (Task 5.2), and constructing surface facilities (Task 5.3) from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1. (5) Allow US Energy Partners (USEP) to be a supplier of carbon dioxide from the ethanol plant in Russell, Kansas. (6) Change the pilot flood pattern, including the number and location of wells involved in the pilot. (7) Expenses are shifted from Budget Period 2 to Budget Period 1 to cover costs of additional reservoir characterization. All modified activities and tasks would maintain the existing required industry match of 55% in Budget Period 1, 65% in Budget Period 2, and 90% in Budget Period 3. Carbon dioxide supplied by the USEP ethanol facility would be valued such that the total cost of CO2 delivered to the demonstration site injection wellhead would not exceed the $3.00/MCF cost of supplying CO2 from Guymon, OK. Total cost of the modified project is $4,415,300 compared with $5,388,064 in the original project. The modified project would require no additional funding from US DOE.

  8. Idaho National Laboratory Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    No name listed on publication

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land and facility use planning and decisions at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site are guided by a comprehensive site planning process in accordance with Department of Energy Policy 430.1, 'Land and Facility Use Policy,' that integrates mission, economic, ecologic, social, and cultural factors. The INL Ten-Year Site Plan, prepared in accordance with Department of Energy Order 430.1B, 'Real Property Asset Management,' outlines the vision and strategy to transform INL to deliver world-leading capabilities that will enable the Department of Energy to accomplish its mission. Land use planning is the overarching function within real property asset management that integrates the other functions of acquisition, recapitalization, maintenance, disposition, real property utilization, and long-term stewardship into a coordinated effort to ensure current and future mission needs are met. All land and facility use projects planned at the INL Site are considered through a formal planning process that supports the Ten-Year Site Plan. This Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report describes that process. The land use planning process identifies the current condition of existing land and facility assets and the scope of constraints across INL and in the surrounding region. Current land use conditions are included in the Comprehensive Land Use and Environmental Stewardship Report and facility assets and scope of constraints are discussed in the Ten-Year Site Plan. This report also presents the past, present, and future uses of land at the INL Site that are considered during the planning process, as well as outlining the future of the INL Site for the 10, 30, and 100-year timeframes.

  9. The effect of dust blowback on spatial orientation estimation during lunar landing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tritchler, Stephanie E. (Stephanie Elaine)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landing is a dangerous and complex phase of any flight. Landing on an airless, dusty world presents unique challenges to perception, including dust blowback. During crewed lunar landings, astronauts will either be directly ...

  10. Using land value capture to fund rail transit extensions in Mexico City and Santiago de Chile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covarrubias, Alvaro, 1973-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of rail rapid transit on land uses and land values are discussed. Rail transit can enhance accessibility, and can raise the demand for locating in areas around stations, increasing land value, and in some cases ...

  11. Redefining the typology of land use in the age of big data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Liqun, M.C.P. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use classification is important as a standard for land use description and management. However, current land use classification systems are problematic. Labels such as "residential use" and "commercial use" do not ...

  12. Essays on the Impact of Development on Agricultural Land Amenities and Values in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machingambi, Memory

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Market land prices ignore the non-market value of ecosystem goods and services; hence, too much agricultural land may be developed. Correct land valuation must include these non-market values. Values of ecosystem services provided by the Richland...

  13. IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION;! i! IMPACTS OF LAND COVER CHANGE: ENERGY REGULATION, BREADBASKET PRODUCTION, AND PRECIPITATION Justin of scales through biophysical exchanges of water and energy, this widespread conversion of land cover has

  14. Wealth Inequality in the “Land of the Fee”: A Conversation with Devin Fergus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Carolina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Center. Wealth Inequality in the “Land of the Fee”Wealth Inequality in the “Land of the Fee”: A Conversationand Osoro 2013). Wealth Inequality in the “Land of the Fee”

  15. Oklahoma City Flash Flood Event, 31 May -1 June 2013 Annual Exceedance Probabilities (AEPs) for Worst Case 4-hour and 6-hour Rainfall

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oklahoma City Flash Flood Event, 31 May - 1 June 2013 Annual Exceedance Probabilities (AEPs HOLDENVILLEHOLDENVILLE MIDWEST CITYMIDWEST CITY OKLAHOMA CITYOKLAHOMA CITY Hydrometeorological Design Studies Center

  16. Watershed response and land energy feedbacks under climate change depend upon groundwater.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, R M; Kollet, S J

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Human induced climate change will have a significant impact on the hydrologic cycle, creating changes in fresh water resources, land cover, and feedbacks that are difficult to characterize, which makes it an issue of global importance. Previous studies have not included subsurface storage in climate change simulations and feedbacks. A variably-saturated groundwater flow model with integrated overland flow and land surface model processes is used to examine the interplay between coupled water and energy processes under climate change conditions. A case study from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) USA, an important agricultural region that is susceptible to drought, is used as the basis for three scenarios simulations using a modified atmospheric forcing dataset to reflect predicted effects due to human-induced climate change. These scenarios include an increase in the atmospheric temperature and variations in rainfall amount and are compared to the present-day climate case. Changes in shallow soil saturation and groundwater levels are quantified as well as the corresponding energy fluxes at the land surface. Here we show that groundwater and subsurface lateral flow processes are critical in understanding hydrologic response and energy feedbacks to climate change and that certain regions are more susceptible to changes in temperature, while others to changes in precipitation. This groundwater control is critical for understanding recharge and drought processes, possible under future climate conditions.

  17. Land and Resource Management Issues Relevant to Deploying In-Situ Thermal Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Robert; Ruple, John; Tanana, Heather; Kline, Michelle

    2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Utah is home to oil shale resources containing roughly 1.3 trillion barrels of oil equivalent and our nation’s richest oil sands resources. If economically feasible and environmentally responsible means of tapping these resources can be developed, these resources could provide a safe and stable domestic energy source for decades to come. In Utah, oil shale and oil sands resources underlay a patchwork of federal, state, private, and tribal lands that are subject to different regulatory schemes and conflicting management objectives. Evaluating the development potential of Utah’s oil shale and oil sands resources requires an understanding of jurisdictional issues and the challenges they present to deployment and efficient utilization of emerging technologies. The jurisdictional patchwork and divergent management requirements inhibit efficient, economic, and environmentally sustainable development. This report examines these barriers to resource development, methods of obtaining access to landlocked resources, and options for consolidating resource ownership. This report also examines recent legislative efforts to wrest control of western public lands from the federal government. If successful, these efforts could dramatically reshape resource control and access, though these efforts appear to fall far short of their stated goals. The unintended consequences of adversarial approaches to obtaining resource access may outweigh their benefits, hardening positions and increasing tensions to the detriment of overall coordination between resource managers. Federal land exchanges represent a more efficient and mutually beneficial means of consolidating management control and improving management efficiency. Independent of exchange proposals, resource managers must improve coordination, moving beyond mere consultation with neighboring landowners and sister agencies to coordinating actions with them.

  18. FINAL REPORT: An Integrated Inter-temporal Analysis of Land Use Change in Forestry and Agriculture: An Assessment of the Influence of Technological Change on Carbon Sequestration and Land Use.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Sohngen

    2008-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project built a global land use model to examine the implications of land based carbon sequestration on land uses. The model also can be used to assess the costs of different land-based actions to reduce carbon emissions.

  19. Amp-hour counting control for PV hybrid power systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, T.D. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Thompson, B. [Biri Systems, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of an amp-hour (Ah) counting battery charge control algorithm has been defined and tested using the Digital Solar Technologies MPR-9400 microprocessor based PV hybrid charge controller. This work included extensive field testing of the charge algorithm on flooded lead-antimony and valve regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. The test results after one-year have demonstrated that PV charge utilization, battery charge control, and battery state of charge (SOC) has been significantly improved by providing maximum charge to the batteries while limiting battery overcharge to manufacturers specifications during variable solar resource and load periods.

  20. EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    EPA RE-Powering America's Lands: Kansas City Municipal Farm Site -- Biomass Power Analysis Re-direct Destination: Through the RE-Powering America's Land initiative, the economic...

  1. Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB: Hydrogen Fuel Cell & Infrastructure Technologies Program, Fuel Cell Bus Demonstration Project (Fact Sheet) Fuel Cell Hybrid Bus Lands at Hickam AFB:...

  2. Production of Wind or Solar Energy on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations govern the implementation and development of wind and solar resources on lands under the jurisdiction of the Board of Educational Lands and Funds

  3. Exploration and Development of Oil and Gas on School and Public Lands (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute authorizes the Board of School Lands and Funds to lease school and public lands under its jurisdiction for oil and gas exploration and development purposes.

  4. Coupling GIS and LCA for biodiversity assessments of land use: Part 1: Inventory modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geyer, Roland; Stoms, David M.; Lindner, Jan P.; Davis, Frank W.; Wittstock, Bastian

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of land use Part 1: Inventory modeling Roland Geyer & Davidthe use of GIS-based inventory modeling to generatedemonstrated that GIS-based inventory modeling of land use

  5. anthropogenic land-use change: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    David M. 35 Quantifying the impact of future land-use changes against increases in GHG concentrations Physics Websites Summary: Quantifying the impact of future land-use...

  6. Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Heimiller, D.; Dahle, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Brady-Sabeff, L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the potential for using 'Limbo Lands' (underused, formerly contaminated sites, landfills, brownfields, abandoned mine lands, etc. ) as sites for renewable energy generating stations.

  7. agro-ecological land resources: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods as applied to land resource management issues. GOOD TO KNOW Ma, Lena 15 CULTURAL RESOURCES SERVICES CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY LANDS Environmental...

  8. Regulations for Land Disturbing Activities (North Carolina)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The law requires installation and maintenance of sufficient erosion control practices to retain sediment within the boundaries of the site. It also requires that surfaces be non-erosive and stable...

  9. An investigation of the rolling characteristics of two general aviation airplanes for the landing approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chevalier, Howard Louis

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . S. , ARM College of Texas Directed By: Dr. Hilliam P. Jones This report presents the results of a flight test investiga- tion to determine the rolling characteristics of two general avia- tion airplanes: a DeHavilland Beaver DHC-2 and a... APPENDIX 28 30 31 35 38 39 40 43 VITA 46 LIST OF TABLES ~Pa e Table 1. Summary of Test Conditions A. Beechcraft T ? 34B (Landing Gear Down) 9 B. DeHavilland Beaver DHC-2 Table 2. Roll Control Power Requirements Table 3. Comparison...

  10. Demonstrating a Market-Based Approach to the Reclamation of Mined Lands in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goodrich-Mahoney, John; Donnelly, Ellen

    2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project demonstrated that developing environmental credits on private land—including abandoned mined lands—is dependent on a number of factors, some of them beyond the control of the project team. In this project, acid mine drainage (AMD) was successfully remediated through the construction of a passive AMD treatment system. Extensive water quality sampling both before and after the installation of the passive AMD treatment system showed that the system achieved removal efficiencies and pollutant loading reductions for acidity, iron, aluminum and manganese that were consistent with systems of similar size and design. The success of the passive AMD treatment system should have resulted in water credits if the project had not been terminated. Developing carbon sequestration credits, however, was much more complex and was not achieved in this project. The primary challenge that the project team encountered in meeting the full project objectives was the unsuccessful attempt to have the landowner sign a conservation easement for his property. This would have allowed the project team to clear and reforest the site, monitor the progress of the newly planted trees, and eventually realize carbon sequestration credits once the forest was mature. The delays caused by the lack of a conservation easement, as well as other factors, eventually resulted in the reforestation portion of the project being cancelled. The information in this report will help the public make more informed decisions regarding the potential of using water and carbon, and other credits to support the remediation of minded lands through out the United States. The hope is that by using credits that more mined lands with be remediated.

  11. A land based radar polarimeter processing system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kronke, Chester William

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assignments 4 Indicator Circuit Read Port Assignments. 5 Interpretation of Indicator Circuit Data . 6 RF Head Common Control Port Signal Assignments . 7 iSBC-80/24 Parallel I/O Summary. 8 iSBX-311 Analog Input Signal Assignments 9 Memory Map... Polarimeter Antennas 2 Azimuthal Angle of Radar Polarimeter Boom. 3 Block Diagram of the Radar Polarimeter System. 4 Block Diagram of Radar Hardware. 10 5 Microwave Transceiver Circuit Transfer Switches Controlled by RDADS. 12 6 Block Diagram...

  12. Vectorizing the Community Land Model (CLM)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Forrest M [ORNL; Vertenstein, Mariana [National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR); Kitabata, Hideyuki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Japan; White III, James B [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we describe our extensive efforts to rewrite the Community Land Model (CLM) so that it provides good vector performance on the Earth Simulator in Japan and the Cray X1 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. We present the technical details of the old and new internal data structures, the required code reorganization, and the resulting performance improvements. We describe and compare the performance and scaling of the final CLM Version 3.0 (CLM3.0) on the IBM Power4, the Earth Simulator, and the Cray X1. At 64 processors, the performance of the model is similar on the IBM Power4, the Earth Simulator, and the Cray X1. However, the Cray X1 offers the best performance of all three platforms tested from 4 to 64 processors when OpenMP is used. Moreover, at low processor counts (16 or fewer), the model performs significantly better on the Cray X1 than on the other platforms. The vectorized version of CLM was publicly released by the National Center for Atmospheric Research as the standalone CLM3.0, as a part of the new Community Atmosphere Model Version 3.0 (CAM3.0), and as a component of the Community Climate System Model Version 3.0 (CCSM3.0) on June 23, 2004.

  13. CARBON SEQUESTRATION ON SURFACE MINE LANDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald H. Graves; Christopher Barton; Richard Sweigard; Richard Warner

    2003-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2002-2003 Department of Energy plantings amounted to 164 acres containing 111,520 tree seedlings in eastern and western Kentucky. Data gathered on these trees included an inventory to determine survival of all planted species. A sub-sample of seedlings was selected to assess the height and diameter of individual species of seedlings established. Additional efforts involved collection of soil sample and litter samples, analysis of herbaceous ground cover from vegetation clip plots and leaf area on each tree species, and development of tissue collections. All areas were sampled for penetration resistance, penetration depth (or depth to refusal), and bulk density at various depths. Rain fall events and flow rates were recorded. The water quality of runoff samples involved the determination of total and settleable solids and particle size distribution. A study was initiated that will focus on the colonization of small mammals from forest edges to various areas located on reclaimed surface mines. This effort will provide a better understanding of the role small mammals and birds have in the establishment of plant communities on mine lands that will be useful in developing and improving reclamation techniques.

  14. Land reform, regional planning and socioeconomic development in Brazil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Souza, Saulo

    2011-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

    baseline study of PCT settings 96 4.1 Introduction 96 4.2 Access to land under the Land Bill Programme 99 4.3 Agriculture and livestock production on PCT settlements 111 4.4 The standard of living of PCT beneficiaries 119 4.5 The surveyed sites vis... of governance for plan-led land reform 145 Figure 5.3: An illustrative diagram for the regional planning cycle 180 10 ABBREVIATIONS CONTAG National Confederation of Agricultural Workers FUNDEB Basic Education Fund HDI...

  15. Oil Recovery Increases by Low-Salinity Flooding: Minnelusa and Green River Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric P. Robertson

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waterflooding is by far the most widely used method in the world to increase oil recovery. Historically, little consideration has been given in reservoir engineering practice to the effect of injection brine composition on waterflood displacement efficiency or to the possibility of increased oil recovery through manipulation of the composition of the injected water. However, recent work has shown that oil recovery can be significantly increased by modifying the injection brine chemistry or by injecting diluted or low salinity brine. This paper reports on laboratory work done to increase the understanding of improved oil recovery by waterflooding with low salinity injection water. Porous media used in the studies included outcrop Berea sandstone (Ohio, U.S.A.) and reservoir cores from the Green River formation of the Uinta basin (Utah, U.S.A.). Crude oils used in the experimental protocols were taken from the Minnelusa formation of the Powder River basin (Wyoming, U.S.A.) and from the Green River formation, Monument Butte field in the Uinta basin. Laboratory corefloods using Berea sandstone, Minnelusa crude oil, and simulated Minnelusa formation water found a significant relationship between the temperature at which the oil- and water-saturated cores were aged and the oil recovery resulting from low salinity waterflooding. Lower aging temperatures resulted in very little to no additional oil recovery, while cores aged at higher temperatures resulted in significantly higher recoveries from dilute-water floods. Waterflood studies using reservoir cores and fluids from the Green River formation of the Monument Butte field also showed significantly higher oil recoveries from low salinity waterfloods with cores flooded with fresher water recovering 12.4% more oil on average than those flooded with undiluted formation brine.

  16. Harmonization of Land-Use Scenarios for the Period 1500-2100: 600 Years of Global Gridded Annual Land-Use Transitions, Wood Harvest, and Resulting Secondary Lands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurtt, George; Chini, Louise Parsons; Frolking, Steve; Betts, Richard; Feddema, Johannes; Fischer, Gavin M.; Fisk, J.P.; Hibbard, Kathleen A.; Houghton, R. A.; Janetos, Anthony C.; Jones, C.; Kindermann, G.; Kinoshita, Tsuguki; Goldeweijk, Kees K.; Riahi, Keywan; Shevliakova, Elena; Smith, Steven J.; Stehfest, Eike; Thomson, Allison M.; Thornton, P.; Van Vuuren, Detlef; Wang, Y.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In preparation for the fifth Assessment Report (AR5) of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the international community is developing new advanced Earth System Models (ESM) to assess the combined effects of human activities (e.g. land use and fossil fuel emissions) on the carbon-climate system. In addition, four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios of the future (2005-2100) are being provided by four Integrated Assessment Model (IAM) teams to be used as input to the ESMs for future carbon-climate projections (Moss et al., 2010). The diversity of approaches and requirements among IAMs and ESMs for tracking land-use change, along with the dependence of model projections on land-use history, presents a challenge for effectively passing data between these communities and for smoothly transitioning from the historical estimates to future projections. Here, a harmonized set of land-use scenarios are presented that smoothly connects historical reconstructions of land use with future projections, in the format required by ESMs.

  17. Evaluating runoff simulations from the Community Land Model 4.0 using observations from flux towers and a mountainous watershed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Land Model (CLM) is the land component within the Community Earth System Model (CESM) (formerly known earth system model b

  18. A correlation between wettability and the recovery of oil by water flooding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Robert Thomas

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in color and dispersible in hard watez. Petronate L (32) is a low molecular weight& highly refined petroleum sulfonate It is insoluble in waterz highly soluble in kerosene& and is a very viscous~ dark brown liquid. Ethofat 2/+2/60 (33) i. s a tall oil... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE ~ust 1~6 Major Subject Petroleum ineerin A COHRELAT ION BETWEEN WETTABILlTY AND THE RECOVERY CF OIL BY WATER FLOODING A Thesis ROBERT T KLLIK Approved as to style and content by...

  19. Grain sorghum response to different flooding periods at the early boot stage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zolezzi del Rio, Oscar

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following steps should be considered in this drainage research program: 1. Compile as much of the drainage data as is possible and publish it in one report, 2. Since there are so many parameters that effect drainage, try to work with models to eliminate... of inundations of different lengths at the sensitive early vegetative growth stage have been determined. The purpose of the research reported herein was to determine the effects of different lengths of flooding at the other sensitive stage, the early...

  20. Flooded First Street at Y-12 Plant | Y-12 National Security Complex

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.New MexicoFinancingProofWorking Outside theFlooded First Street at